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The Ubyssey Nov 11, 1920

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B.C., NOVEMBER 11, 1920
Number 5
'Varsity Wins
Miller Cup
DEFEATS  ROWERS IN 8-0  SCORE
By defeating the Rowing Club on
Saturday, 'Varsity has, for the second
consecutive year, won the Miller Cup,
emblematic of the city championship.
The game opened with the play very
even, neither team having the advantage.
Our scrum was working well, usually
gaining possession of the ball, but sure
tackling by the Clubjpacks prevented extensive three-quarter^ runs. When our
"threes ' did get away, they were generally pulled up for forward passes, due to
over-eagerness.
The Rowing Club forwards created
openings for their backs by heeling from
the loose. It was from this sort of play
that they gained most of their ground,
Grimmett, McDougall and Winch proving effective.
The try in this half was the result of
some pretty combination play. The ball
came cleanly out of a scrum, Cameron
to Ternan, who elected the blind side,
drawing the lone opposing back before
passing to Hunter, who scored. Gwyther
failed to convert.
Play in the second half was of a determined character, as indicated by the
numerous casualties. Rowing Club forwards showed greater unity, working in
with their backs well and keeping 'Varsity a good deal on the defensive.
Bickle started the best play of the day
with a dribbling rush near our line. He
picked up, passed to Ternan, Ternan to
Hodson, Hodson to V. Gwyther, who
was forced out of touch a bare yard from
the Club line.
Gross made our other try, gathering
the ball in the loose ten yards out and
going over. Gwyther converted. There
was no further scoring, the game ending
with the ball travelling up and down the
field.
There was an all-round improvement
noted, especially evident in the defence
of the backs, who broke up many dangerous forward rushes by going down on
the ball. Wild passing inside our twenty-
five-yard line should be discontinued. The
tackling as a whole was good, and the
line-out play much better than heretofore. Hodson played the game of the
day. Gross, Bickle and H. Gwyther also
showed up well.
After the game, the Rowing Club entertained the team at a The Dansant.
Aggie Profs.
Enjoy
HONORED BY STUDENTS
The first annual banquet of the Agriculture Undergraduate Society, given in
honor of the Faculty, was held in the
Citizen's Club last Thursday evening.
President and Mrs. Klinck, the Faculty
and their wives were the guests.
The president of the A.U.S., Mr. C. P.
Leckie, in his after-dinner speech, stated
that the purpose of the banquet was to
give Freshmen an opportunity early in
the college year of becoming acquainted
with the professors.
Dr. Klinck endorsed the idea and expressed the hope that in the near future
these banquets would be held in University buildings at Point Grey. He furthermore stated that when professors and
students became acquainted the work of
teaching became much easier, and much
better and more certain results would be
obtained.
The work now carried on by the University was first experimented with by
the University of Saskatchewan, and,
while he at first had doubts as to the
success of such a venture, he was now
fully convinced that affiliation of faculties
in the one University could be made a
success.
Dean Clement, in the course of his
speech, mentioned the fact that while the
students of Agriculture were few compared to the other faculties in the University, nevertheless, we represented
practically every district in B. C, and the
work carried on in the University would
have a far-reaching effect, and that there
was a great opportunity for men in this
province.
The Dean, with the kind permission of
the Animal Husbandry branch, announced that Miss M. J. Mounce, Mr. B.
S. Sweeting and Mr. H. Riddell would
comprise the team to represent the University at the Pacific International Live
Stock Exposition being held at Portland
this month.
Mr. C. W. Traves, president of the
A.D.C., extended a hearty invitation to
the Freshmen to join the club, and, with
their co-operation, help to make the society as successful this year as it has been
in the past.
ARTS MEN'S SPECIAL
NUMBER NEXT WEEK
Club Members
to HoW Drive
WILL  INCREASE  LEROY   SCHOLARSHIP TO $500
"The lid is off—open 'em up!"
With this hospitable invitation, Dr.
Mack Eastman declared the programme
of the University Service Club at Pav-
lowa Court, on Saturday night, opened.
His statement was immediately confirmed
by an outburst of melody from the corner of the hall occupied by the Science
Jazz Band. Corks popped, and in a few
moments the air was blue with smoke.
One hundred members of the club were
present; and, as everybody seemed to
know everybody else, the evening passed
without a false note being struck. (No
reference is here intended to the musical programme.) There were no long
speeches, lots of "Players," and plenty of
beer; and what more can be expected of
a smoker—for a few weeks yet, anyway?
A double quartette from the Glee Club
was in attendance, and the success of the
musical programme is in no small measure due to the participation of this organization and of the Science Jazz Band.
The real business of the evening was a
discussion of the best method of raising
the $7,000 still required to put the Leroy
Memorial Fund in a position to double
the annual value of its scholarship. Dean
Brock, chairman of the committee, outlined the present standing of the fund.
and pointed out that $250 was insufficient
to meet the expenses of a student who
was incapacitated by wounds from working his way through college. The University was worth to the city of Vancouver more than $1,000,000 annually, and
as yet the city has done nothing for the
University.
On motion of Mr. H. F. G. Letson.
it was decided to hold a drive. Prof.
H. T. Logan and Mr. Drew Pratt were
chosen as captains of rival teams, and
each of the three hundred members oi'
the club allotted to one team or the other.
Every member of the club should join
one of these teams. If you have not been
notified which team you are on, communicate at once with one of the captains.
Comrade Pratt can be found at 310, Bank
of Nova Scotia Building (phone, Sey.
3120); Comrade Logan can usually b<'
found in Room 10, Faculty Annex.
The committee will welcome the co
operation of all students who may be in
terested. THE   UBYSSEY
November 11, 1920
Clothes with
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and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
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Where you meet your College friends
at lunch or tea time
LUNCHES, TEAS, ICE CREAM
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We deliver anywhere, at any time.
ANNOUNCE CAST FOR
CHRISTMAS PLAYS
Final selection of the casts for the
Christmas plays were announced by the
Players* Club on Friday. In "The Tents
of the Arabs," a play by Lord Dunsany,
the following will take part: Miss Jessie
Adams, Arts '24; Messrs. J. V. Clyne,
Arts '23, A. E. Richards, Ag. '23, H. M.
Cassidy, Arts '23, G. Livingstone, Arts
'24, and C. Y. Robson, Arts '23.
"Trifles' will be played by: Miss M.
Agnew, Arts '22, Miss M. Jackson, Arts
'24; Messrs. A. A. Webster, Arts '21,
Neil McCallum, Science '23, R. Hunter,
Arts '23.
"The Florist Shop" is one of the productions of the Harvard Dramatic Club,
and will be played by the following: Miss
Muriel Evans, Arts 24; Miss H. Kloepfer, Arts '23; Mr. J. M. Saunders, Arts
'23; Mr. A. Hunter, Arts '23, and Mr.
Frank Pumphrey, Arts '21.
The honor of being the first to play
"The Second Lie," written by the talented local author, Mrs. Isabel Eccel-
stone MacKay, will fall to the lot of the
following: Miss I. Elliott, Arts '23, Miss
Helen Clark, Arts '24; Messrs. J. O. C.
Kirby, Arts '21, and Wells Coates,
Science '22.
The Christmas plays will be presented
on three evenings, November 25th, 26th
and 27th. Following the usual custom,
they will be private performances. Each
student will be entitled to an invitation
for either Friday or Saturday evening.
IMPROMPTU TALKS AT
MEN'S LIT.
Impromptu speeches were the main
feature of the first meeting of the Men's
Lit. held on the evening of Wednesday,
November 3rd. The notebook and pencil
of the president, Mr. Hurst, had been
working overtime while the meeting had
been gathering, and the members discovered the reason for this when they were
called upon to speak on topics such as,
"Religious Education in the Schools' and
"College Spirit." Mr. Rive was the first
victim. His talk on "Impressions of the
American Elections" was interspersed
with witticisms, which, he told the members, represented his method of filling in
time. That there is excellent debating
material in the society was proved by the
readiness with which others took their
medicine. Dr. MacDonald, the honorary
president, gave the budding orators some
good advice on "Public Speaking," telling
them that the Men s Lit. gave them an
excellent opportunity to cultivate this art.
A short business session took place
during the evening. Mr. Hurst welcomed
new members and outlined the proposed
activities for the year. As the Student
Parliament seems to offer the greatest
opportunity to the greatest number for
the cultivation of public speaking, most
of the meetings will take that form.
There will also be the usual features of
ladies' night, the oratorical contest and
the inter-class debates. The vacancy on
the executive caused by the resignation
of Mr. McLeod was filled by the election
of Mr. Cassidy to the office of secretary.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone, Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
WHY GO TO
CHINATOWN?
WE   ARE   NOW   SERVING
CHINESE  DISHES  UPSTAIRS
6 to 3 A.M.
DELMONICO CAFE
704 ROBSON STREET
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA  ROOM  BAKERY        ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY,  WEST
SHIRT
SALE
English Silk, and Silk
and Wool Taffeta Shirts.
Values to $11.00.
Sale price ..{ $8.50
Ben Petch
LIMITED
898 Granville Street
Cor. Smythe and Granville November-11, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCCER RESULTS IN CLOSE
DRAW
Moody Square, Westminster, was the
scene of conflict between 'Varsity and
Port Mann last Saturday. Although
weakened by the loss of two of the regular players, our boys played a good game
and had their opponents working at all
stages. The first point came for 'Varsity
after about ten minutes' play, Jackson s
shot being cleared by the goalkeeper, only
to be bounded off in Rushburry's chest.
'Varsity kept pressing, and scored again
when Crute converted a penalty kick.
Port Mann ended the scoring for this
period on a neat corner kick, when a forward carried the ball into goal with the
aid of his arm.
In the second period the play was fairly even, the ball travelling back from goal
to goal, 'Varsity backs playing a great
game. Port Mann evened the score on
an Alphonse-Gaston play by Crute and
Henderson, the ball bounding in quite
easily. 'Varsity changed their line-up,
Crute going to centre-half and Mark to
full-back. Thirty seconds later Crute had
the ball up at the opponents' goal, and,
giving a beautiful pass to centre, Lundie
headed the ball in. At this stage Rush-
burry drew the wrath of some of the
spectators, for no apparent reason; but
the threatened storm blew over. Port
Mann evened the score again shortly before time when Henderson fumbled the
ball. 'Varsity tried hard to lead again,
but failed.     Score,  3-3.
McLeod's playing drew forth the applause of the Port Mann spectators at
various stages of the game. The players
appreciated the rooting of the four fair
freshettes who journeyed to Westminster to witness the contest.
The line-up: Henderson, Crute, Wolverton, Cant, Mark, Mitchell, McLeod,
Mensel,  Jackson,  Lundie,  Rushburry.
GIRLS ORGANIZED IN ALL
ATHLETICS
All branches of the girls' athletics have
organized and have commenced an active
programme. The general athletic executive consists of the presidents of the
various societies, namely: President, Gwen
Robson; vice-president, Gladys Weld;
secretary, Vivian Jones; treasurer, Ruth
Harrison.
Basketball: The turn-out at the practices has been very good so far, and we
are planning a busy season. There has
been considerable trouble in arranging
practise hours, but at present the time is
Monday, 2 to 3.30, and Thursday, 5 to
6.30. The Senior team has entered the
league with Crofton House and Normal,
and the Juniors will very probably enter
a league as well. Inter-class games will
start as soon as possible. The executive
is: President, Gladys Weld; secretary-
treasurer, Marguerite Gordon; captain,
Evelyn Eveleigh; curator, Constance
Peters. Besides these, Lila Coates, Arts
'21; Gwen Kemp, '22; Katie Stuart, '23,
and Isabel Mackinnon, '24, have been
elected to act with the athletic representatives from each year to encourage
sports.
Grass Hockey: Mrs. Boving is coaching us again this year. Matches are
scheduled for every Wednesday with the
High Schools and Normal, while Friday
is practice day. There has been a very
good turn-out at the practices, but new
members are always welcome. The executive is: Honorary president and
coach, Mrs. Boving; president, Victoria
Herman; vice-president, Dorothy Hopper; secretary-treasurer, Zella Smith;
captain, Molly Jackson; curator, Mary
Bulmer.
Ice Hockey: We are not sure, as yet,
when we can get the rink; but in the
meantime we would advise you, one and
all, to practise your skating.    Notices will
U.B.C.   STUDENTS
U.B.C. students will find this store carries the largest stocks of Guns, Rifles,
Ammunition, Fishing Tackle, Golf, Hockey, Soccer, Rugby, Basketball and
Athletic equipment in B. C.—and most moderately priced.
We give special discounts to Clubs.
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
Phone, Seymour 7853
C. HERMANN, Proprietor
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U.B.C. Students Should Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER    SHOP
ROGERS BLOCK, 464 GRANVILLE STREET
be posted as soon as arrangements are
made; and we want a good turn-out, to
make the games a success. The executive is: President, Marion Lawrence;
vice-president, Gladys Weld; secretary-
treasurer, Marie Lapsley; curator, Beatrice Pearce.
Swimming and Gym: Swimming is on
Monday, from 2 to 9.30. This could be
well worked in with gymnasium, which is
from 5.30 to 6.30, and which is also in
need of new members. We have secured
as instructress, Miss Goddard, who is very
capable and makes the hour most interesting.
The executive of the swimming is:
President, Ruth Harrison; vice-president,
Vivian Jones; secretary-treasurer, Ruth
Verchere. The gym.: President, Vivian
Jones; secretary-treasurer, Cora Mete.
BASKETBALL
Science '23 and '24 In the Lead
On Friday, November Sth, Science '23
and '24 each added two points to its total
by defeating Agriculture and Science '22,
respectively.	
The first game started at 5.IS, between
Science '22 and '24. In the first half the
junior men seemed to have it all their
own way, piling up a lead of sixteen
points. However, in the second half, the
seniors, strengthened by Don. Morrison,
made a great comeback, but were unable
to overcome the handicap, the final score
being 23-21 in favor of Science '24.
In the second game Science '23 had no
difficulty in overcoming the Aggies. The
game was fast, and at all times interesting, each man putting his best into it.
However, with Cameron shooting baskets at one end and Gross preventing
them at the other, it is not surprising
that the score ended 42-10 for Science.
MCDONALD'S
eH©eou\TEs
Have you had a box of Chocolates
yet from McDonald's new store?
Gee! it's a lovely place!
888 Granville Street
(One block south of old store,  corner
Robson Street)
PITMAN BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Established 1898
INDIVIDUAL     INSTRUCTION
Day and Evening Classes
422 Richards Street
Corner Hastings Street
Phone, Sey. 9135 THE   UBYSSEY
November 11, 1920
WHEN YOU
GIVE CANDY
When a young man's fancy turns
to—all you fellows know the rest—
and it comes to the place where
you want to take a box 6f candy
every time you call—wouldn't you
prefer Purdy's name to any other
.on the box?
Purbys
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675 GRANVILLE STREET
PERSONAL
LETTERS
The personal correspondence paper
is often the only way strangers
have of judging the taste and character of the writer.
One may be sure that, in selecting Olde English Parchment Vellum, the requirements of good taste
have been met.
Put up in boxes or tablet form.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers and Wholesale
Stationers
VANCOUVER  AN6  VICTC-RIA,   S.C.
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
AVENUE THEATRE
Week Commencing   Monday,   Nov. 8th
Mats. Wednesday and Saturday
EDWARD LEWERg, supported by an
All-English    Cast,    in   Cyril    Maude's
Greatest Comedy Success
"GRtfM'PY"
Even'g, $1.65 to 55c; Hits., $1.10 to 55c
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions,  $'2.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
/•A. H. Imlah
Associate Editors { S. M. Scott
VMiss R.  E.  Verchere
Chief  Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
{Miss A.  Anderson
J.  C.  Clyne
Bert  Sweeting
Cliffe Mathers
Miss P. Stewart
Exchange  Editor Miss   K.   M.   Portsmouth
Literary  Editors i £•  L. Stevenson
I G. G.  Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising   Manager II.   M.   Cassidy
{n.  A.  Wallace
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H. G. Scott
Circulation  Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor  for  the  Week S.   M.   Scott
A DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY?
Under the heading, "Democratize the
University," the "World" publishes an
editorial in which it complains that the
"range of interest" of our present Board
of Governors "is not extended.' Its
membership is largely confined to members of the learned professions, and the
large body of skilled artisans in the province is without representation. The
"World" would remedy this condition by
"the democratization of the whole University through the election of a Board
of Governors drawn from all classes." At
the present time the board, which has
jurisdiction over the University, faculty,
appointments, buildings, etc., consists of
the president and nine members appointed by the Government.
The proposal is an interesting one.
The result at which it aims is clearly
desirable. While there appears to have
been no complaint that the University in
the past has not been run on democratic
principles, yet it is proper that the skilled
artisans who pay a large part of the expense of our education, and to whom
higher education tends to become of
greatef interest year by year, should have
some say in how their money is to be
spent and their families educated. The
difficulty arises in the question of how
these representatives are to be chosen.
The "World" simply advises that they be
"elected," presumably by the whole of
the provincial electorate. Such a system
would necessitate either a special University election throughout the province
every two years, or such changes in the
University Act as will allow the Governors to be elected at the same time as the
members of the Legislature. The former
would be a great expense; the latter would
be liable to drag the University into party
politics. Moreover, the Governors, to
function efficiently, should be within easy
reach of one another, and of the University itself. It is not clear how voters in
outlying districts are to choose such men.
An alternative way, and one more commonly in use, is for Convocation to elect
the Govefriors. But as Convocation consists entirely of University graduates, and
as most of them enter either business or
one of the learned professions on graduation, it is not at all certain that their
appointees would include many skilled
artisans. Of fhe fifteen Senators now
elected by Convocation,' not one may
aspire to be counted in the ranks of Labor. Under this system it is probable
that the board would be composed entirely of U.B.C. graduates.
If it is desired to have representatives
of Labor on the Board of Governors, the
simplest way would seem to be for the
Government to appoint them when the
next vacancies occur.
ROUSE UP, ROOTERS!
At the beginning of this session it
appeared that the Rooters' Club had decided, at last, to function as a college
organization. "Yells ' were published in
our first issue, a practice was held and
many plans for the winter were discussed.
Then there came a lull. Three Senior
Rugby games have been played and won
by our 'Varsity team. On each occasion
U.B.C. has been well represented. But
the effect of our presence has been reduced to a minimum through the entire
absence of co-ordination, of any kind, in
our "rooting." Until we realize that the
only way to create a distinct impression
by means of 'Varsity cheering, and incidentally, to enjoy the greatest amount of
fun, is to sink our individualities into a
larger, fully organized mass of students,
under the leadership of one whose instructions shall be responded to at once
by the whole body, our efforts shall be
of little avail.
We suggest to the officers of the club
that a knowledge of a certain nurfiber of
standard "ye'ls" be made a requisite to
membership in the organization. Those
who are really anxious to joi" in a united
campaign to "boost" the 'Varsity will
thus be lined up. When the games are
at Brockton Point, would it not be a good
idea to take possession of a section in the
grandstand, and from this point of vantage give exoression to our enthusiasm
under the direction of a capab'e leader?
A well-organized group of leather-lunged
students can do much to keep the spirit
of victory in the air at a time when the
score is acainst us.
A reformation is necessary. Rdoters,
awake! Make haste to justify your existence!
The next number of the "Ubyssey,"
except the work of editing the paper, is
in the hands of the Arts Men's Undergraduate Society. If you have something
which you think should go in this issue,
get in touch with one of the members of
the executive of the above-mentioned society. The Science Men's Undergraduate
Society is going to handle the issue of
December 2nd in a like manner.
We humbly apologize to the Literary
and Scientific Department for the editorial
which we published last week. Had we
read the minutes of their meeting, we
probably would have worded the article
differently. November 11, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
MR.   RIVE  EXPLAINS
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—In your issue of November 4th
an editorial appears under the heading.
"Sine Qua Non." I quote the first sentence:
"Last week Sir Arthur Currie, president of
McGill University, was in Vancouver, but
no attempt was made to have him address
us until his itinerary was complete." This
is characterized by the writer as "unfortunate" and "short-sighted," and he goes
on to make the suggestion that the Literary
and Scientific Department "appoint a committee whose duties would be to arrange in
advance with such men to speak in the University auditorium."
Had the writer first questioned a member
of the Literary and Scientific Department,
he probably would not have written as lie
did. May I quote from the minutes of the
meeting of October 8th, one month before
this editorial  appeared:
"Moved by Mr. Mitchell, seconded by Mr.
Kirby, that the president, vice-president
and secretary-treasurer be appointed as a
committee of three to procure speakers to
address  the  University.    Motion carried."
By way of ascertaining the best method
of carrying out the idea embodied in this
motion, President Klinck was interviewed on
the subject the same day. At his suggestion
it was decided that, whenever the L.S.I),
wished a public man to address the student
body, they should inform the president, who
would issue the invitation and make the
necessary arrangements. At the same time
the wish was expressed that Principal
Currie and Premier Meighen should both be
invited to visit the University while in the
city.
In order to place this before the president
in writing, a letter was addressed to him a
week or so later, repeating the request that
Principal Currie be asked to speak at the
University. The president himself was
anxious that the General should accept the
invitation, and no pains were spared to have
him come.
Trusting that this letter will correct the
"unfortunate" impression conveyed by the
editorial, and that you will be able to spare
space enough in your editorial columns for
a note of correction and, among the correspondence, for this letter of explanation.
ALFRED RIVE,
President Literary and  Scientific Dept.
TOO  MANY CLUBS?
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Permit me, through your
esteemed journal, to address your correspondents of last week, both of whom complain
of foibles in our University life for which
the remedy, if one there is, evades us.
With the increase in our numbers, cliques
have crystallized, and the one all-embracing
fraternity, which was once a living reality
among us, now exists only in the ideal.
About the time when our present graduating class were novitiates, the first disintegration into "years" was apparent. Now,
as J. E, G. writes, we have lost that "spirit
of clanship." We forsake our classmates for
the riistorical Society, the Letters Club, the
dramatic clubs, or the secret fraternities
that are even now undermining our college
politics. We shudder to be identified with
the "common herd." Who, besides J. E. G.,
expect Arts '21 to wreak any deliverance?
All such are invited to join me in an expedition to the valley of Achor.
Yet I would not, even as Cognovi does,
accuse our journalists of designing a paper
according to their own ideas. I can only
regret that anyone should criticize so harshly sincere attempts to pander to the taste
of the majority. For Cognovi utters an indictment that is unpleasingly true, yet which
is the presumptive fruit of overweening
egotism.
"I am angry with you, Cognovi, because
thou hast discovered our weakness in the
sight of our lovers; because thou sayest I
am rich and increased with goods and have
need of nothing: and knowest not that thou
art wretched and miserable, and poor, and
blind, and naked."
To Cognovi, and to J. E. G., let me offer
this  consolation:   that   when   "Joe"   is   con
strained to address his lady love in dignified
English, when the multiplication of clubs
shall cease, when students no longer take
delight in personal mention, when they
themselves pass at last to the ideal sphere,
the cause of their grievances will have vanished. "We are such stuff as dreams are
made  on." "CHARITAS."
SOCIAL  FUNCTIONS
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—For the information of all organizations within the University which
intend giving any sort of social function in
the near future, will you please print the
following by-law: .... "That arrangements tor any social functions of the University be submitted for the approval of the
Students' Council at least two weeks before
the date of the function."
ARTHUR E.  LORD,
President A.M.S.
TWO 'VARSITY TEAMS
Two teams will be entered in the City
Hockey League this year, according to
the decision of the Hockey Club, wnich
met on Tuesday. There will be one
senior and one junior team. The following officers were elected: President, Lou
Hunter, Arts '22; vice-president, J. H.
Wilson, Arts '24; secretary-treasurer, A.
B. MacPherson, Sc. '24. Although the
expense of renting the rink is rather
heavy, the officials of the club are looking forward to a successful season.
CHRISTMAS CARDS
Following its usual Custom, the Y. W.
C. A. is having some Christmas cards
made. These cards are printed in the
University colors, and in previous years
have been much in demand. As there is
no definite idea of how many will be required, only a limited number are being
ordered. They will be placed on sale
during the third or fourth week of November.
Ceylon
Flannel
Blouses
FOR  SPORTS SERVICE
$5.75 Each
Smart, warm and serviceable Blouses
for wearing at golf, for skating, or
for any occasion where an extra
weight blouse is required. These come
in mauve, flesh or white, in combination with black, mauve or flesh, and
all are in effective stripe patterns.
Some of the models are made with
long roll collars and have smart turnback link cuffs; others are made with
convertible collars. All sizes in the
assortment.    Each       $5.75
—First Floor
575 GRANVILLE STREET
0RPHEUM
Week Commencing
Monday,  November 15th, 1920
MADAME DOREE'S
OPERALOGXXE
Presenting Famous
"SWEETHEART   SCENES"
From Opera.    Company of Ten
LAUREL LEE
The  Chummy  Chatterer
BIGELOW and CLINTON
Merry-Makers to Canadian
Theatregoers
BILLY— —BUNNY
DALE & BURCH
In Their Original Comedy Creation
"THE  RIDING MASTER"
By Billy Dale
GARCINETTI BROTHERS
European Novelty Hat-Throwers
LUCAS and LEE
A Snappy Introduction
The  A.   &  A.   Producing  Co.,  Inc.,
Presents
THE MAGIC GLASSES
A Speculation in Specs
By Frances Nordstrom
British  Weekly Concert Orchestra
JUST PUBLISHED
30th  ISSUE
The Canadian
Customs Tariff
Showing List of Articles Subject to
Luxury Tax, etc.
Price, $2.75
We have it.    Get yours to-day.
arijp.
OUark* $c Stuart do.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
November 11, 1920
UNDERWEAR
STANFIELD'S SILK AND
WOOL UNDERWEAR. This is
one of the most popular garments
on the market to-day. So many
men cannot wear wool — this will
take its place, the wool and silk
being woven in such a way as to do
away with the irritating effect that
wool often has, yet retains all the
warmth-giving qualities of the wool.
Unshrinkable. Shirt or Drawers,
per garment   $5.25
Combinations     $10.50
We carry the above line and also
all other popular lines of Stanfield's
Underwear.
David  Spencer
LIMITED
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
— of-
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
U.B.C. TEAM AT INTERNATIONAL
CONTEST
Three Agriculture students — Miss
Marion Mounce, Mr. Bert Sweeting and
Mr. H. Riddell — will represent the University of British Columbia in the annual
stock-judging competition which will
take place in Portland on Saturday, November 13, in connection with the annual
Pacific International Live Stock Exposition. This is the first year that B. C. has
sent a full team to the inter-collegiate
contest, and it is hoped that the "Aggie'
representatives will make a good showing. These three won their places in an
elimination contest in which all members
of the junior and senior year were
eligible.
The members of this team will be required to place twelve classes of dairy
cattle, and to support their placings with
oral and written reasons. A prize of $100,
donated by the B. C. Dairymen's Association, will be competed for by these
three students, in addition to the regular
list of medals and prizes given by the
Exposition. Other colleges represented
will include California, Idaho, Nevada,
Utah, Oregon and Washington. Professor H. M. King will accompany the
team.
FIRST INTER-CLASS DEBATE
The first of the inter-class debates held
by the W.L.S. took place on Wednesday, November 3rd. The subject was,
"Resolved that the dress of the ancient
world is preferable to that of the modern
world." Of this debate, Arts '21 took the
affirmative and Arts '22 the negative.
Miss Coates, first speaker on the
affirmative, explained that the periods
under consideration had been limited by
the debaters to the classical period in
Greece and Rome, and the years since
1914 in America. She dwelt on the superiority of the ancient dress over the
modern from, the standpoint of health and
art. Miss Mackinnon, for the negative,
dwelt on the simplicity and practicalness
of modern dress, and the scope it offers
for originality. Miss Matheson, second
speaker on the affirmative, explained the
economic and moral superiority of the
ancient costumes; while Miss Metz, the
last speaker on the negative, spoke of the
freedom of choice offered by present
fashions. The judges, Mrs. Clark, Dr.
Sedgewick and Prof. Sage, decided in favor of the Juniors, Misses MacKinnon
and Metz.
FRENCH  DRAMATISTS  ELECT
OFFICERS
The following officers have been elected in the French Dramatic Society:
Honorary president, Dr. Ashton; president, Miss P. McConnell; vice-president,
Mr. Coope; secretary, Miss D. Weinberg;
treasurer, Mr. A. L. Stevenson. Advisory Board: Miss M. Ross, Dr. A. F. B.
Clarke. The names of those wishing to
become charter members should be
handed to the secretary before November 16th.
Vancouver
Citizens' Club
(Non-Membership)
UNDER  THE  BIG  CLOCK
We serve a 60-cent
MERCHANTS'  LUNCH
TABLE  D'HOTE  DINNERS,   $1.50
SUPPER PARTIES  and  BANQUETS,
with  private  rooms, our specialty
SUPPER  DANSANT  Wednesday  and
Saturday evenings,  from 9 to 12,  $1.00
Phone, Sey. 796
A. WATTS, Mgr.
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and Evening Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.  J.   SPROTT,  B.A.,  Manager.
A SAVINGS
ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We   welcome   small   accounts.
The Canadian Bank
of Commerce November 11, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
CLOTHES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
34S Hastings Street, West
J. W. Foster
Limited
WE   SELL   CLOTHES   FOR   YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light    Refreshments
Ice Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
UNIVERSITY  STUDENTS
We carry a large assortment of
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Fillers, Waterman Fountain Pens, and all requisites to complete your records in your
studies.
Cbe Uancouver Stationers Eta.
SOCIETY STATIONERS AND
PRINTERS
683 Granville St.    Phone, Sey. 5119
S.D.K. HOLD FIRST MEETING
In spite of meetings of other societies
on the same evening, a considerable number attended the first meeting of the S.
D. K. on Tuesday night, November 2nd.
The majority of those present were new
members.
The entertainment took the form of
impromptu speeches on subjects provided
by the executive. After the meeting had
been formally opened by the president,
Mr. Orville Kirby, Mr. Cunningham rendered a piano solo with a remarkable display of talent and technique. This was
followed by an inspired address, entirely
impromptu, by Mr. Edward Matheson.
Then each of the new members was
called upon to discourse on some subject
which was given to him as he came to
the platform.
Among the subjects discussed were:
"Other People's Business," "The Misery
of Being Old and Ignorant," "Keeping
Up Appearances," "Fall Styles in Fashions and Freshmen," "The Necessity of
Being Amused,' "On Wearing Men's
Shoes," "Holding One's Tongue," "The
Speakers of the Evening."
OUR HOSPITABLE JUNIORS
ECONOMISTS ORGANIZE
A meeting of those interested in the
formation of a Junior Economics Club
was held on Tuesday at noon. Quite a
large number of students were present,
and the following executive was chosen
for the new club: Honorary president,
Dr. Boggs; president, W. R. Brown, Arts
'23; vice-president, A. Riley, Arts 22;
secretary-treasurer, Miss D. Fulton, Arts
'22. Committee—H. M. Cassidy, Arts
'23; Miss B. Pearce, Arts '23, and Miss
D. Walsh, Arts '23. The constitution of
the old Junior Economics Club will be
revised and presented at the next meeting.
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
CUSICK
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cusick.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
One Beauty of Our Shoes
Is their perfect comfort. Built, as they are, in the latest models, with every
attention to style detail; nevertheless, comfort has not been sacrificed in the
slightest degree.
Our new Winter Footwear is smart, indeed, yet as comfortable and long-
wearing as shoes can be made.
Their prices represent the Biggest Shoe Values in Town.
THE INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
SIX-SIXTY-SIX GRANVILLE ST.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
Yes, the Juniors were all there, and a
few others as well. Dr. Sedgewick, in
his short opening speech, was kind
enough to welcome everybody excepting
those of Arts '22, who, he added, required
no welcome.
Mrs. Coleman, Mrs. Sedgewick, Mrs.
Clark, Mrs. Robertson and Mrs. Henderson were present as patronesses, and apparently spent a pleasant evening, part of
it in playing cards with Dean Coleman,
Dr. Sedgewick, Dr. Clark and Prof.
Robertson.
As for the rest of us, we had a "scrum-
my' time. They gave us plenty to eat,
all kinds of encores, and we had room to
dance. Somehow the floor seemed better than usual, too. The pretty blue and
gold decorating scheme helped somewhat
to remove the classroom aspect of the
Auditorium, and the large "Class Arts
'22" banners added a touch of individuality. After supper there was a "Paul
Jones," and everyone joined in the ring-
around-a-rosy, which Mr. McLeod directed with a whistle from the platform.
We cannot resist a remark on the generosity of Arts '22 in their invitation list
as shown by the large number of non-
members participating in the enjoyment.
A pleasant feature of the affair was that
everyone danced and no one sat out—another tribute to the executive, and to
their ability as hosts.
COLLEGE NEWSPAPER
CONFERENCE
The students of the School of Journalism of the University of Washington
have established a precedent for the
universities of the Pacific Coast, in that
they have planned a Conference of University Newspapers. This conference is
to be held at the University of Oregon on
the 11th and 12th of this month. Most
of the colleges up and down the coast
have signified their intention to attend.
The business of the meeting will be
to discuss college newspaper problems of
both news and business nature, dealing
especially with advertising difficulties,
and the possibility of establishing an
inter-collegiate news service.
The Students' Council have appointed
Mr. Whitley and have approved of the
appointment of Mr. Webster to represent the Publications Department at the
coming conference. Mr. Webster will
deal with all matters pertaining to editing
and news, while Mr. Whitley will endeavor to handle the business and advertising question.
Chemistry Society
"Recent Experiments on the Disintegration of the Atom" was the subject of
an address delivered by Dr. E. H. Archibald before the Chemistry Society on
Tuesday  evening.
The president of the A. M. U. S. announces that admittance to the Arts
dance shall only be by ticket or invitation,
and that the doorkeepers have been instructed to that effect. THE   UBYSSEY
November 11, 1920
MERTEL AND JOE
Deer Mertel:—■
I gess you were supprised when you
didnt get a letter from me last wk. but
I was sick. They was a row with the
freshees and sience in this University one
day Mertel and I went to see the fun
and was inafenceive but a sience fello
jumped on me and put me down in the
mud and I lost a tooth and a fountain
pen but got a bad cold and a torne soote
and they say that when the exchange is
fare they is nobuddy robbed Mertel but I
was in bed for 3 days.
I didnt mind beeing sick Mertel but I
coodnt go in the trak meat witch made
me mad becus I wood be a champyn now,
Mertel, and had my picksure all reddy to
put in this paper like Garrett Livingstone. Now I gess that the onley way
that I can have my picksure in the paper
will be to rite a letter to the peeple what
make Tanlac and say that befor I got a
bottle I felt all run down like a Freshman but 3 days later I felt like a Senior
and then they will put my picksure and
my letter in all the papers Mertel and I
will be famus and they will be a hole lot
of fellos in this University jelus.
I herd a hole lot of peeple laffing in
the odditorium yesterday Mertel and
went in. You no what I am Mertel. I
like fun. I just got in the door when
sumbuddy sed in a awful voice that he
died with a rope arounde his nek so I
went out. You no what I am Mertel,
caushus. I didnt want to be a witness in
a murder tryle. I found out today that
the peeple was a bunch of acters what
was rehersing a Xmas play. I am going
to seen that play Mertel becus I like
bludshed when I am not in it.
They is sum fellos in this University
Mertel what thinks they is smart. On
Monday I got a letter witch sed I was
invited to the clas partey of the jrs. on
Friday nite. The joke was on them,
Mertel, becus I went and had a fine time
and didnt find out untill Sat. that I wasnt
suposed to be there.    I had a good meel.
Mr. Whitley, what owns this paper
says that I cant rite to you next wk. Mertel, becus it is a speshul number. I gess
you will have to reed this letter agane
next wk. Mertel to make up for the one
you wont get. JOE.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Friday, Nov. 12—Arts Men's dance,
Lester Court, 9 p.m. Y.M.C.A. general
meeting, noon; address by Dean Coleman.
Saturday, Nov. 13—Soccer at Cambie
Street, 1.4S p.m., 'Varsity vs. A.M.
Tuesday, Nov. IS—Boxing Club, Chalmers gymnasium, 6.30 p.m. Sigma Delta
Kappa debate, Auditorium, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 17—Women's Lit.,
oratorical contest, 3.30 p.m. Men's Lit.,
debate, Arts "23 vs. Arts '24, 8 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 18—Inter-class basketball, 5.15 p.m.
Friday,  Nov.  19—Arts '21  class party.
Prohibition — a
home industry.
measure   to   encourage
CLELLAND
KEEPS RIGHT ON
II doesn't matter how many cheap, trashy-
things are offered for suits and overcoats,
Clelland keeps right on supplying genuine material. Nothing tempts him away from it. And
fellows have got to know now that his Made-to-
Measure Suits and Overcoats are better and last
longer.
L,ast longer is right, I'll tell the world. Say—
he's got 400 cloths to select from, and twenty
models. Even if you're not going to buy right
away, you should go up and see him and look over
the  styles he can  show you.
There's nothing like them anywhere else.   Fact!
Express elevator takes you right into Clelland's
room, on the 12th floor of the Standard Bank
Building,  in less 'n a minute.
He  stays open till  6 o'clock  Saturdays.
James Clelland
1225 Standard Bank Bldg.
510  Hastings Street,  West Vancouver,  B. C.
Phone, Seymour 7280
The Barron Hotel
and
Restaurant
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Phone, Seymour 2011
HAS IT OCCURRED
TO YOU
—that your Photograph as a Christmas gift would be highly appreciated
by your friends, especially the absent
ones?
Pictures are very easy to mail, very
inexpensive, and very appropriate.
You'll get the  quality kind at
Bridgman s Studio
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Stolon - (Eraft
Quality Clothes
FOR YOUNG MEN
STYLISH
GUARANTEED
Vancouver,  B. C.
The Shop of Fashion-Craft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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