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The Ubyssey Feb 12, 1920

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FEBRUARY 12, 1920
Number 10
U.B.C. CAPTURES TITLES
Seniors Down
Centrals by
8-5 Score
INTERMEDIATES WIN
DEFEAT VICTORIA PLAYERS FOR
B. C. CHAMPIONSHIP
Saturday afternoon the University
turned out en masse to see the boys in
blue and gold win the Millar Cup, symbolic of the city Rugby championship.
There were over three thousand spectators gathered about the oval, including
a well-organized group of 'Varsity rooters. This latter band of lusties, led by
two white-sweatered contortionists, gave
forth the U.B.C. battle-cries in a very
effective manner, and undoubtedly contributed to the victory. However, to
reach rock-bottom, let us here congratulate the fifteen men who won the laurels,
and also their coach and captain, Art
Lord.
Brockton Point was in fine shape fpr
Rugby, and Saturday's contest was undoubtedly the keenest of the year. At
the toot of the wtiistle Centrals took
the kick and started out in earnest. The
'Varsity squad were again slow in stepping out and were soon hard-pressed by
the onrushing cardinals. The Centrals'
kicking was particularly effective at this
stage of the game, while all college attempts were being blocked. Within the
first five minutes the University crew
had to save twice. The forwards were
not bucking, and the Centrals were controlling the scrum. It was the stellar
defensive work of the three-quarters
which kept the cardinal back division
from scoring during this early spas-m.
The "reds" did cross the touch-line
twice, but just failed to plant the ball.
When about fifteen minutes had
elapsed, Ternan made the last close save
for 'Varsity after a fast sprint. Then,
just as the few college pessimists were
wailing, "Alas! the day," the forward
pack decided it was time for action, and
the old leather was sent flying into Cen-
(Continued on Page 7)
Debating Shield
Won by Aggies
MESSRS.    TRAVES    AND    STACEY
SUCCESSFUL OVER ARTS '20
SPEAKERS        @
Debating the question, "Resolved that
the application of the principle of closed
shop will best serve the cause of industrial peace," Messrs. Traves and Stacey,
of Agriculture, taking the negative, won
over Messrs. McClay and Wallace, of
Arts '20, in the inter-class finals. Dr.
Sedgewick, Prof. Henry, and Prof. Barss
were the judges.
Mr. McClay, opening the case for the
affirmative, laid down the fundamental
principle that industrial peace depends
on industrial justice. He traced the development of the present industrial system, and showed how labor was forced
to organize to protect itself. A chain is
only as strong as its weakest link — so
the strength of organized labor is only
that of the weakest member of unorganized labor. Hence it is essential that all
labor should be organized. This age of
industrial  expansion  is  a  wonderful  op-
(Continued on Page 8)
DECIDE DATE OF
THEATRE PARTY
The annual theatre party will be held
on Thursday evening, February 26th.
The Arts and Science men are joining
together in order to make this event one
of the outstanding affairs of the session.
At a meeting held on Tuesday the
Orpheum Theatre was chosen as the
rendezvous, in place of the other alternative—the Avenue. The entertainment
will be enlivened with a special University act, in which U.B.C. students exclusively will appear. It was decided
that the 'Varsity should usurp the lower
floor with the exception of the boxes.
In order to guarantee an orderly parade,
a number of marshals have been placed
in complete charge of this phase of the
arrangements. Any suggestions regarding "stunts" for the evening will be
gladly received by Messrs. Kingham,
Peebles and Leckie. Come on, 'Varsity
men! Let's have the best theatre night
ever held in our history.
Veterans' Clubs
Are Amalgamated
MACK    EASTMAN    NAMED    COMMANDER OF UNIVERSITY
SERVICE CLUB
The zero hour was eight-thirty on the
evening of Wednesday, February the
fourth. Five minutes later,„M« barage
lifted and the fight was «a»?>=wiien the
combined executives of the Western
University Service Club and the Returned Soldiers' Student Club went over
the top. They attacked over uncertain
territory, but emerged victorious from
the fray by reaching and consolidating
their objective before ten o'clock. No
difficulties were encountered, and, with
the exception of one or two slight
wounds, there were no casualties.
The W.U.S. Club and the R.S.S. Club,
realizing the importance of occupying a
position held by soWier students and
university men as an organization, made
this their objective. Orders to that effect were issued and the plan of attack
was carefully worked out by capable
leaders. Under the cover of the darkness of the night, with favorable winds,
and the moon clouded, the attack was
launched  and victoriously executed.
During the battle many very-lights
and star-shells lit up the field of operations. An extra brilliant one revealed
the establishment of a machine-gun post
in the form of a Scholarship to the memory of our fallen comrades. When the
working party comes in, we shall hear
more about it.
The attacking forces had not been in
their new position many minutes when
they were reorganized and the few casualties replaced. Mack Eastman assumed
command, while Harry Letson was
promoted to the rank of second in command. Thorlief Larsen immediately took
up the duties of adjutant, with a capable
assistant in Colin Ferris. The company
commanders lost no time in assembling
their N.C.O's for a heart-to-heart talk.
Alex. Munro, in charge of "A" Company, has as his special duty the recruiting of new members; while in "B" Company Harry Logan and Morely Scott
look after the war records. Gordon
Nelson has charge of the quartermaster department, and already the rations   for   a   big   get-together   banquet
(Continued on Page 3) THE   UBYSSEY
February 12, 1920
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TW H. Foiter G. N. Jarman Fred Fo«lfr
That the Westminster Adanacs were
blessed with a goodly portion of luck in
nosing out the U.B.C. intermediates for
the city basketball championship was
ably demonstrated to a large number of
fans on Saturday evening, when the
'Varsity defeated the "Y" Ponies 36-23.
Before the game the University players
were thought to have, little chance
against their opponents, who have
cinched the Senior "B" title.
'Varsity started piling up po;nts right
from the start, and when half-time arrived they were leading 20-8. The faultless combination of the winners made
t^e Ponies look foolish at times. Several
'Varsity baskets were scored in about
three seconds, when Mathers, at centre,
'nocked the ball to Anderson, who gave
Arkley a perfect pass under the basket.
The Ponies were unable to get inside
the 'Varsity defence and had to rely on
long shofs.
The "Y" played a much better game
in the second half, and a few minutes
before time were only three po'nts
down, the score standing 26-23. Evi-
den'ly deciding that the score was too
close, U.B.C. got going again and collected eight points before the whistle
sounded.
The following players represented
University: Guards, G. Callaghan and
F. Peterson (2); centre, C. Mathers
(10); forwards, R. Anderson (6) and H.
Arkley  (18).
THE RELAY
Final details are now ready for the
most interesting event ever "pulled off"
in the University of B. C. Seven teams
have entered the relay race from the
Point: Arts '20 (who issued the challenge), Arts '21, Arts '22, Arts '23, Sc.
'23, Sc. '22, Agriculture. From the
enthusiastic way in which the different
teams are training, the race should be
close and interesting from the start. The
course follows Marine Drive to Fourth
Avenue, to Yew Street, to Broadway, to
Granville, to Twelfth Avenue, to the
University. Running on the sidewalks,
cutting corners, or failing to follow the
course, will disqualify the offender and
his team. Dr. Elliot will start the race
at 2 o'clock, and the finish should be
about 2.45 in front of the Arts building.
Those who have cars are invited to follow the runners, but careless interference must be strictly guarded against.
Telephone reports on the progress of
the race will be received in the Publication room from three or four points
along the course. Although no prize,
save the honor, has been offered, it is
safe to say that the winning team will be
quite sure that it has had a real race.
Don't miss the finish!
THEN ALL WAS QUIET
An American host was showing an
English friend the sights of New York.
"You see that large clock over there?"
he said. "Well, when it strikes, it is
heard three days later in 'Frisco."
"We can beat that across the pond,"
said the Englishman. "A few years ago
a bugle sounded in London and three
years later it was heard in the States."
EVERSHARP
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Sterling silver, with ring top $4 00
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Gold-filled   and   engraved $5.75
Colonial style in sterling silver.. .$7.25
All above supplied with pocket clasp
and  12 extra rings.
ROLLED     GOLD     PLATE     POCKET
KNIVES—Two   blades $1.00
With chain   $2 50
Gold-filled,    with    chain;    will   wear
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GOLD-FILLED     CIGAR-CUTTERS —
On  chain    $3.50
Better qualities  at $5.00,  $6.00,  $7.00
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DAVID SPENCER
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MAGAZINES
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BOYS!   Give us a call before you
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578  Seymour  Street
Phone, Seymour 189 February 12, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
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HEADQUARTERS FOR
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Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School  Equipment
Drawing Instruments and  Materials
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(Opposite C. P. R.  Depot)
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Our display is sure to please you
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U.B.C. SENIORS WIN FROM
WESTMINSTER
'Varsity hit their stride last Wednesday evening, when they defeated the
New Westminster "Y" team in the Normal gymnasium by the score of 33-25.
The  game  was  a  City   League   fixture.
Both teams set a fast pace in the first
half, neither having the advantage. -At
half-time the score stood 10 all. In the
second half the ball found the basket
more frequently. Geo. Dixon, Geo.
Gross and Sid. ■ Anderson collected 23
po'nts for the blue and gold, while 15
points were scored by the Westminster
players.
The game was exceptionally fast and
interesting. Very few long shots were
attempted, the majority of the baskets
being scored from close in, as a result
of short, snappy passes. Gross, with 12
points, and Dixon, with 11, led the University scorers, while Shiles and Storme
starred for Westminster. Lacey Fishe.r
refereed.
Following is the University team, with
the number of points scored by each
player: Guards, G. Callaghan and G.
Gross (12); centre, A. Buchanan (2);
forwards, S. Anderson (8) and G. Dixon
(U).
EXCELLENT PAPERS READ
A very interest'ng and beneficial evening was snent on Thursday last, when
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Ladner, Shaughnessy
Heights, opened their home for the
regular meeting of the Historical Society. The first part of the even'ng was
ta'en vp with business matters. The
constitrtion was amended and arrangements for the annual meet:n? were discussed. It was decMed that the club
should take some action agamst the
crif'ci=m  of  Grant's  History  of  Canada.
The club then turned to the subject of
the evening, "The Congress of Vienna
and the Congress of Versailles." Excellent papers were read by Miss McGee
and Miss Munro. The former gave interesting descriptions of the men seated
around the Peace table, comparing and
contrasting them with the representatives of the nations at Vienna. Miss
Munro compared the work of the two
congresses, with special reference to the
Holy Alliance and the League of Nations.
VETERANS' CLUBS
(Continued from Page 1)
have   been   ordered.     After   the   feed   a
short    divisional    rest    will   ensue,   but
marching  orders   read  that   a   great   big
dance will cut short the div. rest.
The members come under two categories, "Al" and "B." "Al," or active
members, are eligible to join up if they
are University men, British subjects, and
did service in the Great War. "B," or
associate members, are eligible to join
up if they are University men and did
service in the Great War in the ranks
of any of the countries allied with Great
Britain. They are entitled to full privileges except voting.
Bill Beveridge is on the headquarters
staff as publicity agent, so get your maps
and flags ready to follow the advance of
the  University Service  Club.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTTSHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
Svrott Shmv Stamp**QuaMty
R. J. SVrtOTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
E. C. KILBY
"Good Goods'
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE    STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
10% off to Returned Men
Students' Loose Led! Supplies
Ring Books and Ring Book
Sheets for all Books. Fountain
Pens, High-Grade Pencils and
Pens.
WE  WILL  APPRECIATE
A VISIT TO OUR STORE
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572 Granville St. Vancouver, B. C. THE   UBYSSEY
February 12, 1920
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FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men who stay young
Issued every Thursday by the Publications  Board
of the  University  of  British   Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
( Lillian  Cowdell
Associate Editors -! A.   TI.   Tmlah
I C. D. Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   Evans   Boss
Exchange  Editor G.   G.   Coope
V     BUSINESS STAFF:
Business  Manager J.   N.  Weld
Advertising  Manager L.   Fournier
.    . .     , f D.  A.  Wallace       W.  R. Smith
Assistants -!,«,«»•
I W. McKee
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor for the Week C. D. Taylor
A POPULAR CRY
A perusal of this week's Council minutes reveals the information that at a
joint meeting of last year's executive
with the present members, it was recommended to Faculty that during the two
weeks immediately preceding the final
examinations there should be no advanced work considered, in order that
some time might be spent in reviewing
and organizing the term's lectures. Attention has been drawn again to this
suggestion in the hope that it may
receive favorable consideration. For
though the popular habit of spring
"plugging" should not be encouraged,
the best of students always feel the need
of a few days in which to prepare for the
crucial tests. In some courses the work
of the final session undoubtedly has been
so planned as to render impossible a
total compliance with this request; but
some other concession, which would be
equally satisfactory, might be arranged
very easily.
?£ 3p Sfi
STUDENT REGULATIONS
In another column, issue is taken with
our editorial of last week, entitled "Student Regulations," and, although it shall
never be our intention to bore the readers of the "Ubyssey" with a detailed
analysis of any criticism which may be
directed against editorial comments,
there is one point in this instance which
deserves an explanation. Our correspondent accuses us of deliberately distorting
facts, and declares that the opposition to
the by-law relating to dances was based
upon the principle that the Council has
no "legitimate control" over functions
held outside of the University buildings.
To be perfectly candid, we never considered such an attitude as representing
a principle of objection because of its
manifest absurdity.
That there can never be any real difference between the restrictions governing college entertainments, whether they
be held in our own Auditorium or in
Timbuctoo, is not a matter of opinion,
but an established ruling. The Univer-
city Act holds Faculty responsible 'to
Senate for student discipline, the former
body  in  turn  fulfilling this  function  by
delegating to us the right of student
-self-government. But, according to last
week's "Buzzer," increased privileges always bring added responsibilities. And
it is especially true in this case. By no
possible contortion can the above clause
be interpreted to exclude any particular
function, held under the University
name, but in some other part of the city.
This is a fact which cannot be altered
by either Faculty or the student body.
Hence, since the Council -is responsible
not only to the Alma Mater Society, but
also indirectly to Senate, for all the
activities of the college, it is evident that
as a general rule similar regulations
must prevail everywhere, in the absence
of any distinct or peculiar considerations.
EX CATHEDRA
The "portable" desks in rooms 23 and
33 are becoming a general nuisance. A
few screws would very soon remedy this
condition.
As long as you don't play for "keeps,"
.marbles are perfectly admissable in the
main hall. According to eminent authorities, "Old Chum" bags make excellent receptacles.
The boy who was expected to deliver
the prze, intended for the Women's
Oratorical Contest last week, being unable to find M<ss Alma Mater anywhere
about the building, returned down town
with his parcel, firmly convinced that
there was no such person dwelling in
Fairview.
STUDENT SERVICE IS POORLY
ATTENDED
The few who were energetic enough
to attend the brief Sunday afternoon
service in the Auditorium had the privilege of listening to a short talk from Mr. f
Hal. Robertson, travelling secretary of
the Student Volunteer Movement. He
succeeded in eliminating from the minds
of the audience a popular conception of
the work of the missionary, who is pic^
tured as wearing a frock-coat, a tall
collar, and top hat, laboriously preaching to a single, sparsely-clad native under a tree.
Mr. Robertson surveyed the work ©f
the missionary in one province of China,
with a population of sixty million people, as an example. There had been no
so-called institutions of high learning in
this entire section of the country. Five
missions have co-operated in establishing a modern university, with an efficient
staff — graduates from Oxford, Toronto
and American universities. The scope of
the work for these educational missionaries is unlimited, and they are often
asked to act in an advisory capacity in
connection with government educational
schemes.
The field for workers of all professions
in China, India and Japan is white unto
the harvest, and the call is just as in-
sistant to other countries, like Africa,
though the work is of a different nature.
President Klinck presided at the meeting, and commented on the simple but
effective and straightforward address. February 12, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
dnrrpBpmtuntr?
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer. Letters must not exceed 400 words
in length.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—I would like to bring before the
students a matter which has been In my
mind for some time, and which has also, I
am to understand, been harboured in the
minds of others, namely, that of a University song book.
Please do not misunderstand me. Not for
one moment do I intend to bring Into ridicule our present song book: that book has
formed the beginning of our college songs;
but I believe we have outgrown it, and that
the first and next step should be to bring
out a song book similar to that of other
universities.
Mr. Russell recently asked the Glee Club
how many had University song books
(meaning editions containing music). Six or
seven hands went up. What better proof do
we need? We want and need a song book
containing the music as well as the words.
How can a student learn a song without the
music?
Remember the shades of Sutcliffe! He
began song-singing. Let's keep up the good
work and show him we will carry out the
idea on which he spent much time and
energy.
Many will argue that we have no songs to
put in a book. We have a few, and a valuable addition was made last year by Messrs.
COOpe and Mahrer. Even if we haven't any,
it's time we were making up and composing
a few. If a student can not compose music,
well and good. Get out the words, and the
music will soon follow. Words come before
the music, anyway. Work out a few rousing
verses, and suitable music can soon be added
to round the whole into an excellent college
song. Think of the glory and fame, ye students'. As for price, it won't be much if
everyone helps. Any student would willingly come across with $1.60 for a real University song book that was worth it. And he
or she could keep it and be proud of it.
It's time we were waking up to our opportunity. What I suggest—I know I'm presuming a great deal—is that the Students'
Council appoint a committee, outside that
body, to study the matter carefully and thoroughly. If the necessary work can not be
completed this year, I feel sure next year's
Council will gladly reappoint the committee
to complete the work. Some, I know, will
raise aloud scornful and pessimistic voices;
but the work has to be done some time.
Why not now?    Think it over!
What better thing could we do for our
University, what greater credit could we
bring upon ourselves—Arts, Science and
Agriculture, '20 to '23—than to be the first
to line up our University with the others by
means of a real, first-class University song
book?
Thanking you,  Sir, I remain,
R.  E. FOERSTEfc.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—My letter of January 22nd appears to have caused some comment. Perhaps my meaning was rather obscure. At
any rate one person at least thinks it contains a hidden plot. He thinks that this
letter, which at first glance appears to be a
gentle rebuke to those who wilfully condemn our not all unworthy neighbor to the
South,  is not what it seems.
In order to grasp the full significance of
the plot as he sees it, one must ignore the
general context of the letter and read between the lines, then enclose a few words
In quotation marks. If by that time the
plot is not cimplete, a few sentimental suggestions from a fertile imagination will
suffice.
If my critic had confined himself to condemning German militarism, I could but
heartily agree; but since he takes exception
to my statement that there are many splendid people in Germany, I am of necessity
compelled to reply to his letter.
In his opening paragraph he banishes
everything German for at least two hundred
and fifty years. In reply, I oan only refer
him to a verse which I once memorized:
"Love your enemies, bless them that curse
you, do good ti them that hate you, and
pray for them that despitefully use you and
persecute you; that ye may be the children
of your Father which is in heaven."
When by banishing the Germans I must
also banish my belief in the teachings of
Jesus, I confess I lack the "consummate
nerve."
As I study the second paragraph, I feel
sure that my critic did not say what he
meant, because by using a double negative
he accuses me of disparaging the work of
the Americans  in  the  war.
With regard to "fraternizing with Fritz,"
I can only say that when we went to Germany I decided to find out some things for
myself. For the remainder of this paragraph
I do not hold my critic responsible, because
when sentiment or passion takes the helm
reason is submerged.
As to my critic's opinion of the German
people formed by his visit to Germany, he,
like myself, is entitled to his opinion, and
he is most fortunate In being able to voice
the opinions of nine hundred and ninety-nine
out of every thousand.
I spoke to a great many prisohers of war,
and in almost every case they had been
used abominably; but if food was as scarce
in Germany as our papers led us to believe,
I wonder that they survived ut all. I wonder if all the prisoners taken by the Allies
were treated according to the rules of "British Fair Play"?
Regarding the remarks as to my admiration for the "Maid in Germany," I must
congratulate my critic on his ability in making puns.
Taking it literally, I may say that I respected the maids in Germany as I respect
maids in every other country.
If he meant that I was opening a market
for German-made goods, I luust deny the
allegation. Of course, we must collect the
war debt in full. Just how we are going to
di this without accepting German goods
puzzles me a little; but, of course, my critic
can explain this.
Yours  sincerely,"-
OBSERVER.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Please allow me a short space
in the columns of your paper to disagree
with you in regard to your editorial, "Student Regulations."
The student body gave its opinion gn the
question in an  unmistakable fashion at the
(Continued on Page 6)
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Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,  B. C
Phone, Fairmont 2075
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Bridgman's Studio
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Insist on your Dealer supplying
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KEYSTONE
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COVERS and SHEETS
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No. 2768 Open Side size 9V£ x 7%
No. 2769 Open Side size 10% x 8
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturing  & Wholesale
Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
Vancouver   and   Victoria,    -    B. C.
R. £. Purdy, Ltd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET
CORRESPONDENCE
(Continued from Page 5)
meeting; and yet you see fit not only to
make incorrect statements in reference to it,
thus creating an erroneous impression in the
minds of those who were not present, but
also to put your criticism in a way calculated to create antagonism and foster just
such a spirit of "revolt" as you arbitrarily
declare to be present.
In your editorial this incorrect statement
occurred: "At the meeting last week there
was not a single objection to the principle
of limiting University dances to 1 o'clock."
Pull yourself together, Mr. Editor! That
"principle" was the ground upon which the
recommendation for the rescission of the bylaw in question was brought forth. For the
sake of that "principle" the second amendment to the recommendation was overwhelmingly defeated. The "principle" of
the thing was that the student body could
not realize what legitimate control the Students' Council had over their action when
they were outside the University, and thus
voted that the by-law be rescinded in so far
as it referred to functions held outside the
University. (You must admit that those
last three words and their significance were
carefully overlooked in your editorial.) There
has been no "revolt" against regulations
within the University.
Therefore, if this action of the student
fcudy is "to revel In a revolt against regulations," the advent of Bolshevism in our
midst can do no other than reflect credit on
the calibre of the students of this University.
The sentiment that "democracy and common sense alone should prevail" was stated
by no speaker in the meeting, and is entirely a chimerical product of your imagination,
and therefore your allusions to it are ridiculous as well as irrelevant.
If your "logical conclusion" in the light of
these facts is arrived at logically, the University would do well to appoint a new staff
in the Department of Philosophy, In order
that the old system of logical reasoning
might be  superceded by the new.
Is not the function of the Students' Council to carry out the manifested desire of the
student body as a whole?
From your contention that the Alma Mater Society ought "to vest in them the right
of imposing certain restrictions upon that
body," regardless of its wishes, one would
judge that the function of the Students'
Council was to form an alliance with the
Faculty to conspire for the complete subjugation of the student body.
J. M.
ALUMNI LUNCHEON
A luncheon will be held next Saturday
in the Hotel Vancouver by the Alumni
Society. The sneaker w*ll be W. E. S.
Winn, of the Workmen's Compensation
Board. Tickets may be obtained at
Burns' Drug Store, Granville Street, until to-morrow evening. Juniors and
Seniors are cordially welcome at all such
graduate  functions.
DRAMATIC ASPIRATIONS
FOR 1920
McGill Seniors—"The Weaker Sex,"
Sir A. Pinero.
Manitoba—"The Magistrate," Sir A.
Pinero.
Alberta—"Barbara's Wedding," J. M.
Barrie, and "Joy," John Galsworthy.
Art  and  Style Clothes Shop
Hose ^i Everything
TJETTER DROP IN and get
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you'll find just the kind of togs
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what the other fellow shows. They
don't cost any more either.
Good   Silk   Hosiery   at   $1.50   or
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Wonderful  Shirt values  at $3.00
and up.
Pyjamas at 'most any price you
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Ben Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Castle Hotel is next door)
Trob Cut flower*.     Taneral Work a Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and  Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street
BRANCH STORES:
57  Hastings St., W.
932  Granville   St.
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government   St.
Phone, Sey. 6410
Phone, Sey. 2313
Phone, Sey. 8723
Phone 4742 February 12, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
•VARSITY — MOUNTED
TALKING OF BONES
K-nl-ys-de, the day after the turnout
for the Arts '20 relay team, was heard
to remark: "Every bone in my body
aches, except mv head." And he wondered why we all laughed.
fn the first league game of the year
the 'Varsity football team defeated the
R.N.W.M.P. by a score of 2-1. The
game was fast from the start; and, although the 'Varsity should have had at
least two more goals, we can still feel
satisfied, for the Mounties were considered the strongest team in the Wednesday League.
During the first half the Red Coats
only encroached upon the 'Varsity defense twice, and on each occasion were
quickly checked. Abort the nvddle of
the half Cameron scored for the blue and i
gold with a beautiful shot which the
goalie had no chance to intercept.
Shortly after the resumption of play following the intermission, 'Varsity was
awarded a penalty, and Crute scored
with a beautifully placed shot. Time
and aga;n the 'Varsity forwards rushed
the Police goal; but a quagmire immediately in front was almost impossible
to pass, and no further score resulted.
Ten minutes from the end the Mounties
svddenly woke ut>, and, after repeated
attempts, succeeded in getting through
with a shot that scraped the post in its
course. For the remaining seven or
eight minutes Wolverton, Baker and
Keenleyside were kept on their toes to
prevent the t:eing score, and the whistle
at length saved the game. Although a
great crowd of Police supporters were
on hand, only a few students turned out;
and thus the 'Varsityites lost an opportunity to see a nrreat  ijarae.
Lineup : Keenleyside, Wolverton,
Baker, Crute, Mitchell, Cant, Jackson,
Foley, Cameron, Denham.
U.B.C. CAPTURES TITLES
(Continued from Page 1)
tral territory for the first time. After
about five minutes of tit-for-tat play, the
'Varsity three-quarters got possession,
and Hunter made a forty-yard dash to
the corner for the first touch. Thus ended the great suspense, and the subdued
enthusiasm of the "U" legion soon revealed itself. The kick was from a difficult angle and Gwyther failed to convert. 'Varsity now forced the nlay and
they had the Centrals saving. The forwards were following up well. About
this time K. Carlisle's jersey began to
show more than the prescribed colors, so the game was halted wlvle he
changed. During the last few minutes
of play Centrals were holding to 'Varsity
terrain.
Gwyther kicked off after the rest, but
the ball landed foul. Then, following a
centre scrum, there developed a kicking
duel, with honors even. After about ten
minutes 'Varsity started forcing the
play; the scrum was working much better now. Hunter and Tofte both came
close to making tries, and the cardinals
were forced to save several times. Some
end-to-end play followed, with the three-
quarters making nice rushes. On one
of these occasions "Pinky" got away, but
M. PERRIN, Manager — 20 years with the leading Hotels of Europe and America
BARRON HOTEL RESTAURANT
A   DIFFERENT  PLACE
Often you hear it said:  "The Barron is different!"
MAYBE it's the quality of the cuisine.    Perhaps it's the superiority of the music.
Again,  it  may  be  the  dance  floor—or  the  atmosphere  that  pervades—or  the
character of the people.
PERHAPS  it  is  all  three—for  the   BARRON  is  different,   and  that  is  why  this
expression has become so respected.
"More than a Restaurant — a Vancouver Institution"
Matinee Luncheon, 11.30 to 2.30
FRENCH DINNER  Every Day, including Sunday
5.30 to 9 p.m.
GRANVILLE AND NELSON STREETS Phone, Seymour 2011
PHONE, SEYMOUR   7853
C. HERMANN, Proprietor
&¥MM*
U.B.C.  Students Should  Patronize
HERMANN'S   BARBER   SHOP
ROGERS  BLOCK, 464  GRANVILLE  STREET
was well tackled by Crann. At this stage
the best individual effort of the game
was made. Wallis closed in on Morin,
as he was catching a punt, and, snatching the ball, he evaded Crann and
touched behind the goal. Gwyther had
no trouble in converting this time. The
Centrals came right back, and McGowan
scored a try after a nice run. The cardinals failed to convert, and 'Varsity
remained on the defensive till the finish.
Bickle, James and Carlisle played a
good game on the forward line for college. Hodson, the new find from the
Science ranks, also showed to good advantage throughout. "Lou" Hunter, the
speedy wing three-quarter, was the
bright star of the back division, and
proved a tower of strength with his neat
recoveries and kicks.
'Varsity lineup: H. Gwyther, Wallis,
Morrison. Ross. Hunter. Ternan, Tofte,
Honeyman. Gross, Bickle, Carlisle,
Swanson,  Plummer, James and  Hodson.
The 'Varsity If. Rugby team settled
all doubt as to their right to the intermediate championship of the province
by winning the curtain-raiser on Saturday. The college boys showed a better
general knowledge of the game than
their Victoria opponents, and worked
with the confidence of veterans.
The "U" forwards started right out
at the whistle, and pushed deep into
Victoria terr'tory; the front line was
more than holding their own. The 'Varsity b?ck division, however, had not
found their pace, and the left wing lost
several opportunities through fumbles.
Play remained close to the Victoria line
and   they  were   forced   to   save   on   two
occasions. After the game had gone fifteen minutes the 'Varsity three-quarters
got going right, and Russell touched
after a nice run. It was a corner try
and Hearst had little chance to convert.
The University boys had all the better
of the play till near the end of the period,
when Victoria worked their way to centre field. 'Varsity had two free kicks in
this session, but Arkley and Scott were
both a little short on their drops.
The second period found the ball permanently planted in Victoria's half.
After some good three-quarter runs,
Arkley got over for the second try. The
forwards continued to follow up well,
but they were not getting the ball from
the scrum. About the middle of the session Russell made the 'Varsity's third
touch after some neat passing by the
backs. The three-quarters stuck to the
attack, and E. Solloway came near scoring on one occasion. He was tackled
hard by the Victoria fullback and laid
out for a few mmutes, but he came back
and helped finish the job. Callaghan also
came within inches of securing a try
soon after. The U.B.C. boys were going strong and the game ended with the
ball across the Victoria touch-line.
Neither of the touches in this. period
were converted, owing to the difficult
angles.
On the 'Varsity forward line Meeki-
son. Greorg and Gunning played a great
game. Callaghan and Scott at halfback
were a formidable pair, while Russell,
on the three-quarters, worked well.
Lineup: W. Hatch, Russell, Hearst,
Solloway, Arkley, Harvey, Scott, Callaghan, Wallace. D. Hatch, Jones,
Gregg, J. Weld, Meektson and Gunning. THE   UBYSSEY
February 12, 1920
Deer mertel—joe
Deer Mertel:
I gess you are still wondering why I
didnt rite to you last wk. but it was
worrey and disapointment witch caused
me to neglect you Mertel. It all started
when I found out that all that stuff
about a fraternity was a joke and that
some of the fellos thot they was having
a lot of fun with me. I will get revenge
if I have to spend money to do it. You
no what I am, Mertel. Then the next
day I went down to the "Better 'Ole"
witch is the name the newspaper call
there office in this University and I
found Mr. Webster there playeing soly-
tare. Will you play poker, he sa:d. All
rite, I said. So I sat down and befour
long had lost $2 witch was all I had. Do
you blame me for being worried, Mertel?
I didnt no what I wood do, Mertel,
until I herd Mr. Peebles and Mr.
Coates, witch is in the government of
this University, say they wood make a
lot of money by betting-on the Rugby
game on Sat. Will we win, I asked.
Sure Mike, they said. Then I went to
Dr. Sedgewick and asked him if he cood
lend me $5. What do you want it for,
he said. To bet on the Rugby game, I
sad, becus I always tel the truth, Mertel. All rite, he said, heres $10, bet $5
for me too. I did, Mertel, and we both
one. I gess I am sure to pass in English now.
It was a grate game, Mertel,' and I
wish you cood of seen it, but I gess you
being of the delikate sex do not like
manley sport.
When Messers Hunter and Wallis
scored we all yelled like we were tryeing
to talk to Mr. McClay when he was with
a prettey girl at a dance but when the
Central fello scored we never said anything which I cood repeet to you Mertel. All he did was grab the ball and
run which anyone with a pr. of legs-
cood do. They was nothing to cheer
about. They is some more games this
yr. and I will bet on this University
again if I can find some fello to bet with
who has no brains. I never miss a
chance.    You no what I am, Mertel.
JOE.
HOCKEY TEAM LOSES
The U.B.C. intermediate hockey players lost their first game of the season
last Friday night, when they were defeated by the Nationals. The score was
3-1. Poor shooting lost the game for
'Varsity. Time after time they would
carry the puck right up to the goal, only
to have their shots miss the net—sometimes by several feet. The Nats., on the
other hand, took advantage of every
opportunity.
The only goal of the first period was
scored by the Nationals, after some
pretty combination. 'Varsity evened the
score in the next period, when Norm.
Grimmett batted the puck into the net.
Though play was even in the last session, the Nationals added two more
goals, while they held University scoreless.
The 'Varsity team was as follows:
Goal, Lambert; defence, Manual and J.
Grimmett; rover, Ternan; centre, Mc-
Diarmid; left wing, Plummer; right
wing,   N.   Grimmett;   substitute,   Wilson.
IILAS and VAUGHN MOORE
Studio of
Ballroom Dancing
Private and individual instruction.
Dancing increases your popularity
and social acquaintances. We instruct you to dance gracefully.
Studio: GRANVILLE ST. at Cor. of Dummuir
Pavlowa Court
Our
Fee
$10
Eight
Lessons
Our ^m°ur
Number   2081
DEBATING SHIELD
(Continued from Page 1)
portunity for labor to gain this end. Labor is entitled to seize it, legally and
morally. The unionization of labor will
lessen the possibility of violent class
war. It is the uneducated and unenlightened who are dangerous; and the
closed shop will draw them into the
unions, where, in governing themselves,
they will learn the difficulties and responsibilities  of government.
Mr. Traves, for the negative, showed
how the application of the closed shop
principle gives labor unions world domination, for none but union members
may obtain employment. He went on
to show how labor leaders of to-day are
becoming increasingly more radical and
less worthy of being trusted with great
powers. The strike, said the speaker, is
the clumsiest weapon labor has. He
urged that labor throw aside this weapon and take up that far more sensible,
democratic and powerful one—the ballot. The worker has the ballot. Let
him use it intelligently, and in that way
gain redress for his wrongs.
Mr. B. H. Wallace, for the affirmative,
laid down the principle that industrial
democracy is essential to industrial
peace. Industrial democracy can be obtained only through the closed shop. He
compared the position of the non-unionist to that of the slacker in the great
war, reaping all the benefits but undergoing none of the sacrifices. When great
masses of people are willing to give up
their all for a principle, there must be
something in that principle.
Mr. Stacey, for the negative, showed
how restricted output, with consequent
high prices and social unrest, was an
outcome of the closed shop. The minimum wage destroys individual initiative.
The restriction of apprentices keeps
men from learning the trades and forces
them into the great army of unskilled
labor.
Dr. Sedgewick spoke at some length
on the subject of debating, and this debate in particular, after the judges' decision was announced. The honorary
president, Mr. Henry, then presented the
Debating shield to Miss McKechnie, representing the Agricultural Discussion
Club.     .
REMEMBER THIS DATE
Keep   Friday,   February  27th,   for   the
international debate with  Idaho.
TO-DAY AND
TO-MORROW
You may not think it necessary
to save to-day, when you are
young and things are going well
with you. How about to morrow?
Life is not all sunshine, and you
should prepare for a rainy day by
opening an account in our Savings
Department.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where quality counts, we win.
The "Combination"
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<I This insures that perfect glove fit
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Cluff Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS   STREET,    WEST
Opposite  Bank of Commerce

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