UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 22, 1925

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0123700.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123700.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0123700-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0123700-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123700-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0123700-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0123700-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0123700-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0123700-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0123700.ris

Full Text

 Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, JANUARY 22nd, 1925
No. 12
CO-EDS STAGE
PEP MEETING
Enthusiastic Crowd Witness
Novel Programme
The auditorium was taxed to its utmost capacity on Friday at a, jolly entertainment given in honor of the Arts
men by the co-eds. Among those present were all those who could crowd
into any available space, those unable
to do so being absent. From the smallest freshman who stared open-mouthed
to that walking prodigy, the terrible
gowned senior, all were highly interested as their minds were transported
from co-eds to witches, from fantasy
to infancy. It was, as one of the
diminutive freshmen put it; "As if
Grandmother had doffed her gloves to
make me a medley of sugarmen and
while I soaked them in turpentine had
sung me a swan song."
Brick McLeod opened the festivities
with his yell in which he celebrates the
transcendent beauty of Vancouver's
natural surroundings and points out
the gradual evolution from a savage to
a yelling university student. The curtain was then drawn aside and presently behind a number of tapers were discernible ten witches, who all the while
kept up a clamoring noise on dead
bones, paper-covered, hideous, fascinating. The onlookers sat, their blood
rapidly.curdling and congealing. Numerous skeletons and ghosts fluttered
in the air keeping in time with the
weird, exotic, strains of music that
rose from the fantastic ceremony. The
black-stoled, revelling, witches wore
paper masks on their heads. The audience afterwards learned that the
spirits assumed these whenever sacrificing to their new patron goddess
Cedara (Latin from the Greek "Shing-
los") of bobbed hair. They suddenly
vanished. Such is the power of the
co-ed!
Doris Shorney brought the audience
back to reality with a "Catfish" and
then led a Skyrocket for the women.
The Science men yelled the loudest.
Tommy Taylor then addressed the
meeting. He deplored the petty thieving going on at present and promised
the offenders rigorous punishment.
He concluded by announcing the basketball games and dance on Saturday
night.
Miss Alice Metz played a violin solo
which was much appreciated and resulted in her being encored. Brick
McLeod introduced some of the new
yells. The Nursing undergraduates
put on a skit that opened with a noise
as if all the itinerant cadgers at the
exhibition had been let loose. This,
however, was merely to show the
value of taking a gallon of milk and
three deep respiratory breaths every
half hour and was not, as has since
been alleged, a disingenuous advertisement displayed by the Liquor Control Board or the government of B. C.
The children were soon appeased by
the trinkets their mother gave them;
for instance one, Science, was much
taken up with a pipe. The mother
crooned the children to sleep but they,
artful little nurses, fooled her; for
(Continued on Page 2)
MEMBERS OF CLASS OF ARTS '25
MAY GRADUATE THIS YEAR
FROM NEW^UDITORIUM
Now Definitely Settled that the Move to the Point
Will Be Made This Summer
Graduation at Point Grey this year
is still undecided, it was learned this
week, when a delegation from Arts
'25 interviewed Dr. L. S. Klinck, president of the university. If the audi-
toriumi building can be finished and
the seating arrangements made, the
classes of '25 may be able to secure
the privilege of holding the exercises
at Point Grey.
Members of the graduating classes
this year feel that they have been so
interested in the campaigns of the
past three years that they have earned the right to be the first group to
receive their degrees in the permanent home. It is thought that this will
be an excellent means of linking this
year's classes to the Point Grey university.
It has definitely been stated by F.
Dallas, bursar, that the move will be
made this summer while the students
are away and that the classes of '26
will be the first seniors to carry on in
the new buildings.
According to Mr. Dallas, the labra-
tory equipment will be moved as soon
as the exams begin in April and the
summer session students will take
their work at King Edward High
School. Some of the books of the
library have already been sent to that
building which is being rushed at top
speed.
Other buildings at the new site are
being rapidly completed and the University authorities will commence taking these over as the contractors finish their work. The university will
assume complete responsibility for
each structure as it is taken over and
will make allotments of the class
rooms.
The timetable for the next session
is being arranged and it is stated that
the excessive crowding that is being
experienced in the present buildings
as well as the necessity of repeating
lectures several times will be eliminated.
The official opening of the new buildings will take place this fall, it has
been stated, and it is hoped that
graduates will hold some kind of reunion at that time.
VARSITY WINS
IN HOOP GAMES
l/ 	
Duncan and Native Sons Beaten
in Thrilling Fight
The large crowd that braved the
stormy weather and turned out at the
Normal Gym last Saturday night, were
treated to a fast exhibition of basketball. Varsity won both games; in the
first the senior B defeated Grandview
Natiye_Sons.._2iJ:14; and in the~secbh(l
game the seglot A won a hard fought
battle fremjpuncan 30-19.
The first game was fast and thrilling from start to finish, both teams
checking hard. In the first half the
teams were about evenly matched,
both were playing excellent combination and the guards were working
well, consequently there were few
points scored. The first period ended
with Varsity leading by a few points
owing to their superior shooting abil-
ity.
In the second half Varsity excelled
in their combination and had a little
the better of the play. They gradually drew ahead of Grandview and the
game ended with Varsity leading 20-14.
Frost was the best man for Grand-
view; he scored an even eleven of
their fourteen points. For Varsity H.
King and R. Gordon played well.
The feature game of the evening
was the second between Duncan and
Varsity. Varsity obtained revenge for
their defeat at the Island City, but
only after a keenly contested struggle.
The game was fast and clean with
(Continued from Page 6)
"7
PLANS COMPLETED
FOR ARTS SMOKER
I
rts Men to Fumigate Pender
Hall
Again do the feet of the Arts Men
shuffle impatiently to get on the trail
leading to the Arts Men's Smoker. The
trail will be shorter, as the "Smoker"
will be held in Pender Hall on February 13, and not at the Rowing Club as
last year.
Again will "Bill" try to drag "Leonora" to the Smoker trusting that his
;'azz cap will hide her bobbed hair
from the eyes of man. But, "Oh, Sorrow and Joy!" The entertainment
will be minus the "Jew Gypsy Japs,"
negroes, and other outside talent, for
Bert Smith and his merry men have
resolved to raise the standard of the
Smoker.
There will be enough smokes to
satisfy a battalion. For the non-smokers, the usual abundance of fruits and
candies will be ready. All this and
more will be given to the men at no
expense other than two car-tickets.
"How about the entertainment?" you
ask.    Well here is the gist of it.
Judging by the talent shown in the
recent Pep Meetings, the "Entertainment Committee" know that there are
many budding artists who can more
than equal the "outside artists." At
any rate, each class will be given a
chance to show their stuff. Individual
stunts will form part of the programme. Music, of the Capital
Theatre type and the 57-variety type,
(Continued on Page 5)
CHANGES IN
^CONSJITUTION
Council Endorses Plan to
Reduce Membership
At its meeting Monday night the
Students' Council decided in favor of
some important changes in the Alma
Mater constitution. Before these
changes can be put into practice, they
must be approved by the student body,
and a meeting is being called for that
purpose two weeks from Friday.
The changes are briefly as follows:
The membership of the Council is to
be reduced to nine, the Council positions of the presidents of the three
men's undergraduate societies being
merged with that of the marshal to
form one position. Further proposals
endorsed by the Council were the appointment of a standing committee on
discipline to deal with minor infractions of the Students' Code, and the
advancement of the dates of the annual student elections one week.
The present Council felt that it was
imperative to complete these steps before the move to Point Grey, so that
future Councils there might .not be embarrassed by the need for changes in
the midst of other vital problems.
Accordingly, a committee was appointed last fall to work out the details
of the proposed changes. The report
of this committee was discussed from
every angle at several meetings, and
after taking the following factors into
consideration, Council decided to adopt
the changes embodied in the report-
In the first place a council of nine
members is much more efficient as a
governing body than one with twelve
members. After a council of eight or
nine members has been developed, it
has been consistently found that extra members tend to hinder the expeditious handling of business. On this
point it was found that graduates with
council experience were unanimous
in upholding the idea of a smaller
body.
Under the plan of merging the council positions of the three men's un-
dergrad presidents and that of the
Marshal, no one would, as now, represent a group of students whose interests were not those of the whole
student body. Five council members,
the President, the Treasurer, the Secretary, the President of the Lit. and
Scientific, and the Editor-in-Chief,
would represent different capacities
of the whole student body. Two
would represent the athletics of the
University and two would represent
the undergraduate bodies. Such a
plan would provide a far more equitable system of representation than
the present.
The difficulty with the marshal system in the past has been the fact that
the disciplinary powers have been divorced from the social and political
powers as embodied in the presidents
of the undergraduate societies. Disciplinary powers have to be used only
in the social and political aspects of
student life, hence a satisfactory system is possible only when the same
person is responsible both for discipline and actual undergrdauate leadership.
Under the proposed plan, the presi-
(Continued on Page 4) THE   UBYSSEY
January 22nd, 1925
Men's and Young Mens
SUITS
AND
SHOES
At Special Prices
MEN'S and YOUNG MEN'S
SUITS, sizes 34 d»-io  rn
to 46, selling at «plO. DU
Well-tailored Tweed and Worsted Suits that promise good
service for business and general
wear. New season's styles—
two and three-button, single
and double-breasted.
Slater's    Strider   or   Talbot s
BOOTS or OXFORDS,
brown or black calfskin, in these
high-grade dependable makes,
in round or spade
toes.   All sizes   -
$8.00
David Spencer
Limited
FRESHMAN RUGBY
^ NEXT SATURDAY
The weekly postponements of the
crucial game between Ex-King George
and the Freshmmen seems to have
ended at last.
The game is scheduled for 2 p.m.
next Saturday, and precedes the Vict-
Varsity McKechnie Cup tussle at
Brockton Point.
Ex-King and Frosh are tied for the
top positioin with 12 points each.
Should the former win the coming
game which is their last league one,
the Freshmen will have one more
game. However, in order to eliminate any doubt and delay as to who
should oppose Victoria Wanderers, the
Freshies are determined to win, notwithstanding the loss of Ken Eckert,
who suffered a twisted knee in last
Saturday's Miller  Cup game.
All those Varsity supporters intending to be present at the second game
will be pleased to learn that no extra
charge will be levied upon those arriving at 2 o'clock.
LUNCH      TEA      SUPPER
Household and Vegetarian Cooking
Phone, Seymour 2940
The Cosey Corner
MRS. DANBY SMITH
Rooms for Private Parties, Etc.
116 EMPIRE BUILDING
603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of NoTa Scotia
/Outdoors club
A meeting of the Outdoors Club was
held last week to discuss the program for the term. The following
schedule   of   hikes  was   drawn  up; —
January 31. Hollyburn and Mt.
Strahan.
Feb. 7-8—Moonlight trip to Goat Mt.
Feb.  21-22—Echo Peak.
March 15—Seymour.
March  28-29—Goat  Mt.
Hikes will be held to the cabin
every other week-end.
Blood test certificates must be obtained for the trips to Echo Peak and
Seymour. These may be obtained
from the clinic on 12th Ave. and are
good for 6 months.
Saturday, 11 hardy members climbed to the cabin and spent the week-end
in useful toil despite adverse weather
conditions-
Sunday evening the club members
in a body attended St. Mark's Church,
where a special mountaineers' service
was held by the Rev. A. H. Sovereign.
After the service the members adjourned to the residence of the honorary president Mr. Lighthall, where
discussions on mountain climbing and
music and bountiful eats passed the
time very quickly, and after thanking
Mr. and Mrs. Lighthall for their kindness the happy mountaineers departed
for home.
SCHOLARSHIPS IN
FRENCH ACCEPTED
Reg. to $35
Young Men's Suits
A most unusual group of the latest models, both
single and double-breasted, finely tailored from
■ Plain Blue, Plain Grey, Pin Striped or Fancy
■■ English Worsteds of recognized quality.     All
sires   and   an advanced   Spring    tf* s^% £■*
offer at only        - -        -        *P^O
WILLIAM DICK LIMITED
Agents for the World-Famous JAEGER Lines
45-47-49 HASTINGS  STREET,  EAST
he Senate of the University on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Arts
and Science has approved the acceptance of five three-year scholarships,
each of the annual value of $1200,
made to the University by His Honour
the Lieutenant Governor of the Province, with the object of developing in
Canada a wider knowledge of the
people of France, their ideals, literature, arts and science; and thus promoting a better mutual understanding
between French and British in the
Dominion, while making available to
British Columbia in particular the culture and science specially developed
in France.
The terms of awards are as follows:
(1) That the Scholarships be given
for study in the University of
France or at one of the other
official institutions of higher
education in France.
(The second part of this clause
is intended to take in such advanced schools of applied
science for Forestry, Engineering, Architecture, etc.—as are
not part of the national university).
(2) That they be open to graduates
of the University of British Columbia who intend to take up
teaching as a profession.
(3) That each successful candidate
must undertake to return to
British Columbia to practise his
profession for such tim,e as
seems reasonable in the opinion
of the Senate of The University
of British Columbia.
(4) That a scholarship may be held
for three years provided the
holder can show from year to
year satisfactory progress in the
course of study undertaken.
(In easel of the lapse of a
scholarship after one or two
years, the scholarship may be
awarded for the remaining
period to a member of the University staff or some other highly Qualified candidate).
(5) That the scholarships be payable quarterly, the first instalment upon the arrival of the
holder in France.
(6) That after the first year applications for the scholarships be
made   to   the   Registrar   before
May 1 of the year in which candidates hope to begin their studies
abroad.
Pep Meeting
(Continued from Page 1)
when  she  was  about  to  depart  they
began their strange harmony again-
Milla Alihan and Sheila Phipps
danced a Russian dance very cleverly
and the students called upon them to
repeat it. Brick McLeod spoke about
the work that Eric Tuestis had done
in procuring the new song sheets and
the jazz caps as well as these. The
students expressed their genuine appreciation in a skyrocket.
Helen Creelman and Rena McRae
represented the Education class in a
short skit "To Be or Not To Be."
While the well known sentiments of
the chunk of bacon that produced something rotten in the state of Denmark
where entirely absent, the jerky,
bobbed-haired method in the acting
and singing was an appreciable innovation.
Bert Smith led some sacrilegous
singing ably assisted by those mudlarks who had followed the birds to
Victoria. A rejuvenated edition of the
witches band next merrily chanted
a mournful love melody. The meeting
broke up with the singing of God Save
the King.
"The Devil
First Taught
Women to Dance"
We don't believe it I
What we do believe
is that we can please
and delight you with
DANCE
PROGRAMMES,
PARTY
FAVORS.
GEHRKE'S #
. PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS.
SOCIAL AND BUSINESS
STATIONERS
Whose Store of Good Taste
is at
651 SEYMOUR STREET
(Near Hudson's Bay)
GBANTHAMS
IRealFruitJuiceI
party punch
PURE CONCENTRATED
FRUIT JUICES
and CANE SUGAR
Phone for Sample
Fair. 1250
F. C. GRANTHAM & CO. LTD.
700-716 16th Avenue West
VANCOUVER. B.C.
<$H$H$H$
B.C. Public Stenographers
  FOR 	
ACCURACY AND INTELLIGENT WORK
115 Bank of Nova Scotia Building
Phone, Sey. 2696 602 Hastings St., W.
Midway <*
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and
Heather Street
W. H. Caldwell, Proprietor
Phone, Fair. 840
.*-•«§.•-•.
DRUGS
LOOSE-LEAF SUPPLIES
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
KODAKS
jySIGMA DELTA KAPPA
The first meeting of the Sigma Delta
Kappa Society was held on Tuesday.
The meeting was called for the joint
purpose of discussing business affairs
and of holding a debate on the subject- "Resolved that Fraternity Societies have a beneficial influence among
the students.' President Jack Leding-
ham, when approached on the subject of future meetings, said that
throughout the term debates and mock
parliaments would be held. January 22nd, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
Last Chance
AT OVERCOATS. Every Coat in the
store at practically wholesale cost.
It's a wonderful opportunity. Drop
in and look them over.
TURPIN BROS., LTD.
Men's Outfitters
629 GRANVILLE ST
COLLEGE INN |
752 ROBSON ST. I
Just West of Granville. T
COSY AND SELECT
Club Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners
50c. up
Also, A la Carte.
PARTIES SPECIALLY CATERED
FOR.
8 a.m. to midnight.   Open on Sundays
Phone, Sey. 8096
SHELLY'S
Bread and Cakes
are baked according
to modern standards
of quality, flavor and
purity.
| THE LESTER
|   Dancing Academy
i       SATURDAY  EVENING  SOCIAL
t DANCE (by Invitation)
t 	
f Instruction by Appointment
LESTER COURT
Seymour 1689
Ed. Da Motta
HAIR CUTTING a Specialty
Expert Attendant
2558 Heather Street
EVERYTHING FOR
Indoor and Outdoor
SPORTS
except the skill and muscle.
We are agents for the BRUNSWICK
PHONOGRAPH and RECORDS
McGill-Sparling Ltd.
Sey. 4653      718 ROBSON ST.
i$t*«<
SPORT NEWS
VARSITY SKATERS
,yWlN FAST GAME
Varsity Ice Hockey team showed a
great reversal of form in their intermediate game at the Arena, and registered their first win of the season
at the expense of the Towers. The
score was 4-1. The game was fast,
both teams checking hard. Only one
penalty was handed out by referee
Murphy.
"Varsity had the better of the play;
from the start they uncorked an unexpected display of combination, and
backchecked the Towers into submission. Demidoff opened the score for
Varsity. He obtained the puck at
centre ice, circled the Towers' defence
and sent in a hot one which Emery
in the Towers' goal failed to see. A
few minutes later Selman carried the
puck through the opponents' defence
and passed to McPherson who made
sure of his shot.
Shortly after the commencement of
the second period McPherson netted
.his second goal of the evening on a
rebound from Selman's shot. The
Towers obtained their only goal when
McCuaig scored on a solo rush. Less
than a minute from the end of the
period Seliran scored Varsity's final
count on one of the nicest plays of
the game. The third period was featured by hard checking and strong defensive by Varsity.
For the Towers McCuaig and Moore
were the best men. The whole Varsity team deserves credit for their
evening's performance. They skated
like fiends possessed, checked consistently and combined well on the
offensive. McPherson, Demidoff and
Selman on the forward line and Stood-
ely in goal were the pick of the team.
Score
First Period—Varsity, Demidoff, 7.30,
Varsity, McPherson from Selman, 2.00.
Second Period—Varsity, McPherson,
6.30; Towers, McCuaig, 7.30; Varsity,
Selman, 1.55.
Third Jeriod—No score.
Penalties—Towers, Jones, 3 minutes..
CANADIAN RUGBY
Varsity's fast stepping junior Canadian rugby squad made an auspicious
debut when they took the measure of
the Tillijims by a 17-5 score at the
King' Edward campus last Saturday.
The grounds were practically unplayable and the senior game was postponed until the weather man gets into
a better humor than that which he has
been subjeet te~..of late.
The Tillicums started out strongly
and get a touch through Walker in the
first quarter, which proves to be all
the points that they were to have.
The students did not get going in this
period at. all but in the second canto,
the Blue and Gold obtained three
points, two from a roughe, and one
deadline kick by Winn.
Harry Seed and Drennan put the
game on ice for the collegians in the
last quarter, each getting a touch.
Winn thought another little deadline
kick wouldn't do any harm and brought
the score up to 17. Seed was aided
greatly by Saunders in getting his
touch but the husky North Sider played a whale of a game. Morris also
scintilated for the Blue and Gold.
Lapsley and Walker were the pick
of the losers- Lever Bates the first
team skipper handled the whistle to
everyone's satisfaction.
SECOND SOCCER
MEN CONQUER
The second soccer team vehemently
rejoicS3 when they waded through
mud to victory on Saturday against
Mac and Mac at Templeton Park. The
score was 2-0 and no doubt originated through the appearance on the
field of Manager Liersch wearing his
usual bland smile and two new football boots, both of which were vociferously acclaimed by his hirelings.
The General, Gibbard, having ascertained the nature of the ground and
the customs rampant in those regions,
attacked the muddier end in the first
half, this rather vigorously. The barbarians, having obtained the ball, led
in all directions towards the U. B. C.
goal. But HONKY Shields, who was
wont to be trumpeter, ordered his left
wing to advance, this being done by
passing the ball to that quarter of the
field in which there were the fewest
of the enemy. Whereat Macintosh
and Evans smote the barbarians hip
and thigh and would have none of
them had they not fallen, overcome
with the intensity of the mud. Thereupon the enemy pressed yet more
fiercely, gaining many cubits distance,
and had well nigh been the ruin of
our men had not Gibbard the commander, and certain other defenders
of the last rank that were with him,
advantageously withstood these onslaughts. Not least of these was one
Sutherland surnamed Plea (for he
was of that stature), who boldly refused to surrender a certain citadel
he was in the habit of occupying. But
Jupiter, both preceiving the faintness
of our men and himself being hungry,
caused a whistle to be sounded. When
this was done both armies returned to
camp while Juno served near beer
and sandwiches on Mt. Olympus.
In the second half the Varsity
startled everybody like an exploding
firecracker. They rushed play into
the opposition's area and Evans scored
the first counter with the help of
Cant. Whenever Mac and Mac attacked it was generally on the left
wing but they rarely passed Robertson. Evans, who has yet to have an
off-day, scored the second and last
goal after some clever dribbling by
Reid. The Varsity boys simply had an
on-day;   that explains their win.
The Line-up—Sutherland, Warden
and Shields; Robertson, Gibbard, Hunter; Disney, Reid, Cant, Evans, Macintosh.
1/
Juniors Lose Game
Varsity Juniors dropped another
brace of points Saturday, this time
South Hill being the recipients of
five goals to nil. The conditions of
ground, weather, and the ball made
good play impossible, and Stewart had
difficulty in controlling the greasy
sphere. The Hillmen tallied three
times in the first half and twice in the
second, and in spite of nice tries by
Gaudin and Spillsberg, Varsity failed
to register.
x" Basketball Notice
Attention! Important Basketball
game on Saturday evening at the Normal gym. Varsity Senior A vs. New
Westminster Adanacs. The Adanacs
and Y. M. C. A. are now tied, Varsity
defeated the Y. W. last week, therefore in order to head the League it
is necessary to down the Adanacs.
Come out and help to win the game.
What Is Winter
Doing To Your
Skin ?
RIPPING winds.   Changes
of temperature.      What
are these doing to your skin ?
There are so many simple
remedies available that there
is scarcely any excuse for letting winter get the better of
you. Fragrant lotions and
creams. Powders with a cold-
cream base. Curatives for
chapped skin. Soaps that are
gentle in treatment.
Drop in at our toilet goods
counter and let us assist you
in choosing what is best for
your complexion.
jr»
-fg
UM(TED
575 Granville St.
pollin'pin
Bake shop
CAKES, SANDWICHES
for the
Dance or Party
2415 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Bayview 4076
The Price
Reductions
Given
Here Are
Only A
Sample
Few
The large number
who read 1020*8 announcements find, every now and again,
exceptional price re-
ductions. For instance, this week
Sweaters worth to
$7.50 are cut to $2.95,
and $10.00 Crepe Rubber-soled Russian
Calf Brogues to $5.95.
at*
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1A^A   GRANVILLE
1UZU  STREET /
THE   UBYSSEY
January 22nd, 1925
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued  every  Thursday  by  the  Publications Board of the University of
British Columbia.
Extra  Mural  Subscription,   $2.00  per
Session.
For  Advertising Rates,  apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair. 2093
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor-in-Chief T. W. Brown
Senior Editor- Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A. Earle Birney
William C. Murphy
Exchange  Editor John  Grace
Literary Editor Miss Doris McKay
Sporting Editors H. Les. Buckley
Laura Mowatt
Copy   Editor     Marion   Smith
Chief   Reporter Kenneth   A.   Schell
Reporters — Florence Williams,
Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald Gillingham.
David Warden, Francis Stevens, G. W.
Ashworth, James Dunn, Dave Taylor,
T. S. Byrne, F. W. Dimmick, Alice
Weaver.
BUSINESS   STAFF
Business Manager H. A.  Thompson
Circulation   Manager E.   J.   Eades
Business  Assistants—.H.   G.  McWilliams
J. Stanley Allen
W.  F.  McCulloch
EDITOR    FOB    THE    'WEEK
W.  C.   Murphy.
THE CAFETERIA
Let us introduce you again to our
Student Cafeteria. Although you have
been there for lunch and tea you may
not realize just how important a part
of student life it is. The food is
wholesome, the prices are very moderate, and except at the noon rush,
the service is expeditious. Not everyone knows that the students themselves run the Cafeteria, and that any
profit makes returns to them to be
used for their other activities. The
Cafeteria is one of the few institutions on this old "campus" that is so
satisfactory that no one can find any
reasonable fault with it.
Some students, however, might be
more thoughtful in their use of the
Cafeteria. At the rush hour it is unjust to those waiting in line to occupy
the valuable and limited space at the
tables longer than is necessary—the
discussion, can be carried on just as
well outdoors, in fact some of the discussion^ we have heard might be better unsaid. For be it from us to
urge anyone to ruin his digestion by
hurrying through a hasty lunch, but
there are some who linger unnecessarily long over their tea cups.
The Cafeteria deserves the patronage and co-operation of everyone, and
to date seems to have it. Let this
act merely as a reminder to continue
in these good paths, and as a hint to
remember the wants of others when
there.
CHANTICLEER, ETCETERA
Don Chaucer, in his classic Canterbury Tales refers to the fable of a
young priest who was accustomed to
rely on a certain chanticleer of a
neighboring barnyard to wake him
in the morning. One day, in a fit of
boredom, he shied a rock at the bird
and broke its leg. The rooster recovered from the physical injury but
the hurt to his heart apparently remained. He bided his time however,
and in the meantime continued to
crow punctually. Some months later,
on the morning on which the youth was
to be ordained and receive a benefice,
chanticleer refused to function and the
theolog thus deserted by his alarm-
clock, slept in and being late, lost his
chance for a sinecure.
All this may seem to have little to
do with the University of B. C, yet it
does seem possible that several of its
students have offended their favorite
chanticleer, or alarm clock, or mother,
or who, or whatever they rely upon
to recall them from the land of satisfied complexes to that of reality and
nine-o-clock lectures. Else why are
those professors who are so unfortunate as to give lectures during the first
period of the day consistently subjected to interruptions from tardy seekers-after-knowledge panting into the
class-room several minutes after the
hour?
What is more inexcusable, the habit
persists far into the afternoon, with
all the accompanying annoyances—
save perhaps the breathlessness. For
the procrastinator apparently "matures" as the day wears on, saves his
wind, adopts the complacecent countenance of one-who-gets-away-with-it,
and wandering in at ten after the hour
with an armful of books (that later
fall severally to the floor), seats himself in the last squeaky chair with
the utmost insouciance.
We will not threaten anyone with
the moral of the tale by which we
embarked on these editorial wanderings, as we are fairly sure that, unfortunately, it would not apply, but—
"verbum sapienti."
ARTS '28 NOTES
Any student who has not paid his
class fee of $2.00 by Saturday, January 24, will immediately receive notification of his default through a list
pinned to the notice board in the
main hall of the Arts Building. Unless a suitable excuse is given by the
individual and passed by the executive,
measures will be taken in the future
to exclude that student from all functions of Arts '28-
Buck up Freshmen! show the spirit
of the U. B. C.
Mr. A. Maxwell, who is in charge of
the arrangements for the Arts Men's
Annual Smoker on February 13, desires
the Freshmen to give all assistance
in making the event a success. All
who are willing to help either in the
musical program or some other part
of the entertainment are asked to communicate with Mr. F. Adams, Mr. J.
Shakespeare, Mr. C. Dowling or Mr.
J. Grace as soon as possible.
All persons who desire to secure
an Arts '28 class pin are asked to hand
in their names as soon as possible to
their sub-marshals or any members
of the Frosh executive. The pin is designed after that of Arts '27, but on
a smaller scale.
The price will be either 60c or 65c.
The Freshman Rugby Team meets
Ex-King George in a final terrible battle for the Mainland Championship at
Brockton Point, 2 p.m. Turn out all
ye rugby fans and help send the boys
against the Victoria Wanderers for
the Intermediate Provincial Championship.
 O	
On Tuesday afternoon, from 3 to 5
the Chalmers tank will be the scene
of the boys' semi-final swimming
events. The Freshmen have some
good men and intend to capture a few
more points for the Governor's Cup
in the finals.
-o-
The girls are competing for the
swimming championship of U. B.
C. at Chalmer's tank on Wednesday
afternoon. They also are striving for
more points to win a big cup.
The President of the Track Club
wishes to anounce that on a motion
put through at Monday's Athletic Executive Meeting, it was decided to
have the Annual Arts '20 Relay on
February 18 instead of the 4th as
formerly announced.
"Travel in the younger sort is a part of education.   In
the older, a part of experience."—Bacon.
EDUCATIONAL TOURS
-TO-
BRITAIN   -   HOLLAND  -   BELGIUM   -   FRANCE
The first tour, under the auspices of
Guy Tombs, Ltd., leaves Montreal on the
"ATHENIA" for Glasgow, June 10. Returning from Southampton July 17 on
the "AUSONIA."
The second tour, under the auspices of
W. H. Henry, Ltd., leaves Montreal June
27 on the "AUSONIA" for Plymouth. Returning from Liverpool July 24 on the
"ALAUNIA."
The third  tour,  under  the  auspices  of
Guy Tombs, Ltd., leaves Montreal July 3
for Glasgow, on the "LETITIA."   Returning   from   Southampton   July   31   on   the
"ASCANIA."
Inclusive Cost of Tour
$330.00
For full particulars of itinerary apply to:
GUY   TOMBS,   LTD., W.   H.  HENRY,   LTD.,
285 Beaver Hall Hill, 286  St.  James  Street,
Montreal. Montreal.
THE   ROBERT   REFORD   CO.,   LTD.,
20   Hospital  Street,   MONTREAL.
CUNARD—ANCHOR—DONALDSON
BY THE WAY
Have you had tea with Her in the
Cafeteria  this  week?
This  university  hasn't,  as  yet,  departed en masse to the canines.   More
students   lined   up   to   pay   their  fees
than to get Aggie dance tickets.
 O	
The   cynic   says   this   is   the   week
when every senior is popular and brilliant and every seniorette is popular
and pretty—in the annual write-ups.
 O ■
Speaking of cross-word puzzles—did
you ever try to imagine an English
translation of an altercation between
two citizens of Pender St.?
-O-
Some innocent once said—"The best
of this thirst for knowledge is that
there is no morning after." All we can
say is this imbiber must have tasted
the empyrean spring with Volsteadian
timidity, and never started a term
essay the night before it was due.
■ o	
Staticus, our staid statician, has estimated that the amount of energy consumed in one term by the average
student late for Room 33 lectures in attempting to shut the door would push
any make of car out of any Pt. Grey
mudhole at least once a week during
the same time.
NOTICE!
Copies of the "Record of Service"
are now available at the Registrar's
Office. Any returned soldier at the
University whose name appears in the
"Record" is entitled to a copy FREE
of charge, and may obtain same by
calling at that office.
A limited supply will also be placed
on sale at the Registrar's Office, and
other students desiring copies are advised to procure them immediately.
The price of the "Record" is fixed at
one dollar and fifty cents.
Changes in Constitution
J ■' (Continued from Page 1)
dents of the three men's undergraduate
societies, elected by all the men of the
university, would have all the power
of the present marshal, besides the
duty of co-ordinating and stimulating
the activities common to the three
men's undergraduate societies. His
department, consisting of the presidents of the separate undergrads.
would hold regular meetings, much as
the Lit. and Scientific Department at
present. Discipline would be administered through the class organizations.
The Council believes that this plan
will solidify the undergraduate side of
student government.
The plan is to be put to the students two weeks from Friday. The
students should be reminded that
Council has spent a great deal
of time and thought on the problem, and every student should think
the matter over seriously, and be in
a position to cast an intelligent vote
when the final decision is to be made.
30,000 MILE COLLEGE
COURSE
Credit will be allowed for one year
of college work to the students of Tufts
College and New York University who
are to make a trip round the world
under the guidance of some of their
profs. Several large Eastern colleges
have arranged to club together in chartering one of the U. S. shipping board
vessels. The cost to students will not
be more than is usual at college, and
languages,, history, and georpraphy
will be studied.
WEAR   A   MANN'S   SHIRT
SHIRTS
EVERY SHIRT OVER $3.50
REDUCED
$1.00
Flanolo Shirts $1.50
Pure Lineen Shirts $1.50
English Twill Shirts $1.50
Regular $2.50 Values.
Bombay Cord Shirts, with
separate soft collars; Regular $3.00 $2.25
500 Silk Shirts in plain colors, at $4.00
MANN'S MEN'S WEAR
Shirt Specialists
TWO   STORES:
411 and 474 Granville St.
WEAR   A  MANN'S SHIRT January 22nd, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
Snappy Styles
for University
Students
Priced all the way
from
$4.85
TO
$10.00
WILSON'S
TWIN SHOE STORE
157.159 Ha.ling. St., W.
«|f*-«»«-«**l
Evans & Hastings
-:-     -:-     PIONEER     -:-     -:-
BETTER QUALITY. PRINTERS
Prices Right
<%>
I    94-YEAR    SUCCESSFUL    BUSINESS    CAREER
IN     VANCOUVER     PROVES    CONCLUSIVELY
THAT   WE  ARE    FAVORED   MORE   THAN
OTHERS BY THE EXACTING PUBLIC
WHEN   THEY   DESIRE   THEIR
MONEY'S  WORTH.
We make a specialty of
Magazines, Annuals,
Dance Programmes, Legal Forms
and
General Commercial Printing
See us before ordering elsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189      576 Seymour St.
For Your Dance or Party
take the Promenade
2094 Beach Avenue
Excellent Floor, Heating and Ventilation
Fire-Places and all Accommodation.
**************************
-PIANISTS' CLUB
A very successful meeting of the
Pianists' Club was held Monday evening at the home of Dean Bollert. Miss
A. M. Fraser, of the teaching staff of
the King Edward High School, gave a
delightful lecture on "Russian Music,"
illustrated with a variety of well-
chosen phonograph records. Speaking of the music of the modern school
of Russian composers, Miss Fraser
dealt first with its historical background of folk-lore and legend, then
surveyed its distinguishing characteristics as shown in the work Foremost
representatives.
AT THE ORPHEUM
Signor Friscoe is coming this week
accompanied by a native Guatemalan
marimba orchestra. There are several
acts in Vaudeville that suggest travel,
but the latest is "A Dance Voyage,"
presented by the Wright Dancers.
One of the really funny comediennes
of vaudeville is young Jean Boydell,
"The Unique Pepologist." Eileen Van
Biene and Richard Ford, are from
musical comedy. Weston and Elaine,
offer "Character Interpretations" in
song, dance and patter. Harry Breen
is back again with an entirely new
act.
Correspondence
,...*
..........................„._......^,
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves in moderate language
on any topic of general interest. The
"Ubyssey" does not assume responsibility  for   any   of the views expressed.
All contributions must be signed and
written legibly in ink, on one side of
the paper only. They must not exceed
two hundred words in length, and must
reach this office not later than noon
Monday, in order to appear in the issue
of the following  Thursday.
"DISAPPOINTED" NOT A
GENTLEMAN
Dear Mr. Editor:
May I be permitted to reply in your
column, to a letter written last week,
and   signed   "Disappointed-"
I should like to ask "Disappointed"
whether he really thinks that it is a
gentlemanly thing to refer to a girl
as "some foolish female," and then
hide behind a fake name? Surely, one
given to those methods is in no position to criticize the student body on
any score, especially in view of the
fact that, as compared to some universities in the states, for example, the
students here are a pretty hard-working level-headed lot.
Is Mr. Disappointed prepared to
declare that he never skipped a lecture in his life? If not, why does he
worry about my doing it? It seems
to remind me, this lordly criticism, of
a "mote" and a "beam" I once heard
of which were lodged in the eyes of
certain gentlemen mentioned in the
Scriptures.
Yours for no more anonymous letters.
JOHN STANLEY,
Arts '27.
-o-
"DISAPPOINTED" NOT A LADY
The Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I read in the issue of January 15th
a somewhat critical letter avent the
scramble for "Aggie" Dance tickets
by one who signs, presumably, herself
"Disappointed." As the disappointment
was probably due to lack of an invitation I feel that the writer is being
somewhat unjust, not to say hasty, in
criticizing the alledged frivolity of
some of the hard-working lads who
desire a little relaxation. I feel sure
that somewhere in this institution of
learning there are others who will
agree with me. There is of course the
possibility that "Disappointed" was
peeved because he was unable to procure a ticket and thus felt called upon
to get back at the more ambitious
people who lined up. While it is true
of course that some of the students do
not study as intensively as they might,
however I cannot see that a line-Ui) of
men who it is true skipped lectures
can prevent "Disappointed" from upholding the scholastic honour of his
Alma Mater and indulging in a very
laudable ambition which he, or she,
insinuates is completely lacking in the
present day student. I may say that
in spite of the censure of "Disappointed" I intend to enjoy the Aggie Dance.
"Hopes-he-wont-be-Disappointed."
PEDAGOGUES TO HOLD
HOP
The class of Education held its first
meeting of the present term last week,
and at it the question of fees and
festivities was discussed. It was decided to hold a party at Willow Hall
sometime in February. This will be
the first activity of the class officially
connected with the University.
The women of the year have agreed
to stage a stunt at High Jinks, the
form of which will appear later.
Three Nights For
Spring Plays
Players to Celebrate Decade of
Activity
At a meeting held last week the
executive of the Player's Club decided
to feature in various ways this year's
performance since it will be the tenth
annual spring offering of the Club.
Instead of the usual two nights, the
Orpheum has been engaged for three
this year. It is hoped that this increased responsibility will be recognized by the student body, and that
they will do their utmosst to assure an
audience for each of the three nights.
Souvenir programmes of special interest will be given out, also there will
be various other features which will
be divulged later. The dates of the
porformance here are March 16, 17 and
18.
An invitation has been received and
accepted, as in five previous years, to
present the play in Nanaimo. The
performance will be given on Tuesday,
March 10th, under the auspices of the
Bastion Chapter, I.O.D.E. The New
Westminster performance will likely
be given during the same week.
The final tryouts for parts were held
on Wednesday, but unfortunately the
results were not available before the
Ubyssey went to print.
Lecture On Garibaldi
y        Park At Institute
At the Vancouver Institute last week,
Rev. A. Tl. Sovereign, F.R.G.S., representing th^e Alpine Club of Canada,
gave a very interesting address entitled "Mt. Garibaldi." A fine selection of slides illustrating Rocky Mountain scenery were used and intimately
described by the speaker.
Mr. Sovereign emphasized the fact
that the creation and maintenance of
National Parks is one of Canada's
great needs.
The Garibaldi region adjacent to the
head of Howe Sound is rich in grand
Alpine scenery, surpassing the best
for which Switzerland and France are
so famous. Such a wonderful area
within fifty miles of Vancouver should
be protected from exploitation by commercial enterprises.
The tourist trade is B. C.'s fourth
basic industry, and it bids fair to become the first. Thirty-six million dollars were received from tourist trade
last year and with more attention being, paid to national parks that revenue
should be doubled.
Dr. Eastman moved that the meeting go on record as being heartily in
favor of supporting the movement for
the fostering of National Parks. Dr.
Burwash in seconding the motion testified to the vast importance of National
Farks.
"Picturesque Bavaria" (illustrated)
by Prof. Isabel Maclnnes of the Women's University Club is the subject
for to-night in the Physics Lecture
Room.
FOUNTAIN PENS
AT
SALE PRICES
That long-felt want may be visualized now that prices have been so
materialy reduced.
Three of Our Most Popular
Lines at Sale Prices.
THE H. B. C.  DOLLAR
FOUNTAIN PEN
Best chased vulcanite holder ;   14-
kt. gold nib; self-filling and safety.
SALE PRICE, 89c.
THE  H. B. C. REGULAR $1.50
FOUNTAIN  PEN
Best quality chased vulcanite holder ; 14-kt. gold nib ; self-filling and
safety. SALE PRICE, $1.29
THE NEW DIAMOND-POINT
PEN
Suitable for women. Best quality
vulcanite holder; 14-kt. gold nib,
with gold-filled lever and gold-
filled ring on end of cap. Regular
$1.50. SALE PRICE, $1.29
$»
Hudson's Bay Company
Vancouver, B. C.
YOU WILL FIND IN THE
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
 OF	
COMMERCE and TELEGRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming, M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can be of any service to you,
give us a call.
dl._„ I Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
rnone« } Seymour 7125; Seymour 7451
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
v       Arts Smoker
(Continued from Page 1)
will send the listeners into the realms
of Heaven (?) or the asylum. Further there will be—now that is too
bad. Somebody whispers that I will
start those feet doing the Saint Vitus
Dance.   Therefore take heed.
All ye who wish to have the best
time in your lives, take your latch-key,
bring your favorite pipe and ash tray,
your song-sheet and voices, and JOIN
the impending rush to the "1925 Arts
Men's Smoker," the biggest and best
yet to be staged.
AMBASSADOR  CAFE
610 Seymour Street
Headquarters for Service
Club Luncheons, Dinners, Banquets and Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing, Entertainment
EVERY EVENING
9:00 p.m.  to 1:00 a.m
v*= THE   UBYSSEY
January 22nd, 1925
Loose-Leaf Ring Books
and Refills
Fountain Pens
Drawing Instruments
and
Drawing Materials
Slide Rules
THE
Clarke & Stuart
Co., Ltd.
Stationers, Printers, &c,
550 SEYMOUR STREET
PHONE. SEYMOUR 3000
PHONE SEYMOUR 4000
FOR A
RELIABLE
j Phones : Fair. 77,   Fair. 5660-R
WILLOW HHLL
j 806 17th AVENUE, WEST
I       One Block  West of Heather Street
I      This Hall is for rent to Clubs and
! Private Parties.
For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,    5
&. ■t"»-«->-»'«i
Proprietor.
T. J. KEARNEY & CO.
Jfamrral Strertara
Private Ambulance Service
PHONE, FAIRMONT 3
802-808 Broadway, West, Vancouver, B.C.
The Palm Garden
FRUIT, CONFECTIONERY,
ICE CREAM and TOBACCO
HOT LUNCHES SERVED,
Also, AFTERNOON TEAS.
Phone, Fair 377
Cor. 10th & Heather St.
! CO-ED ATHLETICS |
^.•-•.••.••-••••.••••••••••••.•.-•••••.•■••-•••••••-••.••••••••••.••Hlt
V SWIMMING
Last Thursday evening at the Swimming gala staged by the mermaid A.
C. in Chalmers tank the Varsity Swimming Club was defeated by St. Marks,
20-11. The V. A. S. C. withdrew from
the competition, leaving Varsity, St.
Marks and the Mermaid Club to battle
for points. The winners of the different events were as follows:
50 yards free—iL. Broadfoot, St.
Marks; R. Tingley, St. Marks, M. Higginbotham, Varsity.
50 yards breast—S. Thrupp, Varsity;
L. Broadfoot, St. Marks; P. James,
Varsity.
Relay—1st—St.  Marks—
 L. Broadfoot, R .Tingley, D. Blackburn.
2nd—Varsity—
J.  Gilley,  M.  Robertson,  M.  Higginbotham.
Diving—L. Broadfoot, St. Marks; D.
Blackburn, St. Marks; J. Gilley, Varsity.
Plunge   for   Distance—Varsity    (by
default)
Novelty Battle—1st—St. Marks—
L.   Broadfoot,   D.   Blackburn,   R.
Tingley.
2nd—Varsity—
S. Thrupp, J. Gilley, P. James.
 o	
The Women's Athletic Executive
held a meeting last Thursday noon in
Room 31. It was decided that the Badminton inter-class games will commence on Tuesday, February 3.
It was also decided that the names
of those taking part in the inter-class
Swimming Meet must be handed in to
the President of the Swimming Club
not later than the Friday before the
Meet.
Arrangements are being made for
the Athletic Banquet, which is to be
held in the near future for members of
the  different  Athletic  Clubs.
BADMINTON CLUB
BEATS FAIRVIEW
First Time in Years
On Saturday the U. B. C. Badminton Club met their old rivals the Pair-
view Badminton Club at King Edward Gymn and for the first time in
the annals of the club did not suffer
defeat at the hands of Fairview's more
experienced players, the match resulting in a draw at 10 all. Pairview
won nine of the mixed doubles to
Varsity's seven. Varsity, however,
won both the men's doubles and one
of the ladies' doubles, thus evening
the score. The best play of the afternoon was seen when Hincks and
Davidson beat Fairview's best pair,
wood and Adamson in straight games.
The preceeding week the Varsity
club played a return match against
New Westminster, winning by the
comfortable margin of seven games.
On Saturday, 24th, the club meets
North Vancouver in two matches; first
team home and second team away.
Last year Varsity's first team won by
a very narrow margin and a keenly
contested  match is anticipated.
Members of the club are notified
that the club's open tournament will
be held early in February. The events
include men's and ladies' singles and
doubles and mixed doubles. Further
particulars will be posted later.
Watch the notice board!
Red. McL.—"Gosh, but I'm thirsty."
Ross—"Let me get you some water."
Red—"i said thirsty, not dirty."
{LITERARY CORNER
• x
/JANUARY
O Moon of darksome days!    Where is
thy beauty?
Must   we   live   on   through   cold   and
dreariness
And have no glimpses of a fairer day?
Ah! no-   We see in Thee, the promise
.     of spring flowers
And bright green grass.
E'en now the herald songsters of the
Spring
Pour forth their welcoming notes.
Thus may we know that Beauty doth
but sleep
Safe and protected  by thy sheltering
snow!
\    Arts '28.
One who wishes to do her bit to help
her College Paper.
fHoop Games Won
(Continued from Page 1)
Varsity playing a better combination
than their opponents. The sweaters
of the two teams being so near alike
in color were confusing.
The first few minutes of the game
were evenly contested, neither team
showing to much advantage. As the
first half progressed the game grew
faster; by half time both teams were
going at a whirlwind pace. Varsity
seemed to be capable of finding the
basket more often than their opponents, a few minutes before half time
they   ran   in   four  baskets   in  a   row.
The second half was equally as fast
as the first. Duncan missed several
shots in this half whereas Varsity
forwards had their shooting eyes working overtime.
Philips and Olson played sterling
games for the visitors; for Varsity, H.
Arkley, Peck and Dad Hartley, displayed excellent form.
Duncan—J. Dirome, C. Dirome,
Frence, Olson, Philips.
Varsity—Newcombe, H. Henderson,
A. Henderson, Peck, Arkley, Hartley
Wilkinson, Buchanan.
AGGIE DANCE AS
PEPPY AS EVER
Chicken Sandwiches Star
The Aggies surpassed themselves at
their annual faculty dance at Lester
Court last night. Those who had the
pleasure of being at last year's occas-
sion did not expect that the agriculturists could beat it, but it was apparent right from the time that Lee's
nine-piece country club orchestra jazzed it up that the Aggies were more
than going to live up to their reputation.
The farmers' annual confab was assured of success from the time that
the Faculty chickenologists' gave
twenty-one cockerels at the U. B. C.
farm, form, time and place utility.
The famous Aggie sandwiches were
not only good but there was enough
Bill Gough and Newcombe added new
punch to the program of refreshments
to satisfy even the keenest appetites.
which resulted in much smacking of
lips by all those that partook of the
Aggie's delight.
Lester's was magnificiently decorated
with cedar boughs and surpentine,
hanging balloons also added to the effect. There were colored lights and
numerous novelties which all coru-
tribued to the evening's success.
Notable among those present were
Hezekiah Snatchbreath, Miss Jemima
Hayloft, Reuben and Ebenezer Hay-
tosser from Alfalfa Corner, B. C. They
are still telling the natives about it.
A Good Photograph speaks
a language all its own"
X
Charlton $ Ratbbun
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Specialists in Colour   Portraits
X
711 Holden Bldg., 16 Hastings St., E.
(Jutl Eait of B. C. E. Rly. and Carr.ll St.)
Phone, Seymour jj6o
ENGINEERING and
DRAFTING SUPPLIES
Canadian Distributors for
A. W. Faber Pencils
Carl Zeiss Binoculars
Icacameras
Hughes Owens Go. ltd.
Gait Building
WINNIPEG  -   -   Manitoba
After the Show—
Visit Our
Soda Fountain
Burns Drug Co., Ltd.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
Frosh Hold Meeting
The auditorium was the scene of a
Freshman. New Year meeting last
Wednesday noon when members of
Arts '28 turned out in full force to
learn of the vital activities for this
term. Mr. E. Bebb, president of Arts
'28, presided over the meeting.
In conjunction with the E. S. R.
tag day held last Wednesday, Mr. C.
Gibbard opened the meeting with a
few remarks on the present day student situation in Europe, stressing the
point that the country suffered from a
lack of professors and text books
which evoked a rude sigh from the
youthful audience. Mr. B. Thompson,
athletic representative for the Freshmen, spoke on the coming events in
the land of sports and appealed for
the co-operation of the students in the
fight for the Governor's Cup. The
Women's Athletic representative for
Arts '28, Miss D. Woods, outlined the
sports program for this year. The
girls are also fighting hard for a cup.
Following a brief talk on the Arts
Annual Smoker by Mr. A. Maxwell,
Mr. E. Bebb brought the vital questions of the hour before the meeting
The students were elated to hear that
the class party would be held at Lester
Court on March 6, but the cruel assertion that it was to be a draw brought
a groan from many lips. The theatre
party has been cancelled, leaving one
more event for this season, which will
be in the form of a spring hike. After
the new Men's Marshal, Mr. K. Eckert,
had been elected to replace Mr. M.
Lange, the meeting adjourned following a yell lead by F. Fournier.
"Have you an opening for a bright
energetic  college  graduate?"
"Yes, and don't slam it on the way
out."—Ex. January 22nd, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
J. W. Foster Ltd.
345 Hastings Street,   West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
See  US Before Buying
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features and artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
\ALUMNI BRIDGE
The Alumni of the University are
holding a bridge evening in the auditorium, Monday, the second of February. There will be bridge and mah
jong tables, a musical programme,
with refreshments and dancing. The
cost of tickets is 75 cents apiece.
They may be procured from any of
the following: Miss Eve Eveleigh,
Miss Kirsteen Leveson, Miss Isabel
McKinnon, Miss Eugenie Pournier,
Mr. Art Lord, Mr. Frank Pumphrey,
Mr. Neil McCallum, and Mr. Harold
Afford. The Alumni always stage interesting features, and it is expected
that the auditorium will be filled to
capacity.
First Frosh: "I don't see why they
want to learn us this old English for
anyway."
Second Ditto: "Me neither. It ain't
no good to an engineer."
\Jhe largest selling
quality pencil
the world
17
black
degrees
3
copying
Superlative in quality,
the world-famous
Y
ENUS,
PENCILS
give best service and
longest wear.
Plain ends, per dor.
Rubber ends, per doz.
cAt all dealers
American Lead Pencil Co.
t 220 Fifth Ave., N.Y.
$1.00
1.20
t
4
t
t
STRAW FROM THE STACKS
|H«.*«H»H»H«HI
JONAH AND THE ARK
If, with some of our classrooms in
a church, we find one of our professors
speaking to a class at a 9 o'clock lecture of "Noah and the Whale," what
will become of us when we get out
to Point Grey, so far removed from
all religious influence?
••-••<§*••.•.
"Your honor," said the attorney,
"your bull pup has chewed up the
court Bible."
"Well", grumbled the judge, "We
can't adjourn to get a new Bible.
Make the witness kiss the pup."
—Davidsonian.
••-•*§>^-«*
Nervous Person (in aerial taxi
about 8,000 ft. up): "W-w-what are
you laughing at d-driver?"
Driver—"I'm just laughing at the
superintendent. About this time he'll
be starching for me all over the
asylum."
LOVE DIES
All is over between us,
Our love lies stricken and dead.
For I can no longer cherish a wife
Who eats Graham crackers in bed.
"How did the accident happen?"
"Why, I dimmed my lights and was
huggin' the curve."
"Yeah,   that's   how   most   accidents
happen." —Ex.
.•-•-3>..-..
Prof.—"This is third time I've seen
you looking on Wilson's paper."
Davies—"Yes, sir; he doesn't write
very  plainly."—Ex.
A nigger sat on the railroad track
And he wouldn't budge,
'Long came a train—
Chocolate fudge.
—The Reflector.
PROBLEMS FACING
JtffcNS' ATHLETICS
Fairness of Letter Awards
in Question
One of the big problems facing the
Men's Athletics this year is the giving of letters. Some agree that too
many letters are given at U. B. C.
On the other hand, if the giving of
letters will encourage the sport, why
not give them freely, others argue.
The fact remains however that if too
many letters are given, as seems to
be the case at present, the letter becomes cheapened.
To the writer a far bigger problem
seems to exist in the fairness of giving the letter, especially the big letter
award, which is without doubt the
highest honor that can be conferred
upon an athlete by his Alma Mater.
A case in point is the question which
arose at the last meeting of the Men's
Athletics last term. The argument,
in brief, is that, according to the constitution, inter-collegiate track men
must win an event at the prairie meet
to get his letter. Those members of
the track club who are trying to
change this rule, put forward some
pretty convincing arguments in favor
of deleting this clause from the constitution.
They argue that the members of the
Varsity team that went east this year
went as a team, consequently if one
of them get a letter they all should.
Their points counted as a whole. One
man might win his race by inches and
not have much competition. Another
man might just lose out and yet be a
much better man than the one who
won -his event, because the loselr
might be up against very tough opposition. This danger, which was
pointed out by the President of the
Track Club, is a very real one as a
perusual of past track records soon
shows.
Whatever happens we must give our
letters fairly. Obviously it would not
be just to pick out individuals on our
McKechnie and first soccer squads and
say to them "Well, you didn't p'ay a
very good game this year. I guess
we wont give you your letter." The
Inter-Collegiate track team is just as
much a team as our rugby and soccer
men are, as their points count as a
total, and they also must spend months
of intensive training to make the tram
at all. Even if too many letters are
being given, they must be given fairly.
WOMEN'S DEBATE
WON BY SENIORS
Arts '25 Continues Unbroken
Record
The first 1925 meeting of the
Women's Literary Society took the
form of the second inter-class debate,
the subject being. "Resolved that the
Japanese immigration in the U. S. A.
should be placed on the same basis as
the European.' Miss Helen MacGill
and Miss Phyllis Gregory supported
the affirmative for Arts '25, while Miss
Kathleen Clark and Miss Jean Graham
upheld the negative for Arts '26. The
judges were Miss Sallee Murphy, Prof.
Robertson and Mr. Soward.
Miss MacGill opened the debate
with a brief history of the acts effecting Japanese immigration which
had been passed up to the time of the
Exclusion Bill. Her arguments
against the latter were well ordered,
clear and emphatic.
Miss Clark dealt very ably with
the evils of Japanese immigration from
an economic standpoint. Following
Miss Clark, Miss Gregory supported
Miss MacGill, accentuating the sensitiveness of the Japanese people.
Miss Graham dealt chiefly with the
national, social and international disadvantages of Japanese immigration.
Miss MacGill's rebuttal was splendid,
showing a quick intellect and a keen
sense of humor.
Miss Murphy gave the judges decision in favor of Arts '25.
TUXEDO
SUITS
3-Piece
SPECIAL
$35.00
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
M-COMMERCIAL
and Secretarial School
INDIVIDUAL COURSES
709 GEORGIA STREET, W.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
Varsity Defeated
^   In Swimming Tilt
The conflict between the Canadian
Amateur Swimming Association and
the Canadian Amateur Athletic Union
was indirectly felt at the recent meet
between the Mermaid A. C. and the
Varsity Swimming Club. The university swimmers won the much heralded 200 yards relay race for the
Mainland Championship, but owing to
the above difficulty and the resulting
action of the Vancouver Amateur
Swimming Club in withdrawing from
the meet, they did not receive the
cup to crown their success. However
the trouble may soon be cleared up
and if that is done another very desirable piece of silverware will be secured for the University.
There will be an open meeting of
the swimming club in Room X, Monday, January 20th, at 12 noon. The
athletic representatives of each class
are asked to attend to look after the
interests of their class in the draw
for the inter-class swimming competition. Competition will take place in
the following events—50 yards, free
style; 100 yards, free style; 220 yards,
free style; 50 yards back stroke; 50
yards breast stroke; 100 yards breast
stroke; diving, plunge for distance
and 150 yard 4-man relay.
Profits Reduce
Twenty Payments to Fourteen
Policy 43485, issued In 1909, called for 20 premiums,
but Great-West profits reduced this to 14 premiums.
Amount: $7452   Premium $ 246.70
Earnings credited 1914       197.85
Earnings credited 1919       353.40
Earnings credited 1923       557.45
Total end of 14th year     1108.70
Required to pay future premiums 1046.70
Cash Surplus to Assured  $   62.00
Although no further premiums are to be paid, the
policy will continue to participate in profits.
i J.X©   ©ssfflaaKrsr
HEAD   OFFICE  - WINNIPEG 8
THE   UBYSSEY
January 22nd, 1925
r^C TRADEJ)l^§
^&'
The Spalding Line of
'Made in Canada" Goods
is most complete.
Play safe by using
Spalding Goods, which
are   nationally   known
and of
Best Quality only.
Rugby     Hockey
Skates      Basketball
Boxing Gloves
Striking Bags Skis |
Badminton Goods,
Etc.
m       '      OF Canada/limited
424 Hastings Street, W.
VANCOUVER. B. C
WE HAVE THE BEST
Adjustable Clamp Lamp
ON THE MARKET.
Can be attached anywhere.      Movable
Shade.   Indispensable to every student.
Price, $2.50 only
including six feet of cord.
For sale only at the
GREAT WEST SALES CO.
Room 309, 315 PENDER ST., W.
Say you saw it in the "Ubyssey"
BAGGAGE
TO       FROM
ALL TRAINS AND BOATS
ROYAL  TRANSFER
PHONE,  SEY.  6
DANCING
x
Private and Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
/	
Portraits car
i be made
at
1
any
Jn
time
from the
GRADUATION
PHOTOGRAPHS
\^^  STUDIOS
1
v	
1°
vy
553 Granville St.
 '
Our Weakly Cross-Word Puzzle
i.
9.
10-
11.
13.
15.
16.
18.
19.
20.
22.
23.
24.
26.
28.
29.
31.
32.
33.
35.
36-
37.
39.
Horizontal.
Secrets secretly told.
Manner.
Wtat the crew says when distrub-
ed.
Were the exams easy?
River in Africa.
Our province.
Definite   article.
Cent.
Son of (Scotch)
What   chickens   walk   across   to
get to the other side.
Paddle.
One   of  U.   B-   C.'s   international
debaters.
Valley.
Baby's ecstatic remarks.
Useful in hot weather.
The  sun of Mohammed.
A monarch (French)
Civil  Engineer.
Delete.
Westward.
Friend   (French)   spelt backward.
North  Labrador  Territory.
How do you do? (plural)
Prairie Debaters
Here February 5th
' Co-eds Arranging Debate With
Oregon
Saskatchewan is sending West her
best team to oppose the U. B. C. supporters on February 4. In fact it is
the same team which met the Oxford
debaters in their recent tour, and it
consists of E. C. Leaslie, J. C. Goslyn,
and W. J. McLellan. King Edward
Auditorium will witness a spirited encounter for these opponents will be
hard to overcome.
Tickets will be 25c for all seats
except in the reserved section, where
50c will be the price. The public is
showing such interest in debating that
it is planned to sell them tickets from
some place in town. University students will be wise therefore to purchase
tickets as early as possible- They
will be on sale in the Main Hall at
noon on Friday.
Meanwhile the co-eds have not been
idle. Arrangements for a debate with
the Oregon Agricultural College are
well under way. Should these negotiations produce a final settlement the
subject will be on the Japanese Immigration Question.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
12.
14.
15.
17.
19.
21.
22.
25.
27.
29.
30-
33.
34.
36.
38.
Vertical
Declares the opposite.
Scotch negative.
Oar of a fish.
Flag.
Resembling an Ostrich.
Conjunction.
Company (ab.)
Series  (plural)
A note of triumph.
Kind of boat.
What eggs sometimes are.
A bird of prey.
Feudal habitation.
Deer.
A covering for the head.
An aviator.
What  the   small  girl   said   when
she saw the Christmas Tree.
Article X a rodent.
Ain't.
That bird again!
A priest in the Old Testament.
French pronoun.
Preposition.
^       BASKETBALL
Last Friday night in the Normal
gym the Senior A Basketball team
won a considerable victory over the
Normal B team, the score being 33-3.
From the start, Varsity proved the
stronger of the two teams. At the
opening, Gay Swenciski and Flora
Musgrave did much to bring up the
score while Winona Straight starred
in passing and checking.
The same evening, the Senior B
team was not as lucky in Its game
being defeated by the latter 36-6. In
against the Royal City Y. W. C. A.,
this game, Alda Moffatt starred on
the Varsity team.
SommetZ
, LIMITSD '
556 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
COATS
$9.75
Plaid Back English Tweed
Goats ; heavy, warm, comfortable.
Gravenette Raincoats of fine
quality, very desirable for
early spring wear.
Fancy Lightweight Plaid
Sport  Goats.
Savings $10.00 to $14.00
on these coats.
Varsity Students
— dance differently than the
general public.
If you want the new dance
steps danced by Varsity's
best dancers
SEE
VAUGHN MOORE
518 HASTINGS ST., W. Seymour 707
tS" TRY  AND  FIND  US ^»
> LA CANADIENNE
Mr. Delavant will entertain La Can-
adienne in their first meeting of the
term on Thursday, January 22nd, at
8 p.m., in the Women's Building, 752
Thurlow St. The programme for the
evening will be given by the members of La Causerie who will present
their play "Les Deux Sourds." A good
attendance is requested as there is
important business to be discussed.
DANCING or CROSS-WORDS ?
Notwithstanding Cross-Word Puzzles, DANCING still continues to
be the mo»t popular recreation, tor we take the Puzzles out of Dancing,
also the "Cross Words." Our system enables you to learn with ease.
Our steps are up-to-the-minute.
Broadway Dancing School
1400 BROADWAY, W. (One Block East of Granville St.)
Phone, Bay. 5834 "We Correct All Faults."
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Broadhead

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0123700/manifest

Comment

Related Items