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The Ubyssey Jan 31, 1924

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 Issued Weekly by the Student Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
V olume VI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., JANUARY 31st,    1924
No. 14k
VARSITY WIN
I. L. A. GAME
SATURDAY
U. B.  C.   Men   Defeat   Division
Leaders  2-0—Phillips  and
Mosher Play Stellar
Game
The I. L. A. took their first defeat
of the season at the hands of the fast-
stepping Varsity soccer eleven at Con
Jones' park last Saturday in a Mainland Cup game. Over fifteen hundred
fans saw Wilkinson and Lundie bulge
the Longshoremen's net for a brace
of counters, whilst Mosher held the I.
L. A. sharpshooters scoreiess. Heggie
had little to do, but he made two brilliant saves, one a penalty from Bob
Forgie's boot, and the other a hot
shot sent in by Jimmy Grant. Both
shots were sent in in the second half,
and extended the tall custodian to his
limit.
Accompanied by the strains of the
Freshie band and the vociferations of
some -100 Varsity rooters, the Collegians gave a spirited display. In fact
it was spirit more than good soccer
that won the game for Varsity, and
a lack of it that lost the day for the
dockers.
The waterfront men started off at
a fast clip and for a few minutes the
Collegians seemed lost and over anxious, but they soon settled down and
forced the play for the remainder of
the period. About the middle of the
first stanza Huestis broke away and
took the ball down the right wing
with terrific speed, beat Smith, the
opposing back, and drew Robinson out
of his goal, and then passed to Wil-
(Continued on Page 5)
Intercollegiate /
Hockey Feature ^
Next Wednesday
Free    Skating    Session    After
Washington-Varsity Game
On Wednesday, February 6th the
hockey team plays its first game of
the annual series for the Pacific Coast
Intercollegiate Championship. On
that date University of Washington
tangles with the local squad at the
Arena.
After the game there will be a free
skating session. The game starts at
7.00 p.m., which will allow two hours
of skating. Owing to the kindness of
the Arena management Varsity students will have the opportunity of seeing the game and having a skating
session for the one admission.
This is the first intercolleggiate
game of any kind this season. With
the aid of the Pep Band and Varsity
rooters the team will show Washington that U. B. C. has the speed and
punch of a real live institution.
Tickets will be on sale at the Students' Council Office and by all members of the team.
DEVELOPMENT 1PR0MINENT
WORK TO BE
UNDERTAKEN
Students Enthusiastically Accept
Jack    Grant's    Challenge—
Playing Fields To Be
Prepared
SPEAKERS AT
/ CONFERENCE
Vital   Questions    Considered   At
Various   Sessions—Discussions
Rather Disappointing
MISS HETTY S0MEKSE7
Who again takes Lead in Spring Play
Plans Under Way
For Spring Play
Parts Assigned Production To Be
Given in City, March 24-25
With the exception of one/role, the
cast for the spring play, 'tflie World
and_His_Vjiife," has now been aehnite-
ly decided. As in the two previous
years, Miss Betty L^omexset will play
the part of tlie leading lady. As Gloria last year, and Olivia in "Mr. Pim
Passes By," her portrayal was of outstanding  excellence.
Miss Elfreda Berkeley, who was
chosen for the second feminine part,
is also known to University audiences,
having taker part in "Green Stockings" in 1920. Miss Avis Pumphery
and Miss Mildred Teeple, the latter of
Christmas play fame, will alternate in
king the part of the maid.
For the leading male role. Peter
Palmer has been selected. He is by
no means a stranger to the students,
having won his laurels, both on the
stage and in athletics, where he is a
member of the first rugby team.
The remaining masculine roles will
be filled by Alex. Zoond, Tommy M.
C. Taylor, and Fraser Lister. Of
these, the first two have taken part
in Christmas productions, and Mr.
Lister in "You Never Can Tell."
The part yet undecided is that of
the husband, for which H. N. Cross
and E. R. Chamberlain are competing.
These two are so equal that only
weeks of rehearsing will decide which
is the better The former won much
(Continued on Page 5)
On  Tuesday  last a  large  crowd  of.
students  gathered  in  the  Auditorium j
to hoar the plans for the development j
atLPoint Grey.   Mr. Jack Grant spoke!
of the future of athletics at the Point, j
saying that until the present time all i
negotiations     with     the     government j
have been kept  secret, but that now \
the time has come to lay the case be- !
fore the student body.    A gymnasium j
is   needed   at   the   Point,   but  unfortunately the government is not in a position to state definitely what contribution it  can make towards  the construction   of   it;   nevertheless   a   substantial   sum  has  been   promised   for
the   locker   compartment.     The   playing   fields   will   call    for   considerably
more  outlay  on  the   part  of  the  students   than   was   expected.     The   successful   execution   of    this  work   will
prove that U. B. C. students are willing, first of all. to make some personal
sacrifice   before   seeking   outside   sup-
Port. t'p-fo-k
—'vLJ-^ —
Justice Murphy
Speaks on League
Work of League of Nations  To
Date Outlined—Its Effectiveness in Preventing War
One of the most eloquent and forceful addresses that has been giv. n an
the LTniversity Auditorium for .some
time past was delivered last/Friday
noon, when Mr. Justice [^Mujvphy,
representing the Vancouver branch
or the League of Nations Society,
spoke on the work which the League
has been doing in the interests of
world  peace.
Mr. justice—Mjirphy- began by referring to the evils of war and the need
of peaceful arbitration of a decisive
kind which should pervent reversal
to force in the settlement of national
disputes. He then proceeded to sifow
that the -League of Nations,/"backed
as it was by the moral and physical
power of the fifty-four nations represented in it, was the only council of
arbitration capable of permanently
settling the numerous disputes that
are constantly arising between nations.
The speaker then went on to give
concrete instances of the satisfactory
work which the League had accomplished during the past few years.
Amongst these was the settlement of
the quarrel between Sweden and Finland over the Aaland Islands. Then
followed adjustments of disputes be-
(Continued on Page 6)
The first session of the-^S. C. M.
Conference was held last Friday evening TiT the Auditorium, when many
availed themselves of the opportunity of hearing discussed some of Canada's most vital  questions.
Mr. Gibbard, president of the S. C.
M„ acted as Chairman and in his
opening address welcomed to the conference, Miss Silverthorn, secretary
of the S. G. M. at the University of
Alberta.   /
Dr. S. S. Osterhout,_the first speaker, read an interesting paper on "The
Immigration Policy of Canada and
Treatment of Immigrants When Here."
He pointed out that the problem had
six distinct aspects—the International, Biological, Educational, Trilingual,
Economic and the Social. To each
one of these he suggested a feasible
solution.
In dealing with "The Treatment of
Orientals When Here," he maintained
that the difficulty could be surmounted by means of suitable Immigration
laws, vigorous law enforcement, maintenance of higher ideals, cultivation
of an international spirit, and an adequate social program. ,
The second speaker, Miss M. E."Xol-
man, took as her subject, "The South
Europeans." She gave statistics as
to their physical defects, illiteracy and
criminal intents, stating that they furnished an educational, social and
criminal problem. "The two great
agencies at work amongst foreigners,"
she said,' "are the Church and the
State." She maintained that the only
policy to be followed is that of the
Quota law, vocational aid, and supervision.
The meeting was then thrown open
for discussion. As the Hon. H. H.
Stevens happened to be present, he
was called upon to speak. He emphasized the practical nature of the
(Continued on  Page 2)
Annual Pictures
J     To Be In At Once
All those whose pictures are to be
taken for the Annual—all graduates
and those holding executive positions,
whose pictures are to be run, MUST
have them ready by the first week in
February. If they are not already
in, send in to the photographers
the proof which is to appear in the
Annual,  IMMEDIATELY.
Secretaries of societies, and others
delegated to prepare class and club
write-ups are reminded that their
work is due by the end of this week.
Those responsible for the class scrap-
pages are particularly urged to begin
work at once. Material for their
pages should be secured through the
co-operation of the class sub-marshals. 2
Students Loose
Leaf Supplies
A full line of covers
and refills at reasonable
prices.
THE     UBYSSEY
Jan. 3 1st, 195
M. Conference
MURPHY & CHAPMAN
LIMITED
STATIONERS,   PRINTERS
S69 Seymour Street
The     VARSITY    SHOP
ANNOUNCING
Our
Removal Sale
Commencing
FRIDAY,   FEBRUARY
1st
Watch  our  Window  for
Daily Price Features
Fashion Craft
Thos. Foster & Co.
514   Granville  St.
One Store Only
problem, and declared himself impres-
by the atmosphere of sincerity in
the arguments of every speaker.
SECOND   SESSION
The second session of the S. C. M.
Conference was held on Saturday
afternoon, the subject being, "Christianity and Higher Education." As
the first speaker, Dean Coleman, was
unable to be present, the meeting was
opened by Miss Bollert who took the
practical end of the discussion, "Religious Education in the Schools."
Miss Bollert pointed out that religious
education was necessary in the
schools, but that as it was at present,
it was inadequate. A survey of the
different types of religious education
used in the United States and Canada,
and their results comprised the rest
of the speech.
2J2! ^fdgpwirk was the second speaker. In an interesting talk on "The
Reaction to Christianity," he declared
that the conflict between science and
religion which was now affecting the
masses, was the same as that which
had formerly disturbed Matthew
Arnold and his contemporaries. "It
is the business of the S. C. M. to
make the scientific and religious
views coincide," said Dr. Sedgewick,
in concluding.
In his address on, "The Alliance of
Chris'tianity and Education." Dr. _W.
H. -jSniiLh pointed out that owing to
a lack of proper understanding, there
is difficulty in uniting the spheres of
religion and education. Dr. Smith
closed with a plea for a more profound regard for the scientific and
religious  worlds.
An open discussion followed the address of the last speaker.
THIRD SESSION ^j>C '
At the third session of the conference J. E. Gibbard presided, and with
but few preliminary remarks (introduced the first speaker, Mr. Harkness.
His subject dealt with modern so~cial
problems. At the outset he gave
startling   statistics   on   infant   mortal-
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SHELLY   BROTHERS
ity, the prevalence of social diseases,
and the large and increasing number
of sub-normals. Mr. Harkness pointed
out that unless the latter were given
adequate education and care many of
them in later life would be found
among the criminals. The time has
passed when anyone can gather his
coat about him and live heedless of
his fellow. Society is, in a certain
degree, a great organism which is affected throughout if one of its members be unhealthy. The speaker then
appealed to every student to grapple with these evils, and especially
emphasized the responsibility that lies
upon the Christian student who has
pledged himself to follow the Nazar-
ene.       S/V.
Mr.j/Priestman then followed. His
topic was whether Christianity and
prosperity in business were compatible. At the beginning of his address
he defined what he considered to be
true success. It consists, he said, not
in the amassing of a fortune but in
the ability of the business man to
gather other men around him so that
ultimately the whole community is affected. Sometimes businesses carried on according to Christian principles may have suffered financially
yet they have accomplished a great
deal in making these principles more
universal. In one case that was mentioned the practice of bribery was exposed to the English House of Commons, with the result that a law was
passed making it a penal offence. Several methods of conducting a business
were outlined, but experience has
shown, the speaker said, that the most
efficient way is to allow the employees some share in the management.
The last phase of the question, the
church and the/fabor movement, was
taken by Mr. ^Richardson. He first
mentioned some" of the reforms in
economic conditions that needed to be
undertaken, but apparently failed to i
realize how slowly only beneficial
change in society can take place. He
criticized the organized church rather
severely for its indifference to social
affairs. The church had cried "Peace!
Peace!" when there was no peace.
Mr. Richardson, however, was definite
in his announcement that a more
persistent following of the Christ was
required; such a course would render
indolence and indifference impossible.
The Florence
Confectionery
437   BROADWAY   W.
(Corner  Cambie)
Light   Lunches                      Tobaccos
Confectionery
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A cosy spot on  a cold day.
ERNEST   T.   TAYLOR,
Fair.   5697.
in
Spalding Sweaters
Are Warm Friends
Become Avquainted.'
1 Of Canada. Limited "
424 Hastings St., W., Vancouver, B. C. I
Have
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Our
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Free
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Dixon Motors Ltd.
Phone Sey. 274
Make Canada a Nation
YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN OF THE STUDENT
BODY
An organization has been formed, named the Native
Sons of Canada, for the purpose of promoting the interests
of Canada and Canadians.
It is the hope of our body, now Dominion wide in its
establishment of "Assemblies" or branches, to contribute
its utmost to the advancement of Canadian Industry and
Learning and to the development of a Canadian National
Pride and Sentiment.
Canada's future is the future of her young men and
women. You will be able to do most for our country and
for yourselves as individuals, if your Life and Activities
are guided by a devotion to Canada and her Institutions.
Only by developing a Broad National Sentiment and
Patriotism can we have Unity within; and on Unity-
depends prosperity and everything of a National Character.
We stand for Equality and Nationhood and Sovereign
Rights within the Commonwealth of the British Nations.
Any native born Canadian is eligible for membership.
Application forms may be obtained from the Secretary,
Capt. E. B. MacMasters, 633 Hastings St. W., Vancouver,
B. C.
Join the Assembly nearest your home.
NATIVE SONS OF  CANADA
(Vancouver Assembly No. 2) V"
Jan. 31st. 1924
THE     UBYSSEY
Take a Co-Ed or go on your
lonesome to the
««
ALADDIN"
Delightful  Luncheons
Snappy Afternoon Teas
Epicurean  Dinners
Situated   at  Granville   Mansions
Bldg.,   721   Robson   St.
MRS. E. MAY MOODY
Hostess
Mid-Season Overcoat reductions at the
SEMI-READY
CLOTHES SHOP
t>55 Granville  St.
All Overcoats selling at reduced prices
25 to 331/3      off
Thomas k McBain Limited
Semi-Ready  Service  Shop
655 GRANVILLE STREET
EMPRESS
Phone   Seymour  2492
Miss Verna Felton and the
Allen Players in
'' Fair and Warmer''
By   the   Authohr  of
"Why   Men   Leave   Home"
Eve.. 8:30; lioe, 55c, 60e, 75c.
Wed. Mat.: 20c, 60c: Sat. Mat.:
30c, 40c. Kiddies anytime, 15c.
500  gallery  seats  15c.
Get a
VARSITY PENNANT
For the
FOOTBALL MATCHES
We have them in stock
SHAW &MGGILL, LTD
SPORTING GOODS
658 Robson St.
Service Bldg., 4 Doors East of
Granville St.
rENUS
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Write for
booklet on
Venus Pencils and
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Mechanical Pencils
Varsity Basketers
Are Unable To Down
^/ Washington Players
Last Saturday night a record crowd
witnessed the defeat of the Varsity
Senior A squad by the speedy Wash-
ingTojLNormal quintette to the tune
of" 41-26! Band master Ben Williams
and his Pep Band escorted the visitors
onto the floor. Shortly after the opening whistle Tanny Butler made the
tally with a field basket. In the first
part of the half Varsity held their
own over the Normals, the score once
standing 9-5 in favor of the U.B.C. Les
Bickell had his shooting eye open and
dropped in :hree field baskets in a
row. Toward the end of the half the
State Normals got into their stride
and broke away from the home team,
leaving the half time score at 21-13
in their favor.
At the beginning of the second half
Yell King Bishop^ led the crowd in
a sky-rocket for the Washington boys.
From the opening whistle the visitors,
displaying wonderful combination and
accurate shooting, out-played the
home squad. Thomas, the Normals'
speedy left, forward put up a star exhibition, finishing with 19 points to
his credit. Toward the end of the
half Varsity tried to force the play
but was unable to better its condition. The State Normals called time
out. held a consultation and then proceeded with their speedy pace for the
rest  of the  game.
Referee E. L. Yeo handled the
whistle in his usual efficient style to
ihe satisfaction of all. Though the
result, of the game was disappointing
to the Varsity supporters, the game
itself was an excellent exhibition of
the sport, ami the brilliant play of the
visitors brought much applause from
the  spectators.
The   Teams
Varsity—Bickell    (10),    Butler    (8),
Bassett   (2),   Carlisle   (4),   Wilkinson
(2).  Lewis,  Hartley.
State Normals—Thomas (19), Wan-
derford (10), Rankin (6), Wilks, Dawson  (6).
Following the game players and
spectators enjoyed an informal dance
which lasted till midnight. The
basketball club wishes to thank Fletcher Bros, for the use of a piano for
the occasion.
Varsity Ruggers Win
New Trophy By
Victoria Win
VarsiFy's first rugby team added another cup" to the collection for Pt.
Grey last Saturday when they defeated the Victoria Wests in a hectic game
at the Capital. That Underhill has
five stitches in his head, that Palmer
has a sprained ankle and that Price
was ordered off the field shows conclusively that play was rough on both
sides. Price's offense seems to have
been, too rough play following Underbills mishap at the hands of the
wests.
The Varsity squad played the man
short for most of the second period
and during this time the Wests scored.
They were unable to even the eight
points the collegians had gained earlier in the game, however and went
down to defeat. The team will receive the Rounsefell cup as the best
team in the -city leagues of the province.
Varsity    vs.     Washington,     at    the
Arena,  Wednesday,  Feb. 6.
Varsity Juniors Lose
To St. Mary's
' VARSITY   SENIOR   A   vs.   NATIVE
SONS
1 Monday evening the Senior A
squad met and defeated the Native
Sons at the Normal Gym by a score
of 26-17. At the beginning the Sons
got away to a lead of 6-0, but Varsity
soon settled down, and displaying
good combination brought the scbre to
8 all by the end of the first half.
For the first 10 minutes of the second half the play was about even, both
teams working hard for the lead.
However toward the end of the half,
with Tommy Wilkinson getting into
his old time form, Varsity drew away
from the Sons. Tanny Butler showed his usual form and topped the scoring list. Dal. Grauer played an excellent game at guard, while Gord Lewis
not only held down his guard position
but broke into the scoring list for
6 points.
The third team's winning streak of
eight gahies' "came to an abrupt end
on Gordon Mud Estate where St.
Mary's strong squad, considerably reinforced, gave the promising new
team its walking ticket from the Allan
Cup__Series to the tune of 4-1. It
was~ the old case of funk. Varsity
started off to wipe up, and during the
first half were very unfortunate not
to have run through at least three
goals. In the second stanza, however,
the moral standard fell away below
par, and in spite of the great work ot
Sutherland, Davies, and a few others,
the back fell out of the team. Following some splendid play, including
many golden opportunities thrown to
the little fellow with horns, by Varsity's firing line, St. Mary's scored on
a neat header. Miller finished one
of Varsity's frequent raids a minute
later by easily scoring the second
counter; but in spite of the blue and
(Continued on Page 5)      J
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University students extend to Mr.
Heilly Arkley their heartfelt sympathy
for the injuries which he sustained
in Saturday's Basketball game.
Always—"Your Money's  Worth or  Your Money Back"
William DICK Limited
45-47-49 Hastings Street East x/
THE      UBYSSEY
Jan.   31 st,  J92
©In? HbgSBH}'
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued    every    Thursday    by    the    Publications
Board  of  the   University of   British   Columbia.
Extra   mural   subscriptions,   $2.00   per   session.
For advertising rates apply
Business   Manager. • Phone   Fair.   4485
EDITORIAL   STAFF.
Editor-in-Chief    A.   I,.   Wheeler
Senior  Editor Cliff  Uowline
Associate   Editors Miss   Grace   Smith
T.   W.   Drown
Miss  Sadie   Hoylos
Feature   Editor    Ralph   Mathews
Literary   Editor - _\V.   C.   Murphy
Exchange  Editor Miss  Gwen   Stirling
Sporting Editor  - J. Cows
Chief  Reporter   H.  C.  MacCallum
BEFORTOBIAL STAFF.
Laura S. Mowatt, John Grace, Dorothy Arkwright, A. Earle Birney, Florence Williams, Doris McKay. K. O. Norman, Dave Taylor, R .YV. Hall. Marion
Smith, T.es Buckley. Alan Hemingway.
H.   D.   Wallis
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager  T.  .1.  Keenan
Assist.  Bus.   Mgrs W.  H.   Sparks
Eric   Dunn
Homer   A.   Thompson.
Circulation  Manager  F.  J.  Brand
Business   Assistants H    C.   Etter
Miss  Eloise  Angell
Miss  Isabel  Macbeth
E. J. Eades
EDITOR   FOB   THE    'WEEK
Sadie   Boyles
ATHLETIC  EQUIPMENT
v A serious problem is facing • the
Student Body at present in the matter of supplying athletic equipment,
which the Government will not furnish in its completion of our new
home at Point Grey. In order to
maintain a reasonable standard in our
athletics it is absolutely necessary
that we have equipment prepared and
available on our arrival.
The most pressing of our immediate needs at the Point are the supplying of additional equipment for the
cafeteria; the establishment of a cooperative store, with which might be
combined the book store; and the laying out of athletic fields. It is not
known whether the Government will
build the gymnasium or not, but it Is
certain that we will have to make
provision for the equipment. The
construction of the rugby and soccer
fields will involve considerable labor
and expense, as the ground must be
leveled and then covered with four to
six inches of good soil which will
form the base for the turf.
This is an important matter and
demands immediate attention. It
must be dealt with and the work done
before we reach our promised home,
which we understand will be next
session. The problem renuires the
serious consideration of the whole
Student Body, and it is up to every
member of the Alma Mater Society to
support any committee that may be
appointed to deal with the situation.
S. C. M. CONFERENCE
The first inter-provincial conference of the S. C. M. to be held at Vancouver took place in the auditorium
last Friday and Saturday. Vital students problems were dealt with by
competent speakers, yet the number
of students attending the meetings
was rather disappointing and consequently the discussions were not entered into with much enthusiasm. In
fact, there was very little expression
of general student opinion.
Although it is true that the date
of the conference was unfortunate, as
other student activities of great interest and importance were taking
place at the same time, yet even under the most favorable conditions it
is not likely that the conference
would have aroused very much enthusiasm. The vast majority of students take no part whatever in any
religious activity at the University,
regardless of whether they are or are
not connected with denominational
bodies of the city. There is a spirit
of indifference, even of passive antipathy to religious matters, pervading the University. It, is unfortunately true that with most of the students
all generally accepted religious theories are condemned without any consideration of their worth. This attitude represents intolerance in its
n^ost objectionable form—the intolerance of apathy.
Such a spirit of bigoted indifference
is a discredit to the University,
where keen interest is evinced in
questions, economic, historical,literary,
and scientific, which are less fundamentally important than religion. The
result is that what, should comprise
one of the most important spheres of
thought and discussion at a university
—consideration of the underlying
problems of life—is almost entirely
neerleeted. While such conditions prevail the University as a centre of
thought is defective in one of its
chief  functions.
/\  OUR   CIRCULATION
As members of the Student Publication Board we wish to thank the readers of THE UBYSSEY for their obvious appreciation of this paper. Appreciation has been carried to such
an extent that last week some three
hundred extra copies were carried off
as if by magic. Now appreciation in
itself is acceptable enough, but when
it costs in the neighborhood of fifteen
dol'ars a week for twenty-two weeks
in the year, it causes us to stop and
consider whether it may not be pur-
chpsed at too great a price.
The point is this. Each student in
the University has in his or her Alma
Mater fees paid for one copy of the
Ubyssey for each week in the term.
If some two hundred people make it
a habit of taking an extra copy
"while they're at it" it means that the
deficit must be made up with money
which is badly needed for other purposes.     Please  take  One  UBYSSEY.
In order to facilitate the work of
our Circulation Manager on Thursdays
we request that students do not call
at the Publications Offices for UBYS-
SEYS. Henceforth no papers will be
obtainable except at the customary
places of distribution.
Varsity vs. Washington, at the
Arena,  Wednesday,  Feb. 6.
\   HIGH JINKS
High Jinks promises to be one of
the "highest" this year. Anyway it
seems to be diverting to those who
have charge of the affair, but it is
rather disconcerting to be one of the
many to whom, for the present, the
affair must be wrapped in mystery,
and to be content with hilarious
shriek and "Oh, won't that be a
SCREAM!" proceeding from those
who do know.
However, there are a few details
and a few "musts" that are to be
broadcasted. First and foremost, the
only admission to the affair is a fancy
costume of some description, but—
it is especially requested that the
women appear in couples. There will
be five prizes given, the best costumes
to be judged by Miss Mclnnes and
Miss Bollert.
First on the program will be a
grand march of all the couples, after
which Miss Mclnnes will speak. Then
the skits, of which there are four,
will be staged. The remainder of the
evening will be devoted to prize-giving, dancing and refreshments.
Remember—Friday, February ,8th,
from 7.45 till 11 p.m.
Exchange News
Willamette   University,  January.  —
The junior annual, the Wallulah, is
sponsoring an innovation — for Willamette—a beauty contest for the purpose of discovering the five most
handsome men and the five most beautiful girls in the upper classes. The
results will not be known until the
annual is published in the spring,
when the pictures of the winners will
appear in  the  feature  section.
LOST
Black loose-leaf note Book.    Please
return at once to Mr. Lome Morgan.
CHARLTON & RATHBUN
Photographers and Miniature Paintera
2044   GRANVILLE   STREET
(Cor.  5th  Ave.)
PHONE   BAY.   170      -    VANCOUVER
Typewriter
Repairs
We    repair   all   mokes    of    Type-
tcriters   at    reasonable   prices   and
our   work   is   guaranteed   to   give
satisfaction
A   TRIAL   SOLICITED
Moke   T'se  of  Our  Monthly
Inspection   System
Graham Hirst
Company
THE  CORONA  PEOPLE
312   PENDER   ST.   W.
Sey. 8194 Vancouver, B. C.
LIONEL WARD
&   COMPANY., LTD.
Printers
of
Magazines
Papers
Annuals
and
All Business
and Society
Stationery
and Printing
H
Telephone   Sey.   195
316-320   Homer   St.
Vancouver,  B.  C.
VELOUR
HATS—'The   N-'ew   (Snappy
Spring; Ones Have Arrived.
$7.50
A    Reasonable    Price    for    a
Wonderful Hat.
Turpin Bros. Ltd.
MEN'S   OUTFITTERS
629 Granville St.
Pitman Shorthand
BUSINESS COLLEGE, Ltd
422   RICHARDS  STREET
The business of a country Is
carried on by the men and women
who have been trained in the
lines of commerce and industry.
We can give you all that is required to make you a successful
business   man   or   woman.
The   PITMAN   COLLEGE,   during    25    years,    has     successfully
trained  young   people   to   hold   responsible   positions.
Cor. Hastings St.   Phone Sey. 9135
Lovers
of good dance tunes-
—
When you
wish to purchase a wonderful w
hot blues fox trot—buy.
iltz and a
Paul
Whiteman's S. S. Leviathan Orehestrt
MAMMA, PAPA AND  YOU
Also
MEXICALI ROSE
, hit
THE
Featured  this  Week  at
EMPRESS  and  COLONIAL  THEATRES
Any Orchestra will be delighted to play them
for you. Jan.  3 1st  1924
THE      UBYSSEY
l/
Of course you don't
like
A LEAKY
AUTO TOP
We  arc  quite  sure you
DON'T  LIKE
RUBBERS
AN   OVERCOAT
that   leaks   is   worse
DUOO Waterproofing1 cures all
these troubles, so don't stand for
them  any  longer.
Small  tins  for   Boots 8 An
Large    tins    for    Autos SI.25
Overcoats   Treated
$2.00   to   $2.50
Outings   Limited
Tel.   Sey.   t38C
817   Pender   St.   W.
EVANS & HASTINGS
Better Quality
PRINTERS
We make a specialty of:
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., Etc.
Students would do well to give
us a call before going elsewhere
578 Seymour St.
PHONE SEY. 189
Get   Your   Next
HAT  or     CAP
at
LINFORTH'S
Formerly
RICHARDSON   &   POTTS
417 Granville St.
MADAM E. VERONA
Is giving free teacup readings
with afternoon tea.
Palm and card readings with
evening dinners, at
PURDY'S
The   home  of  the  famous
Chocolates
Purdy's
675 i Granville Street
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express iht.mselves on any topic of general interest. The Ubyssey does not assume responsibility lor any of the views
expressed.
All contributions must be written
legibly, in ink; on one side of the paper
only. They must not exceed two hundred words in length, and must reach
this office not later than noon Monday,
in order to appear in the issue of the
following  Thursday.
\ NOT    GUILTY.
Kditor   M'bys.sey."
Dear   Sir: —
-N'"l as a mark of disapproval, but as
a method oi clearing up a misunderstanding, I would like it understood that
1 am not the author of the letter appearing     in     tile    n>yssey     of    last    week,
under  the  initials  "A.  E.  B."
It is to lie regretted that University
traditions reRardini; student correspondence are such that anonymity is the
custom   and   not   tlie   exception.
A.   Karl   Birney
V     THAT   RUBE   BAND.
Editor  tlie   Ubyssey.
Sir:—
on behalf of a certain section of the
readers of your vaiuable paper, I rise in
protest at a barbarous and unsportsmanlike action by the freshmen class.
i reler to the disgraceful exhibition at
Tan Jones' Baric on Saturday last, when
the "rub? band11 of that class so conducted itself that the I.B.A. football
.e.ini was forced into a state of bewildered inefficiency, and were compelled to ap teal to the referee for fair play.
While a certain amount of enthusiasm
may lie permissible, still the shouting
of "The poor old l.B.A. ain't what it
used to be." is hardly in accord with the
general standard of our ethics. Let us
hope tht general public will take as
charitable a view of the incident as the
Daily Sun which said: "The part
psychology plays in athletics. was
demonstrated    when   the
Varsity     rooters     sin^in^1     "1.I..A.,     you     ain't
what   you   used   to   lie	
snared     tho     Angoras     of    the     fighting
dockers   -and    romped   away
with   the same  :!-()."       I remain,
X.    V.   7...   Aits   '27.
VARSITY  vs.  ST.  MARY'S
,   ..   (Continued from Page 3)
gold advantage during the remaining
mintues, the enemy put themselves
one up. The second half was a tale
of woeful confession, for St. Mary's
added another brace. Smith, Partridge, and Miller tried with occasional brilliant breaks, and Davies
tried to save the situation valiantly,
but the tale is told as far as Varsity's
Allan  Cup career goes.
The Team—Sutherland, Ledingham
and Dav es, Cunningham, Heaslip and
Taylor, Smith, Miller, Partridge,
Dynes  and Black.
Varsity    vs.     Washington,    at    the
Arena,  Wednesday,   Feb.  6.
^ t Saturday's Game
(Continued  from Page 1)
kinson, who banged the sphere into
an open goal. A few minutes later,
Lundie put the game on ice for his
team mates by a fine individual effort. Lundie eluded Ingram, and although knocked down by Robinson,
who ran out of his goal to meet, him,
Jock regained his feet in time to kick
the ball into the rigging for Varsity's
second counter.
After this reverse the I. L. A. seemed to go up in the air, and a little
hard feeling entered into the game;
this was particularly so after the interval, when the waterfront men started to play the man rather than the
ball. It speaks well for the students
that none of them lost their tempers,
as they were fouled pretty often. Referee Allen checked up the play pretty
closely, and raised the ire of the I.L.A.
supporters and players alike. The arbiter was forced to remove the dockers' linesman, who was favoring them
in his decisions and criticising Allen's
work—which, by the way, was excellent.
Varsity had it all over their opponents in speed, and when they got
away they got away cleanly, whilst the
I. L. A. attack was cumbersome. The
whistle went for time with the students still pressing, but. unable to add
to their score.
After the game Allen was attacked
by several of the losers' supporters,
and had to be escorted home. The test
of a good team is one that knows
how to take a licking, and although
the knocking of the I. L. A. out of the
cup was a bitter pill for the dockers
to swallow, this does not justify their
unsportsmanlike conduct, and their
display lost them quite a few friends
in local soccer circles.
Varsity Line-up: Mosher, Baker,
Crute, Buckley, Phillips, Ledingham,
Huestis, Lundie, Wilkinson, Butler,
Emery, Deans.
SPRING PLAYS
(Continued from Page 1)
commendation by his portrayal of the
Fantastic at Christmas, and the latter
took part in last year's spring play.
In Vancouver, performances will be
given at the Orpheum Theatre on
March 24 and 25. Also plans are being made for the annual tour of the
province in May.
Ai/TRIOLET
I'm not in love with anyone,
It's just on general principle,
That I should have a little fun!
I'm not in love with anyone,
I've had some snubs since I've begun,
But zeal remains invincible,
I'm not in love with anyone,
It's just on  general principle.
—O. B. R.
'?■
INTERNATIONAL CELEBRITY
CONCERT  SERIES
MISCHA LEVITZKI
Celebrated Pianist Orpheum, Feb. 19, 8.30 p.m.
IGNACE  PADEREWSKI
Famous Pianist March 25
BAUER AND CASALS
Greatest of British born pianists   and   the   world's   greatest
'Cellist, April 1st.
Management—Lily  J.  Laverock.    Address all inquiries to care of
Fletcher Bros. 633  Granville  Street
For   Bf..w tv  axd   Skrvice
Thkkk's   Nothing   to
Far a i.
Our
"IMPERIAL"
It is a superfine quality,
pure thread silk hose, made
especially for the Hudson's
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in Hudson's Bay Stores.
Come in ribbed or hemmed
top style, in black and all
wanted colors, specially reinforced at heel and toe, and
all sizes.
Per Pair, $2.00
Hudson's Bay
Company
Student's Note
Books
Loose Leaf and Bound Form
also
Fillers for all Standard
Shes
CLARKE & STUART
Co., Ltd.
..Educational Stationers and Printers..
S50   SEYMOUR   ST.
Telephone Seymour 3000
The Palm Garden
Fruit, Confectionery
Ice Cream  and
Tobacco
Hot Lunches Served,
Also Afternoon Tea
Phone Fair. 877
Cor. 10th and Heather St.
PRINTING
We give the very Best in Serric*
and Quality
Dance Programmes, Letterheads,
Envelopes, etc.
also     Personal   Stationery
COADE & DAUBNEY
028 Broadway Wist THE     UBYSSEY
Jan. 3 1st, 1924
EVERY
SUIT
REDUCED
BUY
YOURS
NOW
C. D. BRUCE
Limited
Cor.  Homer and Hastings
The
Royal cleans
everywhere
thoroughly.
B. C.    ELECTRIC
J. W. Foster Ltd.
345 Hasting. St. West
All the Newest Models
in College Suits and Overcoats at Prices that are
right.
See us before Buying
Dancing
Private and  Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W.E.Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
SEY. 3058-O or SEY. 101
Jones'  Entertain
\        On the Radio
The installation of the radio had
brought new life to the Jones' household. Mrs. Jones loved good music
and was thrilled with the variety
symphony from P.K.Q. and O.K.D.
What an opportunity to put on a little
class and invite the Adams' lor an
evening's entertainment. Accordingly an evening was set aside and the
highbrow neighbours deigned to honour the humble household of Jones.
Mr. Jones was primed for the occasion, the radio was not. The clock
struck 9. Mrs. Jones chirped in, "and,
Mrs. Adams, last night we heard the
most beautiful oratorio from station
K.F.I., Los Angeles." Just then Mr.
Jones tuned in. The room was filled
with an ear splitting noise that fairly
rocked the loud speaker. Mr. Jones
stood horrified, "I guess there's a confounded pidgeon on the aerial," he
stuttered, "you know they always spoil
things (rushes out and comes back")
there now we'll get something good.
(Grasps the tuner and vernier and
labors vigorously—hears something)—
"Hah! here we are; come, Mrs. Adams,
don't miss this."
9.15—Market reports come through,
continues tuning.
9.30—Local station starts broadcasting bedtime stories.
9.45—Driven crazy by bedtime stories. Mrs. Adams yawns and appears
fidgety.
10.00—Jones tunes incessantly—■
busts a tube—goes downtown to buy
a new one.
10.30—New one won't work—hears
noise in distance—expressions of joy,
"Ah that's got it."
10.45—Lady singing, sounds like
dicky bird screeching, fades out and
announcer calls station. Terrific
screaming interrupts everything and
can't catch name of place. Tries to
explain that it is all due to grounded
wire.
11.00—Curses! Nothing on the
radio, faint scratching, immediately
put phones on Mrs. Adams. Dr. Raz-
zem lectures on "The value of a perfect bust."    Mrs. Adams horrified.
11.15—Suddenly discovers that
aerial has broken loose—place looks
like a cyclone-stricken junk-shop.
11.30—Turns to fifteen or more stations only to hear "Signing off, Good
Night." After fifty more stations are
caught signing off hears faint voice.
"This is New Westminster, B. C,
signing off, Good Night." (Hurrah!
Hurrah! Finds he has plucked so
much hair he won't have to go to barber's to-morrow.)
12.00—Dragged off to bed by Mrs.
Jones who gives her husband a thorough drilling on how to behave before
rich lady friends.    "Good Night!"
R. M.
^ MASS MEETING
\ '       (Continued from Page 1)
Mr. Hedley, by means of a diagram,
gave an interesting description of the
-buildings at the Point. He made humourous reference to the grandsons
of the present students, describing the
magnificent buildings they will enjoy.
The speaker made a vigorous appeal
to all students to assist the campaign
for athletic equipment, pointing out
that the junior years would reap benefits in proportion to the work they
did.
Mr. Grant stated that the future of
the Varsity in athletics depended on
the outcome of the campaign. Without proper means it will be impossible
for the teams to maintain their past
standards.
Mr. Goodwin moved a resolution
that the meeting go on record as being in favour of a campaign to raise
funds    for    athletic    development    at
Literary Corner
^SONNET
There   is  a  murmur  falling   soft  and
low,
That  lends  a  music  to  the  mystic
light.
It is the waters as they come and go,
A   gentle   cadence   floating   through
the night.
It glides o'er moonlit wastes of silvery
seas,
That   lie   all   gleaming   'neath   the
starry sky,
It   lightly   rides   upon   the    midnight
breeze
And whispers in my ear its murm'r-
ous sigh.
Where,   all   alone   beside   the   rugged
shore.
As  one  enamoured  of the  whispering night,
I lie and  dream  of days  that are no
more
And hear their echo in each zephyr's
flight.
While every murmur of the night wind
brings
Those thoughts that delve into the
heart of things.
 l*G-
SPEECH ON LEAGUE
( " a (Continued from Page 1)
tweqjh Poland and Germany in connection with territory in Upper Silesia,
and the termination of the Vilna controversy which had long sustained enmity between Poland and Lithuania.
Even in the Balkans the League had
preserved peace, Justice Murphy declared, the squabbles between Albania
and Jugo-Slavia having been rapidly
smoothed over by its intervention.
Italy's quarrel with Greece, resulting in the sensational bombardment
of Corfu, was carefully explained by
the speaker, Mr. Justice Murphy tracing in a clear and comprehensive manner the course of events leading up
to this dispute. He claimed that in
all these bellicose struggles the
League of Nations had worked successfully  in  the  interests of  world-peace.
In addition to affording an intimate
insight into contemporary European
history, Mr. Justice Murphy's speech
proved to many students the power
of logical and convincing oratory.
To-morrow noon the second in this
series of League lectures will be given
when the well-known British labor
leader, Mr. Tom Richardson, will
speak on "Labor and the League."
A full attendance of students is expected.
Point Grey, and that the Students'
Council be empowered to make all
necessary plans.
The resolution was heartily carried.
Mr. Grant appealed to his audience
to give the campaign their serious consideration, and to work hard in support of it. He pointed out that if the
public can be made to realize that the
students are doing their bit, the support that Varsity will require in the
future will be more readily forthcoming.
Dan
cing
Scmmenz
556  Granville  St.
Vancouver, B. C.
The New
"Folly Girl
Basque"
It i.i without a doubt the
smartest creation of the cor-
setless fad—It moulds the
figure in slim graceful lines
and is absolutely comfortable.
Made of heavy satin in
Pink or Black, trimmed at
top zcith Filet Lace—has
wide section of hand woven
elastic on each side.
Sizes,  32  to  42.
Ed. Da Motta
Hair Cutting a Specialty
Expert Attendant
□
2558 Heather St.
Attention University Ladies
By  merely   mentioning   this   advertisement    and    date    in    your
weekly   paper   you   may   have   for
one  week  from  date of  issue.
Vanitv Purses.    Regular $1.95 for
$1.50.
Vanity   Purses.     Regular  85c.  for
65c.
Silk and Wool Hose. Regular
$1.35 for $1.10. Colors: Black,
Brown and White, Polo and
White, Grev and White, Black and
White.
Miss J. EMSLIE
695   BROADWAY   WEST
Phone Fairmont 724
Alexandra Dancing Academy
Wednesday and Satueday Evenings
Our   new   Augmented   Orchestra   playing   14
instruments features all the latest dance hits.
-804 Hornby St., Opposite Court House- Jan.  3! st,  1924
THE     UBYSSEY
MUCK-A-MUCK
THIS   WEEKS  AD.
Baldwin's  Hair Tonic  Never Fails to   Remove  the   Dandruff  from   Your
Fur Coat
Remarkable   Value
in  Ladies'
Cardigans
Three stylish types to
choose from. One in brushed
wool with a fancy squared
front, features turned up
cuffs and two pockets. Colors are camel and brown,
pearl and peacock, camel and
tomato. The others are in
plain stitch with small checked front, the five buttons
match the check, giving a
very pretty effect. These
come in camel and brown,
pearl and peacock, black
and white, oyster and scarlet. Special Price,
$3.95
David Spencer
Ltd.
Phone:   Fairmont 3.
T. J. Kearney & Co.
Funeral Directors
«$>
Private   Ambulance   Service
802 Broadway W., VANCOUVER
The Athletes' Friend
If you are interested in
sports—come in and have a
talk with Geo. H. Goulding,
successful Rugby, Hockey,
Swimming, Soccer and Track
and Field Coach.
GEORGE GOULDING
Sporting   Goods   and   Bicycle
Dealer
957 Granville Street
Funeral Notice
A touching funeral was held from
the OHice Parlors ot The University
on Sunday last when the two front
teeth ol Mr. Heilley Arkley were laid
to rest in the Mountain View Cemetery.
The students extend to the bereaved
"father' their heartfelt sympathy.
The accident occurred last Saturday
at the Normal Gym, when the unfortunate victims, quietly reposing in
their customary position, were rudely
struck and trampled upon. The Funeral march was played by the Heinz
Band.
OLYMPIA
'Hurry up."
"I  can't."
"Isn't yours better yet?'
'No,   is  yours."
'Sure,  long ago."
'Did it take?"
'Yes, it took."
fr\ frr\fc\
Hostess—Winter draws on.
James—Not yet, madam, but if it's
as cold as this tomorrow I'll have
them on.—Voo Doo.
Stude-
Waiter
Sit down
NASTY
Do you serve lobsters here?
—Sure!    We  serve anybody.
No child  should  be  spanked on an
empty  stomach.     Turn  him over.
TERRIBLE
"Ever hear the story of the Japanese incense?"
"No.    Spring it."
"I'm not jossing you when I say it's
punk."
frv fr*\fe\
Algernon, the English tea hound,
remarks that, he does not like the
Canadian custom of saying "Hello,"
when  answering  the  phone.
"In England," he avers, "we say,
'Are you theah,' and then, of course,
if you are not theah, theah is no use
of going on with the conversation."
"He's an awful ladies' man."
"I know it.    I've seen him with some
awful ladies.
PHILOSOPHICAL
"Father, what is innocence?"
"Innocence,   my  child,   is   a  parent
who believes everything his son writes
from  college."
According to Dad Hartley and nis
fang of basket pushers they were
completely bewildered by the delicate
and syncopated strains of the spice
hand as rendered on Saturday night.
Anyway it all goes to. show that Bel-
lingham couldn't appreciate good
music.
FASTER, GEORGE, FASTER!
O Marjorie, dear, her mother said,
That man had better go;
O mother, dear, please not just yet,
He works so doggone slow!
W3WKV
ORPHJUH 1 CIRCUIT VAUDEVILLE
DAYS
Starting
Wed. Night,
MiATINEES—THURSDAY—FBIDAY—SATURDAY SEY.    852
JTHE QISTINCTIVE- AR.TIST,
CHARLES
'IN RURAL* CHARACTER 9TUPIES TAK£Mj FROM LIFE>1 jj
JANET of PRANCE
THE FIVE AVAIONS
WOOD & WYDE
"ALL    RIGHT    EDDIE"
LEWIS & DODY m
In    "HELLO—HELLO—HELLO!"   ^=
JACKIE  8c BILLIE—THINKING AND TALKING BIRDS
GEORGE MacFARLANE & CO.
In "SONG FANTASIES"
With Herbert C. Howe and Marguret Walter
ATTRACTIVE PICTURES
CONCERT   ORCHESTRA
!lii5
The Light That Never
Failed
There was a light in her blue, blue
eyes as he waited breathlessly for her
answer—a light that was meant for
him alone. He puffed nervously at
his cigar—but it had gone out. There
fell a silence—a silence pregnant with
the communion of two vibrant souis.
He fumbled for a match and then—
then—He lit his cigar by the light in
her eyes.
Undergrads and
Coeds. Attention!
You will find "Wilson's''
equipped with every type of
Shoe for any occasion.
Dress Shoes,
Sport Shoes,
Walking Shoes.
Ten per cent, discount on
presentation of this ad. at
□
WILSON'S
Twin Shoe Stores
157-159 Hastings Street West
Lanky Bill Ties
The   Xew   Narrow   Braided
Tie that tlie Young Fellows
are demanding
50c
In All Colors
Wear a Manns Shirt built to a
standard of quality and not to a
price.
Mann's Men's Wear
Specialty  Shops
411-474 Granville St.
RADIO
SETS
PARTS
LOUD SPEAKERS
Drop in  and  ask for our
new price list.
RADIO CORPORATION OF
VANCOUVER, LIMITED
Sey. 3814   605 Dunsmuir 5.. Ice Hockey - Next Wed.
GLUBB&STEWART
LIMITED
All This Month
We Are Offering
20 ss off
All Men's and Boys'
Suits and Overcoats
EVENING CLOTHES AND
FURNISHINGS   20%   OFF
ALSO
Clubb & Stewart
LIMITED
Hastings   Street
QUALITY
PRINTING
Invitations
Dance Programmes
Announcements
Printing for all
the Social Functions
of the School
Term
The
Sun Publishing Co.,
Limited
Printing Department
137   PENDER    STREET,   WEST
Music    and    Musicians
Is the Subject of
Institute Paper
The Auditorium was the scene of a
somewhat different though nO/lfess entertaining meeting of the^^Vaficouver
Institute last Thursday evening7~wlrpn
a paper on modern Russian composers
was given, illustrated by vocal solos
and by renditions on the piano. The
programme was in the/Hands of the
Vancouver Musical Council, the speaker being Mrs. Alice-TJrewer. Those
who assisted Mrs. Brewer in the entertainment were Mme. R. Burke, Mrs.
W. Coulthard, Mme. Stonjalski, Miss
Doris Wilburs, Mrs. J. Hinlon, and
Miss Hambly.
Mrs. Brewer spoke first of the work
of Igof~Stravinski, the greatest orchestral composer of this school, the lecturer giving a careful description and
sympathetic criticism of his best-
known compositions, such as "The
Firebrand"  and  "The Nightingale."
Rimsky-Korsakoff was the next musician discussed, the speaker referring
especially to the fantastic and romantic qualities of his themes, and to the
harmonic wealth of his orchestral
compositions.
Grechaninoff, Arensky, and Rachmaninoff were taken up in turn. Of
these 'three the latter is perhaps the
best known on this side of the Atlantic, having achieved a reputation
not only for the beauty of his compositions, with their characteristic
oddity and strangeness of modulation,
but also for his sheer interpretative
ability as a virtuoso.
Mrs. Brewer concluded her paper
with a delightful sketch of "the amazing Ornstein," that versatile futurist
who is the newest and perhaps the
most interesting of this school.
Patronize Canada's finest Barber Shop. We have 18 chairs and
specialize in Ladie's Hair Bobing
as well as Manicuring.
The ROGERS  BUILDING
WM. BRENNAN,  Proprietor
464 Granville St.      Phone Sey. 7858-0
"Down the Marble Stairs"
The^Aggie Dance
Last Wednesday evening the annual
Aggie dance was held at Lester Court.
The Aggie boys surpassed themselves
in the decorations. Loops of cedar
boughs, charmingly relieved by colored lights, adorned the walls, while
long rows of multicolored balloons,
stretched across the ceiling, lent, gaiety to the scene. A novelty which
demonstrated the ingenuity of the decoration committee was the shining
moon, which during the "moonlights"
solemnly rose and set above the dancers. At the end of the ballroom was
the word "Agriculture" cleverly executed in wheat sheaves. The several
"rendezvous" were denoted by different letters. Lee's orchestra supplied
its usual good music.
The supper, always a feature of the
affair, was unusually good. There
were heaps of chicken sandwiches,
cake, ice cream, candy and olives, and
at each place was a sprig of holly and
a suitable favor.
The patronesses were: Mrs. L. S.
Klinck, Mrs. F. M. Clement, Mrs. H.
M. King, Mrs. P. A. Boving, Mrs. A.
F. Barss, Mrs. W. Sadler, Mrs. E. A.
Lloyd, Mrs. R. P. McLennan, Miss M.
L. Bollert.
ARTS  '24.
The class of Arts '24 plan 1o hold a
Leap Year Party in the Auditorium,
on the evening of Feb. 29. The draw
for partners will take place at some
date in the immediate future.
A Valedictory Gift Committee, consisting of Miss Archibald, Mr. Riddehough. and Mr. Hislop, has been
elected.
>'
WOMEN'S DEBATE
On Monday, at 3 o'clock, the tryouts for the Women's International
Debate with Willamette will bl> held
in Room 23. Two speakers will be
chosen to represent the University.
The subject for the try-outs is "Resolved, that the French should immediately evacuate the Ruhr." Each
candidate will be requested to give a
five-minute speech, upholding either
the affirmative or negative of the question.
'/■■■   BADMINTON   CLUB .,-    x
The Annual Open Tournament' will
be held in King Edward Gymnasium
on February 11th, 18th and 25th.
Events include—Men's and Ladles!'
singles, Men's and Ladies' doubles
and mixed doubles. Two cups are up
for competition, one for Men's singles
and one for the Ladies' singles event.
A fee of 25c for each event entered,
is being charged. Entries should be
handed in to O. Woodman, Sc. '27 or
E. Davidson, Arts '27, before February 4th.    -
Watch notice board for further particulars.
\      MUSICAL  SOCIETY
Plans are now being made for the
Spring Concert of the Musical Society,
which will be held sometime in March.
The programme has not been settled,
but some excellent instrumental and
vocal selections are now being practiced. There will also be a number of
solos.
WOMEN'S   BASKETBALL
On Wednesday evening the_ Senior
-A Girls lost to the Native Daughters
8-7. The game was a very close one,
as indicated by the score.
The Team:—"Patsy" Robinson,
Doris Shorney, Isabel McKinnon,
Isabel Russell, and "Gay" Swencisky.
1020's
Catalogue
A catalogue whic/i
is a complete book on
what is what in
Sport Outfits and
equipment is now in
preparation.
Copies will be sent
anywhere, in or outside the city upon request.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1020 Granville Street
Wholesale and Retail
Boost Canada's
National   Game
To  be   Popular   at   DanGes
It is necessary to
Dance Well
VAUGHN
MOORE
"//  you
can walk
The Students of Vaughn Moore will tell   you   that   " they    learned
more here in 2 or 3 lessons than they believed possible."
Private Lessons:   Forenoon, Afternoon and Evenings,
for beginners or advanced in the Tango, Fox Trot or Waltz
VAUGHAN   MOORE   STUDIOS      Sey. 707
518  Hastings St. W.     (Across from Spencers Ltd.)

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