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The Ubyssey Jan 30, 1919

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume I.
VANCOUVER, B.C., JANUARY 30, 1919
Number 9
Admit Soccer to
Varsity Athletics
BOXING AND SOCCER RECOGNIZED—ROWING CLUB MAY
BE FORMED
A meeting of the Men's Athletic Association was held in the Physics Building,
January 3rd, for the purpose of discussing the Soccer Club's request to be
admitted to the main organization. The
executive, according to the president,
thought it was better to boost only basketball and Rugby, rather than to branch
into too many fields, and so did not
favor granting the request. Mr. Swen-
cisky pointed out that, although this was
a good plan in war-time, now peace has
come its value is doubtful. On being
put to a vote, the Soccer Club was admitted by a small majority. The request
of the Boxing Club to join the association was also granted. Mention was
made by Mr. Morrison of a Rowing Club
to be formed in the University.
NEW RULES FOR
UNIVERSITY DANCES
The following recommendations affecting the students' dances have been
passed by the Students' Council:
That the sale of tickets must close one
week before the date of function.
No more than two tickets may be sold
to any one student, with the exception
of the Congregation Dance, where the
members of the graduating class may invite their friends.
All students must sign, both for themselves and for invitations sent to friends.
All invitations must be presented at
the door.
That all arrangements and plans for
any social function within the University must be presented for approval to
the Students' Council at least four days
before the date of the function.
Read the ads. on the next page.
Arts '20 Party
An Original One
TRADITIONALLY GRINDSTONES,
JUNIORS BECOME HUMAN
FOR  A  FEW  HOURS
On Saturday evening, January 25th,
the Third Year Class party was held, an
occasion upon which the members of
Arts '20 and their student friends enjoyed themselves thoroughly. Mrs.
Sedgewick and Prof, and Mrs. Elliot
acted as chaperones at this most successful event. Unfortunately, Mr. F. G.
C. Wood, the honorary president of the
class, was unable to be present.
Originality, the thing devoutly to be
wished at all class parties, was amply
displayed in the matter of entertainment.
As a beginning, Mr. Peebles conducted
a most interesting auction sale, which
served the double purpose of providing
the guests with some very useful purchases, and of helping to collect funds
to buy milk for next year's Freshies.
Then some of the men of the class, including such worthies as Messrs. Mc-
Kinnon, Keenleyside, Coates, Siddons,
Peebles and Weld, entertained the company by singing the praises of Arts '20
in some very original songs.
After dancing had been in order for
some time, excellent refreshments were
served, the merits of which were enhanced by the fetching appearance of
the be-aproned waiters. An onlooker
was forced to conclude that there is no
such thing as unalloyed triumph, when
he beheld the head waiter, gallantly
mounting the stage steps to serve the
chaperones, suddenly stumble, upsetting
the coffee as well as his dignity, and
completely spoiling the effect of his
carefully laundered pinafore. During
the supper interval more songs were
submitted for the approval of the guests.
The words of these songs were decidedly
new, if the music was not.
Dancing was then resumed until 13
o'clock.     "Tag"  and  medley  dances,   an
(Continued  on Page  6)
Toronto Abolishes
Military Drill
MILITARISM DEPOSED IN EASTERN UNIVERSITIES—IS U.B.C.
TO  REMAIN DORMANT?
The male members of 1T9 U. C.
showed in no uncertain manner that
they are strongly opposed to compulsory
military instruction when their mass
meeting, held in East Hall recently,
unanimously placed itself on record to
that effect. A resolution of a conciliatory tone was put forward, with a view
of lessening the burden and making the
drill of a more inviting character, but it
was given no support.
Toronto, Jan. 22.—At a meeting of a
special committee of the University of
Toronto Senate yesterday afternoon, the
request of the students' administrative
council, that drills should be done away
with, was acceded to.
Y.W.C.A.
On Thursday, January 16th, a general
meeting of the "Y" was held, the speaker being Mrs. Mcintosh, and her subject,
"Settlement  Work."
Mrs. Mcintosh gave a brief outline of
the beginnings of this work through
university extension work in England
and the United States, and spoke of it
as a dream that even yet has not been
wholly realized. The success of the work
is chiefly dependent on the personality
of the leader; and in this connection she
spoke very highly of the Vancouver
leader, Mrs. Van Munster, whom she
described as having the right attitude
towards the people.
The remainder of the lecture dealt
with the University settlement in Montreal, with which Mrs. Mcintosh was for
some time closely connected; and her
most interesting account of the work
done there was very greatly appreciated
by an extremely attentive audience. UBYSSEY
January 30, 1919
Great Demand for Efficient
Stenographers
START NOW
Take a  Course at the  Oldest and
Best Business College
Results count—all graduates
placed in good positions
The
PITMAN
Business  College
Established 1898
422   RICHARDS   STREET
Phone, Seymour 9135
ENLARGEMENTS
Photographs copied equal to the
original. Duplicates, enlargements
and   miniatures   made  from   same.
Uancower Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
Sfosljum -Craft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY   should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's clothes.
QUALITY     dominates     in    all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value  positive.
SHOP OF
FASHION-CRAFT
Gty00. Joatrr $c Ota
HJiutitr-u
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CYNICA GAY
CORRESPONDENCE   ANSWERED
Dear Readers: Sometives even Cynica has questions. Can anybody tell me
why Marjorie had so many partners in
the Tag two-step? If Prof. Elliot relieved Adams of any specie? Did Lord
take  the  cushion  home?
Hughie—Although your present manner of serving coffee is quite graceful, I
would suggest that the use of a hose,
while just as effective, would be safer.
Meekison—Searching for a lost car on
a rainy day is rather hard on the temper. Yet you voice your protest in rather
vulgar language—though I admit it was
a very unladylike action on their part.
In future, lock your car, and the marauding Freshettes will be foiled.
E. Conomyx—Yes, you can stay away
from the Orpheum next week. The lectures in Economics will be delivered by
Dr. Boggs, as Mr. Smeaton is vocally
indisposed (over-exertion), and Mr.
Adams' attention has been drawn from
Jebb by that aristocratic recreation,
soccer.
Josephik Denhaminski—I am in deep
perplexity as to whether Professor Robertson's red tie is a sign of Bolsheviki
sympathies or not.
Sleuth—Despite the fact that "Doc"
camouflages a bathrobe under an overcoat, I feel he would not be guilty of so
serious a misdemeanor as a holdup.
Dear Cynica Gay:
It seems to me that there are those in
the University who are seeking to usurp
your rights in making decisions in beauty and heart questions. While in the
kitchen, boiling water for Dr. Ashton's
tea, I accidentally overheard the following conversation from the council room,
where, as you know, all serious student
business is transacted:
S—tc—e's voice: "If there's one thing
I hate to see, it is a girl back-combing
her hair."
G—b—n's voice: "It's bad for hair,
too."
S—tc—e: "Or those sausage-rolls on
their cheeks."
G—b—>n:    "So do I."
S—tc—e: "Well, a boudoir cap covers
a multitude of sins, anyway."
G—b—n : "But sometimes very little
hair."
After long pondering, I have come to
the conclusion that such knowledge
could come only from you. If such is
the case, you should realize that such
knowledge is highly improper for young
men of tender years.
In the interest of innocence,
THE JANITOR.
Phone, Seymour 1391
H. F. Storry & Co.
Tailors
650 Granville Street
Up Stairs
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Success Business
College
Limited
B.   SCOTT   EATON,
Principal
B.A.,
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone, Fairmont
2075
GIBSON STUDIO
Photographers
214-18   BIrks   Building
Phone, Sey. 3430 Vancouver,  B.C.
HARRISON  &  CO.
R. H. SBABROOK, Prop.
Drawing    Instruments    and    Materials
Architects', Engineers' and Surveyors'
Supplies—Nautical   Instruments
and Charts
Telephone, Seymour 5826
582 RICHARDS STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MCDONALD'S
CHOCOLATES
For   Birthday  Gifts
Granville  Street Near  Robson
U.Morimoto&Co.
Direct Importers of
Japanese Fancy Goods
Ladies' Wear Made Special to
Order
Hemstitching  by  Measure
Manufacturers of
"Bamboo Knitting Needles"
Main Store:
673 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone, Seymour 6410 January 30, 1919
UBYSSEY
HOC KEY
Seattle at Vancouver
Monday, Feb. 3, 8.30 p.m.
Prices:
Reserve    Seats,    SOc;    Promenade,
$1.10;    Box    Seats,    $1.35.      Entire
Balcony    Unreserved,    55c;     Boys,
25c.    Prices include tax.
Reserve  seats  now  on  sale  at the
GROTTO  CIGAR  STORE
622 Granville Street
Phone, Seymour 23420
Wellington and Comox
COAL
The Best for Kitchen and
Furnace  Use
Macdonald, Marpole Go. Ltd.
Sole Agents
1001 MAIN STREET
Phone, Seymour 210
J. N. Harvey's Clothing Stores
We   Are   Showing   a    Number   of
NEW SPRING MODELS
In  Young  Men's
Form-fitting Suits
That You  Should See
Look them over now—try them
on. They will show you just
"what's what" for this coming
spring.
The  prices  range
$25, $30,  $35, $40  to  $45
Bargains  in all broken lines  of
Suits, Overcoats, Shirts, Underwear,      etc.,     during     January.
Watch   Our  Window
J. N. HARVEY, LTD.
125-127   Hastings   Street
West
Also 614-616 Yates Street,
Victoria, B. C.
Look for the  Big Red Arrow
SERVICE CLUB DANCE
SPLENDID SUCCESS
MANY STUDENTS AND GRADUATES, RETURNED FROM
OVERSEAS, AMONG THOSE
PRESENT
The first dance given by the Western
Universities Service Club was held in
the Auditorium of the University on
Friday evening. It was well attended,
and everybody that was present declares
it to have been a splendid success.
"I haven't had such a good time since
the boys went overseas," was said by
more than one fair maiden; and the reply invariably was, "I've had the time of
my life."
The orchestra was splendid. We are
greatly indebted to Harry Letson and
his friends, for, as someone remarked,
"they are a better orchestra than any
you ever pay for, and they are so much
nicer to look at! Don't you like the way
Lieut. Letson does that rattety-tat-tat
on the chair, and the two at the piano?"
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the 196th
provided the refreshments, and a hearty
vote of thanks was accorded them at
the end of the evening. Mrs. Brock,
president of the auxiliary, and a number
of the members acted as chaperones.
Among those just returned was Mor-
ley Timberlake, of Arts '18, who left
with the 196th in 1916. On his left breast
he now wears a narrow strip of red,
white and blue ribbon—his Military
Medal.
We wish to correct a misunderstanding that seems to have kept some of the
boys away from the meetings of the
club. The Western Universities Service
Club is not a 196th organization; it is
for all returned soldiers of this or another university. The name Western
Universities was chosen in the hope that,
in time, the organization might extend
through the four Western Canada universities. As the 196th was organized
as a University battalion, all who served
with it, whether students or not, are
eligible for membership in the club.
HEARD IN EC. I.
Mr. Smeeton—Excuse me, sir. I know
I'm taking up too much .of your time,
and it's probably presumptive on my
part because I don't know anything
about the subject; but it seems to me, I
mean t' say, sir, that Aristotle can't have
looked into the subject very thoroughly,
because, sir, two and two might tend to
make five—that is to say, in another inconceivable world.
Leckie Shoes
are   made   for   the   man   who   is
particular
Remember:    "The Quality goes in
before the Name goes on"
"That's  a Leckie"
University Students
Who have time to spare
could make no better use of their
time  than in the
Study of
SHORTHAND
It will be of untold advantage
to you in taking lecture notes.
Most great speakers and many
great writers are good shorthand
writers.
What about  YOU?
Don't you think it would be
valuable to you also?
Enter any time—Day and Evening Sessions.
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.,
Manager.
Phone, Seymour 1911
"MIKADO"
Our  Specialties:
Silks,  Kimonas,  Ladles'  Wear
Made to Order
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
766 Granville St. Vancouver,  B.C.
PATRONIZE YOUR
ADVERTISERS UBYSSEY
January 30, 1919
Clubb & Stewart
Limited
309 to 315  Hastings Street, West
Our Sale on
YOUNG MEN'S SUITS
AND OVERCOATS
will   continue   until   February   1st.
We also have on sale a Men's
Glove Special, regular up to $3.00;
your choice, $1.50.
Special   line   of   Felt   and   Tweed
Hats; were up to $3.00, now $1.50.
Phone, Sey. 8380
The
Northern Life Assurance
Company of Canada
is a  good   Company  to Insure with
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New and  Old Book  Shop
Specialists   in   University   Books
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital   -
Reserve  -
- ?15,000,000
- $13,500,000
THRIFT AND  SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and deposits made by mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District,
including the  following,  which  are  in
the vicinity of the University:
Falrvlew—Corner   Sixth   Avenue   and
Granville
Kitsllano—Corner Fourth Avenue  and
Tew Street
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth  Ave.
and Main Street
UBYSSEY
Issued     every    Thursday     by     the     Publications
Board  of the  University  of  British   Columbia.
Extra  mural   subscriptions,   $2.00   per   session.
For   advertising:   rates,   apply   Advertising   Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief Ian.   A.   Shaw
Senior   Editor Alfred   Rive
( Margaret Browne
Editors J  Patricia  Smith
I Reginald  E.   Cribb
Chief   Reporter T.   Preston   Peardon
DEPARTMENTS
Musical  Editor Leopold J.  Mahrer
Military   Editor Claude   P.   Leckie
Exchange  Editor Agnes  M.  Ure
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager W.   John   Allardyce
Advertising Manager John N.  Weld
Circulation   Manager J.   Gordon   Eraser
Editor  for  the  Week Patricia  Smith
THE LITERARY SOCIETIES
For some time the need has been felt
of a more progressive policy on the part
of the two literary societies. Now, as
never before, it is important for University students to have some knowledge of
the elementary principles, at least, of
public speaking and the proper manner
of conducting meetings. The three inter-
class debates each year, arranged for by
the present syllabus of the Women's
Lit., are not sufficient to develop practised debators, while much latent talent
is neglected owing to the fact that only
two speakers are chosen from each class.
Although the meetings are invariably
interesting, they may be criticized on
the grounds that too seldom is the
entertainment entirely in the hands of
the members of the society; and that the
system of addresses by members of
the Faculty, although much appreciated
by the audience, does not tend to develop public speaking among the students. The Men's Lit. is more fortunate,
in that its members have the chance
of participating in the annual intercollegiate debate and oratorical contest.
Nevertheless, some fairly radical changes
in the plans of these two societies are
essential before they can fulfill their aim
of stimulating debating and public speaking. Again, the constitutions may be
criticized with regard to the fact that
there are no limitations of membership.
This tends in many cases to produce
carelessness and indifference on the part
of the students, who have come to think
of the "Lit." as something interesting to
attend, but demanding no great enthusiasm or support.
The executive of the Women's Literary Society is fully aware of the lack of
interest and zeal on the part of the stu
dent body. Tentative efforts are being
made to overcome the defects of the
present constitutions by the formation of
a new branch of the Literary Department, open to men and women alike, the
meetings of which would be conducted
entirely by the members. Careful attention would be given to rules of Parliamentary Procedure, and, instead of listening to addresses by Professors, the
members would have excellent opportunities for becoming themselves practised and capable speakers. Under the
present system, the task of debating falls
upon a few only; but in the new organization all would have an equal chance.
According to the plan now under consideration, membership would be restricted.
Any students really interested in such
matters would be invited to form a neu-
cleus; and the new society once formed,
fresh members would only be admitted
through merit and ability. Membership
in such an organization would be something to be sought after, and would be
a recognition of keen interest in the literary and intellectual side of University
life.
Until after the examinations, it is impossible to accomplish much in the
development of such an idea, but not
a few students have promised their
support; and it is hoped that, when a
definite plan of procedure is announced,
sufficient backing will be assured by the
men and women of the LTniversity to
secure  its  success.
CORRESPONDENCE
(The editors accept no responsibility for statements made in this column.
Letters must be brief. They should be written
on one side of the paper only and, if typewritten,
must be double spaced. The name and year of
the writer must be enclosed, but the letter may
be published over the initials or a pen-name if
so desired. No attention will be paid to letters
that do not comply with these rules.
The editois consider themselves under no obligation to publish any one letter. In the case of
two letters on the same subject, if both cannot be
printed, the briefer will be given the preference.)
Mr. Editor:
There has been considerable discussion about
the C.O.T.C. I do not wan? to risk a promising
career by stating my views on that matter. What
I would like to do is to offer a simple suggestion
in case military drill is "forced down our throats,"
so to speak.
If war should break out once more, I think
that the bulk of the student body would enlist
either in the Flying Corps or the Red Cross. Now
I would suggest that, since the infantry would
derive no recruits from amongst us, something
useful be substituted in place of military drill.
Taking into account the etiquette of the Flying
Corps and Red Cross, the proper substitutes
would be, say, lessons in "How to walk when
wearing riding pants," or "Selling tags for the
Red Cross." What say the puttee-legged multitude?
Tearfully yours,
L.  CUTLER. January 30, 1919
UBYSSEY
The Art of Speaking
Debates, Speeches, Play-parts,
Recitations  Coached
Special   rate   on   single  lessons   to
U.B.C. Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite 23, 709 Dunsmuir Street
Phone,  Sey. 6535Y
Mrs. A. L. Richardson,
L. R. A. M.
Pupil of Tobias Matthay
Formerly     Professor     of     Piano     and
Lecturer at McGill  University,  Montreal,   and   Midland Institute,   Birmingham, England.
Studio,   709   Georgia   Street,   West
Phone,  Seymour 8519L
VIOLONCELLO
MISS MAUDE SCRUBY
A.R.C.M.,  L.R.A.M.
Receives Pupils, Ensemble Classes,
Concerts, Recitals. Visits Vancouver weekly  (Tuesdays).
Studio:  709 Georgia Street
Telephone, Bay. 189
CUSICK
SERVES   GOOD   EATS
692   BROADWAY,   WEST
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
EASTMAN KODAKS
Developing   and   Printing
Copying  and   Enlarging
CAMERA   AND   ARTS
610 GRANVILLE  STREET
R.   P.  DUNNE,  Mgr.
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For   Light   Refreshments,
Ice   Cream   and   Candies
at
774 Granville Street
We Specialize in
GLOVES
DENTS       FOWNES
PERRINS
Ladies' and Men's
E. CHAPMAN
545 Granville Street
Editor "Ubyssey":
It is felt by many students in the University
that the Men's Literaiy Society is making a mistake in excluding women from those meetings
devoted to debating and public speaking. In
a modern University, where the desire is to
promote good-fellowship and so create an "atmosphere," such an attitude savors of the last
century, when the presuming *'co-ed" was tolerated at lectures but not expected to interfere in
affairs of the College. In many of the leading
universities to-day the men and women have one
literary society, which is found mutually beneficial.
At the commencement of the year, because the
men wished -it, special arrangement was made to
hold the Women's Literary Society meetings on
a day when the men could attend, although this
change conflicted with the lectures of a number
of the women. All regular meetings were thrown
open and no restrictions made. In return, the
men have now debarred the women from the
meetings most interesting to the student body.
It is understood that the reason given for this
extremely conservative action is that the men are
afraid to express their opinions on the question
under discussion while the fair sex is listening.
On this account it is believed that the members
will benefit more by speaking to the twenty or
thirty men occupying the Auditorium. But suppose that they do learn to speak to a group of
men, of what use will that be to them on leaving
the University? They will either have to stop
public speaking then, or learn to speak before
women under less advantageous conditions. There
is no place where they can speak without women
being present. If they become lawyers, they must
speak before women in addressing the court; if
they become lecturers, there will be women in
the audiences they address; if they become politicians, they cannot even reach the distinction of
sitting in the Legislature without having women
as fellow-members. Then why not face these
modern  conditions  now?
This new measure to gain confidence, Mr,
Editor, reminds me very much of the duckling
who tried to learn to swim on dry land before
venturing  into  the  water.
HAZEL  E.   McCONNELL.
January   22nd,   1919.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir: Every week we have delivered into
our hands eight bright sheets of paper, which we
all—for there is hardly a student in this whole
institution who does not take some interest in the
College paper—snatch up with eager anticipation
and peruse from headline to footnote, wading
through the oft-times weary and ungrammatical
reports of College functions. The students of
U.B.C. have a great deal of patience—that is why
you get away with some of your issues; but they
are not satisfied, and why? Why is it that the
paper is sometimes pronounced good, and at other
times resembles, from its lack of "pep," a missionary  society  bulletin?
Perhaps you will answer this with the oft-
repeated "Tuum Est"; but that is insufficient.
You make appeals for jokes and "literary" articles, but none of these seem to see print. You
have tried hard, Mr. Editor, to make "The
Ubyssey" of a high literary standard; but how
can you accomplish this when you only print 12
columns at the most? Who, in a real literary
article, could confine himself to this space? The
advertising staff is probably the most efficient on
the Publications Board; indeed, they have been
too zealous, for they have succeeded in almost
filling the paper with advertisements. Surely they
could find a few more advertisers who would
make the enlarging of the paper possible. Perhaps, too, if money is any object, the rates could
be advanced, for I think they are abnormally low.
Yours,  etc.,
D.   A.   WALLACE.
FOR CLASSY SWEETS
AND   DAINTY   EATS
Give
THE ARBOR
the  "Once  Over"
779 GRANVILLE STREET
T£EEP   the   happy   memories   of
College days for all time.
Bridgman's Studio
will    help   you   with    pictures    of
established  reputation
At  the  same  address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
The
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers   and   Printers
Students'   Loose-Leaf  Binders
Educational Stationery
School   Equipment
Drawing   Instruments    and    Materials
320  SEYMOUR  STREET
(Opposite  C.P.R.  Depot)
Vancouver,  B.C.
Fresh  Cut  Flowers
Funeral   Work  a   Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists, Nurserymen
and Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head   Office:
48   HASTINGS   STREET,   EAST
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728   GRANVILLE   STREET
Phone,  Sey. 9513 UBYSSEY
January 30, 1919
WISE     YOUNG     MEN   AND     WOMEN
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Apply for Yours in Canada's Largest Life Company
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Xovers'
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BOOKSELLERS   AND   STATIONERS
649  GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 602
VANCOUVER, B.C.
THE     YAMATO
Direct Importers of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone, Seymour 2288
E. C. KILBY
The Hosiery Specialist
628 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DRAMA
(Unfortunately     omitted     from     last
week's issue.—Ed.)
Owing to the rather unique fact
that the dramatist who wrote "Mary's
Ankle," a play in the lighter vein, is a
British Columbian born and bred, this
week's article will be confined to something about her life rather than her
work. May Tully was born in Nanaimo
and educated in the public and high
schools of Victoria, being a classmate
of  one  of our  own  professors.
She left McGill University, in her
Sophomore year, to become a great
actress. So strong was her yearning to
uplift the stage, that she could not even
wait to finish her college life. Entering
a school of acting, she was soon bold
enough to accept a tragedian role as
the heroine "Glory" of Hall Caine's
"Christian"—a difficult and rather exacting part.   At once she communicated
the marvellous news to her old college
chums, and received in reply their
schoolgirl gushes, predicting a tremendous  career.
But, unfortunately, her Southern tour
in "The Christian" lasted only ten
days, and she was back again in New
York, with a little wind taken out of
her sails. She at length resolved to be
contented with a rather more minor
role. From one agency to another she
journeyed, until she arrived at the stage
when she was glad to accept a position
in the chorus of a showgirl-and-pony
type of musical comedy, "The Grand
Old   Summer-time."
Now comes the fun—for she laughingly tells this tale of her early madcap enthusiasm and the cold shower it
got. "The Grand Old Summer-time"
was to play Montreal, so, of course, she
again wrote to her college friends, telling them she was coming, but not that
it was as a member of the "merry-
merry."
The press agent diabolically planted
the story in the papers that May Tully.
a McGill student, was to make her stage
debut in Montreal. And so the first
night came. The boxes were occupied
by the Faculty in evening dress. Two
hundred college boys had seats in the
balcony; ten rows of the orchestra were
taken by the women, all expecting her
to do at least Lady Macbeth, for they
knew not of her rapid descent from
stardom. The curtain went up; she
tripped gaily onto the stage at the head
of the line of showgirls, all lustily
singing, "Bimbo, Do I Love You?
Bimbo, Indeed I Do." Then the full
realization struck her. She thought of
flight, of painting; but a push from behind recalled her. For a few moments,
of course, no one recognized her. Then
a giggle came from the balcony, and
her   agony   began.
When it was all over, the Dean of
the College, an English titled lady,
came to her and said, "Don't you think,
my dear, the more serious side of your
Members of Arts '19
are requested to have their pictures
taken at
BRIDGMAN'S STUDIO
413 GRANVILLE STREET
not later than Feb. 15
No photographs will be taken after that
date; and all are asked to go through
with the ordeal at once, even at the risk
of failing at the long-delayed and much-
lamented "Xmas" exams.
profession offers a more satisfactory
career?" to which she mumbled something about developing grace by dancing.
And   then   May   Tully   made   a   hasty
exit.
II.  R.
THE GLEE CLUB
Under the able leadership of Professor
Russell, the members of the Glee Club
arc entering heartily into the spirit of
preparation for the coming concert. An
excellent programme is promised; and,
in view of the large numbers taking part,
the entertainment will probably be held
in one of the city churches.
ARTS '20 PARTY
(Continued  from  Page  1)
innovation at U.B.C, enabled the members of the class to get thoroughly
acquainted with each other, so that now
there is absolutely no excuse for any
member of Arts '20 not smiling serenely
at another member of the class upon all
future meetings.
Mr. MacKinnon and his executive are
to be complimented for having arranged
so  successful  a  class  function.
An impassioned letter was received
the other day from an Agriculture student complaining that we referred to
such beings as himself as "Agrics." Correspondent stated that they answer only
to the name "Aggie," in honor of a
prominent famil3' of Holstein-Friesian
cattle. We are also informed that the
short-course men have been dubbed
"Shorthorns."
Read the ads. on the next page. January 30, 1919
UBYSSEY
SHIRTS
FOR EVERY PURPOSE
FOR EVERY PERSONALITY
FOR EVERY PURSE
New weaves
And colors
$1.50 to $12
Pons $ Small
LIMITED
Cor. Granville and Pender
SEY. 1643
RX.Purdy,Dd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675   GRANVILLE   STREET
EXCLUSIVE
COSTUMIERES
For  Women,  Misses and  Children
-^Mfe^
575 GRANVILLE STREET
MILITARY NOTES
In spite of rumors and agitation
against its existence, the C.O.T.C. still
continues its appointed .task. On all
sides wc hear arguments in favor of
abolishing military drill and substituting
organized athletics; and we also hear the
Bolshevist cry of "Down with everything
but us." The majority, however, agree
that everyone should do something, and
to this end would let all those who go in
for athletics drop the drills.
This brings us to the old question of
proper equipment being necessary for
the pursuit of sport. Well might we cry,
"How can we play when there is nothing
to  play with?"
It seems necessary then that, until the
Government recognizes our crying need
for a respectable gymnasium, military
drill should continue as at present. Special time could be set aside for recreation; but with conditions as they are at
present, most of the students would have
nothing to do but study or go to a
movie.
SCIENCE
(Owing to lack of space in this issue,
the report sent in by the Science men
has had to be cut down considerably.)
Meekison
stolen police
hlankety blank
Overland Car
ate no lunch
two freshettes.
RED CROSS
The U.B.C. Red Cross Society makes
an urgent appeal to all the students for
help in their workroom. The request
for monetary assistance met with such
hearty response that the executive are
encouraged to ask for workers to help
make up the materials that the students'
generosity has purchased. The work is
handed in by the Society in the name of
the students. Will not the students back
up the Society? As long as there is a
soldier in France, we must "carry on"—
and there are still 42,000 Canadian- soldiers in hospitals overseas.
Y.M.C.A.
Last week's "Y" meeting was addressed by Dr. Gillespie, who spoke on
"Sex and Manhood." The meeting was
well attended.
Exclusive Styles
in
for
Young men and
Young Women
*T»HE  NEW STYLES  IN  FALL
AND WINTER FOOTWEAR
are  certainly handsome.
For the young woman, the new
military heel boot, with cloth or
buck tops, in colors of brown,
grey, or black.
For the young man, the new
shades of tan, with leather or
Neolin soles; also smart styles in
black.
We have an Expert Fitting
Service.
Ingledew
Shoe €o;
666 Granville Street
"Vancouver's   Smartest   Shoe
Store" UBYSSEY
January 30, 1919
Shoes for
Young Men
QJMART and SNAPPY STYLES
—the latest in Shoes as now
being worn in the large Eastern
centres.
In   all   leathers—in    Black,   Tan,
Brown—all  the  popular  shades.
The   largest   and   best   stock   of
Men's Shoes in Vancouver.
Your   Money's   Worth
or  Your  Money  Back
WILLIAM DICK
Limited
33-49 Hastings, East
Vancouver, B. C.
RENNIE'S  SEEDS
They  Always  Grow
Send for Catalogue To-day
WM. RENNIE CO., LTD.
1138 HOMER STREET
872 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 530
RECONSTRUCTION
The prosperity of Vancouver
depends in great measure on
the presence of an enterprising
electric light, power and railway
system that has resources to
supply industries with these
services.
Without the foresight of this
Company, in preparing for the
future, Vancouver would have
been severely handicapped in
bidding for new industries.
B.C. Electric
THE LONG AND
SHORT OF IT
OR THROUGH THE EYES OF
ALGERNON
It is always encouraging to know that
one's efforts to
maintain a humorous column are supported by the rest
of the students.
On Tuesday I met
1'ourniet, who
stopped me and
asked: "Say, are you
Algernon?" I gave a non-commital nod.
(It is never safe to say yes to these fellows; they may not like something you
wrote in last week's "Ubyssey.) "Here's
a good joke, then," he said. "Who started the 'flu'?" "No," I said, "but I bite.
Who did?" "The bricklayer," he answered, and left me to Figure it out and
make a note of it. On Wednesday I
met Weld, who accosted me with, "Say,
here's a good joke for the paper: "Who
started the 'flu'?" "The bricklayer?" I
modestly suggested. "Say, I thought
you told me you had lectures all Tuesday afternoon," he said: but before I
could get him to explain what lectures
on Tuesday afternoon had to do with it.
he was gone. On Thursday, Lord told
me about the bricklayer, and on Friday
1 heard the story (with variations) from
Cribb, Denham, Pratt and Webster. It
was quite uncanny how it seemed to be
getting around. Then, on Saturday
afternoon, a friend took me to the Or-
pheum, and I, too, learned who started
the  "flu."
By the way, rather an unusual thing
happened yesterday. I was passing
down the corridor, on my way to room
"Y," when I noticed three Orientals
humbling themselves before the last
door to the right in that corridor. In a
burst of sympathy and fellow-feeling, I
asked the one that seemed to be doing
the most scraping and bowing: "Didn't
you hand in your essay last week, or
isn't your literature prepared?" he gazed
on me for a minute or so, and a look of
compassion overspread his face. "Joss
House," he said, indicating the door before which his companions were still
prostrating themselves; "all samee Joss
House, burnee incense," "No savvy." I
replied. "No savvy! Smellee incense!"
Then, like a flash, I understood everything, for a chance breath of air had
brought to my nostrils hints of those
subtle but pungent odors that Cynica
mentioned last week.
Read the ads. on this page.
The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
HEAD    OFFICE:    WINNIPEG,    MAN.
Assets,  December  31st,  1917,
Over 24 Millions
As soon as possible every young
man should create an estate by purchasing a life insurance policy.
Investigate the merits of The Great-
West Life, and it will not be necessary  to  seek  information  elsewhere.
Inquire at
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Branch Office for B.C.
Remodelling: Skins Tanned
FURS
A  SEALSKIN   COAT   or   a   fur
piece made up by us is a thing
of beauty.
H.  E.  TAYLOR
Repairs
508   DUNSMUIR   STREET
Phone, Sey. 4891
WELL-PRINTED
STATIONERY
Means Everything
to Your
Business Success
Get   Your   Next   Supply
from the Pioneer
Printing House
EVANS & HASTINGS
PRINTING   COMPANY
578 SEYMOUR STREET
Phone, Sey. 189     Vancouver, B.C.
None  but  Union   Mechanic!  Employed

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