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The Ubyssey Mar 20, 1924

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Issued Weekly by the Student Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume VI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., MARCH 20th,    1924
No.
71
PLAYERS' CLUB
PERFORMANCE
; COMMENDED
Top-NotcX Production is Verdict
if Carroll Aikins
"The top-notch production in University performances." ■ This was the
iverdiet of Mr. Carroll Aikins after
witnessing a full rehearsal of "The
World and His Wife" in the Auditorium, Saturday evening. Mr. and
Mrs. Aikins are conducting classes in
dramatic art in the city prior to their
return to their own theatre at Naramata where they will continue their
usual summer performances, beginning May 1st. They have seen the
University plays of the last five years
so these high words of commendation
are very significant. Beyond question
the production on next Monday and
Tuesday evenings will mark a distinct advance in dramatic achievement in the University.
The play opened on Wednesday
evening in Nanaimo and is playing
to-night in New Westminster. These
two performances will serve to correct
any rough edges and the smoothness
of a professional company is assured
for next week. Every live student
from the loftiest senior to the greenest freshie will be on hand, many of
them in very elevated positions.
There are still a few seats available
in each section for either evening and
the 25c rush seats are always to De
procured and not to be despised.
WILLAMETTE COLLEGE IS
DEFEATED BY VARSITY
y        CO-EDS.
Winnie Cawthorne and Greta Mather Win First Women's Interna-
"tronalH&elJates—Jvtdges~ArTTJnanimous in Decision
Appointments To
J U. B. C. Staff
Miss HelentJIacfiill has been chosen
for the^posltioii of Senior Editor of
the Ubyssey during the coming year.
Miss MacGill has had ample experience in journalistic work. Last year
she was on the Annual staff, and "this
year she was an associate editor of
the Ubyssey until she resigned to
edit the Annual, which, by the way, is
expected to appear at the end of the
first week in April. The position of
Senior Editor carries with it the greater part of the responsibility of the
editorial work of the Ubyssey, and it
is expected that Miss.'MacGill will be
a success in her new/position.
Mr. Homer A, Thompson has accepted the position ot^Bxtsiness Manager of the Publications for the term
1924-25. Homer is a member of Arts
'25 and is best known as a sterling
performer on the champion Arts '20
relay team. He has, as business assistant, been very successful this year,
and should handle the duties of his
new office very well. The importance
of the work ie indicated by the fact
that Mr. T. J. Keenan, business manager for this year, handled over $7,000
of funds.
The first Women's International Debate held in Vancouver resulted in
an unanimous decision in favour of
the University of B. C. On Friday
evening Miss Winnie Cawthorne and
Miss Greta Mather, both of Arts '24,
successfully debated against Miss
Esther Moyer and Miss Claine Huberg
who represented the Willamette College, Oregon. The subject for the
debate was: "Resolved that the
French should immediately evacuate
the Ruhr," Varsity taking the affirmative.
Miss Betty Somerset presided over
the meeting and welcomed on behalf
of the University the representatives
from Willamette. The debate was, she
continued, in the nature of a return
debate, for U. B. C. sent representatives  to  Willamette  two  years   ago.
Miss Winnie Cawthorne opened the
debate with a forceful outline of legal,
political, economic and moral reasons
why the French should evacuate the
Ruhr. She declared the French policy
illegal since it was based on a doubtful interpretation of one clause of the
Treaty of Versailles and violated an
other. Politically France should eva
cuate because her present policy is
estranging from her all her former
allies and creating in Germany a
burning hatred that cries for revenge.
Morally her policy is wrong also, Miss
Cawthorne continued, for she is causing untold suffering in Germany which
is not justified by the suffering she
herself underwent during the war.
Economically she should evacuate for
by undermining the German industrial
system she is destroying all her
chances for reparation. In conclusion
Miss Cawthorne pointed out that
France is now the military despot of
Europe just as Germany was in 1914.
Miss Moyer, the leader of the negative asserted that. France had suffered unbelievably and is now in a state
of economic ruin, for besides the destruction of her buildings and the loss
of her finest men, her soil has been
rendered useless by the shells and
poisonous gas entombed > within it.
The French waited, Miss Moyer went
on, for four long years, and in desperation they undertook this policy
(Continued  on  Page  5)
PRESENTATION
DAY DRAWS
^BIG CROWD
Ten   Athletes   Win   Big   Block
•-EetteES^-^ Geh''    Receives
rlbute from Students
NINE RECORDS ARE BROKEN
7 AT TRACK MEET WEDNESDAY
Agriculture Wins Meet with 33y2 Points.   Harry Warren Is Track
Champion.   Barton and Buckley Break Records.
Last Wednesday at Brockton Point
the Track Club staged a very successful meet at which nine new records
were established. Harry Warren of
Sc. '26 won the track championship,
while the Aggies piled up 33% points
to win the meet. Sc. '25 came second
with 15 points, while Sc. '26 and Arts
'27 were third and fourth.
Warren put up the best performance
of the day. He broke the 220-yard record set by Livingstone, tide for first
place in the 100:yard dash, and came
second in the 440. His record for the
220 is the best comparative- record
made at a U.B.C. track meet.
Nine new records were established.
In the sprints, Warren clipped 2-5 second off the 220 and McKay brought the
440 time down 1-5 second. Buckley
broke his own record in the half mile.
Barton established new records in the
mile and the three-mile events. Demidoff raised his pole-vault record another five inches. Good records were
established in the two new events,
the hammer throw and the 16-lb. shot-
put. Goldie, of Agriculture, threw the
hammer 94 feet 2 inches, while Ramsell put the shot 34.95 feet. In the
discus event Ramsell broke his record
of last year by over ten feet.
The results of the meet are as fol
lows :
120-yard Hurdles—Hyslop, Arts '24;
Russell, Ag.; Hatfield, Arts '27—18 4-5
see.
880-yards—Buckley, Ag.; H. Arkley,
Arts '25 ;S. Arkley, Arts '25—2 min.,
8 sec.
Broad Jump—Buckley, Ag.; Hyslop,
Arts '24; Russell, Ag.—18ft. 6in.
100-yard Dash—Warren, Sc. '26 and
McKay, Ag. (tied for first place);
Stanley, Sc. '27—11 1-5 sec.
16-lb. Hammer—Goldie, Ag.; Ramsell, Sc. '25; Plummer, Ag.—94ft. 2in.
High Jump—Russell, Ag.; Hyslop,
Arts '24; Hatfield, Arts '27—5ft. 4in.
Pole Vault—Demidoff, Sc. '25; Newby, Arts 27; McLean, Arts '27.—9ft.
lOin.
One Mile—Barton, Sc. '26; Hope,
Ag.; Elliot, Arts '27.—4min. 53 2-5 sec.
220-yards Dash—Warren, Sc. '26;
McKay, Ag.; Thompson, Arts '26.—
23  3-5 sec.
16-lb. Shot—Ramsell, Sc. '25; Greggor, Sc. '25; Proctor, Sc. '27.—34.95 ft.
Javelin—H. Arkley, Arts '25; E. Lazenby, Sc. '25; Davis, Arts '26.—130.1 ft.
440 Yards—McKay, Ag.; Warren,
Sc. '26; Thompson, Arts '26.-54 4-5
sec.
Discus—Ramsell,    Sc.    '25;    Goldie,
Ag.;  Kelly, Arts '27.—106.3 ft.
(Continued on Page 6)
rpsentation Day, held on Tuesday
last, once more drew a packed Auditorium when cups, shields and letters
were awarded to both the teams and
the individual athletes who had been
successful in the sports of the past
college year:
President Klinck opened the ceremonies by presenting large Block Letters to the following:
B. Brock, J. Emery, G. Hyslop, J. Un-
derhill, T. Wilkinson, G. Ledingham,
E. Huestis, H. Warren. G. Shields Jted
J. Maclean of Arts '27, also won them,
but will receive them next year.
On behalf of the Men's Athletic Association, Jack Grant presented a
special, individual cup to "Geh" Ternan, as the greatest athlete that U. B.
C. lias yet produced.' Ternan has been
captain of the first rugby team for
the past two years, and., has also
found both the time and the ability
to play on the First Soccer squad and
on the U. B. C. Hockey sextette.
The McKechnie cup' "was then
awarded by its donor, Dr. R. E. McKechnie, Chancellor ofthe' University,
to the First Division TRlugby Team.
"Jim" Scott, popular "coach of this
team and a graduate of the old McGill University College of B. C. was
given a silver cigarette case as a
token of the esteenj in, which he is
held.
Following this—the Miller, Tisdall,
Rounsefell, and Cooper-Keith trophies
were presented by Mr. C. Gardiner
Johnston, and the Women's and Men's
small letters by Mrs. Boving and Dr,
J. G. Davidson respectively.
The Governor's Cup, emblematic of
first place in the Inter-class Sports
was then entrusted to the care ot
Alex Swanson on behalf of the winning year. Arts '27, who scored fifteen
and a half points against Science '24
with fifteen, Agriculture with 9% and
Science '26 with 9.
Bert Smith, representing Arts '25
(Continued   on   Page   6)
DR.McKECHNIE
^ RE-APPOINTED
Dr. R. E. McKechnie has again been
elected Chancellor of "tne University
of British Columbia. Dr. McKechnie
has already spent two periods of three
years each as Chancellor, having held
the position for the first time six
years ago.
Dr. McKechnie is very popular at
the University, and his re-appointment
will be the source of considerable satisfaction to the students. He has
been a hard worker in his work as
Chairman of the Senate, and has done
everything in his power to get the
University moved to its permanent
home in Point Grey. His new term
will end in 1927. THE      UBYSSEY
March 20th, 1924
Parker Pens
The ideal Pen for student use.
Smooth Writing.
Holds More Ink.
Can't Leak.
Guaranteed  Point.
A real  good  Fountain  Pen.
^iU Phillips Heads
^   Science Undergrad
Mr. William J. Phillips has been
elected by acclamation president of
the Science Undergraduate Society.
Mr. Phillips has a splendid record and
has the reputation of being one of the
best all round men in Varsity. After
he returned from overseas, where he
served with the 15th Battalion, Mr.
Phi lips took his first year at McGill,
then coming West he entered Science
at U.B.C. During the present year
he has been captain of the First Soccer
team and president of his class. It is
rather interesting to note that the
president-elect is the eighth returned
iran   to  hold   that  position.
MURPHY & CHAPMAN
LIMITED
STATIONERS,  PRINTERS
569 Seymour Street
The     VARSITY    SHOP
Our New Address Will Be
608 Granville St.
In the meantime we will continue our Removal Sale at the
old stand, and the values offered will more than compensate
one for the inconvenience necessitated by the torn up condition of the present store.
FASHION CRAFT
514   Granville   St.
Thos. Foster & Co.
ONE   STORE   ONLY
EVANS S HASTINGS
Better Quality
PRINTERS
We make a specialty of:
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., Etc.
Students would do well to gire
us a coll before going elsewhere
678 Seymour St.
PHONE SEY. 189
CAMPAIGN COLLECTIONS
Miss B. Johnson, of Nursing '23, at
present with the Victorian Order of
Nurses at Montreal, has sent $10 for
the CAMPAIGN Fund.
Those glittering cups which played
such a prominent part in the Presentation last Tuesday, were cleaned by
Miss Kirsteen Leveson. By cleaning the cups Miss Leveson saved $10
for the CAMPAIGN Fund.
\ BRITISH PEACE AWARD.
'How can Peace and Prosperity be
Restored in Great Britain and Europe
through International Co-operation?
Such is the question -which must be
answered by those who take part in
the British Peace Award Competition.
This competition, which is of a similar nature to one held recently in the
United States, is for the purpose of
interesting British citizens in the
problem of international peace. Corresponding competitions will be held
in France and Italy for the purpose
of bringing forth the best and most
practicable proposals in those countries. There are thirty-seven cash
prizes in the British competition, the
first prize being £1,000. This money
is available by the generosity of Mr.
Edward A. Filene of Boston, who has
donated the prizes. Further information concerning the competition may
be obtained at the Publications Office.
Last Word on
"The Ceilidh"
To-morrow night marks the culmination of the past month's activities of
the Alumni Society. The University
will be given over to amusement;
pleasure-seekers will throng the halls.
That the student body will be well
represented at the "Celidh" is evident
from the brisk sale of combination
tickets. Many of the students who did
not profit by the reduced price are
expected to attend the cabaret and
jitney dance in the Auditorium.
Entries for the waltz competition
are still in order. Entrants should
give their names to Jack Grant.
AGRICULTURE   AND   SCIENCE
y DEBATE
The Agriculture delating team defeated the Science team on Wednesday, March 12, when they met in the
Physics Bldg. to debate the resolution, "Resolyed that a system of Preferential Tariff applied within the
British Empire would be advantageous
to the Empire." Messrs. Plummer
and Mallory of Agriculture upheld the
affirmative against Messrs. Cook and
Stacey of Science. Both teams displayed a thorough understanding of
preferential tariffs, and contested each
point vehemently. The debaters were
very evenly matched. A two to one
decision was rendered in favor of the
affirmative, by the judges, professors
Lightfcall, Williams and Barss.
S.  C.   M.   SUMMER   CAMP  CONFERENCE
"fhe S. C. M. is holding a camp
conference on Gambie Is'and from
June 18-27. Dr. Richard Roberts of
Montreal, and Dr. Sharman of Toronto will attend. The camping site
chosen is one of the very best in B.
C. and possesses the advantages of
boating, bathing, tennis and badminton. Roberts and Sharman are two
of the foremost leaders of religious
thought on the continent, and are both
authors of international reputation.
Anyone interested, faculty or student, can secure more information from
Fred Brand, Mildred Osterhout or
Gerald Kerr.
Young Men and Women
of the University of
British Columbia:
Upon you and the students of all other Canadian
Universities will eventually fall the task of guiding
our country through the medium of public opinion.
Providence has been exceedingly beneficent
with Canada; her only limitations are those which
we, her people, impose upon her.
Our greatest handicap at the present time is the
lack of a Canadian national pride and sentiment sufficiently strong to eliminate or submerge the sectional and racial antipathies and jealousies of a portion of our people. We are striving to create the
necessary patriotic love of country which alone can
achieve internal unity.
Your aid is cordially solicited in the task of
making Canada a united, prosperous and great nation; as fellow Canadians we rely upon you to do
your part in private and public activities as we are
striving as an organization to do ours.
NATIVE SONS OF  CANADA
VANCOUVER ASSEMBLY No. 2
Prof. E. O. Matheson, Pres. Capt. E. M. McMaster, Sec.
CROESUS
with   all   his   wealth   could   not
buy a Fountain Pen.
GEHRKE'S
YOU
Can
Fountain Pen Headquarters
The largest stock of standard
parts and repairs in the West.
Eversharp and other propelling pencils speedily and satisfactorily put in perfect working
order.
GEHRKE'S
651   Seymour  Street,
Gity
The Florence
C onfectionery
497   BROADWAY   W.
(Corner Cambie)
Light  lunches Tobaccos
Confectionery
Hot Meat Pies a Specialty
A cosy spot on a cold day.
ERNEST   T.   TAYLOR,
Fair. 5897.
>"V.
Spalding Sweaters
Are Warm Friends
Become Acquainted!
I Of Canada. Limited
I 424 Hastings St., W., Vancouver, B. C.
THE
CAMPING
SEASON
will soon be here.
That old Tent might last
another year if
DUCO TREATED
For light waterproof
TENTS
Canvas Goods
Camp  Equipment
Outings Limited
Tel.  Sey. 4886
817 PENDER^T. W. March 20th, 1924
THE     UBYSSEY
Ed. Da Motta
Hair Cutting a Specialty
Expert Attendant
□
2558 Heather St.
The Big Question Now Is
Spring Clothes
Our stock is nearly all here
and the styles and materials are
better than ever.
The new samples are here.
Prices are very reasonable —■
$25.00 to $40.00 to your measure.
Thomas & McBain Limited
655 GRANVILLE STREET
Semi-ready  Shop
EM PR ESS
Phone  Seymour 2492
Miss Verna Felton and the
Allen Players in
'THE DAWN OF A
TOMORROW
Evenings,   8:30....25c,   55c,   60c,   75c
Weekday  Matinee   20c,  30c
Saturday Matinee  30c, 40c
Kiddies, any time  15c
500  Gallery  Seats  16c
McGill & Sparling Ltd.
formerly
"Shaw & McGill
wish to announce a change of address from 658 Robson  Street  to
718 ROBSON STREET
We solicit your Sporting Goods
trade at our new store.
Phone Sey. 4653
rENUS
PENCILS
<jftp largest selling Quality
pencil in die world
FOR the student or prof., the
superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
17 black degrees—3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
229 Fifth Ave.
New York
Write for
booklet on
Venus Pencils and
Venus Everpointed
Mechanical Pencils
VARSITY TRACK RECORDS AND
y      CHAMPIONS SINCE FIRST MEET
TRACK MEET RECORDS
Event Record Holder      Class
120-yard   Hurdles Garret   Livingston Arts     '24
880 yds.   (%  mile) Les.   Buckley    Agric. '25
Broad Jump   Ken. Williams   Arts     '24
Arts     '24
100-yard  Dash Garret Livingstone	
16-lb.   Hammer    James A.  Goldie Agric. '25
High  Jump   Hugh   Russell    Agric.    24
Pole  Vault    Peter  Demidoff   Scien. '25
One  Mile   Carl   Barton   Scien. '26
220-yard Dash  Harry Warren  Scien. '26
16-lb.   Shot   J. L. Ramsell Scien. '25
Javelin    Eric Lazenby  Scien. '25
440  Yards   John   J.   McKay Agric. '24
Discus  J.   L.   Ramsell Scien.  '25
%   Mile  Relay Agriculture  	
3  Miles   (Open) Carl   Barton    Scien. '26
TRACK CHAMPIONS
Jasper   Wolverton,   Science   '24	
Garret   Livingston,   Arts   '24	
Al. Buchanan, Arts '24	
Hugh Russell, Agriculture '24 	
Harry  Warren,  Science  '26	
Tear Record
1920 18   sec.
1924 2  min.,   8  sec.
1920 19   ft.,   3   in.
1920 10 4/5   sec.
1923
1924 94   ft.,   2   in.
1923 5 ft.,  9 in.
1924 9  ft.,  10 in.
1924 4 min., 53 2/5 sec.
1924 23 3/5   sec.
1924 34.95  ft.
1923 132 ft., 4 in.
1924 54 4/5 sec.
1924 106.3 ft.
1923 1 min., 41 4/5 sec.
1924 16 min., 37 2/5 sec.
.1920
.1921
.1922
.1923
.1924
£er Team
es to Central Park
Varsity lost its grasp on another
trophy when the Second Men went
under to Central Park in a re-played
Brunswick Cup semi-final, 1-0. It is
generally conceded that the Park was
fortunate to gain the verdict, but
U.B.C. were admittedly off color in
the first half at least. Following the
kick-off the winners broke away fast,
and took advantage of U.B.C.'s loose
play to force matters, ultimately
scored the fatal goal from a weak
clearance. Davidson, who was again
in splendid fettle, had" no chance.
This reverse seemed to stimulate the
students, and they injected more fight
into the fray, gradually assuming the
offensive and getting two corners.
Newcombe shot past on a good chance,
and both defences were tested in turn.
After the resumption, Varsity fell
away again, and only stout defensive
work saved them during the first ten
minutes. But they came back strong,
and gradually wore down their opponents, playing hard, forceful ball, and
testing the Parkmen's goalie severely,
while they practically took the play in
hand. But the Park team clung to
their narrow margin, and frustrated
Varsity's ten-man offense, to go into
the finals by a single goal. Shortly
before the end, Demidoff,- who, along
with Newcombe, turned in a stellar
performance, was injured, but tried
gamely to come back. Five fruitless
corners in as many minutes were
U.B.C.'s sole reward.
Line-up:—Davidson; Disney and
Shield; Gibbard, Muylaert and Demidoff; Martin, Newcombe, Cant, Underwood and Evans.
Varsjty Juniors
(^Defeated by C.P.R.
Varsity Juniors' last chance of adding to the silverware died with the
final whistle that ended a gloriously
fought struggle when C. P. R. defeated them 3-1 last Saturday. The general run of play was very even, but
the Railwaymen deserved their win
by their spirited attack.
C. P. R. started with a rush, but the
Varsity defense was equal to the occasion, until a fast cross was headed
past Sutherland. Play continued lively, but there was no further score in
tho first half.
After the interval, Varsity pressed
hard, and just missed scoring several
times, but the opposing net-minder
was impregnable, until a fast shot by
Miller gave him no chance. C. P. R.
soon scored again, when the centre
headed a second one between the
posts. Just before the final whistle
a_ third goal was tallied against the
Varsity. The game was efficiently
handled by Mr. Richards, whom the
Varsity team has been fortunate
enough to secure as coach for next
season.
The Team—Sutherland, Warden and
Davies, Morrison, Heaslip and Taylor,
Smith, Miller, Partridge, Dynes' and
Black.
A New Shipment of
Corselettes
Just In
SIDE OK BACK
FASTENING STYLES
Including models of pink striped
grenadine with elastic adjustments in skirt and under arm;
very suitable styles for average
figures; sizes 32 to 42 at $4.25;
also of plain pink grenadine, in
sizes 32 to 38, at $3.25.
Back Fastening Corselette of
grenadine with long skirt with
elastic over thighs; sizes 32 to
36, at $1.95.
— Drysdale's   Corset   Shop,   Second
Floor.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
TheC<Senior__A_. girls defeated the
Naiivj2^Ha2ghters on Saturday evening 4-2. The game was featured by
extremely close checking, so close in
fact, that at the end of the game the
score was only 2 all. In the overtime period Varsity scored the winning basket,      /
The Senjpr ,£S girls lost to the ex-
Normals tBe/same evening 12-8. At
the end of^rne first half the score was
6-4 but the ex-Normals pulled ahead
near the end.
Senior A—Doris Shorney, "Gay"
Swencesky, Isabel Russell, Isabel McKinnon, Bea Pearce, and "Patsy" Robinson.
Senior B—Margery Bell, Alda Moffat, Katherine Reid, Irene Carnsworth,
Margaret Ryan, Winona Straight.
Midway
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and Heather St.
W. H. Caldwell, Prop.
Phone Fair. 840
DRUGS
STATIONERY
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHAP PENCILS
KODAKS
Our Popular
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A wonderful spring hat buy, fellows!
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come in newest shapes with rolled
brims. Search the city for a better
hat value—you'll  not  find  it.
Dick's
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4.45
William DICK Limited
45-47-49 Hastings Street East
OUR GUARANTEE:
"YOUR   MONEY'S   WORTH   OR   YOUR   MONEY   BACK" IS
THE      UBYSSEY
March 20th,  1924
(Member ' Pacific"' Intec-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued    every    Thursday    by    the    Publications
Board   of  the   I'niversity   of   British   Columbia.
Extra   mural   subscriptions.   $2.00   per  session.
For advertising rates apply
Business   .Manager.   .Phone   Kair.   44S5
EDITOKIAL   STAFF.
Editor-in-Chief   .; - A.   1,.   Wheeler
Senior  Editor Cliff  Dowling
Associate   Edft6rs-'--.!-'.MisS' Grace   Smith
T.   W.   Brown
Miss  Sadie   Boyles
Feature   Editor ...Ralph   Mathews
Literary  Editor  W.   C.   Murphy
Exchange Editor Miss  Gwen   Stirling
Sporting Editor ., ; J. Cowx
Chief Reporter   ..,..,, H.  C.  MacCallum
BEPORTOBIAL STiPF.
Laura S. Mowatt, John Grace. Dorothy Arkwri-jrht. A. Earle Birney. Florence Williams, Doris McKay. R. O. Norman, Dave Taylor. R .W. Ball. Marion
Smith, Les Buckley, Alan Hemingway.
H.   D.   Wallis. 'Louis ' Smith.
BUSINESS  STAFF.
Business Manager  T.  J.  Keenan
Assist.  Bus.   Mgrs .W.  H.  Sparks
Eric   Dunn
Homer   A.   Thompson.
Circulation  Manager .........' F.  J.  Brand
Business   Assistants H.   C.   Etter
Miss  Eloise  Angell
Miss Isabel  Macbeth
E. J. Eades
EDITOR   FOR   THE    WEEK
T.   W.   Brown.
^>
AVE THE CAUTION  MONEY.
For the past month the roost vital
question confronting the student hody
has heen how to raise money for playing fields at Point Grey. The majority of the students have lent their
whole-hearted support to various
schemes, and have turned over their
caution money to the CAMPAIGN as
a voluntary contribution.
However, after signing away their
money, many have assumed the attitude that it is immaterial how many
windows, benches, or laboratory articles they break, as no funds will be
refunded to them in any event. This
attitude is not only selfish, but is absolutely out of keeping with the spirit
of the CAMPAIGN. Their carelessness wastes money which might otherwise be going to increase the CAMPAIGN Fund.
We urge that greater care be taken
in future of all University properties,
so that as large an amount of caution
money as possible may be donated to
the CAMPAIGN at the end of the
term
AMPAIGN   RESULTS.
The near approach of the final examinations necessitates the temporary
suspension of campaign activities. It
might not be out of place at this time
to review briefly the work already accomplished.
As far as the financial end of the
matter goes, the campaign committee
express themselves as well pleased
with the results. Each class has entered whole-heartedly into the spirit
of the campaign, and by various means
$7,000 has been raised among the student body. The crowning event will be
the Geilidh, put on by the Alumni, at
which it is hoped sufficient funds will
be raised to bring the total up to the
required $10,000.
The other phase of the campaign,
the work at Point Grey, has not met
with the same support. Each Saturday, a gang of students has gone out
to clear the land, and a fair portion
of it has been gone over. The number of students volunteering for this
work hase been somewhat disappointing, but this may be due to the proximity of examinations.
While satisfied with results so far,
we must not forget that the suspension of campaign activities is only
temporary, and that after examinations, and next. term, they must be
taken up with renewed vigor.
VARSITY ATHLETICS
The irfajority of students hardly re-
alizjii^the significance of a "Big Block
L«euer"   award.     This   year   ten   men
achievedthe highest of athletic honours and were rewarded with their
Big Block Letters. These men have
participated in a major sport, including rugby, soccer or track, and in
that field have particularly distinguished themselves. This year the letter has been a particularly coveted
honour, for the competition has been
keen and places on the major teams
have only been won by evidence of
outstanding ability. In order to win
such an honour athletes are obliged
to keep themselves in the pink of condition and this involves a sacrifice of
valuable time for which they are not
credited in their academic work. The
University not only wins its reputation
by a high academic record, but to a
large extent it is judged by these athletes who are willing to sacrifice first
class marks and undergo bodily harm.
In closing we should like to pay a tribute to those who have been more or
less  permanently injured in sports.
\ BY  THE  WAY
Speaking of  a  return  to  normalcy,
it, is almost two weeks since anyone
has   been   heard   to   sing,   shout   or
whistie,    "Last    Night    on    the    Back
Porch," in the halls.
*        *        *
Noting the re-appearance of a certain epidemic, the youngest reporter
offers his toast of appreciation.
"Here's  to  bobbed  hair,  long may  it
wave."
* *    *
Don't be afraid to be with the minority ;  read the editorials.
«        *        »
We are pleased to announce that
"spring has came on the college campus." Note the tennis-golf, the profusion of cameras, the bunches of
violets, and the new spring smiles displayed by the Freshettes.
•     «     *
Talking about election posters, the
most hardened cynic in Arts '24 says
he 1 asn't seen so much nicely done
painting since the Science Dance.
* *    *
The next issue of The Ubyssey will
contain the literary supplement, and
will be the last of this academic year.
CALENDAR CHANGES
University students will be interested to learn that the Calendar for
1924-25 is now in the hands of the
printer. The registrar hopes that it
will be ready for the students before
the close of the term.
The following important changes in
regulation have been passed by the
Faculties and Senate, and are incorporated in the new Calendar:
No candidate under 18 years of age
will be admitted to the University
without complete Junior Matriculation; and no candidate over 18 years
of age, who has deficient Matriculation standing will be admitted without the special permission of the Faculty  concerned.
No student may enter a higher year
with supplemental examinations still
outstanding in respect of more than
3 units of the preceding year, nor with
any supplemental examination outstanding in respect of the work of an
earlier year or of matriculation unless special permission to do so is
granted by Faculty. Such permission
will be granted only when Faculty is
satisfied that the failure to remove
the outstanding supplemental examinations had an adequate cause.
LEAGUE OF NATIONS
SUBJECT OF ADDRESS
"The League of Nations and the
Church" was the subject of an interesting address given by Dr. Smith of
Westminster Hall, last Thursday
noon in the Auditorium. Dr. Eastman
introduced the speaker.
Dr. Smith pointed out the part that
the Church is p'aying in trying to establish world peace, and a feeling of
good-fellowship among nations.
He traced the different attitudes
which the Church has taken, through
the ages, toward warfare. He pointed
out the opposition of the early Church
and 'ater the linking up of militarism
and religion under the Roman Empire.
He stated that since the last war.
great efforts have been made to banish warfare and make religion supreme.
ELECTION   TODAY.
The election of the president of the
A.M.U.S. will take place to-day (Thursday). Polling between 10 a.m. and
3 p.m. The candidates are Len Gaddes
and Bert Smith.
University of Oregon—A fountain
pen filling station which will demand a fee of one cent for extracted
service, is soon to be installed in the
library in the lobby of the re^ervt
department. The steps in the filling
process are indicated by a little individual figure which adds to the attractiveness of the machine.
THE    ORPHEUM.
Sarah Padden, wonderful and subtle mistress of human emotions, is
headliner in a splendid vaudeville bill
at the Orpheum this week, offering a
new playlet, "The Accusation." Her
art seems to increase with years and
her performance is one of outstanding
appeal. Joe E. Brown, former major
league baseballer and Broadway comedian, is also a star, offering "Arrest
Me," a comedy sketch. M'lle Ann Co-
dee, Parisian comedienne; The Five
Petleys; Ayn Mann in a Whirl of
Dance; Clinton Sisters in Cartooning
in Danceland; Sam Green and Mildred
Myra in a musical art, are other outstanding features of this splendid bill,
easily one of the best offered here
this season.
LIONEL WARD
&  COMPANY., LTD.
Printers
of
Magazines
Papers
Annuals
and
All Business
and Society
Stationery
and Printing
Telephone Set. 195
816-320   Homer   St.
Vancouver, B. C.
The Spring Shoe
Offering
.-   ZEO   SANDALLS
Patent   Leather  or  Audale
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Siz? 2% and 7
WOMEN
Paddock Boot
Shop
989 GRANVILLE ST.
Corner Xelson St.
Tea Cup Readings
Free with Afternoon Teas,
'.1 o'clock to (j p.m.
I'jil in and Card Readings
to Dinner Patrons, Free, 6.30
to S.:jO, by Madam  Verona.
Music and Dancing from
f).;S0 to 12 o'clock p.m.
Purdy's
675 Granville Street
Seniors !
Goodness knows you need
a Corona in college, but it's
in business the man with a
Corona really shines. Get
your Corona now and learn
to use it before you start
hunting that job.
Price $69.00
Graham Hirst
Company
THE CORONA PEOPLE
812   PENDER  ST.  W.
Sey. 8194 Vancouver, B. C. March 20th  192-4
THE      UBYSSEY
*
Proof of a
Good School
7 Gold Medals.
3  Silver Medals.
2  Gold  Pencils.
Awarded by Typewriter Companies for Speed and Accuracy
in Typewriting.
INDIVIDUAL
COURSES
Day   and   Night.
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School
709 Georgia   H. C. Duffus S. 7564
Buy Today at Reduced
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$50   SEYMOUR   ST.
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NU-TOP SIX
$6.00 HATS $6.00
ARE JUST RIGHT
You'll Say So Yourself
LINFORTH'S  Ltd.
417  Granville   Street
Formerly Richardson & Potts
SHIRT WEEK
This is Shirt Week. All our
new Spring Shirts are on display.
Drop in and look them over—
the biggest display we have ever
made.
The  New Ones Are All  Here
Turpin Bros. Ltd.
MEN'S  OUTFITTERS
629 Granville St.
Dear   Editor:
Having been a student at the University tor one or two years T have had
a wood opportunity to observe the different W«ys in whieh each Sophomore
Clas^_>mtiates the Freshmen. Now the
usual initiation carried on at this University is very foolish and does not lead
anywhere. The class of '27 seems to
have started out very well on its college career so why shouldn't it set a
precedent by coming- out with an entirely new form of initiation. 1 have
a suggestion which I would like to offer.
Each' freshman class contains some
very good entertainers, either as actors,
sleight of hand artists, players of different musical instruments or as vocal
students. Now why not have the freshman Class put on a concert which embraces all the Freshman year and let
the  Sophomores  be  the guests.
Hoping this may be worthy of your
notice.
-   I  remain.
S.  GIRSON.
CLASS AND CLUB
NOTES
//BOXING CLUB.
Two wins and four close fights, two
of them necessitating extra rounds,
marked Varsity's first entrance into
inter-collegiate boxing. The intensive
training for which Washington's fine
gym. and coaching system are responsible was the deciding factor in the
fights, and Varsity's men need feel no
shame at going down before the ring-
experienced "Huskies." The strange
gym., the small 16-foot ring, and the
lack of support in the audience all
tended to confuse the Canadian visitors, hut the great work of the seconds,
Dr. Louden and Mr. Morgan, soon gave
them back their confidence.
SWIMMING CLUB.
St. Mark's defeated Varsity in a
closely contested swimming meet held
last Wednesday night at Chalmers
tank.
ARTS   '26    HIKE.
Last Saturday, Arts '26 held a very
enjoyable hike. The members took
the 1.20 ferry to North Vancouver,
rode by street car to the end of the
Capilano line, and then proceeded to
hike to West Vancouver. At the dance
hall a four-piece orchestra awaited
them, and the few who turned out
spent a good time. Later Dr. and Mrs.
Sedgewick arrived with an enormous
box of chocolates. After supper the
majority travelled to Hollyburn and
mingled  with  the  Freshmen.
[/ARTS '27 HIKE.
Arts ^7 also held its hike last Saturday. They took the 2.15 West Vancouver ferry and then went to.Hollyburn. Miss Peck undertook to chaperone the party. The afternoon was
spent in ball games, hiking and dancing. Everybody voted the hike a great
success.
./'
CHEMISTRY  SOCIETY.
Tlie next meeting at 8 p.m. in the
Physics room on Thursday, March
20th, instead of Tuesday.Tfarch 25th,
as this date clashMr-vyith the Spring
Plays. Dr. Hebb Will spfeak on "The
Theory of Relativity."* After the lecture the election of the executive for
the 1924-25 session will take place.
X
'TV.
ARTS '24 EXECUTIVE
The following have been elected
members of the Arts '24 permanent
executive:
Honorary president, Dr. Mack Eastman; president, J. R. Davidson; vice-
president, Rena McRae; secretary,
Helen Creelman; treasurer, John S.
Burton.
Kitsilano Defeated
by Varsity Firsts
The Varsity first soccer eleven came
back to their "old time form and took
the Kitsilano pigskin artists into camp
by an 8-2 count. It was rather a
featureless encounter and the students had it all pretty much their own
way. In the first period the collegians contented themselves by scoring three times when Emery, Ternan
and Lundie broke through. Ternan
retired with a sprained foot just before  the  interval.
Upon resumption of play Varsity
continued to press. Lundie went on
a scoring spree and bulged the net
for two more counters. Wilkinson
then netted the sixth and it looked as
though the Kitsies were going to be
whitewashed. But Buckley, who was
officiating between the posts in the
absence of Mosher, came to their
rescue and let two in, in quick succes
sion.
After Eb. Crute had insisted that
there should be no more goals scored
he found the net accidently from a
well placed kick from the right wing
that caught the loser's goalie napping.
Lundie scored the eighth with his
head soon after. Baker did his best
to score after testing out Buckley
with a hard shot in the early siages,
then he confined his efforts to the
other goal but his kicks were all wide
pi the mark. Scotty Deans worked
hard and came within an ace of scoring on several occasions.
Varsity Line-up—Buckley, Baker,
Crute, Wilkinson, Phillips, Butler,
Deans, Emery, Lundie, Huestis, Ternan.
yWOMEN'S  DEBATE
1   /(Continued from Page 1)
of aggression as their only salvation.
Germany is prosperous now, and can
well afford to pay her debts but instead she declared herself in a state
of voluntary bankruptcy. France's
policy has created in her the "will to
pay" and it would be disastrous for
France to withdraw now, both legally
and politically.
Miss Mather established tne fact,
that the present French policy is suicidal since she is spending huge sums
to maintain her army in the Ruhr
which serves only to destroy the German Industrial system, her only hopes
for reparations. There is in Germany
today, she asserted, a chaotic disorder which renders hopeless any at,
tempts to bring back her former prosperity.
Miss Huberg emphasized the fact
that Germany does not intend to pay
unless she is forced, and that she has
not taxed her people as much as
either France or England. France,
she asserted, should be given at least
as long as Germany was given to make
reparations, in which to prove her
policy effective.
The speakers were all very forceful
and interesting, Miss Cawthorne being especially well-adapted to public
speaking. The debate clearly showed
that in the future, women's international debates will become fully as
important factors as those of the men
in university activities.
The judges were: Brigadier-General
Odium, Mr. A. M. Whiteside and Mrs.
S. Jamieson.
ENGINEERING   HEAD  ARRIVES.
Dr. Herbert Vickers, acting head
of the Department of Electrical and
Mechanical Engineering, arrived at
the University Monday from Birmingham. Dr. Vickers was appointed by
ther Senate and Board of Governors
last November.
It costs no more
to buy
a FORD
from DIXON'S
Dixon Motors Ltd.
1291   Granville  Street
Phone Sey. 274
As illustrated
MEN'S SOUTH  AFRICAN
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Of genuine cowhide, calfskin
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Hudson's Bay
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The Palm Garden
Fruit, Confectionery
Ice Cream  and
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Hot Lunches Served,
Also Afternoon Tea
Phone Fair. 377
Cor. 10th and Heather St.
Pitman Shorthand
BUSINESS COLLEGE, Ltd.
422  RICHARDS  STREET
The business of a country la
carried on by the men and woman
who have been trained In tha
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We can give you all that Is required to make you a successful
business  man  or woman.
The   PITMAN   COLLEGE,   during   26   years,   has    successfully
trained young peeple  to  hold  responsible  positions.
Cor. Hastings St.  Phone Say. 9135 THE     UBYSSEY
March 20th, 1924
'CHEMISTRY   SOCIETY   MEETING
The regular meeting of the Chemistry Society was held in the Physics
lecture room on the evening of March
11th. Dr. Marshall spoke on "The
Production and Measurement of High
Temperatures." He mentioned the
various materials used in the construction of electric furnaces and the
merits of each. The sources of difficulty and error were discussed in detail. The instruments used in the
measurement of high temperatures
were dealt with and the advantages of
each pointed out. .. ta
I   stood   where   no   man   ever   stood
before!
Achievement thrilled my being to its
core.
Triumphantly I thought that I, alone
Amongst    my    struggling    comrades,
would be known
As he who could successfully explore.
The pride of conquest made my spirits
soar!
With firm feet planted in the hollow
cone
(Laid   bare  when   I   unearthed   a  Pt.
Grey  Stone)
I   stood   where   no   man   ever   scooa
before.
The
Royal cleans
everywhere
thoroughly.
B. C.   ELECTRIC
Patronize Canada's finest Barber Shop. We have 18 chairs and
specialize in Ladies' Hair Bobbing
as well as Manicuring.
The  ROGERS  BUILDING
WM. BRENNAN,  Proprietor
464 Granville St.      Phone Sey.  7853-0
"Down the Marble Stairs"
PRINTING
We give the very Best in Servica
and Quality
Dance Programmes, Letterheads,
Envelopes, etc.
also       Personal   Stationery
COADE &  DAUBNEY
628 Broadway Wm
J. W. Foster Ltd.
345  Hastings St. West
All the  Newest  Models
in College Suits and Over-
eosit'i   at   Prices   that   are
right.
See us before Buying
Feeble Elections of
1924 Are Deplored
Do you remember the good old elections we used to have? There would
be only two or three candidates and
oh, what a lovely time we had. Each
candidate would get up and say what
a noble man his opponent was. The
candidates would then withdraw, and
then the supporters would speak.
Most of the speeches ran after this
fashion:
"Mr. Chairman, our worthy opponent is a fine man but, do you know he
has spent most of his life in jail for
chopping off the hands of widows and
orphans and selling them in pawnshops to the sausage factories. Are
you aware that he has just been pardoned for the murder of fifteen babies!
Members of the student body, I ask
you, can you vote for such a crook?"
Then the other man would get up
and point out that this was all a lie
to hide the fact that his man was a
dope fiend, a thief and a traitor. Then
we would all start to fight, and throw
rotten eggs. As soon as one crowd
had the upper hand, the meeting would
continue, with all the winners speaking, until the riot broke out anew.
Polling day would be even more
sport. Each side would take it in
turns to try and wreck the Students'
Council offices. Finally, at three
o'clock, the ballots would be counted
and the one with the most supporters
in the returning officers would be the
winner, thanks to the votes of half-a-
dozen dead students, the loss ot one or
two ballot boxes, and several people
voting twice. The successful candidate would then go down town and
get drunk, while the loser went out
and hanged himself. Them was the
happy days.
Now the Ubyssey, feeling that such
a  state  of affairs  is  needed  again  to
liven up elections, is offering a prize
contest:
TEN   DOLLARS    ($10.00)    IN   CASH
FOR THE BEST ESSAY ON HOW
TO CREATE BIGGER AND
BETTER ELECTIONS.
The conditions of entry are as follows:
1. All essays must be under 200
pages in length.
2. Members of the Liberal, Provincial and Conservative parties are
barred as professionals.
3. The editor of the Hook is barred.
4. The winner is to try to collect
his prize from the business manager.
His heirs will also have this privilege.
N/PRESENTATION day
/       (Continued from Page 1)
then received the Arts '20 Relay Cup
from   the   hands   of   Prof.   H.   Logan,
who also  presented  Agriculture  with
the Faculty Cup.
Tennis trophies were then awarded
by Dr. Boggs to the following: —
Gordon Shields, winner of the Men's
Singles. Messrs. Kerr and Miller, winners of the Men's Doubles, Miss Millener winner of the Ladies' Singles.
The Freshettes were then honored
with the custody of the two cups
which they have won in athletic activities, the Chris. Spencer and the
Arts '25 Womens Relay.
Track Ribbons were then presented
to the men and women who were successful in winning them.
Debating find oratorical stars were
nlpo accorded their due meed of praise,
the Arts Inter-Class Debating shield
being awarded to Arts '25, and gold
pins for Inlei-rollefr'ate debating given
to Percy M. Barr, and A. E. Grauer,
and silver pins for places in the debating teams to Winnie Cawthorne,
Greta Mather, H. Yonemura, A. Zoond,
W. C. Murphy. H. Goodwin, J. S. Burton, S. Kobe, J. Craig. A gold medal
for first place in the recent Men's
Oratorical contest was given Nahar
Singh Mangat. while H. Cantelon received a silver medal for second
place. |
Women of Arts *24
Win Track Events
In the women's events Arts '24 led
the field with 8 points. Arts '27 came
second with Arts '25 third. Isabel
MacKinnon of Arts ' 24 was high
scorer with eight points to her credit.
She won the basketball throw, the
11yard dash, and was second in the
120 yards. Arts '27 won the Arts '25
relay cup by doing the half mile in
record time.
The results are as follows:
Throwing Basketball—I. MacKinnon, Arts '24; D. Murray, Arts '25; A.
Moffatt,  Arts  '26.-68  ft.
120 Yards—Taylor, Arts '27; I. MacKinnon, Arts '24; Mowat, Arts '25—
15 1/5 sec.
75 Yards—I. MacKinnon, Arts '24;
Pettipiece, Arts '27; Williams, Arts
'26—10 2/5  sec.
Half Mile Relay—Arts '27, Arts '26—
2 min., 2 sec.
^SENIOR  B's DEFEATED
On Saturday evening the Varsity
Senior B men's basketball, team threw
a scare into vvestminstir Y, league
leaders, when they came very near to
beating them. At half time the score
stood at 9 all, but the Y managed to
outdistance the local boys in the final
half, to the tune of 36—20. The score
does in no way indicate the closeness
of the play.
The Team:—H. Henderson (9), H.
O. Arkley (2). C. Newby, A. Henderson (3), D. Mackay (5), A. Hemingway, F. Eliot, F. Warne (1).
FRIZES TO BE AWARDED
The Canadian Club of Vancouver is
planning to award two scholarships
for the best original investigations by
an undergraduate student of any Faculty of the University during the academic year 1923-24, the investigation
to be in any field—natural science, history, literature. In case the Senate
sanctions the award, as is expected,
the first prize will be $200, and the
second $100.
This should create a great deal of
interest and attention among the students, as the prizes besides being well
worth working for, will carry great
distinction with them. It will be a
Nobel award on a small scale.
/<.   S. C. M- DISCUSSION
"War" will be tiie subject for discussion at the S.C.M. meeting to be
held on Sunday afternoon at 3:30 p.m.
at the home of Mr. Stewart Allen, 675
Twelfth Avenue West. The group will
consider the rrany causes of war, and
the means that must be adopted for
its prevention. Mr. Soward will be
present to open and lead the discussion.   Everyone is invited to come.
TRACK   MEET
(Continued from Page 1)
One-half Mile Relay—Ag., Arts '27,
Sc. '27.—1 min. 42 1-5 sec.
Three Miles—Barton, Sc. '26; Buckley, Ag.; Farr, Ag.—16 min. 37 2-5 sec.
Dan
ctng
Scmmenz
556 Granville St.
Vancouver,  B. C,
The College Girls'
Chiffon Hose
$2.50
Dame Fashion decrees that
smartly dressed women wear
filmy Chiffon Hose, in light
shades—such as Dauru, Banana,
French  Nude  and  Sahara.
This is an ideal hose for college girls, and at a price you
can pay.
'It Costs no More to Shop
at Sommer's"
Specials in Ladies Hose and
Vests
Hose—Art Silk in Black, White
Polo, Camel re-inforced to wear
like lisle thread, specially priced.   75  cents  pair.
Hose—Fancy Ribbed Mercerized
Lisle in Camel and Grey at 75
cents.
Vests—Straps, Cumfy Cut. or
Short Sleeves at 3 for $1.00.
Vests—Plain or Ribbed, Tailored
or Lace Finish at 50 cents and
60 cents each.
A good selection in better Vests
up to  $1.50 each.
Miss J. EMSLIE
695   BROADWAY  WEST
Phone Fairmont 724
Boost Canada's
National   Game
CHARLTON & RATHBUN
Photographers and Miniature Painters
2044   GRANVILLE   STREET
(Cor.  5th  Ave.)
PHONE   BAY.   176      -    VANCOUVER
Alexandra Dancing Academy
Wednesday and Saturday Evenings
Our   new   Augmented   Orchestra   playing   14
instruments features all the latest dance hits.
■804 Hornby St., Opposite Court House« March 20th, 1924
THE     UBYSSEY
MUCK-A-MUCK
i&--v
^.<J
Silk Afternoon
Dresses at $25
One of the best assortments we
have assembled for some time is
available at this modest price
for those who seek an afternoon
dress. Dozens of different styles
—long waist effects, panelled
and side-draped dresses, some
French models in the lot that introduce novel treatments that
are sure to appeal to those who
look for the distinctive in dress.
Materials are cantons,flat crepes
and vella vellas; dark shades
predominate—navy, black and
brown; brighter shades include
peacock, copen.sand, tomato, etc.
Plenty of sizes.
Special at 	
$25
David Spencer
Ltd.
Phone:  Fairmont 3.
T. J. Kearney & Co.
Funeral Directors
«$>
Private   Ambulance   Service
802 Broadway W., VANCOUVER
Saturday Evening
Social  Da ree
LESTER COUKT
Private Lessons by Appointment
Sey. 1689
The Lester Academy
Positively
Desperado—"Halt!
you're dead."
Benny  Williams—"My    man,
should be more careful of your
lish.   If I should move it would be a
positive sign that I was alive."
If   you   move
you
Eng-
"Minion, tell me the truth!" thundered his august majesty. "What
made all these nicks in my broadsword?"
"Sire," replied the trembling page,
"I don't want to snitch on a woman,
but the queen's been sharpening pencils."
MR. CUSPIDOR
Kaleel—"I sure miss that cuspidor
since it's gone."
Spud—"Well,  you did   that before;
that's  why  it's  gone."—Ex.
^^r^^^'v^r
The Eternal Question:    Huh?
The   Not-so-frequent   Answer:     Uh-
huh.
The Result:    M-m-m-m-mmmmmm.
"That young bride worships her
husband, doesn't she?"
"I guess so. She places burnt offerings before him three times a day."
—The Hornet.
"My good man, you'd better take
a taxicab home."
"S'no use; my wife (hie) wouldn't
let me keep it in the house."—Ex.
Muck-a-Notes
"Ask Grace if she knows Heily?"
How about this: . "Your wife can
be tinted, framed, and enlarged for
$1.25."
Are we on the road to Emmaus?
Nobody knew the words of "God Save
the King" on Friday night.
If Mrs. Sippi could wear Miss Ouri's
New Jersey, what would Dela ware?
Uncle Sam's Panama.
Speaking of the Spring Play we
wonder if when "My. Pim Passes By"
he will notice the "green stockings"
trimmed with "Sweet Lavender." You
Never Can Tell! It was Merely Mary
Ann speaking.
^*^<^*,"W^p
Down by
The Old Mill,
He tried to kiss her,
But she said
She wouldn't kiss him by a dam site.
—(W. U. Gazette.)
Lome—"Say, Buck, did you take a
shower?"
Buck—"No;  is there one missing?"
"Pardon me, professor, but your
daughter accepted my proposal of
marriage last night. I have called to
ask if there is any insanity in \ our
family."
"There must be."
DAYS
Starting
Wed. Niffbt,
ORPHEUM \ CIRCUIT VAUDEVILLE
MATINEES—THUBSDAT— FRIDAY—SATURDAY
AND
HIS
(CAMEO RECORD ORCHESTRA
KRANZ   tc   WHITE
ED.    B.  CONRAD
HARRY & ANN SEYMOUR
BREEZY BITS OP
MIRTH  AND  MELODY
AN  ORIOINA£  "AFTERPIECE"
STROBE! & MERTENS
JACK WILSON
with CHARLES FORSYTH IN
"A NONSENSICAL REVUE"
ATTRACTIVE PICTURES
CONCERT ORCHESTRA
lllillll
iNlffhts—23c, 50c, 73c, $1.00.
Mats. (Week)—14c, 28c, 36c.
Mat.  (Sat.)—14c, 38c 50c.
PLUS  7%   TAX.
US J
Featuring    Snappy
YOUNG MEN'S OXFORDS
priced  from
$5.00 to $8.00
Ladies' Sandal Patterns in
patent and log cabin,
at $6.85
10%  discount to students
on presentation of this ad.
□
WILSON'S
Twin Shoe Stores
157-159 Hastings Street West
Morleys Fancy Hose
New Patterns
Just Arrived from England
$1.00
Per Pair
The Real Socks
Mann's Men's Wear
Specialty Shops
411-474 Granville St
RADIO
SETS
PARTS
LOUD SPEAKERS
Drop in and ask for our
new price list.
RADIO CORPORATION OF
VANCOUVER, LIMITED
Sey. 3814    605 Dunsmuir St. THE     UBYSSEY
March 20th, 1924
GLUBB&STEWART
LIMITED
Big Shipment of the
Celebrated
20th Century
Clothing for
Young Men
All the Latest
Models for Spring
Clubb & Stewart
LIMITED
309-315 Hastings  Street'
QUALITY
PRINTING
Invitations
Dance Programmes
Announcements
Printing for all
the Social Functions
of the School
Term
The
Sun Publishing Co.,
Limited
Printing Department
137  PENDER    STREET,   WEST
Dancing
Private and  Class Lessons
•Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W.E.Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
SEY. 3058-O or SEY. 101
Miss Rilance, Laing
and Atkinson Are
Chosen for Council
SECRETARY   A.   M.  S.
Miss Elsie>Rllance of Arts '25 is the
Secretary-elect of the Alma Mater Society. Miss Rilance has always taken
a prominent part in student activities.
She is a member of the Players' Club
and acted in the Chrietmas plays; she
also acted in the French plays produced by La Canadienne. Miss Rilance
is an interclass debater and has shown
herself keenly interested in all matters pertaining to the activities of the
student body. This year she has been
Secretary of the Literary and Scientific Department, and it may be taken
as a criterion of her efficiency in that
position that she has been acclaimed
Secretary of the Alma Mater Society.
A. U. S.
The new President, of the Agriculture Undergraduate Society is Mr.
Art' Laing, of Ag. '25. Mr. Laing has
liem ma"ny~"important offices; he has
been Treasurer of his class, and Marshal of his faculty. This year he has
been Treasurer of the Agriculture Undergraduate Society, and it is his extremely efficient work in this capacity
which has qualified him for the presidency.
Mr. Laing comes from Sea Island,
and, according to those who know
him, he throws a mean horseshoe. He
is a very ardent politician and is always happy when he is in the midst
of a political argument. All the Aggies unite in praising Mr. Laing's unfailing good natur-'
TREASURER  A.  M.  S.
Mr. Lyle^Aminson, a popular member of Ag. '2T>7~has been elected Treasurer of the Alma Mater Society. Mr.
Atkinson has held many executive offices during his three years at Varsity.
He has been President of his class,
and President of the Agriculture Discussion Club, which is one of the most
progressive debating clubs of the U.
B. C. He has been an interclass and
an inter-faculty debater and has always taken a keen interest in student
activities. He is a member of the
Players' Club and took part in the
Christmas plays. Before coming to
Varsity, Mr. Atkinson gained considerable business experience with the Canadian Western Lumber Company. During the campaign last year he organized the work of securing signatures
at  the  Westminster  Exhibition.
Selection meeting
Friday last was announced as Presentation Day, but the mass meeting
at noon was instead turned into a
campaign meeting for the candidates
for treasurer of the A. M. S. The
chairman, Mr. Percy Barr, opened the
meeting with a humorous account of
the treasurer's duties and his rewards,
or rather lack of rewards.
Mr. A. R. Fee, the first candidate to
speak, outlined the -problems which
the treasurer will have to face in the
coming year, and told how he would
meet them. Speeches from the other
candidates, Mr. J. Kania, Mr. T. J.
Keenan, Mr. Gordon A. Abernethy and
Mr. Lyle Atkinson followed. Each
outlined the course he would pursue
if elected, and declared that he would
do his best for the Alma Mater Society.
After the candidates had withdrawn,
their various supporters were given
an opportunity to speak. Many of the
students availed themselves of this
opportunity to speak in glowing terms
of their "best man for the position."
L.IVNBL. WARD ft COMPANY.   LTD..4£
Singh Mangat Wins
^Oratorical Contest
Speaking in the auditorium Wed
nesday evening, March 12th, on the
original; difficult and intriguing subject of "The. Apalysis of Woman,"
Nahar Singh iMangat, Arts '24, won
the gold medal offered annually by the
Men's Literary Society for first place
in the Oratorical contest. Mr. Mangat treated his subject in a delightful
manner that was an admirable blending of whimsicality and poetic philosophy. He showed a familiarity with
and grasp of his subject that was the
envy of all mere males in the- large
audience. S
Mr. Harold B. feantelon, also of
Arts '24, won seeon<T-p1aee and the
silver medal with a well-prepared and
fluent address on "Canada and the
British Empire." Mr. Cantelon reviewed the Dominion's rise to nationhood, her past contributions and her
present place in the Empire.
Honorable mention was given Eric
J. Dunn, Arts '25, for a keen and forceful treatment of his topic, "The Price
of Peace."
Other speakers and their subjects
were:—Walter Hodgson, "The Chance
of Youth;" Wilfred Kelly, "One Aspect
of War." and Hozumi Yonemura,
"Quo Vadis?"
The contest was keen and close,
the Judges, Profs. Angus, Wood and
Henderson, experiencing considerable
difficulty in reaching a decision. In
a short speech containing all the elements of dramatic suspense, Prof.
Angus, on behalf of the Judges, explained their decision and declared
that they believed the general standard of this year's oratory to be considerably higher than that reached at
any  previous  oratorical  contest.
STARTLING ANNOUNCEMENT
LADIES and GENTLEMEN of the
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA! Have you heard about the
Heinz Band Flower Day? Probably
you have. Friday, March 21st, is the
day, the University Campus is the
nlace. Members of the Freshman
Class are supplyinq the flowers, the
Freshettes are selling them, and the
proceeds go to swell the Campaign
Fund. Send us your support—the
price is optional—qive what you can.
"SAY IT WITH  FLOWERS!"
(Freshmen and Freshettes are re'
minded to hand in their contributions
of flowers  early  to-morrow  morning).
The Week's Events
Thursday March 20th—.
Musical Society meeting in the Auditorium at noon.
Election of presidents for the Undergraduate Societies.
Institute: "Educational Conditions
in the Orient," Dr. H. H. Gowen.
Physics Bldg. at 8 p.m.
Chemistry Society:  "The Theory of
Relativity,"  Prof.  Hebb, Auditorium, at 8 p.m.   Elections of officers
at the close of the meeting.
Friday, March 21st—
Alumni: "Ceilidh," benefit entertainment at U. B. C, at 8 p.m.
Sunday, March 22nd—
S.C.M.    Discussion:   "War,"  at the
home   of  Mr.   Stewart  Allen,   675
12th  Ave.  W.,  at 3.30  p.m.
Monday, March 24th—
'   Recital:   Ignace Paderewski, Orpheum Theatre, at 5 p.m.
Elections for Presidents of Men's
and Women's Athletics, and of
Lit. and Science Department.
U.B.C. Players' Club presents "The
World  and   His   Wife,"   Orpheum
Theatre,  at 8 p.m.
Tuesday,  March 25th—
U.B.C. Players' Club presents "The
World and His Wife," Orpheum
Theatre, at 8 p.m.
i«wiwwwra*vMni*s
EVERY
SUIT
REDUCED
BUY
YOURS
NOW
C. D. BRUCE
Limited
Cor.  Homer and Hastings
A SPECIAL ATTRACTION
ONE NIGHT ONLY
Orpheum, March 31
Edith Wynne Matthison
and
Charles Rann Kennedy
in  his latest play
"The Chastening"
Note to Students—As the
demand for seats is now
very active it is suggested
that students who wish to
attend should send in their
orders early in order to
secure the best seats available.
SEATS NOW ON SALE AT
WALTER   F.   EVANS
657  Granville   St.
Prices:  $2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.00;
tax   additional.
Local management, Ida Wilshire
The
Spring
Catalogue
Is
Out
If   any
of you
folks want
one, you
can have
it.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1020 Granville Street
Wholesale and. Retail
■ PRINTERS.  318   HOMER  ST.,  VANCOUVER,  B.  C.

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