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The Ubyssey Oct 30, 1919

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Issued  Weekly  by  the  Publications  Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.                                                       VANCOUVER, B. C, OCTOBER 30, 1919                                                               Number 4
Ruggers Slaughter
Rowing Club Team
U.B.C. WINS FROM ROWING CLUB
23 TO 3
The University Rugby team made an
awful mess of the Rowing Club at
Brockton Point on Saturday afternoon,
scoring a 23-3 victory in their second
game of the season. To the five hundred
U.B.C. supporters it was a great match,
but to the other spectators it was a terrible slaughter.
'Varsity started right out to win, and
in less than a minute had scored their
first points, Harold Gwyther sending the
ball sailing over the bar after a free
kick. A few minutes later Ternan intercepted a Rowing Club pass, and made it
6-0 after a nice run. The try was not
converted. Though this finished the
scoring in the first half, it was evident
from the playing of both teams that the
Rowing Club had no more chance than
the proverbial snowball in the lower
regions.
Hatch, who was playing a steady
game at fullback for University, became
a casualty just before half time, and was
posted as missing in the second half.
"Bill" got his proboscus in the way of
a charging sculler, and had that useful
member broken. His place was well
filled by Broadfoot.
"Lou" Hunter opened the scoring in
the second half, when he evaded four of
the opposition and fell across the line.
The 'Varsity three-quarter line showed
a big improvement in this half. Lord
and Morrison did a lot of good work,
and Ternan was running well. Morrison
was the next to score. "Pinky" tore
through and placed the ball right between the posts; but the try was not
converted by Gwyther, who was away
off in his kicking. The Rowing Club
scored their only points about the middle of the second half, when they got
across on the left wing. From then on
it was all University, and the Blue and
Gold went through the Rowing Club defense like water through a sieve. Gwyther converted after Heyland had
scored from, a miskick by the opposition. Then Art Lord plowed his way
over the line, and this was soon followed
by another try by Heyland. Neither of
these was converted. This finished the
scoring and put an end to the 'Varsity
yells.
The U.B.C. scrum was more effective
than in the first game, though there is
still room for improvement. On Saturday,  however, the  Rowing Club used a
'Varsity Wins
Initial Contest
SOCCERITES MAKE GOOD SHOWING—OUTSCORE K. E. H. S.
Last Wednesday was the date selected for the opening tilt of the season in
the 'Varsity soccer schedule. At 3.30
in the afternoon the University squad
and their opponents (King Edward
High School) lined up on the High
School grounds. It took just 30 seconds
for the Blue and White to score the first
goal. The centre forward easily passed
Martin and then crossed the ball to the
outside right, who made a neat run down
the side, fooling Mitchell and Swencis-
ky, and, with a pretty shot from a difficult angle, beat Keenleyside. After this
inauspicious start 'Varsity set out to
prove the first goal to have been a fluke.
For fifteen minutes, however, the High
School team kept pressing, and only
good work by the 'Varsity defense kept
the score down. Finally the University
squad got going, and Martin scored on
a nice pass from Baker. Half time went
with   the   Blue   and   Gold   still   pressing.
The second period started in a.light
drizzle, but this did not dampen the
ardor of the 'Varsity team. After nearly
fifteen minutes of play, during which
the University forwards had nearly
scored on several occasions, Martin
again came to the front by cleverly
hooking the ball into the net from a
scrimmage a few yards out. As the rain
had now started to come down in torrents, the referee called the game.
The executive of the Soccer Club is
planning a series of games for Wednesday afternoons during the fall, and in
this way hope to be able to field a strong
team when the Victoria trip is made at
Christmas.
3-2-3 formation, and benefitted from the
weight of an extra man.
There was a large turnout of 'Varsity
rooters, who were loud in their cheering and greatly encouraged the players.
There were a few hundred absentees,
but this could not be helped. There are
always a certain number of half-dead
students in any university. Too bad!
Those who weren't there don't know
what they missed.   It was a great game!
The following players represented
University: Fullback, Hatch (first half)
and Broadfoot; three-quarters, Wallis.
Morrison, Ross and Heyland; five-
eighths, Ternan; halfbacks, H. Gwyther
and Hunter; forwards, Gross, Lord,
Rolston, V. Gwyther, Carlisle, Swanson
and James.
Sigma Delta
Commences Work
TWENTIETH   CENTURY   PROVED
MORE ENTICING THAN THE
ELIZABETHAN AGE
"Discussion is a sign of the best," as
our honorary president once remarked;
and certainly the zeal of the members
of the Sigma Delta Kappa for animated
discussion shows little sign of flagging.
As the objects of the club include an
endeavor to foster public speaking, be
the time limit long or short, and the subject "high-brow," or suited to the comprehension of ordinary mortals, this
animation augurs well for the success
of the session's programme.
The first meeting of the club this fall
was held on October 8th in "Ye Little
Brown Inn." This change of place has
been necessitated by the impossibility of
arranging for free discussion at a meeting in the large and echoing precincts
of the Assembly Hall.
Among other matters of business, several amendments to the constitution
were brought before the meeting, the
most important being that to limit the
number of active members to fifty. Mr.
Sage then took as his subject "The University Idea," and, by his rather idealistic description of the freedom of college thought, aroused a keen discussion
as to whether university students really
think for themselves.
At the second meeting, on Thursday,
October 23rd, some rather startling assertions were made during the discussion
following a debate on the subject, "Resolved that life in the Elizabethan age
would be preferable to life in the twentieth century." The question of present-
day discontent was touched upon, one of
the debators advancing the philosophic
argument that "it is better to be a pig
satisfied than Socrates dissatisfied."
Three members of the club acted as
judges, rendering a decision in favor
of the negative, as upheld by Misses
Blakey, Lawrence and Brown, against
the advocates of Elizabethan England,
Messrs. Coope, Matheson and Weld.
As it is felt by the executive that each
member should be given an opportunity
of speaking as soon as possible,"the programme for the next meeting has been
arranged with that end in view. Slips
of paper bearing subjects have been distributed, and each member will be required to give a three-minute speech on
his or her particular topic. THE   UBYSSEY
October 30, 1919
Arrow Shirts and Collars
Stanfield's Underwear
Hobberlin Clothing
i
THIS  IS   THE   STORE
that can always show you
something new, and where
you are always sure of a
smile.
"Our Prices Are Right"
RICKSON'S
Apparel for Men
820  GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
3flais{|t0tt - ©raft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY   should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's clothes.
QUALITY   dominates   in   all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FAS HION -CRAFT
GUma. 3obUy $C (£0.
Ctmitri)
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
It is evident that the students of the
University are becoming more and more
interested in Chemistry, judging from
the splendid audience which greeted
Dr. Mcintosh on Thursday night, when
he began the season by lecturing on
"Fires, Explosions and Industrial Accidents."
The meeting was opened by the new
president, Mr. Honeyman, who outlined
the benefits to be obtained, especially in
the industrial world, by a study of
Chemistry. The vacancies on the executive of the society were then filled, Miss
E. Gilbert, '23, and Mr. McCallum, of
Science '23, being elected to represent
their  respective  years.
In the course of his address, Dr. Mcintosh showed how many severe fires
occur in factories through the ignorance
of the workmen or the negligence of
the owners as to installing proper safety appliances. He told of a few of the
most modern methods of extinguishing
these blazes, relating several instances
from his own wide experience in explosive plants, and stated that, as a general rule, the most disastrous accidents
occurred when the plant was speeded
up. He instanced many simple ways
whereby explosions resulting from other
causes might have been prevented, and
closed with a few words on occupational
diseases. He gave some facts about the
terrible sicknesses acquired by men
working in match factories, lead smelters, and the like, and stated that sooner
or later the law would compel owners
to eliminate all unhealthy occupations,
except those which are absolutely essential.
At the conclusion of the lecture the
committee served refreshments, following which some of the members repaired to the auditorium to indulge in
a little dancing.
WHAT  OTHER  UNIVERSITIES
ARE DOING
U. B. C. students may find matter of
interest in the announcement of the programme of the Players' Club of the
University of Toronto for the coming
session. The aim of the society is worthy of notice, being "the presentation by
university men, to university members
and others interested, of some of the
best dramatic work of all countries and
ages, specializing exclusively upon plays
whose nature makes them unsuited to
performance in- down-town theatres."
The first production, Ibsen's "Enemy of
the People," was given in 1914. A year
later a double bill of modern plays—
Galsworthy's "The Pigeon" and Shaw's
"Dark Lady of the Sonnets"—was given.
An ambitious programme is being prepared for this year, comprising six plays,
four "matinees lyriques," a combination
of reading and music entirely new to
this continent; six lectures by members
of the staff on the plays being presented
by the club, and six illustrated lectures
on the art of the little theatre.
The bill of plays includes the following: "The Queen's Enemies," by Lord
Dunsany; "The Alchemist," "Love's
Labour Lost," and the mediaeval farce
of Master Pierre Patelin.
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments  and  Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R. Depot)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital  $13,500,000    Reserve  $15,000,000
THRIFT AND SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and  deposits  made by  mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District, including the following, which
are in the vicinity of the University:
Fairview—Corner    Sixth    Avenue    and
Granville.
Kitsilano—Corner Fourth Avenue and
Yew Street.
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth   Ave.
and Main Street.
Evans & Hastings
 Are the	
Proud  Printers
of
//
The Ubyssey "
For 1919-1920
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour Street
VANCOUVER, B. C October 30, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
L.  PATTERSON L.  PATTERSON
GROTTO
CIGAR STORE
622 Granville Street
L. PATTERSON L.  PATTERSON
The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
HEAD   OFFICE:      WINNIPEG,    MAN.
Assets,  December 31st,   1918,
Over 27 Millions
As soon as possible every young
man should create an estate by purchasing a life  insurance  policy.
Investigate the merits of The Great-
West Life, and it will not be necessary
to seek information elsewhere.
Inquire  at
640   HASTINGS  STREET,   WEST
Branch  Office for B. C.
%. 3Ut d. ©o.
©TeclusiVe. vJTurriers
800 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
SAY YOU SAW IT IN
"THE UBYSSEY"
W. D. McLEAN    L. S. POWELL
McLean & Powell
Iron Works
358-398 Dufferin Street, W.
Phone, Fairmont 1546
GENERAL   FOUNDRY
AND  PATTERN - MAKING
We specialize in Mill and  Marine
Boiler Grates
Satisfaction    Guaranteed
JUNIORS LOSE IN INTER-CLASS
DEBATE
On Wednesday night the hopes of the
Juniors of competing in the final inter-
class debate of the Men's Lit. were
dashed to the ground on the question:
"Resolved that the future political organization of the British Empire should
take the form of a Commonwealth as
outlined by Curtis." Despite the highly
technical nature of the wording, the details of the project were soon made clear
to the audience in the able summary of
the matter given by the first speaker for
the affirmative, Mr. F. H. Buck, of '20.
Mr. Buck's speech was well worth listening to, apart from its merits in debate,
for its easy flow of literary English
promised something in the nature of <
change from the usual rather casual vocabulary of 'Varsity debates. The next
two speakers, Messrs. Boss ('21) and
Peebles ('20), brought forward their arguments in a convincing, if somewhat
conversational, manner. The last speaker for the Juniors, Mr. J. Mitchell, made
quite a hit with the audience by his easy
address and quickly appreciated "hometown" allusions, but, according to the
criticism voiced by the judges, introduced a little too much of the "conversational" into his manner to meet the
requirements of formal debates. The
suspense of the audience was finally ended by the decision of the judges in favor
of Messrs. Buck and Peebles, of Arts
'20.
WESTERN UNIVERSITIES
SERVICE CLUB
About a hundred and fifty returned
men were present at the re-union banquet of the Western Universities Service Club, held in the Citizen's Club on'
Friday evening. Among the new members present were Dean Brock and Professors Mack Eastman and L. Larson.
This is the first of a series of social
evenings planned for the winter. All returned men of the University are invited
to join this society, which meets about
once a  month.
VICTORY LOAN DRIVE
This year, as in the last Victory Loan
campaign, a student committee has been
given charge of all the subscriptions
coming from the students or their
parents. In 1918 the sum of $25,000 was
raised. What about 1919? Everybody
get busy and boost the drive. Hand in
your subscriptions to any of the following: Miss E. Abernethy, Miss M. Kil-
patrick, Mr. G. Leckie, Mr. R. Kingham,
Mr. A. Peebles.
ANNOUNCEMENT COLUMN
Thursday, Oct. 30—Aid. Kirk to address Economics Club.
A big time at the Science Men's
smoker on Friday night at the Rowing
Club.
The second of the inter-class debates
will be held between Arts '23 and '22 at
the Men's Lit. meeting next Wednesday
night.
Junior Economics next Thursday.
Subject:   "Profiteering."
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTTSHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special   Evening  Classes
This   department,  as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
Sprott Sbaw $tamp='Quality
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
DO YOU LIKE THE "UBYSSEY"?
IF SO, SAY SO; IF NOT, TELL US
WHY.
A Reliable
MAN'S WATCH
at LITTLE COST
Probably the best watch
made that sells for a small
price. It is made by the
well-known Tavannes Watch
Co. and has a sturdy movement featuring seven jewels,
three adjustments and bre-
quet hair spring. It is proof
against magnetism, and for
all around durability and
timekeeping is most remarkable. The case is of nickel-
silver, flat, smart in appearance, and will satisfy the
most fastidious city man;
made in two sizes; fully
guaranteed $8.50  and  $9.00
Jewellery  Dept.,   Main  Floor
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED THE   UBYSSEY
October 30, 1919
CLUBB   &
STEWART
LIMITED
Headquarters for Young Men
for the past 30 years
Our slock of Young Men's Suits
and Overcoats this season is
better than ever
SEE  OUR   WINDOWS   for
New Models
309    to   3 15
Hastings Street W.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
The
Young
Men's
Tailors
&
Semi-Ready Shop
655 Granville Street
Issued every Thursday by the Publications  Board
of the   University   of  British  Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
( Lillian  Cowdell
Associate Editors...' -! H.  L.  Keenleyside
[C.  D. Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   H.   Imlah
Exchange  Editor T.   P.   Peardon
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager J.   N.   Weld
Advertising  Manager L.   Fournier
.     . ,     , f D.  A.   Wallace        D.   Mclntyre
Assistants -f ...   ,, T_ _   „
I W.  McKee J. Berto
Circulation   Manager A.    CrawforJ
Editor for the Week II.   Keenleyside
THE BURSTING OF THE BUBBLE
Among those blessings which we are
urged to name over "one by one," a
prominent place should be reserved for
thanksgiving on the ending of the economics "craze" which last year afflicted
our University. Apparently a sense of
proportion has at last entered the minds
of some of our erstwhile incipient Bolshevists. This term we have not to run
the gauntlet of a mob of wildly-gesticulating male undergraduates every time
we pass the men's locker-room; we are
not assailed as "traitors to the cause of
down-trodden humanity" because we do
not agree with the economic and political theories of Trotsky and Lenine;
and, finally, it is not recognized as a
sign of moral degeneration to be interested in History, in Literature, or in
Art.
Undoubtedly, Economics is a study
which is now of importance, and which
will be even more important in the days
yet to be. It should not be, however,
the only, nor even the primary, study of
any person who desires to keep in touch
with the generality of human progress.
Economics without History has been
the cause of many of the wild and impassioned statements which were constantly thrown at our heads during the
last session. If many of our friends
could only have realized that, far from
being new, many of the "latest" theories
advanced are as old as civilization; that
they had been tried and forgotten by
erenerations of men long dead; and that
they had been found to fail when put to
the test of practicability—if they would
realize this, a saner outlook on present
problems would be the result. Again, to
devote ourself to the study of Economics, to the total exclusion of Literature,
would be as wise as the attention of a
human scientist to the physical attributes of humanity, to the total neglect
of  the  spiritual.
But enough has been said; the worst
features of the "craze" are over. Let us
hope that a more intelligent — and a
more reasonable — interest in the study
of Economics will result.
THE BOOK STORE
As the "Ubyssey" has been instituted
to act as a medium for the expression
of student opinion, we take this opportunity to voice the protest most frequently and most forcibly enunciated:
The University Book Store is not satisfactory to the student body either in
arrangement  or  management.
In the first place, we are forced to pay
too much for our text-books. This is
an easily explained fact, inasmuch as the
University Book Store is not licensed,
and, therefore, has to order through another dealer. Thus a retailer's profit is
paid by the students, which, under a
properly organized system, would be
eliminated. A comparison of prices
charged for texts by our Book Store and
the Book Store of the University of Alberta (which is licensed) reveals the
fact that the cost is 15% to 25% higher
in British Columbia. When books are
so expensive as they are at present, this
means no inconsiderable amount; and
when it is realized that this is an entirely unnecessary expense, we feel that
a protest is entirely justified.
The second cause of dissatisfaction is
the time of arrival of the text-books.
The usual procedure in a university is
to order books for the different courses
a year in advance. This permits the
sale of texts at the end of the spring
term, and their use during the summer
months. In U. B. C. the policy seems
to be to wait until the number of students taking a course is ascertained and
then to order the books. The result is
that in practically every subject there is
a delay until the arrival of the textbooks. Even when ordered ahead the
number is always insufficient. Thus
there were two copies of Milton secured
for a class of twenty; ten copies of
"Henry" for a class of ninety; and less
than half the number of Channings
necessary for History 5. This list might
be drawn out indefinitely.
Again we take issue with the policy
of management of the Book Store. For
over two weeks "Hills and Ford—First
Spanish Course"—the text for Spanish
1—were lying in the customs depot in
Vancouver waiting to be cleared. Meanwhile the class were trying to progress
without books. This is inexcusable. In
the same line we would point out that
the Book Store set a certain time for
the opening of the sale wicket, and yet
it is only on the odd occasion that the
store opens within fifteen minutes of the
time set. The hours when it is supposed to be open are, moreover, the
busiest of the whole day, 2 to 4 in the
afternoon, when practically everyone is
occupied with lectures.
This is a brief statement of only a few
of the causes of discontent which is
voiced against the Book Store in U. B.
C. While comparisons may be odious,
they may also at times be helpful. Therefore, we shall describe a properly managed Book Store—that of the University
of Alberta. In the Alberta book-room,
books for all courses are ordered a year
ahead, and in such quantities as to amply supply all classes. They are sold at
wholesale cost price to the students. The
Book Store has a printing press, which
produces the college paper, pamphlets,
notices and calendar, which latter was
ready this year on August 15th. The
store  is  open  at  all  times  from  8  a.m. October 30, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
until 5 p.m., with attendants who know
their stock always ready to serve. Over
and above, the text-books, the store sells
pennants, college colors, and insignia of
all kinds. An assortment of note-books
(something that cannot be obtained at
all in U.B.C.) are always on hand. Finally, the Alberta Book Store is managed
by an ex-student, paid to devote his
whole time to the work, and qualified in
every way to control an up-to-date
establishment. Is it beyond reason to
hope that some such arrangement could
be made in our University? At all events
a change—a very radical change—must
soon be made in the policy of the University of British Columbia Book Store.
*
*
If the reformation continues we will
soon have a new Students' Council.
Anyone desiring a position on the new
Council please apply to the secretary.
TAKE NOTICE
We wish to draw the attention of the
students, more especially those of Arts
'23, to the relative importance of the
advertising matter in the "Ubyssey."
We feel confident that, if they realized
that the advertising brings in $65.00 per
week, whereas their own subscriptions
net only $60.00, they would do more towards proving to the merchants that the
"Ubyssey" is a good advertising medium for them.
Surely it is not the wish of the student body to spoil the advertising for
future years by giving these merchants
cause to regret advertising with us.
The Publications Board is at last in
its new quarters, and the staff is busy
cleaning house.
The following rules are to be observed
in "The House that Jack Built":
(1) Knock before entering.
(2) Enter the sanctum on tiptoe.
(3) Reporters must converse in whispers—only editors may laugh.
(4) No puns.
(5) If by any chance you have a contribution, break the news gently.
Don't shock the editors.
(6) Don't contribute jokes from current magazines or the Orpheum.
(7) Only six persons allowed on'each
table at one time.
(8) No sonnets in blank verse.
What has happened to the University
Rooters' Club? If our memories serve
us faithfully, a full executive, including
a yell leader, was elected at the annual
meeting last spring. Get busy and justify your selection!
EX CATHEDRA
By the Editor for the Week
It is reported that the library stack-
room is to be made a lounging place for
the lazy. Seats and chairs are to be
placed in each of the aisles, and the result will be a miniature edition of the
bedlam that reigns in the reading-room
upstairs.
We would draw the attention of Mr.
McClay to the fact that the "Ubyssey"
box is not intended for out-of-date
Council notices. If the aforesaid gentleman cannot think of anything more
original to contribute to the College
paper, we wish that he would desist
entirely.
It is reported that a society is to be
formed of ex-members of the Students'
Council of 1919-20. The enrollment is
rapidly increasing.
Sixty-four votes cast in the election of
the president of the Arts Men. This is
an up-to-date example of our College
spirit.
Congratulations to the Players' Club!
At last we are to have something a little
out of the ordinary.    Keep it up!
The first issue of "Spasms" has appeared, and it fully justifies the advance
notices. Adams' poetry as a subject for
criticism is becoming worn out, but
otherwise Arts '20's peculiarities are
much in evidence.
(QovvvBuonomn
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Be it far from me to attempt
the interpolation of any Innovation this
year; but, in view of the fact that I will not
be an inmate of this institution next term, I
would like to tender a suggestion, which
I am certain would be of inestimable value
to oncoming hordes and future generations.
If necessary, this suggestion could he adopted as an amendment to the Alma Mater
constitution, if by any chance, hap, or contingency, a quorum could be induced to assemble and gather together for an extended
period of time, in order that the idea might
be propounded to it. Briefly, the commehdaj-
tion is this: That the perquisites of tho
Alma Mater Society be augmented to a sum
total that would Include all the fees of all
the societies within the University, the entire amount to be extracted or subtracted
from each student. Any society with which
a student did not desire to incorporate himself would reimburse him to the amount of
the fee due said  society.
Yours  very respectfully,
EPICENE.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—With your permission, I would
like to make an attempt to answer a question which appeared in the editorial columns
of last week's issue, which asks why the
U. B. C. has not more prestige as a seat of
learning than it apparently has.
This deficiency, I take it, is due, primarily,
to two distinct causes: First, of course, is
our youth and temporary buildings; and,
secondly, the conduct of the students as a
whole.
The former, though serious, it is to be
hoped, will be remedied within a few decades
at any rate. The latter point, however, is
one which time cannot remedy. It lies within  the power of the students themselves to
(Continued on next page)
Smart Footwear for every occasion
©
UR SHOES are worn by young people who appreciate the
limit of shoe swellness. Fall and Winter Styles are now ready
and the new creations are indeed smart.
t* INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666 GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST   SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
October 30, 1919
Art  and   Style   Clothes   Shop   for
Snappy Styles
REMEMBER THIS !
When you buy your Clothes from
us you are getting the very best
of   material,   tailoring   and   style.
Prices:
$40.00 t0 $75.00
GLOVES
Our Glove Department offers an
assortment hard to beat — constantly being added to. We invite
you   to   come   in   and   see   them.
Prices:
$2.00 >° $5.50
Ben Fetch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Opposite Orpheum Theatre)
fmb C«t Tlowcn.     funeral OlorU a Specialty
Brown Bros. & 60. Ltd.
Tlori$t$, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and   Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
P.  PARIS
BOOT AND SHOE MFR.
Repairing Our Specialty
51 Hastings Street, West
VANCOUVER, B. C.
make or mar the name of our thriving Institution. By that I refer, not so much to
the personal conduct, though that too is
important, but rather to the actions of the
students  "en masse."
In other words, what is needed is a good,
healthy, virile college spirit which will prevent the whole, or any section, of the student body from doing anything or. perpetuating any custom at which the outside
world would have reason to look askance.
For instance, when we permit and indulge
in the obsolete barbarities of hazing and,
worse still, the petty meannesses of class
distinction in regard to seniority, "right-of-
way," etc. (not begrudging the Seniors their
degree of honor, but let them show that
they deserve it), it does not irfcrease our
prestige to any very great extent.
Moreover, the rumored "friction" between
the "Arts" and "Science" students, which in
other years has borne much bitter fruit, is
a disgrace even to be mentioned, bearing
the ear-marks of the tribal conflicts of the
aborigines of Eastern Canada, when Columbus brought the first installment of boasted
civilization   to   the  shores  of  this   continent.
If this condition of affairs, Mr. Editor,
persists and grows, as it surely will if not
stopped at once, it will be a lasting disgrace,
rather than an honored tradition, on the
name of our fair Alma Mater. In other
words, the U.B.C, which is one of the great
institutions of our fair country, proud of its
civilization and democracy, would appear to
be sadly lacking in this latter quality, which
is so absolutely essential to the best interests and progress of the college. Moreover,
until these existing evils be removed, it cannot expect, nor does it deserve, the prestige
which it would naturally, and which we all
fondly hope,  it will some day possess.
E. S. F.
Remember to sign your letters to the
Correspondence Column if you want
them published.
THE AFTERMATH
From the accounts of those who were
among "those present" at the Sigma
Delta meeting on Thursday evening,
the most interesting part of the evening's entertainment occurred after the
larger numbers of the members had
fared homeward. It seems that, to begin with, the secretary kept his friends
waiting while he haggled over 25 cents
which the proprietress said was owing
to her. Then the gentlemen of the party
(ten in number) started, with four young
ladies, for Purdy's, but, discovering a
shortage of the basis of credit, three of
the gentlemen offered to take two of the
ladies to a concert (free) in O'Brien's
Hall. Thereupon the remaining five
men, by pooling resources, were enabled
to take the two ladies to the home of
"Pineapple Supremes." One of the most
surprising facts in connection with this
performance was the presence of four
members of the Publications Board and
two members of the Students' Council.
Why these learned and supposedly dignified undergraduates could not find
some more suitable medium of enjoyment ts a query for comment. Ought
they not to have been expending their
time drafting laws for our guidance,
or endeavoring to elevate our minds
through the  columns of the  "Ubyssey"?
BRIDGMAN'S STUDIO
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Addr.
413 GRANVILLE STREET
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A., Principal
Success Business College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone, Fairmont 2075
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New  and   Second-Hand
Book  Shop
Specialists  in University Books
DO  YOU  MENTION  YOU  SAW  IT
IN THE "UBYSSEY"?
ENLARGEMENTS
Vancouver Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
MAKE   OUR   STORE   YOUR
HEADQUARTERS  FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize  in   fine   Stationery
the Uancouver Stationers Ltd.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone, Sey. 6410
BRANCH STORES:
57 Hastings St., W.       Phone,  Sey. 2313
932 Granville   St. Phone, Sey. 8723
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government   St. Phone 4742
PATRONIZE YOUR
ADVERTISERS October 30, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
THE COLLEGE CAT
I've pondered very deeply what to
write about this week, but I cannot find
a subject no matter where I seek. I
have searched the friendly Walker, but
his help is very slight, so the rhyming in
this column will doubtless be a fright.
I've looked vainly for assistance from
my dear old Uncle Walt, but he's not
the least inspiring, and I guess that's not
his fault. So I've decided, briefly, to
give a discourse, small, on everything in
general and nothing quite at all. I'll
speak on many subjects from science
down to art, of Cusick's dainty doughnuts, and eke his apple tart; of memories multitudinous and many other
things, of words like "musilaginous," of
cabbages and kings; and why most college students will not be famous men;
and of the cruel janitor who puts me
out at ten. And of my respect for Freddie, when he strokes my silken hair, and
tells me I am beautiful, when we meet
upon the stair. I've tried to like Doc.
Sedgewick, but I nearly always fail; he
rubs my fur the wrong way round, and
pulls my very tail. And I'd like to let
the public know I've changed my habitation, and moved down to the basement,
where they make this publication. It's
damn, and cold, and windowless, and
nearby they keep the coal, but we're
very than'-ful for it, and it's called "The
Better 'Ole." The staff induced me
down there to chase away the rats; it's
wonderful to meditate"what useful things
are cats. I used to haunt the stack-room,
when no others were let in; now it's full
of "rampant" Seniors, who make an awful din. Worse than twice one hundred
Freshies is the noise that they create, so
I hied me to the cellar in a very nervous
state.
Now I think I've done my duty by the
paper for a while; you'll agree I've done
it nicely in the true poetic stvle. I've
really said a great deal more than it at
first may seem: now I am going to Mr.
Tansley for a saucerful of cream.
PUSSY.
NEW    MEMBERS    ENTERTAINED
IN AUDITORIUM  ON FRIDAY
NIGHT
The University auditorium was the
scene of another reception on Friday
evening, when the new members of the
Players' Club made the acquaintance of
those whose dramatic talent has already
been proven. Few, if any, University
dances have been so well planned or so
well carried out. Refreshments, instead
of being squabbled over in the kitchen,
were served from a daintily decorated
table, at which Mrs. Wood and Mrs.
Klinck presided. There was ample floor
room for the dancers, who did not stint
their praise of the University Orchestra.
The introduction committee, distinguished by badges of yellow and blue, won
everyone's praise and gratitude. The
ladies present found added enjoyment in
watching the lugubrious expressions on
the faces of those gentlemen who, for
once, found themselves wallflowers.
Dancing continued till one o'clock, when
the men concluded the affair by giving
the University yell with an enthusiasm
that showed how keen had been their
enjoyment throughout the evening.
Students' Loose-Leaf Supplies
RING BOOKS and RING BOOK SHEETS for ALL BOOKS
FOUNTAIN   PENS,   HIGH-GRADE   PENCILS  AND   PENS
WE   WILL  APPRECIATE A   VISIT   TO   OUR  STORE
WESTERN SPECIALTY LIMITED
PRINTERS and STATIONERS  -   572 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER
PHONE, SEYMOUR  7853
C. HERMANN, Proprietor
v • --r   '    "l T • ft       "?   ".1
HERMANN'S   BARBER   SHOP
ROGERS  BLOCK, 464  GRANVILLE  STREET
SUTCLIFFE  AT   HARVARD
U. B. C. students will be interested to
know that our late Alma Mater president, "Bill" Sutcliffe, may now be found
roaming the stately halls of Harvard in
search of further knowledge, in his favorite subject, Economics. In a letter
to a member of the Publications Board
he speaks of their first experience as
"gazing in awe" at the sight of the great
university. And he goes on to say that
lie little wonders "that our professors
are always raving about Harvard."
There are 5,000 students in attendance
this session; but, according to "Bill,"
they don't believe "in the sardine practice here as the B. C. Government does
in regarding students of the West."
He gives an amusing account of how
Fraser and he tixed up their room, and,
in referring to the work of hanging the
curtains, says: "We developed such
marked skill in plying the needle that
we are giving serious consideration to
the possibility of hiring out as seamstresses in a Xew York shop next summer." We are not surprised at Gordon
cherishing such a desire; but Bill—we
didn't expect it of you. They both wish
to be remembered "to the boys" of the
'Varsity.
Y. Y. C. A. NOTES
This week's meeting of the Y.M.C.A.
will take the form of an address to be
given by Dr. G. G. Sedgwick. This is
not the first occasion that Dr. Sergwick
has spoken to the members of the association, and his message always appeals.
The hour is 12 noon on Friday, in Room
23. All men attending the University
are invited.
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY, WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
R.e.Purdy,ttd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET THE   UBYSSEY
October 30, 1919
.. Th
e ..
Western Life
Assurance Co.
Offers  in  its   Guaranteed  Security
Policies   one   of   the   best
investments for to-day
Every Student Should
Carry One
See  the  Manager,  or  one  of  their
many agents, for particulars
Head Office for B. C:
701 LONDON BLDG.
626  Pender  Street,  West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
C.  E.  MAHON,  Manager
J. W. FOSTER
LIMITED
TWO STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men  who stay young
ARTS '12
Last Friday the Juniors held a meeting in Room Z for the purpose of making the preliminary arrangements for
their annual class party. The committee
in charge will put forth every effort to
prove, first of all, their originality in
creating new and novel forms of entertainment, and then the possibility of
making this year's friendly gathering on
November 7th as successful and distinctive as are the other class parties in
our University.
Miss Agnes Ure has been appointed
class representative to the Women's
Literary Society, to fill the vacancy
caused by the absence of Miss Laura
Gilroy.
JUNIOR ECONOMICS CLUB
The first general meeting of the
Junior Economics Club was held in "Ye
Little Brown Inn" on Thursday evening.
A very pointed address on "Rights of
the Minority" was given by Prof. Angus.
He dealt with these rights, both past and
present, not only in our own country,
but throughout the world, and in many
phases of life, as religious, political, etc.
A very lively discussion followed,
which showed that, although the members were not very numerous, they were
very active and earnest.
All economic students should keep
Thursday evening, November 6, at "Ye
Little Brown Inn," for the next meeting,
as the society promises to be one of the
most interesting of the student activities.
SCIENCE NOTES
At the last meeting of Science '23 Dr.
Hebb was elected honorary president.
It was decided to have pins of a similar
design to that of Science '22. A class
reporter was also chosen.
Prospective notice - hangers, please
note:
Some of those putting up notices have
omitted to duplicate them in the Science
Building. As few of the Science students enter the Arts Building, they are
unaware of certain events—such as the
football practice of last week.
GIVE THE VICTORY LOAN
COMMITTEE YOUR SUPPORT
The University will be represented by
two teams in the Vancouver Basketball
League this season. At Monday night's
meeting entries were made in the Senior
"B" and Intermediate divisions of the
league.
The U.B.C. players have been practicing for the past three weeks, and are
rapidly rounding into shape. Over forty
candidates have been turning out for
places on the teams.
"Sid" Anderson has been elected captain of the Seniors. The first team will
be selected from S. Anderson, G. Gross,
G. Dixon, R. Anderson, A. Lord and D.
Taylor. The Intermediates will be
chosen this week.
Something New
Every Week for
Young Men
Another shipment of Suits and Top-
Coats just received.
Included in this remarkable shipment are Suits and Topcoats displaying the most up-to-date features in
tailoring,  style and quality.
Represented are numerous neat and
fancy patterns, that we will be glad
to show you at any time.
The  prices are:
$35, $40, $45, $50, $55
J. N. Harvey, Ltd.
123, 125, 127 Hastings Street, West
Also 614-616 Yates Street, Victoria
Look for the big Red Arrow Sign
J&TBell.
WMITCO
Dame   Fashion's   latest   dictates   in
Fine Footwear
in   endless  variety  at
CLUFF'S
You will always find just the shoe
you are looking for at the right
price here.
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where  quality  counts,  we  win.
Cluff Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite   Bank   of  Commerce

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