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The Ubyssey May 18, 1954

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 END OF THE BEGINNING
First Medical Students Graduate
The University of British
Columbia will officially come
of age on May 18 when fifty-
five men and two women become the first undergraduates
cine degree in this Province,
to receive the Doctor of Medi-
The day will be particularly memorable for Dr. Lyon
Weaver, Dean of the Medical
School, who surely must have
had his moments of doubt
when in 1949 he first observed the collection of shacks
and army huts that were to
be the home of his faculty.
Dean Weaver came from
the University of Minnesota,
where he was assistant dean
for many years. Before that
he was at the University of
Chicago. All in all the Dean
has been a teacher of doctors
for over a quarter of a century.
"We had to build from the
ground up," recalls Dr. Weaver, and build he did. UBC's
first fifty-seven doctors will
be as well trained and as up
to date as graduates from any
university medical training
school in the world.
"Biggest difficulty we had
was finding faculty members," said the Dean. Today,
as the first of his 232 students
come up for graduation they
are outnumbered by more
than 250 faculty members
members that constitute as
fine a medical faculty as can
be found in any medical
school.
Among   the    outstanding
men who head the various
departments are: Drs. Sidney
M. Friedman (anatomy);
Marvin Darrach (biochemistry); Harold Copp (physiology) ; Robert S. Kerr (medicine); J. F. McCreary (pediatrics); H. Rocke Robertson
(surgery); Alec M. Agnew
(obstretrics & gynaecology);
W. Donald Ross (psychiatry);
and William Boyd (pathology).
All of these men are outstanding in their own fields
and to give their full histories
and record of their many
degrees would take many
pages. Suffice it to say that
men like Drs. Sidney Friedman, Robert Kerr and Rocke
Robertson are recognized in
the world of medicine as
"among the best in the business."
The students themselves
present an interesting cross-
section of Canadian men and
| Continued on Page 5)
See DOCTORS
THE UBYSSEY
\ Ui-uivir. AAA Vi
MONDAY, MAY 17, AND TUESDAY, MAY 18, 1954
Price 5c;      No. 60
Spring Convocation
Bids Grads Farewell
Six Win
Honorary
Degrees
MATHEMATICAL WIZARD "Robin" Thompson recorded
high marks in maths and physics to win prized Governor-
General's Medal. Robin has led his class for the past three
sessions, ranked second in his freshman year.
Robin' Thompson Wins
Cash, Massey Medal
Highest academic standing of arts and science graduates in
the Class of '54 was made by mathematics wizard Robert Charles
Thompson,  who will receive the coveted Governor-General's
gold medal from the vice-regent himself Tuesday afternoon.
The    twenty-three   vear    old"
year
South Burnaby High School
graduate is no stranger to distinction, however, having won
nearly $3,000 in cash scholarships since he attended high
school.
He will go on to obtain his
mnstelr's decree at UBC, according to present plans. His
career will have to wait until
he's through with studies, mainly because he hasn't decided upon a career yet.
NRC  WINNER
The young mathematician also honored in physics in his third
and fourth years, and thus was
selected as winner of an $800
Natlional Reosearch Council
scholarship this year.
News   of   Thompson's    being
(Continued  on  Page  7)
See  WINNER
Men Win
Nearly All
Top Awards
Announcement of graduating
awards for the class of 1954 failed to advance the scholastic reputation of women. Men students
won all but two of the top 16
prizes.
Only classes led by women
were Home Economics and Nursing—traditional women's faculties.
Upwards of 120 awards will
go to 1954 graduates, ranging as
high as $1400. They total more
than $175,000.
(Continued on Page 7)
See AWARDS
The distinguished and controversial Dr. Brock Chisholm will
receive an honorary degree at
at UBC's graduation ceremonies
this year.
Dr. Chishoim Is one of five
leading Canadian figures who
will receive honorary degrees at
UBC during the two-day proceedings. He will receive a D.Sc.
A D.Sc. will also be conferred
upon Dr. Ethlyn Trapp, renowned radiologist and first woman
president of the B.C. Medical
Association.
Joseph Smallwood, first Premier of Newfoundland and colorful leader of that province's
confederation move, will receive
an honorary LL.D.
The Rt. Hon. Vincent Massey,
Canada's present Governor General, will be honored with the
same degree, as will H. N. Mac-
Corkindale, retired Vancouver
school inspector.
Medical Administrator, Dr. G.
F. Strong, will be the recipient
of a D.Sc.
DISTINGUISHED
Doctor Chisholm is undoubtedly one of the most distinguished
Canadian figures of this era.
In 1924 he graduated with a
degree in medicine and began to
study psychology. He is now acknowledged as one of the world's
most outstanding psychologists.
In the dark days of 1942 Chisholm held various armed service
posts having to do with medicine and psychiatry. At the close
of the war he was appointed
Deputy Minister of Health in
Canada.
It was while serving in this
I capacity that the "Santa Claus"
controversy originated. From
that day, Brock Chisholm has
almost become a household word.
IRONY
It is ironical that, to many
people, he is not known or remembered so much as an international health figure, or even
as the organizer of the World
Health Organization, but as the
"Santa Claus hater."
(Continued on Page 23)
See HONORARY DEGREES
HON.   VINCENT   MASSEY
.    .    .    Doctor of Laws
HON. JOSEPH SMALLWOOD
.    .    .    Doctor of  Laws
DR. BROCK CHISHOLM
.    .    .    Doctor of Science
Degrees and diplomas will be
conferred upon 853 graduates of
the University of British Columbia during 1954 Spring Convocation ceremonies Monday
and Tuesday in the university
armouries.
,     The  coiorful  ceremonies  will
i include the awarding of the first
! Doctor  of  Medicine  degrees  at
UBC. Fifty-.seven medical graduates, two of them women, will
receive degrees.
I     Three   Doctor   of   Philosophy
I degrees will also be conferred.
HONORARY  DEGREES
First day of congregation, Monday, three honorary Doctor of
Science degrees will go to: Dr.
Brock Chisholm, one-time director of the World Health Organization; Dr. George Frederic
Strong, President of the Canadian Medical Association; and
Dr. Ethlyn Trapp, first woman
president of the B.C. Medical
Association.
Monday's Congregation Address will be delivered by Dr.
Chisholm.
Other degrees conferred Monday will be in Pure and Applied
Science, Agriculture, Forestry,
Social Work, Education, Commerce, Home Economics, Physical Education, Nursing, Architecture and Medicine.
GOVERNOR-GENERAL
Three more honorary degrees
will be conferred Tuesday, these
being Doctor of Laws, and going
to: the Hon, Vincent Massey,
Governor-General of Canada; the
Hon. Joseph Smallwood, Premier
of Newfoundland; and H. N. Mc-
Corkindale,   Superintendent   of
Continued on  Page 5)
See GRADS
EXECUTIVE OF TU
GRADUATING CLASS:
Honorary President —
Professor H. Logan
Honorary Vice-President —
Miss M. Lanning
President — Douglas Third
Vice-President —
Phyllis Cooper
Secretary, Margaret Stewart
Treasurer — James Clarke
Social convenor—
Murray Trigg PAGE 4
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17, 1954
THE UBYSSEY   hoofs in
hell
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Post Office Dept. Ottawa.
Mail subscriptions $2.50 per year. Published in Vancouver
throughout the university year by the Student Publications
Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial
staff of The Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater
Society or the University.
Editor-in-Chief   PETER SYPNOWICH
Writers for graduation issue;
RAY LOGIE, STAN BECK. BILL STAVBAL,
AB KENT, ED PARKER
Not  Enough
McCarthyism is proving to be a very popular evil.
It is so handy.
Students across the country—certainly at UBC—are
spending amazing amounts of time clucking their tongues
in disapproval of McCarthyism and its kinfolk. They find it
a convenient way fo dispose of ^heir intellectual obligations.
This is not enough. The responsibility of thinking people
entails considerably more than a smug denunciation of
demagogism.
For McCarthyism is only the illegal weapon of the hardening front of reaction in the Western world, a reaction
which is extending further than a defense against the bogey
of totalitarian Communism.
If there is one thing a university graduate should
possess when he leaves school, it is the ability to examine
new ideas without prejudice. Yet it is a common failing
among students to assume valuable truths are spurned by
reactionaries only in history.
Only yesterday there was fundamentalism. Today there
is a frenzied anti-socialism, particularly absurd in the United
States, where proven institutions such as the Tennessee
Valley Authority and Social Security are either forgotten
or unappreciated.
It is not mandatory to be a revolutionists, blind adherent
of American prohibition or Russian Communism. But ail
knowledge is subversive, as Irwin Edman aptly pointed out
during UBC's celebration of the Columbia Bi-Centennial.
Those who make most of tomorrow's decisions must be wary
of rejecting admirable subversions.
Wisp of Memories
(Re-printed from an old Ubyssey)
It is spring of '54 and the past four years have gone up in
smoke leaving only the wisp of memories and two extra letters
to your name. The twenty-five odd hours of written exams,
the essay deadlines, the good books found, the conversation,
the parties and games, and the people met during those four
years at UBC have left their mark on the '54 graduates.
Time and again the sweetest and the most bitter memories
will return, but the years are done, their work completed.
They were the closing door of adolescence and the entrance to
maturity. Now the press of an occupation, a family, the social
responsibility of the individual to his society replaces the
lighter duties of schbol life.
As freshmen, life was one great wonder—but a lot of
fun. During sophomore and junior years the work grew larger in amount and more confusing in degree. By the beginning
of fourth year the goal was too close to foresake; and, besides,
the disappointments were being forgotten in favour of the
more pleasant memories.
Now graduation is here and with it the awareness that
this is the last obligatory trip to the old campus, the last walk
to the Brock, the last opportunity to ignore the "Keep off the
Grass" sign. Today, the graduate receives his certificate:
Baccalaureate: a bachelor, the last step in a general education,
first step towards specialization. This is the time of parting,
the final goodbye, and now, the need for decision in a world
certain only of its motion.
University life can be a benefit to each person. It may
not prepare an individual for the business of industry but it
can make the business of life more meaningful. It imparts a
zest to living: an appreciation of, and a sensitivity towards the
ideas extant in a world of action. That quality of acuteness is
sufficient achievement for the general BA candidate. Being
aware of ideas and contemporary trends of thought and activity, their sources and contemporary suitability is, in itself, the
mark of an adult. The power to evaluate, to aclopi or discard,
concepts and ideologies, whether in literature, politics or the
general attitude toward life signifies the maturity of mind
found in a well-rounded personality.
That completeness of person is the goal of a general education and the key to satisfaction. If the years spent at UBC
have in any way begun or completed that movement towards
maturity, they were not wasted years.
By PETER SYPNOWICH
No, I am not taken in by
the idyllic optimism of the
society pages. For sentimental society writers, graduation exercises are a glowing scene: Mother in a
white, father gazing proudly, and flowers everywhere;
the fresh young graduate,
maintaining the dignity of
his motarboard, steps forward and takes his parchment.   He is on the threshold
of life.
No. Craftily looking ahead,
I can see that the only threshold a graduate crosses is that
of an employment office. I
can see what graduation really means: Work.
Not For Mo
I am suspicious of work.
After three years In an arts
course, it is something nearly
forgotten, only half-familiar,
like childhood. Yet I have
the distinct impression that
I didn't ever like it.
Some say they do, and look
with a bright eye to the future.
They speak of a "career."
This can lead to real tragedy,
particularly if you are an arts-
man.
I know one arts graduate
who went through his undergraduate years scorning the
engineers who graduated to
accept high-salaried posts.
Engineers, he knew, were
uneducated. This he had learned from the LSE. And The
Ubyssey had been adamant on
the point.
Then he graduated. Dimly,
he pictured his "career" as
necessarily involving unpleasant contact with engineers—
giving them permission to
build their bridges, etc. All
the same, he said, he was going
to get a job. He owed it to
society, he said.
He didn't work for four
months. I saw him then—he
was looking very seedy, and
finally working at his new
job, a clerk in a consulting
engineer's office.
Not For Art's Soke
Now, there are several ways
to avoid working after leaying
school. Most of them are unsatisfactory, however.
Number one: don't leave
school. Unfortunately, the
university has established a
limit on the number of times
a student can flunk out. And
collecting degrees or winning
enough fellowships to continue
post-graduate studies are rather gruelling methods of
avoiding labor.
Number two: marry a wealthy woman. This is one of
those Utopian, impractical
ideas which are always coming to mind. It is all right to
wish for it, but attempting to
carry it out could become a
life's labor.
Number three: buy a beret.
This is it. It has everything:
simplicity, glamor and self-
satisfaction. Give me Bohemians rather than the bourgeosie any day.
I might just do that.
CAMPUS  CHAFF
ON PAGE SEVEN
__    ___~  Four years of Ubyssey headlines were dug up
%0 wBmn**or ^ls cover» t-leniumbled to provide a kaleide-
scope of memories.
Notice the profusion of headlines concerning The
Ubyssey itself—we think a little modesty goes a long way.
Besides, we're active.
On page 19, you can read the stories behind ihe head
lines.
AB'S
TRACT
iy Ab Kent
So you've finally made it. Three years — five — seven,
or whatever your particular sentence has been — are now up
and you must go out into the proverbial bleak world and try
to get along with human beings for a change. Making money
won't be any problem after all the specialized training you've
endured; it'll be the social obstacle that may be hard to get
over.
Consider, for instance, the effect on your future business
associates when you demonstrate your Caf-inspired dining techniques over soup at The Vancouver. Their reaction might conceivably have some effect on their estimation of you, particularly if they are impressed on the eve of The Big Deal.
Maybe your style was nurtured at Fort or Acadia where
it was common practice to submit to the impulse to fling sopping tea bags at the backs of likely looking heads. This will
not go over at Board of Trade functions, Birk's Coffee Shop,
or Eaton's Marine Room, however likely looking the heads.
Likewise yur conversational intercourse might need some
retreading. It won't be proper to answer the boss with the same
gutteral rumble that has passed in years of classes as a reply to
Professor Queasy's question, "What universally accepted procedure aimed at promulgating existential philosophies designed
with a view to delineating introspectively, and as a matter of
fact, neterospectively, the time-honored systems adhered to by
our forefathers fourscore and seven years ago you gotta accentuate the positive eliminate the negative Rodger dodger frantic
antia crazy man crazy?"
But then, with some bosses, it might be just as well.
Continental Capers
Perhaps you will pick up the continental attitude to social
contact when you are making the Grand Tour this summer. If
you are at all an average student (or were), you must be making
the trip to Europe this year; everybody and his Totem has designs on Paris, profs included. And those Frenchmen know
more about Emily Post than Mr. Post did.
I guess you're all pretty eager to shake this decidedly
detrimental influence on your lives, this monster, this university, where the outer shell of your cocoon is distorted and
only good old varsity is declaimed.
"Good old varsity" consists of the things you will remember as you trudge the toilsome trail of life. Things that will
haunt you to the point where you wake up screaming and then
discover that you are a misfit in society, a veritable Dostoyevsky.
This would seem to build up a case for "bearing the
troubles that we have, than flying to others that we know not
of," to improvise Shakespeare. So why leave university to be
forever glancing backward with wistful gaze on the halcyon
life severed by a mild clubbing from Chancellor Lett's ceremonial  head-piece? Be a professional student.
You psychology majors, raising your baleful brows, think
this is the working of a warped mind; that this attitude is
suggestive only of an escape mechanism engendered by an unwillingness to assume a position of responsibility. You're probably right.
But who can deny that this time passed in university has
not only served to give him the rudiments of the tools he will
require to forge his way past West Point Grey, but has actually
been a rather enjoyable experience, well flavored with diversion of the most extraordinary type.
'And The Greatest of These ...'
The jolly times will be no more, you realize, or at least
there will be no more just like them. You mull this over after
the final seige of examinations as you wait for graduation.
Maybe the wistful thought crosses your mind as you take a
final stroll along the rock-strewn sands of Spanish Banks, scene
of more than one pleasantry during your undergraduate years.
Many of you will be leaving Vancouver, perhaps never to
return, never again to know the thrill of the traditional Homecoming game which 'Birds sometimes won; or the feeling of
personal achievement when the student body bled more profusely than any other North American university to the greater
glory of UBC and the Red Cross. For some there will never
again be the opportunity to gain precedent-setting scholastic
honors, about the only tangible recognition you'll ever receive
for the often  demoralizing slavery  you  put  into your course.
Let's not be selfish about these things, however. Maintain
a spirit of Christian charity, bearing in mind thr.t our successors on tho Point have a right to indulge in the same life we
led and, who knows, they might even make a better thing of it.
*P Op *p
A goodbye t > everybody, and especially Fort Camp. MONDAY, HAY 17,1S54
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGES
DOCTORS
(Contiaued from Page 1>
women.
Leagh Hartwell, 25, is having his way paid by the Royal
Canadian Army. In return he
agrees to repay the Army by
serving for two years when
he is a fully trained doctor.
At that time he will be given
a commission as a captain
and is liable to be sent anywhere in the world where
there are Canadian soldiers.
Harry Webster, one of the
younger members of the class
at 23, gives the first graduates
an international ilavor. Born
in Chile, educated in Spanish
and English in Bolivia, Harry
came to Vancouver with his
parents some time ago. When
he graduates Harry plans to
settle down and practise in
Vancouver.
Marjorie and Edward
Jansch proved that love can
bloom among hard. work.
Both were among the first
medical students and it
Wasn't long before they became Mr. and Mrs. Now they
make their home in a trailer
camp at Acadia Camp. To
raise her share of the cost of
a degree, Marjorie spent last
studying "swimmer's itch"
summer at Cultus Lake,
with parasitology expert Dr. i
J. R. Adams. Both Marjorie ,
and Edward plan to practise .
after graduation.
Fred Harder, 26, chose off
duty work that will aid him
in his chosen profession. He
has been paying his way
through school by working
nights and holidays as a driver for Kingsway Ambulance.
Thus he gained experience
with emergency cases and
and gave the odd lecture on
first aid to fellow drivers.
The medical faculty is »till
* housed in shacks and converted army huts but out of
them will come fifty-seven of
the finest trained doctors in J
the world who will be the
first proud wearers of a gown ;
with a blue hood facing on
May 18,1954.
VALEDICTORY
The Field Is Ripe
May 17, 1954
It Ls a very great honor at any
time to graduate from a University, an honor, let us hope, that
is at least partially deserved.
There ls, moreover, special honor
today ln being a memuer of the
first graduating class in Medicine
from the University of British
DONALD AND£H80N
. . . valedictorian
Columbia. The trials if the past
seven, to eight years seem to fade
in the light of this privilege, and
I would be remiss were I not to
express the most heartfelt thanks
on behalf if the graduating class
in the newest faculty, to the cit- i
izens of the province for the
financial investment they have
colleagues in the faculty, who
have met so well the challenge
of starting a new school.
We, in Medicine, have been
especially privileged today to
graduate in company with Dr.
Brock Chisholm and Dr. Ethylyn
Trapp. These physicians have
taught us that medicine has a
universal obligation; that we
who graduate are not to confine
our thoughts to our immediate
environment of patients, but are
to become concerned about national and global matters. We
have learned that medicine has
no boundries in race, creed, or
color; that all human beings, each
of distinct worth, need our attention, and that it is the total personality, social as well as physical and mental, that we serve.
This afternoon we are on the!
verge of facing our obligation for
the first time.
What I have said about Medicine applies equally as well to
you  who are   graduating from;
ether faculties.    The ability  of j
medicine to combine science and!
the humane arts so effectively to
the service  of mankind should;
serve to stimulate each one of us. j
Whether we have studied in the
great halls or in the tiny huts
of  this   institution,   the  call   to
each of us today is "Learn Wisdom—apply Knowledge — wait
upon Mankind."
All of us today, whether graduating in the broader fields of
nursing, teaching, social work or
home economics, or in the more
specialized fields of commerce,
engineering, forestry, agriculture
or architecture, are called upon
in greater or lesser degree to
"wait upon mankind." We may
sometimes find that that call is
hard to hear. Yet it is still present. Long ago, on the lakeshore
of Galilee, seventy young men of
just as diversified vocational
callings as ourselves graduated
to a lifetime of service with the
exhortation of their Master still
ringing in their ears:
The harvest truly it great,
but tht labourers ar* few:
pray ye therefor* the Lord of
th* harvtit, that h* would send
forth labourers into his harvest.
Very few of that group entered
into full-time Service for their
Master; yet they all served as
they spread abroad the good tidings of Peace.
Our world needs such a Peace.
It is not for the politician nor
for the statesman alone to usher
it in; it still needs all of us who,
though dedicated to our chosen
vocation, are concerned enough
j about Mankind to give of our-
l selves for  it;  to become  wise,
as well as learned, and yet be
| willing to be labourers.
i Sometimes this may mean that
I v/e will reluctantly have to give
up the careful scientific approach
to life that we have learned
! here; often we will have to be
> practical and favour experience
over experiment. The question of
; "Will  it  work   well  enough?"
iather than "Why does it work?"
may often be foremost in our
, minds as we study each new de-
' vice or method. Yet this should
| not frighten or disappoint us, but
rather challenge  us   and  often
gratify us.
;  ' Those of us who are willing
! to   learn this  lesson  well,  will
lind most satisfaction in our life,
as we repay the debt we owe to
our University, our teachers, and
j the citizens of this province.
Our University has always
recognized that obligation. Lot
uS also recognize our obligation.
There is a call'for labourers, for
the field is still ripe unto harvest;
but the same Master would gently remind us that we are to
broaden our horizon; for "the
field is the world."
—Don Anderson
Medicine
VALEDICTORY
No Man An Island
May 18, 1954
We graduate today knowing,
like John Donne, that no man
is an island unto himself. For we
who were born in the twentieth
century have had our lives shaped by a new concept of the world.
Today's news is the news of
continents the western world
has only recently learned of,
today's political tensions and
pressures touch and affect us
and all the earth's peoples. We
are subjected to a new experience, the responsibility of thinking and acting on a global plane,
and we leave here to share in
the hopes and terrors of a rapidly shrinking world, which must
be, for we cannot escape the
reality of our existence. And so
: we graduate, surrounded by the
world's affairs and problems,
but this is a circumstance we
cannot control.
I But there ls yet another and
I more personal problem each of
! us faces. Are we to graduate and
; be hemmed in by the details
of the everyday, life, to the ex-
| elusion of all else?
Granted, it is foolish to think
that we may retire in solitary
splendour to contemplate our individual self.We have been consciously trained, by the educational system of which we are
now a finished product, to serve
society, to serve our clients, our
patients.  But  in  so doing,  we
[may easily let ourselves be ab-
I sorbed in the details of earning
i a  living.
GRADS
(Continued from Page 1>
Schools for Vancouver.
Mr. Massey will deliver Tues-•
day's Congregation Address.        ,
Degrees and doctorates in;
Philosophy, Arts. Law and Phar-!
macy will be conferred on Tues-j
day. |
VALEDICTORIES j
Valedictory address will be
given Monday bv Donald Anderson, M.D. and Tuesday by Jane
Banfield, L.L.D .
Throe of the persons being
■distinguished by the award of
honorary degrees are citizens of
Vancouver: Dr. Trapp, B.C.M.A.
president in 194fi and first woman to give the Osier Lecture,
1952: Dr. Strong, specialist in
interial medicine and one of few
Amei ican-born doctors to become
■president of the Canadian Medical Association: and Mr. McCork-
indah', who will retire in August.
This spring's congregation will
award 20 fewer degrees than last
year, when 873 graduates were
admitted to convocation.
_*mmiii^^
WHITE DOVE
CLEANERS
* SAME DAY SERVICE
... No Extra Charge
COMPLETE DELUXE LAUNDRY SERVICE
4567 West 10th Ave. ALma 1688
4567 West 10th ALma 1688
Congratulations and Best Wishes
from
Jhsb (bolphinA,
Your Host     -     Robert Antille
Your Hostess    -    Mrs. Stanley
RENDEZVOUS ON THE CAMPUS
. 6000 S.W. Marine Dr.
AL. 1962
We  have   been   forced   to   be
intellectual during our stay here.
We   have   been   nurtured   in   a
hothouse of theory and research.
Now that we are graduating, we
rebel against this enforced study.
We arc free at last, free to take
part in the outside world from
which we have, for so long, been {
separated. We are at liberty to I
disown and forget most of what j
we learned. This freedom may |
indeed be a heady wine, but itj
plunges us into life and lets us
be swamped by regrets. j
We have complained that
there never was enough time to
do everything, never enought
time to explore our courses. This
complaint will follow us Into
he workday world. There will
never be enough time to write
the best possible" brief or make
the best possible report, and we
will complain again. We will
think hat we have outgrown the
habit of scholarship.
But in thc midst of this hurly-
burly, we can, if we wish, escape from the humdrum details
and pick up the threads of some
of the things we thought we left.
person who in the middle
behind on graduating. There are
books, yet unopened, Miat could
add to our mental depth, in our
own and other fields. There are
theories of jurisprudence, of
history, of political thought that
we have never looked into, but
which are worth the effort we
will have to make. There is, in
fact,   an   inexahaustible   supply
of new ideas and experiences
that we have learned of, but
never thought seriously about.
All these things wait for the
of a crowded life, snatches
a few, too brief moments to become a scholar again. Wc leave
this place bent on serving the
mass yet forget that we can only
do so by serving ourselves at
individuals.
This, then, is the problem: the
problem we faced as undergraduates, surrbunded by too much
JAN1
. . . valedictorian
knowledge. And this is me problem that we face as graduates,
hemmed in by the absorbing
routines and pressures of making a living. Perhaps we can
overcome it by cultivating again
the habits of the scholar which
we learned here. I hope we can.
—Jane Banfield
(jtace £pencer Ifli/linerLf
Point Grey's Exclusive Milliners
4465 W. 10th Ave,
AL. 1251 GE«
 1—
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17, 1454
EVERY SUCCESS
.**
atsmdlstiL dtatudy. Salon*
FOR COURTESY AND SERVICE
4447 W. 10th Ave. ALma 0616
Come and Enjoy the famous old Heidelberg
STUDENT life in the film
"I Lost My Heart In Heidelberg"
Music - Romance - Humour
AT
ODEON  HASTINGS THEATRE
(20 W. Hastings)
On May 31st and June 1st
from 1 o'clock
ENGLISH SUBTITLES TWO DAYS ONLY
Congratulations
to the
Graduating Class
of 1954
Gordon & Belyea
LIMITED
101 Powell St.       PA. 4244
Vancouver, B.C.
Improvement Work
Already Underway
This summer, as in every summer, UfiC will undergo its
annual face lifting and program of improvements.
The most apparent change will
be made on the north bank,
facing Fort Camp, where UBC
maintenance crews will do extensive landscaping on the
hitherto bare ground. The work
is under the direction of the
Botanical Department, which
will install shrubbery in that
area.
WASHROOM
Fort Camp itself is due for
some long needed improvements.
A large men's washroom will be
installed at Fort this summer.
Two more huts are being brought
in to increase accommodation
there.
Acadia's kitchen facilities are
being largely renovated also.
Contractors are at present doing
work which, when completed,
will result in the kitchen having
one third greater capacity than
Your Hopes fulfilled
Years of Study behind you
and the Future stretches
Before You. Whatever path
you choose . . Medicine . . Law . .
Teaching . . Engineering . .
Far Off Places . . Homemaking
Eaton's Congratulates You . .
Wishes You Good Luck .
Much Joy and Happiness !
at  present, combined with increased efficiency of operation.
The dining room at Acadia is
also being enlarged considerably
by the addition of another room
onto the existing two. This enlargement will keep pace with
the increased kitchen facilities.
Approximately SO men are
engaged in pouring concrete
foundations for the huts at Acadia, replacing the cement blocks
which up until now served as
the only support for many huts.
11 square yards of facing
which peeled off the engineering
building last winter will also be
replaced.
ART WORK
Painters are now busy touching up the outer woodwork of
the Arts building, the Forestry
and Geology building, the Auditorium and Administration building. Window frames and door
jambs are being given a fresh
coat of cream paint before summer school opens.
In addition to these projects,
maintenance men are carrying
on their regular work on the
lawns and shrubbery of the university, helping to further UBC's
proud reputation as one of the
most beautiful universities in
Canada.
Grads See
World On
Studies
Eight scholarship winning
UBC students will continue their
studies at foreign universities
this fall.
Three of the scholarships are
World' University Service of
Canada exchange plans, four are
Athlone Fellowships, and one is
the Rhodes Scholarship.
The Rhodes scholar, Ivan
Feltham, president of the Student, Council for 1953-54, will
travel to Oxford for three year3
to study law.
The Athlone Fellowships, all
for two years, go to graduates
in Engineering who will travel
to England to further their
studies. Norman G. Davies, Engineering Physics; Gordon Oates,
Mechanical Engineering; Jim
McNish, Elecrical Engineering;
and Gordon Ward, also in Electrical Engineering, are the winners of this award.
Winners of this year's WUSC
exchange scholarships are:
Alfred H. Siemens, third year
Arts, who will leave for Europe
next September to study human
geography at the University of
Hamburg,
Michael G. Peers, third year
Arts, who will also leave Vancouver in September to study
German language at the University of Cologne.
Corinne Robertshaw, fourth
year Arts, who has already left
for India, where she will study
tnltemational relatione at the
University of New Delhi.
Lists   of   Canadian   exchange
scholarships     are     unavailable
pending announcement of under-
I graduate marks. MONDAY, MAY 17,1054
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGET
CAMPUS CHAFF
Allen Fetheringham
Newton J. McSlurp uneasily shifted from one foot to the
other, tried to brush the beer stain from the lapel of his blue
serge suit and glanced up the long line-up ahead of him to the
stage where Dr. MacKenzie was already handing out the
sheepskins.
"Just a few more minutes," thought Newt, "ten more
minutes and I'll be educated."
It was really amazing, when you think of it, that a student
of McSlurp's mental abilities had earned his degree in such
a short time. Newt thought back to 1946 when he had enrolled
as a freshman. And here it was only 1954 and he was receiving
his B.A. already. Wonderful how they can speed up education
these days, he thought, scuffing his shoes against the armouries'
beautiful dancing floor to give himself that required scruffy,
destitute look which any truly educated person should have.
McSlurp, his bloodshot eyes half dosed, thought back to
his years on the campus—the departure of the last of the vets,
the building of the gym, the promise of the bowling alleys, the
terrible Fort Camp food, the bodies in the library, the typographical errors in The Ubyssey, the Ostrom Plan, the terrible
Fort Camp food, the demise of tbe Jokers Club, the coming and
going of football coaches, the Les Armour-Council duels, the
terrible Fort Camp food. Bellingham invasions, Homecoming
parades, the fraternity discrimination fights, nights under the
table at the Georgia,, nights on top of the table at the Commodore, the gradual thickening or engineers' skulls, the terrible
Fort Camp food, St. Paul's nurses, St. Paul's night watchman,
the swimming pool, the effigy-burning, the dirty old Newman
Club and VCF, the terrible Fort Camp food . . .
*r *r *r
He thought of the things he had enjoyed while at the home
of the Thunderbird—Her Scienceman Lover, throwing engineers into the lily pond, six years of free-loading at rushing
functions, sitting in the library and looking, just looking, Ascent
of F6, Professor Soward's lectures, cheering at football games,
Varsity Review, reading Reginald Seaforth's letters-to-the-
editor, listening to Eleanor sing at pep meets, watching 'Birds
trounce Alberta Golden Bears, afternoons down on the beach,
Tom Franck's column, the first day back every September, the
last World Cup game in 1953, sitting in the bleachers one fall
afternoon after 'Birds had beaten Eastern Oregon and it was
getting dark and everyone was waiting for the Royal Couple
and when they got there everyone yelling "We Want Phil,"
Mack's cartoons in the Slipstick, the noon-hour talks, debates,
side-shows, the time he borrowed someone else's essay, changed
the "howevers" and "therefores" and got 27 more marks than
the original received, the day he went to the reserve room and
actually got the book he wanted, the way that little girl threw
herself into his arms when the ceiling fell in that day in Arts
100, about 4:00 during exam-time afternoons when you came
out of the stacks, squinty-eyed and ready to chuck it all, and
you walked out on the library steps and the sun was shining
and the girls were laying on the grass and suddenly it didn't
seem so bad after all, the Booze Cruise . . .
Op Op Op
Someone behind him poked him with an old cheating
paper and Newt shuffled forward in the line-up. Still reminiscing, he thought of the things he hadn't enjoyed ... the caf,
first year lawyers at AMS meetings, Brock Hall politicians,
May Success Be With You
Point (jn\i Ptcjuce
5790 University Blvd.
AL. 0342
0
MPf
For Graduation Photographs . . .
D'Arcy Galleries
Makers ol Fine Photographs
2\r,2 i'r.v.wW.c
ce. i;;u
1502 Marine Dr.
West Van
the library's revolving doors, the extreme heat or extreme cold
in the huts (the HUTS, for that matter), the couples holding
hands around campus, Brock Hall snack bar service, essays,
the anti-climax after you leave your last exam, getting asked
to leave the Leopold, girls with nylons and saddle shoes,
Ubyssey editorials, the morning after the Booze Cruise, the
sports section of the Totem, the professors who wanted details
parroted back to them on exams, the people who wear logging
boots in the stacks, COTC ? . .
Newt gazed down at the scars on his hands and fondly
chuckled as he remembered the scalding water in the library
jawn. He winced as he felt his ribs, still crushed and misshapen from those line-ups in the bookstore each September.
He winced again as he felt his wallet, still crushed and tender
from thoSe bookstore prices.
Just before he had entered the armouries, Newt had sadly
and tearfully thrown into the lily pond his last pair of earplugs.
He smiled as he remembered the name on the box . . . Thunderbird Earplugs—Built Exclusively for Fdrt Camp and Acadia
Students, Guaranteed to Work Even on Mardi Gras Nights.
Newt laughed aloud as he remembered how he had recruited 80 artsmen and commerce types to raid the Engineers'
Smoker that night at the White Rose; how his boys had started
the riot and how the engineers had got blamed the next day
in downtown papers' headlines usually reserved for the expose
of a call girl racket among city taxicabs. McSlurp's uncontrolled
mirth quickly subsided with the stares of his more serious-
minded grads.
By now he had reached the stage. As the names were called
out, Newt's mind slipped into neutral, where it usually rested,
he thought for an instant he might faint—names, objects, dates,
memories rushed through the tepid mass of sloggish grey matter
which kept Newt's ears apart . . . botanical gardens ... caf
coffee . . . whispering in the library . . . Philosophy 100 — do
I exist, if I do, why the hell do I exist . . . Shakespeare lectures
. . . the types on campus . . . players club . . . the recluses in
the huts behind the brock ... the tweed jacket and grey flannel
types in law . . . brock bridge players . . . pubsters . . . engineers
. . . the, pseudo-intellectuals . . . those buried in research . . .
the athletes ... the athlete-haters . . .
McKenzie . . . McMahon . . . McRhinegold . . . McSLURP
... as his name rung out through the armouries' rotted timbers,
flounced against the armed barricade of the COTC quarters,
saucily danced out the windows and actually tempted the employment office, resounded courageously over to the den of the
frats, rolled across the campus and thumbed its nose at the
engineering building, then returned to bow graciously in the
direction of the president's office, McSlurp stepped forward,
nonchalantly waved at the chancellor, confidently winked at
Dr. MacKenzie as the Passport to Society was pressed into his
hand and whipped through a quick Charleston step as he bounded
from the stage.
Then with the roar of the assembled guests at his back,
Newton J. McSlurp, B.A., flung open the armouries' door and
rushed out into the cold, cruel world.
CONGRATULATIONS QUADS
It has been our pleasure to serve many of the students during
the semester now closing. We extend our hearty thanks for
your patronage.
Riahant
PHOTOGRAPHER AND CAMERA SALES
4538 West Tenth Avenue
(Opposite Safeway)
ALma 2404
COMMODORE SCENE
Of FINAL FLING
Graduation Ball, 1954, is
Tuesday night at that final
resting place of so many UBC
students, the Commodore.
Dress is purely optional and
tickets for persons not members of the graduating clase
are $3, obtainable at the
Alumni office, Brock Hall.
Cabaret style. See you new
alums there.
WINNER
(Continued from Page V
chosen recipient of the Governor-General's medal came as a
complete surprise to "Robin,"
as he is farniliary called, largely
because he felt this that year's
work was not cf as high a standard as he had achieved last year.
Then he had managed to obtain
a 92 per cent average.
He had led his class in both
second and third years at UBC,
after being runner-up in his freshman standing. Resuirs oi this
success paid off, mainly ln tht
form of Vancouver Sun. scholar*
ships.
CARRIER BOY
His first one, for $250, was
given in 1950 on his graduation
from high school, followed by
two for $400 the next year and a
renewal of the same sum for hus
third year studies.
Last year he also won a $600
award for academic excellence,
making the total $2850, of which
$1450 was from, the Sun. Hf>
started his climb after being a
Vancouver Sun carrier boy in
Burnaby.
Not content to study mathematics and physics during school
time, Robin has also devoted
many of his free hours to the
same things. He was a member
of both the mathematics and
physics club* on campus, and
lectured to architecture students
on calculus.
MANY JOBS
He claims he worked harder
during his first two years than
he^id this year and last, but he's
probably being modest.
Supplementing his scholarships in the way of cash ha3
been accomplished through a
variety of summer jobs. Robin
has worked on James Island as
a laborer, for the CIL explosives
plant there, clerked in a ticket
booth for Pacific 3tage Lines,
end last summer ' operated a
mathematical computing machine at the Universiity of Toronto.
His mother, Mrs. C. T. MaCal-
lum, lives at 3191 Mathers, West
Vancouver. PAGE 8
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17, 1951
President's Message
The students who graduate
this year from the University
of British Columbia will share
in a number of circumstances
that are rather unusual and
will never happen again.
Among   our   distinguished
PRESIDENT MaeKCNZIE
guents whom we are honour-
•ing and who will address us
is His Excellency The Right
Honourable Vincent Massey,
P.C, C.H., Governor-General
or Canada. He has had an unusually distinguished career
in higher education, public
affairs and diplomacy, both in
this country and abroad. He
also has the unique distinction
of being the first Canadian to'
represent Her Majesty in Canada, in the office of Governor-General.
Dr. Brock Chisholm, C.B.E.,
M.C., who as Major-General
Chisholm was head of the
Medical Services of the Canadian Army during World War
II and later Deputy Minister
of Health and Welfare in our
Federal Government, also has
the distinction of being a
"Canadian First" in that he
was the first Director of the
World   Health   Organization
(W.H.O.) of the United Nations
Jor some seven yean. During
that period at Geneva and
throughout the world, he discharged duties of great importance to human beings
everywhere with efficiency
and satisfaction to the peoples
he served. He will be given
the degree of Doctor of
the degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, and will
the others who graduate with
them, something about the
role of the physician in the
modern world.
Mr. Joseph Smallwood is
one of the most colorful
figures in the political life of
Canada. He is first Premier
Canada's newest Province and
Britian's oldest Dominion,
Newfoundland. It is a matter
of very great regret that there
is no opportunity for him to
speak to the student body,
for he is one of the most in
teresting and entertaining
speakers in Canada. However,
I hope it may be possible to
persuade him to come back
again when the University is
in session to tell us something
about Newfoundland, and perhaps to bring with him some
of the folk tales and ballads
for which it is famous.
Dr. Ethlyn Trapp, Mr.
MaoCorkindale and Dr. Strong
are citizens of Vancouver. In
.their cases, it is a pleasure to
note that prophets can be accorded honour in their own
city. We are conscious and
proud of the contributions!
they have made in their chosen
fields of medicine and Education. We would like them to
know that we do appreciate
them, are grateful to them
and are most happy to include
them among those whom we
honour.
And finally, this year the
first students who have completed the requirements for the
degree of Doctor of Medicine
at this University will walk
across our platform and receive our degree. Because of
this, we have a special interest
in them, and we will follow
their careers as long as they
live, with the feeling that they
are unique and that this University, their Alma Mater,
looks to them with confidence
to set and maintain a high
standard of professional competence and public service.
To the other graduates, following in traditions already
established, we offer our congratulations and best wishes,
secure in the knowledge that
they will be a credit to us, and
will, as the opportunity offers,
make their contributions to
their comunities, to their
country and to the world.
Norman MacKenzie
Alumni Message
On   behalf   of   the   U.B.C.
Alumni Association I am
happy to offer you our congratulations upon your graduation and to wish you every
success in the future. That future now presents itself as a
challenge which I expect already seems to dwarf the success of graduation after four
or more years of university
life.
However, as you meet new
challenges in professional
careers or personal life you
will be thankful for the years
of training and association at
U.B.C; and most of you will
want to re-associate yourselves
with the life and problems of
your university.
I suggest to you that con
tinuing membership in the
Alumni Association provides
the easiest and most effective
way in which to keep in touch
with U.B.C. The Alumni
Chronicle will come four times
a year to your home—let us
have your changes of address!
—to tell you of new developments at U.B.C, of student and
graduate activities and of personal notes about your old
friends.
If you are interested, there
is no end of committee work
on such present problems as
athletics, residences and housing. Your contribution, if you
are able to make one, large
or small, will help to swell
the growing University Development  Fund  annual  appeal
which last year totalled $40,-
000.00.
The university is entering
into another period of rapid
expansion, and as U.B.C. is a
provincial institution it is of
great importance for the public throughout B.C. to understand thoroughly the problems
of the university, and to be
sympathetic to the spending
of money which the university receives from Victoria. Remember that to some extent
any alumnus who is in touch
with the public on business
related to the university contributes to the university's
public relations.
Remember, too, that U.B.C.
graduates already have an active role in the university af
fairs. As Members of Convocation you may participate in
the election of the 15 graduate
members of Senate. Three of
these members (today Mr.
John Buchanan, Mr. Kenneth
Caple and Judge A. E. Lord)
are elected to the Board of
Governors. Thus the tradition
of undergraduate participation
is continued in your graduate
years.
Active membership in the
U.B.C. Alumni Association is
for you an opportunity and a
new challenge.
Tuum Est!
Sincerely,
G. Db Darling n*
President, ^
U.B.C. Aiumni Ass'n
O. DUDLEY DARLING
AMS' Message
It is a pleasure to have this
opportunity to extend my
hear y congratulations to fel-
IVAN   FELTHAM
low members of the Class of
'54.
"Students" of the Class of
'54 would perhaps be a more
descriptive term. For, when
after a tap by the Chancellor's cap and the words "I
admit you" we become members of Convocation of the
University of British Columbia, it will be appropriate
for us to examine closely our
years of college life to ascertain what we have gained from
them.
Of course, not for many
year* can we hope to appreciate from the proper perspective the effect and benefit of a university education.
But let us hope that we have
become "students" of the
life around us, in the widest
sense of the word. Having
been merely made aware
through our academic courses
of the complexities of the
modern world, it behooves
us now to continue our study
as we take our places in business, industry and the professions.
Undoubtedly some one or
several persons of long experience will charge us with
grave responsibilities as "leaders of tomorrow" while most
of us in our own minds think
first of earning for ourselves
a comfortable living. Do not
understand me to suggest that
the latter consideration should
be relegated to a position of
incidental importance - - to so
suggest would be unrealistic.
At the same time, regarding
our responsibilities as "leaders of the future", it might
be well to direct our minds to
our responsibilities as citizens
who will ourselves be led in
one way or another for the
rest of our lives.
It seems to me that our
university education and the
smattering of knowledge
which it can give to us in four
or five short years should at
least have indicated to us the
responsibilities of intelligently appraising the course of
our day-to-day lives. The
position of leadership should
fall incidentally to those who
diligently apply themselves to
understand and aid in developing the society within which
that course winds its way.
Elsewhere   in   this   special
grad edition of the Ubyswey,
the varied facets of our college life will be called to
mind, for lampoon or serious
study. In this brief note, I
have attempted merely to convey a fragment of a thought,
as one student of the Class of
'54 to another.
It has been an honour and
a pleasure to serve you a* an
officer of the Alma Mater
Society during our final session as undergraduates at
U.B.C.
Congratulations and heartiest best wishes for a happy
and successful future.
IVAN  R.  FELTHAM,
(Arts '53: Law '54)
President (Session '53 - '54),
Alma   Mater  Society. _ONDAY,MAY17,1954
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE 9
AWARDS
(Continued from Page S)
Son of a UBC professor won
I the top arts award in the humanities and social sciences, the University Medal for Arts and Sci-
I ence. He is Ian McDonald Drummond, whose father—Prof. G. F.
| Drummond—teaches economics.
Ian, who is only 20, also won
| a $1200 Woodrow Wilson Foundation fellowship, and the S250
Alan Boag  Scholarship for the
j best essay   on some ■ aspect   of
socialism.
He says he will use the fellow-
I ship to attend the University of
I Toronto and work on his Master's
j degree. Then he will either obtain his doctorate or enter teaching or the civil service.
practice—probably as a general
practitioner.
"One object of the medical
school Is to provide a complete
class of good, general practitioners," he said.
Eugene Butkov, who brought
a brilliant mind to Canada from
troubled Trieste on the Adriatic
ranked first in the over-sized
enclneering class.
IAN DRUMMOND
. . . Arts
Right tvnv, hb is in the middle
of a road tour with thc UBC
Flayers Club. Ho is stage manager for this year's production
oi George Bernard Shaw's "Major Barbara". After convocation,
the club will hit the road again,
bound for the Interior.
Treasurer of the club for the
past two years, Ian says his acting has gone no further than the
occasion crowd scene. The technical end of stage-craft is his
forte, and he plans to continue
pursuing it at Toronto.
Also a member of the University Reserve Squadron, and winner of a Literary and Scientific
Execute activity award this
session, Ian says he didn't spend
too much time at his studies.
"I suppose 1 did well because
I only took the course I liked,"
he said (economics and foreign
languages).
Ian lives at 5789 College High
Road, near University Hill High
School, which he attended before enrolling at UBC, He's lived
in Vancouver since birth.
EUGENE   BUTKOV
. . . Engineering
A graduate in engineering
physics, Eugene will receive the
Association of professional Engineers Gold Medal. He lived at
Acadia Camp during the session.
Fo»ty-two-year-old John Bry-;
ett Watson won thc Law Society
Medal and prize for top marks
in his law class. He won the Newfoundland Rhodes Scholarship in
1931 when he graduated from
McGill University.
Since then: He spent World
War Two in the Canadian Army
Transport Command. He worked
two years in Germany in the
reparations sections of the control commission, plus another
three years in Brussels in the
same capacity.
He returned to Canada, where
employers told him they wanted
young men, — men who could
learn.
"So I decided I would learn
them," he cracked, "and myself
at the same time."
ROBERT BONES
. . . Agriculture
Hardworking Lillian Nina
Miller was one of the two girls
who placed tops in their class.
She won the British Columbia
Parent-Teacher Federation Prize
01 $100 for recording the highest
marks in Home Economics.
Other girl winner is tiny Shirley Margaret Engelland, who led
12 other graduates for the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing.
The 24-year-old President of
the Nursing Undergraduate
Society says she plans to work
in the public health field, either
tor Vancouver or the Provincial
Government. And four months
after Convocation, she will marry
UBC engineering graduate John j
Warren.
Tall, blond Ewart Arthur
Wetherill was awarded the Royal
Architectural Institute of Canada
Medal for graduating at the
head o- fhis Architecture class.
Kenneth Leonard Ward, 22, of
1231 East Tenth in North Vancouver, wttl have a wife who also
understands the nature of a pill
when he marries 21-year-old
Elaine Moore of 116 East Fifteenth in North Vancouver.
Ken, who won the Horner Gold
Medal for leading the graduating
class for the Bachelor of Science
in Pharmacy degree, has been
working for the same drug store
chain as his fiancee, who won
a $100 scholarship in pharmacy
in 1953.
cher Training degree next session.
RONALD LEVERSAGE
. . . Physical Education
Two prizes were won by Robert Selkirk  Wood,  wbo gradu
ated at the top of the class for
the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Forestry.
The Vancouver Island (Lady-
smith) forester won the H. R.
MacMillan $100 prize for his top
marks, and the Canadian Instl.
tute of Forestry Medal for the
best all-round record.
KENNETH WARD
. . . Pharmacy
Youngest married man among
this year's prize winners is Ronald George Leversage, 11, top
physical education graduate and
winner of the $50 prize of the
Canadian Association for Health.
Physical Education and Recreation.
Leversage was married last
September and his wife helped
him through his final year. More
help: he intends to take his Tea-
KOtJERT  WOOD
. . . Forestry
(Continuad on Page 10)
Saa AWARDS
DONALD   ANDERSON
. . . Medicine
Highest marks of UBC's first
graduating class in medicine
were recorded by Donald Oliver
Anderson, who is also valedictorian for the first day of the
Convocation  ceremonies.
The 23-year-old doctor has led
his class for the past four years.
Leading this year has won for
him the Hamber Gold Medal,
awarded for the first time.
After a year of interneship at
General Hospital, he will enter
JOHN  WATSON
. . . Law
Bryett is now articled with
Elmore Meredith, Q.C, and intends to remain in practice with
the firm.
High   man   in   the  Commerce
Faculty  is  Robert   Earl Blaine,1
who won the Kiwanis Club gold
medal and $50 prize.
One of the few out-of-town
students to win a top award
Blaine is from Cranbrook.
It's "back to the farm" this
summer for Robert Barry Sones
21, who was awarded the Wilfrid
Sadler Memorial Gold Medal as I
head of this year's Agriculture
class.
Sones has lived at 1765 Gordon in West Vancouver, but will i
return to his birthplace at Glen-
avon, Sask.,  for summer work
Then, he says, he will follow
in the footsteps of his father, a
teacher  in  Nanaimo.  He  hopes'
to specialize in agricultural sub-j
jects in a B.C. school.
SHIRLEY ENGELLAND
. . . Nursing
Shirley is from New Westminster, where she attended Duke
of Connaught High School.
High man in the Teacher
Training class Gerald Peter
Browne won't be at Convocation.
He is at Camp Shilo in Manitoba taking summer military
training under the Canadian Officers Training Corps.
Winner of the Dr. Maxwell A.
Cameron memorial medal and
prize, Gerald was raised since
childhood by his grandmother.
Mrs. Alice Hudson, who lives at
1312 Barclay.
The 23-year-old teacher won
his Master of Arts degree last
session, and his Bachelor of Arts
degree the session before with
first-class marks and a $250 B.C.
Electric scholarship in historical
studies, his specialty. He was
president of the Historical Society on the campus during the
session.
Compliments
to the
Grads of '54
TRIMBLE SERVICE GARAGE
4494 W. 10th Ave. ALma 1551
PHOTOGRAPHERS   —   ARTISTS
Manufacturers of "Scan-a-graver" Plastic
HALFTONE CUTS
193 E. Hastings Phone TA. 6929
VANCOUVER, B.C.
EWART WETHERILL
. . , Architecture
Every Success . . . Graduates of 1954
GENERAL EQUIPMENT
LIMITED
POWER PLANT HEATING AND
VENTILATING EQUIPMENT
CEILING AIR DIFFUSERS
12.10 Granville St.
PAcific 59.12 PAGE 10
■m   ..  ..ii
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
.   ' ul1  i. !i „ ..    .   ... •:•••••   ....
MONDAY, MAY 17, 1W4
AWARDS
The Special University Prise
for the head of the graduating
class in Social Work was won
by Stella Flader, who also won
the $282.50 Laura Holland Scholarship for outstanding achieve-
ment in her first year of the
course.
Winner of UBC's Rhodes Scholarship was announced is December. The coveted award went to
23year-old Ivan Reid Feltham,
who receives hU law degree at
Spring Convocation.
Ivan, who established a reputation for amazing competency
as this session's Alma Mater
Society President, will leave for
England in the fall.
IVAN FELTHAM
.. . Rhodes Scholar
Following is the complete list
of awards for graduate study
and awards for the final year
of undergraduate study:
Medols, Fottowffiipa, SchofertMpt and *riw*t
THE RHODES SCHOLARSHIP
IVAN REID FELTHAM
Awordt For Hoods of tho Sm4mtin§ Clow•
Ths Governor General's Gold Msdal (head of th* Graduating
Class for ihe B.A. dsgrss):
ROBERT CHARLES THOMPSON.
Tha Wilfrid Sadler Memorial Gold Modal (head of tha Graduating
Class for tha B.S.A. dsgrss):
ROBERT BARRIE SONES.
Tho Aus«.stts» cf Professional Enginesrs Gold Modal (hoad of
ths Graduating Class for tht B.A.So. dsgrss):
EUGENE BUTKOV.
Tha KWrani* Club Gold Modal and Priio, ISO (hoad of of th*
Graduating Class for th* B.Com. d*grs*)t
ROBERT EARL BLAINE
Thr Unlvtrs-ty Modal for Arts and Seioneo (hoad of th* Humanities snoVSoeial Selene* Groups in tho Graduating Class for th*
B.A. dsgrss):
IAN MACDONALD DRUMMOND.
Ths Law Society Gold M*dal and Prise, Call and Admission Fs*
(htad of th* Graduating Class for ths LL.B. dsgrss):
JOHN BRYETT WATSON.
Ths Hsmbsr Gold Msdal (hsad of ths Graduating Class for ths
M.D. dsgrss):
DONALD OLIVER ANDERSON.
Ths Hornsr Gold Msdal for Pharmacy (hsad of ths Graduating
Class for ths B.S.P. dsgrss):
KENNETH LEONARD WARD.
Ths British Columbia Parsnt-Tsachar Fsdsration Priss. $100 (hsad
of ths Graduating Class for ths B.H.E. dsgrss):
LILLIAN NINA MILLER.
Ths  Canadian Association for  Hsalth,  Physical Education,  and
Rscrsation Msdal and Prize. $50 (hsad of ths Graduating Class
for ths B.P.E. dsgrss):
RONALD GEORGE LEVERSAGE.
Ths University Nurses' Club Prise, $50 (hsad of ths Graduating
Class for ths B.S.N. dsgrss):
SHIRLEY MARGARET  ENGELLAND.
Ths Canadian Instituts of Forestry Msdal (bsst all-round rscord
in Forsstry or Forsst Enginssring):
ROBERT SELKIRK WOOD.
Ths H. R. MacMillan Priss in Forsstry, $100 (hsad of ths Graduating Class for ths B.S.F. degrss):
ROBERT SELKIRK WOOD.
Ths Dr. Maxwell A. Camsron Msmorial Msdal and Priss (lsading
student in ths Tsachsr Training Courss):
GERALD PETER BROWNE.
Spscial Univsrsity Priss, $25 (hsad of ths Graduating Class for
ths B.S.W. dsgrss):
STELLA FLADER.
Ths Royal Architectural Instituts of Canada Mstal (hsad of ths
Graduating Class for ths B.Arch. degrss):
EWART ARTHUR WETHERILL.
Awards For Graduates and For Graduate Study
Ths Alan Boak Scholarship, -250 (bsst essay on some aspect of
Socialism):
IAN MACDONALD DRUMMOND. j
Ths Anne Wesbrook Scholarship, -200:
AUDREY MARILYN ADAMS.
Ths Britannia Mining and Smelting Company Limited Scholarship, $250 (for graduate study in Mineralography, warded in December, 1953):
JOHN ADRIAN CLAUDE FORTESCUE.
Ths British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited Fellowship in Agriculture. $800:
HUGH ALEXANDER DAUBENY.
Ths British Columbia Elsctric Railway Company Limited Graduate Scholarship in Engineering, $500:
NORMAN WALTON.
The British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited Graduate
Scholarships:
AUDREY MARILYN ADAMS (Political Science), $100.
RUTH E. McCONNELL (English), $275.
MARJORIE ELSIE WORTHINGTON (Bacteriology), $175.
JOHANN  MARTIN STOYVA (Psychology), $200.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Company Limited Scholarships;
RONALD EDGAR DAVIES (Apriculture). $300.
DONALD GEORGE  FARIS (Agriculture), $200.
FRANCIS MOLLIS FAY (Zoology), $300.
S.  FRED FLORIAN (Agriculture), $300.
MARY LOU ESTHER JEFFREY (Biology and Botany), $300.
(Continued on Page 11)
See AWARDS
"■WP«fP
Sincere Best Wishes To
Graduating Class Of 1954
From Ths Following Professional And
Businsss Msn And Firms
(jotdtn Jamil
iHf. & trifA. ?. &mI4 (jHthom
(jeofje X Cunninfhom
7 £. bheon
C <j. fiarnejS
ieon J. tadntr Q.C.
#ojj & Kerr
(CUSTOM BROKERS)
V). Iflark be Ceto
Jack PattUon
Senator £. £. DtcKeen C.8X.
%
hen Cronue
C. £. H. Van tforman
Pacific Heat Co. M
Ttonleif & iHatheton
C. H. C. William* Co. ltd.
(jat-m See & fuel Co. ltd*
Canadian Cxploration iU.
S. C. k'titrict Telegraph Co. ltd.
John )H. Buchanan
Kenneth P. Caple
Hon. Arthur C. tci-4 IONDAY, MAY 17,1854
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE 11
Sincere Best Wishes To The
Graduating Class Of 1954
From Ths Following Profsssional And
-  Businsss Msn And Firms
Chancellor Shenoood iett
C U Hamber ChXtj. LLh.
U (j. iHurrtH
9rank H* Sroton CSC
H Q. iHclHillaH CSX.
Jrank IK. Hou
Cric boneyanl
Senator J. Ul. Jarrti
fliehol'A Chemical Co. ltd
(jeorye W. fforyan
H J. Sird and Company limited
(Investment Sscuritiss)
hai (jrauer
W. H. iHalkin
^ J. Klein
Jourex SakerieJ
John ti. Wlckson Jr.
Ulackenjie, White & faunJmulr ltd.
WeUonJ XaundererA
and fcrij Cleaner*
G. H HeetandA
Hon. JameA HL Coady
fcuncan Crux
AWARDS
(Ctattawd from Pas* 10)
RAYMOND EDWARD SALMON (Agriculture), $250.
SIEPKO ENDRIK LOK (Agriculture), $300.
SHERMAN PAUL TOUCHBURN (Agriculture), $300.
GORDON ALLAN WHITE (Biology and Botany), $250.
Th* British Columbia Tslsphons Company Scholarships in Engl-
nssring and Physics:
GEORGE LeROY B. NELMS (Electrical Engineering), $700,
ROY ANDREW NODWELL (Physics), $600.
EDWARD GRAHAM POOLE (Electrical Engineering), $600.
DONALD CHESLEY MILLEY (Physics), $300.
Th* California Standard Company Graduate Fellowship. $750:
HUGH ALEC JOHNSTON.
Th* Canadian Industries Limited Fsllowship, $$00:
ARTHUR HUBERT WEBSTER.
Th* Canadian Pulp and Paper Association (Wsstsrn Division) Fsl.
lowshlps. $$00 sach (Forestry):
WALTER BRUCE GLENN DENYER.
ROBERT SELKIRK WOOD.
The Cariboo Gold Quarts Mining Company Limitsd Scholarship.
$100:
No Award.   *
The Cominco Fsllowship, $1000:
DAVID ALAN GUTHRIE.
The Dr. F. J. Nicholson Scholarships, $500 each:
Chemistry—To be awarded later.
Geology—HUGH JOHN GREENWOOD.
The  Edith  Ashton  Memorial  Scholarship,  $250   (Biology  and
Botany):
FRANCES ELLA CAMERON.
Th* Gault Brothers Limited Graduate Scholarship in Commerce,
$700:
PETER ALFRED LUSZTIG.
The General Construction Company Limited Scholarship. $300
(Civil Engineering):
ALFRED GEORGE MERCER.
The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire Scott Memorial
Scholarship, $100 (proficiency in Biology 330):
COLIN FARMER, $50.
Second award to be made later, $50.
The Lsfsvrs Gold Msdal and Scholarship, $150 (gsnsral proflcisncy
in Chsmistry or Chsmlcal Enginssring):
WILLIAM DAVID SAMUEL BOWERING.
Ths Lson Kosrnsr Graduats Scholarships, $250 sach (Biology and
Botany):
THOMAS CHRISTOPHER BRAYSHAW.
ROBERT TOWNLEY OGILVIE.
Ths Morris Bslkln Priss, $100 (bsst sssay on subjsct in ths fisld
of Frsudian Psychology):
HERMAN JULIUS HEILBRON.
Ths MacMillan Company of Canada Prjtss in Crsativs Writing,
$50 sach:
Original poems—WILLIAM WAYNE DUMARESQ.
Original short story—To be awarded later.
The Native Daughters of British Columbia Scholarship, $100 (work
in early B.C. History. Provincial Archives):
ROBERT EDGAR CAIL.
The Pacific Pine Co. Ltd. Scholarship in Forestry. $300:
To be awarded later.
Th* Powell Riv*r Company Limited Scholarship, $700  (Wood
Chemistry):
DALE WELTON READ.
The M. H. Ruttlsdgs Msmorlal Scholarship, $100 (for rsssarch In
Poultry Husbandry):
RAYMOND EDWARD SALMON.
The Shell Oil Fsllowship tor Research. $900 and tuition fses:
WALTER HAYDUK.
The Standard OU Company of British Columbia Fsllowship. $950:
ETTIGI SIVAPPA JAYADEVAPPA.
Unlvsrsity Gtaduats Scholarship, $200:
VLADIMIR PAPEZIK.
Vancouver B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Scholarships. $125 sachi
DONALD GEORGE FARIS (Agriculture).
MARJORIE ELSIE WORTHINGTON (Arts and Science).
HOME ECONOMICS
The Lower Mainland Dietetic Association Scholarship in Home
Economies. $100 (for dietetic interneship):
JOAN PHYLLIS DIANA GRANT.
SOCIAL WORK
Ths   British   Columbia   Elsctric   Railway   Company   Graduats
Scholarship. $250:
ANDREW MacCULLIE.
The Junior Lsagus of Vancouvsr Scholarships. $500 sach:
1. MICHAEL WHEELER. j
2. Award to be made later. i
Ths Laura Holland Scholarship. $262.50 (for outstanding achisv*
ment in the first ysar of ths courss):
STELLA FLADER by reversion to MICHAEL WHEELER.
TEACHER TRAINING
Ths Entomological Soeisty of British Columbis Book Priss (proficiency in Entomology):
LIONEL EARL WADE.
Special Awards For Postgraduate Study
Ths Abbott Lsborstoriss Fsllowship in Anassthssiology. $1000:
JOSEPH MITCHELL HIDDLESTON.
Ths Burroughs Wslleoms Fsllowship in Anassthssiology and Ap-
plisd Pharmacology, S1000: '
JOSEPH MITCHELL HIDDLESTON.
Univsrsity*Fsllowships Fund. $1500 sach:
GORDON A. GROVES.
ORENE J. ROSS.
Awords For Tho Final Undergraduate Years
GENERAL
Ths Franess Willard Prisss (sssay study in ths fisld of tsmpsrancs):
First Prize. $50—GEORGE EDWARD LONGSTAFF.
Second Prize, $25r—To be announced later.
(Continusd on Pegs 12)
Sss AWARDS
__, PAGE 12
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
AWARDS
(Continued front Pago 11)
Playsrs' Club Alumni Scholarship, $50 (for tho Summer School of
the Theatre):
ROBERT STEPHEN WOODWARD.
The United Nations Prise, $50 (glv*n by the late Dr. Annie Bruce
Jamleson for the most outstanding contribution in the furtherance
of the alms and objects of the United Nations)!
CHARLOTTE JANE BANFIELD.
AGRICULTURE      -
Th* MacMIUan and Bloedel Prise in Agriculture, $100 (best report
on an assignsd study involving ths uss of Douglas fir plywood):
EWING WILLIAM RAE.
ARCHITECTURE
Ths Archilsctural Instituts of British Columbia Priss, approx. $$$
(books) (for architectural design):
EWART ARTHUR WETHERILL.
B..C. Coast Woods Prise in Architecture, $100 (for special design
project Involving use of wood):
. R. WELDON HALEY.
The Powell River Company Prise, books, $50 (for excellence in
Planning):
DEREK NEIL WEISMILLER.
ARTS AND SCIENCE
The Armstead Prise ln Biology and Botany, $50 (scholastic achievement):
JOB KUIJT.
The David Bolocan Memorial Prise, $25 (outstanding student in
Dspartmsnt of Philosophy and Psychology):
MARGARET KNOX McILWRAITH.
Tho Llswsllyn Jonss Priss in Zoology, $50 (outstanding achiavs-
ment ln Zoology, field of Entomology):      <!
CHARLES RONALD HARRIS.
Prise of the Minister of Switisrland, books (proficisney in French
Language and Literature):
PETER REGINALD COLLINS.'
SYLVIA MARIA OPECHOWTSKI.  ,
Slavonic Studies Graduation'jPriiss, $50 *aoh (donatsd by Waltsr
C. Kosrnsr, Esq., In honour of Dr. William J. Ross, and awardsd
for high standing in Slavonic Siudisk):
BOLESLAW BORESYZA.
SYLVIA MARIA OPECHOWSKI.
Spscial University Priss for Proficisney in Economics, $50:
RONALD ALEXANDER SHEARER.
The United Empire Loyalists Association Medal and Prise, $35
(best essay, dealing with history of United Empire Loyalists):
VACLAV MUDROCK.
University Essay Prize, books, $25 (best essay in Department of
English):
RUTH E. McCONNELL.
COMMERCE j
The CKNW Scholarship in Television, $500 {for the summer course
at Northwestern University):
RONALD THOMAS tfOBINSON.
ENGINEERING
The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (U.B.C. Branch)
Prise. $25 (best design in.the course M.E. 463):
GORDON STANLEY BOYLE.
Canadian Forest Products Ltd. Prises, $100 eaoh (general proficiency in the final two years of Forest Engineering):
1. JAMES THOMAS TREBETT.
2. No award.
Engineering Institute of Canada (Vancouver Branch) Walter Mo-
berly Memorial Prise, $25 (best engineering report):
DONALD ALLEN SHAW.
The H. R. MacMillan Prise in Forest Engineering, $100 (highest
standing in the course for the B.A.&C. degree in Forest Engineering):
JAMES THpMAS TREBETT.
The Ingledow Priss. $50 (gensral proficisney in snglnssrlng):
GORDON CEDRIC OATES.
Ths Northsrn Elsctric Company Limitsd Priss. $100 (outstanding
rscord in ths final two ysars of Electrical Enginssring):
KARL HEINZ ENGLEHARDT.
Ths Road Buildsrs and Hsavy Construction Association Graduation Priss, $50 (highsst standing in ths courss CE. 470 on Highway Enginssring):
RONALD ARNISON.
Ths Timber Preservers Limited Prises (best plans and specifications of a structure of treated timber):
PHILIP T. COOK, First Prize, $65.
THOMAS COVELLO, Second Prize, §45.
JEFFREY STEWART CRAIG, Third Prize, $25.
RONALD ARNISON, Merit Award, $15.
PAUL JOHN HOENMANS, Merit Award. 515.
DONALD ALLEN SHAW, Merit Award, $15.
j LAW
The Canada Law) Book Company Prize (high standing in the subject of Conflict of Laws):
NORMAN BELL CHRISTIE.
The Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation Priss, $50 (highsst
standing in ths courss,qn Mortgagss):
JOHN BRYETT WATSON.
The Carswell Company Limited Prize, books (highest standing in
Third Year):
JOHN BRYETT WATSON.
The Norgan Essay Prize, $50 each (bsst lsgal rsports):
GOWAN THOMAS GUEST.
ALLAN WINSTANLEY BILSLAND.
The Toronto General Trusts Corporation Prize. S30 (highest standing in the subject of Trusts):
NORMA BELL CHRISTIE. *
MEDICINE
The Dean's Medal (outstanding record and progress throughout
the four years of the course):
VICTOR ALLON McPHERSON.
The Dr. Frank Porter Pattsrson Memorial Scholarship, $150 (merit
and interest in orthopaedic surgery):
RALPH MARENUS CHRISTENSEN.
(Continued on Page 13)
I Sss AWARDS
CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE
GRADUATES OF '54
Trimbleten
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ALma 0444
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IXL
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for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential Insurance needs:
ANGUS SMITH
JOHN TENER
LARRY WRIGHT
DICK WRIGHT
JACK PEARSON
J. R. BRANDON
PAcific 5321
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
LIFE OF CANADA
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
extends
Two Hands
to
the
1954 GRADUATES OF U.B.C.
one in
CONGRATULATION
on the attainment of one
of the most important
steps in life, the completion of a formal education
designed to equip you for
the important role you are
to play in this complex
and fascinating drama of
modern civilization.
the other in
WELCOME
to the world of opportunity
which awaits you in your own
Province of British Columbia,
where a highly-organized and
energetically progressive machinery of industrial and professional services to civilization
has a constant need and a real
reward for the talents and abilities which you possess. Industry
the Professions, the Services of
the fastest-growing Province in
Canada offer the graduating
student innumerable opportunities to fulfill the career destiny
for which his or her University
training has been the preparation.
DEPARTMENT ot TRADE and INDUSTRY
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
E. G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister
HON. RALPH CHETWYND,
Minister MONDAY, MAY 1?; 1954
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE 13
AWARDS
(Coniinusd from Psgs la)
Ths Dr. Waltsr ■t*wart Stfri Msmorisl Priss, ISO (bsst graduation
dissertation)!
To be awarded later.
Tli* Mentor Pflss. 1100. and Ooid Medal (highsst aggrsgats stand*
ing la th* four-yasr courss in th* subjsct of Msdielns):
ALBERT REGINALD COX.
NURSING
Ths Provincial Department of Health and Welfare (Health Branch)
Priss. 1100:
THORUN HELGA ARNGRIMSON.
Vancouver Registered Nursss' Award. 1250 (for post-graduate
training)!
SHIRLEY JANE MATTHEWS.
PHARMACY
Th* Cunningham Priss ln Pharmacy. $50 (outstanding rscord In
all years of tho sourish
PAUL PETER ANTOSZ.
Th* Dsan E. L. Woods Msmorlal Priss, 150. donatsd by the Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of British Columbia (outstanding record in th* practical and theoretical parts of ths
pharmaceutical subjects during th* course)!
ANNE TOMLJENOVICH.
The Malllnckrodt Chemical Works Limited Prise. 125 (highest
standing in Pharmaceutical Chemistry), divided equally between:
PAUL PETER ANTOSZ.
Chemistry)!
PAUL PETER ANTOSZ.
KENNETH LEONARD WARD.
Pharmacy Alumni Book Prise (best all-round potential pharmacist)!
T. G. OWEN NELMES.
AWARDS ANNOUNCED BY OTHER
INSTITUTIONS
Th* Athlon* Fellowships (awarded by th* United Kingdom Oov-
srnmsnt to snginssring gradustss for post-graduate training in
ths United Kingdom), transportation, fees, and maintenance!
NORMAN GEORGE DAVIES.
GORDON CEDRIC OATES.
JAMES ALEXANDER McNISH.
GORDON VICTOR WARD.
Fellowships. 11400 each!
RONALD ERNEST BEDFORD, Physics.
HARVEY ALLEN BUCKMASTER, Physics.
JOSEPH ANDRE PAQUETTE, Physics.
ALLAN ROBB PATERSON, Biochemistry.
Studentships. S110Q each:
THOMAS KENNEDY ALEXANDER, Physics.
GEORGE flRIERLEY CHADWICK, Physics.
CHARLOTTE FROESE, Mathematics.
DONALD GRANT IRVINE, Zoology.
GARTH JONES, Physics.
GEORGE CROYDON NEILSON, Physics.
ERNEST PETERS, Metallurgical Engineering.
ANNE COCHRANE ROBERTSON, Pharmacology.
ERIC PATERSON SWAN, Chemistry.
HAROLD H. K. WESEMEYER, Physics.
Bursaries. $800 each*
CHARLES B. M. BAILEY, Animal Husbandry.
LAWRENCE GERALD BELL, Metallurgical Engineering.   ,
WILLIAM DAVID S. BAWER1NG, Chemistry.
EUGENE BUTKOV, Mathematics.
JOSEPH S. FIORENTINO, Metallurgical Engineering.
BEVERLEY JOAN FULTON, Chemistry.
RUDOLPH R. HAERING, Physics.
MICHAEL ROSS HANNA, Agronomy.
YVONNE HENRION, Mathematics.
B. PERCY HILDEBRAND, Electrical Engineering.
MARY LENNOX, Zoology.
GARFIELD W. McMAHON, Physics.
HERBERT S. PEPIN, Biology.
STANLEY JAMES W. PRICE, Chemistry. j;       !;
ROBERT EDWARD PUGH, Physics. »   '•'''      '
HOWARD NORTON RUNDLE, Physics.
JAMES WILMER SMITH, Chemical Engineering.
ROBERT CHARLES THOMPSON, Mathematics.
CAROLE ANN WALLICK, Chemistry.
ROBERT SELKIRK WOOD, Forestry.
Woodrow Wilson Foundation Fellowships. $1200 and tuition fees:
PETER REGINALD COLLINS, French.
IAN MACDONALD DRUMMOND, Economics.
World University Ssrvlcs (University of British Columbia Branch)
Exchange Scholarship (to India):
CORINNE FLETT ROBERTSHAW.
MISCELLANEOUS
Wall Strsst Journal Priss (achisvsmsnt in ths courss on Sscurity
Analysis and Investment!):
CECIL ALEC MacKENZIE.
Congratulations
to tht
GRADUATING
CLASS
Whether for Home or
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4469 \V. 10th Ave.
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to   the   1954   graduates   of
the    University   of   British   Columbia.    The    Hudson's    Bay
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success    for    the    future.
(NCORPORXTED   Mff MAY 1670. I'AGE 14
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17, 1954
CLASS WILL
To Those That Remain
We, the Graduating Class of
1954, of the University of British
Columbia, in the city of Vancou-
\fr, do solemnly swear and
hereby declare that this is our
last free will and revokes all
other mental abberations here-to-
four years back expressed and is
to be compleley executed and
administered by the duly appointed undergraduates of our
University.
We leave . . .
1. To Eric Nicol. 290 dollars
— for a capital effort.
2. To Ivan Feltham, one of
the Rhodes that lead to
Oxford.
3. To Earle Birney, some hair-
restorer.
4. To the Engineers, a special-
BEST WISHES
TO THE CLASS OF '54
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICING
WE CATER TO UBC STUDENTS
Roy Hand, Proprietor
2180 Allison Rood AL. 0524
(Just off University Boulevard)
COLLINS
and
COLLINS
Chartered Accountants
470 Granville  St.
MArine 0564
Best Wishes To The U.B.C.
1'i'om
J. R. WILLIAMS & SON
Assaying and Ore Testing
METALLURGICAL WORK EXCLUSIVELY
580 Nelson St.
MArine 5821
ly super-strong structural-
steel playground, separate
from the rest of the campus
behind a hydrogen-bombproof wall ...
and to all Non-Applied
Science Faculties, the Federal grant that Duplessis
wouldn't accept to be placed in a fund to be known
as "The United Faculties
Fund for the Relief and
Rehabilitation of those suffering from destructive
engineering."
5. To "Baru", A course at
"Tammany Hall" and a
political campaign in Van*
couver Centre.
6. To the British Empire
Games, their swimming
pool for a week with reversion to U.B.C. in perpetuity.
7. To the City, the problem of j
connecting Granville Street j
with its bridge. j
8. To the six terrible "macs"!
— to Senator McCarthy, a
sludge pump,  a  bottle  of,
"Dralno", and Private Shine \
on a sanitary fatigue.        -4
— to Colonel McCormick,
' an  urn-full  of  ashes  of  a
burnt effigy. j
to Senator McCarran, Igor!
Gouzenko's telephone num-j
ber.
to General MacArthur, the
Mikadoship of Japan. |
to Archie McGugan, the
LPP Club and Tim-Buck-
Too.
to President MacKenzie —
gratitude — and the story
of the Scotsman who;
thought the "meek" (who
were to inherit the earth)
was just the Biblical plural,
for Mac. I
9. To the housing authorities,!
the    increased    enrollment
problem,    and    a   box    of
matches  to solve  the Fort
Camp problem.
10. To Dean Andrew, a tattered United Nations Flag.       i
11. To the AMS. more recriminations if they continue to discriminate against
discrimination.
Class
Poem
JOHN G. MEYERS
IT HAS finally come ...
That dimly dreamed-of day
when all the hopes and fears of struggling youth disintegrate
in an ache of anticipation.
But in their place once more a gangling dream appears
and we stand awestruck on the brink of something!
It seems a few short weeks ago
when first we waited with a thousand other pounding hearts
for that simple slip — which proved to be
the rigid mentor of our lives.
We come so innocent, confident, yet immature
but alive to learn the why's and what's and who's.
It's a pity that we so sure
are disillusioned. For as we learn we lose
and as we lose we find the enormity of our ignorance.
Once more we stand falsely confident
at the anti-climax of our struggles.
Like the fickle freshman wallowing in the mud
of some dark lilypond we are still sure
and yet we cannot help but question the integrity of the future.
The academic screen that sifts the kernel from the husk
has left the questioning ones —
for this is education.
They have caught some glow from that great light
which is the gift of those
whose patience guides and molds
us.   We strive so hard for that precarious peak
which is the hallowed home of professors' wizardry.
and fall short in semi-mellowed maturity.
We are dreamers self-destined to become great.
Let us not forget that this is but the dawn
of greater understanding.
—John G. Myers
To those that remain and
those that follow after, our belief that,
When    the    Great    Professor
comes to write against our name
He'll  write   not,   "passed"  or
"failed",
. . . But how we played the
game.
-Peter Lowes MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE 15
HISTORY
The Fish's Viewpoint
Perhaps the main principle of; manner in which Mr. Benchley noted that this year the Mardi
education is not that of exer- j approached   his   problem,   and Gras chorus line girls even went >
cising and improving one's mem* notes the progress of the class
ory — and as a result of this, from the viewpoint of the poor
practice, to develop the ability
to parrot the professor or the
text — but rather that of teach-
fish . . . er, the students.
Mr. Gibbon once said "History
is indeed little more  than the
ing one to think, and in so doing i register of crimes, follies and
to develop one's ability to apply j misfortunes of mankind." One
knowledge and theory to prac-j might assume that Gibbon was
tical problems with a fresh and an engineer; particularly in view
original outlook. j of the "crimes, follies and mis*
An outstanding example is
that of the late Robert Benchley
when he himself was in a university and was taking economics, among other courses.
When confronted with the examination paper at the end of
so far as to consider proposals1
from supper club managers.
seemed to take place in a re
action — partly chemical —
when Bluecoats were added to
a mixture of Redshirts in a
White Rose Ballroom.
Then there was the (art) pres*
the term, he was as shocked as j entation made by one section of
the other students upon reading the Commerce graduating class
"The Impartiality of history
Is not that of the mirror, which
merely reflects objects, but of
the judge, who sees, listens
and decides."
Thus it must be recorded that
Chief Justice John Fraser of the
fortunes    of   mankind"    which Frosh  Regaila  Violation  Court
Every Success to the
Graduates of 1954
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the first question which stated:
"Outline the economic significance of the fishing industry
to the United States and to
Greet Britain in tha nineteenth century."
Mr.    Benchley    thoughtfully
turned this problem over in his
mind and like moat pf us, found! beauty   ot   ^*ese   masterpieces
that he knew nothing about the and the contrast they made to
was extremely Impartial. Of the
twenty-three offenders appearing
before him, only twenty-three
were convicted. Likewise, complete impartiality was displayed
by Fort Camp residents at the
burning of lovable ol' Col. McCormick. They said either an
Eddy safety match or a Ronson
lighter would have ben satisfactory.
Other historical sidelights to
fishing industry.    However, he
exercised his freshness and ori-
to a well-known and respected
gentleman Professor and Director of the School of Commerce.
Impressed by a gift of several
large    landscape   paintings    of
British Columbia scenery, the^ ^corded in our tome are
Director lectured at length upon I J*10** «PP«"-in* in the following
the   simple,   quiet,   wholesome Incidents:
Ken Perry to Roy Trimble: "If
the BEG pool were filled with
beer1, I would drown at my
next debate."
the complexity of modern art
In conclusion, he stated that any
ginality  of outlook,  and   intro- other such donations would find | A reply to j0hann Stoyva's edi-
dueed his answer to the above,1® Measured place on the some-      torial  regarding  women   and
question by writing: j what bare Commerce walls. education:     "Man  may  form
"Knowing   nothing   of   the  I    The    Commerce     graduating j     and  educate   the   world,  but
significance  of  tho economic   j class being quick, receptive and |     woman educates man."
aspect of the fishing industry  i eager to pass, took this request Overheard   while   leaving   the
to   the   United   States   or   to  i to heart. They appointed Geoff!     McGoun Cup debates:  "Well,
Great Britain in the nineteenth    Dewis to satisfy the professor's;     Kinsey or can't she?"
century,   I  shall  endeavor  to    hunger for more aesthetic beauty, Two co'ds at rugt:)y garnc: "My
discuss the significance  from   'in  the  Commerce  huts.  Taking)     govn      the     All-Blacks     are
the viewpoint of the fish." great pains, he produced a uni-1     white."
This he proceeded  to do — que   hand-painting.     Simplicity; Custer's    Last   Stand:    Lawyer
and, incidentally, he passed.        i was the word for this "human-j     R0iancj Bouman's proxy vote
This  history  of  the  class  of scape" — a black bow tie and|     for nis whole class in an at-
1954   is  recorded  in   the  same   the two white tabs of a wingj    templ to raise funds for the
/collar. Apparently, a renaissance!     publication of "Legal Notes."
. has commenced at the School of | Grand   Opening:     A   fraternity
Commerce; indeed, it has beenj     tnat   will    ,lccept   even   Joe
said: j     McCarthy.
"History is a great painter ... An Academy Award nomination:
it exhibits man in his pride."      To Dr. MacKenzie — a truly
Ask any coed-in Arts or Home!     convincing  freshman.
Economics what, in her opinion,'And let us not forget the Stu-
is history, and  she  may quote dent's Council:
Rivarol: |    "This was decreed by superior
"History is only time furnished powers
with  dates  then  rich  with      In a moment of wisdom side-
events." real.
Now the arrangements in this;     That  those  who  dwell  upon
EVERY SUCCESS
IN YOUR FUTURE ENDEAVORS
MAYOR
f. J. HUME
Ann Bisset
quotation may be questioned
According to the Slavonic
Circle, it seems that events such
as Homecoming contribute a
great deal toward the making of
dates.     Moreover,   it   must   be
Ivory   Towers
Shall have heads of the same
material."
—Ann Bissett
WARMEST
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Graduating Class
OF 1954
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To ba rehashed
619X PAGE 16
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
PROPHECY
We Board the Bus
• • •
Come along with me as I
conduct you on a sightseeing
tour of the University Campus,
1974.
We board the bus here at the
Blanca Cut-off, right next to the
twenty-five siory building that
houses Dgan's Million Dollar
Restaurant.
As we pass through the gates
of the University, you will notice
the building on the left. That
building hduses an American
Junior Senator and his two assistants, Jim McNish and Archie
McGugan, who are checking the
political affiliations of everyone
that enters the campus.
The Golf Course beside us,
looks just the same. It's Ladies'
Day and you can see some very
important people playing there
today.In the first foursome is
Ann Bissett, President of the
Canadian Women's Anti-discrimination League; Irma Deer-
lng, President of Radio-Television Station, 1-R-M-A, British
Columbia; Audrey Butler Head
of College Shop Enterprises; and
Marilyn Russell, Director of the
Female Physical Culture and
Charm School. The three ladies
about to tee off are Irene Mc-
Callum, publisher of Home Economics Press; Marg. Stewart,
Head Nurse at the General Hospital; and Jane Banfield, Canada's only woman representative
at the United Nations.
Attached to the Gym there to
the right, is the new swimming
pool, still an open-air pool. And
GEOFF DEWI8
you can see Ex-watery Monster
Peter Lusztig, teaching Industrial tycoon Bill Stuart and Financier Jimmy Clarke how to
swim the full length of the pool
without sinking under the
weight of their money.
As we pass the Brock you can
fee a very large addition to the
building. That is the new Publications Office, built of marble
and gold leaf, and paid for by
return deposits on glassware
that has been accumulated there
for many years. This addition
was opened last year by Allan
Fotheringham, President of Fotheringham Press.
Standing outside the building,
you can observe Bill St. John,
now head of the Canadian Blood
Drive Public Relations Department, talking to Al Goldsmith,
who will definitely be graduating this year. Also ln the group
Is Rhodes Scholar Ivan Feltham,
who now runs his own transportation business — he got the idea
when someone told him "hit the
road, scholar."
Along the Mall here you fee
the Old Commerce Huts. From
the Fairview Shacks to the Commerce Shacks represents fifty
years of progress.
This other row of shacks to the
right is Fort Camp. They will
be replaced this year by the
Government,, which is now led
by^ that notable politician Bafu
Nylander, who was swept into
office by his supporters — "The
Little Baru Crowd that Lied."
You can see an armoured oar
outside the Caf. It is delivering
a pound of coffee — this is the
second pound they have used
since 1926.
This building to the right is
the Armouries, and looks much
the same as, it always did. You
can see 800 chairs set out inside.
There is a General Meeting in
progress, and those twenty-three
people that you see in there are
lawyers, led by John Fraser,
4111 arguing the point as to
Whether or not the Newman
Club is a discriminatory organization — they started in 1954
and are still talking.
Over on the right you can
see the new, two-million dollar
Bat Mskn
•
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Administration building. This
was built by Mr. Bagshaw, and
his hired Boy-in-Blue; and was
paid for by one million students
fined for parking in the Faculty
Parking Lot.
There, to the left, is the Library. It has been finished and
now has both wings complete.
In the new wing is housed the
Vaughan Lyon Letter-writing
and Arguing Room, where students may gather to argue about
discrimination and NFCUS. You
will notice that the door to the
room is a foot ond a half wide
and twelve feet high.
The Library had new doors
installed in 1994, a present of the
1994 Graduating Class. They
are swinging doors and were
particularly suited to that year's
class. They felt at home in any
building that had swinging doors.
The building here to the right
with the bars on the windows ls,
of course, the Engineering building. In the group of gentlemen
outride are Bob Benson, the
singing Chemical Engineer; Doug
Third, well-known Electrical
Engineer; and Phil Cook, the
famous roadbuilder who built
the crose-town speedway to the
University, and opened lt with
his well-quoted words, "Go,
man, Go!" Another prominent
engineer is Dave Dufton. He
was responsible for the New
Marpole Bridge that fell down
last year. Remember, don't cross
your bridges' until you'come to
them, and in the case of a Dufton
Bridge, not even then.
Now, I've knocked everything
but the Mardi Gras Chorus girls'
knees, and Mother Nature beat
me to that, I must bring this trip
to a close.
But before we leave the University Ground at the end of our
tour, over there is the most important man on the campus. He's
reading the weather prediction
for snow. It is President Norman
A. MacKenzie, and he's waxing
his skiis!
—Geoff Dewis
a
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TAtlow 4281 MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE 17
Proved to be Colorful Experience
Activities Provided
Excitement Humour
Four or more years at UBC.
Away from the classroom, what
did you do? What happened?
More than kidnapping. The
past years have been a high-
powered sequence of hoaxes,
backroom politicking, parades,
bitter fueds, athletic squabbles,
starry-eyed dreaming, Ubyssey
pomposity, hectic noon meetings, blunders, fun.
An LSE President produced
an undercover, one-page flyer
denouncing what his group considered a sell-out to athletics. A
Ubyssey editor-in-chief humbled
Student Council. Another new
building was opened. A queen
visited UBC.
And UBC professors made
shrewd international predictions
and comments, co-eds sweated
out gruelling chorus-line practices, bewildered football players were loved, then scorned,
and Student Council bp^ghtfc
blazers.
Read the news stories which
tell the talc of student activity
for tho past four years:
SEPTEMBER 29. 1950—AMS
President Nonie Donaldson said
she was "absolutely floored'
when told she would assume the
leadership of student councjl following the resignation of John
Haar, who accepted a fellowship
in Texas.
Formerly AMS vice-president
and president of the Women's
Undergraduate   Society,   Miss
Donaldson's temporary position
as AMS president was ratified
with an AMS general meeting's
vote of confidence.
OCTOBER 3, 19S0 — Sports
editor Ray Frost took over the
editorship of The Ubyssey when
former editor-in-chief Vic Hay
v/as forced to quit school.
Balding, funnyman Hay, who
was well-known as a columnist,
was unable to continue his graduate studies when he learned that
the DVA refused to finance him.
OCTOBER, 5, 1950 — Professor Geoffrey Andrew told the
United Nations Club that UN
forces in Korea should cross the
48th parallel unless the North
Koreans asked for a settlement
in terms of their own defeat.
"Organized peace is impossible without organized force,"
fte said,    i
Confidence
-OCTOBER 14, 1950 — Confidence  in  football   coaches   and
UBC's  ability  to participate  in!
inter-collegiate football was dem-j
on.strated    by    1500    chanting, j
shouting students  in  a  surprise (
finale to one of the worst defeats
the Thunderbirds ever suffered
on the football field.
As soon as the Thunderbirds'
Western Washington football j
game was faver, with UBC on
the short end of a 47-7 score,
fans rushed from the bleacher
seats and carried every available
player from the field on   their
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shoulders. Then they ranged
themselves before the grandstand and chanted "We want
Osborne."
The director of UBC's physical
education department took the
mike at the public address booth
and told students: "The main
responsibility is not with Dr.
MacKenzie, the deans, or the
faculty, but with the enthusiasm
of students themselves."
At this point students took up
another chant: "We want scholarships."
Charles Marshall, public relations officer for student council,
grabbed the mike and shouted:
"You want scholarships—we'll
help you get them." He said student Council was firmly behind
student opinion.
The third chant shouted by
students was: "We want Burke."
When the Thunderbird coach
took the mike he tore out a
headline from a downtown paper
which read:- "UBC Faces End of
College Football".
"I guess you've all seen this
headline," he said. "If you fellows keep this spirit up, this is
what will happen"—and he tore
the newspaper page in half.
Ostrom  Plan
OCTOBER 17. 1950 — Student Council asked MAD chairman Brock Ostrom to prepare a ''■
brief which will aid distressed
athletics at UBC "as soon as it
is humanly possible".
As graduate manager of atlv
letics Ole Baaken termed the
football situation at UBC "critical", Ostrom's plan was hailed
a.s the beginning of a new era in
UBC sports.
The Ubyssey appeared with a
front-page, black-bordered obituary which, "with very little regret," reported the death of "Athletic Lethargy."
Said PRO Charlie Marshall:
"BrOck has been working on
just such a plan for months. If
he cant devise one to work, then
nobody can."
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Ostrom's plan: Rescheduling
of athlete's timetables so that
they have afternoons free to
practice, and winning of faculty
approval of active participation
by UBC in inter-collegiate athletics.
OCTOBER 17. 1950 — Wire
service and daily newspaper
stories claiming that UBC's Student Council refused to allow
charity and community chest organizations to hold tag days on the
campus were denied by AMS
President Nonie Donaldson.
"No minute refusing permission to any charitable organization has been considered by
Council at any time," said President Donaldson.
OCTOBER 20. 1950 — Student
Council decided to allow mem
bers of the Student Peace Movement to circulate the Stockholm
Peace Appeal af UBC. "If they
go through the regular channels."
Discrimination
OCTOBER 31, 1950 — Removal of discriminatory clauses from
the constitutions of national
fraternities was one of the recommendations resulting from a
Western Regional Inter-Fraternity Conference held ln Tucson,
Arizona.
Recommendations were to be
forwarded to the coming National Inter-Fraternity Conference at
New York by UBC's representative Bruce Lee on November 28.
(Continued on 19)
See FOUR SESSIONS
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UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
FOUR SESSIONS
(Contlhued Item Fag* 17)
NOVEMBER 1. 19S0 — LSE
President Ed Federson and "four
etudent lawyers" produced and
distributed an unauthorized flyer
calling for the end of "the crucifixion of every student activity
in the name of a professional
football team." It was called
"The UBC Times".
NOVEMBER 3. 1950 — Student decision on the Ostrom Athletic plan was postponed two
weeks following a motion pre*
sented by EUS president Don
Duguid.
Speaking to a general AMS
meeting of 4000 students, Duguid
said Ostrom's plan was "not concrete." He added: "It is too loose
and open to too many flaws."
NOVEMBER 9. 1950 — UBC
president Cy McOuire was commissioned by Student Council to
head an investigating committee
which would examine the high
cost of meals in UBC's cafeteria.
McGuire told Councillors that
1,000 pop bottles had disappeared in jihe cafeteria In one month.
NOVEMBER 15/1950 — More
than 2000 students attended aj
special general AMS meeting to
approve adoption of the Ostrom
Athletic plan.
Arts Purchased
NOVEMBER 17. 1950 — Engineer Terry Lynch issued an
eviction order to arts students
after purchasing the building for
$25.26 at a March of Dimes auction held by the EUS.
NOVEMBER 23. 1950 — Student Council decided to allow the
EUS to publish their own year
book, over the opposition of
Totem Editor Hughie Cameron.
NOVEMBER 24, 1950 — Football coach Orville Burke resigned his position "because of business reasons."
JANUARY 11, 1831 — Coordinator Jim Midwinter canpelled all
booking privileges of the CCF
club in a letter to club president Ron Cheffins. Midwinter
said that the club failed to comply with booking regulations
twice during the fall term.
JANUARY 19. 1951 — Varsity Otudoor Club officials announced that President and Mrs.
N.A.M. MacKenzie would officially open VOC's $12,500, ultra
modern ski cabin on Mount Sey-
mour.
Designed by Professor Fred
Lassere, head of UBC'a School of
Architecture, the cabin's construction was supervised by
senior architecture student Don
Manning.
JANUARY 93. 1981 — A
$10,000 electron microscope was
given to UBC by representatives
of the Kinsmen Club of B.C.
JANUARY 29. 1951 — Ubyssey news stories and an editorial
which attacked the Big Block
Club for its "failure" to carry
out Its obligations to the fund
campaign for the War Memorial
Gymnasium were unjustified,
charged MAD president Brock
Ostrom.
Dirty Politics
JANUARY 30.1981 — Student
Council decided to request tho
bursar to continue collecting thei
$5 building fee until extensions'
to the original building contracts J
of the War Memorial Gymnasium
were paid off.
FEBRUARY 1,1951 — Budget
of the Arts Undergraduate Society was suspended indefinitely
as, a result of a dance in Brock
Hall which lost $40.
FEBRUARY 9, 1951—Jo-Anne
Strutt, chairman of the elections
committee, threatened to halt the
AMS election campaign because
of "dirty campaigning."
"If this underhanded campaigning doesn't stop, the elections will!" she said.
FEBRUARY 18. 1981 — Student Council ordered an investigation into charges by Ubyssey
columnist Jim Banham that campus political groups were attempting to elect a bloc of candidates
to office.   .
In his column, "Brickbats".
Banham said political factions
threatened to take over student
government.
FEBRUARY 22. 1981 — A
three-to-one vote approved the
adoption of religious courses in
UBC's curriculum in a referendum presented to students.
FEBRUARY 23.1991 — UBC's
War Memorial Gymnasium opened its doors for an opening celebration and basketball game between the Thunderbirds and
Eastern Washington Savages.
FEBRUARY 23. 1981 — AMS
President-elect   Vaughan   Lyon
was cleared of Ubyssey charges
that political clubs were attempting to control Student Council.
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FEBRUARY 27, 1981    —   A
committee to "cure the disease"
suffered by the Publications
Board was struck by Student
Council, following complaints of
irresponsibility by EUS representative Bill Haggert.
MARCH 1, 1981 — A Student
Council investigating committee
headed by Charlie Flader reported that the UBC bookstore
was run "on a sound, efficient
basis as far as present circumstances will allow."
MARCH 8. 1981 — Arts student Peter Zuber announced his
intention to circulate a petition
on the campus demanding a revision of Vancouver's "Blue
Laws."
MARCH 22.1981 — UBC Professors were given a $200,000
wage hike from the Provincial
Government, the largest in university history. Professors had
asked for $300,000, which would
have given each professor an
extra $1000 annually.
SEPTEMBER 29. 1981 —
Freshmen turned the tables on
engineering students as crowds of
the I'rosh dumped Into the lilypond the few engineers whoj
turned up for the annual initiation battle.
OCTOBER 4. 1981 — Fort
Camp President Bob Gourly laid
a bitter complaint concerning
student housing with AMS President Vaughan Lyon.
"On top of everything else,
the administration is now charging us $30 a month rent for
our canteen," said Gourly.
Student Council decided to ask
for representation on the administration's Housing Committee.
OCTOBER 8. 1981 — A Roman Catholic priest, Greek lecturer
Father Carr, stopped wearing
his clerical garb in class, reportedly as a result of pressure from
the University Senate. This was
vigorously denied by President
N.A.M. MacKenzie.
More Confidence
OCTOBER 10, 1981 — A vote
of non-confidence in AMS Presi-
(Contlnued on Pago 19)
See FOUR SESSIONS
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SUCCESS TO THE  1954 GRADUATES
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A MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE 19
FOUR SESSIONS
(Continued from Page 19)
dent Vaughan Lyon was defeated
at a Student Council meeting.
Lyon's resignation was sought
by Jack Lintott, Ted Lee, Bill
Neen, Bill Sparling, John Mc*
Arthur, Anita Jay and Mary
Lett. Several later changed their
minds.
Lyon was accused of interfering In the Mussoc director appointment, sending "unwarranted" letters to the administration,
and delaying the purchase of
Student Council blazers.       ""
OCTOBER 19, 1911 — Fort
Camp Committee President Bob
Gourly resigned at a general
meeting of camp residents. Gourly said attacks made on him by
The Ubyssey were "quite unbearable."
OCTOBER 19, 1981 — Editor-
in-Chief Les Armour proposed an
exchange of students between
Canada and Russia in a Ubyssey
editorial.
OCTOBER 19, 1911 — A general AMS meeting decided to inaugurate faculty editions of The
Ubyssey, over the protests of
Editor-in-Chief Les Armour.
OCTOBER 23, 1981 — Queen
Elizabeth and Prince Philip visited UBC, where they both watched a football game between
Eastern Oregon and UBC. Remarked Prince Philip: "Dashed
peculiar game."
OCTOBER 29, 1981 — Nearly
1000 screaming, banner-waving
students stopped Granville street
traffic as a Homecoming Pep
Meet erupted into a gigantic
snake dance.
NOVEMBER 6, 1951 — A formal complaint was lodged with
West Vancouver police by Ubyssey columnist Allan Fotheringham after he was kidnapped by
engineers and abandoned near
Horseshoe Bay.
NOVEMBER 15, 1951 — A student referendum supported the
construction of a $26,987 bowling alley in the War Memorial
Gymnasium.
Library Opens
NOVEMBER 20,1981 — More
than 15,000 books were moved
into UBC's new $300,000 Law
Building.
NOVEMBER 29. 1981 — Education Minister W.T. Straith announced that work would be
started next spring on UBC's
million-dollar pathology building
on Vancouver General Hospital
grounds.
DECEMBER 4. 1981 — Student Council members voted 7-3
ln favor of Instituting dismissal
proceedings * against Ubyssey
Editor-in-Chief Les Armour.
Junior member Ted Lee said
that a majority of students on
the campus did not agree with
Armour's point of view. "They
are, In fact, fed up with him"
said Lee, ^who was backed by
WUS president Mary Lett, Bill
Sparling, Bill Neen, Jack Lintott,
Joan MacArthur and Diane
Livingston.
Meanwhile, the entire Ubyssey
editorial staff announced that It
would resign if Armour were
ousted.
DECEMBER 7. 1981 — Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief Les Armour
was reinstated at a general AMS
meeting called after a petition
signed by 140 students demanded
his resignation.
JANUARY 28, 1982 — The
Board of Governors and the Senate announced their approval of
a program establishing a School
of Physical Education at UBC.
JANUARY 29, 1952 — A resolution to the Senate seeking removal of university recognition
of Greek letter societies was voted down by Student Council after a heated debate.
FEBRUARY 1, 1952 — A
$110,000 B.C. Research Council
Building was opened on the campus. Present at the ceremony
was Trade Minister C.D. Howe.
•on announced hit intention to
form a Social Credt Club on the
campus.
In a letter to AMS President
Raghbir Basi, Steinson said
that "a sudden wave of emotional revelation has overcome me,
and shown me the only way to
a means of satisfying my three
main interests: namely the nation, the province, and myself. I
didnt get Social Credit, Social
Credit got me."
Many students fell for the
hoax, even Stelnson's confes-
son that he "could see that pow
would be my chance to study
opportunism under the best
teachers possibly available . . .
master opportunists."
OCTOBER 9, 1982 — Teacher
Training student Milla Andrews
won a $80.00 first prize and all
expenses paid trip to Montreal
on the CBC radio program "Singing Stars of Tomorrow."
OCTOBER 21, 1982 — AMS
President Raghbir Basi was
elected president of the National
Federation of Canadian University Students, representing 40,-
000 students.
OCTOBER 24, 1992 — More
than 90 "redblooded" engineers
failed in an attempt to kidnap
WUS President Marion Brown
from a WUS pa jama party in
Brock Hall.
They were turned back by
Brock Proctor Bil IBradshaw's
threats of expulsion.
OCTOBER 30, 1982 — Ubyssey columnist Allan Fotheringham was kidnapped by engineers
and chained to Birks' clock.
NOVEMBER 29, 1992 — An
emergency general meeting of
the AMS voted to (1) condemn
the Senate Freshman ruling on
(Continued on Page 20)
See FOUR SESSIONS
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■/»_    •.. Men *B0* H°* PAGE 20
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17, 1954
FOUR SESSIONS
(Continued from Page 19)
sence.
Other members of the new
club (Roy Trimble, Vince Ven-
Athletics, (Z> investigate en- i ables, John Redekop and John
trance into the Canadian Inter- JMdtdoch) denied sharing Thomp-
Frovincial Football League, and j son's views.
(3) reject the institution of foot- j JANUARY 9. 1953 — Social
ball scholarships at UBC. Credit Club  members relieved
Scholarships  were    proposed^ William Thompson of his posi-
by Darrel Tepoorten, and CIPEL j tlon as ^ecretary of the club,
participation   was  proposed   by; , „    „
Allan Goldsmith. !    Meanwhile. Thompson accused
j The Ubyssey of misquoting him,
, ,   , and    branded    the    Ubyssey's
Antl"5©ITIuiC   * istory on formation of the club
JANUARY 6. 1953-"We are "yellow journalism."
against international finance and The club's statement to The
most international Financiers are Ubyssey said Thompson was
Jews," said William Thompson, ousted because he "was alleged
a member of a five-man execu-to have made anti-semitic state-
tive who announced the forma- ments." It added that Social
tion of a Social Credit Club on; Credit "is diametrically opposed
the campus after five years' ab-i to discrimination."
BEST WISHES FROM THE
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JANUARY IS, 1993 — UBC
football coach Jelly Andersen
announced his resignation. "I
cannot harbor any enthusiastic
perspectives that will alter the
calibre of football of which, you,
the student body aod the alumni
expect," he said.
FEBRUARY 10, 1953 — AMS
President Raghbir Basi announced he would present a brief
to the B.C. Electric demanding
a reduction in student fares.
More  Politics
FEBRUARY 13. 1953—Engineering student Campbell Robinson and Co-ed Janie Wright
presented protests which left the\
AMS election committee in a
tangle.
Robinson demanded to be allowed to run for Junior Mem-j
ber, but the Election Committee ruled that Robinson's en-!
trance into third year engineering would make him a senior
and ineligible. i
Janie Wright, defeated by!
Nan Adamson in the race for!
President of WUS, demanded
she be acclaimed Junior Member. She claimed that the extension of time which allowed i
the other candidates to post
nominations was unfair, since a
defeated candidate has two days
to file nomination for another
position after being defeated.
This, she claimed, allowed her
an exclusive 24-hour period in
which to file a nomination for
Junior Member. Miss Wright
finally withdrew her nomination.
FEBRUARY 24. 1953—UBC's
campus blood donor clinic closed
down because, said Red Cross
officials, students were not supporting it.
FEBRUARY 26. 1953 — UBC
claimed the Canadian Inter-Col-
legate Blood Drive's "Corpuscle
Cup", as a result of students
"responding" to the appeal for
donations the day the clinic
closed.
MARCH 5, 1953 — Ex-football
| coach Jelly Andersen bitterly
! denounced the administration
| for its attitude toward athletics, j
JHe blamed the poor showing of
i UBC's football team on "the ad-j
ministration." j
j     MARCH 12. 1933 — President
i N.   A.   M.   MacKenzie     opened |
talks  with  Dr.  William  Miller, <
president of the College of Dental   Surgeons   of  B.C.,   on   the
possibility of establishing a den-|
tal school at UBC. ■
No Sale
MARCH 13, 1953—B.C. Electric President Dal Grauer told
UBC delegates Raghbir Basi,
Vaughan Lyon, Johann Stoyva
and Lorna McDougall that his
company would grant no fare
reductions to UBC students. i
MARCH  17.   1953 — Robert'
Osborne, head of UBC's Physi-|
cal   Education  Department  and |
member of the British  Empire
Games facilities committee,  announced   that   UBC   had   been
chosen as the site for the swim-,
rning pool to be used in he 1954
Games. ]
(Continued on Page 21)
See FOUR SESSIONS
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	 I MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE 21
FOUR SESSIONS
(Continued from 4age 20)
MARCH 30. 1113 — LSE President Johann Styova directed
publishing of a one-page flyer
which denounced the War Memorial Gymnasium as a "million
dollar glass palace." The flyer
was printed to bolster LSE's
fight for more money at a coming AMS meeting by cutting
MAD's budget.
MARCH 20, 1953 — General
AMS meeting voted to ask Faculty Council to order UBC Greek
Letter societies to remove discriminatory clauses from their
charters "within one year."
MARCH 24, 1953—The Inter-
Collegiate Blood Drive Trophy
was won by Mount Allison College of Nova Scotia.
SEPTEMBER 25. 1953—EUS
Vice-President Monte McKay
promised there would be "no retaliation" on freshmen for their
raid on a regalia violation court
established to prevent rough-
house initiations.
Freshmen staged three raids
on the court, brandishing stirrup pumps and spraying engineers with water.
SEPTEMBER 29, 1953—UBC
Thunderbirds defeated the scrub
team of the B.C. Lions-11-1 for
the football team's first victory
in almost two years.
Donor Rush -
OCTOBER  14. 1953 — The
campus blood clinic closed down
because of a rush of donors,
which left nurses short of equipment.
OCTOBER 19, 1953 — Arts
student Archie McGugan
sought Student Council permission to form a Labor-Progressive
Club on the campus.
OCTOBER 27, 1953 — Students ejected hecklers who
threatened to break up the first
meeting of the newly-formed
LPP club, which featured as
speaker founder Archie McGugan.
OCTOBER 30, 1953—Student
Council opened an investigation
into a "riot" of engineers at a
downtown dancehall which resulted in three UBC students
being charged with obstruction
and assault on a police constable.
The fracas occurred after an
EUS smoker.
! NOVEMBER 3, 1953 — Student Council members expressed disapproval of undergraduate society smokers.
IOVEMBER 13, 1953 — Students were amazed as formation of an "un-Canadian Activi
ties Commission" was urged by
a noon speaker.
NOVEMBER 17. 1999—UBC's
rowing team swamped Oregon
State by five lengths to win the
Egg Cup.
Students talked of UBC representation In the British Empire Games rowing events.
NOVEMBER 24, 1935 — PRO
Bill St. John threatened to resign if Student Council did not
take "definite action" to prevent student misbehavior off the
campus.
St. John's threat followed a
letter of complaint written to
President N. A. M. MacKenzie
by a Bellingham hotel operator
disturbed by the results of a
"Bellingham Invasion."
DECEMBER 4, 1953—A group
of UBC students burned Chicago
Tribune publisher Robert G. McCormick in effigy as a protest
against his paper's support of
Wisconsin's Senator Joseph McCarthy.
A long telegram was also sent
to McCormick by the students,
who were later billed $14 for
the message. Payment was
made after the effigy-burners
took up a campus collection.
Joe  Burns
To the Girl
Thinking About
A Career . . .
Girls leaving school today want to know two things about
the jobs they are looking for —
1. Is it interesting?
2. What does it pay?
Telephone Operating has these answers.
1. The work offers a fascinating career
in communications, and
2. The pay is good, starting at $130.00
rising to $203.00 monthly.
Other advantages include adequate time off for sports,
hobbies, shopping, etc., — eight full days in each four week
working period including one period of four consecutive
days.
For other interesting news about the life of a telephone
operator call and have a friendly chat at the Employment
Office — 768 Seymour Street. We'll be glad to see you.
Or if you wish, phone MArine 9171 first and ask for the
Employment Office.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
DECEMBER 4, 1953 — More
than $900 was collected ln an
engineer-sponsored March of
Dimes which saw pie-throwing
auctions, lady wrestling contests, and a female football
game.
JANUARY 8. 1954—The campus giggled as McGoun Cup debaters tangled in a practise trial.
Arguments  were  lurid.
JANUARY 12. 1954 — Fort
Camp officials posted a bulletin
condemning residents for return-
CONGRATULATIONS *rO THE GRADS OF *54
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ing home late "in a drunken,
rowdy manner."
JANUARY 14. 1954 — Rep-
resentatives from the student
body, the faculty and the Housing Administration met to begin
preparing a documented brief to
the provncial government pressing for financial aid for student
housing.
JANUARY 22. 1954 — Dean
Walter Gage humiliated RCMP
by breaking up a wild snowball
fight in front of the library
which the "men in red" had
failed to end after half an hour
of demands and pleas.
FEBRUARY 2. 1954 — Columbia philosopher Irwin Edman delivered 'an address to
UBC students to open UBC's
celebration of the Columbia University bi-centennial.
Home Ec  Boobs
FEBRUARY 4. 1954 — The
Ubyssey appeared with its page
three half-empty as a demonstration against low standards in
faculty editions. The page, devoted to the Home Economics
Faculty, carried an item which
branded the copy turned in by
Home Ec as unfit for a university.
newspaper. j
Home Ec students protested to'
Student Council, but Editor-in-
Chief Allan Fotheringham was
backed up by Councillors.
FEBRUARY 9,1954 — A ques-
, tionaire drawn up by Arts stu-
| dent Colin McDiarmid  was ap-
i proved by Student Council for
use in determining student opinion   of   lectiiring   standards   of
professors.
The questionaires   would   be
anonymously  answered  by  students,  then  returned to profes-;
sors.
FEBRUARY   12.   1954  —  A
student investigating committee \
headed by Don Jabour attacked
UBC's cafeteria as a "disgrace
to the university."
FEBRUARY   19.   1954  —  A
special edition of The Ubyssey
appeared devoted to student
housing. The editorial carried a:
banner headline which proclaimed: "Fort Camp Huts Disgrace
to UBC." |
FEBRUARY 25. 1954 — EUS
Vice-President Monte McKay was
kidnapped by Publications Board
members on the eve of the En-
, gineers Ball, and taken to a
cabin at Cultus Lake. The Ubyssey feigned puzzled Ignorance.
Kidnapping
FEBRUARY 19,1954 — Ubyssey Jdltor-ln-Chief Allan Fotheringham, Executive Editor Jerome
Angel and reporter Bruce Mc*
Williams were kidnapped by
engineers, but later rescued by
pubsters in a wild brawl ln front
of the Commodore Cabaret.
AMS Treasurer Allan Gold,
smith suspended the budget of
EUS because of damage done to
the pub offices by engineers in
two raids carried out to effect
the kidnappings of Fotheringham
and his staffers.
MARCH 9. 1954 — The Ubyssey carried a headline which
declared "Socreds Demolish Ex-
pansion Hopes" as the provincial
budget was announced—with no
provision for UBC's request of
$2 million.
MARCH 19. 1954 — Students
voted approval of a scheme
whereby they could be called upon to pay for roofing of the
British Empire Games Swimming
Pool.
MARCH 23, 1954 — Canada
was horrified as UBC students
voted to retain a measure which
forced Student Council to suspend two religious clubs, the
Newman Club and the Varsity
Christian Fellowship, because of
"discriminatory clauses" in their
charters. _
APRIL 9, 1954 — Students
voted at a special AMS general
meeting to reinstate the Newman Club and the Varsity Christian Fellowship.
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YOUR   GRADUATION PAGE 22
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17, 193
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FULL BEAUTY of UBC's campus can be
enjoyed during summer session. Shrubs and
trees  are full-leafed—untorn by  engineers'
.rampages.   A handful of students have the
campus to themselves.
—PMo by Joe Quon
Wide Range of Courses in
New Summer School Program
Summer session at UBC this son. Lindgren. Clark and Fea. of ture in sociology, and Doctor W.,
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On July 5, UBC will begin its
Education.
35th session of summer school,
for the benefit of both those who! MANY EDUCATORS
are pursuing a formal education!    WeU  Rnown   educators' fr6m
and those who wish to learn for)   „ A, .,      .     ...
... . _. all over the continent will con-
their own enjoyment. , _,_.__,
verge here to lecture in other
This year, visiting professors I fields. Doctor Malcom McGregor,
include   Doctor   Peter   Gurrey, I of the University of Cincinnati,
formerly   head   of   the   English j will lecture on Greek and Ro-
deparment   at   the  Institute   of man   history;   Professor   Albert
Education,   London   University, I Morals,   of  the   Department   of
who will lecture on comparative j Sociology    and    Anthropology,
education, and professors Jack-1 University of Boston, will lec-
of Alberta,
geography.
will teach  physical
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CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE GRADUATES OF '5.4
Eileen A. Sharnell, Designer
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In addition, Alistair McDonald, j
Director of Physical Education,!
Queen's     University,     Belfast,
will   teach   Physical   Education
here this summer.
In addition to the courses for
which credit is given, the Extension department will offer a
varied program of courses in
Theatre, Music, Arts and Crafts,
plus lectures in Human Relations
and an experimental course entitled "Family Camping".
EXPANSION
The Theatre course is expanding rapidly, along with Canada's
professional theatre. David It-
ken, of Chicago, will be Guest
Director and Professor of the
School this summer.
Courses offered range through
[Speech to Stage Lighting, with
j Directing, Stagecrafts and Pro-
; duction also  included.
I     Mr.     Nicholas    Goldschmidt,
! Musical   Director  of  the  Opera
School.   Royal   Conservatory   of
Mu»ie,  will  return  to  UBC  for
the   fifth   consecutive   year   as
Guest Director of the School of |
j Music.   Me  will  conduct   classes!
in    the   study   of   concert   and]
opera, j
The school of Arts and Crafts j
will offer courses in beginner's]
and advanced painting, lectures]
in art history, and two courses!
in ceramics.
SAME MORE j
"Man, Victim or Builder of
Society" is the provocative title
of a series of three lectures to
be offered in July by the School
of Human Relations. The talks
will be given by Professor Albert
Morris, Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.   Boston   University.
Seminar on "Teamwork for
Community Harmony'' will also
be held in July, plus the aforementioned course in Family
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UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE 23
HONORARY   DEGREES
Chisholm,   while  serving  as
lada's Deputy Health Minis-
p,  had on  various occasions
lused controversy. Statements
■eh  as "human beings having
Jen  "utterly and consistently
ong" since the dawn of his-
Illy never failed to bring their
Mre of criticism.
(However, when he made the
ptement "Any child who be-
vea in Santa Claus has had
ability to think permanently
itroyed," it was too much for
clerics.
[Church figures throughout
snada called for Chisholm's
■ignation.
| The doctor made little attempt
clarify his remark, and the
form raged on.
.NTA CLAUS
Five years later Dr, Chisholm
|id  attempt to  clarify  his re-
lark, pointing out that he did
|ot hate Santa Claus or even
ae Santa Claus myth. What he
Iras attacking was what he con-
jidered the harmful act of impressing upon children that San-
Claus and other such myths
Ire true.
Chisholm maintained that the
Jfhild should be made to realize
jhat these myths are not really
|rue, but just a game.
This mild storm did not stop
)r. Chisholm's career. The dbc-
>r became the world's leading
|ealth figure when he took the
;ins of UN's health organiza-
|on in 1949.
TILL ACTIVE
Although retiring to this prov-
|ce in 1953, Dr. Chisholm has
Jmained active and interested
the work that took up so
luch of his life.
|February of this year he spoke
a UN seminar at UBC, mainlining that the UN was man's I
only hope of peace.
Doctor Ethlyn Trapp, New
Westminster • born international
radiologist, will be honored in
recognition of the great contribution she has made in the fight
against cancer.
Dr. Trapp for many years had
an active practice in British Columbia. She is a graduate of McGill University and has studied
abroad.
She became Canada's outstanding radiologist expert and had
much to do with the revolutionary changes made in Canada's
organization of radiation therapy
centres.
DH. ETHLYN  TRAPP
" .   .   .   Doctor of Science
DISTINCTION
In 1946 .Dr. Trapp became the
first woma.n president of B.C.'s
Medical Association. Dr. Trapp
has attended many international
cancer congresses in her long
career. This has made her work
international in scope.
CONGRATULATIONS
DOUGLAS TEA * COFFEE
4441 West 10th Ave. ALma 1594
Success to
the  Graduates  of
1954
file (fa Mh\6 fiakenj
{Coatta-ed from Pag* 1>
The energetic Joseph Small*
wood became recognised as a
great Canadian statesman only
recently. In 1949 he led New*
foundland up the path of confederation.
Born in 1900, Smallwood became a Journalist. From there
he went on to become a whip
for the Liberal Party in that
province.
Smallwood has written some
of Canada's finest books dealing
with the customs and history of
the Newfoundlanders.
In 19S0 he toured B.C. and
visited this university.
WAS BORN
The Kt. Hon. Vincent Massey
is Canada's 18th Governor General. He was born and raised
in Toronto and is a graduate of
the University of Toronto. Massey received his M.A. at Oxford.
During the First World War
Vincent Massey held numerous
government and military posir
tions in Canada including the
office of Associate Secretary of
War.
After the war he became president of the Massey-Harris Co.
and later served as Canada's
Minister to United States.
Massey sat on various commissions after that, eventually
being appointed chairman of the
Royal Commission on National
Development in the Arts, Letters
and Sciences in 1949. : .
EASTERNER
H. N. MacCorkindale, retiring
inspector of city schools, is an
easterner by birth.
He is a graduate of the University of Toronto and came to
B.C. in 1912. MacCorkindale was
principal of Point Grey Junior
High School for many years.
The educator was appointed
Superintendent of Vancouver
Schools in 1933, and while occupying this post had occasion
to tour the globe.
He has actively fought for improvements and changes in B.C.'s
educational set-up during his
lengthy career. In 1939 he urged
"more practical courses" be
taught in high schools with "vocational courses" included in the
curriculum.
He was prompted to suggest
these   radical   changes   by   the
alarmingly low rate of university entrants.
TENACITY
He clung tenaciously to these
solutions in the face of heavy
opposition from School Board
members. One critic insisted that
this low rate proved that only
students from "wealthier homes"
are able to enter university.
MacCorkindale also suggested
at that time the introduction of
scholarships by the Vancouver
School Board.
In 1945 he urged that greater
use be made of schools for chil-
| dren  and adults.  School  build-
I ings should be in use 18 hours
a day, he maintained.
Repeating the aforementioned
j proposal in 1949, MacCorkindale
blasted   the  way  schools  were
I "dark two-thirds of the time,"
"Mac," as he is called by his
friends, was born in 1888 and
educated in his home "province
of Ontario. MacCorkindale is a
member of UBC's Senate.
HELD POST
He has held the post of superintendent for 21 years and will
retire in August of this year.
He began his teaching career in
1906.
Fredrick Strong, born in Minnesota, was elected president of
the Canadian Medical Association this year.
Now a Vancouver citizen, Dr.
Strong is a specialist in internal
medicine. He has been connected
with the B.C. Cancer Association.
He practises in the city.
New Summer School
Starts This Summer
Strangers to Canada will be able to attend a five-day course
in Canadian life at UBC this summer.
The First Canadian Interna
tionalism.
Specialists will trace the dif*
ferent points of view of the
Anglo-Canadian and the French-
Canadian, development of Can*
ada's art, literature and drama,
and the role of Canadian ethnic
groups. ^
Tours will Include visits to
industries, UBC's anthropological museum, the Vancouver Art
Gallery, and a mountain trip
and boat cruise.
Fees for the course, including
room and board, are $25, and
application must be made to the
Canadian International Summer
School at the Alma Mater So-
tions to the Commonwealth, j clety of UBC not later than July
NATO and the United Nations, 131: A deposit of $5 must be in*
and the nature of Canada's na-'eluded.
tional Summer University, sponsored by the' World University
Service of Canada and the University of British Columbia, will
present "This Nation Canada" on
the campus August 9 to 14.
The program, designed to
bring together foreign students,
new Canadians and Canadians,
will consist of a series of lectures
and discussions by professors on
various aspects of Canadian life.
Group visits and tours will be
part of the course.
The lectures will explain Canada's growth from a colony,
Canada's culture, her contribu-
4570 WEST TENTH AVENUE
VANCOUVER, B.C. ALma 0432
Congratulations to the Graduating Class
Thanks for Your Cooperation
A Welcome to Next Year's Grads
Hair Stylists to the University
4594 W. 10th Ave. AL. 0811
During Your Vacation
QomsL 9*l .. .
and listen to your favorite selections
in our
TftojdeAiL dbu&at Shaft
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2914 Granville South
CH. 5144
Park Royal
West 2302
BEST WISHES
to the
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
CROSSMAN MACHINERY
CO. LTD.
806 BEACH AVE.
VANCOUVER, B.C. PAGE 24
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY MAY 17 WWl
Gobs Of Jobs For '54 Grads
Arts Students In Big Demand
Contrary to popular opinion ployment. The ratio is compar-
Arts graduates are in great de- ablle to last year's figures.
mand by employers.
This is the ugly truth revealed
by
figures.   Mr. John MacLean of
MORE EDUCATION
The majority bf those
grads
UBC's  empioymen't'serpice who hfve ,not '»ed applications
are   planning   to   take   post-
Job applications filed have yet
to be placed. Type of work Arts-
men are entering include the
(lumber industry, oil research,
pulp and paper and geo-physical
research.
^Ve^e'saTd'ThuTsTa^'tha.' J«duate courses "If MacLean. !,v^ ■'°^^n^0j^»'J
4K.-= u ..-,_^«„..i„. ^«mo„^.. *«- The non-appllcants will probably ;'? aPPlv to Zoology or Arts and
there is "particular demand'
Arts grads this year.
for
enter Teacher Training, Social Science graduates.
Work, Medicine or Law. I    There  is some  credibility to
In fact, according to MacLean, j "Quite a number of graduates !tne perpetual accusations of the
"There are not enough Job ap- j that we have listed as job appli- worthlessness of an Arts degree,
pllcants to fill the number of i cant8 have changed their minds Thl» year's records indicate that
positions available." | an(j are ai80 planning to do post- »•  least   some   Arts   graduates
From an Arts graduation class j graduate   work,"   MacLean   re-
of approximately 380 students, jvealed-
there have been only 79 applies- EIGHT LEFT
tions requesting permanent em- j    Only eight Arts graduates with
READ ABOUT THE OLD FOLKS
AT HOME IN THE UBYSSEY
After leaving school, graduates can still keep posted
on their Alma Mater through a subscription to The Ubyssey.
Mail your subscription request to the Alma Mater
Society office, and you can read of the activities of undergraduate friends and campus politics in general. Cost for
one year: $2.50. \
Compliments and Best Wishes
SPORTING GOODS
4431 West 10th Ave. ALma 1414
Jha. Tltcmaasmant and.
UNIVERSITY GROCERY
wish the class of '54 every success and thank you
to the Student body for its patronage this past
term. We hope to see the familiar faces back again
in the fall.
5732 University Boulevard
R. HEUSER
ALma 0800
MARSHALL-WELLS
B.C.  LTD.
wishes the graduating class
of 1954 every success
in their future endeavors
549-573 CARRALL STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
PA. 8211
have entered the armed services
and Civil Service — some'have
even ended up in journalism.
The women Arts graduates
further testify to the doubtful
validity of their degree. Of the
140 female Arts students donning robes only 25 have even
applied for employment.
NO SURPRISE
j    This Is not  surprising when
jan insight is obtained into the
types of jobs available for them.
j    Women    Art   graduates   are
| liable to find themselves doing
i personnel, library or, the most
j common, secretarial work.
I    There are 10 female BA holders with applications filed who
| have not yet been placed.
!    In   other   faculties,   the   job
situation could not be any better, according to MacLean. The
only  exception  is  Civil  Engineering.
SLOW STARTER
"But this field is always slow
in picking up." MacLean added.
He gave as the reason for this
exception construction's usual
slow start.
In spite of this, Engineering
graduates are having no trouble
finding employment. "Over 90
percent of Engineering graduates
are now placed," said MacLean.
MacLean also estimates the
same percentage of placements :
for Commerce grads.
Law, Medicine and Nursing
graduates very seldom are in
the position to enlist the service's aid as they enter into
outside training on graduating.
INTERNSHIP
A special "Dietic Internship"!
is required for the majority of
Home Economic graduates. Work
in that field is the major employment  source.
Another aspect of MacLean's
records is the small number of
graduates In any of the faculties who have submitted applications for employment.
Eight hundred and fifty-three
students will receive their vari-
ious degrees at the spring convocation.    However,    only   one
| half of them have found it nec,es-
jsary to apply through the uni-
jversity for employment.
j    MacLean   estimates   that   ap-
Iproximately 400 graduates have;
.applied through the service for'
jobs.
; This may well be a favour
able sign in that the non
applicants may already have em
ployment prospects.
Compliments of
HARRY BARRATT
ARCHITECT
709 West Georgie St.
Management and Staff
Extends Best Wishes to The
Graduates of. 1954
Owl Rexall Drugs
4421 W. 10th Avt. ALma 1002
MANAGER - MR. FEE )NDAY, MAY 17,1954
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE2S
Congratulations to the Graduates
#
Pitman's Business College Ltd.
1490 West Broadway CH. 7848
IFINISHING TOUCHES are being made on
the British Empire Games swimming pool.
Bleachers are still to be set up, but final completion is expected well before the opening
— Photo by JOE QUAN
of the Games. Students have agreed to finance
roofing for the pool if necessary, at an estimated cost of $50,000. Work will start after
the Games. * M
\UBC to Play Host
thletes, Swimming
to BEG
Matches
The University of British of
Columbia will be very much in
Ithe limelight when the British
lEmpire and Commonwealth
|Games are staged In Vancouver
from July 30 to August 7. The
»ames however, will be remem-
Ibered at UBC long after all the
lathletes have departed and one
Iof the world's greatest sports
]spectacles is just a memory.
One of the world's finest swim-
Iming pools and much improved
■track facilities will be lasting
lmomentos on the campus to the
I BE & C Games of 1954.
After a long drawn out fight
with the Vancouver Swimming
| Club the BEG committee awarded the pool to UBC. When the
pool, which i_ being attached to
the War Memorial Gymnasium,
is complete, UGC  will   be  the
I finest athletically equipped University in Canada.
I OLYMPIC STANDARDS
The pool will measure up to
Olympic standards, being 165 feet
long and 50 feet wicte, w::n depth
dimension   in   two  sections.   As
| a target for the divers who will
jump from five and ten meter
boards, tho otherwise calm surface will be ruffled by two agitator.-:. Six thousand seats will be
installed for the Games and will
become the property of UBC
when the show is over. In shorter
terms, thanks to the Games, UBC
i. being given a ,"5300,000 asset
in the form of a championship
swimming pool.
When the athletes from the far
corners of the earth congregate
in Vancouver they will do their
preliminary training in UBC
stadium. To give them the best
training facilities possible the
BEG committee has built the
track facilities at UBC stadium
to resemble, as closely as possible, the facilities in the Games
stadium. This means that UBC
i> the recipient of some of the
finest track and field facilities
in America.
New pole vault, high jump,
broad jump and hop, step and
jump pits along with new shot
out,  discus  and  hammer circles
have been installed. In addition
cement curbs have been put on]
the curves at each end of the]
track and the track itself has
been repaired and put in first
class shape. Again these lasting
i improvements  have  been   built
; at UBC by BEG funds.
EMPIRE VILLAGE
But as in everything else their!
must be giving as well as receiv-j
, ing. I
UBC will house the 700 athletes that are expected to partici-:
pate in the biggest BE&C Games ■
ever.   Men   will   be   housed   in
Acadia   Camp   and   the   Youth
Training Centre while the women
will   be   accomadated   in- Fort
Camp and the Women's Dormitories. This housing area has been
given the name Empire Village
and will be the hub of the Games.
j     The   athletes   will   be   given
three meals a day—a tremendous
task   when   it   is   realized   that
they all will be fed according to
their own special diets. In other
j words the team from Ceylon will
i be able to receive the same fair
! that had  at ther training table
1 back home. Multiply this by 26
j countries   and you  have   a  tre-
! mendous undertaking.
I     In War Memorial Gymnasium
a  vest   radio-telegraph  network
• will be set up for press and radio.
1 Their   will also  be  direct   lines
j from  the Gym to  the scene of
i all the Games events so that the
press and team managers will be
constantly aware of all develope-
ments.  The team  managers and I
coaches   will   be   provided   with j
special   offices   and   equipment !
huts and will  have transportat-
, ion at hand to take them to all
| events. The area will be policed
j by the RCMP and spectators at
Empire Village will be kept at
| a minimum to allow the athletes
to rest.
HECREATION TOPS
To keep the particpants from
[going stale UBC has.agreed to
provide all possible recreational
' facilities. Everything from cricket    to    volleyball   and    football
'■equipment  will be provided for
.hem. In addition both the mens ,
and women's gym will be avail-1
able for their use at night. The j
Wesbrook Buildng hosptal will I
be the medical center of the!
Games and everything from a
toothache to a broken limb will I
be treated their by volunteer1
doctors. The man in'charge of'
this mammoth housing task is i
UBC's Dr. Gordon Shrum. j
Three  men  from  UBC's  athletic staff hold key positions in|
the   Games.    Professor   Robert!
Osborne is the Representative of!
the   BE   Games  Association   of
Canada on the Executive Com-;
mittee. He   has also been  very
active on the Facilities Committee and in general has been one
of the main figures behind the
Games. \
Bus Philips, UBC's athletic director, is the man who is respon-|
sible for seeing that all track
events come off smoothly at the
Games Stadium. Among other
things he is responsible for the
training of all the officials for
the Games and must see that
they are on the job during the
Games. Bus, who has held many
big jobs in the sporting world
calls this one: "The biggest job
I've done."
DOUG POPULAR
Doug Whittle,' also of the UB3
athletic staff, has the important,
task of purchasing all thc equip-;
ment for  the  BEG.   Right   now;
Doug is the sporting good companies favorite pin-up boy as he
purchases  tens  of  thousands  of
dollars worth of equipment.       '
Dck   Mitchell,   UBC's   hockey
coach, is chairman of the wrestling committee of the BEG. Dick'
has been busy training officials;
Mid running clinics for the last
couple of months. !
To the University of British ■
Columbia, a young University
that has to scrape for every dime
to house and provide adequate
facilities to its ever expanding
student body, the BEG of 1934
will be remembered for the fine
athletic facilities that we would
otherwise not have had for many
years to come.
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VANCOUVER, B.C.
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Here at HYGRADE in RADIO CENTRE
you'll find the largest assortment of
WIRE AND TAPE RECORDERS
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Choose from the BIG SIX.
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always find the quality and assortment of
Radio Components.
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971 Richards St. PAGE 26
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
NO TIGHT, FUSSY CURLS HERE!
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for casual hair styles
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AS 853 GRADUATES receive their degrees
on May 17 and 18, 1954, the occasion is commemorated by publication of the graduation
issue of The Ubyssey, Volume 36, Number GO.
Reprinted here is the front page of the first
Ubyssey, Volume 1, Number 1. The edition
was printed by the Publications Board of the
University of B.C. on October 17, 1918, before
the Fairview Shacks, before the "Great Trek",
reportedly even before Forrt Camp was built.
CONGRATULATIONS
VARSITY  WASHERS
4440 W. 10th ALma 1253
Just pin-curl as usual. Apply Bobbi, rinse 45 minutes later.
When hair is dry, simply brush out. No neutralize!' needed.
No curlers, no resetting. So easy, you do it yourself.
Compliment* * * *
FROM MGR. and STAFF
Sasamat 5 & 10
BEST WISHES GRADUATES!
. . . every success in your future endeavors.
Cam/wA Jinn
4423 West 10th ALma 2481
Between Trimble and Sasamat
Congratulations
to the
Class of '54
and
Felicitations to the Faculty
Members for their Work,
Patience and Many Long
Hours.
Austin A-40 Somerset
FOR
Details - Demonstration - Delivery
CALL
GORDON BROS.
CEdar 8105
10th and ALMA
dlL yOlL JllUL Qt ...
MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS
(Milk, Cream, Butter, Buttermilk and Ice Cream)
are among the most essential of foods . . .
Serve Milk in All Forms
Creamland
City Wide Delivery
1335 HOWE ST. MArine 7371
DINE and DANCE
In the Heart of Chinatown
155 E. Pender MA. 1955 MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
PAGE 23
Sett WUheA to the
(jraduatina CiaAA
*{ I9S4
Commodore Cabaret
Your jSotf place-setting of
BIRKS
STERLING
is the most
important
one
Once you start saving Blrlu Sterling ... adding to it
every mouth . . . you'll soon accumulate a complete
service. And then for the rest of your life, you'll use
it every day, and delight ia iU possession.
Prices listed are for six-piece place settings, comprising lunch,
e.n knife and fork, small teaspoon, salad fork, cream soup
spoon, and butter spreader with follow handte.
Pompadour . .
Francis I . .
Oadroon . . .
London Engraved
23.M
23.0S
2470
2460
MMCT TERMS AVAIURE
B I \\ K S
SILVERSMITHS
cSraL UJidJwu
from
The Manager and Staff
The Bank of Commerce
THE UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD BRANCH
University Blvd. ot Wastarn Parkway
Vale Atque Ave.!
A friend of ours, a Scienceman, tells us that
the above phrase in a foreign language can be
tortured into meaning "Goodbye and Hello!"
. . . and we hasten to explain that what wc
mean by it is goodbye and good luck to all
UBC graduates and hello and good luck to the
same graduates as they join the rest of us in
what is somewhat grimly called the workaday
world. Anyway, our sentiments are sincere, no
matter what they say about our Latin.
Norris!
Len Norris, The Sun's
cartoonist, has lately
been awarded about
all the honors thai a
Canadian cartoonist
can accumulate. Look
(or his matchless
spoofs almost every
day in The Sua!
GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA   VANCOUVER, B.C.
Vancouver s  Home - Owned   Newspaper »s^-s-¥f^'!^j-^,jv, ^£^^^|^^l^^^^fi^^^^I4^^p^Sjp|l
^^^^^^mw^flwWWrW f*>wWW-kj^f^m'"X p^|^^^
||PifiPiP^Piilil^
PAGE 24
UBYSSEY GRADUATION ISSUE
MONDAY, MAY 17,1954
BRITISH   EMPIHE   A   COMMONWEALTH   GAMES
Reserve your tickets ond
accommodations by MAIL
Writ* now— and relax! Vancouver will be bursting wiHi
excitement, exploding with color, BRIMMING with visitors
when the world spotlight turns on the British Empire Games
July 30 to August 7 but you can make sure of a rinoside seat
at this great Commonwealth spectacle NOW — by MAIL.
Just send for the B. E. G. Information Folder and have your
reserved seats and accommodation all ready when the biggest
sports event in all B.C. history gets under way. Be on hand
to welcome H R H the Duke of Edinburgh and Field Marshal
Earl Alexander of Tunis ... to watch records broken in
contests among more than 700 champions from 25 countries.
Wrlta tor tha B.E.G. Foldor NOW-TODAY
HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS
THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH
■    PLEASE SEND 8. E. G. FOLDER TO
m    NAME     	
ADDRESS
FOR RESERVATIONS^
... mail coupon now f ^
To: Box Office,
Britinh Empire Games,
658 Hornby Street,
Vancouver 1, H.C., Can;>i'
VANCOUVER, B.C.
JULY 30 - AUG. 7
540]

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