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The Ubyssey Dec 5, 1918

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume I.
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   DECEMBER   5, 1918
Number 3
A Governor Speaks
on The University
MRS. FARRIS DEEPLY INTERESTED IN HIGHER EDUCATION.
On the evening of the 28th a large
audience listened to one of the most
interesting   lectures   ever   delivered   be-
Mrs. Farris
fore the Vancouver Institute. The subject affects closely all British Columbians, the more so as a wonderful
period of reconstruction is commencing
which will leave its mark on all educational  institutions.
Mrs. J. W. deB. Farris chose as her
subject, "The University of British Columbia and its Relation to the Life of
the Province." After a fitting tribute
to the unselfish and ungrudging labor
of the late Dr. Wesbrook, the gifted
speaker reviewed the progress of the
University, describing the early efforts
and the founding of the Victoria and
Vancouver Colleges, which were to
give place in 1915 to the University of
British Columbia. Handicapped from
the very start by' the great world upheaval, nevertheless it has made a wonderful advance and in all Canada is the
College Worked
for Victory
OVER $25,000 IS COLLECTED BY
STUDENTS IN THE VICTORY
LOAN  CAMPAIGN
Every student of the University of
British Columbia is aware of the participation of our University in the recent
Victory Loan campaign, but few know
the full extent of the work carried out
by the energetic and capable committee
controlling the students' share in the
great work.
In the absence of Mr. Sutcliffe, Mr.
Gibson took charge of the subscriptions
and spent two hours daily throughout
the campaign receiving applications in
his office. With the assistance of Miss
Peck, a letter was sent to each student
explaining the work being done and asking for co-operation. Such a splendid
response was made to this appeal that
Mr. Pennock, convenor of the schools
committee, was able to write Jfiat "the
amount of Victory Loan subscriptions
obtained by your committee was $25,-
250." In his letter of appreciation Mr.
Pennock also states: "I wish to express
to you and the other members of your
committee and workers my deep appreciation of your success, and to congratulate you, one and all, on the magnificent result of your labors." Mr. Sutcliffe
also received a letter from Dean Klinck,
complimenting the student body on the
splendid results obtained in securing
subscriptions.
Special credit is due to Mr. Gibson,
who gave so much of his time during
the campaign to ensuring the success of
the University's efforts to swell the subscriptions for the Victory Loan.
only University whose attendance has
increased steadily during the war, and
this in spite of the heroic sacrifice of
so  many  of its  men.
Our    institution    is,    in   Mrs.    Farris'
opinion,   the   logical   completion   of   the
educational  system.   A  people's Univer-
(Continued on page 3)
Where There's Life
There's Hope
RUGBY MEN WERE OUT LAST
SATURDAY FOR A PRELIMINARY   PRACTICE
Owing to the recent epidemic, athletics in the University have suffered a
serious setback. In as much as basketball is concerned, no headway has been
possible owing to the fact that there is
no gymnasium available. It is to be
regretted that in a University of this
size and importance no suitable arrangements can be made to cater to
the athletic spirit of the students. Even
in those games which require no gymnasium, such as Rugby and grass
hockey, the students find themselves
handicapped owing to the fact that they
cannot all turn out at the same time
because no hours have been set aside
for  athletics.
The Rugby team held a practice last
Saturday, and a team is being lined up
to represent the University in the proposed city league. An effort is being
made to arrange a game with a Victoria team during the Christmas holidays. Harold Gynther has been elected
as captain and John Allardyce as vice-
captain.
DEBATING BEGINS
SOPHS. WIN  FIRST  ROUND
"Resolved, that the lot of the common people of England was improved
by the Industrial Revolution," was the
subject of a debate held on Friday,
November 29th, between Arts '21 and
Arts '22. The affirmative was upheld
by the Sophomores, represented by
Messrs. Webster and Denham, against
Messrs. Cooke and Wrinch on the negative.
In opening the debate for the affirmative, Mr. Webster contrasted the condition of the workers before the intro-
(Continued on page S)
Thursday Night!
Rink Night
College Night! UBYSSEY
December 5, 1918
SAY, BOYS!
fl When  you  are  around  this  way,
drop  in  and  take  a  look  at  the
SHIRTS
we can sell you for a two-dollar
bill. They are IT in every way,
and we guarantee every shirt we
sell. We have all the newest
panal stripes in a galaxy of
colors.
Specially priced at $2.00.
fl We are right there with
NECKWEAE
as well.
The Ties we sell for 75c and
$1.00   are   absolutely   the   best
value we can procure for the
money; and they have the right
up-to-the-minute snap to them,
at  that.
RICKSON'S
APPAREL FOR MEN
820 GRANVILLE STREET
ifotHtjtfltt - (Kraft
FASHION-CRAFT
CLOTHES
are made not only to fill the needs
of mature men, but also special
care is taken to provide for the
young man, or youth, developing
into manhood
Prices   Moderate—Values   Positive
®1|0B. WhbUy $c (En.
ffijimitr-u
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
duction of machinery with that of the
present day. The change has brought
to the common people better housing
and transportation, greater security and
a  democratic  education.
Mr. Wrinch, the first speaker on the
negative, drew a pleasing picture of life
during the handicraft stage, pointing
out the independence of the worker,
who supplied most of his own needs.
Under such a system there was little
labor trouble. He described the peaceful domestic life of the workers, in
contrast to the conditions where industrialism has been introduced. Large
cities have grown up, and child labor
was instituted. The workers became
"slaves dependent upon the whims of
their   employers."
Mr. Denham's speech was slightly
sarcastic in tone, and caused much
laughter and applause. He characterized the glowing picture of the happy
life before the Industrial Revolution as
a "myth." In contrast to this description, he showed how the miners to-day
are protected by a minimum wage, old
age pensions and many other beneficial
laws. The struggle between Labor and
Capital is caused not by poverty, but
by the workers coming into their own.
He concluded by offering to wager in
favor of Labor's victory at the coming
British elections: as far as is known,
no one has taken a chance to deplete
our  Scottish  friend's  treasury.
Mr. Cooke then presented statistics
showing the increased number of accidents due to the present system. Agriculture, he went on to state, is the basic
industry of every nation, and agriculture in England has been lessened by
the Industrial Revolution. Formerly the
workers were in the open air, but now
are  confined  in  unhealthy  factories.
While the judges were arriving at a
decision, there was one informal discussion of the subject, and Miss Coates
and Mr. Mahrer rendered piano selections. Mr. Wood announced the decision of the judges in favor of the
affirmative.
After the debate, the men met to
elect a secretary in place of Mr. Crick-
may (overseas), and Mr. Denham was
chosen  by  acclamation.
The next debate will be held on December 18, between Arts '19 and Arts
'20.
Ode to the Physics Text Book
If  there  should  be  another  flood,
For refuge  hither  fly;
Though   all   the   world   should   be   submerged,
This  book  would  still  be  dry.
Phone, Seymour 1391
H. F. Storry & Co.
Tailors
650 Granville Street
Up Stairs
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone, Sey. 474
GEO. B. KERFOOT
Men's  Clothing   and   Furnishings
Suits Made to Measure
155   HASTINGS  STREET,   EAST
Vancouver,  B. C.
GIBSON STUDIO
Photographers
214-18   Birks   Building
Phone,  Sey.  3430 Vancouver,   B.C.
Sey. 9387
955  NICOLA  ST.
Nicola High-class Ladies'
and Gent's Tailors
We Remodel Ladies and Gents'  Suits
and   Overcoats
Fit and Workmanship Guaranteed
Suits   turned   inside   out
Delicious  Homemade  Cakes
Served  at
YE LITTLE BROWN INN
745  DUNSMUIR  STREET
(Around  the  corner  from   Drysdale's)
Luncheon,  Afternoon Tea,  Supper
License   No.   10-2636
YAMAT0
Direct  Importers  of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone,  Seymour 2288 December 5, 1918
UBYSSEY
exclusive Styles
in
for
young men and
Young Women
'pHE NEW STYLES IN  FALL
AND WINTER FOOTWEAR
are  certainly  handsome.
For the young woman, the new
military heel boot, with cloth or
buck tops, in colors of brown,
grey, or black.
For the   young   man,   the   new
shades of    tan,    with    leather    or
Neolin soles;   also  smart styles in
black.
We have an Expert Fitting
Service.
Tngledew
Sim go.
666 Granville Street
"Vancouver's   Smartest   Shoe
Store''
MRS.   FARRIS'   LECTURE
(Continued  from  page   1)
sity, offering its advantages of culture,
discipline and training in leadership, is
more than ever indispensible to the
Province. Men and women must be
trained to take their parts in the new
era into which we are entering; and
when the expected tide of immigration
flows West, it is only fitting that , the
descendants of the early settlers of
B. C. should assume the leadership.
The upkeep of the public schools costs
the ratepayer. $9.00 per annum; while
the University, which is opening up
new lines of work and helping to develop the natural resources of the country, as well as spreading culture and
refinement, is supported by him to the
extent of 65 cents each year. By a
very slight increase in this tax, a sufficient sum would be raised to enable the
University to move into more commodious buildings at Point Grey, where
full attention could'be given to the departments which are at present seriously
handicapped by lack of proper accommodation, with beneficial results to the
students who are seeking to fit themselves for more efficient service towards
their country. Mrs. Farris believes that
the subscription of two million dollars
towards the establishment of the University at Point Grey would be an
excellent investment and a splendid expression of patriotism on the part of the
people of British Columbia.
In addition to the crying need for
increased educational facilities, the necessity for some fitting war memorial
must cause us to turn attention to the
proposed buildings. The new University,
planned with such a double end in view,
would be a lasting token of respect for
the Western soldiers who have fallen in
battle. A simple inscription in each
town or village would keep alive the
names of the heroes, while a magnificent
structure of this kind would perpetuate
their memory, as well as enable future
students to fit themselves fully for their
life work, and would be an ever-present
inspiration to duty and patriotism.
Mrs. Douglas Mackintosh presided
over the lecture, which was given under
the auspices of the University Women's
Club. A vote of thanks to Mrs. Farris,
moved by Dr. S. D. Scott and seconded
by Mrs. W. F. Baird, showed the appreciation of the audience.
In Chemistry Lab.
Professor—How did your experiment
come   out?
Exasperated would-be Scientist (holding up fifth broken test-tube)—See that
hole?    Well,  it  came  out  through  that.
Leckie Shoes
are    made   for   the   man    who    is
particular
Remember:    "The Quality goes in
before the Name goes on"
" That's a Leckie"
University Students
Who have time to spare
could make no better use of their
time than in the
Study of
SHORTHAND
It will be of untold advantage
to you in taking lecture notes.
Most great speakers and many
great writers are good shorthand
writers.
What about YOU?
Don't you think it would be
valuable to you also?
Enter any time—Day and Evening Sessions.
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.,
Manager.
Phone, Fair. 1546
McLean & Powell Iron
Works
358-398  DUFFERIN   ST.,  WEST
General Foundry and
Pattern Making
W. D. McLEAN L. S. POWELL
Phone, Seymour 1911
"MIKADO"
Our  Specialties:
Silks,  Kimonas, Ladies'  Wear
Made to Order
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
766 Granville St. Vancouver,  B.C. UBYSSEY
December 5, 1918
CHRISTMAS    HINTS
■yOU CAN SELECT from the
list we enumerate below a very
suitable gift for your friend—one
of the kind that will be useful and
greatly appreciated:
DRESSING ROBES
HOUSE COATS
SWEATERS and
SWEATER COATS
GLOVES, Wool  or  Silk-lined
Silk or Wool MUFFLERS
Silk or Poplin NECKWEAR
FANCY SUSPENDERS
ARM BANDS and GARTERS
LADIES' and MEN'S
UMBRELLAS
Silk and  Linen  Handkerchiefs
SUITS and OVERCOATS
Phone, Sey. 8380
Clubb & Stewart
Limited
309 to 315  Hastings Street, West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The
Northern Life Assurance
Company of Canada
i* & good  Company to Insure with
Granville Stationery Co.,
Limited
540  GRANVILLE  STREET
Books,   Stationery,   Toys,   Photo
Supplies
Developing,   Finishing   and   Enlarging
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital   -    -    -    $15,000,000
Reserve  -
-    $13,500,000
THRIFT AND  SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and deposits made by mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District,
including the  following,  which are in
the vicinity of the University:
Falrvlew—Corner   Sixth   Avenue   and
Granville
Kitsllano—Corner Fourth Avenue and
Yew  Street
Mount   Pleasant—Corner  Eighth  Ave.
and Main Street
UBYSSEY
Issued     every    Thursday    by    the    Publications
Board  of the  University  of  British   Columbia.
Extra mural  subscriptions,   $2.00  per  session.
For   advertising   rates,   apply   Advertising   Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief I.   A.   Shaw
Senior   Editor A.   Rive
{Miss   E.   M.   Marwick
Miss   P.   Smith
R.   Adams
Chief   Reporter R.    Cribb
Military   Editor R.   Leckie
Exchange   Editor Miss   A.   Ure
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager W.   J.   Allardyce
Advertising   Manager J.    L.   MacDonald
Circulation   Manager J.   G.   Fraser
THE UNIVERSITY
AND THE PROVINCE
Last week many of us were privileged
to listen to the lecture by Mrs. J. W.
de B. Farris on "The University of
British Columbia." Her subject is a
timely one. Peace, founded on victory,
is in sight, with all its joy and triumph,
but also with its problems of reconstruction. Time must now be given to the
consideration of many matters neglected
during the stress of war. Among these
is the question of the erection of new-
buildings for the University at Point
Grey. The number of students attending lectures has increased steadily during the last years, with the result that
the present buildings are not large
enough to afford proper accommodation.
The lack of a residence in connection
with the College deprives the students
of much of the social life and "atmosphere" which mean so much to the students of other universities. Athletics
are severely handicapped by the difficulty of obtaining the use of a gymnasium
and playing field.
Great as is the need for larger and
better buildings, it will be yet more
evident during the next years. The advantages of a college education are being more and more admitted in different
spheres of work. The training in leadership and the higher education received
by the student are going to play an important part in solving peace problems
and in developing the resources of our
Province. An increasing number of
young men and women will take advantage of the boon of university education.
Already many returned soldiers are attending lectures; with demobilization,
many still on service will be registered
as students of the University. The situation during the influenza epidemic has
shown clearly that our present quarters
are required by the hospital. The erection  of  new  buildings   at   Point   Grey
would give employment to many, would
make possible better work, and would
serve as the most splendid war memorial British Columbia could have to perpetuate the memories of those who
sacrificed all, a beacon light of hope and
strength and learning.
THE TIMETABLE
With the resumption of work after the
enforced holiday, the ever-present question of the timetable rises again. Although conflicts between lectures have
been removed, it is still very difficult for
the whole student body to assemble in
order to deal with important issues;
even executive meetings at noon cannot
always be fully attended owing to lectures at 12 o'clock. The athletic societies, already hampered by the lack of a
campus, find it practically impossible to
have a full practice of all interested,
owing to the arrangement of the timetable. The literary societies are also
greatly hindered by this. Concerted
endeavor on the part of the students to
support University activities is a vague
dream until some definite time is assigned for that purpose. The obstacles
to this are numerous, and we all recognize that the members of the faculty
have unselfishly spent much time and
trouble in their efforts to provide a
perfect timetable, but we hope that in
the near future some means may be
found by which the University students
can take advantage of the many societies for their benefit.
University students who attended the
Vancouver Institute lecture last week
were gratified to hear that a member
of the board of governors recognized
the need of the University for a gymnasium. It has always been difficult for
college students here to -engage in athletics owing to the lack of buildings
and campus, but heretofore it has always been possible to make temporary
arrangements.
This year the gymnasium of King
Edward High School is otherwise occupied at all times when it could be
used by college students; that of the
Provincial Normal School is closed to
us. No other quarters are available for
the   Provincial  University.
Some promising artist could find a
subject for his pen in the figure of
College Athletics, prone upon the
ground, while gleeful Timetables and
forbidding Gymnasiums danced about
their prostrate and helpless victim—a
picture to move men to laughter or to
tears. December 5, 1918
UBYSSEY
The Art of Speaking
Debates, Speeches, Play-parts,
Recitations  Coached
Special   rate   on   single  lessons   to
U.B.C.  Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite 23,  709   Dunsmuir Street
Phone,  Sey. 6535Y
Mrs. A. L. Richardson,
L. R. A. M.
Pupil of Tobias Matthay
Formerly    Professor    of    Piano    and
Lecturer at McGill  University,  Montreal,  and  Midland Institute,   Birmingham,  England.
Studio,   709   Georgia   Street,   West
Phone,  Seymour 8519L
FRANK WRIGLEY
Organist and Choirmaster
St. Andrew's Church
Pupils accepted for Piano, Organ,  etc.
Residence and  Studio:
1260   HARWOOD   STREET
Phone, Sey. 6720
CUSICK
SERVES   GOOD   EATS
692  BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Photography Kodaks
Developing  and   Printing
Pictures  and  Frames
CAMERA & ARTS
610  GRANVILLE  STREET
R.   P.   DUNNE,  Mgr.
LUXENBERG
Importer
Ladies'  Exclusive Garments
Our   Prices   are   Moderate   for
Quality Shown
Phone, Seymour 1593
629  Granville  St.,  Vancouver,  B.C.
We Specialize in
GLOVES
DENTS       FOWNES
PERRINS
Ladies' and Men's
E. CHAPMAN
545 Granville Street
MUSICAL NOTES
Twilight  Organ  Recitals
Everybody should make an effort to
attend the twilight organ recitals which
are held in Christ Church every Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock. The very
fact that Mr. Chubb is a Fellow of the
Royal College of Organists ought to be
an attraction; the diploma is the hardest
of its kind to obtain within the Empire,
and no one can hope to earn it unless
he is a thorough master of both the
practical and theoretical aspects of his
art. Moreover, Mr. Chubb has the
happy faculty of choosing well-balanced
and varied programmes, with the result
that, if you really do like good music,
you are sure of hearing some selections
which are certain to be particularly
pleasing.
The organ is the greatest and noblest
of all musical instruments, and the
pleasure and inspiration you will derive
from these recitals will more than recompense you for any small sacrifice
which may be necessary to enable you
to  attend.
* *    *
No Christmas season would seem
complete without a performance of
"The Messiah," because the text, dealing as it does with the coming of
Christ, His crucifixion, and the subsequent redemption of the world, is particularly appropriate to the occasion.
The first Christmas production of this
oratorio will be given in the Chalmers
Presbyterian Church on December 18th
by a chorus of 120 voices, under the
direction   of   Mr.   Nanson.
* *    *
Handel was not a religious man; he
realized, at the age of fifty-six, that his
career as an operatic writer had not
been a very successful one, and accordingly turned to oratorio as a substitute.
The result is, that while "The Messiah"
contains beautiful lyric melodies and
majestic choruses which fill you with
an impressive awe by virtue of their
very grandeur, one cannot but feel that
the work is more the monumental creation of a man who, in the full maturity
of his genius, knew how to handle his
musical tools, rather than that of one
who, though not so skilful in polyphonic writing, was yet Divinely inspired when he wrote. "The Messiah"
is undoubtedly one of the greatest of
all musical compositions, but it is not
a   really  religious  work.
Mcdnld. (sweeping out editorial room)
—Move your foot, Coffin, and I'll sweep
the  other  half  of the  floor.
New and Up-to-Date Models
Every Week
The
Elite Millinery
M. P.  ELLIS
757 ROBSON STREET
Phone, Sey. 4210
T^EEP   the   happy   memories   of
College days  for all time.
Bridgman s Studio
will    help    you    with    pictures    of
established  reputation
At the  same  address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
The
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers   and   Printers
Students'  Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School   Equipment
Drawing   Instruments   and   Materials
320  SEYMOUR  STREET
(Opposite  C.P.R.   Depot)
Vancouver, B.C.
Fresh  Cut  Flowers
Funeral  Work  a   Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists, Nurserymen
and Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head   Office:
48   HASTINGS   STREET,  EAST
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728   GRANVILLE  STREET
Phone,  Sey. 9513 UBYSSEY
December 5, 1918
«
THE NIKKO
Japanese Silk Store
Headquarters for
Christmas Gifts
846 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 3507
ft
E. C.KILBY
The Hosiery Specialist
628 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
"Trade    Upstairs    and    Save
Your Dollars"
Our   New,   Modern,   Daylight
Upstairs
Clothes Shop
will save you Dollars on your
next   Suit,   Overcoat   or   Raincoat.
Over 3,000 garments, in the newest and smartest styles and best
fabrics, at prices considerably
lower than you would expect to
pay.
$15.00 TO $50.00
Instead of $20.00 to $65.00
Arnold & Quigley
546—GRANVILLE—546
The Store That's Always Busy
BIOGRAPHICAL
SKETCHES
PROFESSOR WALTER N. SAGE
Our new history professor comes to
us with a brilliant record of scholarship.
He was born in London, Ont., and received his elementary education there,
attending the London Collegiate College
Institute, and later Magdalen College
School, Oxford. After graduating from
Toronto with honors in History,
Classics and English, he went to Baliol
College, Oxford, to continue his studies.
Here he read History under the two
well-known scholars, H. W. C. Davis
and A. L. Smith, finally taking his B.A.
in 1912. The following year he obtained his diploma with distinction in
Economics and Political Science. In
1913 he returned to Canada, teaching for
the next two years at Calgary College.
In 1915 he was appointed to the staff
of Queen's University, later receiving his
M.A. degree. He remained at Queen's
for three years, coming directly from
there to the University of B. C. He has
just completed a history of the war,
from the commencement of hostilities to
the entrance of the United States. He
has also contributed some interesting
historical articles to the Queen's University  Quarterly.
PROFESSOR  O.  J. TODD,  Ph.D.
Those who have come under the
instruction of Dr. Todd consider themselves very fortunate. Combining a very
fine English style with an intimate
knowledge of ancient times and literature, our new professor in Classics
causes dead languages to glow with
living thoughts.
Dr. Todd is an American, and brings
to his work the energy characteristic of
his nation. Like President Wilson and
many of the ablest men of the United
States, he received his early training
under the shadow of the Manse. In
1906 he graduated as an A.B. from Harvard, and in 1914 obtained his Ph.D.
from the same institution. He is described by one competent judge as "one
of the best classical students Harvard
has had, taking the highest rank as a
graduate." Dr. Todd has lectured at
Whitman College, Walla Walla, and
Carleton College, Northfield, Minn., with
great success. We are glad to welcome
him to our midst, and assure him a large
share of the good-will existing between
ourselves and our American cousins.
Wld.—I   hear   Prof.   Henry  thought  a
lot of your April exams.
Frstr.—He did;   he encored them.
MA
ufT  west   av  -reus,   ■w^vr
MILITARY NOTES
The Officers' Training Corps, on the
occasion of its first meeting since the
reopening of the University, paid solemn tribute to the memory of its late
commander, Major Wesbrook. That
his example of hard work and conscientious effort has had its effect, is
evident from the report of Sergeant-
Major Mitten, our drill instructor, who
states that the work of the corps was
exceptionally satisfactory on his first
day  in  charge.
A route march will be held as soon
as the new uniforms, now indented for,
are received. There will be a camp next
spring between examinations and degree day, providing a sufficient number
volunteer for the enterprise. Don't
forget this.    Start talking camp,  now.
IN   MEMORIAM
The members of Agriculture '22 have
assembled again, only to learn with
deep sorrow of the death of their president, Wilfred Moore. Although the
class was just becoming acquainted, he
was already a general favorite. Students and members of the faculty unite
in regretting the loss of one who promised so much as a student, as a good
fellow, as a friend. To his parents
they  extend  their  sincerest  sympathy.
Guy B. Moore was a former member
of Arts '19. He was born in Mattawa,
Ontario, and came to Vancouver fifteen
years ago, when eight years old. He
was a splendid athlete, and one of the
mainstays of the U.B.C. Rugby team.
After qualifying as an infantry officer,
he enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps in
the fall of 1916, obtained his wings in
record time, and went to France in
August of the following year with a
scout squadron of "Baby Nieuports."
This spring he was gazetted Flight
Commander, but was killed in action on
April 7th; and with the news of his
death came the notification that he had
secured the Military Cross, having
brought down over nine enemy machines.
Our heartfelt sympathy goes out to
the friends and relatives of Captain Guy
Moore,  M.C. December 5, 1918
UBYSSEY
STYLE   CLOTHES
Are Good Clothes
without being in the least
freakish. The Style Clothes
now being shown are the kind
of togs that "get across."
Look to us  for your nifty
togs.
A splendid variety of Xmas
Gifts to choose from.
10% to IT. B. C. Boys
Potts $ Small
LIMITED
449 Granville Street
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
FACULTY NEWS
Branch Stores:
57 Hastings Street, West
Phone,  Sey. 2313
932 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 8723
Victoria Branch:
1232 Government Street
Phone 4742
U.Morimoto&Co.
Direct Importers of
Japanese Fancy Goods
Ladies' Wear Made Special to
Order
Hemstitching  by  Measure
Manufacturers of
"Bamboo Knitting  Needles"
Main Store:
673 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone, Seymour 6410
RESOLUTION OF THE FACULTY
PASSED AT ITS FIRST MEETING SINCE THE DEATH OF
OUR  LATE   PRESIDENT
We, the members of Faculty, desire
to express our sense of the great loss
which we have sustained in the death
of our  first  President.
Dr. Wesbrook came to us, with a
reputation already high, from a comparatively old and firmly established
University; and that reputation he has
not only sustained, but enhanced. His
task was to raise a University which
should be worthy of our people, and
the ideals and traditions of the Empire
of which we form a part. To this task
he brought a combination of qualities
rarely found—a wide knowledge of
educational systems, great gifts of
speech and administration, buoyant enthusiasm, untiring energy and a single
devotion to the public good. His ideal
university was one which should seek
first the intellectual, moral and physical
well-being of the people, and this high
conception he strove with all the energy of his nature to realize. In face
of unforeseen difficulties, his faith did
not fail, nor did his enthusiasm flag;
and, looking back, we can say with
truth that his efforts have not been in
vain. Others will enter into his labors,
but they will find the foundations truly
laid and the building nobly planned,
and the spirit of him who formed the
plan will continue to inspire the efforts
and  shape  the  policy  of  his  successors.
Perhaps nowhere did the true character of the President shine out more
clearly than at the council-table of
Faculty, and in his relations with his
colleagues. Here his ripe wisdom,
sound judgment, wide outlook and
grasp of affairs were always apparent;
but still more apparent were his simple
manliness, the elevation of his moral
aims, his unaffected kindness and cordiality, and his sympathy with every
riiht and just cause. The personal interest which he took in his colleagues
was an inspiration to them in their
work, and their affection for him was
equal to their admiration.
He has passed away while his natural force was not abated and his mental vision undimmed, and the image of
what manner of man he was in his
strength will remain stamped on the
minds  of all who knew him.
Economy in Value
THE LATEST STYLES
THE BEST FABRICS
THE MOST REASONABLE PRICES
are three distinct features of our
clothes
High-class  Furnishings  for  Men
and Young Men
The  swellest  Ties  in  B.C.
The JONAH-PRAT  CO.
401   HASTINGS   ST.,   WEST
Wellington and Comox
COAL
The Best for Kitchen and
Furnace  Use
Macdonald. Marpole Go. Ltd.
Sole Agents
1001 MAIN STREET
Phone, Seymour 210
Double the Value
of your Christmas Gifts by selecting a gift that is suitable for the
particular game the recipient excels  in.
We can supply you with Golf
Goods, Boxing Gloves, Exercisers,
Hockey Goods, Skis, Indian Clubs,
Footballs, Safety Razors and
Pocket   Knives.
COME AND LOOK OVER
OUR STOCK
TISDALLS
LIMITED
618-620   HASTINGS   ST.,   WEST
The Complete
Sporting Goods Store UBYSSEY
December 5, 1918
WILLIAM DICK
Limited
33 - 49t Hastings East
Vancouver, B. C.
Students
—will find this store can fill many of
their student needs:
CLASS PINS
PRIZE CUPS
TROPHIES
FOUNTAIN  PENS
Conklin's—Waterman's—Swan's
THE   "EVERSHARP"   PENCIL
in   Silver  Plate,   Sterling   Silver,
Gold-Ailed and Gold
Many other lines, of course,  in which
"    you will be  greatly interested
O. B. ALLAN
"The  House of  Diamonds"
480-486   Granville   Street
at   Pender
GIVE USEFUL
ELECTRICAL
GIFTS
<I This Christmas you are urged to
give only useful gifts.
«J Every Electrical Appliance is a
conserver   of   time,   of   labor,   of
money, of fuel, or of materials.
€$ In   addition,    Electrical   Appliances   combine   with   their   practicability rare charm and modernity.
q We invite your early inspection.
B.C. Electric
DEPARTMENT    OF    MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING
Said one Freshie to another: "Do
you know what that garage near the
Auditorium is for?"
"Yes," answered the other; "it is
where the professors keep their  Fords."
Such ignorance must be dispelled at
once. Of course, the average person
knows that those new buildings between Arts and Science are used in the
vocational training of returned soldiers.
The garage class is the largest, and it
was the garage I first entered to gather
information for the super-ignorant
Freshie.
I stepped up to a man strenuously
hammering at a tire on a car. "Working?"  I   enquired  pleasantly.
No  answer.
"Putting   a   tire   on?"   was   my   next.
"Nope; taking one off," was the reply.
Then the worker saw my notebook
and at once became friendly. I explained that I represented Canada's
greatest weekly, and he sent me to
Mr. Parsons, the boss, who gave me
the  following news:
The course in automobile instruction
includes theory and practical work. It
is complete in every detail and lasts six
months, after which the pupil should be
an  expert  on the automobile.
At present there are 43 members, and
for their instruction there is a gas engine, a marine engine and eight automobiles. A lathe is to be installed in
the  near  future.
These men have a separate cloakroom.
Judging by the way they work, the
Huns never had a chance from the beginning.
As I left the building I turned to
Mr.  Parsons.
"The professors don't really keep
their  Fords  here,  do they?"  I  said.
"Certainly not," was the emphatic answer.    So there you are, dear  Freshies.
Next week your education will 'be
continued by a description of the steam
engineering class.
Captain S. Anderson, better known as
"Syd," who enlisted from Science '20
in 1916, has resumed studies with Science '22. This gallant officer received
the Distinguished Flying Cross in 1918
for substantial service, rendered in a
sea patrol battle between three British
and seven Hun planes. His seaplane
was shot down and he dung to the
wreck, although wounded, till rescued
by  a  British  destroyer.
The  Pioneer  Union  Store
CLAMAN'S
Limited
153 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Home of
Hart,   Schaffner   &   Marx   Clothes
Young Fellows'
Suits
fl We have the spirited styles
which young fellows want. We
know, because   they   tell   us   so.
fl The rich, exclusive patterns and
colorings appeal very strongly to
them.
$15, $20, $25, $30
WELL-PRINTED
STATIONERY
Means Everything
to Your
Business Success
Get   Your   Next   Supply
from the Pioneer
Printing House
EVANS & HASTINGS
PRINTING   COMPANY
578 SEYMOUR STREET
Phone, Sey. 189     Vancouver, B.C.
None   but  Union   Mechanics   Employed

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