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The Ubyssey Oct 11, 1938

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 FILM  SOOIETY
FRIDAY NIGHT
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
FILM SOOIETY
FRIDAY NIOHT
Vol. XXI.
VANOOUVER, B.C.   TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1938
No. 6
PROGRAM FOR
HOMECOMING
IS ANNOUNCED
WILL FEATURE HARDY
CUP FINALS
"Welcome Home" will be the
theme of Alma Mater when she welcomes her undergrads of former
years to the campus on Homecoming
week-end,   October  21-22.
In charge of the events Is Evan
ap Roberts, who ls at present accompanying the Thunderbird team
on their prairie tour, and Milton
Owen, president of the Aumnl Association.
According to the latest reports
the galaxy of graduate affairs will
commence with the annual alumni
dinner and followed by a danoe for
both undergrads and graduatea.
The tentative place for this event
haa been announced aa the Spanish
Orill.
PARADE.
Another change in the regular
schedule is the parade through the
downtown section which will be held
on Friday noon, and will feature
p.a. announcements of the Saturday
game. This re-arrangement of schedule was considered advisable because of the heavy Saturday traffic.
A pep meet, speolal for the occasion will be held on Saturday noon
in the auditorium and will feature
skits and swing music provided by
a  popular  downtown  orchestra.
FOOTBAli, OAME.
At the same time, Big Blocks of
present and former times will gather in the cafeteria for a reunion luncheon. Following the
luncheon and pep meet, the Thunderbirda and Huskies from the
University of Saskatchewan will
meet In a Hardy oup game for the
western intercollegiate, supremacy
in football. The Big Blocks will
occupy one section of the stadium
at thla four star game.
Miss Jean  Stordy and her executive of the Women's Undergraduate Society are sponsoring the tea
dance In the gym, whloh will follow  the   game.     The caf.   will  remain open  so that students  may
obtain  supper   there   and   proceed
to the theatre program at 6.80 In
the auditorium.   One aot plays and
a film showing are the present possible Items on the program.
A basketball   tilt  will   will   be   the
final event on the program and will
start   immediately    after    the   plays.
The teams will be Varsity vs. Graduates, among whom will be veterans
Jimmy  Bardsley,   Bob   Osborne   and
Art Wllloughby.
THIS YEAR'S TOTEM
WILL BE DIFFERENT
A section of colored photographs,
an entirely new theme, and refreshingly short comment are high-lights
of the huge 250-page Totem which ls
taking form under the direction of
editor John  Garrett.
Freshmen photographs' are almost
finished and the supplementary pictures to the sophomore year under
way, for the large section which will
include pictures of every student on
the campus. This undertaking Is a
part of the editorial policy to increase the photographic content of
the book and decrease the black and
white  wordage.
The unified theme of the book will
be a current commentary on the activities of the local campus rather
than the traditional Indian motif.
Entirely new photographic angles of
the campus in general and buildings
in particular are some of the Idoas
which have evolved from weeks of
thought on the part of the editor.
TOTEM
All undergraduates are again requeated for the third to the la.st
time to hop over to the gymnasium,
halfway between the Library and
the deep blue sen and either have
their pictures taken for the annual
yearbook,   namely   the   Totem.
Come and have your lineaments
carved   on   the   ancestral   polo.
GRAD GREETER
Evan ap Roberta, touring Tunder-
blrd, who Is In charge of Homecoming  preparations.
Campaigners to
be Given Film
Society   Passes
Vear membership in the University Film Society haa been bestowed upon all the members of the
Student Campaign Committee, It
waa announced today by Dick Jer-
vls, prealdent of the Aim  group.
GESTURE OF
APPRECIATION.
The pass, which will entitle the
holder to see the Society's presentations for the coming season was
presented aa a gesture of appreciation for the untiring efforts of
the oommittee members on behalf
of the student  body.
SOCIALISTS VOTED
DOWN AT FIRST
POLITICAL MEETING
The Dolltlcal Discussion Club, opening its first full session last Thursday, voted down unrestricted immigration to Canada. Socialist Premier
Harold Rome and his followers,
supporting the resolution, 'went down
to defeat at the hands of the Conservative and Liberal factions. The
house divided six to twenty-one
against the Socialists. The Conservatives, under Don McOill, will form
the next government.
Contending that Canada would
prosper were she to throw open the
door to Immigrants, Rome quoted
the example of the United States. All
the prosperity, luxury, and happiness
of that country, he said, was due to
the policy of immigration she followed in the early years of her development.
Darrel Braid wood, leading the Liberals, opposed Rome's argument, and
pleaded for selective British immigration. He stated that Canada was
in no position to absorb any more
foreigners. The Conservative opinion, voiced by Don McOlll, was that
extensive immigration has never
succeeded in Canada, and can not
be made to succeed as It has done in
the U.S. The two countries are different  in all respects, he stated.
A meeting to elect new officers will
be held next Friday. The conservatives will strengthen their growing membership by merging with the
defunct Imperialists, led last year
by fiery Norman Depoe.
All those wishing to join the Club
are requested to send their name and
political affiliation to Alex. Sharp before next Friday.
ALPHA SUBCHAPTER
EXECUTIVE ELECTED
Alpha chapter of Phrateres held
their elections on Friday afternoon
following tea in the lower common
room.
The executive as it now stands is
composed of Ruth Hutchinson, president; Margaret SaKe, vice-president;
Barbara I,ognn, secretary, and Frances Montgomery, social service representative.
Announcement of the "slack party" to be held by all-phrtiterians on
Friday was made to the members.
Plans for the coming season were
iilsto   discussed.
AUSTRALIANS
HAVE POLISH
...WIN DEBATE
SPLIT   DECISION   ON
QUESTION
The resolution "that nationalism
ls the enemy of civilization," upheld
by debators Harold Rome and Alex.
MacDonald of U.B.C, was defeated
by Hugh Robson and Fred Thoneman of Australia, at the Imperial
Debate last Friday night.
In   defeat,   the   U.B.C.   speakers
bowed  to  a team   who   were,   as
MacDonald   pointed   out,    polished
and   capable   debators.     The   fact
that the Judges' decision waa spilt
Indicates   how   closely   the   resolution was contested.
Alex.  MacDonald  opened   the  case
for the affirmative, arguing that "but
for    the    existence    of    nationalism
there could be no war," and that as
war is  the  enemy of  civilisation, lt
therefore follows that nationalism Is
the enemy of civilization.
CAUSE OF WAR.
He affirmed that "nationalism ls
a modern phenomena," which has
led to the result that "today ln international relations man Is guided
by hate and prejudice." MacDonald
declared that "nationalism leads to
militarism, and to a bellicose foreign
policy," and that as a result "the
world Is drifting inevitably Into
war."
Hugh Robson, leader of the Australian team, replied to MacDonald,
saying that if nationalism waa the
cause   of   war,   then   how   did   the
affirmative account for the Spanish
civil  war, whloh Robson declared
was of economic and political origin.
While   he   did   not   deny   that    the
world    was     drifting     towards    war,
Robson  stated  that  "the  future war
is going  to be one between  conflicting ideals, and ln It nations will forget   their   nationalistic   tendencies—
that if Canadians fight lt wilt not be
because they are Canadians."
ANTI-CHRISTIAN.
Harold Rome, second speaker for
U.B.C, reaffirmed hla partner's statements, saying that "practically all
wars or threats of wars are caused
by this nationalistic feeling," and
'nationalism Is unquestionably the
greatest factor tn life today." He
pointed out how nationalism ts the
absolute antithesis of Christianity,
and how it shows itself in dictator
nations, reading several excerpts
from Hitler's "Mein Kampf," to illustrate  his  points.
CRADLE OF CIVILIZATION.
In reply to Harold Rome, Fred
Thoneman of the Australians developed the point that "nationalism is
the very cradle  of Western  clvlllasa-
(Continued  on   Page  3)
VARSITY TIME
GETS OFF TO
GOOD START
THUNDERBIRDS BEAT
HUSKIES IN SECOND
WIN OF RUGBY TOUR
By  IRENE   EEDY
"On the air." The little red letters
glowed on the wall sign box in CJO
R studio A on the stroke of eight
fifteen Friday evening, as the first
Varsity Time of '38-39 was released
to a waiting world.
Preliminary to the program the
Varsity Time director paced the floor
of studio No. A ln the depths of
CJOR, muttering under his breath,
"Where  ls my  script?"
From six thirty until a quarter to
eight on Friday evening students,
both performers and spectators tread
down the steps to the broadcasting
studio. Sheaves of typewritten manuscript rustled, as several students
perched on the edge of their chairs,
and furrowed their brows In a scholarly 'swotting' attitude.
WARMING UP.
Script, speech, arid program directors pussy-footed from studio
to technlchians' room and back
again, while various performers
warmed up their vocal chords, and
others gave the grand piano a preliminary dusting.
The studio Itself appears like a
small show case, two walls being
practically all window. An organ, a
row of chairs, and a door All up the
remaining wall spaces. A microphone stands In the middle of the
room, an object of awesome power.
Above the piano Is the electric
clock* with Its sprinting minute hand.
Behind the piano, which fills the gap
between the door and one of the
glass panels, ls the control room,
which observes the "goings on" of
the studio room. Against the adjoining wall, sat the drowsy sound
effects man with his table of contraptions composed of a miniature
door which opens with a scraping of
hinges, into a box, and a block of
gadgets, buzerzs and bells to represent anything from a toy telephone
to a clanging street car and last but
not least, a fly swatter arrangement,
with the notice inked beneath it,
"Pistol."
One by one, the actors and  musicians   tip-toed   to   the    mike,   as
they   were    beckoned   In   the   sign
language. Handymen turned pages
of  muslo, and  retrieved  discarded
scripts   with   noiseless   efficiency.
Timed to the last second the members of the cast of Varsity Time related campus Incidents, presented an
interesting  skit   (whose  ending  surprised  even  us), solos,  speeches and
a racy news flash of sports and other
general news of local and general interest.     The  control  room  also  contained   Interested    would-be    technicians.
And so for the first program of
the year, Varsity Time, after a
half hour durance, concluded without a 'hitch' ... a credit to the
University and the students who
took part In It.
Two Touchdowns Scored by Renwick
and Roberts Bring: Cup
Closer
By ORME DIER
The U.B.O. Thunderbird- rang up their second straight win
of the inter-collegiate rugby season as they defeated the Saskatchewan Huskies 13-6 before a record Re-union Day orowd at Griffith Stadium Monday afternoon.
Scoring opened early in the flrst quarter when Bd. Dowery
rouged Potts for one point, and big Hank Stradlottl made it 2-0
a few minutes later when he rouged Weaver on one of Tommy
Williams' punts.
The Huskies then came back strong with a driving aerial
attack that pushed the ball to the B.C. two yard stripe. Three
out of four passes were completed in this attack that had the
'Birds looking weak on the defence.
CONVERT MADE.
Finder of Saskatchewan then fumbled on the two yard line,
but Quinlan recovered and plunged over to give the Huskies the
lend. The eonvert was made and the score stood at 6-2 for the
prairie boys.
■    On
bled <
Carscm McGuire
to Speak Friday
on Varsity Time
Varsity Time, which got off to a
good start last week, will make Its
second appearance on the air lanes
next Friday at the usual time, 8.16
p.m.
This week's program will feature
a talk by Carson McGuire, A.M.S.
president, on student government
and the function of the Students'
Council.
Another of Bob Thompson's original skits, written especially for the
broadcast, will be presented, and Jim
McFarlane's Varsity news column
will  be heard again.
A choir from the Musical Society
will supply vocal Interludes.
Last week's program evinced considerable comment, announced program director Ozzle Durkin, and
"most of lt was very favorable, too,"
beamed the gentleman In question.
Modern French Film will be
Featuredat F reeShow Today
Detailed History of Car Engine   to   be   Shown   Friday;
Technical Supervisor for Motor Company to Lecture
"Double crime sur la Ugne Mag-
inot" the first French film to be
shown this term will be presented
under the auspices of the French
clubs today ln the auditorium at
11.30. Anyone interested may attend.
On Friday noon, sponsored by the
Film Society, Oxford Motors will
bring to the campus a film telling
the stoiy of the production of a car
engine from the mining of the ore
that goes Into it to the finished mechanism.
Taken in the largest engine plant
In Great Britain which has just been
completed at a cost of ten million
dollars, the film deals with the treatment and manufacture of all parts
of an Internal combustion engine.
Each of the component parts are produced individually and the camera
follows these separate units through
to   tbe   completion , of   the   whole.
SUPERVISOR TO SPEAK.
Mr. J. JC. Hoare, technical supervisor for Morris Motors, who is here
from England, will be present at the
presentation and will speak to the
students   concerning   the   film.
This   film    should   appeal   particularly to the Applied Science students
but all students are welcome free of
charge.
NAMES.
Names for the Film Society Review are coming ln steadily. Some
of those suggested are: To See and
Not To See, The Critic, Films on Parade, Real Reels, and many others
that will give the Judges a tough
time of choosing the best.
Tickets will be on sale in the quad
box  office  at  noon   hours  this   week
but as the quota is expected to be
reached by Friday no more tickets
will   be   available  after  then.
...Anyone  interested   in  the  techni-.
.cal  part  of  producing a  film  is  in-.
.vited   to  attend   the   general   meet-.
.ing at 12.30 Wednesday in Arts 108..
CONSERVATORY
AWARDS GIVEN IN
AUDITORIUM
The University of Toronto came to
the University of B.C. Saturday when
the campus Auditorium was the
bcene of the annual presentation of
diplomas and certificates by Sir Ernest MacMillan, principal of the Toronto Conservatory of Music.
Two ceremonies were held, one in
the  afternoon   and   one  in   the  evening.  Sir  Ernest   addressing  both.
At the evening presentation the
distinguished visitor waa introduced by Dr.  W.  L.  MacDonald.  acting aa chairman in place of President Kllnck who was precented by
Illness from attending.
Sir  Ernest then  gave a short   address   in   which   he  exhorted  his  listeners to preserve an  open mind toward  new music.    He stressed   that
new  music  should   be   given   serious
consideration,  that  some  opinion   of
It should be formed whether it were
favorable or otherwise.
TEACHING STANDARDS.
He spoke also of the necessity for
government legislation to ensure
that teachers of music be properly
qualified for such a position, describing It as scandalous that any person
should be allowed by law to practice that profession regardless of
ability or training.
In Introducing the eminent Canadian   musician   Prof.   MacDonald
referred  to the Increasing  Importance nf muslo on the U.B.C. campus, drawing attention to the fact
thnt  music.  Is  now  being accepted
for credit  toward  the B.A.  degree.
Both   afternoon   and   evening   programmes  included   a  short  recital   by
advanced   students   of   piano,   violin
and   voice.
the next kick-off Pinder fum-
. rolling ball and U.B.C. recovered to place themselves In scoring
position.
RENWICK  SCORES.
Carrot-topped Norm Renwick galloped over the pay line in an extended end-run on the next play, and
Aub Gray converted to sew the game
up for the Pacific Coast boys
In the laat quarter Evan ap Roberts led the way In a 60 yard mats2'
to the goal line and carried the oval
over the Saskatchewan play line to
add another five markers to the Blue
and Gold total.
CUP IS NEARER.
This double win on the prairie
jaunt puts the Varsity team ln the
best position it has held ln many a
long year ln the annual pursuit of
the elusive Hardy Cup, emblematic
of Western Canadian Collegiate grid
supremacy.
The final fate of the cup will be decided during Home Coming week on
Oct. 22, when the Golden Bears of
Alberta come out here to tackle the
Thunderbirds In the Stadium on the
campus In what will be the crucial
football game of this season.
But If the Huskies trounce the
Bears It leaves very little chance for
the Blue and Gold squad to be ousted
from the front seat in the drive for
inter-colleglate championship recognition.
ROBSON SPEAKS
TO LAW SOCIETY
Budding barristers of the University Law Society met Thursday night
ln Arts 100 to hear an address by
Hugh Robson, member of the conquering debating duo visiting here
from  Australia.
Mr. Robson spoke on the faculty
of law at the University of Sidney,
of which he Is a graduate. This subject was of special Interest to his listeners since the efforts of the Law
Society are being directed toward
the establishment of a similar faculty here.
He described it as being conducted
on the most progressive lines, Its professors being mainly practising lawyers ■who are thus closely ln touch
with both the theory and application
of law.
Elections held for the honorary
presidency of the Society resulted
in the appointment of Mr. R. H.
Tupper to tbe position. Mr. Tupper is a lawyer and lecturer on
commercial law. Prof. Jennings,
recently "ome from England, was
elected fuculty adviser of the Society.
PHRATERES  PARTY
Phrateres Slack Party on Friday,
October 14. nt 6.30 p.m., at Killarney.
Admission is 15c. All Phraterlans
welcome!     Wear  yonr  slacks! T"TO
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 11, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office! 206 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Grey 206
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50 Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummlngs
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday Friday
Jack Mair Robert King
SPORTS EDITOR
Orme Dier
C. U. P. EDITOR
James D. Macfarlane
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Irene Eedy James Macfarlane
ASSOCIATE  SPORTS  EDITOR
Basil Robinson and Myrne  Nevlson
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Ossy Durkin Jack Mercer Joyce Cooper
Van Perry Lester Pronger Rosemary Collins
COLUMNISTS
Ossy Durkin, John Garrett, James MacFarlane, Dorwln Baird, Mlml Schofleld
PUBLICATIONS   SECRETARY
Virginia Galloway
CIRCULATION  MANAGER
Harry Campbell
STAFF
Jaok Bingham, Victor Freeman, Joyce Cooper, Joan Haslam, Halen Hann,
' Betty Boldue, Ann Jeremy, Pat Keatley, Joan Thompson, Bill Beckman,
Ted Underhiil, J Metford, Ruth Millar, Janet Walker, Brita  Vesterbaok,
Hurndall, Bob Manson, Bob Osborne, Ken Vernon, Doreen Henderson
Advertising Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
STUDENT ADVISORY BOARD
The Student Advisory Board, as described at the semi-annual
Alma Mater Meeting:, is one of the most progressive ctiangcs ever
to be made by Students' Council. Every year one campus executive works out the students' destinies to the best of their ability.
They make laws for that year, but cannot, constitutionally, bind
the incoming councils to stand by their decisions.
More than often it is only by the end of the year that they
realized the significance of their actions. It takes fully a year
for them to discover pertinent information behind some of the
problems whieh they are expected to face.
No sooner do they learn the significance of their problems but
they leave their positions to entirely inexperienced successors.
It would not hi feasible, and perhaps not even advisable, for
uncil to serve more than one year. But the Student Advisory
Board, composed of members of the retiring council can supply
the new members with information concerning the matters with
which they have to deal. They can counsel the executive on the
wisdom of their decisions still leaving the new officers freedom to
decide the matters as they see flt. The Students' Council will not
be restricted by the actions of this advisory committee but they
will be able to obtain information which will, without a doubt,
influence them to make wiser decisions.
HOME-COMING
■ Home-coming weekend, which is planned for October 22 is an
opportunity for the undergraduates to interest the alumni in the
serious and manifold problems of their university. Perhaps it is
because they are too busy with their struggle with the world, or
perhaps it is because the alumni organization does not competently
communicate with its members, but the graduate students of this
university have shown an unmistakable lack of interest in their
alma mater.
The numerous attempts to collect contributions for the Union
Building from this section of the provincial population have eome
to a miserable and meagre conclusion. The alumni show no interest in the university, and yet when these same students were on
the campus they inaugurate the great building campaigns of which
we are so proud.
It seems logical that, if these ex-students were brought back
to the campus and instilled with the need of the present U.B.C.
students, they would in future take a more active part in the university.
Homecoming is an opportunity for the undergraduates to
enlist the aid of the alumni in just this way. But home-coming
eannot be successful unless the graduates can be encouraged to
return to the campus. It is in the interest of every student that
he personally invite as many graduates as he can contact, to take
part in Home-coming.
ALONG f^rLf
E MALL
By PROXY
TOTEM
For the past two years attempts, and a very successful one,
have been made to produce a "Totem" whieh would be treasured
by students as the most beautiful and most interesting souvenir
of their four college years. This year, there is no doubt, the
"Totem" will safely reach that goal. Students' Council hnve
recognized the importance of the "Totem" nnd are willing to lend
n sympathetic ear to the problems of its production. The engraver,
who has been in charge of setting up the forms for the book, for
many years, has determined that this year's Totem will startle the
campus. Thirdly, the internal organization of the Totem Staff has
Ibeen reorganized to include men experienced in the duties which
they have been nllo'ted. Plans are undr way for a pre-publication
selling campaign which will place the book on a solid financial
basis. When nil these things arc combined with the enthusiasm
and originality of the determined editor John Dnrrett, there is no
doubt that the result will be an extraordinary year-book.
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My boss, the Senior Editor, caught
up with ihe today and said, "Proxy,
be funny. This thing of tearing Big
Blockers and people to pieces is all
right once in a while, but we want
to keep some sort of staff. And If
you make many more cracks at
things, some morning you won't
show up at all any more. So be funny.    We don't want to lose you."
That's Just the way he said lt.
Very poor way to talk,
But as a matter of fact, I'd been
having some ideas of the same sort
myself. Not that I think I can be
funny. But I was beginning to
wonder just when people would start
descending upon me from all at once.
And I wouldn't like to lose me either.
Consider. When you pick up a
copy of the Ubyssey and find that
even your fellow-columnists think
you're not nice any more, It's almost
time to turn over a new leaf, Isn't It?
Besides, there's always a few people who like to read drivel. And
who don't mind bad grammar like
'there's.' There must be, or Scotty
wouldn't be holding down his job.
And the Sports page is drivel. And
look at how they eat that up. And
so on. . . .
But there are angles. It's one
thing to be told to be funny. It's
another thing to be funny. Anyhow,
has being funny done anything for
Eddie Cantor? He still wants a
boy. . . .
Which proves that you can't have
everything. Take me. There are a
lot of things I want. Even If I could
be funny I'd never get 'em that way.
I think the Sr. Ed. was wrong. - He
doesn't understand me. He doesn't
realise that I'm the type that parr
ents and professors call "a serious
child, a trifle Introspective, but
bound to get somewhere." Let the
Sr. Ed. try to be funny for a change.
I've never seen him crack that sour
puss of his. He's not funny. And
I'm not. And I'm not going to prove
that he was wrong. I'm going to try
to be funny.
You can't be funny unless you have
a sense of humor, so I'm told. Well. .
I laughed at this: A certain pudgy
science man sat down at his table
the other day ln the Caf, glanced at
his food, and said: "Ah, what foods
these morsels be." I laughed. I
thought It was funny. Which proves
that I've no sense of humor. And
also proves that I don't read the
Reader's Digest. Or I would have
heard It before. And also proves
that sclencemen—and probably Big
Blockers will invariably quote the
Bible wrong.
•      •      •
And another: It seemed that three
Harvard men, having met a fairy
queen or something, had wished for
an interview with God. And had
been granted their wish. It also
seemed that after the Interview, they
let out that God had seemed pleased
with them, and that they had been
fairly pleased with God.
Well, I thought that was funny.
But I also thought that suoh a thing
could be said, not only of Harvard
men, but alsd of Science men, Big
Blockers, and Sports writers and
columnists named Scotty. They're
all like Harvard men. Pleased with
the deity . . . and themselves.
So—there you have lt. If a guy
can't be funny, he just can't be funny. The Sr. Ed. was wrong. I was
right. And I'd like a little, corroboration from all my readers. I know
I have a lot. Of readers, nothing
else. Scotty hasn't any. Dier hasn't
any. I'm hoping that after this I
won't have not any.
Next week I won't try to be funny.
Next week I won't try to write dtiv
el. Next week something'!! probably
happen that'll make me feel anything but funny or drivedly, I hope.
Then I won't have to be funny. Then
the Sr. Ed. will come to me and say.
"Proxy, this Is no time to try to be
funny. I have something Important
here that I'd like you to comment
upon, and 1 don't dare let Scotty or
Dier at it. Thoso guys can't be serious- at least, their word doesn't
carry enough weight. And besides,
I want this to go into a column that's
read by someone. And anyhow.
Proxy, you were light. You can't bo
funny."
from
THE OUTSIDE
. . by Darby
Mention  thut   you   suw   It
Ubyssey.
in    the
Friday's Ubyssey was interesting.
Particularly so to one who
had spent hours with the Campaign Committee in research
that led to the conclusion that
the university is not overcrowded and will not be so for some
time.
Yet the Ubyssey informs us
that the Science Building is suffering from overcrowding, an
affliction much discussed these
past few months. The Ubyssey
is probably right, but there is
(mother side to this story—a side
that has been stressed enough
since this term opened.
REVISION OF TIMETABLES.
Students under the handicap
of crowding in the Science
Building muy rest assured that
n certain amount of their troubles could be removed by one
simple act—the proper revision
of timetables. lt is known to
all those who have the power of
observation that the Library is
usually crowded in the afternoons. This simple fact led a
few members of the Campaign
Committee into on interesting
bit of reseorch.
MORNING   LABS.
Result of that research was
a series of suggestions made by
the committee to the administration. We outlined a detailed
plan whereby the classrooms
available could be used to greater efficiency. It entailed the
placing of more lectures in the
afternoon, with the majority of
Arts classes finishing at 4.30 instead of one or two hours earlier.. In addition some labs
could be moved to morning, a
time when labs are not for the
most part in use. This evening
oft" of use of labs and classrooms
would tend to decrease overcrowding in both, and ns well
would feed the library with a
steady flow of students—rather
than a large number in the afternoon.
The above is a very brief outline of what we suggested. It
is presented mainly with the
purpose of telling you that the
problem has been considered by
the Campaign Committee, and
that the committee has what it
honestly believes to be a solution.
Placing of such a plan in effective operation might involve
certain changes in curriculum.
This is not our concern, except
to express the view that some
changes that would place U.B.C.
vip-to-date  are long overdue.
UNIVERSITY  NOT
EOVERCROWD.
Other problems are facing the
gentlemen in the Science Building. Their biggest worry, however, could be overcome with little effort. As long as this remains true, we cannot truthfully claim that the university is
overcrowded.
THANKSGIVING   AND
VARSITY  TIME.
Enough of that for the moment. A rainy Thanksgiving has
inspired an added note. It is
merely a reminder to tune into
CJOR next Friday evening for
Varsity Time, your own radio
show. What rain and Thanksgiving had to with that I don't
know.
FAITH  NEEDED.
And while the reminders are
flying about, I might append another. Students who feel that
the university is facing insurmountable problems should be
forced to sit through a showing
of '' Boys' Town. " Tf I *m right,
they'll come avvny feeling that
the one tiling that will help U.B.
C. continue to expand and progress is faith—faith of the students in the inevitable success
that is theirs in any problem
they tackle, and faith of the authorities in the students' efforts.
Enough of that.—le's have another serving of cold turkev.
"Let me serve your oar and your oar will serve you"
"Prank" Pioke
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service. Complete Repair Facilities.
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD PT. GREY S3
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CORRESPONDENCE	
Letter to the  Editor:
I noticed with a great deal of pleasure that in the last Issue of the
Ubyssey the editor of the Ubyssey
had embarked upon a campaign to
unearth conditions of overcrowding
existing on the university campus.
The first of the series of articles
which appeared last week did not
come as a revelation to me but tt
must have been news to a great
number of people. The fact ls that
tn many departments of the University such conditions flourish and
and no mention has been made of
them  to  date.
- Perhaps lt would be better to withhold such information in order to
protect our students. For when they
graduate it would undoubtedly reflect upon their professional status,
If It were known that they had acquired their practical knowledge of
chemistry and such like subjects ln
a laboratory totally Inadequate to
give them a sound basic knowledge
of the subject. Unfortunately, however, It Is not the students now attending the University, but those to
come, of whom we must think. The
time has come for the university to
make known to the world outside
just how badly we are overcrowded
and just how seriously lt ls affecting the standard of our tuition. For
doing this noble task, I should like
to compliment the editor of this paper.
The author of last week's artlole
however, probably was not acquainted with the full facts of the case. At
the time that the Board of Governors made their announcement regarding fee raise and limitation, the
Student Campaign Committee set
about to show the administrative
body of the University that If timetables were revised overcrowding
oould be eliminated for at least a period of one year. They suggested to
the Board that a complete revision
of the timetable should be made, putting more laboratory periods into
the mornings and more classes In
the afternoon. By working out an
equitable distribution of lab and lecture hours overcrowding in the library oould also be alleviated. The
board of Governors have revised the
timetables, but they have not accepted any of the suggestions of the
Campaign Committee, with the result that labs are still filled to the
point of congestion In the afternoons,
and classes overcrowded in the
mornings.
For this reason and others, I think
MUSICAL SOCIETY
TO HOLD ANNUAL
BALLTHURSDAY
The Musical Society will hold Its
pnnual Formal Ball Thursday evening In the Peter Pan ballroom, it
was announced today.
Dancing will be from nine to one,
to the music of BUI Tweeie and his
orchestra.
The affair is under the directorship of Kay Washington, general
convenor, and Ruth Hutchinson,
newly elected vice-president of the
Society.
PATRONS.
The patrons will Include Dr. and
Mrs. Kanla, Mr. and Mra. Nelson
Allen, Dr. and Mrs. W. L. McDonald, Professor Gage, Mr. and Mrs.
Hadyn Williams, Miss Vera Radcliffe, and Miss Alice Rowe.
Miss Radcliffe and Mlas Rowe are
former prominent members of the
Society.
ASTRONOMICAL MOTION
PICTURES WILL BE
SHOWN HERE TONIGHT
The Vancouver Centre of the Royal Astronomical Sooiety of Canada
will hold an open meeting on Tuesday, October 11th, 1038, in Room 200,
Science Building, The University of
British Columbia, at 8 p.m.
A series of scientific motion pic-
trues will be shown dealing with the
Romance of the Skies, the Birth of
the Earth, Life on Mars, and other
toplos.
All those interested tn astronomy
are cordially invited to attend. The
Sooiety presents a programme of leotures on astronomical subjects during the winter months, and persons
interested In becoming members are
asked to write the Secretary, H. W.
Fowler, 4680 West 1st Ave., Vanoouver.
that more articles should be written on this problem. It seems as if
it has become the responsibility of
the students to stir up publio sentiment In favor of providing buildings
on the campus, and if so I might
say the students accept the responsibility willingly In face of present
conditions.
—A DlsaUlualoned Student
Shoes that can take
Itl Designed specially for Vancouver's  Young Fellows!
$4
SOLD   EXCLUSIVELY   AT
COPP'S
339 West  Hastings  St.
The   Hotel   Vanoouver
presents
MART KENNY
at   the  Spanish   Grill
Campus Clothes
for
CAMPUS MEN
DOCKER'S
M
en**
w
ear
807  GRANVILLE  (at Robson)
See  campus  representative
—Herb Burke
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Have a real
HOME-COOKED   MEAL
with Mr. and Mrs. Thomson at
THE   GABLES   INN
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897
ORANVILLE
(At Smythe)
IOE CREAM
After Theatre
Specials
Silk Hat
MARGARET FINLAY,  Arts  '31
JACK PARKER, Arts   30 Tuesday, October 11, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
Prominent Physicist Speaks
at First Institute Lecture
PROBLEMS OF RADIUM
OUTLINED BY
DR.  ELLIS
Speaking under the auspices of
the Vancouver Institute Dr. C. D.
Kills enlightened .a capacity audience Saturday night on radium and
Its   problems.
The speaker was Introduced by Mr.
John Ridington who gave an Interesting synopsis of the noted physicist's career.
MYSTERIES OF RADIUM.
Prof. Ellis dealt with the application of radium In curative treatments,   the  difficulty of  obtaining
It In sufficient quantities and  the
unsolved mysteries whloh surround
this Intriguing  element.
The   lecturer  paid   tribute   to    the
Curies,   whose   name   is   Inseparably
bound  up with the early history  of
the  element,  but  It was  of  Rutherford  that  he  spoke   most.     He  described how the great British physicist had first Inspired him to undertake the study of radium.
Prof. Ellis defined clearly and simply for his audience the different radium rays, alpha, beta and gamma.
His description of experiments was
illustrated graphically by numerous
lantern  slides.
DANGERS.
He also  spoke   on   the   danger
which surrounds the worker who
seeks to extend our knowledge of
the element.   He described sympathetically the price they pay, often
losing health and life.
Dr. G. M. Shrum of the physics department   extended   appreciation   of
the audience for the absorbing and
enlightening discourse.
This was Dr. Ellis' first formal lecture ln Canada. From here he goes
to Edmonton and points East.
Next Saturday's leoture will be
given by Dr. G. G. Sedgewlok and
la entitled: "In the Beginning Was
the Word."
HON. BARROW WILL
BE GUEST SPEAKER
AT AGGIE BANQUET
The annual fall banquet of the Aggie undergrads will take place In the
Commodore at 7.30 on Thursday evening.
Guest speaker for the evening will
be the Hon. E. D. Barrew, while
other speakers will Include Dean
Clement, of the Agricultural faculty and Jack Gray, president of the
Aggie Undergraduate Sooiety. President L. S. Kllnck and Carson McGulre, president of the Alma Mater
Society or his representative will
also be present.
In the usual traditional manner
the freshmen class will present the
highlight skit of the evening.
All Aggie undergrads will be admitted to the banquet on the presentation of their passes, since this is
their official function of the year.
FURNISHED   SUITE
Large bed sitting room; full
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OEBATE
(Continued from Page 1)
tion," and that "alwaya a great civilization has grown out of a great
nationalism."
He used as an example the Great
Britain of Shakespeare's day. He
Btated that suppression of nationalism would result in internationalism
which in turn "would result ln the
world of Marx which Russia ls renouncing today." In conclusion
Thoneman   said:
"I am no advocate of war, but
if It came to a showdown I would
prefer the bloodiest war to a *'.orld
state."
Hoofitas
_Backtoart>s
Freshmen of today may be thankful that they are not forced to suffer
the Indignities inflicted on their prototypes of 1919. Looking backwards
through the years we And a harrowing description of their mortifications.
First of all the Innooent and unoffending Frosh were prepared for
the slaughter; for they were not to
enjoy the privileges of the U.B.C.
without a test of merit.
LED TO TORMENT.
With their eyes bandaged and
their thumbs tied together, they were
lad away to torment. They were
brought before a barber noted for
his unsteady hand, who wrought
havoc with their coiffures. Finally,
chastened by sundry ordeals they
were branded on the forehead with
their year.
But their sufferings were rewarded. They were taken on a parade of
triumph through town. After honoring the Hotel Vancouver with their
presence they Invaded  Purdy's.
Here, Inflated with their new prestige the revelling Frosh forced them
to make Varsity specials.
Unfortunately, It was not related
what the sensitive souls of the general public thought of these proceedings.
FRESHETTES FOUND GUILTY
Nor was the Initiation of the
Freshettes neglected. In a scene of
awful solemnity they were brought
before a judge and charged with
ultra verdancy. Having been found
guilty of this crime, they were dismissed to suffer at the hands of the
outraged Sopha.
PUNISHMENT.
With fiendish glee they fed their
victims a mixture of gum, castor
oil and mustard. The Freshettes, lt
was noticed, displayed true unselfishness In not taking more than their
share. But this was not all. They
were taken through the gloomy halls
of the Arts' building, even Invading
the fearsome precincts of Dr. Sedge-
wlck's empty offloe. Finally, humbled by these ordeals, they knelt
down and solemnly swore to love
and reverence seniors, to respect
juniors  and .to tolerate  sophomores.
SUFFERINGS REWARDED.
Afterwards they were revived by
a danoe in their honor. Here, Freshette and Freshman met and compared their Indignities and as full-fledged
undergraduates to enjoy the fruits
of their struggle.
LOST
A green Parker pen was lost In or
about the Arts Building Friday. Will
finder please get in touch with J. D.
Smith, or return to Mr. Home's office at once.
TRANSPORTATION   WANTED
From    Second    and    Waterloo    by
Jack,  publications  office.
TRINITY 3377
MACK A.
STARK
LIFE INSURANCE
other side
-airedale
You are probably thinking "Well,
here's another screwball who thinks
he ls an embryonic Bugs Baer or
John Lardner. Get him!" And with
a disdainful sniff, you whip over the
Sports page to see whether the coeds have started a track club. Well
nuts to you, buddy, nuts to you. This
Is only temporary. Just hold your
nose, and you will never know what
hit you.
There doesn't seem to be any outstanding bone of contention to gnaw
on, so let's talk about a noise. It's
a fascinating noise. Sort of eerle-
llke. You must have noticed it, If
you have ever had reason to enter
or leave the Science Building. It's
that devilish wall that emanates from
somewhere along the  front  wall.
Nobody seems to know what It Is,
but there are many theories. One
of the more popular of
A NOISE these ls that there la a
fifth year scienceman
living there In a burrow. And he
Isn't happy. It sounds silly, but the
Idea is that that scienceman has
had so muoh trouble that every tew
mlnutea, he comes out of his tunnel,
and, sitting on his haunches, lets out
r great sigh of despair, whloh he
tops off with a horrible groan. And
although you more or leas expect lt,
this moan a la mode makea you
jump when It hits you right between
the shoulder blades. Makea you
think you have gone to work and
stepped on a Freshman or something. Another theory Is that the
noise Is the expulsion of the various
smells which gleefully throng the
halls of the building, and whloh
would otherwise make physical
wrecks of the sclencemen. But that
doesn't seem possible.
Speaking of smells, perhaps you
upper-class people remember how
Chang Suey slithered
A SMELL his cankerous way Into
the pages of the Ubyssey last year. How the writer disguised lt from the editor as everything from a sports column, down
through letters to the editor, to
Handy Dandy Recipes for Brand
New Brides? No? Well the new
author wedged C.S. In by even more
dramatic methods. He walked Into
the Pub fairly reeking savoir falre.
Drawing himself up to his full
height, he peeked over the top of
the counter and said:
"See here. I think Chang Suey
would look pretty good In the Ubyssey!"
A vicious silence slapped his face,
a volley of Remingtons rushed toward him, and every-
WELCOME thing went black.
When he rejoined the
living, he was tucked between Cicero
and Plato on the top shelf of the
book-store. He paid his respects to
the boys, and hobbled back Into the
Pub. He oould see that they wanted to play. Showing in the tail of
his shirt, Me reiterated:
"I still think Chang Suey would
look pretty good In the Ubyssey!"
This time he regained the light between Plato and Cicero. Realising
that he was at least making a nlohe
for himself, he laughed heartily, and
staggered back Into the Pub. He
did not get around to opening the'
trap on this occasion,
SUCCESS but he felt that they
were hitting him with
greater respect, amongst other
things. And it waa by these tiring
taotlos that he won out. The whole
staff finally lay all over the floor, Its
tongue hanging out, and puffing like
a pack of university busses. He
clambered aboard his pedals, beat
his chest feebly, and squeaked:
"Chang Suey shall be In the Ubyssey!"
And all the staff could do was to
nod Its collective head resignedly.
Despite the fact that he would have
to learn to write with his teeth and
knit with his toes, he had won out.
Temporarily.
FOUND
Found, one pair of brown gloves
at the Imperial Debate Friday evening. Owner may have same by applying  to  the  Publications'  office.
The Esquire Men's Shop have a
rettl bargain In their Balmac English
rntncout at $14.90. It's light as a
feather and smart.
CLEVER SALLIES, WITTY
REPLIES FEATURE OF
IMPERIAL  DEBATE
THUNDERING
HOOFS
OR
CHANG SUEY
AT THB PALOMAR
CHAPTER THREE
Someone clucked "Tsk, tsk,  tsk."
Then the damp, dark place was
again silent. 11
MAD smelted   of  Caf   cof-
ADVENTURE fee and rotting flesh.
In that order. Suddenly, something stepped on one of
the many banana skins with which
the floor was tastefully decorated,
and did a neat jack-knife dive,
shrieking a few Chinese proverbs
that Confucius never heard of. Then
the lights blinked on, and there, beside a Pep Club-covered table, stood
Patrolman W. Appleyard, an upstanding figure of a man, with his
hat on, and pullllng his bell-equipped
tricycle by a string.
"I've got you now, Suey!" he
screamed, In the vernacular of the
Province, and, firing his cap-gun
twice, fainted dead away.
To the cheers and applause of several hundred people,, who had evidently been helping one another with
Chan_r Suey
Students—Patronise
ers in  the Ubyssey.
( I
the   advertis-
thelr home-work, Chang Suey flitted to a secret trap-door, and, pausing only long enough to wave his
pig-tail at his many admirers, filtered through. Then the lights onoe
more gave up their little Masda spirits, and all was as before.
At  the  appointed  hour,  the  Dirty
Nine came trucking Into their cavern
and    lowered
"OLE MAN MOSE   their la n d I n g
IS DEAD" gears.   But they
quickly got up
again to let the Lone Ranger ride
through to the oatchy strains of
"Heigh yo, Silver!"
"This place is getting as bad as
Grand Central," grumbled Chang
Suey, feeling around on the ground
for his fraternity pin.
"However, we must get on with the
ceremony," he added. "Bring lt out,
men!"
He always called them men, it
bucked them up so.
Quickly, a small-type coffin was
placed on the table, and opened to
reveal a shrunken, be-whlskered, little body.
"Hit on the head by a heavy
board,"  sobbed  No.  4.
"Men," cried Chang Suey, "A
toast!"
As orfe man, the Dirty Nine lifted
up their milk shakes.
"To this poor, dead, little creature! To the 1938 Campaign Against
Raising the Fees!"
Silently,   or   nearly    silently,    they
downed  the  fiery  liquor.    Then  they
tried  to  break the
TO THE Caf    cups    on   the
GOVERNMENT floor, but after
two or three unsuccessful attempts, gave lt up. They
all kneeled down, and Chang Suey
opened a musty book. With the tears
rambling over his chops, he started
to read:
"Dear Buddha. Please arrange it
ao that thoae unfortunate students
who couldn't pay their feea, but did,
will eat. Bestow upon them a little
money."
"Buddha,  can you  spare  a  dime?"
choked  the  irrepressible  No. 4.
THONEMAN SCORES ON
ALEX. MACDONALD
The Imperial debate held last Friday ln the Hotel Georgia, was one of
the beat attended parliamentary
functions that has been presented to
the  public.
And studenta were not disappointed. As well as magnificent oratory,
there was enough rollicking humor
to satisfy the most ardent lover of
verbal 'slapstick comedy'—ln fact, lt
almost seemed as tf the contestants
believed that the debate would be
won by the side having the best sense
of humor, so fast and so freely were
the wisecracks tossed back and
forth.,
A remarkably quick wit was
shown by Fred Thoneman who, at
one point in the debate, turned Alex
Macdonald's humorous quip into a
boomerang.
CLEVER RIPOSTE.
Alex had just learnedly compared
debate speeches to babies In that
they, "are easy to conceive but hard
to deliver." Whereupon the redoubtable Mr. Thoneman retaliated by remarking: "That If as the opposition
stated . . . debate speeches were easily conceived but hard to deliver
then what you have just heard was
a Caesarian oration!"
Another highlight In the thoroughly entertaining evening oame
when the same apeaker, referring
to the frequent use of professors
as reference by the opposition, remarked that "it Is a well known
faot, that If all the professors were
laid end to end, they would still
come to no conolusflon."
OKEY-DOKE.
Although the Australian debaters
have been here a scant three weeks
it waa noticed that Americanism
had already made serious Inroads Into their vocabulary. "If," said Mr.
Thoneman, "our opponents oan show
us a system of Internationalism
whioh will not destroy the finer aspects of nationalism, I would be the
first to say . . (pause) . . okey-doke!"
The evening was not without a
sample of the lowest form of humor,
the pun, when Harold Rome remarked In referenoe to the time limitations of the debate, "we are like
Egyptian mummies, pressed for
time."
SASKATCHEWAN HELD
HOMECOMING MONDAY
SASKATOON. Sask., Oct. 5—With
thousands of old students, members
of the Grad Society, hundreds of
alumni are expeoted to make their
appearance at the first reunion celebration to be staged at the University of Saskatchewan, Thanksgiving
Day, October 10. Old students will
revive Varsity songs and yells. The
band will te in attendance at the
rugby game that will be staged on
that day between Saskatchewan and
British Columbia. To finish off a
day that promises to be full of surprises for the Grads, the Saskatoon
Branch of the Alumni Society are
making arrangements to hold a
dance at the Bessborough Hotel in
downtown  Saskatoon. ?
Chang Suey kioked him, and continued, brokenly.
"And Buddha, bless the man. Car-
size McMire. Not only did he spend
precious hours and sleepless nights
for the cause, but the greatest sacrifice of all—" here Suey almost
broke down. "But the greatest sacrifice of all—he spent a week-end ln
Victoria!"
The whole of the Dirty Nine was
sobbing unrestrainedly, and the choir
swung out on "Rastus At De Forge."
Will the U.S. Marines be able to
save Penelope from the hungry cannibals?
Read Chapter 4 whenever it gota
written.
ESQUIRE'S
COLLEGE LEADER
AT A SAVING
BALMAC
RAINCOATS
Cheers to these new Coata! Here's
absolute protection—they're  100'
rainproof!    Of exceptionally hli
quality,   they   add   distinction   ._
any college man's wardrobe   .and
give hla puree   a   treat,   because
we've priced them way down lowt
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where, praetloal lor
and season . . . any purpose)
wearing
or any weather
. . any purpc
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Magnificently
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way, bi   . 	
to make them easy to' buy. . .
They're the Esquire's Value Trl
umph!
mt, besfof all they're priced
ESQUIRE
Men's Apparel
Exclusive Tip Top
Agents
on South Granville
"Clothes  Styled  for  To-day"
9604 Granville St.       Bay.
NOTEBOOK LOST
Lost: Black loose-leaf notebook.
Please return to Students' Council
Office as lt ls urgently needed by
owner.
FILM PRODUCERS
A meeting of thoae interested in
the technical part of film production will be held in Arts 108 on Wednesday at  13.30.
LOST
One loose leaf note book was lost
somewhere between the Library and
gymnasium. Would finder please
turn In to Mr. Home's office.
When buying tell people you are
a University student. It will save
you money.
R.
pher,
210T.
H.   Marlow,   sooiety   photogra-
for fine  portraits,  phone  Trin.
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Pour
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 11, 1938
Touring 'Birds Flap Down Bears
Williams Stars in Edmonton
Battle as U.B.C. Wins 40-11
By  NORM  RENWICK
(Special to Ubyssey)
BDMONTON, Oot. 8. (O.U.P.)—U.B.O. Thunderbirds blasted
the hopes of the University of Alberta Golden Bears in the flrst
intercollegiate grid battle of the year to the tune of 40-11 here
Saturday.
The 'Birds showing more power than ever, smashed through
the Alberta line consistently for long gains and featured almost
perfeot interference on end runs.
Tommy  ^rVilliams,   nfter  scor-
onside
—bnsil robinson
Oood news . . . the rampaging
Thunderbirds' viotory flight over
the poor Bears . . . and . . . the brilliance of Coach A. B. Carey's rug-
germen.
It's been a long, long time since the
Oridders and the "ruggahs" got together and had an outstanding season all at onoe, and, though you
don't have to wander about broadcasting It If we're offside on this
point, this ysar looks to be a safe bet
for a double killing. Ridiculed and
chaffed through the years of hard-
luck unsuccessful grid teams, flrst
Doc Burke and now Maury Vliet
can ba congratulated on their efforts
to build up something U.B.C. has
now—a football team, and, what is
more, one it can really be proud of.
COACH OOOD.
And on the other front, where Jolly
old tweed suits and foul-smelling
pipes are In evidence, orchids are
ones again in order. Although the
whole English rugby set-up was of
necessity drastically changed with
the departure of Captain Dobbie, and
several of his famous "Wonder
Team," the new Coach, A. B. Carey,
has made such a great Job of marshalling and tutoring his new talent,
that the name of Varsity Thunderbirds still stands up there ' as the
stumbling-block of any team In the
West.
OENTLEMAN'S OAME.
And lt was only yesterday that, as
we massaged gently an ankle which
objected strenuously to vigorous
treatment, it occurred to us that
perhaps this game of Rugby, which
we all play for the love and joy of
just gambolling on the turf, Is not
quite such a delight as It might be.
Take the case of the U.B.C. entry,
for Instance. The casualty list reads
as follows: Dave Bone, tall, blond
freshman forward taken to the Royal Columbian Hospital with a concussion; Fred Billings, packed off
with a badly-kicked knee; PhU Griffin, with a back that pained him so
much only sheer grit kept him on
the field, and Don Pyle who worked
like a truck-horse all afternoon and
got nothing but painful bruises and
hacks for his trouble. A nice, gentlemanly pastime.
OFFSIDE!!
And a bouquet to the soccer club
for their valiant Saturday stand.
With at least four of their last year's
regulars off the team-list, they reconstructed their forces and with a
makeshift team just missed holding
the strong West Van aggregation.
There's the whistle; shucks, hope
I'm not offside.
HOCKEY'.
And with such a llvewlre executive
as Jim Ussher and Orme "Oolf
Coach" Dier, sports Editor of this
esteemed sheet, the lce-hockeymen
seem to be in for a really bang-up
season. We hear the boys have ambitious notions for the coming year.
And talking of hockey, the crooked
stick artists are having a hard time
this fall, and If aome of the aspiring
pucksters feel they'd like to get In
shape, they could do worse than ally
themselves with Archie Macauley
and hia boys on the grass hockey
Held.
Watch Mary Ann for Student Specials.
in-j two touchdowns in the first
half, breezed through the whole
Alberta team for n 75 ynrd run
to n touchdown in the Inst quarter.
RUN  WILD.
Freshamn Oraham scored two
more markers when he retrieved a
fumble and then later Intercepted a
pass for a 20 yard run to the pay
line.
Alberta, forced to resort to a pass
attack after smashing against B.C.'s
stonewall defence, offered opportunities for more interception aa Milt
Angus snatched the ball out of the
air and galloped for a marker. Evan
ap Roberts scored the final touch
and Aub Oray completed B out of T
converts.
The boys are all primed to set the
University of Saskatchewan Huskies
back on their collective heels Monday In the same Impressive manner.
HUSKIES PASTED BY
RE6INA DALES
University of Saskatchewan Huskies got a preliminary taste  Saturday of what the touring U.B.C.
Thunderbirds  hope  to   administer
to   them   In   the  three   gamea   between   the    two    squads    this   fall
when-they went down to a 18-5 defeat at the hands of Regina Dales.
Weakened   by   the   ravages   caused
by   Old   Man   Oraduatlon,    and    outweighed   by   the   heavy,   hard-hitting
Regina  Line,  the  Huskies  put  up  a
good   fight,   according   to   C.U.P.   reports,  but  just  failed   to  click  when
the pressure was needed.
The Coast team, fresh from their
smashing triumph over the Oolden
Bears of Alberta, are without injuries and confident of outhowllng
the Husky in his own den.
JUNIOR GRIDDERS
LOSE TO KITSIES
AT BRAEMAR
Varsity Junior Grid Squad went
down fighting before the undefeated
Meraloma team by a 15-6 score in a
thrilling game at Braemar Park last
Saturday.
The Kitsles sweeping end runs had
the students baffled and 'two touchdowns in the flrat half gave a ten
point   lead   to  the   downtown   team.
FRITH  SCORES.
The Bolton and Morrow board of
strategy worked out a plan to bottle
up the 'Lomas end-run play, and in
the third quarter the Orange and
Black squad were stopped cold -whllo
the Blue and Qold reeled off long
gains.
Halfback Austin Frith crashed
through the line to give the Point
Orey laddies renewed hope. Junior
Lamb of rugger fame booted the
convert and the battle was on.
ROUOH FIELD.
A risky forward pass play backfired In the hands of the Thunderbirds and Fagan of the Meralomas
sewed up the old ball game by breaking into the clear and diving over
the pay line.
Both teama took a beating from
the Braemar Rock pile, and the next
game ia to be scheduled on the Upper Pitch ut Varsity for next Saturday.
Finest SHINE PARLOR in Town
Alr-Cushlonc-d   Cromium   Spring   Chairs
»t
WORLD  WIDE  NEWS    *.:';;,„
When downtown use our PHONE FREE
SPEARHEAD
This "Bird Is Todd Tremblay, Sophomore star on Coach A. B. Carey's
brand new, 1B88 edition of Varsity
ruggermen. Tod Is a wing-three and
laat year had the distinction of
catching a plaoe on Captain Dobble's
"Wonder Team" while still the most
verdant of Freshmen. This year he
Is one of the most brilliant spearheads of the Blue and Oold attack.
U.B.C. RUGGER
SQUAD BEATEN
SATURDAY
THREE STUDIES HURT
IN LOSING 19-3
U.B.C. ruggers discovered IS was
mathematically      and      physically
stronger than  13 at Queens  Park
Saturday    when    a    heavy-weight
New   Westminster   team    reduced
the student lineup to an even dozen by a series of pulverising   attacks  and  then  ran    rough    shod
over the Blue and Oold to a IBIS
score.
The   dynamic   Westminster   scrum
averaged nearly 200 pounds per man,
and crushed the way for all the major  scores   of   the   day.     The   U.B.C.
team was smarter and faster on the
whole,  but  weight  played   the  leading role  ln  one  of the wildest  battles of the young rugger season.
ROBINSON  SCORES.
Up to the end of the first half, the
game was a real thriller, with r.eith-
er side having the advantage. Westminster opened the scoring when
Maury Edwards of lacrosse fame
fell on the ball to make a try after
a long dribbling rush of the delta
boys.
After the breather, the Point
Orey laddies came back atrong,
and scrum half Basil Robinson
tied the score with a beautiful
penalty goal from SO yards out.
DOWN AND OUT.
Then the fireworks started. Dave
Bone, useful scrum man who had
played a bang-up game all through,
was carried out unconscious after
receiving a bad clip on the forehead.
Fred Billings from the pack followed him to the sidelines with a
wrenched knee, and shortly afterwards Don Pyle came off with a
gashed cheek.
The score mounted rapidly after
that as the boys from lacrosse town
dammed over 16 points without a
reply from the outnumbered Blue
and  Oold  aggregation.
HOCKEYISTS LOSE
A    fighting    bunch    of    Varsity
grass   hockeyists   went   own   to   a
8-© defeat at the hands of the newly   formed   North   Shore   Reds   In
the flrst game of the season at the
Varsity Fitch Saturday   '
Fighting   gamely   through   all    the
first half to he mthe boys from over
the  harbor   ln   their  own   end   of  the
field, the Varsity squad weakened  in
the   second   half   when   lack   of   experience  and  conditioning  told  badly.
Captain Archie Macauley played
his uaual outstanding game between
the posts and with six newcomers in
front of him beside veterans Gav
Mour.tt and Daishan Singh to ward
off the sabotaging attacks of the
Reds, the Blue and Gold squad
showed   Hip  best  form  of the season.
VARSITY TEAM
ROUTS GRADS
AT STADIUM
RUGGERS WIN 48-0
TEAGLE STARS
Varsity's   mighty   Thundrerblrds
of the Rugger pitch sailed majestically to a crushing 48-0 triumph
over the demoralized Orad fifteen
Saturday In the first English Rugby fixture of the season to be played at the standi urn.
And  strangely enough,  lt was the
work  of Coach  Carey's young  pack
of scrum  men who started  the season as an unknown quantity, which
turned  the  tide  irresistibly In favor
of the high-flying students.
SCRUM STARS.
Jim Harmer, who scored two of
the flrst three tries, Vic Moore, Tom
Robson, Evan Davies, Fraser Shepherd all helped to boost the top-reavy
score, while only Sandy Lang and
Wilson College of the back division
were able to register major scores.
LUCKY THIRTEEN.
Ernie Teagle, baok in hla accustomed spot at fullback did his bit
towards wrecking the Orad cause by
notching no less than IS points with
his  trusty  left  foot.
Though the Tmunderblrd backs
pulled off many brilliant Individual
horties, their combination waa foiled
on many occasions by the desperate
Orads who were lying up close in an
effort to keep the score from assuming dinosaurlal proportions. As a
result It waa left to the acrumsters
who carried all before them In their
viotory maroh.
FROSH RUGGERMEN
TROUNCE THIRDS
BY 22-8 SCORE
Showing promising form, Varsity's newly formed band of Frosh
ruggermen left no doubt as to their
ability Saturday on the upper campus field when they trimmed a disorganised Third XV by a soore of
aa-8.
PYLE   STARS.
According to Ranjl Mattu, newly
appointed coach of the newcomers,
members of the flrst and second
team will have to look to their laurels. Not conceded a ghost of a
chance against their heavier and
mere experienced opponents, the
Frosh, led by copper-thatched Oordle
Pyle who soored three tries, converted two and booted a penalty goal,
went Into the second half leading
11-8, and then commenced to ride
roughshod over their Ill-fated opponents to run In 11 straight points before   the   final   whistle.
Outstanding for the "greenles" besides Pyle were Morrie Physlck who
broke through beautifully on two
occasions for scores, John Clement,
hook, and Jack Bingham another
scrum  man.
The Thirds who were rather weakly represented, were served best by
Johnny Runkle and  Dave Rolfe.
ICE HOCKEY
Meeting Wednesday at 12.30
in Arts 104. Everybody out!
CO-ED SPORTS
With the grass hockey league opening next week and both basketball
squads shaping up well, the sports
front for co-eds on the campus ls
looking more like a record breaker
than   ever.
Bob Osborne ls none too enthusiastic about his basketball charges, but
he Insists that the lassies will be
right in there when the silverware is
dished  out.
In the Senior "A" squad, freshette
Fay Burnham looks very good, and
along with such veterans as Lois
McEwen, Adle Collins, Nancy Martin, Jean Thompson nnd Ruth Wilson goes a long way to make the
Varsity team a strong contender In
the   league   nice.
Both hockey teams are threatening
to tear the opposition apart and the
U.B.C. team in particular looks very
Ftrong   for   this   time   of   the   yonr.
FOR VARIETY
94Vtl0cm&
FIVE
DELICIOUS
FLAVORS
LIMON
ORANOI
STRAWS! KRY
VANILLA
BOROIAUX
THE   BEST   CHOCOLATE   MODE
offside
—orme dier
The first thing to amy. ot course, Is
that we are Just aa aorry as you are
that this column Is coming out today for the third conseoutive Issue,
but like the one about the travelling
salesman, there Is a long story behind It.
You see yesterday was a holiday, and everyone had lots of turkey and stuffings. Everyone, that
Is, but the poor overworked staff
of ye campus rag. They had to
go down and get out a paper of
sorts for the special benefit of no
one in particular. The result was
that there was a terrifying lack
of news to be printed, and hence
the deluge of columns on the sput
page.
DOUBLE-HEADERS.
Well, since we have nothing in
particular to say, lt would be a good
idea to start off on a serious note.
What we want to know Is why our
nice big stadium ts only being used
for one game a week. One of the
nicest thlnga we know ot is to get
two for one. And so 'when we get
two games for the price of one as
happened last year several times, it
just throws us into ecstacies. And
we know a lot of people who think
the same way. So all together now
. . . we want double-headers ln the
stadium!
TITLE-BOUND.
Over In the gym the basketballers
are working out diligently nearly
every week, and Just from this point
it looks as though there might be ah-
cther one of those famous devastating Thunderbird Fives being primed
to take another crack at the Dominion title. Kbep your fingers crossed
and watch the 'Birds go by.
Getting around to personalities,
the two hard luck men of the campus
these days seen, to be Johnny Pearson and Ranjl Mattu. John -was all
set to kick the devil out of the Huskies and the Bears when he came
down with an Infected leg that kept
him  off the prairie Jaunt.
Ranji on the other hand, finished
the flrst game of the season is
dear old ruggah with couple of
cracked ribs, and now he is in the
strange position of watching instead of playing.    But he ls keeping
111****111111,1**1111111(111 1111,1*1, lllltlMIIIIMIIIIIIIIII II**, tilt (If,
Just   about   all   you   couM ask    I
for    ... I
ARISTOCRATIC .     f
HAMBURGERS f
Limited |
10th and Alma |
TAKE    SOME    HOME     §
.HIMIH.HIIIIIHIHIIHHMHIHtHIII.HfHIIHHIIIIIHIIItlHIIIMlr.
SOCCERMEN
LOSE CLOSE
CONTEST 3-2
TODD    SCORES    TWO
AS W. VAN WINS
Varsity soccermen gave promise of
a great season Saturday at Ambleside Park by putting up a gallant
fight against the favored West Vancouver Merchants before going down
ln the last two minutes to a heartbreaking   3-2   defeat.
Blair Edwards* first half tally was
enough to keep the West-eiders
ahead until after the half-time Interval when Doug Todd, U.B.C. ln-
slde-left tied the count on a pass
from McLaren. Their success was
shortlived, however, as Edwards, the
Merchants' dynamic left-winger put
hia buddies ahead once more on a
solo effort.
TODD COUNTERS.
With the time going fast, the Point
Grey boys got right back in the battle on a beautiful low drive again
from the foot of inside-man  Todd.
And then lt happened again. With
but two short minutes remaining and
the campusmen almost congratulating themselves on holding the favored Merchants to a draw, the Blue
snd Gold defense was left helpless
as Edwards came In fast from the
left wing to notch his third goal of
the game and put ln the bag for his
West Van. buddies.
TOE  KICKS.
It was a tough one to lose for the
roundballers but they need not be
discouraged as the form shown was
far above the wildest dreams of
Charlie Hltchens and his board of
strategy.
Fred Sasaki, freshman acquisition
from St. Regis played an outstanding game at left-half for the students, while Spencer 'Wallace, who
got Into part of the second half also
showed  good  form.
—ROBINSON
himself busy by coaching the Frosh
fifteen, and If the results of the game
last Saturday mean anything, Mr.
Ranji ls just as potent in the coaching position as he is ln the scrum
slot.
CRUNCH! !
And from this position far up in
the stands, it appears not unlikely
that the insurance .carried by the
boys this year will come In very
handy. Maybe the lods take the
games too seriously, or maybe they
get a kick out of smiting each other
so freely. Yes sir. It's u great life if
you don't  get your  teeth  kicked  out.
There goes the whistle, and we
hope we are outside  for a change.
"AS   NEAR   AS  YOUR  PHONE"
SEYMOUR 2405
Delivery   Anywhere  in  City  Limits
E ' S   .   .   .   840 ORANVILLE

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