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The Ubyssey Jan 20, 1921

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, JANUARY 20, 1921
Number 10
First Athletic Dance
A Great Success
SOCIAL FUNCTION HELD ON
RETURN TO COLLEGE
Good music, a floor that was not too
crowded, and excellent arrangements all
contributed to make the first annual
dance of the Athletic Department on
Friday evening last in Lester Court an
entire success. Mrs. L. S. Klinck, Mrs.
J. G. Davidson, Mrs. P. A. Boving and
Mrs. P. H. Elliott were the patronesses
of the evening, and, although everyone
did not have the courtesy to pay their
respects, yet these ladies were not neglected. Supper arrangements were very
neatly carried out, and everyone managed to get something to eat. The evening's enjoyment came to a close at 1
o clock, when we wended our way homeward to dream about 9 o'clock lectures.
KLA-HOW-YA WEEK
True to the forecasts made by the
speakers at the "pep seance" last Friday,
Kla-how-ya is proving a "humdinger."
On- Monday, at noon, a campaign meeting for the election of president of the
Rooters' Club was held. The two nominees, Mr. Honeyman and Mr. McDougall, outlined their proposed policies, answered questions, and then retired, to
permit the free discussion of their merits.
The halls and reading-room were deserted at noon on Tuesday. Everyone
crowded into the Auditorium to sing
or shout, according to their ability.
"Jimmie" Mitchell was in charge, and he
put the multitude through many choral
stunts. As usual, they disturbed one
o'clock lectures with the serviceable Kit-
silano.
At the time of writing, the election
for R. C. president is being held. Tomorrow there will be more ado, while on
Friday and Saturday night—well, everyone will be able to tell you about the debate and parade.
Show Kla-how-ya
Spirit in Drive
$6,000 NEEDED FOR LEROY
SCHOLARSHIP
The activities of Kla-how-ya Week are
due to come to a close at an indefinite
hour on Saturday night, or maybe Sunday morning. On Monday we shall have
an opportunity of putting its principles
into practise.
Every U.B.C. student has his part to
play in the Leroy Memorial Scholarship
Drive. The Leroy Scholarship is to be a
$500 annual scholarship in this University in memory of our men who gave
their lives for us in the Great War.
Nearly a hundred U.B.C. men are among
this number. This is our first and only
memorial to them, and it is 'up to us to
see that it is one worthy of them. Three
thousand dollars have already been subscribed, largely by returned men; 10,000
is needed; and of this the student body
has been assigned $3,000 as its quota.
The central executive, which includes
the presidents of the four undergrad. societies and other representatives of the
Students' Council, has drawn up a thorough plan of campaign, which will be
presented to the student body at one of
the mass meetings this week. Every student is a collector.
If the lesson of Kla-how-ya Week has
been well learnt, there will be no trouble
in reaching our objective. No greater
opportunity will be given us to show that
our new college spirit means more than
skull-caps and rooting.
SPEAKERS FOR 'VARSITY
President Klinck made a very pleasing
announcement in his address at the
opening of the second term. The policy,
long advocated by members of the student body and of Faculty, of securing
eminent speakers to give lectures at general meetings, is about to be consumated.
The first of these lectures, which will
be on subjects of interest to all, will be
announced shortly.
Varsity Team in
Senior League
MORRISON'S MEN MAKE GOOD
SHOWING
The game with the Monarchs last Friday night was remarkably close, as the
score of 3-2 indicates. As a matter of
fact, our men out-skated and ottt-played
their opponents; but the victors were
decidedly superior in the accuracy of their
shooting. All their three points were
made by long, fast shots, which Broadfoot hadn't a chance to save. The latter
put up a rattling good game in goal, and
at times his performances were nothing
short of spectacular.
Both teams started the first period at
a fast pace. Following a series of 'Varsity rushes, Shields picked the puck out
of a scramble in front of the Monarchs'
goal and scored. The rest of the period
saw fairly even play, both goalkeepers
being called upon to save several times.
The Monarchs had the edge in the
second period. "Pinkie," who had been
the hardest working man on the ice in
the first period, was resting on the bench,
and the Monarchs took advantage of his
absence and scored. 'Varsity seemed
to lack the finishing touches, and there
was no further score in this period.
The third opened up with both teams
doing their best to gain the lead. The
speed grew quite dizzy at times, and the
'Varsity players were getting perceptibly
weary. Our lack of substitutes was one
of the causes of our defeat, as our opponents .were able to throw in fresh men
whenever necessary. They soon drew
out into the lead when Anderson scored
on a shot from the blue line. A few
minutes later they scored again. In response to frantic appeals from the sidelines, Shields worked his way through
the entire opposing team and passed to
Hunter, who tallied with a pretty shot.
The final whistle went, with the 'Varsity
team, packed around the Monarchs/ goal,
shooting like demons.
To-night, 'Varsity is scheduled to play
the Towers, who are at present leading
the league. If we beat them, we will be
tied with them for first place.
On January 7th, in the first game of
the league, 'Varsity defeated the Elks
7-4.
Get the Habit.      Say KLA-HOW-YA! THE   UBYSSEY
January 20, 1921
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's  a  certain  unusual  Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an.
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
Corner Tenth and Willow
"Sou need some relaxation about 4
o'clock in the afternoon. Tou can get
it over the tea cups at the "Palms."
Bring your  friends.
We serve good Lunches, too; and
our Candy is top-hole.
CLUFF'S
PRE-INVENTORY
Shoe Sale
JANUARY 15th to 31st
Will save you money on all lines of
Fine FOOTWEAR
Cluff Shoe Co.
Limited
649 HASTINGS STREET, W.
"SWEET LAVENDER" CHOSEN
Since the beginning of the New Year, a
number of plays have been considered by
the Advisory Board—Prof. Wood, Prof.
Larsen and Dr. Clark—for the annual
Spring production of the Players' Club.
Try-outs "were held in two plays of an
unusually heavy nature, the results, however, being rather discouraging. It has
now been definitely decided to present
"Sweet Lavender," by Sir Arthur Pinero.
This play is considered the best sentimental comedy produced in the past
thirty years, and should prove a source of
genuine delight, if not of serious instruction, to more than one University audience.
"Art" Lord will play the part of "Dick"
Phenyl, a dissolute bachelor of forty,
about whose life the story centers. The
entire cast has not yet been selected, but
the following members have been assured
roles: Miss D. Adams, J. Kirby, L.
Fisher and A. Richards. The business
manager, "Bob ' Hunter, is now making
arrangements with a local theatre for the
production of the play in the early part
of March.
Requests have already been received by
the club to appear in Chilliwack, Nanaimo
and New Westminster.
The announcement by the committee
appointed to select a coach that Mr.
Wood will again be in charge of the
Spring play, has been received with unusual satisfaction. In this connection the
club desires to acknowledge the generosity of Dean Coleman in placing his private stenographer at the service of the
club coach. Mr. Wood has also been
assured the" co-operation of all the experienced members of the club in the
work connected with the staging of
"Sweet Lavender."
WHERE TO GO TO-NIGHT!
The cry about the halls this week
should be "Back to the High." For some
of us, several years have passed since
entering U.B.C. But on Friday evening
(to-night) we all intend to return to the
scene of many youthful struggles. In the
King Edward High School auditorium
the annual inter-collegiate debate between
Washington and British Columbia will
be staged. Messrs. T. P. Peardon, Arts
'21, and W. E. Graham, Sc. '23, will uphold the affirmative against the visiting
team on the subject, "Resolved that the
Anglo-Japanese Alliance is a menace to
future Anglo-American relationships."
This has always been considered one of
the biggest events of the year, and if
only you heed "the college spirits" you
will be found at the K.E.H.S. this evening at 8.15. "Bill" Graham is not well
known in the 'Varsity, but is considered
a strong debater. Great things are expected of "Tommy" Peardon, who won a
permanent place in the hearts of U.B.C.
students by his brilliant performance in
the contest against Washington last winter. A large audience is required. Don't
fail your Alma Mater. "Back to the
High" to-night.
Jimmie Lawrence, Arts '21, and George
Clarke. Arts '22, are at present in Seattle,
and will meet the affirmative team at the
University of Washington.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS   .
Depot for
FOUNTAIN PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
v»yxw^^WAWtwt«'iVf*!.«i;w;!.v»^t'»'j'Vf/»v»y^v
AFTER THE SHOW
Try the
JDelmomeo Oajfe
704 ROBSON STREET
^r^Tr»vy«vlrrtAT^;r^,y«\i^f,(-»,^;y»\«/*^y»\:^
PHONE /»/»on
Seymour DOOfa
Day and Night
SERVICE
BIG
TAXI
SIX
Ask   for
V.  YOUNG or FRED
Office:   725  Dunsmuir Street
The Lids Off, Boys
Special this week only—
Felt and Cloth Hats
regular to $9.00;
Sale Price
$5.00
Ben Petch
LIMITED
898 Granville Street
Cor. Smythe and Granville January 20, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
U.B.C. Triumphs
On Xmas Day
LOU HUNTER STARS IN
HISTORIC GAME
The famous Rugby game on Christmas
Day has become a matter of history; but,
nevertheless, this, the first issue of the
"Ubyssey" since the holidays, should not
pass without some mention of that great
event. We had prepared a write-up of
nearly 1,000 words, which was to be used
in the first issue last week; but, owing
to the printers' strike trouble, we have
had to revise our entire edition, making
every write-up much shorter, so that all
the news could be printed.
There are one or two features of the
game, and of the effects, that must be
recorded. In the first place, it was the
greatest victory that the University of
British Columbia has ever won. Eight
of the fifteen men on the Stanford squad
were members of the world's championship team, and the Cardinal team came
here with a great deal of multitudinous
praise from all parts of the country.
Space will not permit that we record
the run of the play at all. Sufficient to
say that our forwards were the main
factors in the win. Every man on the
team was in the pink of condition, and
every man knew what to do and how to
do it, and when to do it. The result was
that the famous Cardinal back division
did not have an opportunity to get
started. They were throttled at all
stages, and the direct methods of the
forwards made possible this blocking of
every Stanford move.
Lou  Hunter,  of  course,   was  the  star
HARRY    CARTER
Bicycles and Accessories
General Repairs
Cab,  Buggy and Invalid  Chairs
Re-tired
Charges Moderate
Agent for
C.C.M.   "RAMBLER"  BICYCLES
632 Broadway, West
Phone,   Fairmont   1386
P.  D. I. HONEYMAN,  Sc. '21
Our New President of the Rooters' Club
of the game. By three well-placed drop-
kicks he won for our College, 12-0. But
it was only the heartiest co-operation of
every man on the team that made these
kicks possible. On every occasion the
team played as a team. There was no
thought of individual work. Every man
was a cog in the machine. And this is
as it should be.
The support given by the Rooters'
Club was the feature of the day. Packed
in the grandstand, some 800 students
yelled themselves hoarse with delight,
with entreaty, and with triumph. Yell
King Meekison, assisted by Yell Leaders
Ernie Clarke and Mickey McDougall,
gave a creditable exhibition. Not only
was the support a great feature, but it
was also sportsmanlike in its attitude of
the game; and every good play was
cheered, whether by our men or the opposition.
The entire spirit of the game was one
of good sportsmanship. The Stanford
squad played like true college men,
and, even when they saw victory oozing
from their grasp, they did not resort to
questionable tactics. And it was this
spirit that made the members of the visiting squad such enjoyable guests. During
their  stay  in  the  city they  were  enter-
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and Evening Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.  J.  SPROTT,  B.A.,  Manager.
FOOTBALL EQUIPMENT
Rugby and Soccer teams will And that this store has the largest and best assorted
stock of Football equipment in Western Canada.
Jerseys, in all color combinations, in pure wool and cotton, priced from $2.50 to
$10.00 each.
Footballs, for Soccer and Rugby, priced from $3.50 to $11.00 each.
Boots, $9.00 to $12.00 per pair.
Pants, $1.50 to $3.50 per pair.
Leg Guards, 75c to $3.25 per pair.
"Special Discounts to Clubs."
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST Phone, Seymour 152
tained not only by the University in the
tea dansant at Hotel Vancouver, but by
many private parties of University people. We look forward with pleasure to
another visit from these men.
LOSE SAPPERTON GAME
For some reason or other the jinx
seems to be following the trail of the
'Varsity soccer team. Last Saturday, at
Sapperton, it was hoped that we had
shaken it off, and the team took the field
determined to win and add a few points
to our win column.
Though all players are worthy of mention for playing a good game, special
credit must be given to Bobby Jackson
for the way in which he stayed in the
game after he had been seriously hurt.
The line-up was as follows: Henderson, Crute, Wolverton, Mitchell, Cant,
Mark, Rushbury, Lundie, McLeod, Jackson, Cameron.
A JAUNT TO THE CAPITAL
It would be difficult indeed to portray
our impressions of Victoria, the wonder
city, following true annual trip of University students to that village. We went
over on Friday morning's boat, and returned on Sunday afternoon. On Friday
evening we played four games of basketball; on Saturday we played soccer, grass
hockey, Rugby and ice hockey. And we
only won four games out of nine!
The Victoria avalanche started on Friday evening, when the intermediate
ladies' team commenced the evening's
proceedings by losing to the Victoria
College ladies 7-6. The senior ladies—
that team of which we have every reason
to be proud—were next on the programme; and they failed to put up an
exhibition   worthy   of   their   past.    The
(Continued on Page 7)
THIS IS
ATHLETIC
There's a fighter's roadwork
Sweater that has made a great
hit with young men. It has a
swagger style, with plenty of
life, and strong color if you
want it. Of course, its practical purpose is to keep a man
warm.
Regular $18.00 for $14.40
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor. Robson and Granville Streets THE   UBYSSEY
January 20, 1921
PURDY'S ARE
REDUCED
Mr. Purdy announces a reduction in the price of Chocolates.
The cost of some materials
have come down, and he is
quick to give this advantage to
his patrons.
Purdy's are now $1.25 the
pound.
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
AVENUE THEATRE
Coming Dec. 27, 28, 29, 30.    Mat. Wed.
"The Maid of the
Mountains"
With complete English cast and
chorus. Direct from Daly's Theatre,
London, England, where it ran for
five  years.
City and out-of-town mail orders
will be accepted now, if accompanied
by cheque or money order and self-
addressed, stamped envelope for safe
return of tickets. Make cheques payable  to AVENUE  THEATRE.
Prices: Lower Floor, $3.30; Balcony,
$2.75 and $2.20; Gallery, $1.65 and $1.10.
Box Office Sale, December 23rd.
TREFOUSSE    GLOVES
Famous on account of their excellent
style, superior fit, finish and durability. The best of all Christmas Gloves,
in kid or suede.
—Trefousse Fine French Kid Gloves,
oversewn seams, two-dome style with
fine stitched points; shades of brown,
tan, grey, navy, beaver, green, champagne, and also black or white. Sizes
5% to 8, at $4.50 a pair.
—Trefousse Extra Quality Pique Sewn
Gloves with fine stitched points, perfect fitting; shown in brown, tan,
grey, navy, green, purple, wine, beaver, champagne, white or black. All
sizes, $5.00 a pair.
—Trefousse Extra Quality Gloves,
pique sewn and having two pearl
dome clasps and heavy embroidered
points. These are finished with band
at wrist. Grey, navy, brown, tans,
champagne.    All sizes, at $5.50 a pair.
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
(Member Pacific  Inter-Collegiate  Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,  $2.00  per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
KLA-HOW-YA
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
(A. H. Imlah
Associate Editors { S. M. Scott
I Miss R.  E.  Verchere
Chief Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
(Miss  A.   Anderson
J. C.  Clyne
Bert  Sweeting
Cliffe   Mathers
Miss P. Stewart
Exchange    Editor Miss  P.   I.   McKay
Literary Editors > £. £• l^™50'1
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising  Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
IT). A.  Wallace
Assistants \ W™; MfKee
I P. V. McLane
1 H. G. Scott
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor   for   the   Week A.   H.   Imlah
FOUND—A UNIVERSITY
How many times has the spectacle
been witnessed of a rising leader of men,
struggling under the crushing weight of
new responsibilities, meeting new problems, fighting his way through opposition
and difficulties by sheer energy and willpower, and yet afraid? Not afraid in any
physical or mental sense, but more afraid
of being afraid—in short, doubting himself. Then how often comes the sequel.
In the white-heat of some great crisis he
finds himself. No longer doubting, but
with the firm courage of his convictions,
he comes into his own.
The comparison may not be exact, but
surely something very similar happened
to our University at Brockton Point last
Christmas Day. We found Victory, and
in so doing we found something far more
lasting—we found ourselves. During
those two never-to-be-forgotten forty-
minute halves, most of us probably
learned more about that Morale, Esprit
de Corps and College Spirit, without
which a University can but exist in name
alone, than we shall ever learn again.
There was more than brain and muscle
in that game on Christmas Day. Inspiring the team, electrifying the packed
grandstands was an indefinable something. Something against which Stanford was powerless—something against
which even Empires have proved themselves powerless. That indefinable
something we call, for want of a better
word, morale. As applied to our particular case, it becomes College Spirit. We
have it, and we are going to hold it. We
won a Game, we won a Spirit, and we
found ourselves at Brockton Point last
Christmas Day.
The biggest word in the vocabulary of
every student this week should be Kla-
how-ya. About it is associated not merely
the idea of a salutation, but of something
deeper and more significant. It is suggestive of a student fellowship such as
we are just beginning to appreciate. If
our enthusiasm carries us no farther than
skull-caps and "rooting," we have failed
to catch the true spirit of Kla-how-ya
week, the purpose of which is to instil
into the heart of every student a new
pride in his University, a keener interest
in all activities, and a sense of genuine
pleasure in every phase of his college
work. This can only be accomplished by
the fostering of that buoyant, genial
spirit which should be peculiar to student
character.
Thus we are led to think not only of
our loyalty to the U.B.C. and all her interests, but also to each other as college
men and women. There is an undefinable
bond which unites students the world
over. It cannot be explained, but it can
be felt. Friendships formed within such
an atmosphere make a man bigger and
better  equipped  for  the  business  of  life.
Let us cultivate the Kla-how-ya spirit,
realizing that future classes will pick it
up and carry it on to ever increasing
strength and power. We cannot be good
British Columbians without the Kla-
how-ya idea.
MR. F. G. C. WOOD RETAINED
If you are homesick or discouraged,
just say "Kla-how-ya," and the clouds
will soon disappear.
There is no feature of our University
activities which is more encouraging than
the constant generosity of certain members of the Faculty in placing themselves
at the disposal of student organizations.
In this respect the Players'- Club has
been especially fortunate. From the time
of its organization, during the first session of the U.B.C, until the present, Mr.
Wood has filled the position of honorary
president and coach. Each Spring the
University public is forced to ask how
our English professor is able to assume
such a heavy burden in the absence of
any official recognition of his work in the
cause of the drama. To any one who has
been associated intimately with the club
affairs, the wonder is even more pronounced.
The decision of Mr. Wood to resign as
coach of the Spring play, therefore, was
not entirely unexpected, although deeply
regretted by all the members. Feeling
that the past successes have been due in
large measure to the untiring efforts and
careful management of their coach, and
realizing the serious objection to an outside professional, the executive have been
working quietly with the one desire of
retaining the services of Mr. Wood. The
club is now to be congratulated on its
successful arrangements. We understand
that the deciding factor proved to be the
hope, which the club feels justified in
cherishing, that in the near iuture the
University may be expected to assist in a
definite manner the interests of the drama
in the college. In this may they not be
disappointed.
Under the continued direction and care
of Mr. Wood, the programme of this session is assured the usual happy reception. January 20, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
BY THE WAY
When the "Ubyssey" ceased publication during the holidays the job printers
in the city went out on strike, evidently
in sympathy with our paper. Not until
Tuesday of this week were we able to
convince them that we had rested long
enough and that it was time to go to
work.
'The programme for to-morrow's events
could not be published because of the
unsettled weather conditions. If you are
alive and full of "pep," keep your eye on
the notice boards for further information.
The   "sing-song"   on   Tuesday   was   a
veritable whirlwind.    Fine work, "Jimmie."
Wear your skull-caps to-night!
"Pinkie's" team was considered a dark
horse. Now we know the shade that
carries the biggest kick.
We have top-notch teams in Rugby,
hockey and basketball. What more is
there  to live for?
A London authority claims that the
average person covers at least eleven
miles during an evening's dance. Eight
o'clock lecture, why art thou so appealing?
The Toronto 'Varsity hockey team
have been touring the Eastern States
during the holiday season.
A hungry man always packs a grouch.
Get rid of yours by eating at the Student
Cafeteria.
See you at the debate to-night!
Smile and say "Kla-how-ya."
©
o r r es p oi> dei> ce
T\d<
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—On behalf of the workers of
the Turner Institute, I desire to express our
sincere appreciation of the valuable assistance given our work by the young ladies of
the Y.W.C.A., under the leadership of Miss
Agnew. Each week since the opening of
our work in the fall the Social Service Department of the Y.W.C.A. has sent us capable assistants for the night schools, and at
Cnristmas time the young ladies gave of
their means and their time to give pleasure
and Christmas cheer to some of the girls
they had met at "our classes.' We appreciate
very much the splendid work that is being
done by the Y.W.C.A. of the University.
Sincerely yours,
A.   E.   ROBERTS,
Superintendent,  The Turner Institute.
Editor's Note:—The Y.W.C.A., we believe,
is doing equally good work in several other
institutions  in  the  city.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Lately we have heard a great
deal about "college spirit." It should have
an influence not only upon our support of
the various teams, but upon every phase of
our University life. It does not show college spirit, nor is it democratic, that a good
ly number of the women students should
dress so expensively that their less fortunate
classmates not only feel uncomfortable, but
actually, stay away from University social
functions, or even drop out without completing  their courses.
We wonder why some of the women
"never come to dances," or take little part
in student activities. Let us put ourselves
in their places: They come, perhaps, from
homes that find it a real sacrifice to send
them to college, that can afford to give
them little more than their fees and board
money. If one of them goes to a dance in
a simple muslin dress, you may be sure she
does not go to another; for, unfortunately,
when
"Jim's  gal  wore silk  and  satin,
My gal wore  calico,"
the   former   had   her   programme   filled   and
the   latter   was,   most   probably,   a   self-conscious   wallflower.
Let us all do our best to make it possible
for everyone to enjoy college life to the full.
A.  M.  A.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—At the request of a member of
the committee in charge of the Science
edition of the "Ubyssey," I attempted a
sketch in which I tried to give an Impression
of a girl floating on a cloud through misty
■vapors.
On obtaining the following edition of the
paper, I was dumbfounded to read the criticism of W. G.  B., Arts '22.
The sketch and the criticism were both
submitted to the pastor of a Methodist
church in Greater Vancouver for the purpose
of obtaining an unbiased opinion for some
one whose standards were above question.
The pastor in question remarked that he
could see nothing which would give rhe impression that M. G. B. has retained, and
also that he was sorry that the mind of the
aforementioned critic should be in such an
attitude that the sketch should create such
an impression  in his mind.
(Continued on Page 6)
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,Q70.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
A  SAVINGS  ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We welcome small accounts.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
©RPHEUM
Week Commencing
Monday, January 24, 1921
ELIZABETH BRICE
In "LOVE LETTERS"
By Edgar Allan Woolf
With GATTISON JONES
KENNEY AND HOLLIS
The Original  College  Boys,  in
The   Two  Doctors
DORA HILTON and COMPANY
The  Girl  with   the  Golden  Voice
Assisted by FRED AHL at the Piano
J. C. NUGENT
The Author Comedian
IN  A   LINE   OP   TALK
PERCY  OAKES and
PAMOLA  DELOUR
Present   a   Cycle   of   Cyclonic   Dances
MR. & MRS. GORDON WILDE
and their Daughter, Connie Wilde,
PREMIERE   SHADOWISTS
Jack— —May
M'LALLEN & CARSON
In  a  Rollicking  Whatnot,  entitled
"WHOA!    SARAH"
British  Weekly Concert  Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF   BOOKS,   Etc.
.2%.
(Mark* Sc Stuart OIn.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
January 20, 1921
One of the Good Things
in the
UNDERWEAR SALE
at Spencer's
Underwear,   Regular   to
$10.00 a Suit for $5.75
Comprises Stanfield's silk and linen,
natural finish, Stanfield's silk and
wool, and Stanfield's natural wool.
These are all well-known lines, and
sell regularly up to $10.00 a suit.
Sale price   $5.75
Combinations same price.
David  Spencer
LIMITED
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA  ROOM  BAKERY        ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692  BROADWAY,  WEST
BOX OF
SAPP'S
FREE
Some of the bright heads of
the U.B.C. ought to be able to
supply advertisements for a
candy shop—and I need some
"copy."
For the best ad., or series of
ads., turned in to Cassidy, at
the Ubyssey, that will help sell
Sapp's Chocolates, I will be
glad to return a 3-lb. box of
the chocolates.
Don't write poetry.
Robt. Sapp
CANDY MAN
814   ROBSON   STREET
CORRESPONDENCE (Cont'd)
The uncalled-for and despicable insinuations which W. G. B. makes about barrooms and road-houses are typical of those
who   take   refuge   behind   insinuations.
I deem it my right that he make a public
apology through this paper for the insulting
remarks that he has found necessary to use.
The motto of our country might be appropriate:    "Honi soit qui  maly pensi."
C. B.  H.,  Science '24.
December 31,  1920.
Captain, Rugby Team,
University of British Columbia.
Dear Sir:—I am directed by the Board of
Governors of the University of British
Columbia to offer you their congratulations
upon the success of your team in the recent
contest  with  Leland  Stanford University.
Trusting that this may be the forerunner
of many other victories,  I  am,
Yours very truly,
S.   D.  SCOTT,  R.,
Hon.  Secretary.
U.B.C. AT GUELPH
The conference at Guelph, from December 29th to January 2nd, was perhaps
the most momentous occasion in the history of the student Christian work in
Canadian universities. Practically every
university in Canada was represented,
there 'being sixty-seven delegates, of
whom forty-five were students. The representatives from B. C. were Harold
McLean, Arts '21, and Isobel Miller, Arts
'22.
The result of this assembly was the
formation of the Student Christian Movement of Canada, which aims at a federation of all Christian societies and organizations in all the universities of Canada
whose aims are in harmony with those of
the movement. The basic unit of this
national movement is the local organization in each college or faculty, with-whom
rests even the selection of the name of
the local organization. The movement
will be directed by a general committee,
the greater majority of whose members
are   students   or   student   representatives.
In spite of the many distinct types of
personalities represented and the evident
diversity of opinion and misunderstanding, the .conference was characterized
from the very beginning by a unanimity
of spirit and purpose, and it is a safe
assertion that each member of the conference will carry back to his or her association the conviction that in Jesus Christ
alone, around whose life and teaching the
Student Christian Movement centres,
there is the full realization of life.
The "Ubyssey" is glad to direct the attention of the men to the class which is
being led by Dean Coleman for the purpose of discussing any of the problems
with which young men of the present day
are struggling. The group meets on
Monday, at 4 o'clock, in Room 24 of the
Arts Building. Come along next week.
You cannot spend an hour to better advantage.
Don't fail to attend the special student
service which will be held in Chalmers
Church next Sunday evening. Dr. Ogden,
one of England's greatest preachers, will
deliver an appropriate message.
FIRST WEEK
Students' Cafeteria
Lunches,   11.30   to  2
Candies,   Stationery,   Tobacco
Open 9  to 3.30
This Cafeteria is being operated by
the proprietor of the Tally Ho, 1013
Robson Street, and the Old Country
Tea Rooms, 641 Granville Street. Our
policy is to give the best value possible  to our customers.
By arrangement with the Students'
Council, a percentage of the profits is
returned to the Council; so patronize
the Cafeteria.
Let us quote prices for catering for
your next class dance refreshments.
A. WALTER Seymour 2045
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For    Light    Refreshments
Ice Cream and Candles at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
LOOSELEAF COVERS
AND REFILLS
NOTE BOOKS, Etc.
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
BARRON
HOTEL
Restaurant
Two Blocks from Vancouver Hotel
When you compare quality, service
and price, and consider the high
standard of the food we serve, you
will realize wherein it is to your advantage to come here.
A welcome awaits you.
BARRON
Corner Granville' and  Nelson
Phone, Seymour 2011
Operated by W. D. Wood Limited
MAURICE  PERRIN,   Manager January 20, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
CLOTHES  FOR YOUNG MEN
Glad   to   show  the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Fofter
Limited
WE SELL CLOTHES FOR YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
— of —
"The Ubyssey"
for 1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
A JAUNT TO THE CAPITAL
(Continued from Page 3)
V.I.A.A. ladies fought hard from the very
start of the game, and pleasantly surprised the Victoria fans by winning 18-13.
The intermediates helped along the
Victoria landslide by allowing the speedy
Victoria College quintette to walk over
them to the tune of 40-28. Strangeness
of the floor, and an apparent inability to
work together, caused the loss of the
game.
The seniors saved the evening from a
whitewash by walking away from the
Victoria High team by the score of 30
points to 20. Our squad were superior
in team work and shooting, but the teams
were fairly evenly matched. Close checking by both sides produced some rough
play.
Having somewhat recovered our characteristic "savoir faire" by the time Saturday morning arrived, we ventured
forth in the rain to see the soccer squad
play. MacLeod secured two counters and
Rushbury one, making the total 3-0 for
the blue and gold.
Although feeling the call of dinnertime, we travelled over to Oak Bay to see
the last few minutes of the intermediate
Rugby game. In spite of the fact that
our gallant fifteen had started with only
eleven men, and finished with a mere
fourteen, and in spite of the fact that two
of the men on the Victoria High team
were members of the Victoria "rep"
squad, things were easy for us. We won
9-0.
The senior game in the afternoon was
quite   an   excellent  exhibition,   when   one
PRACTICAL
PATRIOTISM
To buy, so far as possible, school
supplies is the most practical of
patriotism. You help B. C. to
keep her citizens busy and happy.
The S. D. & W. monogram or
Keystone Brand is fostering a
British  Columbia  industry.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers of School  Supplies
VANCOUVER   AND   VICTORIA,   B.C.
considered the state of the grounds at
Oak Bay. In spite of the slippery, slimy,
juicy mud, our squad travelled over the
Victoria line five times. Score, 15-0. The
performance which our fifteen put up was
nothing like the usual standard of play.
. The ladies' grass hockey was a parade
for the more experienced and much older
(and less attractive) Victoria team.
Our squad showed that they had only
had one or two practices. together, and
they failed to make any real opposition
for the home team. The final score was
10-0.
The ice hockey game was one of the
most interesting games of the trip. It
was a good game, and had all the earmarks of a scoreless draw to within a few
minutes of time. At that crucial moment,
one of the Victoria ladies managed to
slip the puck into the 'Varsity net when
no one was looking, and the game was
over.    Score, 1-0.
The end of a perfect day came late in
the evening, or, to be more precise, early
on Sunday morning, when we wended
our way homeward from the Empress
Hotel, where we enjoyed the pleasures of
an informal dance. The music was good,
and the ladies were all very nice (at least
the ones we danced with), and there was
no boracic acid in the punch (for there
was no punch), and we remembered all
our partners without a programme, and
we had to take our girl away from another fellow when we found that it was
the last waltz.    Nobody had told us.
And then the end of a perfect trip
came on Sunday afternoon when we filed
on to the Princess Adelaide. We thought
we had seen the last of Victoria, and we
waited impatiently until 2.15. But the
boat would not leave.. Horrors! We had
to stay till 5.15. And so we decided to
seek some sheltered corner and there woo
the Godess of Sleep that we might forget
that we were still in the Capital City of
the Sunset Province.
Appointments to the "Annual" staff
have now been completed. The editor,
Johnnie Walker, Sc. '23, will be assisted
by the following associate editors: Arts,
Miss M. Agnew; Science, Mr. T. Guernsey; Agriculture, Miss M. McKecknie;
Sports, Mr. G. Livingstone; Pictures and
Cuts, Mr. R. L. McLeod; Society, Miss
Urquhart.
All Seniors are requested to be "shot"
at Bridgeman's at their earliest convenience—if not,  "at sunrise."
HAGAR
SHOES
FOR
MEN
AND
WOMEN
As surely as there is a sun in the heavens, we can
satisfy any man or woman's Footwear desires in
"Hagar" Shoes.
We specialize in this brand and stand back of
every pair.
- FOR QUALITY
FOR FIT
FOR STYLE
FOR VALUE
we earnestly commend the "Hagar" line.
INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
666 GRANVILLE STREET 8
THE   UBYSSEY
January 20, 1921
THE UNIVERSITY AND VICTORIA
(By E. M., Arts '19)
Between the University of B. C. and
the city of Victoria there is a great gulf
fixed. Serious folk speak of it as regret-
able. Frivolous people treat it lightly.
Neither of these attitudes has helped, as
yet, to bridge it.
Not very long ago, I was watching,
from the deck of a steamer, the beauties
of Victoria unfolding themselves as the
boat approached the harbor. (Space forbids a detailed description, but a picture
postcard will be sent on request.) Beside
me stood an elderly gentleman, a glance
at whom was sufficient to assure me that
he was one of those retired English gentlemen who form a strong element in
Victoria's population. With typical Canadian rudeness, I was moved to listen
to his conversation with a fellow traveller.
"A beautiful city," he was saying.
"Very quiet and restful; a typical university town. It was there," he continued,
waving his hand to the right, "that we
planned to build our college — an ideal
spot."
I, too, turned to look at the place Victoria had set aside for her university. I,
too, thought of the dream, even yet
scarcely abandoned by the capital city,
the dream of possessing the provincial
university. In a vision, she had seen,
added to her many attractions, a college
with clock tower and chapel, vine-mantled walls, and grave, gowned students.
Of all this, Vancouver's jealous spirit had
deprived her good citizens. What are
they given in its place? Once a year, a
pack of yelling hoodlums descend upon
them. They carry toy balloons, and
carry an Indian war cry at the top of
lusty lungs. If Victoria had a university,
how different it wbuld be, say the retired
English gentlemen, and their gentle
wives stay indoors until the row is over.
But there is another idea of what a
college should be, which is prevalent
among the younger generation of Victorians. It is a rather vague idea, and
finds its main expression in the desire to
attend a "regular," or a "real" college.
In what way, or ways, U. B. C. fails to
measure up to this standard, these ambitious young people are not able to explain. They have been told, by vague /authorities, that the failure of U.B.C. is self-
evident, and they take it for granted.
Not long ago, I met a cheerful, curly-
headed youth, and asked him if he went
to school.
"Oh, yes," he replied; "that is, I attend
college."
"College?"
"Why, yes," he said, surprised, "the
Victoria College." I understood that he
was speaking oi the two years' course, in
affiliation with U.B.C.
"Of course," I said, at once interested
in this innocent freshman, "you will be
going to Vancouver to graduate, I presume?"
"Well, you see," he said, "we men at
college here feel that the university in
Vancouver is not big enough. We should
like to go to a regular college, you know;
we want the real thing."
Some time later I had the privilege of
seeing,   en   masse,   the   knickerbockered
youngsters and ribbon-bedizened maidens that constitute Victoria "college men
and women." Alas, they are freshies,
and they know it not. What wonders a
good, hearty initiation would do for many
of them! I wished earnestly for a few
copies of the "Ubyssey" to distribute,
tract-like, amongst these innocents. Many
of them have never heard of this illustrious paper.
It has come to my mind that perhaps
the students of U.B.C. could help bridge
the gulf between Vancouver and Victoria.
It pays, in these modern times, to advertise, and surely good advertising is that
which appeals to the point of view of
those whom • it is desirable to impress.
When next U.B.C. students visit the
quiet little island village, let them laugh
at it, and shock it—such things do us
good; but let them also remember that
they are advertising the university, and
perhaps they could do something to point
out to the uneducated Victorians the vital
force U.B.C. students are going to be in
the life of the province. A little fellowship extended to Victoria s "college men
and women" will go a long way towards
changing the prevailing antagonistic attitude. Is it worth while? Yes, something done for our University is always
worth  while.
JUNIOR DEBATERS WIN
The reciprocity issue was the subject
of the inter-class debate held on Wednesday, January 12th, the contending
teams being from Arts '21 and Arts '22.
The debate was fairly even as regards
the subject matter presented; perhaps
the Seniors had the edge in that. But
Messrs. Heaslip and Woodworth, who
spoke for Arts '22, talked directly to the
atidience, while the Arts '21 men, Messrs.
Pratt and Cribb, read papers upon their
subject. Mr. Sage, in announcing the
decision of the judges, said that the reading of carefully prepared essays was not
good debating. For that reason the Arts
'21 team had lost a good many points.
The size of the audience was disappointing. A faithful few from the two
senior years were on hand to support
their representatives. These loyal few,
with the judges, Mr. Sage, Dr. MacDon-
ald and Mr. Beckett, heard a debate that
was worthy of a much larger audience.
MRS. RICHARDSON
We regret to have to record that one
of our Professors—Mr. L. Richardson, of
the Department of Mathematics—has
sustained a severe bereavement in the
death of his wife.
Mrs. Richardson had been in poor
health for some time in the summer, having never quite recovered from the effects
of influenza.
The sympathy of both students and
members of the Faculty is with Mr.
Richardson in his great loss.
MEN'S ORATORICAL CONTEST
NEXT WEDNESDAY  EVENING
DON'T MISS IT
GRANVIL
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
G U S I C K
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR   WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cuslck.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
SPECIAL
$25.00
Rough Blue
Serge
Norfolk Suits
REGULAR
$45.00
THE SHOP OF
fflaafrtntt - (graft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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