UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 13, 1924

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0123644.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123644.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0123644-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0123644-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123644-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0123644-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0123644-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0123644-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0123644-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0123644.ris

Full Text

 ®fj£   luTJ0B?g
Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B.C., NOVEMBER 13th, 1924
No. 7
CLUB TO GIVE
XMAS CONCERT
Excellent Programme Arranged
by Musical Society
The Musical Society will be heard
in a splendid programme at the Christmas concert on Saturday, November
15th, in King Edward High School
auditorium at 8:15 sharp.
Both the Glee Club and Orchestra
will render several numbers, while the
individual talent of the University
will contribue solos, duets and trios-
vocal and instrumental.
The program is as follows:
"O Canada."
1. A Slumber Song..Frederick N. Lohr
Glee Club.
2. Piano    Solo—Hark,    Hark   the
Lark Schubert-Liszt
Gertrude Dowlsley
3. Violin Solo—Pierrot Serenade	
   Randegger
Alice Wilma Metz.
4. Ballet Egyptian, Nos. 1, 3 and 4
  Luigini
Orchestra.
5. The Slumber Boat..Jessie S. Gaynor
Ladies' Chorus.
6. Instrumental Trio—Anitra's
Dance (from Peer Gynt)....Grieg
Violin, J. E. Kania; Clarionet,
D. Lucas; Flute, R. Todd.
7. Vocal Solo—Love is the Wind....
 Alex.  MacFadyen
Lillian Reid.
8. Violin Duet—Serenade Schubert
Alice Wilma Metz and J. E. Kania.
Accompanist, Nellie Harrison.
9. Daybreak Alfred R. Goul
Glee Club.
10. Piano Solo—
(a) Liebestraune, Nocturne
No. 3 .'. Liszt
(b) Staccato-Caprice (by request)  Max Vogrich
Rose  Marin.
(Continued on Page 2)    _^
Annual Stampede
yt     Next Monday Noon
Tickets for Christmas Plays will
be Distributed to Students
The tickets for the Christmas plays
will be distributed at noon on Monday,
November 17th, as follows:
Agriculture—Braemar.
Science—Physics Lecture Room.
4th Year Arts—Room X.
Third Year Arts—Geology Lecture
Room.
Second Year Arts—Chemistry Lecture Room.
First Year Arts—
•   A   to   F,    inclusive—Commercial
Building, entering by front door.
G   to   N,    inclusive—Commercial
Building, entering by side door, near
Students' Council.
O to Z, inclusive—Room 2, entering by kitchen corridor door.
Faculty of Education — Students'
Council.
All unclassified students in all years
in Arts will get theirs at Students'
Council office. No person may ask for
more than one ticket.
McKECHNIE CUP TEAM
defeats Vancouver rep
FirVt Game of Season Ends in 3-0 Victory for Varsity.
Terrific Struggle Witnessed Between Evenly
Matched Teams
Varsity defeated Vancouver on
Thanksgiving Day in one of the hardest-fought games the matching of
these teams has produced. Owing to
the wetness of the ball, fumbling was
much in evidence, few of the three-
quarter runs on either side having any
success worth speaking of; but the
two teams made up for lack of finish
by putting heart and soul into the
game.
Varsity kicked off, but Vancouver
brought the ball right back, and a
couple of Varsity fumbles put Vancouver on the college five-yard line.
After an anxious ten minutes Shaw
returned with a nice kick, and Ramsell
continued the good work by breaking
through the ensuing line-out and taking the ball to Vancouver's twenty-five.
Several three-quarter runs were started by the Collegians, but fumbling or
uncertain passing spoiled them, and
McLean relieved the tension for Vancouver by dribbling the tall back to
mid-field. Here Kelly obtained the
ball and booted back to the City
twenty-five. Some effective work by
Varsity forwards carried the ball another twenty yards, and Lange capped the movement by plunging over
from a five-yard line-out. He failed
to convert. The half ended shortly
after this.    Varsity 3; Vancouver 0.
The second half opened with Varsity attempting a three-quarter attack,
but faulty passing rendered these ef-
VARSITY ROWERS
/ IN ACTION AGAIN
Energetic Executive Arranges
Details With V. R. C.
After much heart-burning on the
part of certain officials, and steady
perseverance on the part of J. C.
Oliver, Arts '27, and H. Maclean, Sc.
'26, the Varsity Rowing Club is at
last to get under way this Saturday at
2:30 p.m., at the Coal Harbor Clubhouse. All University rowers owe a
deep debt of gratitude to John Oliver,
for it has been through his untiring
efforts that the Rowing Club has been
able to operate at all this year. A
splendid equipment has been secured,
and until the end of the rowing season,
April 15th, 1925, the University men
are expected to make full use of it.
Already ambitious plans have been
drawn up. A light crew will be chosen
shortly to represent U.B.C. against
Brentwood College, Victoria, during
Varsity's annual invasion of the Capital city, while a racing meet with the
Vancouver Rowing Club has been arranged for the spring. There are still
places open in the club, and all applications for places should be handed
to either J. C. Oliver, Arts '27, or H.
Maclean, Sc. '26. The fees are $10
for the entire season.
forts fruitless. Vancouver now took
the offensive, but the City's three-
quarter runs were productive of little
better results than were the Collegians'. After a series of sharp attacks,
however, the Rep. threes obtained possession of the ball and winged it out
to Wetherspoon, who was away like
a flash; only fine tackling by Cameron
prevented a score. Shortly after this
Lawson marked the ball on the Varsity twenty-five directly in front of the
posts. Lange very effectively blocked
his kick, and the Rep's chance was
gone. Shaw relieved the pressure momentarily with a nice kick, but the
Rep. would not be denied and pressed
again, their forward rush being stopped only just in time by Kelly's neat
fall. Ramsell came to the rescue by
breaking through and taking the ball
into the Rep. territory before being
downed. Here Varsity attempted a
series of forward plays, but were frequently penalized for illegitimate work
in the loose and in the scrum. Stuart
eventually secured the ball and booted
it back to Varsity territory, where it
was kept for the remainder of the
game, the'whistle going with the Rep.
frantically trying to score."
Varsity, 3; Vancouver, 0.
ARTS '28 PARADE
TO RUGBY GAME
Y       ■—
Pep Band Leads Procession
to the Point
An event which is destined to become one of the leading traditions in
the U.B.C. took place on Monday last
in the form of a Freshman parade
through the city to the McKechnie
Cup game at Brockton Point. This
was the outcome of considerable disappointment manifested by the members of Arts '28 for the cancelling of
the parade on initiation night, and it
is hoped that in the future the Freshmen years will always march to the
one big game of the season.
The procession left Homer and
Smithe recreation grounds at 1:15 p.m.
with the Pep Band, containing more
.varieties—musical instruments, comic
costumes and the like—than Heinz
ever dreamed about, leading in a
sightseeing car and the whole student
body, headed by a few comedians,
bringing up the rear. The procession
occupied a block and held up the traffic along Smithe, Granville and Pender streets to Stanley Park.
At the grounds the Freshmen
assembled in the grandstand, where
they showed the true spirit of Arts
'28 throughout the game by being the
first to root for Varsity and the last
to stop. During the half-time period
the Heinz Band again led a number of
enthusiastic Arts '28 members around
the course.
GREAT ESPRIT
/AT MEN'S LIT.
Informal Debate Held at Well-
attended Meeting
"Peppiness" was the order of the
evening at the Men's Lit. last Wednesday, when an informal battle on the
question: "Resolved, that the MacDonald Government deserved the support of the British electorate," was
waged with considerable oratorical
fire.
Mr. Pilkington opened the war by
showing what a tremendous bungle
the Labor Government had made of
affairs and how much better things
were going to be now that the Conservatives were back in power.
Mr. Hector Monroe returned Mr.
Pilkington's fire in a speech which
showed what a tremendous success
the Labor Government made of affairs
and how much worse things would be
now that the Conservatives had "arrived" and how much better they
would have been if the Laborites had
remained in power.
Following these prepared addresses,
impromptu speeches were given in
rapid succession by nearly every member of the now thoroughly aroused
meeting. This fight between Laborites and anti-Laborites proved so hot
that when the question was put to a
vote, the resolution was upheld by a
majority of only one.
The meeting was one of the most
successful that the Lit. has held for
some time, many interesting phases of
the subject were brought up, and the
question thoroughly treated. Several
members of the lower years joined in
the discussion and revealed forensic
ability which promises well for Varsity's debating future.
The attendance was good, but the
Physics lecture room can hold still
more. Come along, frosh, sophs, everybody, unloose your silvery tongues
and get in training for an international
debate.
Stock Judging Team
Returns From South
>
Aggies Fail to Bring Home the
Usual Trophies
Agriculture sent fourteen of its
worthiest representatives to Portland last week to compete in the
stock-judging competition. However,
they were up against strong opposition, and were handicapped in some
contests by a different system of marking than used here, and in others by
the fact that they were contesting in
these events for the first time. Teams
from Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Oregon Agricultural College, California
and British Columbia were so well
matched that in many cases comparatively few points separated the first
and last contestants.
The Dairying team took fifth place,
158 points behind the fourth team on
a basis of 4,500 points, basing their
defeat on a different system of judging. They were second in Holsteins
(Continued on Page 4) THE   UBYSSEY
November 13th, 1924
Spencer's Is
Headquarters for
Wolsey
Underwear
THE  WOLSEY  TRADE  MARK
guarantees many things. It
guarantees that every garment
which bears it is made from
the finest selected long staple
wool. It guarantees that the
garment is absolutely unshrinkable in wash or wear. It guarantees that the garment is made
by the largest and oldest established firm of underwear
makers in England. It guarantees greater economy and more
lasting satisfaction than you
can possibly get from any other
make of underwear. Therefore,
look for the Wolsey head trade
mark on all underwear before
you buy it We carry a full
range of Wolsey pure wool unshrinkable underwear.
David Spencer
Limited
LUNCH     TEA     SUPPER
Household and Vegetarian Cooking
Phone, Seymour 2940
The Cosey Corner
MRS. DANBY SMITH
Rooms for Private Parties, Etc.
116 EMPIRE BUILDING
603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of Nora Scotia
Duo-Art Recital
Much Appreciated
The Duo-Art recital held in the Auditorium on Wednesday afternoon,
Nov. 5th, under the auspices of the
Musical Society, was highly appreciated by a large audience of students
and friends, and members of the Faculty.
Among the artists whose playing
was reproduced were Paderewski,
Bauer, Grainger, Thompson, Gabrilo-
witch and Carolyn Baldwin.
Miss Doris Wilbers was very much
appreciated in her brilliant rendering
of two vocal numbers to the accompaniment of the Duo-Art. Her unaffected singing quite charmed her audience.
From among our own number, Mr.
J. C. Kania, who is the orchestra representative in the Musical Society,
contributed a violin solo which was
keenly enjoyed. Although showing
somewhat the strain of playing with
an accompaniment which is essentially unsympathetic, he performed admirably, and rose even higher in the
estimation of his fellow students.
Of the Duo-Art numbers the items
which perhaps delighted the audience
most were "Rhapsodie Hongroise,"
played by Paderewiski, of which the
rare beauty was exquisitely interpreted by that great artist; "Les Jeux
d'Eau," played by Robert Schmitz, with
its liquid notes of rippling melody;
and "Danse des Elfes," full of vivacious gaiety and lightheartedness,
played by Gabrilowitch.
This is the second time that Mr.
R. V. Gould has given the students an
opportunity of hearing such an enjoyable program, and the very sincere
gratitude of the Musical Society and
of the students as a whole is extended
to Mr. Gould for making such a treat
possible.
/AT THE STRAND.
"Single Wives" is essentially a modern production. When a husband is
so bound up with his business that he
has no time for pleasure either for
himself or his wife, or is so wrapped
up in his own selfish pleasure that he
is a stranger to his wife, of what avail
is her devotion to him? Corinne Griffiths is a single wife, and Milton Sills
her husband in this stirring drama.
Next week a Famous Lasky Production, "Sinners in Heaven," adapted
from the English story of the same
name, will feature Bebe Daniels and
Richard Dix.
SNAPPY MODELS
FOR YOUNG MEN
In Fine English Worsteds
A splendid selection of new arrivals in suits revealing
fashion's latest decree in style, featuring both single
and double-breasted effects with one or two buttons.
■ The materials are the finest of imported English
Worsteds, showing fancy mixtures, subdued checks,
pin stripes and novelty weaves in the newer colorings.
Hand-tailored throughout, they tf* -^ f\ f\f\
present unusual value at  only «i[7«3 vJ«vJVJ
WILLIAM DICK LIMITED
45-47-49 HASTINGS STREET,  EAST
CLUB NOTES
^••••••ji
^FRENCH CLUB DANCE
Last Thursday evening the two
French Clubs, La Canadienne and La
Causerie, united at a sori4e held at
Laurel Court, under the patronage of
M. and Mme. Delavault and Mrs. Clark.
The hall was appropriately decorated
in Varsity colors, and a cheery fire
and chesterfield lent a cosy atmosphere.
The Urst part of the evening was
spent in lively conversation and amusing games. (We advise anyone who
wishes to get forecasts on the newes+
feminine fashions to appeal to Mr.
George Ledingham.) The rest of the
evening passed enjoyably in dancing,
broken only for refreshments. At midnight the party broke up, after being
voted "the best ever" by the enthusiastic sfclidents.
•BIOLOG'CAL DISCUSSION CLUB
^Jleamings from the British Association meetings at Toronto," was
the subject of Dr. A. H. Hutchinson's
address to the Biological Discussion
Club.
Many important and interesting results of recent experiments in the
fields of Botany, Biology and Pathology were reported by Canadian
Scientists. Plant inoculation, disease
in trees, reproductive processes of
various fungi, the Biogenetic laws,
chromosomes in wheat, chemical functions of insulin and the spreading of
sleeping sickness by the deadly
tsetse fly were among the main topics
brought up at the conference.
Following a short discussion during which time refreshments were
served it was announced that the
next meeting will be in the form of
a debate on the subject, "Vitalism vs.
Mechanism."
MATHEMATICS CLUB
The last meeting of the fall term
will be held on Tuesday, November
18th, in Room 34, when Dr. Buchanan
will speak on "The Three Body Problem in Celestial Mechanics." Dr. Buchanan is an authority on this subject,
having done much valuable research
work in connection with it. All those
interested in mathematics are invited
to attend.
y(    CLASSICS CLUB s~\
A meeting of the Classics ClubyWiU/
be held at the home of Professoir-H.
T. Logan, 7856 Heather street, at 8
p.m., November 15th. Professor Todd
will speak on his recent tour of the
Mediterranean world. Those eligible
for membership in the Club are cordially invited to attend. Take an Oak
street car.
./LETTERS CLUB
On Tuesday, November 4th, the Letters Club enjoyed the hospitality of
Mr. John Ridington. Mr. Ted Brown
read a short and well-constructed
paper on "Robert Bridges." The discussion which followed was lead by
Mr. John Ridington. Mr. T. W. Brown
Mr. Ridington, nearly all the members taking part. It was finally decided that Bridges should remain in
the position of Poet Laureate. Refreshments brought a very enjoyable
evening to a   close.
<r Christmas Concert
(Continued from Page 1)
11. Vocal Duet—By the Waters of
Minnetonka ..Thurlow Lieurance
Kathleen Baird and Carl Barton
12. (a)  Menuet;
(b)  Sarandole  (from L'Arlesi-
enne)  Dizet
Orchestra.
GOD  SAVE  THE  KING.
The admission is 25 cents.    Tickets
may be had from any of the members.
Important !
TWe, the J. W. GEHRKE
Co., Ltd., are the only
I people designing, engraving, embossing and printing
a full range of Autograph
and Private Christmas
Cards in British Columbia.
We created a pay-roll for
the Province when we
commenced manufacturing
fourteen years ago.
We challenge comparison in
quality and price.   Service is
naturally speedy.
GEHRKE'S ^
651  SEYMOUR STREET
(Near Hudson's Bay)
GRANTHAMs
RealFruitJuiceI
p4ftTY PUNCH
PURE CONCENTRATED
FRUIT JUICES
and CANE SUGAR
Phone for Sample
Fair. 1250
F. C GRANTHAM & CO. LTD.
700-716 16th Avenue West
VANCOUVER. B.C.
i$h$h$h$h$h$h$m$h$m$m^<$h^4$h$h£<^h$h^$h$h$h$h3h$h$i
B.C. Public Stenographers
   FOR 	
ACCURACY AND INTELLIGENT WORK
115 Bank of Nova Scotia Building
Phone, Sey. 2696 602 Hastings St., W.
Occupational lectures
The second of a series of noon hour
addresses in connection with the future prospects of students entering
Applied Science, was delivered yesterday by Dean Brock in the Geology
Lecture Room. The Dean treated of
the life and work of graduate engineers in various parts of the globe, outlining the prospects of development
that existed  there.
This series of lectures is designed
to be of use to freshmen who are considering going into Applied Science.
Last year in a similar series of addresses several of the foremost engineers of North America gave their
views, and it is hoped that similar advantages may occur during the course
of the present term.
^OUTDOORS CLUB
A victory was scored by the members of the Outdoor's Club during the
week-end when they roofed their
cabin.
Several members spent Saturday
putting on the cabin ridge and other
roof stays. They enjoyed a moonlight excursion to the Plateau. On
Sunday they were reinforced by their
Honorary President, Mr. Lighthall,
and seventeen other members. This
additional help, with the finishing
touches of those who stayed till
Monday, completed   the roof. November 13th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
English Broadcloth
SHIRTS
at $3.00 each.
WE  CAN'T  OFFER  ANY  BETTER VALUE
TURPIN BROS., LTD.
Men's Outfitters
629 GRANVILLE ST
Ed. Da Motta
HAIR CUTTING a Specialty
Expert Attendant
2558 Heather Street
WE STOCK
Varsity and Science
Pennants
SWEATERS made to order in
any color or design, at specially
low prices to students.
SKATES        SKATING BOOTS
McGill-Sparling Ltd.
Sey. 4653      718 ROBSON ST.
DRINK-
"SQUEEZE"
Grape, Lemon,
Li
,ime an
dOr
ange
Bottled by
THORPES'
*$•••*••
>•*••«•••••••••••-••••••••••*•••*••••
-••>*+
Dancing Classes!
• Adult Beginner Class, Monday ;
? SATURDAY   EVENING   SOCIAL f
| DANCE (by Invitation) !
•   i
? Private Lessons by Appointment •
• •
i ...<s>... j
• <
• Seymour J 689 J
| The  LESTER   Academy j
«|v»««»«» »"•»*•- •-•■■•••♦ ■*■>■»■>■O—•"• •*••*••*•»••••"••••»••*£»
rENUS
PENCILS
Vk largest setting Qualify
pencil in the woiid
FOR the student or prof., the
superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
17 Black degrees—3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
220 Fifth Ave.
New York
Write for
booklet on
VENUS Pencils and
VENU3 EVESPOINTED
Mechanical Pencils
£+•••••-•-1
»•»•„•»»„»„
——■•••••-•-••t%i
SPORT NEWS  I
■$*••■
>•»•..•»*..•»•..•«•«•.»..•»«»•»(
..«.*;,
SEN10R SOCCER
WIN BOTH GAMES
Varsity's_fir^t_di5LisiOB-soccerite3 had
a most successful week-end and won
their way into the second round of the
O. B. Allan cup series by blanking the
B. C. Telephone by a 2-0 score. The
-|—student IdgMklll chasers also celebrated
Thanksgiving by boosting their league
average at the expense of the Sapperton eleven by a 2-1 count. The
students had it all over their rivals
in a somewhat listless encounter.
Tanny Butler scored in the first stanza
from a mix-up in front of the B. C.
Telephone area. Lindsay missed a
great opportunity to even the count
when he took a penalty awarded
against Buckley for hands. King
saved brilliantly, however.
After the lemons the collegians
forced the play into enemy territory
and the losers were seldam in the
picture in the latter stage of the fracas. Auchinvoile bulged the net for
the winning count.
Monday's game at Athletic Park was
a torrid affair and Sajipeiian had the
best of the excha'nges in mid-field
p'ay, but stellar defense tactics by
Baker, Crute and Phillips kept the
"Saps" out. Tanny Butler was the
star of the game, beating Sanford
for a goal in both the first and second
periods. Jimmy Gardiner beat King
with a fast high shot that gave the
Varsity net-minder no chance to stop.
It was a fast game and the fans as
well as the players enjoyed it, the
youthful Sappers playing • the same
kick and rush style as the students.
End to end play was the order of the
day and there were no idle moments.
The game ended with the "Saps" bombarding the Varsity goal from ail
angles, but the Varsity defense was
steady.
fANDCERERS
VARSITY «r». WANDERERS
Varsity defeated the Wanderers nn
Saturday by an 11-0 score in a fast,
well-played game.
Varsity scored before the game had
gone a minute. From a scrum in
centre-field the Varsity threes obtained the ball and gave Warren room to
show his speed by circling his check
and planting the ball almost directly
behind the posts. Bain converted
nicely. The Wanderers attempted to
force the play after the centre-kick,
but sure tackling by the Varsity
threes held them well in check, and
Varsity retaliated by a series of fast
three-quarter runs. The half ended
with Varsity pressing.
Varsity opened the second half
auspiciously by again scoring within
the first five minutes. A three-quarter
run featured by Buchanan's bee-hive
rushes and Warren's speed resulted
in a try near the corner. Bain failed
to convert. Varsity continued to
press after the kick, and the threes
again obtained possession of the ball
and sent Warren over for a try which
was again unconverted. This ended
the scoring, the game closing with
the Wanderers pressing in a belated
attempt to  score.
The forwards played a steady and
unselfish game anu gave the threes
plenty of opportunities which the latter utilized to great advantage
NOTICE.
Will the person who took the slide
rule from the 1st year Science locker
on third landing kindly replace the
same. The rule has been traced and
unless returned at once, action will
be taken immediately.
W. H. SPARKS, Sc. '28.
SENIOR^A"
BASKETBALL
Varsity Senior "A" lost a very
closely contested basketball game to
the Rowing Club last Saturday at
the "i.M.UA. by the score of 38-19.
Time after time the Varsity men
missed easy shots, either Old Man
Jinx was on their trail or they
lacked practice. Wilkinson and Newcombe were tired from soccer games
they had played earlier in the day
and the remainder of the team did
not play together. Tanny Butler was
unable to play owing to a broken
bone in  his hand.
Rough play was prevalent throughout the game. Lack of combination
and poor shooting by both sides were
also very noticeable. The Varsity
team would probably be better encouraged if they were given bett»
support, very few Varsity student^
were  out at the  game  on  Saturday.
ST?
THROUGH SPORT LENSES
Last Saturday evening at the Nor
mal gym the Varsity Senior
basket ball squad took a 38-19 defeat at the hands of the Rowing
Club. The TJ. B. C. boys put up a
great fight but lacked both the speed
and shooting ability of the winners
who were all fresh ,for the fray
whilst the students had four of their
players taking part in rugby and soccer games on  the  same afternoon.
Although the spirit of the U. B. C.
athletes who take part in more than
one sport is to be admired, it seems
a pity that enough players cannot be
found to take part in one sport at
one time. These same four athletes
had  football   games on Monday  also.
The big trouble with athletes in
this College is that there are a few
athletes who are called on to do too
much, and a far greater number who
don't do anything at all. Specialization must be encouraged if U. B. C.
is to compete with any degree of
success  against it's local competitors.
"Ian" Balmer, Arts '26 long distance star, led over twenty-one
competitors by about a quarter of a
mile, in the Intermediate Anglican
Road race on Thanksgiving day. Balmer first opened the eyes of local
track men when he cleaned up in the
Varsity three mile event last month
coming within an ace of breaking the
record.
Jack Buchanan plans to have a very
strong track team in the annual five
mile Dunlop road race on New Year's
day this year. The Varsity coach is
getting his men lined up right away
for the event, and will welcome any
new material. Six of the best distance men in the college will comprise the team, each man running the
entire distance of five miles. Balmer
is looked on with favor by "Buck"
as the likely winner of the race.
Varsity soccer men established a
record last week end, all three teams
winning their matches on Saturday
and Monday, making six wins for the
Blue and Gold. The rugby men's
McKechnie Cup victory makes the
■TJ. B. C. and Intermediate defeats seem
small.
Hats off to the Freshmen rugby
fifteen—their last Saturday's win
makes four straight for Arts '28 squad.
The freshies may be green in some
ways but they are right there with
the goods when it comes to booting
the pigskin around.
Polo
Cloth
Coat
As
Pictured
Downstairs
Shop
Special
$18.50
-^
LIMITED
575 Granville St.
pQLLIN'PiM
Bake shop
CAKES, SANDWICHES
for the
Dance or Party
2415 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Bayview 4076
The Catalogue
Will Tell You !
Everything in Football, Basketball and College Sports is lister]
in Lisle Fraser's Catalogue.
Everyone of you folks at the
University are welcome to a
copy if you don't mind letting
us know.     Call in, or write.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1AAA  GRANVILLE
1UZU  STREET THE   UBYSSEY
November 13th, 1924
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued  every  Thursday by  the  Publications Board of the University of
British Columbia.
Extra Mural  Subscription,  $2.00 per
Session.
For  Advertising Rates, apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair. 2093
EDITOBIAIi STAFF
Editor-in-Chief T. W. Brown
Senior Editor Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A. Earle Birney
William C. Murphy
Exchange  Editor John  Grace
Literary Editor Miss Doris McKay
Sporting Editors H. Les. Buckley
Laura Mowatt
Copy   Editor     Marion   Smith
Chief   Reporter Kenneth   A.   Schell
Reporters — Florence Williams,
Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald Gillingham,
David Warden, Francis Stevens, Robert
Wright, G. W. Ashworth, James Dunn,
Dave Taylor, T. S. Byrne, F. W. Dimmick, Peter   Palmer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business  Manager H. A.  Thompson
Circulation  Manager E.  J.  Eades
Business  Assistants....!!.   G.  McWilliams
J. Stanley Allen
W.  F.  McCulloch
EDITOR   FOB   THE   WEEK
Sadie  Boyles
OUR STUDENTS' DEMOCRACY
Every student in the University of
B. C. has the right to criticise any action of the Students' Council and to
offer suggestions for policies of the
student group. It is the duty of the
Council to consider all suggestions
that may directly or indirectly benefit the Alma Mater. The students of
this session are responsible for the
policies that will become traditions in
the future generations at Point Grey.
Every student should take a direct interest in the Council proceedings in
an effort to give the best possible traditions to the institution of which he
is a part.
Wherever the policy of the Council
and the ideal of the student come into
conflict the two should be made to
harmonize. If this cannot be done by
the student appealing to the Council
he should carry his grievance to the
Alma Mater Society where the whole
group of students can deal with it.
This can be done only by calling a
meeting of the students. It is neither
the duty nor the right of any student
to start an undercurrent of rumor in
the halls or common rooms.
We are a democracy, we are a self-
governing group, we demand the right
of free speech within the University
of B. C, but in fairness to our elected
representatives we demand that the
dissatisfied student should speak boldly in a voice that reaches the Council
directly. From Point Grey the students will look tack upon the old
shacks at Fairview and will judge our
worth by the traditions that have
arisen here. The Council can do its
share of building but the student body
must offer criticism and suggestions
so that, the best may be given.
/CONFERENCE OF EDITORS
At the conference of Pacific Coast
Collegiate Editors held in Seattle last
week-end, the usual and necessary exchange of practical problems and suggestions concerning the organization
and routine work of the college paper,
occupied the greater part of the time
of the twenty-two representatives assembled. In addition to gleaning from
older and wiser scribes a few helpful
hints of interest only to journalists,
the U.B.C. delegate was in a position
to make some interesting comparisons
between American college papers and
our own much-maligned rag.
It was surprising to find that the
Ubyssey was the only paper represented which had an entirely amateur
staff. It is admitted that attaching a
salary to a position does stimulate interest and responsibility; but the Uni
versity of B. C. has never favored the
professionalizing of any activities, and
while we may lose in journalistic technique and efficiency, we gain in the
"esprit de corps" on the staff of the
paper.
There were three other weekly
papers represented, all from smaller
universities than U.B.C. Universities
having more than fifteen hundred students had dailies or tri-weeklies. It
1 as long been felt that a paper issued
twice a week would be more acceptable here than the present weekly, as
most of the news is five days old when
published—"a post mortem of events
gone and nearly forgotten." But with
the present equipment any change is
practically impossible, and we must
wait until after the move to Point
Grey for a more frequent appearance
of the Ubyssey—a four-page paper
twice or three times a week is the
most probable form.
The Ubyssey came in for some
praise for its general appearance, the
composition of individual write-ups,
and (whether or not our student body
can believe it), the quality of its
humor. But as yet we are out-classed
by most of the American papers in organization, business efficiency, and
journalistic style.
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE WILL
V    GIVE WINTER COURSE
The third annual winter course offered by the Faculty of Agriculture is
to commence shortly after the opening
of the spring term. Three excellent
courses are offered to prospective students: Poultry Husbandry, to commence January 20th and end January
31. Horticulture, to commence February 2nd and end February 14th.
Agronomy, Animal Husbandry and
Dairying, to commence February 16th
and end March 6th. The first course
deals with breed studies, general management, treatment of diseases, marketing, etc., and the University flocks
are used for demonstration purposes.
The second class will take up all the
problems connected with the raising
of fruit trees and fruit. Management
of land, rotation of crops, etc., will
form the subjects of the third course.
Students may register for a whole
course or any three weeks of any
course. No qualifications or exams
are necessary. All classes will be
held at the Vocational Building, University Farm, Point Grey.
DEBATING TEAM
Dr. Klinck Returns
After attending the ceremonies in
connection with the opening of the
new buildings of the University of
Western Ontario and receiving an
honorary degree from that institution, Dr. L. S. Klinck returned to
Vancouver on Thursday night last.
The President stated that the object
of his trip was not only to represent
the U. B. C. at Ontario, but to study
the Extra Mural Courses of Science
and Arts. While there he paid particular attention to the management
of the bookstores, by students in the
eastern colleges, which will be of
great interest to the members of this
institution.
>
RHODES SCHOLARSHIP NEWS
Each year the students of the University have displayed a keen interest
in the choice of Rhodes scholar, and
this year has proved no exception.
But within two weeks now the selection committee, which includes two of
the Province's foremost judges, and
two former Rhodes scholars, will have
finally decided which of this year's
candidates will represent British Columbia at Oxford.
Only six students are trying for the
honors this year as compared with
thirteen last year. However, Mr. H.
T. Logan, secretary of the committee
and former Rhodes scholar, says that
he feels sure the capabilities of this
year's  competitors warrant the belief
/
VISITS VICTORIA
Victoria College will this evening be
the scene of a debate between that
institution and our University. The
Vancouver team will be composed of
J. Craig, S. Kobe, and E. Dunn. These
men will advance the case of Socialism.
The debate is one of a series
which has been organized to aid our
Oxford debaters in preparing for the
big event which will take place on
November 24th.
This will be the first time that
U. B. C. has debated with an English
university, and it is sure to be a great
event. It is urged that University students buy their tickets as soon as possible, as numerous enquiries from the
general public have been received.
Tickets, fifty cents for unreserved and
one dollar for reserved seats. Tickets
will be on sale in the main hall every
day at noon, or may be obtained from
H. Moore or J. Covey.
Stock Team Returns
(Continued from Page 1)
aljd second in Ayrshire,  barely missing  the  trophy  in  the  former.    The
team;   T. Wilkinson, G. Dynes and H.
McCurragh (high man).
The General team was up against a
stiff proposition in so far as they
worked under a different system of
judging, and the introduction of new
events. They judged all sorts of stock
exclusive of cattle, and finished up
sixth, Califronia taking first place. L.
Murphy, A. Aylard, J. Nelson, G. Challenger and Fraser (high) composed
the team.
The Agronomy team made their first
appearance in the competition, judging
grain and field products. Although
finishing last, they did very well considering their handicap, and made perhaps the best showing of B. C.'s representatives. Montana finished first. D
Thompson, W. Chester and A. Laing
(high) formed the team.
The Diary Products team, judging
butter, cheese and associated products,
appeared also for the first time, and
did extremely well to finish in third
place, with Washington the champions. They were handicapped by
changes in the system. W. Cameron,
C. Rive and C. Townsend represented
B. C. in this contest.
y   AT THE ORPHEUM
If the advance tale of tickets for a
theatrical attraction indicates anything then the visit of the comedy
of "Merton of the Movies" to the Orpheum on Monday and Tuesday, November 17th and 18th, will be very
largely patronized. Since the opening
of the advance sale of tickets it hfcs
developed that during its long run al
the Cort Theatre, New York City,
many people of this city and vicinity
have witnessed performances of it,
and in each instance these citizens
have been "boosters" for the play and
the players; and to prove the sincerity of their assertions they purchased
tickets to witness it again. Messrs. George C. Tyler and Hugh Ford,
producers and managers of "Merton of
the Movies," are sending here practically the same cast that appeared in
the comedy during its long run in New
York City. Glenn Hunter, the comedian who now stands prominent among
the younger school of players, created
the title part (that of Merton Gill) and
las played it from the start. He will
be seen in it during the forthcoming
engagement here.
that the choice for 1925 will be able
to carry on the good name made by
those of '23 and '24. These latter have
gained at England's great University
an enviable reputation for scholastic
achievement and general efficiency.
A Special Watch !
This strong Sterling Silver
Watch, with fully guaranteed movement, is most
suitable for boy or girl.
Fitted with seconds hands,
solid leather strap, very
neat appearance   -
$10.00
Henry Birks & Sons
UMITED
DIAMOND MERCHANTS
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Wear a
Mann's Shirt
the best
SHIRTS made.
A standard of quality that is never
equalled. Prices that are at all
times the most reasonable.
British Shirtings
$1.50 to $7.50
MANN'S MEN'S WEAR
Shirt Specialists
TWO   STORES:
411 and 474 Granville St.
WEAR   A  MANN'S SHIRT
E. VUAGNAT
Private French Tuition
639 11th AVENUE, WEST
Phone, Fair. 2247-R
BREAKFAST AFTERNOON TEA
LUNCH DINNER
Phone, Seymour 8403
Open 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.    Closed Sunday
KRGYLE TEA ROOM
717 DUNSMUIR STREET
Just around the corner front Drysdale's
Afternoon Tea Parties for Students
by arrangement.
Mrs. Agnes Orr Robinson, Proprietress
Home Cook in gr.
Entire Staff Canadian Women. November 13th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
POPULAR
FOOTWEAR
For U. B. C. Students
Men's Brogues,
Black or Brown,
$5.85
UP
Dancing Oxfords <M  AC
or Pumps, ^rt.JFil
UP
Ladies' Brogues    d*C'/IE
and Sport Oxfords,      ^KJ»TTiJ
Evening Slippers,
Satin, Patent,  Suede,
Gold and Silver,    -
$4.95
UP
WILSONS
TWIN SHOE STORE
157-159 Hastings St., W.
*••«•••••••«•••••••••••••>••»«£»
Central Public Stenographers
Foreign Translations
Miscellaneous Typewriting
Phone, Sey. 5078
414 Dominion Bldg.     207 Hastings St. W.
Evans & Hastings
-:-     -:-      PIONEER      -:-      -:-
BETTER QUALITY] PRINTERS
Prices Right
I    34-YEAR    SUCCESSFUL    BUSINESS    CAREER
IN    VANCOUVER    PROVES    CONCLUSIVELY
THAT   WE  ARE    FAVORED   MORE   THAN
OTHERS BY THE EXACTING PUBLIC
WHEN   THEY   DESIRE   THEIR
MONEY'S WORTH.
<%>
We make a specialty of
Magazines, Annuals,
Dance Programmes, Legal Forms
and
General Commercial Printing
See us before ordering elsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189      576 Seymour St.
V
PURDY'S CONFECTIONERY
If you happened to be in at Purdy's
this week making a purchase of their
world-famed chocolates, you would
have heard the sound of carpentering
in the background. If you investigated you would have realized that
there would be opened in a few days,
the most attractive cafe and tea-rooms
in Western Canada. This is under the
supervision of R. G. Hunter, formerly
of Hunter's Tea Rooms, whose ability
to operate a cafe and tea-room is well
known in Vancouver. The cafe and
tea-room where you can enjoy a quiet
tete-a-tete with just the right amount
of privacy, appeals to everyone desiring a chat with a friend, while partaking of refreshments, breakfast,
luncheon or dinner. Popular prices
will prevail.
He (angrily)—''I should think you'd
be ashamed to look me in the face,
or speak to me on the street."
Kenny—"I'm kinda, but I've got to
be courteous."—Purple Cow.
Xtra! Xerxes Makes
Exciting Excursion
Lugs Lizzie to Lester's Lodge
Dear Lizzie:
Last letter I told you that Xerxes
McGoogle had asked me to the Arts
dance, and how fussed and thrilled I
was. Well, on the given night we sallied forth (I only kept Xerxes waiting
half an hour) and after meeting Mr.
Cork and Elsinore under the clock
at Birk's we proceeded to Lester
Court.
The decorations were quite dainty
and tasteful. Down the hall we heard
one member of the "Pub." staff venting his emotions in enraptured triolets,
while Mr. Cork was quite visibly affected to see how the dainty flowers
so nearly resembled the sun-flowers
on Elsinore's dress. The crowd became denser (?) every minute, and
soon we were playing a "Rachel" and
"Jacob" game to find our partners.
Everything went fine till supper
(punch included). The eats were so
good that they reawakened our
trampled spirits, and after Xerxes had
made a tour of the tables and scooped
up the last crumbs of cake, we adjourned to the ball-room, where I
amused myself playing ring-on-the-peg
with Mr. Cork's "turnip" nose.
The rest of the dances went so
quickly, for one reason and another,
that soon we were wending our ways
homeward, Mr. Cork and Elsinore to
Westminster, and Xerxes and I to the
Lulu Island car tracks. So farewell.
I'll write again when I get home.
Yours,
IZZIE.
CONTEST FOR NAMING OF
y   UNIVERSITY STREETS CLOSES
Next Thursday, November 20, is
the day upon which all entries in the
competition held by the Minister of
Lands for street names in the new
University Grant sub-division in Point
Grey will be due.
The Provincial Land Agent's office
in the Court House has for the past
few months been issuing carefully
prepared plans of the newly surveyed estate, on the back of which is a
notification to the public that a prize
of fifty dollars is offered for the best
set of street names inserted in the
12 blank spaces provided for the purpose.
A large number of entries have already been handed ,in, embodying
very widely diversified opinions as to
what constitutes an appropriate set of
names for a collegiate estate. Some
have suggested the classical names
of the stars, as for instance, Orion
Avenue, Great Bear Boulevard, and
the Milky Way; others, more sentimental have brought forward the
names of the battles in which the
Universities Battalion fought, in the
Great War. Another competitor, who
loves his work, believes that the
names of various entrancing studies
should be perpetuated in asphalt, as
Biology Boulevard, Sociology Street
and Latin Lane, whereas one, brighter than the rest, has noted the number of names required and brought
forward the appelations of the Twelve
Apostles as suitable for the purpose.
These, and other similar proposals
lead Mr. Patullo to ihope that the
streets of the new sub-division will
be quite the most brilliantly named
of any group in the province.
y SCHOLARSHIP CARDS
' Scholarship students are requested
to hand in their cards at once. By delaying four or five days needlessly,
they cause a great deal of trouble for
fellow-scholarship winners, who are in
need of their money but are unable to
get it until all cards are turned in to
the Bursar. Such conduct is selfish
and unnecessary.
Soccer Juniors Give
Excellent Display
Varsity Juniors figured prominently
in the perfect record the Soccer Club
set over the week-end. On Saturday, Varsity lowered the colours of
the strong Cj R, tpam in a strenuously contested game 4-1, being
rather fortunate to romp home by
such  a  comfortable margin.
Black surprised everyone by depositing the ball in a high curling
shot behind the goalie, and, stimulated by this success, the college forwards worked well, and Gaudin made
it 2-nil within 20 minutes of the
start. The Railwaymen were desperate at the unexpected turn of events,
but the half-back trio in Blue and
Gold bottled them up, and with Smith
on top form, and Pullerton, substituting for Stevenson, turning in a plucky
performance, Stewart in goal had
plenty of time to deal with the dead-
on shots.
Just before the interval the C. P. R.
men scored. After half time the defense never gave an inch, and although the forwards were off their
game, Spillsbury managed to score
from  a  scramble.
On Monday, Varsity was prevented
from helping their goal average, when
St. Mary's had only five men,
and the referee awarded Varsity the
points. However, after some delay,
an all-star team was picked
from the crowd at Powell Street and
Varsity, although tired after Saturday's hard contest, fought 90 minutes
to a draw. Spillsbury did the trick
for Varsity, and st M^ry'g rc^igterpri
on an unstoppable penalty awarded
against Dynes. Manager Mellish
proved that he is the second best
right half on the field when there
are only two, and deputised till Gaudin appeared. The College boys, obviously tired, were not in such good
form  as on Saturday.
oSlGMA DELTA KAPPA
The Labor government of the
Sigma Delta Kappa dissolved parliament at the last meeting and will
hold office again next fall when the
student parliament assembles. The
government was successful in sustaining its socialistic platform by a small
majority when it proposed large
amounts of Women's legislation.
The next meeting of the Sigma
Delta Kappa will oe held Wednesday,
November 26, and will take the form
of a mock trial in which some law
students will take a leading part.
Var
AT THE CAPITOL
'arious adaptations of the "eternal
triangle" have formed the plots of
love stories since time immemorial.
That is why the Capitol production
this week is so "different." In "Three
Women" we have Pauline Frederick,
May McAvoy and Marie Prevost, all
with their hopes and aspirations centered on one man; a widow, her daughter and the inevitable "other girl"
with one object in life. The resulting
tangle is appealing and amusing. The
Capitol is also featuring a special musical program.
Next week Harold Lloyd in his latest and best "scream," "Hot Water."
fT\      You'll be delighted
^S**'       with our assortment
of
fteramtal
QJJjratmaH
FGIartos
See books of samples
in our Stationery
Department.
Don't leave your Christmas Cards
to be chosen at the last minute ;
besides, by ordering early you
have a much better assortment
from which to choose, and the
added certainty of their being
delivered on time. Our stocks
are most complete as to Greeting
Cards and_Dressings. May we
not be favored with your order ?
Hudson's Bay Company
Vancouver, B. C.
YOU WILL FIND IN THE
s
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
OF-
C0MMERCE and TELECRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming, M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can be of any service to you,
give us a call.
p|loneg j Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
) Seymour 7125; Seymour 7451
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
For Your Dance or Party
take the Promenade
2094 Beach Avenue
Excellent Floor, Heating and Ventilation
Fire-Places and all Accommodation.
AMBASSADOR  CAFE
610 Seymour Street
  Headquarters for Service 	
Club Luncheons, Dinners, Banquets and Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing, Entertainment
EVERY EVENING - - 9.00 p.m.  to 1:00 a.m.
*i= THE   UBYSSEY
November 13th, 1924
Prepare for your
Card Parties *£
Prizes for the Winners
Large assortment of
PLAYING CARDS
THE
Clarke & Stuart Co., Ltd.
550 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE. SEYMOUR 3000
WHY NOT PATRONIZE YOUR OWN
DISTRICT HAIRDRESSERS?
Iris Beauty Parlors
1464 Broadway, W.
Phone, Bay. 5666
25c.
JUST THINK !
YOU CAN TRAVEL IN
A YELLOW CAB FOR
One-third Mile.
Each additional One-third Mile    -   -   10c.
Special rates for Shopping and
Business Calls.
Buy a book of coupons and save a further
10 per cent.
For Christmas Parties, Dances, Social
Functions—Closed Heated Cars.
Prompt. Safe and Reliable Service.
It is cheaper to ride in a Yellow Cab
than to drive your own car.
You pay only from the time you step into
the Cab until you reach your destination.
yellow <zm eo.
Phone. Sey. 4000
4$M<
•••-•"•-••^
Phones : Fair. 77,  Fair. 5660-R
WILLOW HftLL j
806 17th AVENUE, WEST
One Block West of Heather Street
This Hall is for rent to Clubs and      \
Private Parties.
For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,
Proprietor.
The Palm Garden
FRUIT, CONFECTIONERY,
ICE CREAM and TOBACCO
HOT LUNCHES SERVED,
Also, AFTERNOON TEAS.
Phone, Fair 377
Cor. 10th & Heather St.
Second Soccer Team
Defeats Mac and Mac
U^B^-CL second_team vanquished
Mac and Mac by a 3-0 score at
HeatherTPark, Saturday. The Varsity
hoys re-arranged their front line, playing Alsbury outside right, Newcombe
inside, McLuckie centre, Cant inside
left, Evans outside left.
Mac and Mac had only ten men
and in the first half drove long shots
at Sutherland, all of which that gentleman handled coolly. Alsbury scored
the first for Varsity with a long shot.
Evans made it 2-0 shortly after. In
the second half Newcombe got the
3rd. Cant was Varsity's bright particular star, although Reid and McLuckie worked hard. Mac and Mac
were best served by their goalkeeper,
inside left and right back.
MONDAY'S GAME
continued
Ining   streak   by   defeating    S.
its
S-
_g-0 at   Sapperton on   Monday".
The score in no way represents the
play. S. S. Canora made several
dangerous rushes and came within an
Inch of scoring on more than one
occasion. Their goalkeeper played a
stellar game as also did the left
back.
Cant opened the scoring with a
beauty in the first half. In the second period a penalty was awarded
against Warden for handling inside
the sacred area. He, incidentally,
played a splendid game, his big boot
often clearing the ball far down the
field. Sutherland, allegedly clothed
in Mosher"s sweater, saved the spot
kick brilliantly.
During the rest of the game Hee
scored on a rebound from one of Mc-
Luckie's shots and Newcombe scored
the last near the end. Varsity lineup:—Sutherland, Warden and Hunter,
Gibbard, Reid and Robertson, Alsbury, Newcombe, McLuckie, Cant and
Rvans.
Canadian Rugby \
l/   To Be Introduced
A meeting was held last Tuesday
for students interested in the game
"developed in Canada for He-Canadians." Last year a Canadian rugby
team was entered into the Canadian
Rugby League of Vancouver. In all
other Canadian universities Canadian
rugby is played, but as the University
of British Columbia had no official
Canadian rugby team, no intercollegiate games were played.
At the meeting! were two American
rugby players, Mr. Ross and Mr. Bates.
Mr. Bates was elected chairman, assisted by Mr. Lange and Mr. Seed. Mr.
Bates gave valuable hints, pointing out
that the training was more severe
than in English rugby. One hour in
the morning and two in the evening
every day was considered to be tho
minimum training time. The training
in its infancy consisted of running,
tackling and bucking. To assist in
this training, plans were made to get a
"dummy" and to construct a "bucking
horse."
It is expected that with official recognition Canadian Rugby will thrive
at the University of B. C, as there is
plenty of talent and enthusiasm.
INTERNATIONAL BOXING
y TOURNAMENT PLANNED
J
The Boxing Club has had a larg>
turnout at all of its workouts up to
the present. Much new material is
on hand and it is hoped that a strong
line-up of stars may be obtained for
the annual tournament with Washington. The Washington boxers will
come to Vancouver sometime in
January, the U. B. C. boys going
south for a return contest in February.
<$*••><
....*
j Literary Corner j
*>••«•..•-•-•■
*..«..•*••*•••. *•»«•.<
TLE   THINGS.
I want to show you little things,
Auturrn cloud and autumn leaf;
Sea spray whitening on a reef;
Scarlet vines and brown bird wings;
Beauty that the twilight brings
Past belief.
I want to hear your shout of glee
When I tell a foolish jest,
Argue and discuss with zest,
Cigarettes and poetry;
Crumpets for a fireside tea,
And the rest.
I can fight and conquer too,
Memory that wakes and stings;
For the ache this longing brings,
Dear—I know not what to do,
I want so much to share with yg
Little things.
^.••••«i
CO-ED ATHLETICS
«|«^«~«»*-»»*~«»*»*»«-«-s...»««»*M».««««»«*»«»«.
X
.•»«mJ»
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
The larger number of girls turning
out to the various practices, shows
that this year they are going into athletics more seriously. Already the
benefits of the new training system
are becoming evident in more ways
than one.
It is regretted that the Training
Club can no longer have the services
of Mr. Jack Buchanan twice a week,
as he is greatly needed by the rugby
and soccer men. Therefore, the Monday class, open to the members of
every club, will in the future he taken
over by Miss Doris Shorney. On Wednesday, Mr. Buchanan will devote his
time to the first and second basketball teams only.
The Women's Basketball Club is
trying to arrange a game between its
Senior A team and Chilliwack for Saturday, November 22nd. If the plan
succeeds, it is likely that the game
will be followed by a dance.
Two basketball leaguegames, Varsity A vs. Normal B, ajxTvarsity B vs.
New Westminster, jHfilbe played Saturday evening at s^enTT'ciock in the
Normal Gym. It Us hoped that there
will be a large attendance.
WOMEN'SuSWIMMING CLUB
On Wednesday noon, November
19th, a lecture of lifesaving and
methods of resuscitating the apparently drowned, will be delivered in
Room Z by a qualified representative
of the Royal Lifesaving Society. As
the Women's Swimming Club is this
year affiliated with the Royal Life-
saving Society, all members are urged
to attend this lecture, and a cordial
invitation is extended to the Men's
Swimming Club and to the public in
general.
At 3.30 on the afternoon of the
19th, candidates for the bronze medal
will please present themselves for
examination by officials of the Royal
Lifesaving Society.
AT THE DOMINION
The ''Covered Wagon" is a tremendous success at the Dominion this
week, and rightly so. The beginnings
of our Western civilization forms a
historical background that is intensely
appealing to we people of the West,
who still have the adventurous blood
of our forefathers coursing through
our veins. A romance of stirring appeal is blended with this magnificent
setting and filmed with a realistic
touch that makes the production one
of the greatest of present day achievements.
So great is the popularity of this
feature that a special re-engagement
for next week has been arranged.
Midway w*
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and
Heather Street
W. H. Caldwell, Proprietor
Phone. Fair. 840
DRUGS
LOOSE-LEAF SUPPLIES
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
KODAKS
T. J. KEARNEY & CO.
Jffimpral BitettotB
Private Ambulance Service
PHONE,  FAIRMONT 3
802-808 Broadway, West, Vancouver, B.C.
tr=
Nothing conveys thoughtfulness
and cheer like
A CHRISTMAS PORTRAIT
x
Charlton $ Ratbbun
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Specialists in Colour  Portraits
X
711 Holden Bldg., 16 Hasting St., E.
(Juil Eatt of B. C. E. Rly. and Carrall St.)
Phone, Seymour Jj6g
Have You Tried
Our Hot Beverages
After the Show ?
.*.*Ǥ>ǥ*.
Burns Drug Co., Ltd.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
The Heather
Formerly Cusick's
Try us for
FRUIT
CONFECTIONERY
ICE CREAM
TOBACCO
AFTERNOON TEAS
Phone, Fair. 2881
Cor. Broadway & Heather St. November 13th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
J. W.Foster Ltd.
34.5 Hastings Street,    West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
<#?
See  US Before Buying
MOUNT PLEASANT
METHODIST CHURCH
10th Ave. and Ontario St.
Minister,  REV. O. M. SANFORD
Out-of-town Students
Specially Welcome
Good Music, Interesting Sermons,
Friendly Greeting.
<•$*•••••.••-<
"•"••••••••••-••••••I
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features and artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
)W TO  UTILIZE THE "UBYSSEY"
Some members of the student corps
seem to be ignorant of how to utilize
the "Ubyssey," and have come to us
with tears in their eyes and entreated
us to shed light upon their ignorance.
Our hard hearts were melted by the
wistfulness of these unfortunate suppliants, and we interviewed one of
our most enthusiastic admirers and
asked him how he utilized the "Ubyssey." For the benefit of our puzzled
readers we have decided to divulge a
few of his suggestions.
When the "Ubyssey" appears on
Thursdays it is advisable to rush up
to the circulation manager, overpower
him, and take a dozen or so copies,
and wile away the afternoon lectures
reading the editorials. Then when
going home, if a few copies are adjusted carefully about the books, no
drops of rain will play havoc with the
covers, producing a sea of color, and
endangering the lily whiteness of the
hands.
It has been discovered also that
lunch takes on a delicious, intellectual
flavor when encased in a copy of the
college paper—and that the secret of
the shoeshine you can see your face
in is merely a brisk rub-down with
the "Ubyssey."
Demoralizing Dissertations
t
k
WEAKLY   EVENTS.
(Use phone book for all addresses.)
Friday,   Nov.   14.
9-12—Lectures will be held in all
the important, class-rooms. A cordial
invitation is extended to all students
who care to attend.
Noon, Auditorium — Address, "Patriotism and Polygamy." Speaker announced after lecture. Frosh, Aggies
and all other students under sixteen
not admitted.
Saturday, Nov. 15.
3.30 (p.m.)—Arts '26 Hike. Meet
corner of Tenth and Willow—proceed
to Auditorium, where dancing will
commence.
Sunday,  Nov.  16.
3.15—Meeting of the Society for the
Suppression of Seniors. That mysterious co-ed who wishes to be known
only by her nom de plume, Old-fashioned Freshette, will read a paper on
"How to remain pretty though winked
at." If there is sufficient time, Miss
Freshette will supplement her paper
with p. short talk on "Personal Impressions of Mr. Quigley."
Monday,  Nov. 17.
12-1—Several students are expected
to partake of lunch during this hour.
5 p.m.—Meeting of the Students'
Christmas Movement. Eric Dunn in
chair. Petition will be drawn up,
copies to be presented to Santa Claus
and each member of the Faculty, advocating the postponement of Xmas,
with its accompanying worries.
Tuesday, Nov. 18.
4 p.m.—Fourth Soccer Team practice. Every student in the University is exhorted to turn out and root.
9 p.m.—Secret meeting of the Tappa
Nu Keg. Members bring own refreshments. Discussion: ''What's in a
Name?"
Wednesday,   Nov.   19.
10 a.m.—Several students will attend
the well-known lecture, Eng. 9.
10.12 a.m.—G. Ledingham will not
attend the well-known lecture, Eng. 9.
3 p.m.—Shades of the Devil Worshippers (defunct) will hold a tea and
seance in the Cafeteria. X. Y. Z. will
officiate as medium. Tables provided.
Bring your own raps.
8 p.m.—Debate, north-east corner of
Physics Lecture-room. "Resolved that
the wearing of Spats is in the best
interests of the Science Men"—Oxford
system — three speakers at once —
loudest wins—yell leaders handicapped—Kenny Schell barred.
Thursday, Nov. 20.
8 a.m.—Vancouver Destitute: "Two
Economic Phenomena," Prof. Itan
Lawss.
••«•<$>••-••
HOW TO   BE  ON  TIME   FOR
9  O'CLOCK   LECTURES.
A question which has aroused considerable interest in student circles of
late, has been how to be on time for
9 o'clock lectures. A questionnaire,
given to students at other colleges,
has unearthed the following devices:
1. Come at 8:30 and put back the
clock.
2. Plug up the bells.
3. Use ladders, ropes or greasy
boards as means of transportation
from floor to floor.
4. Chloroform the professor before
he leaves his office.
5. Sleep in your locker all night.
ARTS DANCE  TRIOLET
'Twas just the merest accident
That made him trip and fall,
A fatal slide, his pumps were rent,
'Twas just the merest accident.
His anxious partner o'er him bent,
And wished for help to call.
'Twas just the merest accident,
That made him trip and fall.
ESSAY ON FRESHETTES
Dear Reader:
This is an essay on Freshettes. You
may have suspected this from the
title but, of course, you know as well
as we do that titles are such misleading affairs—but we are digressing.
As we said before, this is an essay
on freshettes. Perhaps you wonder
why we chose such an absolutely novel subject as freshettes? Well, of
course, that is one reason—because
it's novel we mean. We believe in
printing nothing in our paper which
isn't absolutely original. Hence this
very fresh and distinctive topic for our
essay this week, on freshettes, as we
believe we said before. Then there
was another reason why we chose to
write an essay on freshettes. We have
a belief (or a hallucination) that any
topic upon which we write should be
one likely to awaken lively interest
in the minds of all our many dear
readers—a topic of comprehensive and
never-failing   importance.
Of course, such a complicated ideal
as this involves considerable labor on
our part in its attainment. But since
we are always, as is well-known, willing to sacrifice our time for the benefit of our fellow-students, we have
cogitated for a considerable period
until a brilliant, shimmering brainwave tuned in on us, and we decided
to write an essay on freshettes.
Now, dear readers, we have explained everything and brought our
essay up to such a point that we believe you can go ahead and write
it yourselves without any further explanations.
FEATS   OF   EYES   IN    FICTION.
She cast her eye on the chair and
he sat on it.
He caught her eye and held it.
She threw her eyes along the wall.
With his eyes he swept the gravel
path.
Their eyes met for a long breathless moment, and swam together.
3-Piece
Tuxedo
Suits
Fine quality fabrics, heavy
silk  facings   and   stylishly
cut.    Special.
$37.50
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
y	
The PRESENT
The FUTURE
Your PHOTOGRAPH for
CHRISTMAS by
ii
STUDIOS
553 Granville St.
WORK CAN BE ARRANGED
IN STUDY PERIODS
BETWEEN CLASSES
AND IN THE EVENINGS
2520 LAUREL (Cor. Broadway)
Phone. Fair. 896-Y
GET <v4 PRIMERj
Free—in
the stream
WATERj costs nothing in the
stream but it costs something delivered to your house. Millions may be
invested in mains and reservoirs to
serve you.
It is the same with electric power. The
cost to you represents only the cost of
generating it, delivering it and transforming it.
Dams must be built to correct nature,
huge plants erected, high tension lines
built and substations dotted throughout
the country.
The small cost of your monthly bills
must pay the interest on these millions
of investment.
British Columbia 111 EiectricRhumfCo.
Dr.L.F.MARSHALL
DENTIST
CONVENIENT TO THE UNIVERSITY
HEAD OFFICE
VANCOUVER, B.:
59
fiJSJSJBiBJBJEI^ .ii|n.UPIIIHHI!J.U!IJI».
mmmmmm***
8
THE   UBYSSEY
November 13th, 1924
TRADE
PALpll
MARK
iA.D-1
"fs
an*"1*
SKATES!
They are all here at
SPALDINGS'
Every model built to the
universally known
SPALDING QUALITY
Select your Skates (and
Shoes) NOW !
Skate With Spalding
f. * OF CANADA/LIMITED
424 Hastings Street, W.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
Strut
Your Stuff!
Most partners delight in
dancing something new
for a change.
You will be crazy to strut
your stuff after taking a
few lessons from US.
Have you seen the new
Parisian Walk — straight
from Paris and New York?
Oh, Boy !
VAUGHN MOORE
For New Dancing Steps
518 HASTINGS ST., W.        Seymour 707
BAGGAGE
TO       FROM
ALL TRAINS AND BOATS
ROYAL  TRANSFER
PHONE,  SEY. 6
DANCING
Private and Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
Juristic Offices of
, League Shown
r. Robie
M
Rr»hieyft«»i
Vancoi
»irl, K. C, Addressed
ancouver Institute
Mr. R. L. Reid, K.C, addressed the
Vancouver Institute on "The Supreme
Court of the League of Nations" last
Thursday night.
"War is an ignorant, bloody and say-
age means of settling international
disagreements," said the speaker," and
men must learn to meet the propo-
ganda of war with steady and vigorous propoganda of peace."
The idea of a supreme court is by
no means a new one. Benjamin
Franklin in 1780 urged the consideration of a plan whereby disputes between nations could be settled by an
impartial judicial body. The farseeing
diplomacy of John Jay's treaty which
greatly eased the strained . relations
between Britain and the U.S.A. in 1794
was most unfavorably greeted at first.
Yet it served its purpose and was one
step in the direction of the permanent court of international justice
which we find in the League of Nations to-day.
At the invitation of the Czar of
Russia in 1898 the great nations of
the world met at the Hague Conference to discuss the bringing about of
world peace and to consider the prevention of armed conflicts. Germany
thought that limitation of armaments
was not practical. Backed by the
Kaiser, the Bavarian military representatives firmly maintained that a
strong army and navy was the only
sure guarantee ot national security.
"The hatred which exists between
nations is a direct result of ignorance," stated Mr. Reid in conclusion,
"and people must learn to love peace,
eschew war, and always strive for justice."
To-night in the Physics lecture room
at 8:15 p.m. Mr. A. L. McKillop, B.A.,
will give an address entitled, "The
Truth about Einstein."
V^   NOTICE
Reme^nber the exhibition basketball games at Normal Gym., Saturday,
November 22nd, followed by dancing
until midnight. Chilliwack Senior men
and women are expected to furnish
the opposition and two good games are
guaranteed.
All those expecting to attend don't
forget to procure the Thursday night
tickets for the Christmas plays.
V?
ANNUAL PHOTOS
Members of Arts '25, and those in
executive positions, MUST get their
photos taken THIS WEEK and NEXT.
Price, ONE DOLLAR.
Go at any hour except between 1 and
3:30 p.m.
Hacking Studios, 553 Granville St.
EMPRESS
If you want a thrill don't miss the
Empress this week. Verna Felton
and the Allen Players are presenting
"The Purple Mask," a real mystery
from start to finish. The play centres on the French Revolution and
the strife between the royalty and
citizens for a republic. Your interest
is kept at it's height all through the
five acts, and a little touch of
humor here and there, breaks the
suspense which holds one fascinated
throughout. Between each act the
orchestra keeps you entertained with
choice selections and two of the latest song hits are sung by a very capable soloist, Mr. E. Hammond.
Desperate Dancer
Drinks Dishwater
Although Accustomed Admiration
Attends Arts Affair
X
A rather amusing incident occurred
at the Arts Dance last Friday night.
Perhaps amusing ia hardly the word;
pathetic might better describe it. Certainly the young lady who was serving
the punch considered it pathetic, and
the gentleman concerned no doubt discovered that the final outcome was
pathetic to the point of tragedy.
It will be remembered that the
punch was served over a counter behind which were two bowls, one containing the beverage and the other
containing water in which dirty
glasses were washed out. In the process of washing, the fruit dregs were
incidently dumped into this same bowl,
so that after a time the water, in its
color and consistency, came to look
much the same as the actual punch in
the other bowl.
A certain youth hurled himself madly down the steps and careened up to
the counter for a drink. Now, as it
happened, there were four men in the
line ahead of him, so that in the ordinary run of events he would have
been compelled to wait his turn. But
for some unknown reason he could
not wait his turn. Seizing one of the
unwashed glasses in his hand he
panted, "Nothing like self-service for
speed—what?" and thrusting his arm
over the counter he scooped up a glass
of dishwater and placed it to his lips.
The young lady serving the punch
was  horror-stricken.    "Don't don't
drink that," she stammered, "you	
you that's that's dishwater."
But the youth, with his head thrown
tack, was imbibing too rapidly to hear
a single word. He drained the vile
stuff to the last skin, banged the glass
down on the counter, smacked his
lips, and dashed wildly off up the
stairs for the next dance.
BOOK PRIZE COMPETITION
V      FOR SCIENCE MEN
Two book prizes to the value of $25
each haye_been offered this year,
througETTne Vancouver Branch of the
Engineering Institute of Canada, to
students in Engineering. The A. D.
Swan prize will be awarded for the
best summer thesis on any engineering topic, written by a third year student. The Walter Moberly Memorial
Prize is offered to fourth year students for the best engineering thesis
in the competition. The prizes will
be presented at the Congregation of
the University. Dean R. W. Brock is
in charge of the competition on behalf
of the executive of the Vancouver
Branch, Engineering Institute of Canada.
Sonvmeri
, it.lMIT«P '
556 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
College Girls*
Clothes
Are Our Special
Province
And we bring to the task a
knowledge born of the under"
standing of the requirements
of youth.
During this social season,
when the time for shopping
is limited, you will appreciate
shopping here, where stocks
are complete, service adequate
and intelligent, and prices
right.
It Costs No More to Shop
at Sommers"
»}*»-•-•-•——"•»<
New Floor
Searles' Dancing School
has enlarged their dance floor
to accommodate their many
pupils.
Private lessons every day
and evening.
Class dance Friday and
Monday of each week.
Start any time.
JEAN SEARLES'
Private Dancing Schools
603 HASTINGS ST. W.
(Empire Building)
Residence:    CHencoe lodge       Sey. 23.
If you learn here you can danoe anywhere.
"f.»-|«-«"t"l"l"l"»"»"l '.HJ,
-*****«-•«<
ft
"Why invite l)im, f?e doesn't Dance ?
If it is YOU they are talking about, it is time
you remedied this AT ONCE. We can
teach you during the day, between classes, or
at night. We specialize in BALLROOM
DANCING.    Latest steps taught.
Studio to Rent for Parties. Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Broadhead
Broadway Dancing Academy
1400 BROADWAY, W.       (One Block East of Granville St.)
Phone, Bayview 5834

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0123644/manifest

Comment

Related Items