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The Ubyssey Sep 24, 1943

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 Fraternity Rushing BeginsfNext Week
Vol XXVI
 1	
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1943
No. 2
Naughty Freshettes Will
Be Punished Tonight
Anything For A Rushee
Train 85
Soldiers
At UBC
• BAD LITTLE freshettes who didn't heed the advice of
their Big Sisters will be grimly punished at the Freshette
Supper which is being held in the Caf at six tonight.
Faces  of  freshettes  who  have      ——————————
been saucily defying tradition and % %
wearing makeup during Initiation
week will be thoroughly scrubbed
by a hand-picked group of up-
perclasswomen "who are jealous of
flaming youth."
Naughty freshettes, who have
also been treading on sacred university grass or have been attempting to lure fellow Freshmen will
also be dealt with severely.
Details of the great persecution
are not for publication, but as n
member of the executive put it,
"Freshettes will soon find that virtue brings its own reward."
Upperclasswomcn will present a
program of home-brewed entertainment. The WUS Wigglers, nine
gorgeous Hawaiian beauties, will
cavort for the freshettes, and vocals will be haidled by the WUS
Warblers. The remainder of the
entertainment will be provided by
the freshettes themselves.
Admission charge for upperclass-
women is thirty-five cents. Freshettes do not have to pay admission.
They'll pay in other ways.
It was announced at press time
that Phrateres would also contribute
a short original playlet based on
tho very improbable university
career of a freshette. The play,
authored by persons who wish to
remain unknown, is entitled "Preview In Rhyme Without Reason".
Clubs Offer
Activities
Next Week
t
• FRESHIES will be able
to become acquainted
with the various clubs "and
organizations on the campus
next week.
Murdo McKenzie, president of
the Literary and Scientific Executive, has announced that the week
starting Monday, September 27,
will be known as Club Week.
During this period, all the extracurricular groups at UBC will
co-operate In bringing to the
attention of new students the
advantages to be gained by joining
a club.
Next Tuesday's issue of the
UBYSSEY will devote a doublo
page to these University organizations. Each club will give an
outline of Its activities and Interests, and a tune-table, specifying
the dates and tunes of all orientation meetings, will also be
included.
Alberta Confers
Degree On Athlone
EDMONTON, Sept. 24-(CUP)-
The Honorary degree of Doctor at
Law was conferred on the Carl of
Athlone by the Chancellor of the
, University of Alberta at a special
convocation.
His Excellency addressed part of
the students in the reconstruction
of lcarniiuj after the war based
on sound mutual and moral foundations.
The ceremony was attended by
Princess Alice, University of Alberta Officials and high ranking
government members.
HISTORY DEPARTMENT
The Department of History announces that History 2, History IS
and History 20 will not be given
this ycar. History 3 Is given Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, at
?'3Q as stated in the calendar. History 12 Is given at the History 20
hour, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, at 10:30. No lecture has
been substituted for History 15 at
11:30 Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Those students who registered for History LS are asked to see
Dr. W. Sage as soon as possible,
and if possible, to transfer to History a
• A hand-picked group
of soldier students, ranging in ages from 17 to'21,
are at present embroiled in
a 33-week course at UBC,
intended to make* them into
first-class technical officers
for the Canadian Army.
They were chosen from junior
and senior matriculants of the
spring term. They had to make
at least 60 percent grades in
mathematics and physics in order
to tako tho course.
83 IN COURSE
The group numbers 85, all chosen
from a swarm of applicants who
went before a board composed of
Lt.-Col. G. M. Shrum, Prof. Walter
Gage and Registrar C. B. Wood.
Their course includes mathematics, physics, basic engineering,
map-reading, drafting and English.
The course is tough, needless to
say, and it allows them little time
for anything but studying.
The camp occupied by the
soldiers, formerly occupied by the
Engineers' work company, is rapidly becoming a model establishment. Huts are lined with wall-
board and are kept spotlessly'
clean.
STUDY IN BROCK
For studying the soldiers use the
big double committee room of
Brock Hall. They also use the
gymnasium.
Most of the boys come from
British Columbia centres, but the
unit includes soldiers* whose
homes are as far away as Yarmouth, N.S.
Officer in charge of the camp
is Capt. J. A. Dunster, who left
a teaching position at Revelstoke
to enlist in the Rocky Mountain
Rangers, and was later transferred
to vocational training.
"Best-Ever
Smoker"-
With Cider
• DANCING beauties, a
magician, and smoke
were the main attractions of
the Frosh Smoker held last
night, Thursday September
24 from 8:30 to 12:30 at the
Alma Academy. The M.C.,
the gentleman responsible
for the success of the evening, was Harry Curran.
Faculty Executives ana a certain number of L.SJ2. Executives
were Invited, but apart from these,
only freshmen were allowed
through the gates. No women and
certainly no upperclassmen were
admitted.
The entertainment included both
amateur and professional artists.
Among the amateurs were a couple
of hot pianists, Johnny Francis and
Doug Watt.ex-pubster, student jive
artists. Professional entertainment
Included four dancing beauties, and
a magician.
Contrary to reports, food, cider
and soft drinks, supplemented by
cigars and pipe tobacco, were supplied to the freshmen.
The smoker was a success. In
fact, Harry Curran, a veteran of
many smokers, stated, "Last
night's affair was the best In my
experience."
To-day all Frosh who attended
the smoker will appear a little
green because of last night's orgy,
but then, that's as it should be.
^.:- jtejRip^.:-:-"^5L*3W5,2? -  '       //; ,V ^
■■■■■■\ %'■''-■ ■■:•:, ■•■ ■■■:■>: v'/'. ■■•V,' %"'■-'• '■■< ■'"■ '•■■•';■■■■* ''' * < *   a
-vi.:'- ::-'■:>,:>•■-. ■:   ■$■'■:■ ■:■■_ —• V-'tiT ■/?.:'■'■<>' V.**.-:1. ■ V*.:'.   . •>       'HP.    <.*■♦*»» . s fll
y
' • V- \ ■"' •■ '*    ■ ■•- ■■■*
M^UU)K/W ^Ssy«rv*'
*•*>*
• SCENES like the one above, when every fraternity man
is a "good time Charlie", will again be seen on the campus
as fraternity rushing begins October 3. The women will
begin their rushing September 27. Seen in the picture above
is Doug Jackson, former UBC student, as a pack of wild
fraternity men try to convince him to "go" the right way.
Shrum Appointed To
Nat'l Research Council
•   ANNOUNCEMENT of the appointment of Dr. G. M.
. Shrum, head of the University of British Columbia
Extension   Department,   to   a   position   on   the   National
t
Research Council was made public last week.
The appointment was onnounocd
by thc Minister of Trade and Commerce, who Ls also chairman ot
committee of the Privy Council on
Scientific and Industrial Research,
after recommendations had been
made by members of the Research
Council, and were voted upon by
the members. The Council is composed of some of the most brilliant scientists In the world today.
The purpose of the National Re-
search\ Council la to assimilate the
work of various research bodies,
and from the various meetings
held in Ottawa during the year,
it will direct the course which research will take in the Immediate
future. Dr. Shrum spent the past
week in Ottawa confering with the
Council on plans for post-waf research.
While the immediate interest of
the Council ia in scientific research
of all kinds, 'most of its energies
are devoted at the present time to
war research.
Dr. Shrum's appointment is for
a term of three years, the expiration date being March 31, 1946.
Receives
New Honour. ..
.s«AV*^v<1ft.sy^cn,rtfry/^'
STOP PRESS!
Contrary to Curran's statement that contrary to THE
UBYSSEYS statement that
there would be cider at the
Frosh Smoker, there WAS elder
at the Frosh Smoker.
... Elected To
Research Council
Army Uses
Rooms In
e
Brock Hall
• LACK OF class room
space to serve the largo
classes enrolled in the new
army course at UBC neces-.
sitated a new allotment of
rooms in Brock Hall during
the summer. The Double
Committee room and the
Stage room have been taken
over and seats have been installed.
At present there are no courses
being given in the Stage room and
it is expected that the Musical Society, Players Club, and all other
clubs which need this room may
use it for student bookings, after
obtaining permission through the
usual channels.
The Double Committee room is
occupied every morning until 12:30
p.m. by army courses, and some
regular student lectures may be
arranged to be given there. However, it Is possible that organizations may obtain the room for
evening meetings, and requests for
such occasions must be filed at the
AMS office as previously.
DINING ROOM CLOSED
Because of the difficulty In getting waitresses, Frank Underhill
has closed the Brock Hall dining-
room for the present.
Women's War Work rjooms still
occupy rooms upstairs on the north
side, and the Student Council
sanctum remains intact.
NOTICE
• MORE books are needed by
the Book Exchange, located in
tho north wing of the Brock, and
which is open every day from 11:30
to 1:30. They will sell all the textbooks they can obtain..
Men To Meet Saturday;
Period End October 17
By JIM SCHATZ
• WITH THE RETURN of sophomores and upperclassmen
to the campus, the regular sorority and fraternity rushing
season gets under way. Opening date for men's functions is
October 3, and the period will continue until October 17.
The women's parties begin September 27.
—————^^—— \ meeting will be held for all
men interested in Joining a fraternity In Arts 100 on Saturday,
September 15, at 12:30. It wiU conclude In time for all men to turn
out for the afternoon parade. Prospective members are reminded that
they must register for rushing on
Monday and Tuesday in thc place
announced.
A luncheon and one evening
function between October 3 and
October 15 will be given by each
fraternity. On October 17 each
fraternity will hold an afternoon
and evening function.
ELIGIBILITY RULES
Eligible rushees must be Upperclassmen, attending the university
during the Winter Session, who
(a) have attended any recognized university for one academic
year and who obtain at the University of British Columbia at least
12 units credit for their academic
work.
(b) have attended Victoria Col-
lego for at least two academic
years and who have obtained at
The University of British Columbia
at least 24 units credit for their
academic work at Victoria CoUege;
and Graduates, enrolled as students
or engaged as Instructors at the
University of British Columbia,
who have obtained any degree
from any recognized university.
Students are warned to limit
themselves to not more than four
fraternities in your bidding. Eligible Victoria College men may list
as many as they want to.
SLEIGH
In an interview yesterday, Barry
Sleigh, president of the IFC, said,
"On behalf of thc 12 fraternities
on tho campus, may I offer an invitation to all upperclassmen and
graduates who arc interested in
joining fraternities this fall, and
who conform to the requirements
as set forth in the Constitution of
IFC, to register for the fall rushing
period.
"Some upperclassmen may know
little about fraternities; some may
know few fraternity men; some
may have been disinterested, to
date, In fraternities. However, for
all these men the rushing season is
to enable them to break down the
barriers of misunderstanding and
get them to understand fraternities
and their principles, and to know
the fraternity men."
Registration ends at 4:30 pjn. on
September 28. Date cards will be
distributed on the next day.
A hishing fee of fifty cents will
be charged to cover the cost of
distributing the rushing rules and
a pamphlet sponsored by the IFC.
Rushees have to find their own
transportation to and from all
functions..
Job Bureau
Open Now
Need Help
• PART - TIME employment of both men and
women students in essential
war industries through registry at University Employment of both men and
ment Bureau is a tentative
plan recently announced by
bureau director Ed Freissen.
Negotiations have been made
with Selective Service during the
summer, but rib definite statement
concerning part-time work can be
announced as yet.
OPEN NOW
Registrations will meanwhile be
made for part-time jobs, and the
bureau, which is situated in the
east end of the AMS office, will
be open from Monday to Friday ,
of this week during noon hour.
The business hours will be
extended early in the season when
the bureau is fully organized.
There will be no fee for registry.
Director Freissen and women's
employment head Helen Duncan
have announced that they themselves would appreciate the offer
of student assistance in the bureau.
Players Club
Offers New
Play at Noon
• "CURSE YOU, John Dalton,'"
Player's Club presentation  to
the Freshman class, will be enacted at 12:30 today in the auditorium.
It will be directed by Prof. Walter
Gage.
John Powell ss the villain, complete with handle-bar mustache,
will pursue heroine Margie Beale,
, with ferocious intent. But heaven,
aided by Dick Bibbs, the handsome hero, will protect the working girl.
Authentic stage devices will further the mellerdrama effect The
orchestra will be under the direction of David Campbell.
Supporting players will be
Nancy Bruce, Player's Club Alumnus, as the social register Mrs.
Dalton; Blackie Lee as the siren
Spanish adventuress; Jean Christie
who will be the hero's sister, and
. Don Chutter at the heroine's
brother.
Phrateres'
Firesides
Sunday
• FRESHETTES of the campus
will be given an introduction
. to Phrateres at group meetings on
Sunday, Sept 27.
Small groups of girls, headed by
a subchapter president, will meet
at the firesides In order to become
acquainted with each other and
with club methods and procedure.
Supper will be served at tho
firesides, after which the girls are
Invited to attend a special service
to be held at St. Andrews' Wesley
Church.
The following girls are having
firesides: Aisha Frostrup, Barbara
Green, Joan Fischer, Bernice Williams, Alice Stonehouse, Merita
Robson, Ada McLaren, Dorothy
Payson, Kay McGarry, Mary Chatwin, Shirley Yeo, Julie Van Gord-
er, Lora May Stafford, Jackie
Vance, Susan Dalrymple and Ivy
Pronger.
SCM Holds Party
For Freshmen Sat.
• THERE IS some advantage in being a Frosh. On
Saturday, September 25, at
8:30, the Student Christian
Movement will hold its annual Frosh party in Brock
HaU.
Frosh wearing full regalia will
be admitted free. Others will pay
thirty-five cents. Tickets are a-
vailable from thc S.C.M. room, 312,
auditorium building.
All rushees are reminded to hand
in their bids to Dr. Harris* office
in the Science Building early on
tho fnornlng of October 24.
SORORITY RUSHING
A general meeting of all women
registered for sorority rushing will
bo held on October 7, 12:30 pjn,,
at a place yet undecided. It is
essential that every rushee attend
this meeting as preference lists ot
each girl must be filled out then.
The remainder of the rules concerning sorority bidding and rushing will then be explained.
Rushees are invited to attend any
or all of the TEAS which will be
given by the sororities on the dales
listed below. Dates of the parties
will be given later. Each sorority
holds one tea and one evening
party.
TEA DATES
Each tea will take place from
four to seven on the following
dates: Gamma Phi Beta, Wednesday, September 27; Alpha Delta Pi,
Tuesday, September 28; Delta
Gamma, Wednesday, September 29;
Alpha Phi, Thursday, September
30; Alpha Omicron Pi, Friday, October 1; Kappa Alpha Theta, Monday, October 4; Alpha Gamma
Delta, Tuesday, October 5; Kappa
Kappa Gamma, Wednesday, October 6.
RCAF And Army
Courses Use Labs
• LT.-COL G.M. Shrum announced to—day that the RC.
A.F. and Army courses will use the
labs in the Science Building during the forthcoming year. The
hours are being arranged so that
there will be no conflict with the
science classes who normally use
these rooms. i rtt
•i;
'M'
RushingfBeginsiNext Week
Vol XXVI
■IS
hi>r,l
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24,
No. 2
\s*s
Naughty Freshe
Be Punished Toni
•   BAD UTTLE freshettes who didn't
their Big Sisters will be grimly pi
Suppfer which it being held in the Caf at,
Vaoes "ef freshettes who hive
fcten saucily defying tradition and
*fWing makei)p during initiation
■ week will be throughly scrubbed
by a hand-picked grpjrp ot up-
perclasswomen "who fere jealous of
flaming youttV'
Ngughty freshettes, who have
aleo been treading on sacred unl*
varsity grass or have been attempting to lure fellow Freshmen will
alto be dealt With eevetfly,
Details of the great persecution
are not for publication, but as a
member of the executive put It,
•^Freshettes will toon find that vlr-
tftt brings its own reward."
l^perclasswomen will present a
program of home-brewed enter-
tsihment The WUS Wigglers, nine
gorgtous Hawaiian beauties, will
cavort for the freshettes, and vocals wUl be handled by the WUS
Warblers. The remainder of the
entertainment will be provided by
the freshettes themselves.
Admission charge for upperclasswomcn is thirty-five cents. Freshettes do not have to pay admission.
They'll pay4 ip other ways.
It waa announced at press time
that Fhrateres would also contribute
a short original playlet bated on
the very Improbable university'
carter of a freshette. The play,
authored by persons who with to
remain unknown, is entitled "Preview In Jthyme Without Reason".
ill
K%1
■■•'%.
•   A
of
**$
sWPf'"«
•*%*
intended
first-clasg'!
for the
They wi
and  senl<
spring
at  least
mathematli
to take the
85 IN COl
» The grouji
from a ai
went before'
Lt.-Col. O.
Gage and
Their
matics, phyi
map-rea<
The court*
any, and 4
lor
f ftudentg, rang-
17 to 21,
embroiled in
at' UBC,
them into
officers
•0m Junior
•nit of the
bad to make
At   grades   in
[physics in order
85, all chosen
applicants who
d composed of
Prof. Walter
C. B. Wood,
udes mathe-
engineerlng,
and English.
needless to
Uttlttimi
.4, ■'. Xp-fk
Activities
Next Week
• FRESHIES will be able
to become acquainted
with the various clubs and
organizations on the campus
next week.
Murdo McKenzie, president of
the Literary and Scientific Executive, has announced that the week
starting Monday, September 27,
will be known as Club Week.
During this period, all the extracurricular groups 'at UBC will
co-operate in bringing to the
attention ot new students the
advantages to be gamed by joining
a club.
Next Tuesday's issue of the
UBYSSEY will devote a double
page to these University organisations. Each club will give an
outline of Its activities and Interests, and a tune-table, specifying
the dates and times of all orientation meetings, will also be
Included.
Alberta Confers
Degree On > Athlone
EDMONTON, Sept. 24-(CUP)-
The Honorary degree of Doctor at
Law was conferred on the Earl of
Athlone by the Chancellor of the
University ot Alberta at a special
convocation.
His Excellency addressed part of
the students in the reconstruction
of learning after the war based
on sound mutual and moral foundations.
The ceremony was attended by
Princess Alice, University of Alberta Officials and high ranking
government members.
HISTORY DEPARTMENT
Hie Deportment of History announces that History 2, History IS
and History 20 will not be given
this year. History 3 Is given Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, at
9:30 as stated In the calendar. History U Is given at the History 20
hour, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, at 10:30. No lecture has
been substituted for History IS at
11:30 Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Those students who registered for History IS are asked to see
Dr. W. Sage as soon as possible,
and If possible, to transfer to History 12.
Engineers' work company, It rapidly becoming a model establishment Huts are lined with wall-
board and aro kept spotlessly
clean.
STUDY IN BROCK
For studying the soldiers use the
big double committee room of
Brock Hall. They also use the
gymnasium.
Most of the boys come from
British Columbia centres, but the
unit includes soldiers whose
homes are as far away as Yarmouth, N.S.
Officer in charge of the camp
is Capt. J. A. Dunster, who left
a teaching position at Revelstoke
to enlist in the Rocky Mountain
Rangers, and was later transferred
to vocational training.
"Best-Ever
Smoker"'
With Cider
• DANCING beauties, a
magician, and smoke
were the main attractions of
the Frosh Smoker held last
night, Thursday September
24 from 8:30 to 12:30 at the
Alma Academy. The M.C.,
the gentleman responsible
for the success of the evening, was Harry Curran.
Faculty Executives ana a certain number of L.S.E. Executives
were Invited, but apart from these,
only freshmen were allowed
through the gates. No women and
certainly no upperclassmen were
admitted.
The entertainment included both
amateur and professional artists.
Among the amateurs were a couple
of hot pinnists, Johnny Francis and
Doug Watt < x-puhster, student jive
artists. Professional entertainment
included four thmcing beauties, and
a magician.
Contrary to reports, food, cider
and soft driiks, supplemented by
cigars and pipe tobacco, were supplied to the Yeshmen.
The smoker was a success. In
fact, Harry 0 irrun, a veteran of
nrny smoki-rs, stated, "Lost
night's affair wm the best hi my
experience.
To-day *i F -onh who attended
the smoker w il appear a little
green becauw of last night's orgy,
but then, th it's as, it should be.
Anythingrw A Rushee
t -v».
fcs>$)
.f '<& ■
p* V
„      ' ^   .' '
*<
* SCENES like the one above, when every fraternity man
is a "good time Charlie", will again be seen on the campus
as fraternity rushing begins October 3. The women will
begin their rushing September 27. Seen in the picture above
is Doug Jackson, former UBC student, as a pack of wild
fraternity men try to convince him to "go" the right way.
Shrum Appointed To
Nat'l Research Council
•   ANNOUNCEMENT of the appointment of Dr. G. M.
'   Shrum, head of the University of British  Columbia
Extension   Department,   to   a   position   on   the   National
Research Council was made public last week.
The appointment was announced
by the Minister of Trade and Commerce, who is also chairman ot
committee of the Privy Council on
Scientific and Industrial Research,
after recommendations had been
made by members of the Research
Council, and were voted upon by
the members. Thc Council is composed of some of the most brilliant scientists in the world today.
The purpose of the National Research Council It to assimilate the
work of various research bodies,
and from the various meetings
held in Ottawa during the year,
it will direct the course which research will take in the Immediate
future. Dr. Shrum spent the past
week in Ottawa conferlng with the
Council on plans for post-war research.
While the immediate Interest of
the Council ta in scientific research
of all kinds, most of its energies
are devoted at the present time to
war research.
Dr. Shrum's appointment is for
a term ot three years, the expiration date being March 31, 1946.
Receives
New Honour
STOP PRESS!
Contrary to Curran's statement that contrary to THE
UBYSSEYS statement that
then would be dder at the
Froeh Smoker, there WAS dder
at the Frosh Smoker.
fsa
**■
Men To Meet Saturday;
Period End October 17
By JIM SCHATZ
• WITH THE RETURN of sophomores and upperclassmen
to the campus, the regular sorority and fraternity rushing
season gets under way. Opening date for men's functions is
October 3, and the period will continue until October 17.
The women's parties begin September 27.
——————————— a meeting will be held for all
men Interested In Joining a fraternity In Arta 100 on Saturday,
September 15, at 12:30. It will con.
elude In time for all men to turn
out for the afternoon parade. Prospective members are reminded that
they must register for rushing on
Monday and Tuesday In the place
announced.
A luncheon and one evening
function between October 3 and
October 15 will be given by each
fraternity. On October 17 each
fraternity will hold an afternoon
and evening function.
ELIGIBILITY RULES
Eligible rushees must be Upperclassmen, attending the university
during the Winter Session, who
(a) have attended any recognised university for one academic
year and who obtain at the University of British Columbia at least
12 units credit for their academic
work.
(b) have attended Victoria College for at least two academic
years and who have obtained at
The University of British Columbia
at least 24 units credit for their
academic work at Victoria College;
and Graduates, enrolled at students
or engaged as instructors at the
University of British Columbia,
who have obtained any degree
from any recognized university.
Students are warned to limit
themselves to not more than four
fraternities in your bidding. Eligible Victoria College men may list
as many as they want to.
SLEIGH
In an interview yesterday, Barry
Sleigh, president of the IFC, said,
"On behalf of the 12 fraternities
on the campus, may I offer an Invitation to all upperclassmen and
graduates who are interested in
joining fraternities this fall, and
who conform to the requirements
as set ferth in the Constituvon of
»jq$»4q ^m. let*ZMU)*m
... Elected To
Research Council
Army Uses
Rooms In
Brock Hall
• LACK OF class room
space to serve the large
classes enrolled in the new
army course at UBC neces-
sitated a new allotment of
rooms in Brock Hall during
the summer. The Double
Committee room and the
Stage room have been taken
over and seats have been installed.
At present there are no courses
being given in the Stage room and
it is expected that the Musical Society, Players Club, and all other
clubs which need this room may
use it for student bookings, after
obtaining permission through the
usual channels.
The Double Committee room is
occupied every morning until 12:30
p.m. by army courses, and some
regular student lectures may be
arranged to be given there. However, it is possible that organizations may obtain the room for
evening meetings, and requests for
such occasions must be filed at the
AMS office as previously.
DINING ROOM CLOSED
Because of the difficulty in getting waitresses, Frank Underhill
has closed the Brock Hall dining-
room for the present.
Women's War Work rooms still
occupy rooms upstairs on the north
side, and the Student Council
sanctum remains intact.
NOTICE
• MORE books are needed by
the Book Exchange, located In
the north wing of the Brock, and
which is open every day from 11:30
to 1:30. They will sell all the textbooks they can obtain.
Job Bureau
Open Now
Need Help
• PART-TIME employment of both men and
women students in essential
war industries through registry at University Employment of both men and
ment Bureau is a tentative
plan recently announced by
bureau director Ed Freissen.
Negotiations have been made
with Selective Service during the
summer, but no definite statement
concerning part-time work can be
announced as yet.
OPEN NOW
Registrations will meanwhile be
made for part-time jobs, and the
bureau, which is situated in the
east end of the AMS office, will
be open from Monday to Friday
of this week during noon hour.
The business hours will be
extended early In the season when
the bureau is fully organized.
There will be no fee for registry.
^Director Freissen and women's
employment hesd Helen Duncan
have announced that they themselves would appreciate the offer
of student assistance in the bureau.
Players Cluh
Offers New
Play at Noon
• "CURSE YOU, John Dalton,"
• v— «•#♦**, ^a*\-iemmtet*m-e*-
the Freshman class, Wtil be enacted at 12:30 today in the auditorium.
It wiU be directed by Prof. Walter
Gage.
John Powell ss the villain, complete with handle-bar mustache,
will pursue heroine Margie Beale,
with ferocious intent But heaven,
aided by Dick Bibbs, the handsome hero, will protect the working girl.
Authentic stage devices will further the mellerdrama effect. The
orchestra will be under the direction of David Campbell.
Supporting players will be
Nancy Bruce, Player's Club Alumnus, as the social register Mrs.
Dalton; Blackie Lee as the siren
Spanish adventuress; Jean Christie
who will be the hero's sister, and
Don Chutter as the heroine's
brother.
Phrateres'
Firesides
■4&
Sunday
• FRESHETTES of the campus
will be given an introduction
to Phrateres at group meetings on
Sunday, Sept. 27.
Small groups of girls, headed by
a subchapter president, will meet
at the firesides in order to become
acquainted with each other and
with club methods and procedure.
Supper will be served at the
firesides, after which the girls are
invited to attend a special service
to be held at St. Andrews' Wesley
Church.
The following girls are having
firesides: Aisha Frostrup, Barbara
Green, Joan Fischer, Bernice Williams, Alice Storehouse, Marita
Robson, Ada McLaren, Dorothy
Payson, Kay McGarry, Mary Chatwin, Shirley Yeo, Julie Van Gord-
er, Lora May Stafford, Jackie
Vance, Susan Dalrymple and Ivy
Pronger.
SCM Holds Party
For Freshmen Sat
• THERE IS some advant-
age in being a Frosh. On
Saturday, September 25, at
8:30, the Student Christian
Movement will hold its annual Fresh party in Brock
Hall.
Frosh wearing full regalia will
be admitted free. Others will pay
thirty-five cents. Tickets are a-
vallable from the S.C.M. room, 312,
auditorium building.
period.
"Some upperclaasmtn may know
little about fraternities; some may
know few fraternity mens some
may have been disinterested, to
date, in fraternities. However, for
all these men the rushing season Is
to enable them to break down the
barriers of misunderstanding and
get them to understand fraternities
and their principles, and to know
the fraternity men."
Registration ends at 4:90 pjn. en
September 28. Date cards wtil be
distributed on the next day.
A rushing fee ot fifty cents will
be charged to cover, the coat of
distributing the rushing rules and
a pamphlet sponsored by the IFC.
Rushees have to fbid their own
transportation to and from all
functions.
All rushees are reminded to hand
in their bids to Dr. Harris' office
in the Science Building early on
the morning of October 24.
SORORITY RUSHING
A general meeting of all women
registered for sorority rushing will
be held on October 7, 12:30 p.m.,
at a place yet undecided. It lt
essential that every rushee attend
this meeting as preference lists of
each girl must be filled out then.
The remainder of the rules concerning sorority bidding and rushing will then be explained.
Rushees are invited to attend any
or all of the TEAS which will be
given by the sororities on the dates
listed below. Dates of the parties
will be given later. Each sorority
holds one tea and one evening
party.
TEA DATES
Each tea will take place from
four to seven on the following
dates: Gamma Phi Beta, Wednesday, September 27; Alpha Delta PI,
Tuesday, September 28; Delta
Gamma, Wednesday, September 29;
Alpha Phi, Thursday, September
30; Alpha Omlcron Pi, Friday, October 1; Kappa Alpha Theta, Monday, October 4; Alpha Gamma
Delta, Tuesday, October 5; Kappa
Kappa Gamma, Wednesday, October 6.
RCAF And Army
Courses Use Labs
• LT.-COL. G.M. Shrum announced to—day that the R.C.
A J", and Army courses will use the
labs in the Science Building during the forthcoming year. The
hours are being arranged so that
there will be no conflict with the
science classes who normally use
these rooms. Page Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1943
•    From The Editor's Pen » » »
In Defence Of " The Green
»•
So far, this year's freshman class has
gone green-less. Council members, at the
general meeting of the new students last
Saturday, promised that "the green", to complete their regalia would be distributed this
week. Still none has appeared, and no information concerning the date of its appearance can be obtained.
And so another of the traditional institutions of the university has fallen by the
way-side. In attempting to avoid any publicity in downtown papers, Council has agreed
to ban the green glasses which had already
been manufactured and delivered to the
AMS office.
The Green of freshman initiation week
is the one tradition which the newcomers
have in common with almost every university in the country. Whether they will admit
it or not, they do'look forward to the differentiating characteristics, and upperclassmen expect it of them. There is no harm
in the wearing of the green, and a great deal
of innocent fun can be derived from it.
To be a student of the university is nothing of which to be ashamed, as has already
been proven. Why should university students have to slink about, hesitant to admit
that they are gaining a better education,
when they have been permitted to attend
by the Selective Service authorities?
If students do waste their time, if they
are not serious in their studies, or if they
act childishly and in a manner unfavourable
to the university, then there is every reason
to insist that there be no entertainment for
them. But through the past years the uni
versity has proven its value and through the
past years freshmen have worn the green.
Downtown people know about it, and they
expect it equally as much as do the students.
The university has made valuable contributions to the war effort and to civic
enterprises. When so much of each student's
time is devoted to compulsory training and
academic activities, it is unfair that for one
week they cannot be allowed to enjoy the
organized recreation customary in freshman'
weeks of the past.
Each year sees more and more of the
social and athletic functions lopped off the
university calendar. Why should one week,
perhaps the most memorable week of university life, be relegated to the "out for the
duration" file as well?
Green regalia, be it bows, pins, or
glasses, is a small item, but it has become
the most important one in the whole freshman orientation program. The glasses which
were purchased were inexpensive, and the
cost was paid by the students themselves.
No reverberations can reach the authorities
on that account.
Now eight hundred pairs of green cardboard glasses lie unused in the AMS office.
Council maintains that they will be used as
favours at a dance later on in the year. If
they can be purchased as favours, why can
they not be used for their original purpose?
It is the unnecessary expenditures, such as
favours at dances that should be curtailed.
Let us go without favours at dances, but
let us welcome the freshmen in the traditional manner.
Faculty Forum
B: Dr. Joseph A. Crumb
How Not To
"Polish Apple."
Although the inauguration of the
"Faculty Forum" should ordinarily be a
pleasant assignment—and I undertake it in
that spirit—it is only fair to warn the reader
that other more worthy and distinguished
members of the staff declined the opportunity. I am, in reality, writing in their stead.
When they havguread what I have written
fejr ma^' riot*a"ga!ti take their responsibilities'
so lightly, for I refuse to take their assignment seriously.
Very likely they are too preoccupied
with "sugar-coating" the not too delectable
morsels, which they have stewed, brewed
or concocted for the .intellectual appetities
of the untutored many, to undertake the unenviable task of proving that occasionally a
professor can be human. It is possible too
that they are so concerned with dusting off
the opening days exhortation on how to
succeed in college (and reconsigning it to
next year's file) that they have forgotten the
tremendous interest such a hoary document
would possess for the new generation of
students.
m
Learned By Heart
My own monumental work was stolen
and destroyed by an admiring student who
rebelled against listening to it for the fifth
consecutive year and chose that means of
making a lasting contribution to the intellectual life of the Campus. But unfortunately for posterity I had learned it by heart
and future historians will not face the difficult task of restoring that notable part of the
first epoch in the University's progress. With
the sublime conviction that it establishes a
high standard of opening day exhortations
I am giving you excerpts from it. It is entitled "How Not To Polish Apples."
The title was originally suggested by
the eminent historian, Dr. Sage, but we were
accused of plagiarism by Dean Clement and
I was subsequently sued for libel by an
apple growers' association. It was therefore
necessary to use another title but, however
well disguised, it still reveals the salient
points of any lecture in which the professor
exhorts the starry-eyed multitude to improve upon its modest foundations.
The art of "apple polishing" is undoubtedly as old as the apple itself. But in spite
of the studied guile with which it must be
practiced one might suggest that its- unpro-
pitious beginning in the fabled Garden of
Eden bodes evil for anyone who fails to
abide by its unwritten laws. As a former
member of that ancient, if not honourable
cult (most professors are) I can let you in
on a few of its trusted maxims which are
never uttered publicly; for the first rule of
the cult is that one member shall never
knowingly recognize, nor fraternize with
another.
Pointers
First, never give the professor the
slightest hint that you aspire to membership,
for he may see in you what he may desire
to forget in his own youth. Resist any impulse to smile too ingratiatingly, unless he
is quite near-sighted. Never play the sycho-
phant. There are usually so many doing the
same thing that even the professor catches
on. Do not make the mistake of asking a
question which you are not prepared to
answer in order to avoid one by the professor. That was an accepted "hedge" or
deception practiced successfully by all conjurers, but it is too common a dead give
away which may have unfortunate repercussions. A much better tactic is to engage
the professor on his pet aversion, or .on such
a consuming topic as the relation of his
subject to post-war reconstructions. Not
even an ex-conjurer can escape that temptation and will AD LIB indefinitely.
Although it is unwise to attempt to
pursue a love interest and an intellectual
one at the same time (because they are not
usually of common origin), a fairly human
instructor may abide with you if you resist
holding hands below the level of his eye,
avoid "shoulder leaning", and make a valiant
attempt to concentrate on the lecture. If
you can imagine the inane picture which two
calf-eyed adolescents present to a calloused
professor you may possibly extricate yourself from such desperate circumstances.
Be Fluent
One should make a heroic attempt to
acquire fluence in speech and in written
exposition. An ardent "apple polisher" will
not condone the sort of intellectual vulgarity
which momentarily makes the professor
think of a tavern. Our inimitable Dr. Sedgewick will tell you that some words actually
smell—or are capable of being smelled (according to Dr. Johnson). One would surely
"polish no apples" with him by suggesting
that a rose by any other name would smell
as sweet." A real "apple polisher" can convince anyone—even other members of the
cult—that a single point made with consummate skill and sparkling brilliance is worth
a dozen incoherent ideas which can escape
the prison of a limited vocabulary only by
means of vulgar vernacular.
The really sophisticated "apple polisher"
establishes an air of indifference around himself which may easily be mistaken for the
sapience possessed by scholars who without
design become completely absorbed in a
field of knowledge. Such a sophisticate never
presumes upon the deference of a professor
and gradually acquires the insouciance
which removes the last trace of insidious
design. He is then a full fledged arch-type
of "apple polisher"—a high priest of the cult
of conjurers. When by dint of hard work
and self-sacrifice that stage has been readied, the "priest" discovers the key to the
conjurer's riddle. He acquires a nice discrimination in the choice of apples and observes that the only ones worth polishing
provide their own wax.
(MEMBER, C.U.P.)
Issued twice weekly by the Students'   Publication  Board  of  the
Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Offices Brock Hall
Phone ALma 1624
•
For Advertising
Standard Publishing Co., Ltd.
Uti W. 41st w      KErr. 1811
Campus Subscriptions—11.50
Mail Subscriptions—12.00
•
EDITOKTrN-CHIEF
it Reid
Margarei
Senior Editors
Tuesday Editor ... John Tom Scott
Friday Editor ....flrgiania Hammitt
Sports Editor .....* Chuck Claridge
News Manager Marlon Dundas
Photographer   Art Jones
i «
REPORTERS
Edith Mary dePencier, Grahame
Thompson, Kay^ McGarry, Jim
Schatz, Mary Wiuron, Diana Bamp-
ton, Marian Ball, Ken Weaver, Bill
Stewart, Harry/ Allen, Dorothy
Moxon, Dean "Bonney, K. G.
Martin, Helen Worth, A. W. Attru,
Ernest Roy, Betty Stacey, Pat
Mayne, Joyce Safiderson, Don, Ferguson, Jim Henderson, Gordon
Harris, Pat Dorrance, .Russel Bales,
Virginia Bampton, Glenna Mc,
Leish, Agnes Pappajohn, Milton
Nemetz, Donna Meldrum, Peggy
Holt, Anne Dewdney, Nancy MacDonald, Jack Gilmour, Gerald
Newman, Loralne Large, Doris
Thompson, Elizabeth Scott, Bruce
Lonjon, Charlie King, Harold Siga-
let, Roma McDonald, Norm Jones,
Peggy Wilkinson, Velva Blue,
Frederick Hill, Greg Miller, Wasy,
Wasylkow, J eti n y Rodenchuk,
Ethel Shepherd, Elizabeth Evans,
Florence Danly, Heather Blundell,
Luke Moyles, Robert Armstrong,
Lila Shields, Sharon Bridge, Cal
Whitehead, Bob Weber.
• Shopping
with Mary Ann
• WITH THE transportation restrictions hitting every one
these days, and With the fall formals looming on the horlzen, it's
time you thought of a new evening
gown . . . Lydia Lawrence has thc
perfect answer to your problems
... see the new street length evening dresses, in lace thiffon,and all
th dressy materials, just right for
formal wear . . . The dresses are
personally styled, decollete or
more conservative for dinner dress
. . . Two more Phi Delt pins have
changed ownership over the summer . . .both men are juniors . . .
one of the feminine counterparts
is a tall blonde Soph, the other a
freshette ... 576 Seymour is the
address of Lydia Lawrence's exclusive shop.
* * * *
• RAE-SON'S - Clever   Floor,
where every pair of shoes is tho
same price, $5.95, has a complete
selection of dainty, dressy shoes
for downtown and date wear . . .
perky bows, open toes and heels,
high, Canadian, or Cuban heels,
are merely a few of the styles
which you will ffnd in the lower
floor shop . . . last year's Phrateres
president, the lovely blonde Alpha
Gam, is wearing the signet ring of
a man she met on Vancouver Island while working there in the
summer . . . Date shoes are fashioned of gabardine and suede, and
come in a complete range of sizes,
but they won't last long . . . make
sure of getting the pair you want
by chosing them immediately.
• Coloured gloves to add the final touch to your new fall outfit can still be obtained at Wilson's
Hosiery and Lingerie shop, 575
Granville . . . giving a lift to an
"ordinary" suit or dress, the glove3
come in brightly coloured suedo
and suedette . . . Maybe he doesn't
know it, but there's a certain Sigma Foo who has a little freshette
hot on his trail . . . seems he reacquired his pin over the holidys,
and she, who was never very pleased with the new situation, has
been trailing him all over the campus with we-don't-know-what intent . . . Hard-wearing and good-
looking ... the ideal gloves for
campus wear are the pig-tex slip-
ons to be found at Wilson's . . .
there is a complete range of sizes
and colours  In beige,  tan and
>rown.
On The
Mall
By J. T. SCOTT
• ONE   FACTOR   which
has   always   figured
largely in the making of
decisions at this University
is downtown publicity,
known to various student
martyrs as The Old Bogey,
Bugaboo or Administration
Trouble.
The Old Bogey has always
loomed in the back of student
minds. Maybe, he will always be
there.
BALLOON
In peace-time he was bad
enough, but with the war, the Old
Bogey has swelled like a toy
balloon with each succeeding year.
We are all waiting for the time
when peace comes and The Old
Bogey will shrivel with the relief
of escaping air and a figurative
snap of varsity fingers can be
made in the face of downtown
publicity.
• BUT that day hasn't arrived
yet and until it does we have
to forego the many varsity antics
which downtown papers sieze
upon.
The antics have been dying out
since the day war was declared
and most likely they will be
officially pronounced dead this
year.
Most students blame the newt-
papers for the advene publicity.
They take the attitude that the
surly dty editors of Vancouver are
out to "get" the University.
That's not true. Their business
is reporting the news and if we
make news, we can't ask them to
curtail it merely because it might
hurt us.
And if anybody doesn't think
varsity pranks are news, they're
off the beam. Anything out of the
ordinary is news. Is there anybody
who won't admit varsity students
do things out of the ordinary?
• THE OLD BOGEY has won
the   first   round   this   year.
Fear of him stopped one proposed
»obligation for the fr«shm«n. It is
my belief we might as well give
him the title, if he can stop us
on such a little thing as the green,
cardboard glasses.
We're not out here to make
headlines. They come to us. We
can't get away from them. The
death-knell of student frivolity has
been sounded early in  the year.
ENLIST BOGEY
We can still save some of that
harmless frivolity, the same sort
of frivolity which is still going on
all over Vancouver, by enlisting
The Old Bogey in our cause, as
he works both ways.
We can make the right kind of
headlines just as, but not quite as,
easily as the undesirable type.
You all know how to make them.
• IF the newspapers can put the
head "UBC students open
canteen for soldiers," beside the
head "UBC students throw Freshman in pool," The Old Bogey will
be in the ring by himself.
The Publications Board and the
Student Council are now working
on an idea which will route all
news of the University through a
central agency so that the good
and the bad is put before the
public.
Using this scheme, the three
varsity correspondents of the
downtown papers will get all
student news from the one source,
• Do you get that let-down and
grumpy feeling after spending
a day in town shopping? The one
sure pick-me-up has been discovered ... go in and wander around
the deliciously scented Persian
Arts and Crafts, 507 Granville . . .
it's cool, it's friendly, and the atmosphere has that restful, unhurried quality of the Middle East
. . . you could .spend hours and
still not cover all the wonders displayed there ... an original Persian Koran, over 350 years old,
jade, gold, silver and amber are
only a few of the priceless treasures to be found in the little shop
... It used to be spring, but summer seems to have had its share
of pin planting . , . last year's ed-
in-chief has a blonde, associate editor all sewed up with his Phi Kap
pin ... a cute little Soph is wearing the Alpha Delt pin of a tall,
wavy-haired Senior . . . Gift suggestions abound In the little corner of the East, and prices range
from fifty cents up . . . for something out of the ordinary try the
Persian Arts and Crafts as your
gift selection center.
ANYTIME IS A BETTER TIME WITH A SWEET CAP
If you're "C.fl." and hating
The thought of who's dating
Jhe-sweetie you're longing to w/n;
Think of girls fust as fair
That you'll meet "over there"
—And fhof's where a Sweet Cap comet Ini
SWEET CAPORAL
-v    CIGARETTES
''Th* pur.it form In which foboeco can be •moked"
...You can
spot it every time
YOUTH in everything it does,
goet for the people and things
that are "right." That's why youth
goes for ice-cold Coca-Cola. It
it "right"... in quality... in
taste... and in refreshment.
It's the drink that belongs to
youth's rltualof refreshment.
And there's reason for this.
Ice-cold Coca-Cola has
what it takes... a clean,
fresh taste »•.
unmistakable
refreshment. A
special blend of
flavour-essences
merges all the wholesome ingredients of
Coca'Colalntoanorlglnal
taste of its own.
* * •
t natural for popular names to acquire
friendly abbreviations. That's why you
hear Coca-Cola called Coke. Both mean
the same.. ."coming from a single source,
and well known to the community."
The cuMom in every neighbourhood...to enjoy
detlclout Ice-cold Coca-Cola... though not M
often In wartime at before. And remember
when you lometlroet can't set Coca-Cola, it's
because Coke, being firat choice, telU out firtt.
The belt It always the better buy}
THE COCA-COLA COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
VANCOUVER
<S7
FOR COLLEGE
WEAR
•
Town Talk Shoes
For Women
Foot Pals
For Men
THE STURDY MEN'S SHOE FOR COLLEGE
WEAR
JAMIESON BROS.
837 GRANVILLE      (Opp. CAPITOL THEATRE)
and   no   conflicting   stories   will
result.
When they want to know something about the latest council
action, they will henceforth ge to
the editor-in-chief of the Publications Board for the information.
No other student official will give
out information.
• THE EDITOR will give out the
information correctly or withhold it for a while if it needs
confirmation. The editor will also
inform the other correspondents
what vein the story is being
written in.
Thus student news will receive
a fairer treatment than in the past
Competition between correspondents, which was one of the main
reasons for the adverse publicity
(each one tried to beat the other
with the latest student actions),
will be eliminated.
EXPLOSION THIS YEAR
The scheme may, or may net,
work. It may lick The Old Bogey,
but he'll still be around no matter
how much war relief money we
raise or what charitable causes we
subscribe to, if varsity students
persist in some of the wilder
antics of former years.
Moderation with fun; determination with war effort and The Old
Bogey can be exploded this year.
r/V,i9  afro- Friday, September 24, 1943
TriE   UBYSSEY
Page Three
Co-Eds Plan Full And Varied War Work Year
Courses Begin Next
Week For All Girls
• UBC SOLDIER co-eds, who are planning a strenuous
war work program for the coming semester, will roll up
their sleeves and take their places in the University's war
effort with the men next week as they begin the second year
of compulsory women's war work.
map reading are a few of the
courses to be offered for credit
this year.
•Details of the plan were presented to all women last Friday at a
special meeting called by the Dean
of women, Dr. Dorothy Mawdsley.
FRESHETTE COURSES
War Work B, the lecture part of
the training was dealt with first.
Courses offered to freshettes Include home nursing, first aid, or
an hour of sewing or knitting in
the Red Cross room as an alternative. '*\
Students who are going up for
re-examination in first aid take
two hours a week the first term,
and others who wit^a to take the
course attend two hours the second
term. - ^
Home nursing mil be given
throughout the tow terms, starting
October 19 and 20, and finishing
February 8 and 9. This period will
Include 13 two-hour lectures.
ADVANCED COURSES
The course in day nursery is still
being prepared by a committee,
but Miss Mary Oleason, of the
Social Work Department, said that
the practical end of the work
would be stressed. A psychology
course is prerequisite for these
lectures.
Dr. H. M. Mcllroy, who will give
motor mechanics, was unable to
be present. Dean mlwdtley read
a message from him concerning
the course, in which he said that
the lectures deal with the theory
of operation of motor vehicles,
and practical experience would be
obtained from the Mechanical Engineering laboratory.
Contrary to previous announcement, a driver's license Is not prerequisite for this course.
The course in map reading is
related to motor mechanics, and
together with it composes the
standard Army Driver's course.
A  special course in typing  is
J»talgJ&firtfe^
by the Duffus School of Business
down town. Lectures will be given
for one hour a week on Friday
afternoons for five months, and
only twenty-five students can be
accommodated.
WAR WORK A
There has been an effort made
to have more progression in the
War Work A classes this year,
according to Miss Gertrude Moore.
In recreational leadership, folk
dancing and play and playground
'Appy Aussies
Phyl Bishop ...
Drill, canteen work, home-nursing, first aid, motor mechanics and
>,> io\i \\»\.'. v:.
iKUVkV^W^AWr
LAC'a ERIC WINGETT, LES CLOUT, GAVIN BARBOUR
Three Australian Airmen
"Attend" UBC in Summer
•   VARSITY hospitality is  one thing three  Australian
airmen, who were on the campus this summer, can vouch for.
The three, LAC Eric Wingett,       —————————
LAC Les Clout and LAC Gavin ,   '
Barbour, spent the holidays u the      LaW SoCtOty
WiU   Visit
The   Courts
• UNDER the guiding gavel of
Tom Fisher, the Law Society will
this year continue its ultimate aim
of establishing a law faculty at
UBC.
Programs will consist of varied
and Informal talks, and will be
highlighted by frequent visits to
local courts. The Society will alto
have the use of the Court House
library.
Students of all years who are
interested in any branch of law
are asked to contact members of
tills year's executive: Tom Fisher,
president, Dave Lawson, vice-president; or Dave Housser, business
manager.
Campus Wear . . .
The Dance . . . and
Those Other
Informal Times
Handy, too, right
opposite The Bay.
WILLARD^
Mil   C.MAN VII I 1     '> I
unofficial guests of the summer
session.
NO EXAMS
They sat in on lectures, studied
In the library and made good use
of the Brock Hall Lounge, while
waiting for their return to the
continent below the equator.
No, they didn't take exams.
Before their unofficial tour of
duty «t UBC, they were taking
flying training In Alberta and are
now ready for the long trip home.
In typical Aussie accent they
told THE UBYSSEY they were
delighted with the hospitality of
the University.
PLEASED
"We are very pleased with the
way UBC offered us the use of
lecture rooms, the library and tho
Brock," they chimed in together.
They don't know when they will
begin the trek home. In the
meantime, they've got "many
thanks" to hand out to UBC.
two aeotiona have been set up,
one for beginners and one for the
more advanced students.
In addition to the compulsory
work, provision has been made to
accommodate half the women at
UBC for recreational activities.
This has been made possible by
the addition of an assistant to Miss
Moore, Mrs. Helen Dauphin.
All courses, with the exception
of typing, home nursing and the
Red Cross Corps, begin lectures
on Monday, September 27.
Students'
Your favorite all-weather topcoats
are now here at The BAY for you.
Treated for water-repellency they
maintain their casual, good-
looking appearance In any kind
of weather. We have them in the
popular style sketched right—
with fly-front, deep slash pockets
and close-up collar, as well as
belted styles. All at populor
prices—in wanted shades of light
beige, fawn and navy. Pick yours
out tomorrow so you'll get a full
term's wear out of it.
Men's and Boys' Clothing, Second Floor
tynUonf^aii (Eamnann..
iNCOR^OKAflO   »"!■'•  MAY 10TO
ECONOMICS SOCIETY
All members of the Economics
Society are reminded that the lirst
meeting of the year will take place
at eight o'clock on 'Wednesday,
September 29, at the home of Mr.
G.W. Ashworth, 2466 West Uth
Ave. The speaker for the evening
wiU be Mr. William Mercer, regional director of the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, and graduate
of U.B.C.
Senior members are asked to
submit the topics of their papers
i,s soon as possible, so that the
early publication of the coming
year's program may be facilitated.
e   e   •   •
NOTICE
• ALL upperclasswomen and
freshettes are required to register at the Health Office in the
southwest corner of the Auditorium building within the next two
weeks for a medical examination.
e   •   e   e
NOTICE: Anyone interested in
forming a car chain, leaving from
vicinity of 45th and Granville to
Boulevard, please phone KErr. 2495.
e e e e
LETTERS CLUB
Applications for membership are
requested by the Letters Club
from 3rd and 4th Year students.
Address applications*^ the Secretary, Muriel McDalrmld, Arts Letter Rack, not later than Thursday,
October 7.
♦ » • ♦
FILM SOCIETY
The Film Society, care of Letter
Rack, A.M.S., would like to contact new members—anyone interested in film work—projecting,
managing,  advertisim;,  etc.
LOST
In Applied Science Building. A
blue Waterman's eversharp. Initials "M.J.B." engraved on barrel.
Finder please return to M. Berson,
Bay. 4 262-L. Reward.
Mary, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With cockle shells and silver bells
And one g— d— petunia.
e   •   e   e:
HEARTBREAK
Be she gone? .
Am she went? j
Done her left ij all alone?
Intramural
Program
The Same
• THE BASIS of the Intramural programme this
year will be nearly the same
as last year's. That means
that the more teams entered
in the competition the happier everyone will he, and
that definitely includes all
the involved players.
M. L. Van Vliet has suggested
that there will be a slight revision
in the method of scoring. It if
hoped that by so doing the concerned players will have a better
idea of what the goal Is. Some of
the events took too large a share
of points for the effort put into
them and consequently produced a
lop-sided score in some places.
There is also a possibility that
the three armed forces in the
campus may want to organize
competition in the athletic line.
These teams, if any at all, will
be given a chance to join forces
with the Intra-mural set-up.
As usual the freshmen are expected to produce a goodly share
of the teams in the loop. Harry
FrankUn, men's athletic representative on the Students' CouncU,
and chairman of the Men's Athletic Directorate, will be calling a
Froth rally in support of the Intramural programme during the week.
Playing scvhedule wUl be r^m as
lt ia possible. That is, as many
eventa will be played during the
term as time wUl allow. These
events include the Croat Country
Race, SoftbaU, Touch Football,
Basketball, Swimming, Oolf,
Snooker, and any othert that time
and taste want or permit.
Elsie Graham,
Players' Director,
Opens New Studio
• ELSIE Graham, known to
Players Clubbers as Mrs. A.G.
Graham, director of last year's successful "A Rogue In Bed," will
open a drama studio this year in
West Point Grey to teach dramatic work and speech training.
Mrs. Graham has attended Columbia University recently and
plans to give, among others, a
course similar to one she took there
In interpretive reading.
Included In the course wUl be
basic reading training of speeches,
Shakespearean plays, and modern
plays.
A course for teachers' training
students will also be given, designed to give them a special diploma
In tutoring.
Mrs. Graham worked last ycar
with Miss Dorothy Somerset of the
Department of University Extension and in the speech and voice
classes of summer school.
The new studio is located at
4606 West Third Avenue, and can
be reached for appointments by
phoning ALma 0595-R.
AMS Gives   %
5000 Dollars
To Red Cross
• TOTAL contribution to
the Vancouver Red
Cross Society made last year
by the students of UBC
amounted to $5,169.37. This
sum was earmarked for
prisoner of war parcels by
special request of the Alma
Mater Society.
In appreciation for the donation,
Vancouver Red Cross Officials wiU
present the Alma Mater Society
with a plaque sometime In the
near future.
The various organizations which
contributed and the sums given
are as follows;
Mile of Pennies  $232.04
Ambulance Drive  1016.85
WUS (Self-denial days) ...   290.53
Greek Letter Red
Cross BaU  1161.31
Individual donations
from atudenta  1764.62
TOTAL  $3169.37
OMVEUITY BOOK STOIE
Hit.: 9 am. to 5 pan.; Saturday! 9 am to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper
Loom Leaf Refills, Fountain Pent and Ink
and Drawing Instruments
Bengaline
BLOUSES
2»s
The college crowd love these smart
blouses made of good quality silky bengaline ... and they come in long-sleeved
tailored styles in shades of red, gold,
rose, white, Kelly green, wine, tan and
beige. Just right for campus wear . . .
Beautifully tailored. Sport Shop, Mam
Floor.
Sport Skirts 3.95-7.95
2-piece Suits
Ah, cruel Fatal
80 tad and hlifcd.
To take her 'wey
And leave I *hjind.
14.95-22.95
Make the Famous Your
College Headquarters.
623  Hastings u
Page Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1943
1
-y
Hopes  Still Kept For Canadian   Football
Bob McMillan Seeks    ^^^ J _    \   Hoop Chatter
Interested Players
• GET UP LADS, stretch, and then reach for the old togs.
Yes, you must still be ready for a possible announcement
of great football importance.
Contrary to some campus opinion
concerning Canadian football, or
American rugby, chances for play
this teaaon are not yet entirely
dead. Enough potential players
have let it be known that they
really want to play the hero-worshipping game, that feelers have
been tent out down-town to interested parties In an effort to
revive Interests in a league.
Only two teams were ready to
take the field this fall from the
commercial business establish-'
meats. These two teams could not
consider playing in a league by
themselves and apparently all hope
of Canadian football in Vancouver
folded.
.Varsity did so well in the league
of four last year that it would
welcome a chance to field a team
tlus year also. Last year the American style was played, and the
boys from Blue and Gold won
three and tied one of the six con-
When Boeings and Varsity were
on the schedule last year there
was always a pleasing crowd of
spectators. That was last season
when t^e game was making a
comeback. It was a very successful
year and with the public better
informed on the game greater success should be expected.
Remember, that before Varsity
can be expected to start a team in
practicing, a league must be guaranteed. But, there was no University representative at the meet-
bigs that were held in August and
September this summer. Now with
our little voice in the matter the
scene may change a bit.
If we can show enough enthusiasm the down-town clubs may
reconsider their laid-aside plans
and hence everyone will have another recreation for the next few
months.
Bob McMillan will be pleased to
hear from any one wanting to
play Canadian Football. The more
fellows, that are heard from, the
bigger assurance that a good team
will be ready to take on a powerful opposition In case that a league
is formed at this late date.
By LUKE MOYLS
Will They Play This Year?
• THERE is a dire need of managers for the various athletic
teams on the Campus," announces
Art Johnson, Senior A Basketball
player. Anyone Interested should
get In touch with Art as soon as
possible this week.
ALL sports will need junior and
assistant managers to help along
the teams when the season gets
going.
PROMOTIONS are possible for
good workers and the Senior Manager in each major sport wins a
Big Block award at the end of the
term.
Bruce York...
Meet Willie
she's the smartest gal
the men have ever teen.
theet great trig eyes,
her elothet are mighty
*   SHOWN ABOVE, is the last season Thunderbird American Football squad which turned
in three wins and a tie as against two losses in their six-game schedule. Several of these
players should be out again of the plans for a team come through.	
 r	
Freshies Look Like
Team To Beat Monday
•   THE MOST IMPORTANT event in campus sports for
next week is the Frosh-Soph Basketball game slated for
Monday at noon. Both groups are working hard to get their
respective squads organized for this contest.
... for Froth
Art Johnson ...
She buys them
down at Wlllards where
a gal gets what it takes.
And you can hear,
when the goes by,
the   Imprint   that   the
WHEE WHEEOO!
Willie
from
Willards
m GranvUle
... for Sopht
UBYSSEY
UBYSSEY
Art Johnson, coach of the Sophs,
says that the second year kids will
produce a team capable of swamping the newcomers. This crew will
include Vic Vaughn, BUI H1U,
"Marty" Martin, Al Kenyon, and
"Wazy" Wasylkow. AU were members of last year's Frosh outfit.
According to Bruce York, who is
taking charge of the Freshies, he
has some ace hoopsters ready for
Monday's tilt. Among these arc
Ron Weber, "Pldge" McBride, Ken
McCurdy, Don Woodhouse, and
Bob Heatherington.
In this game the Frosh will get
their chance to show their talent
to the campus basketball moguls.
The most probable star of the
Frosh lineup will be Don Wood-
house, who hails from the Canadian Champion Dominoes of Victoria.
In last year'a thrilling battle the
Frosh managed to down the Sophs
by a single point From the lineups, it looks aa if this year's game
is going to be just as good. Don't
miss It Monday at noon in the gym.
NOTICE
The Beginners' Spanish text
which was delayed in passing
through customs has been released
and is now on sale at the bookstore.
THE
British Columbia
Advisory Board
Hon. W. A. Macdonald,
Eric W. Hamber
R. P. Butchart
J. H. Roaf
W. H. Malkin
K.C.
Toronto General
Trusts Corporation
ESTABLISHED
1882
Vancouver Office:
Pender and Seymour Streets
ASSETS UNDER ADMINISTRATION:
$245,000,000.00
Co-Ed   Sports
• ALL RECREATIONAL phases
of coed sports wUl be under the
direction of Helen Hobbs Dauphin.
Mrs. Dadphin, who received her
Arts Degree at the University of
Western Ontario, it also a graduate of MacOUl's Department of
Physical Education and is an excellent horsewoman and swimmer.
She has had a lot of experience
in sports in elementary and high
schools, in universities and camps.
She will be in charge of monthly
sports activities, which are Archery in October, Playday hi November, Swimming in January, Ping
Pong in February, and Softball in
March.
The Intra and Extra Murals wul
also be uhder the supervision of
Mrs. Daufhin. Already there are
two basketball teams entered In
the League. Members of the team
that won the Lower Mainland Cup
last year will be playing again this
year. They are Margie Rogers,
Jean Handling, Doreen Parks,
Bobbie Glteene, Irene Pierce, Bea
Inch, Mac Boothe, Dorothy Payson,
andeHelen Matheson (old faithful
in goal). "'
<
Two hockey teams are being
formed, Varsity and U.B.C. The
freshettes will make up one team
and seniorliand outstanding "new"
players wtff make up the other.
 »
Big Turnout
For Soccer
• IT LOOKS like the Varsity boys are in for an
outstanding season this year,
judging from the turn-out at
Wednesday's practice. With
the number of players that
appeared!at this first tryout,
it's possible that UBC could
field two teams.
Herb Smith, Pat Campbell, and
Clem Phillle are the only players
back from' last year's crew, but
there are many new feUowa like
William frdm North Van, Beebe,
from P.W., | and Ross, McNeill, and
Ard from Byng.
Another new player will be Don
Petrie,who 'starred at centre half
for St. Savitours last season.
Soccermen will find the temporary lineups! on the Quad notice
board. The i'lrst game in the V and
scheduled for Satur-
2nd, at 2:00 p.m. AU
asts are reminded to
night COTC pa-
D League
day, Octobej
soccer enth
take the
rade.
Lois Reid
OutlinesPlan
To Freshettes
• LOIS REID, Women's
Athletic Representative
on the Students' Council,
outlined the plans for the
freshettes at a meeting held
on   Saturday   morning   in
Arts 100.
Every woman must take one
hour of Physical Ed in the gym.
An attempt was made to increase
this to two hours this year but
whan it was found that the gym
lacked the facilities to handle this
the idea had to be dropped,
In addition to this compulsory
PB, there are many voluntary
sports for the female athletes to
indulge in. These include Grass
Hockey, Baseball, SpeedbaU, Archery, Basketball, Badminton and the
Intramurals.
The Orass Hockey squad wUl
enter two teams In the Lower
Mainland League which functions
on Saturday afternoons throughout
the FaU and Spring.
TWO HOOP TEAMS
In Basketball, Lois hopes that
two teams can be organised. One
for sure will be the Senior B
team, which last year won the
British Columbia Championship
and the Woodward Cup.
If enough girls show interest as
secqtfl teams, composed of Freshettes wiU be formed to enter in
the Cagette League.
The Badminton club wiU function again with Monday and
Thursday evenings set aside for
play. There will be no organized
league for the teams to play in
this winter, because of lack of
players in the downtown clubs,
but matches amongst players in
the Varsity club will provide
plenty of competition for the eager
shuttle chasers.
BARBARA GREENE HEAD
The Intramurals wiU be under
the' guidance of Barbara Greene
this whiter. She has planned two
noon hours a week, Monday and
Tuesday, when the girls wlU stage
their competitions.
On Monday volieybaU will hold
sway, whUe on the following day
there will be Badminton and Ping
Pong.
Lois added that she hopes to
have various programs arranged
throughout the year to round out
the women's sport picture.
Planned are special tournaments,
one for each month throughout the
term. In October it wlU be
Archery, a playday in November,
Swimming in January, Ping Pong
in February and in March Softball.
NOTICE
Accommodation for two men is
available In a modern suite, five
minutes walk from Varalty. Beat
of housekeeping facilities to keep
expenses down to a minimum. See
R. HUENE, Suite 6, 5658 Dalhousie
Road.
• THE SENIOR Basketball League swings into action at
VAC gym,on Saturday, October 30 and already things are
beginninjfto hum around the campus gym. Yesterday, coach
Maury Van Vliet called out all available senior hoopsters
for their first practice.
With Sandy Robertson, Art Johnson, Harry Franklin,
Art Stilwell, Gordie Sykes, Bruce Yorke, and Ole Bakken
back on the scene, it appears that the Thunderbirds should
have a good season. Only three men are needed to fill out
the squad* fend there is some good hoop material back from
both of last year's Inter A teams. And then there may be
some stars among the Freshmen, too.
Ritchie Nicol, ex-Domino now taking the Army course
here, is definitely out as a prospect for the Thunderbirds
since he was suspended from basketball for one year at one
of last year's rougher play-offs.
According to Harry Franklin, Men's Athletic Rep, there
will probably be the Senior A Thunderbirds, the Soph Inter
A's, and the Frosh Inter A team. Hoopsters are agitating to
enter a Senior B team in the V and D League, so there is
a possibility that there will be four Varsity entries in tiie
local league this season.
Powerful
Rugger
Forecast
t   REPORTS  from  the  English
Rugby  men  indicate   that  a
strong team will be fielded this
season. Many of last year's players are back, but there la lots of
room for any freshmen who are
interested.
The team ls stlU looking for a
coach to replace Maury McPhee
who is unable to take over thit
year.
All rugby enthusiasts should
turn out to the first practice which
will be held today in Stadium.
NOTICE TO
* o c^cyb-
STUDENTS
re Sessional Fees   , <t A
Toil 4*1 ~~
*y^6\
Last day f ornayitient of First Term it
October 4dCl94S. .   // V    	
All cheques mulTbe certified and made
payable to the University of British
Columbia.
For   regulations   governing   Fees,
consult your Calendar pages,
inclusive.   Late Fee will be strictly
enforced after due date.
Bursar,
The University of British Columbia
Vv
$04Ze<!f<ic
SUITS
LEAD THROUGH FALL!
Wool Tweeds, Wool
Crepes, Wool Shetland*,
all colors—fully lined 2-
Piece Suits-"Styles As
New As The t Q 7B
New Term" ***• • 9
Ladies Shirts
-SPECIAL-
Short and long Sleeves
in the best Colors that
wash and iron perfectly.
A1' 1 QR
Sizes  *«5r*>
Suede & Felt
HATS
1.00 to 5.95
AU Colors
izette
Q U A I I T Y
Sport wear   Slio|i
tfWI IT.   ««n HOC. nomi
i

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