UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 23, 1940

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0123608.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123608.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0123608-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0123608-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0123608-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0123608-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0123608-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0123608-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0123608-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0123608.ris

Full Text

 YOU OAN DO YOUR
BIT TO KEEP THB
OAMPUS  CLEAN
®tji> Hbyaa^g
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
YOU OAN DO YOUR
PART TO KEEP THE
OAF TIDY
VOL. XXIX.
VANOOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1940
No. 26
On The Forensic Front
Each U. Wins and Loses; So
Nobody WinsMcGounCup
Braidwood and McGiil Win in Saskatoon;
Reed and Carlsen Lose Decision Here
To Manitoba Team of Gow and McFadden
Nobody won the McGoun cup. For the first time in the history
of intercollegiate debating competition for the McGoun cup, the
four universities tied for flrst place . . . each with three points.
In eaoh oaae the negative visiting
Surprise Move
Carey  Resigns
As  Coach  Of
English  Rugby
English rugby enthusiasts were
handed a severe blow late Monday
night when It was learned that A. B.
Carey, head ooaoh of English rugby
at U.B.C. had tendered his resignation owing to the pressure of business, and that Dr. H. V. Warren, as
faoulty advisor, had regretfully accepted  Mr.  Carey's  withdrawal.
Simultaneously, lt was announced
that, while no new coach had been
selected, Mr. Maurioe Van Vllet,
Director of Physical Education at
the University, had agreed to handle the physloal conditioning and*
training of the four  rugger squads.
Mr. Carey had been devoting much
time to the * coaching of English
rugby at tbe University, but found
that, owing to an Increased call
upon hia time pertaining to buaineas
mattera, he would be unable to discharge, effectively, hla taaka aa rugby ooaoh.
Although no successor -was named,
lt was announced that several men
had been approached with a view
to assuming temporary charge until
the season's end. Meanwhile, the
team will be trained by Mr. Van
Vllet.
California Tech
Offers
Assistantships
Fellowships and assistantships from
the California Institute of Technology
and scholarships from the British
Council are being offered to graduates of the University of British Columbia.
Teaching fellowships ln civil, electrical and mechanical engineering and
In aeronautics, giving tuition and
lodging valued at $760 each are being
offered to men with one year of graduate work, while assistantships carrying stipends of from $300 to $800 are
being offered to all graduates. Application should be made before February 15 to the dean of the graduate
school of the California Institute ot
Technology at Pasadena.
team of debaters won, and In eaoh
case th.y won by a two to one decision.
As eaoh university received a
total of three points in the contest,
the University of Saskatchewan will
continue to hold the McOoun oup,
emblematic of western debating
supremacy,  for another year.
SUMMARY
U.B.C. debaters McOill and Braidwood defeated the Saskatchewan
team Albert Nelld and Tom Dels in
Saskatoon.
Alberta debaters Sam Epstein and
John Maxwell defeated the University of Manitoba team David Oolden
and Doug. MoWhannel ln Winnipeg.
Saskatchewan debater. Dlok
Motherwell and Clarence Eatey defeated the University of Alberta debaters Morris Schumlatoher and
Bruce  MacDonald  ln   Edmonton.
The Manitoba duo, Hugh McFadden and Donald Oow won a decision
over the U.B.C. team of Bernard
Reed and Alfred Carlsen In Vancouver.
NATIONALISM  HINDRANCE
Opening the debate at the Hotel
Oeorgla laat Friday for the University qf British Columbia, Alfred
Carlsen claimed that alliances,
treaties, and pacts, binding together
sovereign powers, will fall beoauae
they do not eliminate intense national feeling and national government.
"Aggressive nationalism ln Europe
must go," he said. "A confederation
of European states will wipe out
tariff barriers, and will see democracy protected by a common army
serving its federal responsible rulers.
FEDERATION   IMPOSSIBLE
Hugh McFadden, negative leader,
declaring that a European Federation was Impossible, cited the League
of Nations and the Holy Alliance to
prove hia pointa.
Claiming that such a proposal as
advanced by Carlaen would necessarily lead to German domination of
Europe even though Germany might
be defeated on the battlefield, he
said "Aa long as the Ideologies of
the Demooraole. outer radically
trom thoae of the Central Powers,
the Democracies must retain their
predominance—by force If necessary."
Claiming that people, tired of war
and all that war meant, would oling
to a union ln desperation, Bernard
Reed, seoond affirmative apeaker
said, "Under a federation each state
will lose not only the desire to cre-
(Continued on Page 3)
See  MoOOUN   CUP
Hon. E. W. Hamber
Spain and the World
Spain May Soon Attempt Annexation
•   •   • •   *   •
of Portugal Hilton Informs Institute
Modern Spain, hot' political"
jealousies, her suspicions, and
her aspirations were pictured
for members oft- the Vancouver
Institute, SntR^day evening,
when ProfessorWilonald Hilton,
of the Department of Modern Languages speaking on "Spain and the
World", traced the underlying forces
in   Spanish   diplomacy.
Taking hla audience on a tour of
the countries surrounding Spain, the
young Oxford graduate dealt briefly
with Spain's relation to Portugal,
Britain, Fraitce, Germany, Italy,
Latin America and the United
States.
SPAIN   DESIRES   PORTUGAL
"The keynote between diplomatic
relations on Portugal and Spain Is
England," ^Professor Hilton stated.
"If in the oourse of the present war.
Kngland an|d France are unable to
intervene, /fan attempted annexation
of Portugal by Franco will be quite
likely."        \
icL
The speaker pointed out thnt the
Spanish hatred of the Portuguese
la   only   secondary   to   the   Portuguese hatred of the Spanish.
BONE  OF CONTENTION
Designating the rock of Gibraltar
as the bone of contention between
England and Spain, Professor Hilton, referred to Gilbert and Sullivan's "Gondoliers" as a striking example of anti-Spanish literature pre-
dominent in  England  and  France.
"The sympathies of Spain ln the
present war tend to side with Germany,"  he  revealed.
"Spain has more ties with Italy
than with any other country," the
speaker stated. "But even in alliance, the Spaniards feel a certain
scorn for the Italians whom they
consider effeminate."
IU.MKMB1.R   THE   MAINE
Stating that in Latin America,
Spain was held in good standing except in Brazil and Chile, Professor
Hilton   went   on   to   demonstrate   the
(Continued  on Page  3)
See SPAIN
Lteutenant-Oovernor, who will officiate at the opening ceremonies
of the Brock Memorial Building
on January 81.
Campus
Student
Clean-up  Drive  Begins;
Co-operation  Essential
COUNCILLORS
SUSPEND
LOCAL C.S.A.
The local branoh of the Canadian
Students' Assembly was suspsnded
from all further activity by Students' Counoil at their meeting Monday night, pending submission of a
satisfactory report covering the proceedings and findings of the C.S.A.
Conferenoe held during Christmas
ln St. Anne de Bellevue.
Council's decision climaxed several days of unfavorable reports from
Eastern and Western University
papers, and fell tn Une with the decision of Mount Allison University
and the University of Saskatchewan
both of whloh withdrew from the
C.S.A., and abolished local branches
of the national body.
TO THB MEMBERS
OF THE ALMA MATER SOOIETY
This year the Students' Council, through the efforts of a
Committee appointed by them, are making an attempt to clean
up the University campus. The campaign will centre on the
cleanup of the University cafeteria and the maintenance of order
and cleanliness In the new Brock Memorial Building.
Considerable critlciam has always arisen, from visitors,
members of the Faculty, and from the studenta themselves,
regarding the throwing of lunch wrappers, cigarettes, and waste-
paper about  the  cafeteria.
Appeals of this nature have been made in the paat, but
this year we Intend to carry out a prolonged and strenuous
campaign, not merely ln the cafeteria, but on the whole of the
Unlveralty campus. Efforts will be made to procure more waste-
paper baaketa and facilities necessary to clean up the campus,
and we appeal to all students to keep this clean-up foremost
ln  their  minds.
It is particularly important that this be done at this time,
when we are planning on opening a new building which must
be   respected   and   treated  as  a  home.
The campaign starts today and will be continued until satisfactory results aro attained. If the Oommittee does not receive
the desired co-operation, lt shall be left to their discretion to
draw up rules and regulations and to Impose fines for any
violations. .
I sincerely believe the students realize the need for such a
campaign and trust that you will co-operate in every way possible in cleaning up the campus and making it a credit to the
University.
Yours very truly,
JOHN W. PEARSON,
President,  The Alrna Mater Society.
Fraternities, Faculties Pledge Support
In a United Effort to Ameliorate
Dirty Conditions in Caf and
Common-Rooms
By ARVXD BAOKMAN
This week is clean up week. So is next week and the weeks
thereafter.
Dismayed by the utter lack of tidiness, cleanliness, and neatness in the university students, the editors of the Ubyssey,
working in conjunction with the faculty staff, and Students'
Council are inaugurating: a clean up campaign to bring to the
-eyes of thoughtful students the disgraceful oondltlons existing in some
quarters on this oampus.
TARE A LOOK AROUND
A look In the Kaf, on the oampua,
in the men's common rooms, in some
lecture rooms should be enough for
those students not born and raised
ln a pig sty to realise that a olean
up oampaign Is needed.
Last Saturday Ubyssey reporters
and editors made a comprehensive
survey of the Arts Building, the
Soience Building, the Applied Soience Building, thn Aggie Building,
and the University Orlll (colloquially
called the* Kaf).
I quote the reporters Inspecting
these  buildings  at  II  a.m.  Saturday:
THE  ARTS  BUILDING
"The Arta Building I consider the
dirtiest on the campua. Matchea and
cigarette butta are strewn everywhere—in corridors, leoture rooms,
and In the aisles.
IIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII.il
DEAN     BUCHANAN    of    the
Faculty of Arts: "I should
like very much to see the
campus, the parking lots and
the halls kept ln a cleaner
condition than they have
been ... In fact as clean as
the students keep their own
homes and  yards."
IMMIIIHIMIIMI.fMIMIMIIMMMIMIMMIMMIl
"The men's common room is oov-
ered with scraps of paper of all sires
and description. Chairs are scattered wherever the user deigns to leave
them. Coke bottles and newspapers
hide the tops of tables supposed to
be uaed for studying.
THE  AOOIE  BLDG.
"The Aggie building ia not so
dirty as the Arts butldtng. Aggies, ln
their commons room, have thrown
cigarette butts, bottles, and pieces
of string all over the floor. Olasa
tubing and apparatus are acattered
Indiscriminately in the laba.
APPLIED SCIENCE $08
"Room 208 of the Applied Science
Building 1. the dirtieat room I have
aeen  all  morning.  Soienoemen   aeem
to  have  outdone  themaelvea  in  collecting scrap paper for it.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMMI
DEAN  J.  N.  FINLAYSON,  of
the   Faculty   of   Applied   Science:     "The    cleanup    campaign meets with my hearty-
approval.     You   can   be   a.-
aured of the  fullest co-operation from all membera and
staff of the faculty of Applied  Science."
IMMIMIMMIMMIMIMMIMMMIMIMIMIMMMIl
"Their common  room  ia comparatively   clean,   and   the   locker   room
fair.  As  in  the  other  buildings, cigarette  butts  and  matchea  litter the
aisles and  the  stairs."
KAF KALEIDOSCOPE
Such    'apparent     uncleanliness     is
nothing compared to the utter bland
(Continued on Page 3)
See   CLEAN-UP
Brock Memorial
Dance Formal
Says Council
The long-awaited, mammoth
dance of the century, U.B.C.'s
Brock Memorial Opening Ball,
will tako place on Thursday,
February 1, In the newly completed
building itaelf, under the distinguished patronage of Hla Honour, the
Lieutenant-Oovernor of British Columbia, Eric W. Hamber, LL.D.
end Mra. Hamber.
FORMAL  DANCE
Dresa, a much-debated subject ln
lecture-room., common rooms and
caf alike, will be formal according
to information received from the
Students Council who again discussed the queation laat night.
CLIMAX  TO  EFFORTS
Poatponed from the prevloua week
becauae of the Inability of aeveral
of the patrons to attend, the ball
will climax years of effort on the
part of students, faculty and contributors alike. Spurred on by the
persistence of the students to have
the building constructed at the
earliest possible time, thousands
have done their bit toward making
a reality the splendid edifice which
now stands a permanent tribute to
the memory of a beloved and respected  Faculty member.
And now It's all a reality, and
students are looking forward with
bated breath to the dance which
will mark the opening of the building   they  have   watched   for   months
(Continued on Page 3)
See HROCK BALL
To the left you see three candid
photos of the University Grill, colloquially known as the Caf. These
tuts, taken by a special photographer, wen- rushed at noon yesterday
n. order to make today's 'clean-up
issue.
Though the top cut somewhat resembles tbe Vancouver City Dump,
it is no more than a snap of refuse,
casually tossed by thoughtful students  upon  the caf floor.
In short—the pickings of tbe customary caf sweep-up.
The table, cluttered with an imposing array of dishes, papers, and an
obviously empty package of Exports,
suggests   what  should  not  be.
The t'askct to the im mediate right
is as l>askels should /><•—but could
t/iey not be more numerous? The
< af boasts  three! Keep tbe Campus Clean
Keep tlie *Caf • Neat
Two
THE     UBYSSEY
THE   UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Sooiety of the University of British Columbia
Office) Brook Memorial Building     ......     Phono Alma 16*4
Oampua Subscriptions, $1.60
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
John Garrett
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Arvtd   Baokman
Mall Subscriptions, 93.00
Friday
Jack   Margeson
Joan Thompson
Mlml Schofleld
SPORTS
Lionel Salt
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Janet Walker
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Pat Keatley
Ann Jeremy
Arohle Paton
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS
Doug Watt
Austin Frith
O. V. P. KDITOR
Joyoe Cooper
LITERARY EDITOR
Virginia Galloway
Gerry  Armstrong
Editorial
WASHING BEHIND THB BARS
Students' Oounoil haa taken upon itself a grim and well nigh
impossible task in attempting to inspire the students of the University to clean snd keep elean their campus. But there is a remote chanoe that a 'clean-up campaign' will catch the fancy of
the campus, and will result in a smashing victory for those of a
sensitive aesthetic sense.
To harp on the Cafeteria, in as muoh as it is the worst cesspool
of the University of B.C., may be unwise; yet it is surely no more
than habit which causes the garbage problem. It has beoome a
custom in the Csf to ignore any sense of respectability, to neglect
the elements of good taste and refinement, to forget the unnecessary burden of labour placed upon the shoulders of the Cafeteria
staff, and to enjoy that general atmosphere of noise, confusion and
untidiness which inevitably shocks a casual observer.
When this traditional slovenliness originated, no person
knows. For how many years it must continue is the responsibility
of the student body; in faot the condition of this campus, its
buildings and its grounds, has long been a question for the consideration of the members of the Alma Mater Society, and from
time immemorial the problem has been dutifully avoided and overlooked.
Freshmen and freshettes are probably the least guilty of all
the classes at the University when it is a matter of attaching blame
for the rubbish situation at Point Grey. The oft-called 'Green
Ones' are fresh from High School where litterlouts are appropriately condemned, sometimes even punished.
"Within two years these innocent freshmen have been trained
and groomed in all the arta of successful Caf lounging. The short
span of four terms is sufficient for them to lose all their background of domestic culture and manners—doubtlessly drilled
into them by hopeful parents and despairing teachers—nnd to
absorb a thorough laziness of mind and body whieh typifies this
University in so many ways.
What reasons can be offered for the tragic attendance at
Alma Mater Society meetings, at class elections or meetings, at
Pass system functions, or at athletic functions? What gives rise
to the much hated inter-loeking directorates?
Can the answer be other than a laziness of spirit, n general
apathy among the students?
And here again the blame might be laid at the feet of the
senior students. The Senior Class, let alone the Juniors, deserves
the respect of the lower years no more than a confirmed hypocrite.
No good example is set by the Seniors as a group; no effort is
made by them to improve the criticized behaviour of the other
classes.
This extraordinary state of affairs is unparalleled on almost
any other university campus on the American continent. The start,
therefore, must be an appeal to the Seniors of this campus to exercise what little authority they may still possess in a glorious
introduction of a reformed era. The road that leads to a 'clean
campus* will'be arduous, and a certain amount of the 'do-it-yourself framo of mind may be required of the Senior. It is to be
hoped that the Seniors of every faculty here will show a willingness to co-operate in every possible way with the 'Clean-up Campaign.*
But other groups on the campus should be asked to assist.
Fraternities and sororities have recently completed their Spring
rushing seasons and a bumper erop of pledges await the instructional education usually given out in generous quantity by the
Senior brothers and sisters. Since the fraternity or sorority table
system would appear to be securely installed in the Caf, it might
be wise to suggest that the Greeks keep a group of their uninitiated ones in constant scavenging activity. Such action would at
once secure the Cafeteria of almost twenty spotless tables.
The Faculty, too, it is hoped, will take up the cry. No section
of the University feels more strongly than the Professors the need
for a new outlook, a new behaviour on the part of the students. It
is probably almost beneath the dignity of some of the faculty to
mention a clean-up week in lectures. It is unfortunate that the
students nre of the type that demands such petty attentions from
the professors. Although the days of being told what to do and
what not to do should have gone by the time a boy or girl reach
University, students here apparently still require the attentions
•of a wet-nurse. In brief, the mental age of students of the University of B.C. is unaccountably low.
No longer must the disgraceful condition of the Campus continue. Criticism has been voiced on every side, and concrete suggestions made. Now is the time for very definite action. This time
the Campaign is to be successful, but it would bo unfortunate if
its success had to depend upon threats of punitive measures.
A clean University and a clean Campus must become the
sincere desire of each and every student at the University of
British Columbia.
KEEP THE CAMPUS CLEAN
KEEP THE CAF NEAT
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE  OUR BUDGET  PLAN
Seymour at Dunsmuir
BELOW
THIS
HEAD
By NEMO
HE CAN TELL THE FUTURE
The dizzy little blonde wandered rather timidly into Ozam
the mystic's dive on Meander
Avenue. Of Ozaro she had heard
much. Her friends had told her
that Osam the wonderful was uncanny, he was remarkable, he was
a wlsard—In short he waa the greatest prophet of all time.
Well, this D.L.B. had her troubles.
And shs had learned that for the
miserly sum of Ave sawbucks Osam,
the Oreat, would reveal not only
the past with all Its dark Implications but also the future with Ite
unpredictable Inoonslstsnolss.
OH—PROMISE ME
So thla D.L.B. eagerly handed over
her flvespots and listened Intently
to the hypnotic words of Osam, the
Oreat. She learned that she had remarkable powers; she learned, moreover, that she was one of the ohosen
few, and that she would rise to the
heights of suooess—not beoauss of
her Innate abilities but beoause she
was a Caprioornlan, born under the
beneficent Jupiter wtth the sun In
the Ascendant and Meroury somewhere oloae at hand.
Gladly, she alwaya returned to
Osam, the Flatterer, who would tell
her more about herself for Ave saw-
buoka a revelation. He even told
her future. Though dlssappolnted
when the revelations did not pan
out as Osam promised she rationalised hla failure by saying to herself
that he oould not be oorreet all the
time.
Simply   stunning.
HE HAS BEEN LUCKY
Confused most of ths time by hie
claims she willingly believed his suppositions bsoauas he aseerted that
his predictions had In the paat included wonderful suooesses. And
Osam was so oonvinelng.
Moreover he waa a prominent figure. The daily 'rags' had quoted him
aa an authority on mattera of atate.
But one day Screwball Johnaon,
an orthodox aolentlat, challenged the
olalma of Osam the great. Deeply
hurt by the unwarranted orlttoiam,
Osam, the Magnlflcient, retired into
hta den and three daya later iaaued
a atatement.
Said he, "My ajtudles ot the
future, and my studies of the unpredictable have proved conclusively to me that my predictions
are correct."
NOW HE IS CONFUSING
Slowly Osam shlftsd his massive
bulk and smoothed back his few remaining grey hairs. Benignly he
smiled at himself as he said, "My
new system of fortune telling does
away with all the difficulties that
other prophets have tried, unsuccessfully, to solve. With this system my
predictions have been uncannily
successful."
Vacantly the D.L.B. gaped aa
she tried to realise that Osam
meant that he had Invented a
theory amaslng In Ita simplicity—
a simplicity that was further amaslng beoause It disregarded all
doubtful and controversial points.
These points, she gathered, were
not needed to contuse the layman.
• •      •
A Mr. Thrupp, earthquake
prodieter extraordinary, has
clashed with Shrum, Mann,
Crooker, and Jepperson of the
Physics Department of the University of British Columbia.
MR. THRUPP CAN PREDICT
THINGS, TOO
Inventing a new theory to explain
something or other thi. Mr. Thrupp
■ays ln rabid support of it. "My
studies of auroras and magneto-
grams have proved conclusively that
my theory of the ether Is correct."
—From the Province of Jan. 30,1940.
I wonder If any other person
studying auroras and magnetograms
would arrive at the same result.
Well, one cannot deny that self-
confidence is a virtue. Nor can one
deny that self-confidence, coupled
with a misplaced sincerity, Is to be
commended.
'Wasn't It Oeorge Bernard Shaw
who said that one cannot be sincere unless one ls also stupid?
No wonder astrologera and the
like  have  a wide  following.
* •      •
Clean up the campus, etc.,
reads the front page of today's
Ubyssey. It is regrettable that
anyone should hnve to tell the
intelligent students on this enm-
pus that they need to clean up. But
Matiufi""*
KEEP  THE  CAMPUS  CLEAN
TIDYING UP L.S.E.
A news story on the front page of
last Friday's Ubyssey started with the
words "Six U.B.O. clubs are dead."
The dead clubs, the story went on to
explain, were convicted of inactivity
and sentenoed to death by Judge
Braldwood.
In the case of at least two or three
of the clubs Involved, the death notloe
was a mere formality. They had been
defunct for some time—one of them
died over two years ago. It's Just as
well that L.8.E. let the axe fall.
And now L.8.E. Is planning a reform ln Its constitution whloh will
give the president more power. Just
what form this power is to take
ssems to be a mystery. But if it
takes the right form, it won't be
suoh a bad Idea.
Por lnatanoe: L.S.E. might give itself the right to consolidate under
one name and head all those olubs
having a single or approximately mu
tual end In view.
A "Down with Authority" olub is
started. Somebody doesn't like the
president of the olub, so he resigns
and starts a olub of his own oalled
"Sooiety for Effecting the Downfall
ot the President of Oounoil." These
two olubs funotion as well as might
be expeoted until a "Down with
Everything" organisation appears on
the oampus. This makes the other
two olubs both unnecessary and mad,
and trouble results.
L.SJC. should have enough power to
prevent the development of suoh a
situation. But suoh a situation has
been seen on this oampus, and has
developed without any Intervention
by the powers that be. I'm looking
forward to a more powerful L.S.E., so
long as It means a more compact and
varied list of olub activity.
CLEANING UP THE CAMPUS
This issue of the Ubyssey contains
the spear-head of a thrust against
Uttering the campus with rubbish and
student debris of all kinds. And by
the time you get the paper, posters
here and there ln various buildings
will point out that this Oampaign Is
not a one-man Job.
There have been previous Clean-up
Campaigns. As a matter of fact, there
ts usually one started every aprlng.
Previously, the spring clean-up was
started by a conscientious Ubyssey
editor who wanted to make a name
for himself and news for his paper.
The Editor Is taking a very large
part ln the current Oampaign; but he
Is not alone In hla effort. Student's
Council, and particularly the Men's
Undergraduate bodies on the oampus,
are playing the leading role. Fraternities and Sororities have been asked
tor their support as well, and the
next few weeks should see pledges
busily sweeping the Oaf floor and
surrounding territory.
To be successful, however, the
leaders of the Campus Olean-up
Corps must have the assistance of
every Individual student. As a public-
minded oitlaen of our community you
must take it upon yourself to chastize your friends when you catch
them surreptitiously tossing a rotten
apple or a banana skin under the
table or behind the last row of lockers.
Visitors to Point Orey usually insist that our campus ls the most
beautiful they've seen. We know that
without being told; but there are
times when we forget the part we
must play ln maintaining that beauty.
The present campaign is designed
merely as a reminder. That should be
sufficient for mature members of this
student body.
Tuesday, January 23, 1940
jaesar,
elttlng In Ms tent, from "Light* out" to dawn'* yellow
Smoked hit pipe of Plcobac and pounded out "De Betlo".
• Julius had a lot of De Bello Galileo to do
—and everybody knows what Latin composition is without Plcobac! Perhaps he crossed
the Rubicon to go home and replenish his
supply. Today- however, there ls no need to
cross a Rubicon to enjoy the pick of Canada's
Burley crop, always a mild, cool, sweet smoke
and conveniently low in price.
HANDV MA-.TIOHT POUCH  •   1M
Vfc-I-B. "LOK-TOP" TIN   .   604
^^—^. alto pecked In  Pocket Tint
ricob&c
"It POpS tatfr food In m p»p«l
HOTEL GEORGIA
Necessary Prestige
with
Necessary Economy
All Varsity Funotions
TEAS
DINNERS
SEymour 6742
DANCES
Letters To The Editor
KEEP THE CAF NEAT
then perhaps one is being too optimistic when he says that the students on this oampus are intelligent.
Thank Ood that the students do
not need Intelligence to refrain from
throwing lunoh bags on the floor of
the caf.
Nemo wonder. If the charming
coed tearing up a letter Into confetti last week uses aU her Intelligence In fixing up her personality.
But then she may be absent-,
minded.
NOTICE
The Literary Editor announces
that the poem THE CO-ED, pub-
ltahed Tuesday, Jan. 16, waa written
by Chuck McNeely.
Sir: '
Winston Churchill has Just said
that "the only hope for a speedy end
of this struggle Is through united
aotlop." His warning was intended
specially for neutral nations still
hanging baok from giving open help
to the Allies. But It is equally applicable to Student Associations (Christian) and our Universities in Canada.
The "Oanadlan Studenta Assembly
of Canada" Is one of two Students'
organisations representative of Canadian Universities,—the other being
"The National Federation of Oanadlan University Students. At the annual Conferenoe of the N.F.C.U.S.,
held a few days ago at Montreal, the
delegates unanimously pledged student support to the Oanadlan Government ln Its war effort during this
national emergency. At the same
time, and meeting in the aame Province of Quebec, the annual Conference of the C.S.A. carried through a
recommendation (backed by a strong
Frenoh Canadian faoUon), condemning "any active participation by Canada in this war," *** "because lt
might result in the disruption of
Canadian national unity"!
That recommendation drew bitter
denunciation from the Maritime
Province delegates, who solidly backed the Oovernment, claiming that the
Conferenoe was under control of a
i>mall but powerful minority. Dean
Krug, of Mount Allison University,
N.B., withdrew, saying, "Any patriotic
protest by loyal students against this
resolution has been met by laughter,
scorn, or ihe silence accorded by
adults to childish prattle", "apparently this conference . is definitely
anti-British, anti-war, and anti-air
those principles which form our ties
with the British Empire."
Commenting on Dean Krug's action, Shellah Hutchinson, B.C. local
President C.S.A., branded his assertion as untrue. "I am quite willing to
say that his whole statement ls a
lie," she remarked to a reporter.
To the oredit of two of our "Maritime" Universities—Mount Allison ln
the East, and the U.B.O. In the West,
it Is recorded that the offlolal Students' organs, "The Argosy" and "The
Ubyssey" have oondemned this atrocious resolution, and recommended
withdrawal of their students from the
C.8.A.
Above quotations are from "The
Ubyssey" pf 16th January, whioh
Dives the whole story.
P. W. L. MOORE,
Lieutenant-Colonel, (R. L.),
Victoria.
TBA PARTY
Her name, a boat,
tossing on the sea of conversation
in an adverse wind of Jealousy
and a rising tide of anger,
bruised and  broken
lies sinking.
—From "Fancy Free"
by Carol Coatee.
KEEP THE CAF NEAT
OBT VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your-f
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB FUNCTIONS
THE      /
CLARKE ft STUART
0O. LIMITEjD
Stationers and Printers
580  SEYMOUR  STREET
VANCOUVER, BlC.
KEEP THE  CAMPUS  CLEAN You Aren't Primitive — Keep the Campus Clean
Tuesday, January 23, 1940^
THB     UBYSSEY
.gg»-l!
Three
"You Bet Your Life"
Pedestrian's  Pranks  Panned
Film   Fans  Finish   First  Feature
Film minded graduates and undergraduates of the University are at
present participating ln the making
of an educational motion picture of
the sub-standard type. It will be
silent and deals with traffic safety.
Shooting started on November 36
last year and most of the material Is
"In the can" now. The title of the film
is "You Bet Your Life" and lt deals
with traffic safety ln a way companionable to "Drunk Driving" whioh
drew such favorable comment when
shown recently ln downtown theatres.
DIRECTOR
The picture is being directed by Mr.
Charles Palmer and the scenario was
prepared by J. Brio Dlbb. The shooting script calls for interior scenes
taken in the senior Women's Common
Room at the University.
A  talent search on the oampus
for a female star landed Mary MoLeod of tho Player's Clab In ono ot
the roles of the production.
They are working under the aus
pices of the B.C. Institute of Cinematography, founded last summer on the
campus to promote the production
and educational use of motion pictures ln this city.
AUSPICES
The film is something quite different from the document-type picture
that Is being made of the growth and
history of the University. The Institute intends to make all Its pictures
available to the Vancouver schoola
for class room instruction and showing.
MORE PICTURES COMINO
Suocess ln their first effort has
caused the Institute of Cinematography to prepare for further short
subject pictures. A second shooting
unit will be aet up on January 36 to
go Into produotion shortly.
Information with regard to the Institute will be furnished to any student interested In film work by Mr.
Leonard Chatwln, instructor in visual
eduoatlon of the University Extension Department.
Mamooks Now
Select Shaw for
"The Mamooks club room ia
now located in the South-east
corner of the tlnion Building,"
Bob Marshall, Mamooka prealdent, announced laat week. He
also revealed that Xen Shaw, a former Mamooks president, was nominated for the Honorary L.S.E.
award.
Marshall, who was eleoted at the
beginning of the term to replaoe
Art Rae, who reelgned reoently, told
the Ubyssey that in future all poster
work will be done In the new office..
At-present the Mamooks ars moving
their supplies from their old room
In the Auditorium Building.
"As yet we have no furnishings,"
said Marshall yesterday, "but the
exeoutive consisting of Frank Proud,
Yell Leaden Harry Sohonwald, Seoretary • Treaaurer i Rusa Palmer,
Master of Ceremonies) and myself,
will obtain  furnishing,  in  the  near
in Union Bldg.;
LSE Award
future."
MAMOOKS WILL SERVE YOU
The Mamooks, formerly the Pep
Olub, Is the oampus servloe organisation, whioh working in eonjuno-
tlon with Students' Counoil, sponsors and aids wherever possible any
and all oampua functions. Included
In Ita many diverse aotivltlea are
poster-advertising, stadium-ushering,
tloket selling and collecting, decorating at olaaa parties, yell leading, and
the promotion of Pep Meets.
MEMBERSHIP NOW OPEN
Memberehip on a selective and
competitive basis, Is now open to all
male undergrads — ln particular,
freshmen.
All students desiring to Join the
Mamooks and wishing to serve their
Alma Mater are urged to oontaot
Seoretary Harry Sohonwald care of
the Council Letter Rack, Union
Building, It was announoed last
week.
Radio Society
Plans Broadcasts
To Publicize
Open House
"It's the most Inexpensive, and the
most effective publicity they could
get."
This was the considered opinion of
executives of the Radio Society meeting, as they discussed a publicity
oampaign for Open House.
The schedule drawn up includes a
broadcast of the official opening of
the Brock Memorial building, followed by dally noon-hour programs,
Monday to Friday, relating all copy
to Open House.
The plans call for half-hour pro-
grama, from 12.45 to 1.18, publicizing
such organizations as the Varsity
Band, various clubs, and the Carnegie
set which is considered one of the
finest.
The series, according to present
plans, will culminate ln a broadcast
of the outstanding features of Open
House, originating on the campus.
"With the  sanction  of  the powers
CHINESE MAY
WIN WAR SAYS
KAI SUHR
"It I. my belief that the Chinese'
are beoomlng stronger as the war
progresses and that eventually they
will win this oonfliot," stated Mr.
Kai Suhr on Monday at a showing
of his own Alms of the bombings ln
China.
The speaker, until reoently with
the Chinese army aa Instructor,
showed graphic scenes of the horrors of the unrestricted bombing of
Chinese civilians, and shudders ran
through the audience when some of
the more gruesome pictures appeared.
"I apologise for some of these
scenes," said Mr. Suhr,, "but we
muat realise the inhuman carnage
that  is  war!"
that be, and co-operation of the faculty and the Extension Department,
we can make the public more conscious of the University than ever
before . . ■ and, more than that, we
can bring them here to see what they
have been hearing about," say the
officials of the organization*.
Totem Notice
If you wanted to order s Totem, but didn't have
your dollar; or if you think there'a "lots of time" and
don't want to be disappointed, here's what to do:
Turn in your name—in peraon or by phone, to the
Totem offloe before tomorrow, Wednesday, at 5:00 p.m.
We '11 see what we oan do for you.
No down payment is necessary
AFTER THE SHOW . . .
Visit Vancouver's Most Beautiful Cafe
CHRIS*8 GRILL
BELOW THE COMMODORE
After-Theatre Teas Fascinating Teacup Reading
CLEAN-UP
(Continued from Page I)
slopplness shown by some of the
more respected members of our
Ignoble Kaf Sooiety. These dlllet-
antl, perhaps suffering under delusions that the cafeteria is both a
hotel and a garbage heap, spsnd
most of their time throwing lunoh
bags, cigarette butts, Ubysseys,
apple cores, books, and sometimes
each  other  on  the  floor.
A lunoh box hanga on the wall at
the North East entrance of the Cafeteria yet relatively few uss It. Instead the etudents prefer, for some
undetermined reason, to leave their
lunches scattered over the tables
claimed by tho sorority or tho fraternity to whloh they belong.
Lookers may be found In the Library,   in   the   Arts  Building,   In   the
Aggie Building, In the Science Build-
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIII
HILL   MoLELLAN,    president
of  Inter-Fraternity  Counoil:
"We   are   bringing  the   Idea
up at a meeting Tuesday.   I
believe that the fraternities
will   be   solidly   behind   the
movement.   The good of the
univerelty comes first.    It Is
Uksly   that   the   fraternities
will  start   a   definite   oampaign."
iiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiimimiiimiii
Ing, and In the Applied Solenoe
Building, yet books, and sometimes
old discarded sweaters are piled Indiscriminately not only on the tables
but alao, at times, on the windows.
A SIMPLE REQUEST
Frank Underhiil, genial oaf manager, haa, In order to speed up servloe during the noon hours, * put
signs on the walls asking the students to bring their dishes to the
counter. He haa also aaked studenta
to bring their used water glasses to
the oounter when they are finished
drinking.
Few of those who are able to read
hla requests are willing to ahow their
oo-operatlon, however.
THE STUDENTS COULD HELP
The etudente oould assist materially (even If they are too laay to
paok the trays baok to the counter)
by placing all the dishes baok on
the trays. That comparatively simple
task should not prove to be too difficult for them.
Moreover    they    could     refrain
front ripping up their love letters,
their lunoh  bags,  their  Ubysseys,
and their uaed notes. It they must
tear theae up, they need not throw
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!
OSBORNE   DURKIN:   A.M.U.
8.  proxy:   "Artsmen  will  cooperate with  the  oounoil  ln
every  way  possible."
iiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
the pieces on the floor. Nor do
they have to spill sugar and salt.
Not  unleea  they still' are Infants.
The editors of the Ubyssey as well
as the professors of the University
give the students oredit for being
normal human beings filled with a
natural love for being neat and tidy.
But judging from the conditions of
the buildings and of the Kaf, they
seem to be mistaken in their belief.
It Is safe, however, to aasume that
the majority of the students treat
their homes with respect not beoause they have been eduoated to
do so by the paternal rod.
It should not be too muoh for anyone to ask the students of this university to treat their building., their
university, their Kaf, and their campus as they would treat their home,
their lawns, and the re.taurant ln
whioh they eat.
CLEAN-UP PLEDGES
•Fraternity, aororlty, and olub pres-
ldenta have pledged themaelvea to
aupport the clean up drive. Moreover, they have pledged themaelvea
and their organisations to maintain
the  clean  up  oampaign.
The bookworms who do not belong
to fraternitiea, aororltiea or any of
the 38 campus clubs oan awing into
line with the majority In a determination to keep the university clean.
So your editors say:
Respect the university—keep the
campus clean, the rooms neat, and
the oaf tidy. Be proud that you bave
a university as new as it Is, as prominent aa it is, and as respected as
it Is.
Advice To Dancing Femmes
Gals,  College Men  Aren't As  Dumb
/\S      I heV    /\DDe<5r'       fcVer- that we do agree with you on
' r^r* * one   aoore.      Sln-rinsr.    whi.tlinar    nnri
And then there was the brunette
who peroxlded her hair so that ahe
would look like a lady with a past.
But she Just looked liked one without
a future.
Some   girls   are   Just   not    to    be
trysted.
The gift stolen from the altar of
the gods and given to man was Imagination.
With such an impressive list of
Varsity funotion. aoheduled for the
oomlng. weeks, the worde of one
"Tacoma" Roberts, writing in the
Whitman College Pioneer, have both
a timely interest and a live import
for the girls of our fair campus.
WE WILL CALL AT NINE
"Let us say," says he, "that we
are going to a danoe, an affair for
whloh we are leaving at nine o'clock.
Slnoe the date was set for a speolflo
hour, it Is natural to presume that
that will be the hour of departure.
Strange aa it may seem, we don't
oonsldsr It coyness on the part of
you girls to be late. R neither elevates you In our estimations nor encourages a recurrent date,
AND LEAVE LATER
"Having oalled for you, we drive
to the dance. Now, strange as It may
seem, and disagrseable too, most of
us are not the mooning eentlmental
type who like to danoe In silenoe.
By this we don't mean that a constant flow of Idle ohatter Is essential
to our oomplete happiness and satisfaction, but we do like to dlsouaa
different mattera casually and Intelligently. Our aversion to retloent
danolng develops from a natural ab-
horranoe of lying-oalf oountenanoes.
"It Is only fair to mention, how-
one  soore.    Singing,   whistling   and
chewing gum are  not conducive  to
the   ultimate    In    enjoyment   of   the
light  fantastic.
WHEN WE TAKE YOU HOME
"The greatest controversy has
arisen concerning our actions whan
we take you home.
"It seems to us that you are taking a good deal for granted in thinking we are up to something ulterior
when we Invite you to go for a ride
before going home. In a great
many oases it is merely the pleasure
of your company whloh leads us to
suoh a suggestion.
YOU TAKE THINGS
FOR GRANTED
"And If, perohanoe, we do drive,
you don't have to oramp yourselves
unoomfortably against the opposite
side of tbe oar. We are not so dumb
as we look. Strangely enough, the
majority of us know how to aot, and
we know when our intentions are
welcome and when they aren't. We
wouldn't have taken you out In the
flrst plaos if ws didn't Ilk. you, and
we certainly wouldn't voluntarily
show ourselves up aa boors.
"If you will humor ue In our
whims and feel aure of ua at all
times It will make an evening muoh
more enjoyable and comfortable for
all oonoerned.
Surgeons not Made in a Day
Huggard Tells Pre-Meds
"I sometimes think we are
like blind men in a dark room
looking for a black eat," atated
Captain Huggard. M.D., R.C.A.
M.C., in reference to medical
scientists, when he addressed
the Monro Pre-Medioal Sooiety, at
their supper meeting Friday in the
oaf faoulty room.
REQUISITES
"Three primary requisites are
needed by a surgeon," he said, "flrst,
reasonable and good health; seoond,
good physloal frame; and third, an
abundance of good sense. He must
be able to think clearly, and aot
qulokly. But he must never sacrifice aoouraoy for speed."
After giving a brief historical perspective of the growth of medicine
and surgery, Dr. Huggard described
the hospital duties whloh await the
newly graduated doctor.
Review of practical sciences, working practical knowledge, and case
history analysis with patient receiving, are some of the new realms
open to the Interne In hospital life.
Later, he becomes attaohed to one
of the house surgeons and is permitted to attend pre-operative conferences.
In the actual operating theatre he
is able to observe technical procedure.. "Many men who are oalled
good surgeons are juet brilliant
technicians," Captain Huggard eon
tlnued, "Surgeons require a colorful
Imagination, and oan never spend
too muoh time analysing laboratory
raault., ease histories, and physloal
diagnosis."
OPERATING THEATRE
The next step in his training, after performing operations under supervision, is to do post-graduate
work in another oountry, where he
familiarises himself with all types
of surgical methods. This additional training, the speaker Intimated,
broadens the student's outlook and
prevents him from beoomlng too
dogmatic.
ECONOMIC FUTURE
In speaking of the future, Capt.
Huggard advised his audience,
"Don't think of the economic side.
First and foremost you are a doctor,
"If you have enough to live comfortably, raise a family and educate
your children, then you have accomplished the main part of life.
Let the economic aide take oare of
Itself and do not bo discouraged. A
surgeon Is not made In a day."
KEEP  THE  CAMPUS  CLEAN
— Classified —*■
> Psychology books lost. Morgan :
"Psychology of Abnormal People."
Rosanoff: "Manual of Psyohiatry."
Pleaae return to library, Jaoquelln
MacLeod,
Black loose-leaf notebook loat. Contents very valuable to owner. Please
return to Lost and Found offloe.
Lady's gold wrist watch lost, Friday afternoon, ln Applied Sol.nce
building or cafeteria. Jeweled stem.
Return to A.M.S. office or to Jean
Fitoh.
Transportation available from English Bay or en route. Phone Bill
Cooper,   Angus   appartmenta.
You oan make reservations for reliable transportation to and from the
Brook Danoe by phoning Alma
1746-R immediately.
The Newman Club will hold a meeting Wednesday, January 34, at 8
p.m. at the home of Mrs. F. Taylor,
8480 Point Orey road. The guest
speaker will be Rev. F. Madden,
chaplin to the foroes for Military
District 11, who will speak on "The
Righteousness of the War." Committees for the danoe will be announoed.
The Chemistry Sooiety will meet In
Soience 300 on "Wednesday, January
24, at 12:30. Mr. A. F. Reea of
Standard Oil Co., Ltd., will apeak on
"Recent Developments in the OU
Induatry."
THE Varaity Hand will practice today noon In the stadium. Totem
pictures will be taken at noon
Thursday on the Auditorium stage.
All band members are aaked to be
present,   wearing   band   sweaters.
BROOK BALL
(Continued from Pago 1)
ln conatruotion.
KENNEY  WILL  PLAY
Mart Kenney will bring hlmaelf
and the other Western Oentlemen,
not to mention petite Oeorgla Day,
out to the oampus to provide the
melodies for this flrst big sooial
funotion of the year.
He will be playing his sweet and
low melodies to students who have
paid $2.00 a oouple for their tickets.
These tickets incidentally will be on
sale on the oampus either today or
tomorrow, and are expeoted to go
like the proverbial wildfire.
Several distinguished guesta have
been invited but It la not yet known
definitely exactly who will be the official  patrona of  the danoe.
Dancing will be from 0:00 p.m.
to 1:00 a.m. and tbe ball will be
olaaaed aa a unlveralty function,
with regulations governing other
Alma Mater sooial functions in
effeot.
NOTIOB
There will be a meeting
of    all    members    of    the
Ubyaaey    staff    today    at
12:30.    Everyone    is    requested to be out.
There will be a meeting of all olub
prealdenta on Friday, January 26, in
Arta 106 at 12:30. The purpoae of
the meeting la to determine what
each  olub  will  do  for Open  Houae.
Dean Bollert'. Study Group -will
meet ln the Women'a Upper Common Room on Wednesday at 12:30.
Lunches  may  be   brought.
KEEP THE CAF NEAT
McGOUN GUP
(Continued  from Page  J..>
ate war but alao the meana to wage
war."
DEMOCRATIC   FEDERATION
Donald Oow, aecond negative
apeaker, advanced a propoaal for a'
European Federation of fifteen democracies. "Thla union," he claimed,
"will form a natural trade union of
nationa embodying similar Ideological  princlplea.
"Only by a union of the major
democracies can we prevent the
growth of eoonomio nationalism
whioh has caused European wars
In the past."
SPAIN
(Continued from Pago 1)
burning hatred that the Spaniards
have felt for the United States sver
since the Spanish Amerloan war.
"If Oermany, Italy and Japan
were to gang up on the United
States, you would find Spain raring
to go," he prophesied.
S.CM. SELECTS
WHITE ROCK
FOR RETREAT
The S.CM. Spring Retreat featuring "The World Mission of Christianity" wlU be hold at White Rook on
January 97 and 38, announoed Ernest
Bishop of the Student Christian
Movement.
Shellah Hutchinson, Ted Soott and
Jim Melvln, delegates for the S.CM.
conferenoe ln Toronto, will present
their reports.
Margaret Kinney of Toronto, ono of
the national secretaries, will attend.
Busses will leave tho olty at 1 pjn.
on January 97 and will travel dlreotly
to White Rook.
KEEP THE CAF NEAT
Have Tour Shoes
DY1D
In the New Fall Fashion
70c
PRICE LIST
Men's Half Soles  	
.MO
.400
.M«
91.65
.60o
Men'a Rubber Heals 	
Men's Leather Heela  ....
Ladles' Top Llfte  	
Ladiea* Rubber Heela  , .,
Full Soles, Rubber Heels
Shoes Dyed Rlaek 	
Empire Shoe
Rebuilders
71* W. Fender           TRin. 47M
VAMITY SERVICE
STATION
Tenth and Rlanoa
"AT THU GATES"
"Our Servloe Means Happy     '<
Motoring" •
4,***********+***********l
f_UUUUUUUuUsjJUUtJ_|^
MART  KENNEY  and  His  Western
Gentlemen . . . available for private
engagements.
HOTEL
VANCOUVER
^^_'^_''W^rf^_'^rf'tf^_^W%_^-''W%/%^^^S^^_^N_Ftf%fl_^\_ftBTTBfl_rf
Coming Events!
A smart corsage from Brown
Bros, will help you and your
lady-fair to really enjoy midwinter parties.
FLOWERFONE SEymour 14M
Joe Brown (Arts 'S3), Mgr.
OS.
eea Granville Street
y^wv^ *.*****■*
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Speoialty
DANCE PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,   'AT   HOME,'
LETTERHEADS and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
GEHRKE'S
866 Seymour St. SATURDAY'S RESULTS
VARSITY 11; BARBS 8
U.B.O. a; ROWERS 3
SATURDAY'S RBSULTS
SOOOBRMBN 0; LEGION 0
ORASS HOOXBY S; PRO RBO 0
Four
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 23, 1940
Hoopers Snap Leafs' Win Streak
Seniors Bounce
Barbarians 11-8
As U.B.C.'s Draw
Funny things are happening
in the current race for the Miller Cup. Take for instance last
Saturday's games: Varsity 11—
Barbarians 8 and Ubeecees 3—
Rowing Club 3. Just two scheduled games with University
teams picking up a win and a
tie.
And yet two weeks ago, when
Varsity's flrst fifteen tackled
the Rowing Club squad at
Brockton Point they were handed a 6-3 defeat by the same team
that were tied by the U.B.C. Seconds. At this time, too, the Firsts
were nosing out the All-Black Barbarians 11-8 on the Stadium Orounds.
And Varsity's poor showing ln
face of that of their younger brothers cannot be rationalised by the
faot that star inside three, Howie
MoPhee, was missing from the lineup.
JOHNSTON BOOTS TWO
Beoause to plug the gap In their
baokfleld, the Senior's borrowed Ian
Richard., crack U.B.C. running
baok, who broke through for a try
that gave the Collegian, the winning margin over the combined
North Van-We.t Van foroes.
Varsity opened the soorlng ln the
flrat ten minutes of the game when
Andy Johnston booted a clean penalty kick from thlry yards out for
a three point lead.
Ted MoPhee pulled off the pret-
tie-t run of the day when he dashed   sixty-Are   yards   through   the
entire Barbarian  line-up,   shaking
off  tackier,  as  he  went  to   score
between the posts. Johnston again
collected the convert points to put
the Collegians further ahead 8-0.
The Barbs matched this  run with
one of their own when Johnny Mac-
Sween    crashed    through    Blue    and
Gold   sweaters   from   Beventy   yarda
out  wtth   Hosktns  and   Gardiner   ln
full   purault.   MaoSween   waa   more
fleet-footed   than   the two Thunderbirds, and touched the ball between
the  posta,  setting  up  an   easy   oonvert that Vlo Black made.
Ian Rioharda got the only Varsity
soore in the seoond halt when he
put them ahead 11-B, oroaalng the
line on the end of a three line .weep
that started  from  the  two-bit line.
Vlo Blaok came back for the
Barbs a few minutes later, booting
a twenty-five yard penalty klok that
'Hoed the Varsity lead, but an ag-
greaaive Collegian acrum kept the
ball away from any dangerous position, and protected that 11-8 margin
as the Seniors grabbed off thetr first
win in defense of the Miller Cup.
U.B.C. CLOSE
Meanwhile the amazing Ubeecee.
still further amazed the Brookton
Point crowd that had gathered to
take in the High Sohool game, by
holding Rowing Club to a sloppy 3-3
tie, thereby garnering their first
point  this  year,
Down three points in the first half
when Hicks culminated a cross-field
drive that ended near the flag, the
College lads tied the aoore with a
penalty kick scored by lanky Jack
Rosa, ex-Thunder bird baaketball
atar, who had hit the cross-bar early
ln the flrat half. The scrum were
clicking, tackling hard, and carrying the game to the Rowers.
KEEP  THE   CAMPUS   CLEAN
CANDIDE
A professor waa waiting in the bitter cold for a train to London when
the Non-stop Cornish express aston-
l«hly stopped at the station.
The professor promptly got on
board. He had one foot ln the carriage when a railway guard said,
"You can't get on here, sir. The train
does not stop."
"That ls all right," said the professor. "If the train docs not stop,
then I am not on it."
"I'm    a    dairy    maid    in    a    candy
kitchen."
"What   do you   do?"
"Milk  chocolates."
—Idaho Argonaut.
Cagemen Topple Leaders
As Scott, Flynn Flash
Great Form In 45-34 Win
The Thunderbird basketball machine well-oiled by victories
over Tookes and Angelus, went into high gear Saturday night at
the V.A.C. Qym aa the Collegians rolled over the champion Maple
Leafs 45-34, handing then! their first defeat of the season, and
snapping the Leaf's big ten-game win streak. The win, third in
a row for the 'Birds, pushed them up into a third place tie with
Angelus Hotel.
The hoopsters were paced throughout by the sharpshooting
of Pat Flynn, who performed nobly in the bucket, by lanky Jim
Scott who was netting them from everywhere,  and by  George
Pringle, who played his usual brilliant game on defense.
The Leafs wsre definitely off theirs)	
shooting game, being rushed
throughout by charging Varsity
checks, but Jimmte Bardsley broke
through for his usual quota of
points, as did Joe Ross. The rest
of the smooth organisation were decidedly  off-colour.
SUPERIOR STRENGTH
The deciding edge of the game,
however, was not the shooting of
the Collegiate cagers, but rather
their superior conditioning that had
the Leaflets gaaping for air in the
laat  two quartera.
Iron men were In abundance on
the Varsity roster as Van Vllet,
hitting upon a clicking combination, left his men on the floor, making but one substitution until victory was assured.   -
Pat Flynn, Jim Scott, and Doug
Alexander played all but one minute of the rousing tilt, while Joe
Pringle roamed the back stretches,
warding off Leaf shooters, being
taken off with four minutes left.
TIED FOR THIRD
A packed house watched with
something akin to amazement as the
Varsity cagemen battled past Leaf
checks, hurtled back and forth
across the floor, rushing the league
leaders off their feet ln the same
brand of "explosion ball" that sunk
Tookea and Angelus, earlier this
year.
And with Tookes trimming the
Angelus Angela on the other half of
the evening's double bill, the Collegians climbed into a tie for third
place with the Hotelmen, and Improved their chances for catching a
play-off spot.
Paced by the sharpshooting of
Johnston and Alexander, the Thunderbirda held a surprlalng 21-13 margin at half time. Both teams were
somewhat hampered in that Joe
Ross and Jim Soott had picked up
three personals during the flrst torrid session.
PUFF!  PUFF! ,
After the breather. Varsity came
baok faster than ever, and the Leaf,
were hard put to follow their check,
whoae mad dashes along the floor
forced them to call aeveral timeouts,
Pringle was doing Trojan work on
defense, handcuffing hi. men, while
Flynn and Soott sniped away at that
ten-game winning streak the Leafs
were trying to protect.
They went basket for baaket ln
the last few mlnutea, the oount at
the three-quarter mark being 32-28
but the uaual pay-off flurry of the
Champs was missing, and the rally
fell far short of its aim.
NET NEWS i Byron Straight was
the only Varsity man who didn't
get on the floor Saturday night . . .
Straight showed up late, a little
shaky after an episode with Mr.
Ford's greatest Invention . . . seems
like he cracked up en route to the
game, borrowed another, and in his
hurry to make the game, got the
finger from Joe Constable. . . . Six
of the men on the Leaf's roster are
ex-Varsity men, all coached by Van
Vllet . , . and two of the Varaity
team, Scott and Johnston, got early
training: from the Leaf flash, "Bug."
Bardsley, who was bouncing against
them all evening . . . Art Wllloughby
and "Hunk" Henderson were missing set-ups last night . . . something
the  Leafs   seldom  do.   .  .   .
BAGS FOUR
ORASS  HOCKEY
The Men's Orass Hockey Team
will practice Wednesday. January
24 ut 3.30 p.m. It Is Important that
nil members be present.
KEEP THE CAF NEAT
Shown In serious study, I. Ba.ll
Robinson, one of U.B.C.'a greatest
all-round athletes. Already famed
In cricketing and rugger circles,
Robinson Is fast becoming known
as the Campus' leading soccer star.
Saturday, he bagged four goal, to
lead the parade against Kerrisdale
Legion.
Co-Ed Sports
—By Oerry Armstrong
On Saturday, the U.B.C. hockey
tcam defeated a fighting ex-Kltsllano
team 3-0 to remain in the running for
the League championships. Outstanding performer was Jo Wilson with her
beautiful solo breaks and early goal.
Other goals were made by aggressive
centre-forward Elizabeth Mclnnef
and by right-inner, Myrne Nevlson,
high scorer on the team.
Invincible      fullbacks      Hortense
Warne and Betty MoCormlok, gave
efficient    goalie    Helen    Matheson
little ohanoe at the ball.
Fast-checking Elizabeth  Norle  and
Pauline Scott were aided on the half
line by Grace Bunnell, a rookie with
plenty  of  vim  and  vigour.  Margaret
Oeorge proved a dauntless left wing.
MURALS
In the first mixed mural game the
Aggies finished five points behind
those invincible Theologs and Nurses
while Arta "42 was greatly outclassed
by the would-be school teachers.
Backed by numerous supporters,
Joe and Josephine just had loads of
fun! Today Arts '43 plays Arts '40
end Arts '41, Education. See you
there.
KEEP  THE  CAMPUS  CLEAN
Phrateres Notes
A sports dance in Huron Lodge on
Tuesday, January 23, will be sponsored by Eta and Zeta sub-chaptera,
presidents Pat McMahon and Dolly
Ellis ln charge.
Delta sub-chapter la sponsor'ng a
dinner at the Devon on Wednesday,
January 24. President Margaret
Weldon Is supervising the arrangements.
A fireside at the home of Norma
Scott will be held on January 21,
sponsored   by   Beta   sub-chapter.
Eta and Zeta sub-chapters had a
roller skating party on Wednesday.
January   17,   at   the   Trianon.
Soccerites Take
Legionnaires
Into Camp 5-0
The Varaity soccer team took a firm
hold on third place In a field of nine
on Saturday afternoon when they
soundly trounced Kerrisdale Legion
to the tune of 8-0 at the Legionnaires'
home grounds.
Although the whole team played
beautifully together throughout the
entire game, Basil Robinson was the
man who really carried off the laurels of the day as he garnered no less
than four ot the five goals soored by
tlie Campusmen.
NEW MEN
Despite the fact that Old Man In-
rleglblllty had deprived the team of
four of the best players, the squad
played as a closely knit unit, displaying, a fast-breaking offensive and
hard-checking defensive.
First man to register for the Collegians was a young rookie from the
Intermediate outfit, Oeorge North,
who took a long pass from Herd and
scrambled the leather squarely between the uprights.
Two more counters were sunk
before the end of the half, both
from the toe of Hasll Robinson.
The flrst Basil oonvertod from a
pass from Herd, and the seodnd
from Roach.
After the Intermission the Varsity
lads still continued to press and were
able to register two more markers
before the final whistle sounded.
Both these also were scored by
Basil Robinson. Hamilton, substituting at right wing, supplied the pass
for the flrst of these goals, while
veteran Doug Todd slipped Basil the
second one.
The campus men are now firmly
ensconsed In third place for they
have two games ln hand over the
other teams ln the loop.
TOE KICKS:—Once again lt was
uo tea-party, Mizuhara playing his
first game and getting tangled up
with one husky Legionnaire ln the
Varsity goal mouth. Both were exiled
for the duration, and may receive
suspensions. . . . Don McLean, rookie
goalkeeper, who played another good
game, was emphatic about not going
on the field If he had to have his
picture taken before the game, and
on his Insistence and the rational
attitude of some of the other boys, a
compromise was arrived at . . . the
Totem got its picture at half time.
afl double dellqht
PINIST ROASTID PILBIRTS
JIRSIY MILK CHOCOLATI
Snjoif a bat daily
3feilsmVa
THE  BEST MILK  CHOCOLATE  MADE
MURAL-GO-ROUND
Arts '41 seems to be sitting pretty,
as tar as the Interclass competition
for the Oovernora Trophy Is concerned, but Wednesday noon they are expected to go all out to take the Science  '41  basketballers.
The Junior Artsmen have a four
point lead over Aggys and also a
slight edge over the Theologs, but
thoy will need to net puhlenty of
points ln the hoop tourney to make
up for the potential track squad the
Anglicans will have for the distance
races.
A new cross country grind ls slated
tor Feb. 13, and it ls expected that
the course will be set so that the entire race can be viewed from the
campus. February 28 is the day set
for the traditional Arts 20 relay,
which starts at the old U.B.C. site
and finishes on the campus.
She:    "Do    you    know    what    good
clean  fun  is?"
He:  "iVo, what good is it?"
The Sheaf.
MINOR CAGINGS
Although the Senior "B" team will
have a comparatively easy game to
earn themselves a place Into the finals of their league, the Frosh team of
the Intermediate "A" league must
down the flrst place Arts Club to
make the lowest playoff spot tonight
at the Y.w.O.A.
The Prosh team will have to break
the zone defence with which the Ar-
tlzlans    have    humbled    every    other
club In the loop.
TOUOH JOB
It is doubtful whether Byron
Straight will have his aces, Bobby
Davie and Charley Claridge who are
cut with crocked hands and feet.
Straight has reorganized his team
for the contest tonight as a zone
breaking crew in the last attempt to
keep the club in the running.
Divoters Cop
First Match
In Tourney
By MAC FRASER
(Ubyssey Oolf Writer)
Varsity's crack golf team
opened its spring season successfully Sunday when they
blasted tho University golf
course club 7Vfe-4Vfe in the first
of a series of warm-up matches
in prepnration for their invasion
of California in May.
The West Pointers, rated by
city experts as the toughest club
to beat over their home course,
were easy meat for the Collegians
who have the best team ever to
oome out of the University.
Led by Hana Swinton, who carded
a 74 over the par 71 lay-out the atudenta won three out of four matchea.
Lead off two-some of Ken McBride, Varsity champion and Hans
Swinton, walloped the ace Weat
Point combination of Billy Connelly
and Bill Llndaay 4 and 8. McBride
waa around in 77 strokes.
COLLEGIANS  OOOD
Mansfield Beaoh and Billy Charlton, 78, trlmed Ed Stone and Tommy
Johnson 8 and 2. Charlton, brother
of Ted, the former Willingdon Cup
player, was hot on the home stretch
to turn  In a last nine of 37.
Bob  Plommer  and   Ormle   Hall
clicked together to card a best ball
of   one-under   par   70.   Both   boya
were around In 7S stroke, but ran
up against some tough competition
from   Fred   Woolrldge   and   Colin
Campbell and only won out * and
1.
Oordle Livingston and  Hugh  Hall
suffered the only Varsity loss of the
day  when   they  were   trimmed  8-up
by  the  West   Point   team   of   Dr.   O.
Stong and Rann Martin. Oordie provided the thrill of the day, however,
when   he   nearly   drove    the   fourth
green   and   bounced   into   the   long
trap, a mere swat of over 300 yards.
The  club  plays   Olenoaks   at   Lan-
gara ln the second of the aeries next
Sunday.
DISORDER
I had laid them In lavender,
the packaged houra,
neatly atored  them  for  their passage to eternity.
But now, aa though but yesterday
you had withdrawn the key,
they have been disturbed
to  sweet disorder.
—From "Fancy Free"
by Carol Coates,
KEEP THE CAF NEAT
EUROPEAN DICTATORS PLEASE
NOTE
Two Chinese coolies were arguing
heatedly in the midst of a crowd.
When an onlooker expressed surprise
that no blows were struck his Chinese
friend said, "The man who strikes
flrst admits that his Ideas have given
out" —Colorado Medicine.
A berserk orthopedic named Burke,
Used to lurk in the murk of a kirk;
When he spotted a  Turk
He would  jerk forth a dirk
And plunge smlrkingly into his work.
The Sheaf,
"Does Bill si.ill walk around with
that slouch of his?''
"No, he goes around with nicer
women  now." —The  Sheaf.
KEEP   THE   CAMPUS   CLEAN
THUNDER
BIRDS
Thunder!
•
VARSITY
BEATS
MAPLE
LEAFS
"PLAYOFF
SPOT
A CINCH"
•
"CAMPUS
COLOR"—
THE
STUFF
YOU LIKE
TO READ
Always First
of Course,
and Complete
in the
NEWS-
HERALD
II        READ IT       ||
ON THE BUS

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0123608/manifest

Comment

Related Items