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The Ubyssey Feb 9, 1937

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 GET YOUR SCIENCE
TICKET NOW;
SELL OUT SOON
UHft. _Hbya0^o
Published TwiceWeekly by the    Publications Board of theUniversity of British Columbia
BASKETBALL GAME
IN GYM
Wednesday, 8:30
Vol. XIV
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1937
No. 30
BRANDRETH
SHOWS FILM
AT LECTURE
Superintendent of
Physical Education
Exhibiting a film that he
took at the Olympic games in
Berlin last summer, Mr. Gordon Brandreth, Superintendent of Physical Education for
City schools, will present the
next Vocational Guidance
talk in Arts 100 on Wednesday at 12.15.
His film is dtvideil into two
parts; the first dealing with the
pageantry of the opening ot the
Games and the second with the activities, mainly field work and gymnastics, in the International camp
tor students of Physical education.
DIFFERENT METHODS
Mr. Brandreth, who has been Superintendent of Physical Education
since 930, formerly taught Physical Training at Templeton Junior
High School. He is a leader in the
new program for Physical Education which began in 9_7. The mod-
em Idea is to remove the emphasis from formalized exercises and
concentrate on the joy of physical
activity. Different teaching methods are used and a greater variety
of  activities   is   provided.
Vancouver children in the main
provide a wonderful field for the
physical education worker, since
they generally boast excellent
health. There are a few districts
where some of the youngsters are
under-nourished ancl benefit more
from rest periods than from exercise. However, here also the Department of Physical Education
has ita work, since the under-nourished children and their parents
benefit from the health lessons,
which teach all the rules of healthy
living.
CLASSES  FOR  TEACHERS
Mr. Brandreth believes that Physical education has a great future
In the Province of British Columbia. Up to the present the interior
of British Columbia is almost an
untouched field In this respect.
Already a few classes tor teachers
In the outlying districts near Vancouver have been conducted by the
department and met with enthusiastic response.
Physical education is today a
necessary part ot the equipment ot
all  up-to-date teachers.
U.B.C. Student
Died Tuesday
In Victoria
O. R. L. Kenwrick, a student in
third-year arts at U.B.C, died at
his home in Oordon Head, Victoria,
last Tuesday, after a brief illness.
"Ran," as he was known to his
schoolmates, was Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant in C.O.T.C, and
was a candidate for the "B" certificate in that unit.
Among his other activities, Ken-
wrick was a member of the Mathematics Club. Officers, N.CO.'s, and
men of the U.B.C. C.O.T.C sent a
wreath to tho funeral in Victoria.
The Ubyssey extends to the family
sympathy in their loss.
Music Lecture Will
Cover Classic Songs
Ths fourth muslo lecture by
Allard de Ridder, director of the
Vancouver Symphony Orcheatra,
will be given in the Auditorium
tomorrow at 3.30. Mr. da Ridder
will conclude hla dlaouaaion of
Bach and will refer to the oom-
poaara of the Claasloal Period.
He will be sasisted by aeveral
aololata, Including Mra. de Ridder, Miaa Elajle de Ridder and
Mra.   Hamilton.
PHYSICS CLUB
There will be an open meeting ot
the Physics Club on Wednesday,
February 10, at 12.20 noon, in Sc.
200. Dr. C. F. Beals of the Dominion Astrophyslcal .Observatory
will talk on "The Mechanics of
Formation of Absorption Lines in
Interstellar Space." All students
are  invited   to  attend  thia  lecture.
STUDENTS   ORGANIZE   IN
PACIFIST   MOVEMENT
Speaks Wednesday
W. G. Brandreth, Physical Education superintendent in City
Schools, who will speak in tomorrow's Vocational Guidance
lecture.
Scienceman
Phil Emory, who is one in charge
of arrangements for the Science
Ball, generally conceded to be
the best party of the year.
Canada, the Empire and
the League
A series of lectures given at the
Canadian Institute on Economics
and Politics held at Lake Couch-
lchlng, Ontario, July 31-Aug. 14,
1936. Published by Thomas Nelson
and Sons Ltd., Toronto. Price,
$1.00.
When the Canadian Institute on
Economics and Politics met at Lake
Coucbiching last summer, the subject under discussion was "Canada's Responsibility for Peace."
Some of tbe more outstanding lectures given by such men as Dr.
Raymond Leslie Buell, Dr. Hans
Simons, lord Snell, Professors R.
A. McKay of Dalhousle, A. R. M.
Lower ot Manitoba, and Jean Bru-
chesl of Montreal, have been published in a booklet which is of interest not only to students of history but to all who are interested
ln Canada's future in International
affairs.
Divided into three parts dealing
with the world situation, the background of Canada's position, and
(actors for making for a Canadian
foreign policy, the lectures present
almost every shade of opinion regarding Canada's relations with the
Empire and the League. It ls interesting to contrast the different
viewpoints which vary from those
who urge a strong British Bloc of
Nations as the best guarantee of
peace, to those who advocate withdrawal from the Empire and the
League In favor of a policy of complete isolation. At a time when
attention 1.9 being directed toward
the discontent In French Canada,
Professor Bruchesl's Interpretation
ot Quebec's problems Is both interesting and helpful.
T.   C.   M.
Universities to Petition
Ottawa Re Powers
Of Conscription
MONTREAL, Feb. 8. (Speolal
Wire)—Aa a raault of a Canadian Unlveralty Praaa war aurvay
a oampalgn to gain aupport for
a petition to Parliament aaaklng
tha repeal of conscription powara
now extant and tha enunelationa
by the government ef Canada's
foreign   policy.
The petition la a raault of
oonfaranoaa at tho University of
Toronto snd Queens snd Is being aent to all Canadian unlver-
altlea for sndorssmsnt. Ths petition already has ths backing of
the   French-Canadian   atudenta.
Student Peace Group
Being Organized
At Edmonton
By   FRED   PRITCHARD
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA,
Edmonton, Feb. 6 (WIPU) — A
meeting to organize a branch of
the Student Peace Movement at
the University of Alberta has been
announced. The Student Peace
Movement, with national headquarters at Montreal, ls active at
the universities of McOlll, Toronto and O. A. C. The aim of the
organization ls to Inform students
and the general public on all questions connected with peace and
war, Canada's foreign policy, and
her relations with the League and
the Empire. A representative of
the S. P. M. from McOlll recently
visited the University of Alberta
campus for the purpose of stimulating peace activities here. At the
flrst meeting Dr. Francis Owen will
speak on the European situation,
particularly as related to a policy
for peace. If the movement here
is well organized now, lt will be
prepared for immediate activity
next  fall.
PATRONS NAMED
FOR ROBIN HOOD
When the Musical Society produce their opera on the 17th, 18th,
19th and 20th of February, they
will have a distinguished list of
patrons and patronesses. Heading
the list are His Honor E. W- Ham-
be r, Lieutenant-governor of British
Columbia,  and  Mrs.  Hamber.
Other patrons are: The Hon. O.
M. Weir, His Worship Mayor Miller
and Mrs. Miller, Chancellor and
Mrs. R. E. McKechnie, president;
and Mrs. L. S. Kllnck, Dean and
Mrs. D. Buchanan, Dean M. L. Bollert, Dean and Mrs. Clement, Dean
and Mrs. Findlayson and Mr. and
Mrs.   Allard   de   Ridder.
Manitoba Plans to
Have Commerce and
Engineering Courses
UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA,
Winnipeg, Feb. 2. (WIPU) — Answering a long-felt and often expressed demand, plans for the establishment of a chair of commerce and a chair of mining engineering in the University of
Manitoba are being developed, but
the ultimate introduction of the
two chairs Is largely a matter of
money, declared President Smith
when questioned by a representative of the Manltoban, the official
publication of the University of
Manitoba Students' Union.
Tentative currlculums for the
two courses are being drawn up.
The school of commerce will prob
ably include courses ln business
administration, actuarial science,
applied economics, taxation appraisal and other similar subjects.
The mining engineering course
would pay particular attention to
the problems of Manitoba Mineralogy and would be modelled to suit
the needs of the province rather
than duplicate courses already being; offered in other Canadian universities.
As yet, however, the date when
these chairB will be established
cannot be prophesied. An increase
in the University grant would
probably be necessary before the
University would be ln a financial
position to go ahead with the plans.
"We can only do as the Dalhousle
University motto says: 'Pray and
Work'," concluded President Smith.
LIBERTY IS
PROBLEM OF
PRESENT DAY
Robert Connell
At Institute
Saturday
A picture of Liberty as a
major problem of modern society was painted for the
Vancouver Institute on Saturday evening by Rev. Robert
Connell, leader of the opposition in the B. C. Legislature,
taking as his subject, "Liberty, An Old Dilemna in a New
Form."
He devoted a good deal of his
time to an historical review of the
conception of liberty, pointing out
that man has never been completely
free, neither is he ever likely to be.
In all ages he said, there has been
some controlling force to limit human beings in their actions.
PHASES OF LIBERTY
The speaker then dealt with
some phases of liberty and freedom
in tho present age. He spoke of
freedom of thought, noting that we
are usually referring to freedom
of expression. "Even the most radical among us would limit expression of our thoughts, although they
might want such freedom for themselves," he said.
"In Canada there is not sufficient   liberty   of   criticism,"   Mr.
Connell continued.   "People form
little mutual admiration societies
and agree that everything ia fine.
Woe to him who raises his voice
in any protest.   We do not question    things    as    much    as    we
should."
The   speaker  noted  tho  problem
raised by the assumption that man
charged with an offence Is innocent
until proven guilty.   He stated that
too    often    such    people    are    condemned by press and public opinion
before   they   have   come   to   trial.
"There have been glaring instances
of that In this province," he said.
RIGHTS OF MINORITIES
Speaking of the rights and liberties of minorities, Mr. Connell noted
that in history the minority has
often been right. "The mere counting of heads doesn't prove a thing
right or wrong," he said.
Our people are not educated in
the use of democracy. They are so
busy with private affairs that they
have no time for politics, the speaker continued. "The danger is that
while such people are not thinking
of politics, others are. That is what
you have in countries where dictatorships arise. The seeds of such
dictatorships are not so much in
the economic field as in the hearts
of men."
Printers,    Phone
Bills, Society And
More Steam
The printers are wailing ln their
blackness   and   whiteness;   the   engraver   ls   wasting   time   between
shrieks   ot  Impatience   by  immersing old Totems in acid and watching   the   messages   of   dignitaries
disolving    ln    steam;     the    photographer has had his telephone bill
doubled because ot over-use of the
phone ln calling people to get their
pictures   taken; i the    Totem   staff
has   taken   to   reading   the   society
columns of the Washington Dally.
All thla inactivity, futility, mla-
guided energy, and  nonsenee  because   people   will   not   hand   In
olaaa,   olub   or   Individual   write-
upa,  and   becauae   thoy   will   not
get    their    pictures    taken.     By
people  wo   mean  YOU.
Or If not you then that guy reading  this  Ubyssey  over your shoulder,  or  on  the  floor  ot  your  car,
or   you   reading   it   in   the   waste-
basket in the men's common room.
Even   you   lighting   a   fire   with  lt.
All of you. Anybody and everybody
who ought to get a picture  taken
or a write-up  in  for team or fraternity;   class or club;  pleaae to be
doing ao.
Party Politics In
Varsity Elections
This Year Rumored
Would Inject New Interest In Varsity
Elections and Affairs
With Students' Council elections but one month distant,
the campus is beginning to feel the flrst effects of what
should be one of the hardest fought campaigns of many
seasons.
PARTY   FORMED
The latest development came to
light Monday, despite earnest attempts to keep the matter quiet.
Groups of students, believing that
the only way to gain control of
the Council ls to have control of
all members on it, have banded together and are planning to run a
slate of candidates at the election.
With this move, party politics
will enter varaity elections for the
flrst time in the history ot the A.M.
S. No Information is available as
to the actual membership of the
as yet unnamed "party," but it
is certain that ls includes several
Influential   organizations.
COULD  HAVE  CONTROL
If the candidates ot such a party
were to be elected, or even If a
majority of them were successful,
it would be easy for the group behind the candidates to control all
of the actions of Council. There
is no doubt that it ls this possibility that is acting as a spur to the
new movement on  the campus.
It ls uncertain as to the method
which party politics on this campus
would take. The party or parties
might represent the two major faculties, as is done at eastern universities, or they might draw their following in some other way. It is
even possible that the fraternal organizations are behind the present
move.
WOULD  AROUSE   INTEREST
As far as is known, there is no
clause ln the student constitution
to prevent the commencement of
party government. It ls hard to
realize the change that such administrations would bring about on
the campus. One thing at least
is certain, elections would become
far livelier than before, and a greater number would take part in the
poll. Appointments, such as the
Book Exchange and some minor
positions, would be passed out
more as party patronage. This
condition exists in other Canadian
universities, but has never existed
here, despite occasional accusations by Interested groups.
No student organisation would
be unaffected by the advent of a
party government. A oomplete
change ln the method ot granting
money to clubs, such as the Players and the Musical Society would
be inaugurated. The position of
treasurer would assume a great
deal more Importance than at present.
Under suoh a system, the actions
ot the Council would of necessity
become public. Council meetings
would be reported in the Ubyssey
more fully, because of the ever-
present possibility of party interests affecting decisions.
With no accurate details available as to the shape that the new
party will take, any forecasts of its
result on campus affairs la only
conjecture. It ls expected that the
group supporting the movement
will make its plans public soon,
unless adverse student opinion
causes them to be dropped.
Coed Tickets
To Be Raffled
Three tickets to the Co-ed will be
raffled off by the Women's Undergrad this week. The raffle tickets
will be sold at 10 cents, or three
for 25 cents, the executive has announced.
Drawing for the three useful
prizes will be held in Arts 100,
Friday noon, during a W. U. S.
meeting.
ORAD CLUB
The Orad Olub will hold Ita next
meeting at the home of Mlea Eleanor Mercer, B78A Hudaon Street, at
8 o'clock on Wedneadsy, Fsbrusry
10th. The opsakor will be Dr. Q.
Q. Sedgewlok of the Department of
Englieh. All thoae doing poet-
graduate work on the oampua are
invited  to  attend.
Teachers,  Normal
Grads Organize
Education Class
Not Present
Last Thursday the teachers and
Normal grads met ln Arts 106 and
decided to form the University
Teachers' Association tbat ls to be
affiliated with the B. C. Teachers'
Federation. U n f o rtunately, Mr.
Charlesworth, secretary of the Federation, was delayed by the heavy
snow. Meanwhile a discussion of
the objectives of the club was held
under the chairmanship of O. Cor-
mack. When Mr. Charlesworth arrived he spoke briefly on the membership of the group and congratulated the teachers on tho move
they had taken.
He stated that the teachers who
taught last year would be able to
secure a vote on the present poll
for compulsory membership in a
professional society. Those wishing to have a vote, please see Jack
Wright, or any executive member
this week. This ls the flrst tangible  benefit  of  the  organization.
Unfortunately, the B d u cation
Class were not present, due to the
difficulty ot arranging a meeting.
However, the teachers extend an
invitation to the Education Class to
join the U.T.A. as student members.
The results of the executive elections were: President, John Wood;
Vice-President, Jack Wright; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Margaret
Wlndt, and Executive Members,
Miss Betty Lamb and Oeorge Cor-
mack.
There will be an important meeting on Tuesday, February 9, at
12.16 in Arts 106 to discusa a social and dance for all teachers,
both Normal Graduates and Education  claaa.
E. S. Woodward Speaks
On Gesell System
At U. of Alberta
By   FRED   PRITCHARD
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA.
Edmonton, Feb. 6 (WIPU)—Mr. E.
S. Woodward, of Vancouver, a visitor in the city at the preaent time,
was asked to substitute at the last
minute for John Hargrave, Britiah
Social Credit leader, at the Commerce Club luncheon last Monday.
Mr. Hargrave, former advisor to
the Alberta Government, left the
city on his break with the government leaders and left no letter or
note for the club cancelling his engagement to speak to the University of Alberta students. A telegram received by the club from
Ottawa carried the apologies and
regrets of the British Green Shirt
leader.
Mr. Woodward addressed the
club on the topic, "The Oesell Monetary System and Its Practical Application to Business." In his address the monetary reforms proceeded to show that the practice
of charging Interest on borrowed
capital waa basically wrong. The
Gesell system is based on the entirely opposite principle of levying
a charge on those holding capital.
This "demurrage charge" would
cause those having money to lend
it readily Instead of hoarding it.
This would once again start the
wheels of Induatry turning and
bring about a return of prosperity.
I.  R. C.  MEETING
The International Relations Club
will holds its meeting on Wednesday, February 10, at 8 o'clock, at
the home of Dean M. L. Bollert,
1185 West 10th Avenue. Mr. D. A.
McGregor of "The Vancouver Dally
Province,"  will  be  the  spoaker. Two
THE      UBYSSEY
THE   UBYSSEY
EDITOR IN CHIEF
ZOE BROWNE-CLAYTON
SINIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY: Kemp Edmonds FRIDAY: Dorwln Baird
SPORTS IDITOR
Dick Elson
ASSOCIATI IDITORS
Ken Grant        Dorothy Cummings
Peggy Hlggs
ASSOCIATI SPORTS IDITORS
Frank Perry    Frank Turner
Student rate, $1.00 per year.
Subscription Rates for Ubyssey:
Rate for non-students, $1.50 per year.
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 311 Province Building, Victory Square, Vancouver, 8. C.
Telephone: TRINITY 1945
Advertising Staff:  Charles H. Munro, Howard D. Fletcher
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited.
BY THEIR WORDS YE KNOW THEM
During the last few years, Pacifism as a creed has
Buffered severe setbacks. The opinion ot the majority seemB
to be that Paciclfism Is a hopelessly impossible ideal. Canada,
along with all the other nations ot the world, Is becoming
resigned to the Idea that a world war is Inevitable.
For many years the government of Great Britain was
the main bulwark of the Pacifists, but during the last year
without any opposition from the people, the National government has greatly increased its armed forces and national
defenae expenditures.
And now, betrayed by their government, British pacifists find that the church has also deserted them. Last week
the Archbishop of York asserted that "it can be a Christian
duty to kill," while his colleague, the Bishop of London,
stated that "the real dangers to the peace of the world today
are pacifists."
It seems inconceivable that anyone, let alone a religious
leader, could combine belief in the above statements with
true Christianity. Such prelates as the Archbishop ot York
and the Bishop of London are chiefly responsible for the
modern disrespect of the church. How can one respect an
institution while at the same time being forced to hold the
leaders of that institution in contempt?
While the Archbishops are lauding the idea of war the
students at McGiil have launched a campaign to enlist support of a petition to Parliament seeking the repeal of conscription powers now extant. They also desire an enunciation by the Government of its foreign policy. This movement has the support of the majority of eastern universities
including Toronto, Kingston and the French Universities.
It seems rather significant that while Bishops, who are
forbidden to take an active part in fighting and ln any case
are probably too old for service, condone war and express
active disapproval of pacifism students, who would be the
main participants and sufferers in case of war, unite for
pacifism.
"One In a Million"
Stars Dimpled Skater
Dancing, tbat (or superlative
grace and artistry, Is comparable
to that ot the forever famous Pav-
lowa, set in a creaking disjointed
plot—that is the M.O.M. production, "One In a Million," featuring
Sonja Henie, the greatest figure
skater ln  the  world.
IOV   ATMOSPHBRB
Against the background ot snowy
mountains and glistening ice sheets
the skate dancing of Sonja Henie
makes all the chorus girls and ballets of other Hollywood musicals
aeem mediocre. On ice she seems
to be able to literally take to
wings in glides and swoops of
breathtaking  beauty.
Besides being so proficient on
skates, Miss Henie displays a
most attractive camera personality.
Her charm is by no means of the
standard Hollywood type as her
face ls tar too round and her features too small tor real beauty.
Tbere is, however, an artless sweetness in ber wide, expressive eyea,
her golden hair and her dimpled
smile  that ia  most alluring.
This lovely leading lady, cast as
Greta Muller, a Swiss Innkeeper's
daughter, is placed in a story tbat
shows plainly all the clumsy fingerprints ot the script writers. One
can imagine them sitting ponderously around their desks carefully
Injecting so muoh jealousy into
the plot so that the path of true
love won't go quite straight, and
elaborately thinking out means to
add suspense to the foregone conclusion that Greta will win the
Olympics with her skating.
LITTLE   PLOT
Apart from Sonja Henie the other actors in "One ln a Million"
struggle rather Ineffectually against
the deficiency of plot. Don Ameche
makes an acceptably natural leading man, while Jean HerBcholt as
Greta'B father, givea an excellent
portrayal ot a good, simple Swiss.
Adolphe Menjou and his feminine
orchestra are in the story to complicate Greta's Olympic ambitions
by casting on her a taint of professionalism.
The Rita brothers, comedy singing team, are fairly good, but seem
amateurish when placed in the environment of Miss Henie's skating.
Ned Sparks, with his dry wisecracks, is good comedy, while the
playing of Borah Minnevitch and
his Harmonica Rascals, provides
some bright spots. One does wonder, however, how an unmistakable
black negro managed to be cast as
a harmonica-playing Oerman peasant? We are Bure Hitler won't like
it.
"One  in  a  Million"   ia  definitely
worth seeing becauae never before
has such dancing been portrayed
on the screen, but lt you go expecting to be entertained with a
plot as well as dancing, you will
be   disappointed.—Z.   B.   C.
S.M.U.S.
Smutterings
For the flrst time since the beginning of tbe session have the red
shirts experienced mental relief.
The gross problem of getting a
large Smuss turnout has been
solved. Yes, all that is necessary
is to promise free beer for all, and
at tho crucial moment serve them
Coca Cola. Of course, some of the
upper classmen have tasted beer
before, but they are sprayed into
secrecy with a few squirts of perfume. This situation, however, has
to be made full use of, therefore,
while the children are thus intoxicated put on a skit which, although
so boring that a diamond drill
would hide in shame will produce
from all a most gleeful response.
Now let the boys amuse themselves
with their home-made nursery
songs, and then before the closing
skit serve them their promised gastronomic delights by scrambling
cent candles.
Needless to say, the success of
this pep meet was to a good part
responsible to the generosity of the
Coca Cola Co. and the Lifesavers
Co. of Canada.
The most common question of the
day is "are you going to the Science
ball ? "—and a close second question
Is, "How are you getting there?"
The flrst question is easy to answer. If you already have a ticket
you can go. If you haven't a ticket
you're S.O.L., because they're all
sold out. Furthermore there will be
no ticket scalping, and anybody
caught ticket scalping will be
scalped himself. The executive has
a very effective method of dealing
with this situation, and because of
their force of stool pigeons, it is
conclusive that the ticket is doomed.
The second question, however, is
a mean one, and you Science Bailers are to answer it. If you have
any room in your car or if you want
transportation, see your class president.
A small note of interest ia that
the ball is to be practically 100 per
cent, science, and there are rumours
that any illicit Artsmen or Aggies
TALKIE) talk.
You can look for some of
these to show up at the little theatre around the corner during the
next month. Really good films,
worth the two bits and the three
hours.
After tha Thin Man is much better than most sequels. It ls true
to its original In all respects, and
adds more of that delightful light
comedy. Collage Holiday we mentioned before, but don't miss Martha Raye and Jack Benny. The
Plainsman ls not so showy as most
Ceclle B. DeMille's epics, therefore
more story and better result. Jean
Arthur and Gary Cooper, but not a
Mr.   Dssds.
Garden of Allah shows us the
progress of color, and tbe beauty
of Marlene D. Fair as entertainment. Champagne Walts ls interesting, particularly to those who
like, good music, of all kinds. Picture co-stars "swing" and Strauss
waltzes.
Old Huteh brings Wallace Beery
in a typical role. Few actors are
more typed than he. But then, you
may like the type. Oold Diggers of
1937 has but one Busby Berkley
spectacle and for the rest sticks
to a happy story concerning Dick
Powell, Joan Blondell Powell, and
Victor Moore. Banjo on My Knee
is good entertainment, with Buddy
Ebson and Walter Brennan stealing the honors from Miss Stanwyck and the awkward Joel Mc-
Cree.
Best "second pictures" shown
during January were: Smart
Blonde, Cass of ths Blaok Cst and
Lst's Make s Million, in that order, "Waste" efforts Included: Can
This Bs Dixie?, They Met In s
Taxi, and Jungle Prlnesss, ln thst
order.
*        •        •
THB mail bag.
An unexpected aid in my feud
with th eStudent Prince arrived ln
the mall this morning, fro man old
friend of the columnlstlo fraternity. I present the letter for what
it's worth, asking you to keep in
mind the integrity of he who wrote
It.
Dear Darby:
I read with pleasure your remarks last week, when you congratulated yourself on being recognized by me, and I believe that
what is to follow will be of some
assistance to you,
I knew the man they now call
"The Student Prince" several
years ago, when we were both
panning for gold In the interior
of B. C. His name then was Axel
Andersen, although we all strongly suspected that something was
wrong with that, because of his
Russian accent.
One day Axel, who was work-
Ing a claim near mine, struck a
run of luck and fished out gold-
dust from the river to the tune
of $500. With a whoop he was
off to the bank and the next
thing I heard ot him was when
he passed the Muller Saloon
about three hours later. There,
ln the oentre of a roaring crowd
of uncouth miners, was Axel,
handing out free drinks and
talking like the wind, something
like  this  fellow   McGeer.
I wandered in to watch the
show and Axel spied me.
"Hello, you sucker I" he hollered, and the whole bunch
turned on me and jeered. I
bristled up a bit and looked a
little sore. Then Axel ordered
another round of drinks and
started ln to do some serious
talking, forgetting all about hla
Swedish name and talking like
the Csar's flrst cousin—in accent
only.
"You bag palooka," he cried,
"vy do you work so hard and
earn so leetle? I tell you vy . . ."
And the whole drunken crowd
joined ln.
"I tell you vy," he started
"It's the capitalists, yet the capitalists," and he stumbled away
fairly dripping his enthusiasm
for the working man.
I got out then, but later I
learned the whole story. Axel
was working for a crowd of Russian chaps and he would drop
into a town, get known, spend
lots of money on drinks and then
start hia red flag speech. At the
end, he would take up a collection for the down-trodden workers of the world, and light out to
new fields.
There ls much more to the
story, but I realise your limitations of space. Enough to say
that  it  the   Student  Prince,  the
III
will find the going rather hard.
Who is the Scienceman who
pushed a draughting professor
away from a window in order that
he could throw ano^/balls out of it.
I'm in the dark about the basketball front, but it is axiomatic that
Science is on the up and up.
Every skyrocket ends with Science.
Sun      Editorial
At Amended—
The Archbishop of York, it is
reported in the news, has deliv
ered himself of the dictum that
"it can -be a Christian  duty to
kill."
We do not know the power and
authority of archbishops.
But that authority must be
very considerable when one of
them can subvert and, indeed,
utterly deny the teachings of Him
who has always been known as
the Prince of Peace.
And that power must be exceedingly great when such a dignitary of the church dares to
deliberately and peremptorily
amend that fundamental rule of
life which says:
"Thou shalt not kill."
We listened with considerable
respect to the English archbishops
when they fulminated upon the
conditions which sent Edward
VIII from his throne.
We listen now with even greater respect when we hear that these
prelates have somehow or other
achieved the power to amend the
commandments of God.
The editorial opinion of tbe
Vancouver Sun is never •wrapped in circumlution; this editorial is a sample of tbs forceful and clear manner in which
tbe Sun says what it bas to say.
For regular delivery of the Sun
phone Trinity 4111.
Editor,   Ubyssey.
Madame:
If you reported htm correctly
in your issue of February 2, Dr.
King Gordon scattered a lot ot
glib misinformation about Social
Credit in hla second "Behind the
Headlines" address to students
the  previous  Friday.
He is quoted as stating: "Aber-
hart's Social Credit experiment Is
very Interesting," which, in turn,
is most interesting, because Aber-
hart's Social Credit experiment
hasn't begun yet.
Dr. Gordon's periods became
even more curious when he went
on to say, unless Ubyssey does
him an injustice: "In reality. Social Credit AS PRACTISED IN
ALBERTA, ls the antithesis of
democracy."
The capitals are mine; the
words are as recklessly and as
witlessly used as it Dr. Gordon
had said: "Socialism, as practised in British Columbia," there
being no Socialism practised In
British  Columbia.
Having well scrambled his
facts, Dr. Gordon went on, apparently, to scramble the brains' of
his hearers with: "Social Credit
ls not so much a political opinion
as a creed. It demands a blind
faith from its followers and calls
on them neither to quesUon its
own policies or to listen to opposition to it"
This Is tendentious and, In my
opinion, ingenuous nonsense, nicely calculated to condition any
opinions that might be left after
Dr. Gordon finished his peep behind the news. Social Credit is
not a creed, nor a faith; it la a
monetary reform . . . and Dr.
Gordon, in scattering his pearls
of something or other, is a member in good standing of a political
party, somewhat frayed at the
edge, which opposes lt.
Douglas Social Credit, B. C.
Section, an educational body, proposes to challenge any further
political misinformation ot this
kind placed in public circulation
through the facilities so thoughtfully provided by the University
of British Columbia. I suggest
that before Dr. Gordon again lifts
the veil, peers Into the crystal
ball and tells what is behind the
headlines about Social Oredit be
read a book on the subject, preferably one by Douglas and not
one by Strachey, Durbln, Galta-
kell or Hlskett. They, also, don't
know what Social Credit ia, or
they have the conventional marx-
ian objection to stating it oor-
rectly.
Yours truly,
H. B. TORBJY.
Tuesday, February 9, 1937
man I knew as Axel Andersen,
is allowed to get his hold here,
he will edge his way into the
hearts ot Innocent freshmen, with
his gifts of gallons of cat coffee.
Action ls needed to nip this
radical in the bud. "We must
unite against the evil that may
soon face us. Eliminate the
Student  Prince I
Yours for action and death to
the reds,
PRO  BONO  PUBLICO.
Friends,   the   Issue  ls  closed.     I
leave the rest to you.
"Let me* terve yeter car, mnd  year ear will tarve yam."
"FRANK" PICKS
U.B.C. 8ERVI0E 8TATI0N
24-Hour Imargency Servks — Complete Repair rseWtkM
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD PT. GREY 53
"What would you say if we had to spend the night
in this snowbank?"
'That all depends on how many Sweet Caps you hovel"
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"The purait form In which tobacco cam ba *mohad."—Jf*anctt
t
Educational Stationery Loose-Leaf Binders
FOUNTAIN PENS
Drawing Instruments Slide Rules
Social Printing and Engraving
The
CLARKE & STUART
Company Limited
STATIONERS PRINTERS ENGRAVERS
550 Seymour Strsst "hens Trinity 1141 Vancouvar. I. C.
Correspondence
The Bdltor, The Ubyaaey.
Dear Madam:
Let me tell ypu a fairy tale.
It seems that there was a certain little community oalled You-
beesee whioh was situated some
seven miles from a largo metropolis. This little community waa
governed wisely and well by a
family named the 'Select Family'
which was chosen from the
people themselves. The law ot
the country stated that any baby
born to the Select Family in office should become the ward of
the people, providing the people
were satisfied by the Great Oracle that the child would grow up
to be a benefit to the community.
Now, as lt happened, there was
one Select Family which contemplated tbe arrival of the stork,
yet feared that the people were
too Impoverished to provide for
the Infant. Thereupon they sought
contributions from the merchants
ln the great metropolis to support
their child; these donations were
readily promised. The Oreat Oracle predicted at the baby's birth,
that when It reached maturity, he
would be the oentre of attraction
tor the community and that all
the people would throng to him.
And so this people, who wtre
noted for their credulity, trusted
the promises of the men in the
great metropolis that they would
bear most ot the expense of raising the child, and agreed to pay
the remaining expenses. They
applied themselves diligently to
their task and in a short time
they raised the funds required to
support the babe during infancy,
although an additional tax levy
was required. About this tlmo
the Ruler of the great olty oalled
upon the merchants to contribute
towards the cost of a Jubilant
celebration which he planned.
These worthy fellows, forsooth,
were so eager to please tholr
Ruler that they promptly forgot
the little child out ln the land of
Youbeesee and they have not
thought of him since. No use
was made of the sum which tho
little community had raised by
their heroic efforts, so the child
soon became undernourished.
Thereupon the Select Family,
carefully concealing the forlorn
condition of their first-born, appealed to the already over-taxed
and Impoverished people to provide for another blessed event.
The Oreat Oracle again placed
his benediction on the new-born
premature child. (One never
hears of a man ot religion advocating child-murder.)) The elder
baby took seriously ill, yet the
Select Family made no effort to
save his life; their attention was
fooussed on their latest offspring.
Finally the people . . .
My fairy tale put you to sleep?
No? I surely hope not. Multiplicity of offspring Is all right If
there ls a Charles Vanoo Millar
around; as for me, I have become an advocate ot birth-oontrol.
Yours truly,
33 Members of the A.M.S.
NOTIOB
LOST IN OYM THURSDAY
NOON, PHI KAPPA SIGMA
FRATBRNITY PIN. RBWARD
IP RSTURNBD TO MR.
HORNB'S OPPICB.
JrTnrgnttrtt Mtn
<B_0INQ   LETTERS   RECEIVED   BT   US)
Dear Sir:—
I need a tuxedo for tha end of the month. Will you nlnnaa tali
me what cloth, out and colour I should buy? Ia it rnS-e ___5__t t2
wear a bow tie over or underneath the wing collar? l
Your dinner Jacket may ba either single or doubt-breaatad and
bavo oltbar peak or shawl lapola of dull oorded silk. It mavba either
blaok or midnight blue. If you ohooao the double.breaattf mod.';Au
may button on two buttona or on either tho upper or lower button:
the walatllne button la alwaya tha one to button! end whether vou
plaoe the others above or below Is a matter of peraSnaltaate. *ThS
"'••_1*? ahould oarry four buttona eaoh. The trouaera ahould be 23
or -4 Inohea at the knee and 19 Inohea at the eutf. and ahould oarry
a elnqle braid on the outalda of eaoh leaIt liAeorreet to we_V-a
bow tie  In front of, rather than  undernealh the wlnoeof the ooHar.
Send ue your elothlng problema.   They will
be  anewered   In  thla  oolumn   or  by  letter.
E. A. L
Ltd.
"Distinctive Clothes" - Prices $25.00 and up
1005 GRANVILLE STREET SEYMOUR 2507
For Your Nsxt Class Party, Dance, or Social Occasion . . .
See ANDERSON for the Printing
Phons Seymour 3400 455 Hamilton Strsst Tuesday, February 9, 1937
THE      UBYSSEY
Three
"Dear Dave:
Of course, the Selenee men are
going to turn the sophisticated
Commodore Into tha ssssnoe of a
maehlns shop on Thursday night.
You see they will doff slacks and
swsatsrs to put on dlnnsr Jaokats
and thsy have to make surs nobody
misunderstands. But s s r I ously,
Dave, I'm really glad you're going
to the Selenee Ball. It's always s
grand party.
Lovingly,
OLAUDIA."
IAUNDRY CO LTD
S _ Y rVI O U R    14 2 4
FANNY
FRESHETTE'! 1
DIARY
Dear Diary:
Boy O Boy did I have a swell
time at the Frosh Party 1! Gawd
but I drew an awful drip—he had
a silly little mustache it must
have taken him three years to
grow at the speed he was and he
couldn't danoe and was so fresh
I didn't dare take a cigarette out
of my mouth all evening. Old
I have tun with him; when he
knocked at the door I ran upstairs and turned on the bath
and got out a new "True Story"
and splashed the water every
few minutes. About ten I came
down the stairs and said O, I
hope I'm not late, and he said,
O, no, ao we went. He asked me
Are you going to check your
ooat and I said Oh, No—you are,
and threw It at him and walked
Inside and he lost my overshoes.
I excused myself to powder my
nose and there was Eleanor Inside and she said, Gawd, what a
party, have you got a smoke, the
boy I brought doesn't touoh
them. She had a paok of cards
so we played solitaire until 11
o'clock and when I got to the
table he had gone out for a
couple of beers and was asleep
on the table so I danced with a
couple of stags and he woke up
in time to eat and the he said
shall we dance and I said Is that
what you call it and he was awfully amused and I was right because he wheeled me around'the
floor like a wheelbarrow, especially when he came to the corners and sort ot stopped me and
ran around to the other side and
then started pushing again and
he almost suffucated me and I
thought my shoulder staps would
break he hung on so tight. When
we were going home we went to
the White Spot and he said
what'll you have and Just as I
was thinking of chicken sand-
witches, someone in the front said
I'll have coffee and he said let's
all have some. Wasn't that too
too sweet. And when we were
going home I sat up straight like
a post and he tried to put his
arm around me and I burned his
tongue with my cigarette by accident because I forgot to take it
out when he tried to kiss me
goodnight. And I said I had a
lovely time and went inaide and
ate a whole ham and I was in
bed by three o'clock and my father said I was reforming and why
don't I go out with sensible boys
like   that  all  the  time.     Amen.
"Oh    Promise   Me"   That   You'll
Take  Me to   Robin  Hood.
MUCK-A-MUCK
The Return Of
Chang Suey
CHAPTER THREE.
THE  JEEP  SKATE
There was a conference in the
luxurious office of the great Oay
Jowled. Despair waa written on
every face, but the great man was
undaunted. "What will that fiend,
Chan Suey, do next?" queried Hogan. "He poisoned six Zetes, and
has vowed eighteen Freshmen to
his horrible red-haired deity, Outterfleld. Six were crushed In the
back seat of a car going to the
Frosh class party, and one was
knocked down by a mysterious
black sedan while extracting a
Wing Jing from his left front tiro.
There are still nine to go, and after
that he may start killing for pleasure." But Jowled dismissed their
fears, admonishing them thus:
"You forget that I am here. Let
us consider the matter of the Open
House. The great Doctor Pure is
working with Chang Suey to defeat
us. We must have an open house.
We must not let Chang leave any
bodies for visitors to see, or we will
scare ott next year's Freshman
hordes." Speaking thus, hs reached
for his telephone and asked for the
Doctor. By threat of a sit-down
strike he persuaded the saga that
Open House is necessary, but aa the
great Pure gave his consent a horrid scream rang out of the instrument. Jumping into his shoes, the
ace detective rushed to Pure's
hangout, followed by his faithful
Hogan. Just as they arrived, Ooom
Bye and So Long, the fiendish doctor's faithful henchmen, carrying
the body of Pure, spitted on a long
curved blade, out tho window
"That Is a Wing Jing," exclaimed
the master mind, "Chang Suey's
ancestral weapon." As he reached
out of the window to detain the
horrid pair, a plaster effigy of the
Ooon Ood, dressed as a Science
prof in short flannels, fell from
tho celling and knocked him silly.
A Wing Jing whissed In the window and pinned Hogan to tho wall
by his aristocratic little finger. Peal
after peal of fiendish laughter floated in the window, but the pair were
powerless.
Forty minutes later, the ace
sleuth came to as much as usual
and raced hot on the scent. He
rushed into the Pub offloe as the
centre of all iniquity on the campus.
Loud jeers greeted him, but undaunted, he replied: "You'll be
corry. We WILL have our open
house. I WILL catch Chang Suey.
As he picked up the telephone, an
oily voice exclaimed, "Hello, Mr.
Jowled. Foiled again. Remember
—sixteen Freshmen." Ha impatiently hung up tho instrument as
peal after peal of fiendish laughter
FRESHETTE
PROTESTS
The Editor, Ubyssey.
Dear Madam:
I wish to express my indignation
on the subject of Olass draws. Besides being stupid, Insipid, futile
and silly, they result in ghastly
mts-matlngs. My little Annie, who
is the sweetest girl imaginable,
drew a lout who pawned her off
for a bottle of Scotch, while my
Egbert got a girl who insisted on
a taxi to go two blocks, whioh cost
him all of 30 cents. My Willie
went out with a fast girl who Insisted on going to a barbecue after
the party, instead of going home
sensibly after being out until one
a.m., and she bought 80 cents'
worth of sandwiches after eating
a hearty meal at the Commodore
when she could have gone home
and raided the ice-box. Isn't that
silly? I think the nice girls should
have been paired off wtth the nice
boys, so everyone could have en-
Joyed themselves. While I am on
the subject, why do people arrive
at least an hour late for these affairs? People are so confoundedly
snlsy these days that the girl that
went with my John objected to
riding six In the baok seat, and
Jabbed him with a hatpin when ha
complained b e o a u a a she blew
smoke from a cigarette in his eyes.
What Is this younger generation
coming to; these girls will be
smoking cigars and growing whiskers nsxt.
Yours ln hope that through the
medium   of  your  respected   organ
you oan bring about some change.
MOTHER OP SIX.
PEN LOST
Loot — Orson, mottled fountain
pen.    Please   return   to   Margaret
Haspsll via Arta Lsttsr Rsok.
LOST
A green mottled fountain pen,
Eversharp Junior, Friday 1.S0, between Arts 103 and Applied Sol*
enoe. Reward. Apply E. Fraser,
Arts Letter Rack.
NEXT HE'LL LOSE THE CAR
Lost—A spare tire, tube and rim,
21x600.     Lost   between   Kerrisdale
and   University.     Property   ot   B.
Nesbltt,  arts  letter  rack.
drifted up from its receiver.
Will the Iniquitous Doctor Suey
throw a monkey-wrench Into Open
House? Will Dr. Pure ever come
back to give his extremely interest,
ing lectures to suffering Frosh?
Will the mysterious red-headed
deity gum up the works again?
See next Monday's issue of the
Ubyssey for full details, on sale at
your nearest news-stand for leas
than tho price of an Esquire.
CRITICAL MOMENTS
W««N YOU-M
NUMBIR A
ON T««
SWIMMING
TIAM-
ANO YOUVE  JUST   LEARNED   TWAT
YOUR OPPONENT IS   AN  INTER-
COLLEGIATE FREE STYLE CHAr/IPION-
DON'T WORRY-SLIP OUT TO T«E
LOCKER. ROOM  AND-      . _ *m
lHi
w5^ft»«°
Z5C&****
CLASSIFIED
UNIVERSITY
BUSINESS
DIRECTORY
LUted bslow ars leading Vancouver Professional, ■utlnsts snd
Manufacturing Concerns, compiled for easy reference, ly referring
to tha Firms and Individual! rsprs.sn.ed, your every need can be
easily and completely satisfied. Yes will find It Convenient snd
Profitable to de so.
Retain This Directory for Immediate and future Uss.
Automobiles
A.  B.  BALDERSTON   LTD.
Ford Lincoln Dealer
Cars and Trucks
1190 W. Georgia Say. 5224
CONSOLIDATED MOTOR
COMPANY LIMITED
Packard Motor Cars
1230 Georgia W. Doug. 700
Auto Service
SERVICE AUTO METAL WORKS
Sam Fairley, Manager
Bodies, Fenders, Radiators Repaired
and Built to Order
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Our Aim is to Please
1249 Seymour St.        Trinity 2815
KENNEY'S AUTO SERVICE
Fireproof Heated Storage
(Low Monthly Rates)
Washing, Tires, Greasing,
Simonizing, Batteries, Welding
And All Repairs
Rear, 1280 Grsnvilla St. Trin. 1589
^^™m=s_______===s==^=^
Beauty Parlors
BARCELONA  BEAUTY SALON
Real Permanent Waving
Latest Methods of Beauty Culture
Satisfaction Always
Mrs.  E.  M. Gustavson, Prop.
3779—10th Ave. W.      Bay. 2906
Chiropractors
CAPT. E. GALLANT
Registered Chiropractor
435 Rogars Building
470 Granville Say. 8790
Confectionery
R. C. PURDY CHOCOLATES Ltd.
Two Stores
675 Granvilla St. Say. 1960
2843 South Granvilla      Bay. 7414
MUNRO'S CONFECTIONERY
Where you get the best Milk
Shakes, Hot Chocolate: Also Ice
Cream & Soft Drinks and
Tobaccos
4601—10th Ava. W.  Pt. Gray 80
TUCK SHOP
4409 Waat 10th Ava.
Carrying full lines of Soft Drinks,
Candies and Tobaccos
Full Course Lunches and Suppers
Served and Special Prices to
University Students
Golf Equipment
Hand Mada
<PR0-MADE>
__. Hand Balanead
GOLP CLUBS and ACCESSORIES
Geo. H. Francis, Arts '36
PRO-MADE GOLP CO.
117 Watt Pandar
Ssy* 8618 Ssy. 8618
Bakeries
CANADIAN
WINDOW BAKRIES LIMITED
For the Best in
Cakes, Pastries and Breads
4511 W. 10th Ava.     Pt. Gray 803
Store All Over Greater Vancouver
Insist on . . .
DAD'S COOKIES
. . . always reliable
Dad's Cookie Co. (B.C.) Ltd.
468 Kingtway        Vancouver, B.C.
Brokers
BIRD & TALLING LIMITED
Vancouver - Victoria - Chilliwack
Government, Municipal and
Corporation Securities
Howo & Dunsmuir Sts. Trin. 3381
JUKES & CO. LTD., A.E.
Stock and Bond Brokers
810 Hastings St. W.
Baths
IRIS STEAM BATHS
1235 Wast Broadway     Bay. 9274
Finest on Pacific Coast, Luxurious
Appointments, Modern Equipment,
Experts  in  Swedish,  Turkish  and
Electrical  Massages
Refreshments       All-night Service
Coal
WATKINS - WINRAM
Coal - Sawdust - Oil - Wood
1923 Granville St. Bay. 365
DIETHERS LTD.
Sand, Gravel,  Builders' Supplies
True Mix Concrete - Coal
Granville Island
Sey. 6761
Churches
THE SALVATION ARMY
Men's Social Relief and Industrial
Department
332 Gore Ave. Doug. 5598
For Cast-off Clothing, Etc.
Major T. S. Stewart
Cordage
Compliments of . . .
CANADA WESTERN CORDAGE
CO. LTD.
Manila Rope Manufacturers
Dancing
LILAS MOORE
'Recognized Authority on Dancing'
709 West Georgia St.
Trinity 1710
Decorators
A. V. LEWIS, LTD.
General Decorators
Wallpaper Paints
Established 1909
2756 Granville Bay. 2684
Designing
MADAM L. WELLINGTON
Expert Designer and Stylist
Gowns, Suits and Dresses made to
suit every  individual   requirement
Specializing in Hand-Woven
Materials
2666 Alma Road Bay. 7227
Vancouvar, B. C.
Deli-very Service
SPEEDY DELIVERY SERVICE
With Modern Equipment
Trucks, Motorcycles and Bicycle
Messengers
Seymour 9184
B. C.  DISTRICT TELEGRAPH &
DELIVERY CO. LTD.
516 West Hastings Street
Drugs
VANCOUVER DRUG CO. LTD.
The Largest Retail Druggists in
Western Canada
21 Stores at Your Service
Electrical
G. W. FIRTH ELECTRIC
Wiring Contractors
Repair Specialists
Work and Materials Guaranteed
Prices Reasonable
1515 West 5th Ave        Bay. 5546
UNIVERSAL ELECTRICAL CO.
Engineers and Contractors
Lighting Equipment   Refrigeration
Radio Sales £r Service
We want your Electrical Work
Repairs Our Specialty
1519 West 8th Ave.       Bay. 3923
Night Phone Bay. 4964
Furs
NEW YORK  FUR CO. LIMITED
Largest Exclusive Fur House
in the West
Phone Sey. 7355
Georgia at Howe St.
Hotels
DEVONSHIRE HOTEL
Rates by Day, Week, Month
Dining Room, Garage
Walter F. Evans, Manager
Doug. 2900
In the Heart of the City
HOTEL ST. REGIS
Dunsmuir and Seymour Sts.
Say. 7275 Bill Buxton, hAgr.
Follow the Crowd to the . . .
RAINIER HOTEL
Where friends meet and strangers
feel at home
Headquarters for Loggers, Miners
and Fishermen
 RAINIER HOTEL LTD.
309 Carrall St. Say. 4280
Insurance
Plan your savings in a
Great West Life Insurance Policy
Alex. J. (Sandy) Marling, Arts '34
THE GREAT WEST LIFE
ASSURANCE
Pensions    -    Annuities
12th Floor, The Royal Bank Bldg.,
Vancouvar
Ladders
ALLRIGHT LADDER CO.
912 Richards St. Sey. 1778
J. H. Nixon, Manager
Manufacturers of Extension and
Step-Ladders
Leather Goods
J. P. BURNS
Leather Goods Store
All Kinds of
High-Grade Travelling Goods
541 Granville St. Trin. 5054
Loans
LOANS on
Every Form of Security
B. C. COLLATERAL LOAN CO.
LTD.
Sey. 1317 77 Hastings East
The oldest established Pawnbrokers
in the West
Lumber
Compliments of . . .
MOHAWK  LUMBER COMPANY
1210 Columbia Street
New Westminster, B. C.
Milk
PACIFIC MILK
100% B.C. Products
Build B. C. Payrolls
Meats
BURNS & CO. LIMITED
Shamrock Brand      Meat Products
Highland 200
Mines
CONGRESS GOLD MINES LTD.
(N.P.L.)
Head Office: 302 Pacific Building
Property: 21 claims and fractions,
approximating 851 acres, lying
between Wayside and Minto properties. Main Highway runs
through   lower parts of property. Varsity Pucksters Regain Inter-Collegiate Supremacy
sports i THF. UBYSSEY I sports
Four
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 9, 1937
VARSITY   HOOPMEN   WIN   OVER   CHENEY,  BELLINGHAM
VAN  VLIET  CAGERS  WIN
OVER  BELLINGHAM 44-34
Wllloughby, Matthison, Henderson Turn
In Smart Performances Yesterday
By HUGH SHIRREFF
Before a fair sprinkling of students the Senior "A" basketball team
turned ln a neat 44-34 win over the Bellingham Normal quintet at the
gym yesterday noon. Due to lackadaisacal playing on the part of both
teams the action was slow and the ball-handling ragged for the tlrst
few minutes, but as the boys became wurmed to their work the game
grew rough and at times brilliant.
U.B.C. LEADING 18-18 AT HALP
With the aid ot some effective
long sboting, and slovenly play by
Varsity the Bellingham hoopsters
took the lead ln the early minutes.
About balf way through the period,
the Students began to get organized and "Hank" Hudson and Matthison swished the melon through
the hoop for sufficient points to pull
the Thunderbirds into a 16-15 lead
at the half.
--The beginning of the second halt
was almost a replica of the first,
with Varsity slow to warm up, and
the result was that Bellingham
took the lead for the first few minutes. However, with 11 minutes to
go, Henderson and Wllloughby
went on a scoring spree and ran up
eight and seven points respectively
to enable the Studes to win with
plenty to spare. The Varsity spares
came on ln the last few minutes
and gave a good account of themselves, especially "Spud" Davis,
who  dropped  in  two  nice  baskets.
ROUGH   AND TUMBLE
Ths plsy wss of the rough and
. tumble    variety,    particularly    In
' the aaoond half, with the playara
not trying to  be  rough  but Juat
unavoidably    running    Into    eaoh
other.    Bill Swan and one of the
Normalltea   engaged    in   a   little
ahovlng   and   tempera   became   a
little   frayed   aa   a   raault.     They
had   quite   a   verbal   battle   with
William getting a unanlmoua de-
olalon from the orowd.
Scoring honors for the game went
to   Henderson  who  had   a  total  of
ten.     Wllloughby    was    next   with
nine, while Nelson led the teachers
with tbe same number.    The hard
luck ot the game went to Ed Armstrong, who was under the basket
with no one within 20 feet of him
but failed  to  drop the  melon  into
the   hoop,   although   he   had   three
tries   at  lt.     The   chief   oddity   of
the  battle  occurred  when  Henderson   and   Nelson   went  down   in   a
heap under the Bellingham basket
and tbe referee awarded three free
throws to "Hunk." The reason was
that Nelson not only knocked him
down when  he  was in  the  act of
shooting, but he described Henderson and all his ancestors for years
back   in   a   very   uncomplimentary
manner.
PROVINCE   TOMORROW
The next big test for the Blue
and Gold squad comes on Wednesday when they meet "Chuck"
Jones' Giants in a battle which may
decide the league title. Bardsley,
who missed yesterday's game, will
be In strip for this crucial game,
and a Point Grey win looks very
probable. '
BASKETBALLERS
DEFEAT CHENEY
ON SATURDAY
'MURAL   VOLLEYBALL
TOMORROW
Volleyball will hold the limelight
in Intramurals to be played tomorrow. Sc. '38 meets Arts '39 in the
opener, while Educ. plays Arts '38
in the second game.
As the race for the Governor's
cup nears the halfway mark Arts
'30 and Ss. 40 are leading as the
result of basketball games played
Friday. In two losce games Sc. '40
beat Sc. '39 defeated Arts '38.
Dr. C. M. Whltworth
Dentist
Telephone Elliot 1766
Hours: 9 to 6
Saturday: 9 to 1 '
Cor.  10th  and Sasamat St.
In a fast game that provided
plenty of entertainment tor the
small but enthusiastic group of
hoop fans, the Varsity cagers
nudged out the Cheney Savages 37-
35 ln an exhibition tilt at the campus gym Saturday noon. The victory came by way of revenge for
the Thunderbird melon tossers who
were handed a 37-27 trlmmig at the
hands of the Cheneyltes on their
recent   tour.
Overcoming a four-point deficit
at half time, the home squad staged
a brilliant second half rally to grab
the lead and hold it for the rest
of   the   game.
Opening fast, the visitors piled
up a seven-point lead before the
Thunderbirds could get going but,
led by Burp Wllloughby, they managed to bring the count to 21-17 at
the  half-way mark.
After the breather the students
staged their afore-mentloned rally,
the trio of Henderson, Matthison
and Wllloughby finding the basket
six times to bring the count up to
29-21. With six minutes to go, the
Savages rallied to come within a
basket of the leaders but the
Thunderbirds stemmed the tide,
ending the game with a two-point
margin.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
We war elnformed that Chen-
ey'a lanky centra, Don Eustace,
atanda 6 feet 7 Inohea In hia
atooklng feet — aome fun, eh
Hunk? ... a Jump between Eua-
taoe and Rann Matthison, our
mighty atom, drsw s Isugh from
the crowd . . . we notleed Art
Clsrk looking longlty st Chen-
ey's snsppy strip satehslls, sseh
provldsd with a slppar snd with
"Cheney No. " stamped on It
.... nover mind, Art, aome day,
maybe . . . those Chsney Isds
certainly w a t e h e d Bardsley,
holding him down to two bssksts
. . . Bugs, you will remember was
the ohlef goal-getter for ths
studsnts on thslr tour snd built
up quite a rep. "down South."
THE LURID DETAILS:
Varsity — Bardsley 4, Wllloughby 10, Matthison 11, Turner, Henderson 7, Davie, Hudson, Pringle
3, Mitchell, Armstrong, Swan 2.
Toatal,  37.
Cheney— McBane 10, Anderson,
Brvin, j West 2, Jones, Bustance,
Smith 14, Kerns 5, Schorzman.
Total,  35.
—MAIR.
'ACE SNIPER'
Above is none other than Art
Willoughby, smart sharp-shooter on Maury Van Vliet's Senior
basketballers. Art's topped the
U. snipers in the last two tilts,
scoring 19 points, as well as being one of the main cogs in the
Blue and Gold basket machine.
ATTENTION!!
Team managers:— All pictures of players on major and
minor sport squads must be
in immediately. If managers
do not oo-operate, sport pictures of teams may be omitted from the "Totem." Please
make arrangements with
Aber at onoe.
DICK ELSON,
Sports Editor.
Barcelona
y Beauty) Salon <£
10th Avenue       / \
8      3779 West
u
a
Corsages   *    -    -   75c and $1-°°
We are just as near as your Free delivery within City
phone. limits.
Ritchie Bros,  &w Gramme s«eet Sey. 2405
U.B.C. Beats
Washington ;
Takes Series
Playing before a spiritless handful of Washington students at Seattle on Saturday night, U. B. C.'s
Invincible puck squad took an easy
3-1 victory from the University of
Washington to take their first
Northwest inter-colleglate hockey
series  In  five years.
More speed, plus a more-com-
pletely organized team, beat the
Americans as the British Columbians went down the Ice time and
again iu concerted attacks against
thei rpereunlal enemies, and lt wns
only the efficient net-minding of
Goalie Mickey Held that prevented
a British Columbian blade massacre. Reid, incidentally, was taken
out of the game early in the third
period for medical repairs when he
stopped a fast Harmer shot with
his  ear.
FIRST   PERIOD
One minute after the whistle,
Paul Trussell and Jim Ussher
broke through the Husky defense
to snag the first goal. Ussher
passed to Trussell who bulged the
twine with a well-modulated shot.
Four minutes later Ussher and
Clarence Taylor emerged from a
centrelce huddle to bang ln the
second  counter.
SECOND  PERIOD
Jim Harmer charged through the
defensive zone five minutes after
the start of this session to com-
peltely embarrass the guard boys
with a side shot trom close in. The
pass   was   from   Clarence   Taylor.
THIRD   PERIOD
Jim Panton registered in this session to give the Huskies their first
goal. Final score, U.B.C, 3; Washington,   1.
■iummmi
U. OARSMEN
PREPPING FOR
MEETS «•- ■
Preparing for Triangle
Meet With Washington
And Oregon State
Despite the rigors of the weather, our rugged rowers started their
morning workouts today at Coal
Harbour ln preparation for their
important triangle meet between
U. of Washington, Oregon State U.
and   U.   B.   C.
The senior crew has just been
chosen, announced captain McDuf-
fee. Of last year's team only four
men are left: McLelsh, stroke;
Pearce, 6; McDuftee, 3, and Mcintosh, bow. Besides Mai Chapin,
a Kelowan veteran, two of last
year's second Btring have moved
up—Williams and Melville. Among
the newcomers trying out for
berths on the senior squad are Jamieson and Hethrington. Coach Tom
Brown ls to handle the workouts.
Sport Snaps
by
Frank Turner
Canada's national pastime is ice
hockey—so what!—so, by the usual
intricate workings of smaller particles of matter Inclosed in the human headpiece, Canadians should
be playing hockey.
Just as simple as that — but it
seems there's complications in such
simplicity; arising curiously enough
from apparently futile attempts of
students in the higher institutions
of learning to solve the problem of
competition in said sport.
INTER-COLLEGIATE   HOCKEY
Every winter Canadian colleges
go berserk over the thought of organizing International Inter-Colleg-
Ite hockey—but never seem to get
any results.
This season there's even more
to-day about pucklng with teams
below the border. In the East,
the McGiil "Daily" takes the-
promoting lead. Sports Editor
Fred Price advocates in a column labelled, "Enough of Non-
Collegiate Hockey," more College
exhibition tilts, and favours concentrator on the international
Inter-Collegiate loop idea. As a
start in the right direction, Price
suggests an exhibition series with
Southern teams to stimulate
interest.
PRAIRIE U.'s AMBITIOUS
Manitoba U. has been bitten by
the same bug. After their recent
game with the Minnesota pucksters,
the 'Tobans became fired with ambition to form an International
loop, hoping to solve the travelling
problem by hopping around the circuit in planes. Saskatchewan and
Alberta have been feverishly working for some time to arrange Inter-
Provincial matches with B. C, and
Manitoba, but the wide-open spaces
have proven stumbling blocks to
such a series.
WASH. MANAGER
ENTHUSIASTIC
In Seattle on Saturday, a few of
the dying embers of the International Hockey League proposal
were fanned to flame by Washington's ambitious manager, Hudson,
who confidently stated that next
year would see Washington, Oregon, Washington State, Montana,
and U. B. C. battling for college
hockey supremacy.
All of which means there's plenty
of work to be done. And it's far
more Important than aimlessly
continuing ln exhibition tilts with
all-comers ln non-organized series.
Why not call it quits on all non-
collegiate hockey ln future seasons
and revert to the old Idea of inter-
colleglate competition, and intercollegiate competition only?
STUMP   SPEECHES"
Perusing "Stump Speechea" In
tha  Washington   Dally, ws esms
seross  sn   old  argument   on   ths
Judging    of    bssketball    plsysrs
efficiency    snd    ability.     "Slats"
QUI, eoseh  of Oregon   State  College,   takes   on   angle,   and   Hee
Edmundson,      Huaklea'      maater-
mlnd, the other.    QUI clalma that
reoorda  ahould   be  kept of ehota
taken,    and  b aaketa    made,    to
ahow     percentage    effloieney     In
point-getting.     By  ao  doing,   QUI
pointa out that many playere not
having   aa   many   aeorlng   oppor-
tunltlea,   but   having   better   per-
eantagea,   would   gain   aa   muoh
recognition aa the hlghaeorer on
the  team.
Psychologist      Edmundson      says
"no," basing his deductions on the
Idea   that  sharpshooters   would   refrain from shooting because of the
mental strain they'd be under while
on   the   floor,    ill  they   knew   each
try   would   be  recorded,   reluctancy
to   pot   'em   would   result,   and   no
benefits from  such   stalstlcs  would
be reaped.
SOLUTION?
There's plent yof advantages in
both theories from this writer's
way of thinking. We suggest a
solution, by combining both ideas,
and keep a record of percentages,
releasing them at the end of the
season. This setup would not be
of any value to the individuals on
the team, or the coach unless the
mastermind kept the records se
cretly, and used them to advantage
in his criticism, and correction of
the players in practices — during
the season.
And   so   to   Bellingham  with  the
Bllingtonian swing rhythmers.  . . .
British Consols
COLLEGIATE  CAGERS  PLAY
PROVINCE ON WEDNESDAY
Blue and Gold Still Have
Mathematical Chance
For First Spot
Varsity will play their arch-rivals. Province, ln what promises to
be the game of games in the gym
on  Wednesday  night.
Fighting deaparatsly for ths
bye Into the flnala, Varsity must
win this gsma to remain In tha
running, while a win for Provlnoa
will elnoh them the top apot.
Beaten In their laat game with
the Studenta the Newalaa will ba
out for blood In thla preview of
the playoffa. With Varsity's big
five clicking like thay clicked be
five olleklng like they never
clicked before, Varsity stsnds s
good ohanes of tsklng the Preaa-
boya tomorrow night. Tha fly In
the ointment, however, le that
even If Provlnee loae they oan
•tl 11 tako the league by beating
Forsts.
In the flght that is raging for
high - scoring, Purves, Matthison
and Pringle are all in the running.
"Long John" Purves ,by virtue of
his record-breaking score of 26
points In Saturday's game seems to
PITMAN'S
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ENROLL NOW—FALL TERM
Studenta may enter at any thae.
Pitman Shorthand, Gregg
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Individual attention
MIGHT SCHOOL, RATES i f 3.60 Month
Write to
EVELINE A. O. RICHARDS
Principal
Cor. Qrsnvllls snd Broadway
VANCOUVER, B. C.
be ln the driver's seat. But if
"Hunk" Henderson checks him as
effectively as he did ln their laat
meeting Ranny Matthison will
stand a good chance ot ending up
on  top.
c    a   9151
STAR CABS *
Manager: Bob Strain, '33
Himie
Koshevoy
Sporta
Editor
It's a natural!
Nearly all
sports break
for the
morning paper.
The
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