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The Ubyssey Oct 26, 1951

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 ":«'i Y    Of
*      MMMmA
OCT 2 91351"
T.-iii UBRARY
TOTCTflf xxxiv
The Ubyssey
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1951
No. 15
Editorial
A student newspaper, as the very name would imply,
Is, first of all, a medium for the dissemination of infor-
motion.
But, like all newspapers, it, is much more than tlfet.
It must entertain and it must satisfy curiosity.
And because it is the only newspaper designed primarily to fulfill the needs of a university it must, above all,
stimulate discussion.
Since it serves a community whose prime concern is
education, It must not expect its views to influence the
thought Of the community in the sense of channelling it into
any particular mold.
Free to Choose Subject
It can and must however, expect its views to turn tho at-
1 tentlon of the community to the vital problems which face
it.
Such a newspaper, by the very fact of its being, for
practical purposes, the only medium capable of reaching
the whole community, ought to have complete freedom to
choose its subject matter.
If it becomes the case that any portion of community
takes it upon itself the function of censor and excludes from
tho paper thos matters upon which It feels that discussion
would not he to Us advantage, the whole function of the
. Journal is thwarted.
Censorship Of Criticism
, The Ubyssey has—not without a groat many bitter
fights—won for itself the privilege of commenting upon and
critcising any portion of the community which it feels to be
deserving of such comment and criticism.
*■
Few student newspapers are in this happy position.
Most, unfortunately, are subjected to censorship from
administrative sources.
At UBC, the Faculty Council, duly appointed by the
Senate under the provisions of the University Act, is charged with the maintaince of order, dicipline, and student welfare,
Thc editors of the Ubyssey, as students, arc subject,
under law, to the rulings of the Council.
It has, none the less, become an established tradition
that the Council shall refrain from exercising its rights
in any way which could be conceivably interpreted as censor ship of any .criticism of administrative policies or actions.
Important Privilege
The freedom of the Ubyssey, therefore still remains a
privilege—but a privilege of tremendous importance lo the
campus as a whole.
It is understood that the administration shall, at all
times, be granted all necessary space to reply to any charges
which may, at any time, be levelled.
It has also been understood that any reasonable requests for supression of incidents which, while of little real
news value, could conceivably bring discredit on the university, will be dealt with reasonably and on their merits
by the Editorial Board.
The Ubyssey has been wrong countless times—perhaps
even more often than it has been right.
Constitutional Means
But its editorial comments have almost invariably resulted in bringing most of the relevant facts to light and
thus enabling members of the community to make an intelligent choice.
Thc system, in short, has worked.
The editors of the Ubyssey are determined to see that
these traditions arc maintained.
In so far as possible, they will make use only of constitutional means to achieve this end.
They are prepared to enter into reasonable discussion
on any problems which may threaten to cancel thc privileges available.
Giant Snake Parade
Snarls City Traffic
fry aruos Jsttary
STUDENT MODEL ASSEMBLY discusses the complex Iranian situation as part of United
Nations -Week activities. Students representing all U.N. countries filled tables set up in
Brock Hall for the model assembly. 	
RUSSIAN DELEGATE WALKS OUT
Police Break Lines
No Arrests Reported
By DENNIS BLAKE
Ubyssey Staff Writer
Homecoming Pep Meet Thursday erupted into a gigantic
snake dance that snarled up traffic for bloeks around  the
centre of the city, jj
A line of nearly 1000 screaming, banner-waving students
stopped traffic movement along Granville and Georgia for a^
least half an hour.
e
Thousands of shoppers and office, workers lined the side-,
walks or watched from windows as snake-dancers staged si
demonstration that rivalled in confusion the royal tour of la^'t
Saturday.
Originates At Pep Rally
ed they saw police 'giving tickets
(or speeding and illegal parking. _
The parade originated about 1:30
from the Pep rally ln the Armouries, At tbe conclusion of the meet
students piled into cars urged on
by a speaker over the public ad-
l/W Model Assembly Favours
Independent Iran Oil Co.
By MYRA OREEN
Sixth Model' Oeneral Assembly
of UN Club at UBC voted, Wednes-
day night In Brock Hall, In favor
or -an Integrated organization of
Britons end Iranians being set up
to operate the Iranian oil Industry.
Presiding   over   the   assembly,
held In Brock Hall, was Brigadier-
General  J.   A.  Clark,  president  of!
the 'Canadian   Bar   Association.*      '■
Secretary-general     was     Joseph!
.Void   and   assistant   secretary-general   was   Felicity   Pope.   Nold   said
that   tho  assembly  had   never  ar- i
gued   before  such   a   big  audience,*
which Included a bus load of students from Port Coquitlam.
PURELY DOMESTIC MATTER
"This Is a purely domestic matter," stated Iranian delegate Bob
Loosmore, "and we can't accept the
jurisdiction of the assembly."
He said Iran would negotiate
privately with the' Anglo-Iranian
Oil Company, "To preserve the dignity pf UN, delete this motion,"Vie
pleaded,
"The British government is responsible for the crisis and is trying
to use the l'.\ as a lool to further
economic aspirations," said Vaughn
Convocation
Gym Today,
Conferring of three honorary degrees.and 361 degrees-in-
course and the investiture of a new chancellor will be the highlights of tdnight's activities when thousands will gather at 8
p.m. to witness the dedication of the War Memorial Gymnasium.
The dedication will mark a long awaited day by citizens
of British Columbia and students of the University.
For some weeks now, people have been phoning and writing
the President's Office for invitations to attend this event.
It Is expected  that the gymnas- .	
itini   seats,   capable  of  accomodate  * Tho   new   chancellor   vvill   then
ing .''UOO people, will he comppletely;   ,      . ,    , ,     , , .
.   , , , I give his inaugural address, and as
Bill. Down on the gym, in an area;
his   first  official  duty   will confer
Police attempts to stop the jam
appeared disorganised. Six prowler cars and about 10 policemen
tried to break up the lines by yanking apart hands and forcing students 'to the curb with their cars,
but* their efforts were unsuccessful.
■Inspector Gordon Ambrose of
tjie • traffic division of the city
police dept. told the Ubyssey that
no arrests were made,
However, some students report-
dress system.
The whole thing appeared to be
well-organized. About two hundred
cars, horns honking and head lights
on, left the university and headel
overtown
equivalent to three full size basketball floors, at least a thousand
people will he assembled around
the convocation platform.
GUESTS
Among them will he wives, mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters
of men i.ml women who died in tho
two  world  wars.
Seated on the special platform
among the colourfully garbed members  of  the  UBC  faculty,  will  be
the degrees on Sir Clutterbuck,
Mr. Oregg, and Mr. Stanley Woodward.
Sir Alexander has been invited
to deliver a short coiiKrogatlon address. Immediately afterward;-, the
black-gowned graduates will file
across the platform to receive do-
grees-in-course.
PRESENTATION
Mr.  Woodward  will  address the
Sir Alxander Clutterbuck, Uultedj audience and Brigadier William
Kingdom High Commissioner In: Murphy and student, council 1'resi-
Canada; ' the Honorable Milton j (lent Vaughn Lyon will present the
Fowler Cregg, V.C., Minister of, \Vai. Memorial Gymnasium lo the
Labor and the Honorable Stahleyi rnlvn-Hlty on behalf of citizens,
Woodward,  B.A.,   U.S.  Ambassador | B,.„(|„llt0(t   ,llui   student*   wlu,   fin-
to   Canada.   They   will   await   the
chancellor's invitation to como forward and receive the honorary degree of Doctor of Law.
INVOCATION
Ceremonies will commence with
an invocation hy the Bev. George
Turpin, chaplain al Shaughnessy
.Military Hospital, following this
the new chancellor of Ihe university,  Brigadier Sherwood   Let I,  will
anced the i*S7.r>0,OflO.()() project.
After the Board utul Senate,
faculty 'members aud next-of-kin,
will file In procession Into the ll.all
of Uomomberancje where* Major
General I!. M. Hoffmeister will unveil a w.ull inscription unci I ho Rev,
cleor.-ee (.'liver ImiIIIh will deliver
lhe  invocation.
The Lasl Post will sound aiul Mr.
reeeivo an official Investiture from'Oregg, once minister of Veteran's
Chancellor-Kiueriliis Krlc \V. Ham- Affairs, will give the dedication
bor. ! speech.
Lyon, delegate from U.S.S.R.
"Agreements made by force cau be
broken by force," be suggested.
BRITISH   P08ITI0N
United Kingdom representative
busty Rhodes said he reeajfjifBeflj
the place of Persia In the world
today. "How can Persia learn to
operate technical things over
night?" he queried. "It takes a long
time for peasants to become skilled workers,"
In explaining the position of his
country he pointed out that Persia
had much to thank U.K. for and
that Britain wished to see Persia
strong and prosperous,
'•'rank Polowski of Poland refuted the Idea that Britain had
.-•iiuk vast sums of money Into Iran,
"Iranian employees get only $1.20
a day. I offer Iran my deepest
sympathy."
ICELAND COOL
"Iceland can be Impartial and cool
from her position on top of the
world," quipped delegate Doug.
Stelnson. "Let Iran make money
as long as we get oil.''
Amendments offered by U.S. delegate Tom Franck Included para-
j graph saying Britain be granted a
j ten-year contract for oil and that
j tbe Iranian government own the
| UK-Iran corporation,
| "We love Iran but think of poor
; Britain," said Franck, clarifying
i his position. The motion was see-
! uncled hy Costa Rica.
| IRAN   NOT   PERSIA
I     Although be refused to recognize
! any of the discussion, Iran's Loosmore   was   disgusted   that  Britain
still referred to Iran as "Persia."
"You are forcing succeeding geV-
eratlons of Iranians Into economic
bondage    and    subordinating    the
people  to the  property," he cried.
"We can't continue to answer for
the defense of our bastion to Asia
11*   this   happens."    He   quoted   an
Iranian   proverb.   "Enemy   of  your
enemy is your friend." He also accused   the   British   government   of
actively   furthering   aggression   of
lliissia.
CREDENTIALS   QUESTIONED
llussia questioned credentials of
Chinese delegate Ron Cameron who
merely suggested, "Members should
tall' over tea and crumpets like
intelligent, human beings."
Canada suggested thp matter be
.tabled until Britain and Iran had
further discussion and Bolivian
delegate threw light on the situation (luring his quick speech
whicli was conducted entirely ill
his   native*   tongue.
Ail hough the Russian delegates
staged a walk-out, accompanied
hy the Philippine) delegate, the
amended motion was finally curried. Vote wus :!" for and 17 .njjnlnst.
Traffic At Standstill
The snake dance started at the | were  affected  except  the  one  to
Hotel  Vancouver  and, stopped   at Stanley Park," they told the Uby.
the  Court  House   where  students ssey,
■iwarmed   up   the   front   steps   to
give   three   cheers.
Continuing down Georgia to Granville they then snake-danced south
along Granville • Street to Robson
where they turned. It was at this
time that the police arrived.
Traffic was completely at a
standstill; even pedestrians could-j
n't get across the intersection.
B.C. Electric officials reported a
ten minute delay in service from
2:30 to *.':40. "All our transit lines
Back at Oeorgla and GranvUle
the parade looped around and began to break up. However, disorganized dancers made their way
back to the court bouse where they
again gave three cheers to end the
demonstration.
Homecoming officials completely
denied any hand in organizing the
parade. When phoned by the Ubyssey at about 2:30, Ted Lee appeared to be amazed at the news of
the snakedance.
Spontaneous Expression
"As, far as we are concerned,"]
he told the Ubyssey, "It was a'
completely spontaneous expression!
of student enthusiasm."  ,
However, one homecoming official admitted that he wr.s "glad
tbe snake dance took place since lt
was good publicity for homecoming
week."
Police were undisturbed about
the demonstration. "It was quite
orderly," Inspector Ambrose told
a Ubyssey reporter, "and caused
the police deportment no trouble
In dispersing them,"
He refused to say how many
police had been sent out to disentangle traffic, but said that the
crowd was dispersed ln about
twenty minutes.
Administration     officials     were
also surprised upon learning about
the snake dance. When the Ubyssey phoned the President's offlcb
they appeared to have no knowledge of It.
As yet, no action in, connection
with the parade has been taken
by  the  administration.
EXCHANGE   PROPOSAL
WIRED  TO  MINISTER
The Minister of Higher Education in Moscow has been,
informed of the Ubyssey's proposed plan for exchanging
students of University of B.C. with a similiar number in
USSR.
Les Armour, Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey, wired the
mini;, ter yesterday as follows:
S. V. KAFTANOV,
MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION,
MOSCOW, USSR
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STUDENT
NEWSPAPER "UBYSSEY' HAS PROPOSED EX..
CHANGE OF STUDENTS WITH USSR ON SCHOLAR.
SHIP BASIS. UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION, STUDENT GOVERNMENT, AND INTF.RNATIONAL STU-
DENT SERVICE HAVE PROMISED ALL POSSIBLE
SUPPORT. PLEASE REPLY COLLECT IF INTERESTED.
LES ARMOUR,
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
THE UBYSSEY,
VANCOUVER, CANADA. Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26,1951
THE UBY
Award Winners
MBMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Autliofis^d as sscond class mail by the Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student subscriptions
J 1.00 per year (Included in AMS fees). Mail subscription $2.00 pr year. Single copies
five cents. Published throughout the University year by the Student Publications Board
of the Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed
herein are those of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, add not necessarly those of the
Alma Mater Sobiety or of the University.
Offices IU Brock Hall, Phone ALma 1624          For display advertising, phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LES ARMOUR
EXECUTIVE EDITOR—ALLAN GOLDSMITH MANAGING EDITOR—DOUO HEAL
News Editor, Don Brown City Editor, Harold .Berson; CUP fidltor, Sheila Kearns;
.Women's Editor, Florence McNeil; Fine Arts Editor, John Brockington; Copy Editor,
Jean Smith.
•en lor -Miter This Usus— ELtIK GO MAT
Why So Shy,
Dr. MacKenzie's statement to the Ubyssey which appeared on this page yesterday
is unlikely to satisfy most students.
His arguments are sound—and his figures add up. But they don't go far enough.
They don't tell us anything we didn't know
before. They ate not the complete budget
breakdown which the president promised stu-
dehfs after {he Ubyssey asked a long string of
rgther embarrassing questions.
Dr, MacKentie's arguments suggest theft
we ire faced with an eventual alternative of
higher feea or reduced services.
Wt cannot afford higher fees. If services
are to be cut we Want to know what we are
paying f6r each service so that we can decide
How ittudh could be saved by any proposed
chop.
Dr. MacKemie promised the necessary
information.
lief has not lived up to that promise.
Why?
We imagine that the Board of Governors
has directed him to withhold a complete
breakdown.
The r only reason that the Board could
issue such a directive is that it has something
to Bide.   •
Why should the iofird be ashamed of
certain of its expenditures? Has it been sift*
jected to pressure from groups who demand
needless services?
We Have seen nothing on the campus
which anyone would want to* hide., But we
may have been blind. Perhaps we are too
naive.
It may be impossible to Operate a government-run university without graft and even
political payoffs.
We sincerely hope that this is not the
case. •
But ihe Board of Governors and/or Dr*
MacKenzie have certainly fanned any suspicions which may be lurking in the background.
It is high time they spoke up.
After attending the Engineers Smoker
lay evening I would like to correct a
few facta commonly regarded as true.
1—Engineers drink.
This is not true. Engineers don't drink.
A blotter doesn't, drink either but it can absorb an awful lot of liquid.
2^-Grand Central Station is the busiest
place in the world.
This is not true. The men's washroom in
the Howden ballroom Wednesday night made
Grand Central Station look like a girls pinochle game.
3—Engineers are sex-mad.
This is absolutely incorrect. Engineers
are not sex-mad, they are simply mad. I don't
mean to infer that the sciencemen are hard
up (but an arthritis-crippled old lady of 67
passed the Engineer's beer bath on Granville
Wednesday evening.
The hot air generated by their playful
shouts of glee raised the skirt of the old girl
above her ankles. At last report 247 Engineers
were pursuing the 1894 pin-up girl through
tbe gates of the Rest Home.
LADY GODIVA
This brings up another point-the Engineers-cherished myth of Lady Godiva, a saddle-sere ex-woman jockey. For centuries Engineers have been baUyhooing the story of
the Virgin Godiva as a female with-hot rum
in her veins, gold, in her teeth and blisters
on her bottom.* The (boys in the red sweaters
have always suppressed the truth—the fact
that Godiva was slowly getting bumps on her
nmlp riding the streets looking in vain for an
artsman. The only place a red sweater came
the picture was when the  Coventry
by Al Fothoringham
stree(cleaners needed something to wipe up
the mess left by the unhouse-broken horse.
In the Engineer's song it states than an
Engineer was the only one to notice that
Godiva rode a horse. All I can say is that if
the original Godiva looked anything like the
(to use the term loosely) Women Who displayed their wares at Wednesday's brawl I
cant see how that Engineer distinguished the
woman from the horse. - •
25$ FOR STRIPPER
I heard that the Engineers paid $25 for
the feature stripper. It was funny watching
the EUS executive trying to get $24.75 back
from her after the show. Oh the girl, tried
hard, she got down to a costume which resembled a barbed wire fence—enough to
protect the property but not enough to obstruct the view—but that didn't satisfy the
three artsmen left (the Engineers were in the
washroom taking a cold shower).
CLOSED WITH SONGS
I got a great kick out of the Engineer's
salvage methods. When a scienceman passed
out after drinking two (count em-two) bottles of beer the other Engineers leaped upon
the inert body with a siphon and drained the
beer out of his veins. The strange thing was
that they usually got three bottles back.
The boys closed the show with a few
songs which would definitely not be rated
very high on the Sunday School's Hit Parade.
BC breweries showed a $35 million profit
last year. After taking part in Wednesday's
-beer fiesta I have ortly one question, "What
did the breweries do with the other $29
million?"
PLEDGED TO WORLD-WIDE BROTHERHOOD
Work Of
■y DOROTHEA AUERBACH
Last Sunday afternoon ln Youth
Training Centre Recreation Hall
Mrs. Sherwood Lett declared International House, UBC, open.
With the warm glow of a convivial hearth behind her, Mrs. Lett
dedicated UBC's International
House to the promotion of International brotherhood. She predicted
the success of this experiment ln
human relations, and praised the
Interest and achievements of the
present executive.
Following Mrs. Lett, who had
been Introduced by President MacKenzie, Dr. Murray Cowie, President of the International House
Alumni (BC <branch) presented
Raghblr Basl with a blue and white
emblem of the organization's ideal.
Raghblr .in turn asked Don Dowling, President of Acadia Camp
Council to accept the emblem until
such time as It could be housed ln
a permanent International House
on campus.
Speaking for the consulate corps
here In Vancouver, the Honorable
Dr. 0. H. Wei, clean of the Crops,
paid tribute to the object of International House, and offered material assistance should the executive   be   faced   with   any   prob-
House
Executive
lem whatever.        \
Vaughn Lyon, as president .of
the student council pledged the support of the entire student body.
Thanks to the efforts of the
wives of International House Alumni refreshments were more than
adequate, and thanks to the crackling fire and common Interest, conversation was pleasat.
In the realm of International
House activities'UBC ls a pioneer,
and this ceremony, like the previous Sunday Supper, marks a first in
its history. Though an actual building called International House does
not yet exist, now that the Ideal
has been officially adopted the
committe feels that they are one
step closer to its realization.
Because of the efforts of Peter
Steckl, Raghblr Basl, and Brlgltta
Balla, International House has an
active and enthusiastic committee
who would build the house themselves if they could afford the lumber.
NOT NEW CONCEPT
The House, with its ideal of International Brotherhood, la not a
new concept, Many have conceived
of an extensive plan for world wide
intellectal   exchange.
Here, on this campus, conditions
Opened
Praised
are ideal tor the development ot
a reasonable approach to human
Intercourse. Life is so short and so
valuable that every moment should
be savoured. It is not enough to go
to school, make some friends, pass
an exam, and finally graduate. We
must live in a world of people-most
of whom do not speak our langu
age; but they eat, sleep, swear, and
Idve as we do. They are no differ
ent from us though their recipes
sound exotic, and their epithets
provoke wonder.
International House gives them
a chance to live among Canadians
and grasp the elements of our very
young culture, and It permits us, at
no extra expense, to head about,
and feel for a moment the effects
of a very old and very rich Intel
lectual heritage.
We cannot all travel and see the
world at first hand, but this House
offers each one of us the opportunity of a little second-hand daydreaming, and a chance to make
living in Canada easier for a stranger.
Let's    hope    that    International
House  will  be   more  than  just  a
flaunting   of   our    broad    minded
principals.
(Mere Winners on Pag* 6)
Pi Gamma Chapter of Phi Gam-
|»m Delta Fraternity Bursary, $50»-
"obert D. Bennett, 294& West 4th
ve., Vane.
The Right Honorable Anthony
den Chapter, IODE, Bursary $B0.
obert Keith Turner Bourne, 1737
aro St., Vane.     •
The British Columbia Psycholo-
lc. I  Association   Bursary,  $50.—
Ijfosemary Stokes, 6612   Trafalgar
t., Vane.
The XI Alpha Chapter of Beta
ma Phi Sorority Bursary, ISO—
Frances Liptrot, 259 Bast 18th Ave.
Vine.
The Anne S. Campbell Bursaries
t»l?5 each—Gloria Eliiatteih Mulla,
We East 10th Ave., Vane. Jac<
tyles M. Raymond Qutstwater, 780
last 18th Ave., Vafic. *
The International Student Service Burs&ry Fund (UBC Branch)—
Wgltta Balla 1150, 6589 ' Wycliffe
#d., Vane. Peter Florian Dembow-
ill lioo, Acadia Camp, Vane. Yusuf
talsoy $W», .183 West Ith Ate:.,
Vane. Raghblr Singh Baal $180,
Btrnett, B.C.
The Jonathan Rogers Awards-
Thomas Kennedy Alexander $180,
HIS West Mat, North Vane Rob-
<*rt Keith Turner Bourne $175,1187
flaro St., Vane. Kenneth Oeorge
loyd $176, 105 Seymour St., Kam-
H)ops, B.C. Norma Patricia Cavln
$160, 3163 West 2nd Ave., Vane.
David Hugh Clegg $17S, R.R.I,
William He-ad, Victoria. Walter
Hayduk $173, Armstrong, B.C.
Mary Tamara Kelbert $175, 3136
West 14th Ave., Vane. Gerald Klas-
sen $150, 346 King George Hwy„
New West. John Klassen $150. Ma-
tsqul, B.C. Alexander Hugh Pontiles $200. 948 West 13th Ave., Vane
Wlllium George Sharps $160. Haney, B.C. Gordon Arthur Stewart
1160, 920 Welmore St., Victoria.
John Maldwyn Thomas $250, Gib-
tons, B.C.'
The Pltmsoll Club Bursaries (donated by the Canadian Stevedoring
Company Limited). Roger Goodall
$200, 251 West 4th St., North Vane.
Ronald John Hancock $100, Nara-
mats, BC.
The Pllntsoll Club Bursaries (donated by Louis Wolfe and Sons
(Vancouver) Limited)—ohn Alfred
Birch $150, R.R.I, New West. Walter Wljllam Brotherton $150, 396
Cast1 37th Ave., Vane.
i The Medical Ball Committee,
#ursfe.ry Fund—Nigel Clark $100,
118 West 18th Ave., Vane.
The University Student Liberal
Club Bursary, $80-*Gordon Wesley Young, 525 Northcott Ave., Vic*
torla, B.C.
The Moe Cohen Bursary, $25—
Robert Keith Tower Bourne, 1737
Haro St.. Vane.
The Al- B. Cohen Bursary, $25
'--Robert Morrlce Mlddletpn, Vernon, B.C.
Ti.e a. Rotiste"n Bursary, $100
West 13th Ave* I*nc. , «
Tho Sam Rothstein Bursary,
$100—Edward Fulgham, Manson's
Lanning, B.C.
The M. M. Waterman Bursary,
$25—John Alfred Birch, R.R.I, New
West.
 * , 1~*	
/
The Albert. O. Koch BurB&ry,
$100 — Samuel Alexander Kyle,
2046 Beach Ave.
The Englheers' Wives* Association Bursa.ry, $100—William Ross
Tracey, 628 Bast 8th Ave., Vane.
The/RCAF chapter IODE, Bursary, $76, (Medicine), Alexander
Frank Mandevllle, 645 Johnston
Rd., New Westminster.
The Dr. L. L. Horvath Bursaries
In Medicine, Fred Abram" Harder,
Yarrow, B.C., $160i Donald Ashley
Cooper, Trail, B.C., $150.
The British Columbia Beef ,Cat-
tie Growers' Association Bursary,
$-250, Thomas R. Hopkins, \3lo-l0th
Ave., New Westminster.
The Lower Mainland Fur Breeders' Association Bursary, $800, Harry Madramootoo, Fort Camp, Vancouver! ,
The Richard Ronald Burns
Memorial Bursary, $76, Albert Malcolm Knudsen, 933-4th St., New
Westminster.
The British Columbia Forest products Limited Bursaries, Catherine
Maureen Murphy, Box, 549, Vancouver, $300, Jumes Frederick Palmer, $200, 6744' Dunbar St., Van-
couvej.
The Esmond Lando Bursary,
$100, Kenneth Hardie Wilkinson,
4881 Angus Drive, Vancouver.
The David Thorn Bursaries, No.
Jl ($150) Edgar Wesley Toop, Sar-
dis, B.C., No. 2 ($76) Jacob Duerk-
sen, Langley, Z.C., No, 3 ($75) Ross
Ashford, Trail, B.C.
The Delta Gamma Bursary for
tbe Blind, $100, Duglad Baird, 3256
West 38th Ave„ Vancouver.
Ephemla Laurence McLeod Raphael Bursary, $100, No award.
The Victoria Home Economics
Association Bursary, $50, Anne E.
Neave, Ann Westbrook Hall.
The RCAF Chapter, IODE Bursary (Nursing) $60, Marvel Doroen
Broocks, 4471 West 12th, Vancouver.
Awards made by other Institutions
but Announced by the University
Central   Housing  and   Mortgage
The Allied Officers' Auxiliary'
Bursary, $75—Gordon Wilfred Gell,
5510 Fairview Ave., Vane.
The Louis Toban Bursty, $100
—Nita Judith, Aqua, 610 Salsbury
Drive, Vancouver.
The National Paper Box Limited
Bursaries, $200 each — For Agriculture, Douglas George Routley,
R.R,6, Langley, B.C.; For Commerce, Vern Henry Keven Scott,
483 East 54th Ave., Vane.
The Sea Going Hacks Bursary,
$200—Harold Patrick Flynn, Port
Alice,   B.C.
The Admiral Jelllcoe Chapter,
IODE, Bursaries, $50 each. James
Stuart Brander, 2305 West 8th
Ave., Vancouver. Mary Ann Mead,
24  East 10th Ave., Vancouver.
The Triple Entente Chapter,
IODE, Bursaries; James Alfred
Cuthbert, $75, Cecil Lake, B.C.;
Stephen Mathews, $75, 5510 Fair-
view Ave., Vancouver; Noel Park-
er-Jervls, $50, Box 63, Little Mountain, Vancouver, ,
T h *e , Worthlngton Memorial
Chapter, IODE, Bursary, $100.—
Walter Alexander Graham Bell,
Box 20, .Little Mountain Camp,
Vanoouver.
7* The
U BC 1RAM CURTAIN
fBdltor, The Ubyssey
A news item ln a recent Sun
edition says that the Russians have
suggested an exchange of students with the UBC. According to
this item the reaction at UBC was
anything but hearty. Pres. MacKenzie Is quoted ae saying: "it
the Russians had the proper academic standing." Dr. J. O. St. Claire
head of the dept. of Slavonic Studies, warned that the Russian
proposal might be a "propaganda
balloon". Vaughan Lyon, pres. of
(UBC's Student Oouncl^ termed
the plan "a good Idea" but questioned the costs Involved. "The
Russians suggested it ln the first
place," he said. "Maybe they'd be
willing to finance It". Does that
make sense?
Where's the "curtain" now?
The Russians suggest an exchange
Of students—as good a way of getting acquainted as any. But the
tenor Item ie tha*t UBC president.
Prof, of Slavonics and Student Council pres, say ln e&fect at least,
NO. "Academic standing, propaganda, coats, present temper of
the times. Red tape might complicate the plan." In other words,
none of that exchange stuff.
And what's all this talk about a
'curtain?" The Russians suggest
an exchange of students. Promptly
• curtain or brassy shrugs goes
up around the Ivory towers on
Point Grey. Are they, perhaps,
afraid of being contaminated?
UBC Clrad.
CtaAMfttd
FOR   SALE
1949 PONTIAC SEDAN. BEST
condition. Radio and better; seat
covers. MA 0886. 14—2
1 PHYSICS 100, 1 CHEMISTRY
100 texts. Both ln new condition.
Phone TA 2875.
CABLE .SKI    HARNESS,    MICH-
romatic, brand new. Excellent buy
ttt $8. Anne, KE 3497R,
NOTICE!
MARDI • QRAS CHORUS TRY-
outs. In sttuge room ln Brock on
yet. 30th, Tuesday at 12:30. All
out, freshettes Included, for tall
girls and short girls chorus.
FORE3T CLUB MEETING. DR.
McTaggart Cowan speaking on
"Forests and Wildlife". Tues., Oct.
SO, in F & G 100.
LOST A POUND
WILL THE FOLLOWING PLEASE
come to the AMS Lost and Found:
Lee Hotttman, L. H. Fox, D. Dash-
wood-Jones, Diane J<.*rcMne, Maureen Walsh, Ken Campbell, Robert
A. Hurlay, R. C. Weber, L. A. Mitten,, Danny Pekovich, E. A. Lloyd,
McGulrk, Mavis Bain, George Gal-
bralth, Robert Q. Webes, \ R.
McLorg, Wm. Blair Uttle, Gerald
Coomes, W. J. Bell.
LOST — PAIR Of HALF-HORN-
ed rimmed glasses lost after last
Saturday's game, OCt. 20 outside
Stadium. If found please phone AL
0253M. 16—2
LOST — A BROWN CARDBOARD
folder about 1 foot ,n length, Su-
baiine Shears, KE 6937M..
LOST -< GREY AND GOLD WAT-
erman's pencil, Finder please ph.
CE 5761. Ask'for Pat.
WILL LYNN N, BOTHAM CALL
at the AMS Lost & Found.
LEARN TO DANCE
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PIRST IN RICORDIO MUIIC... FIRST IN TIIIVIIION Friday, October 26, 1951
THE UBYSSEY
Page TRree
ling Crosby Wires
Homecoming
Ballots Cast For Princess
At Saturday's Football Gamq
"HAPPY TO EXTEND PATRONAGE AND HOPE HOME-
COMING   WEEK  AT  VANCOUVER  WILL  BE  A   BIG
SUCCESS*
The real Hollywood' Bing Crosby sent this telegram to
Jerry Duclos, chairman of this year's Homecoming week.
/Jerry   Duclos   also   announced <$-—r—4—-—-—* —
that    ballots    for    Homecomlnk „_,..._,_. .   __.   _ _,_,-_,
TWEEN CLASSES
MANY JOIN
Fraternity Rushing Results
princess will be cast at tbe footbaU game tomorrow.
Candidates for Princess are:
•Lois Dunlop, Aggie candidate;
Louise Morris, Commerce: Mavis
Coleman. Engineers; Lis Fletcher,
Prpsh: Jean Pollack, Home Ec;
Claire Wood; Phuraacy; Peggy
Henniger, Phys. Ed; Lyla McLen-
nan, WUS;  Tad Harper WAD.
the Princess will be crowned
at the Homecoming Dance, In the
Armories,  Saturday night.
The dance starts at 9 p.m., music
will be supplied by Milo Carter's
U'PUce orchestra. Dr*ss ls Informal ind admission price Is 92 a
couple.
.Extending their patronage will
be: Tbe Hon. Clarence Wallace,
C. B. E. Lieutenant-Governor and
Mrs. Wallace; Brigadier Sherwood
Lett, Chancellor and Mrs. Lett;
Dr. N. A*. M. MacKensle, president
and Mrs. MacKensle; Mr. James
MaoDonald, Alumni president and
Mrs. MacDonald, Mr. W. T. Stradth,
minister of education and Mrs.
Straith, Mayor and Mrs. Fred Huiye
The Hop. Eric W. Hamber, Chancellor Emeritus, and Mrs. Hamber,
pt. U B. Kline*, President Emeritus and Mrs. Klinck and Premier
and Mrs. Byron Johnson.
Columnist
, ;#1NK!P»> ■— (CUP) — Ad
lib, regular column by Harold
"JJuchwald appearing in The Manitoban, University of Manitoba
student newspaper, will be reprinted in the University of Toronto's
daily, The Varsity, it has been
announced.
Varsity officials telegraphed Bu-
chwald that they Intend to use all
his columns, as they appear In
The Mrnltoban. Bilohwald thus
has become Canada's only syndl-
piittid college newspaper columnist, according to The Manitoban
editors.
Frosh End In
Music Club
e
MONTREAL — (€UP) — Trinity's annual scavenger hunt, part
of the frosh initiation ended this
year with 17 of the frosh In police
court.
Fifteen of the first year students
face possible charges of disorderly
conduct and malicious damage.
The other two may be charged
#ith Breach of the Liquor Control
Act.
t
This is the second time it) two
yet'"8 that Trinity College has had
trouble as a result of Initiations.
In 1949, the traditional cakeflghts
had to be stopped after flying chemicals from the "smoke bomb" burned  a student's  face   .
Moron Wanted
By AL FOTHERINGHAM
A moron with a* liking for ball-
oops Ih being; sought at UBC. The
moron 'va.s In one of the lead
cn.ru In yesterdays race downtown.
Tho moron lost his balloon out the
window. The moron slummed on
his breivks. Six oars slammed on
their brakes, The sevehth oar (not
really car—it was a Ford) slammed on its brakes.
Nothing happened. I mean nothing happened to the bru-kes. Something happened to the car, lt ran
Into the car in front. It smashed
in Its fenders and grills. It missed
the -nakedance.
The moron recovered his balloon and ,took off. The moron better stay In hiding. The moron la
being sought unto the ends of the
earth even to the Georgia beer
parlour.
If you find the moron send him
in with a top off tin old Cadillac
to the iiub office and we will send
you absolutely free all the old Engineers copies of the Ubyssey to
paper your chicken house   with.
Wanted—one moron,
Program
MUtlC APPRECIATION Club
will present "Excerpts from Boris"
by MousBorgsky on Monday, October J9th at 151:30 in the Double
Committee Room of Brock Hall.
•QUARI OANCI tlttlON will
be lield on Friday noon. The club
will put on a demonstration to
show you how square 'dancing ls
really done.
* *       *
•TUDINT PIACI MOVIMtNT
is holding a meeting to discuss
"The Five Power Peace Pact" on
Monday, Oct. 29, at 12:30 in Arts
104.  All  members please attend.
* *       *
CHIMICAL INtTITUTI of Canada together with the American
Institute ot Chemical Engineers
will present films In Physics 200
on Monday, Oct. 29 at 12:30. The
films will concentrate on the smelting and refining of nickel.
* *       •*
*
SPANISH DANCI of the International House will be held on
November 4, at Acadia. Tickets
are on sale at the AMS Office until
November 1. Students 67c. Adults
$1.00.
* *      *
tAST CALL for Ballroom Instructors.. Anyone who would like to
try Ballroom Dance instruction
is invited to the final open meeting of the Instructors' Club which
will be held Friday night at 6
p,m. In HO 4.
Complete results of fraternity
rushing at University of B.C.
were released this week.
ALPHA DILTA PHI
. "Hugh M. Blair, George Seymour,
Orover Sinclair, PhU Barter, J.
Oeorge Orimston, Derek Stanfield,
Dave Stacey,, Rifchard Andersen!
Alton J. Oreen, Denis Shalman,
Bud Frederickson, Harvey Thorn
son, Jim Ryder, Dwlght Perots,
J.F. Hamilton, CO. McLeod, Jack
Herb, Charles P. Gray, Godfrey
Chowne, Ray 8. Dixon, Jim Eccott,
Bob Dawson, John Newton, Stuart
Clyne.
ALPHA TAU OMtOA-
WUHaim Bmerton, R obert M.
Mlddleton,.Chris Trunkfield, J. Edward Coe, John V. MacDonald,
Robert Dickerson, John Oonsta-
baris.
BIA THITA PI
Hector Frith, Douglas M. Deeble,
W. Blair Little, Norman Walton,
Jack J. McOhee, Ted Duncan, Olen
Baker, James F. McWilliams, Henry Engman, Pater Grantham, Ron
MacRae.
DILTA KAPPA IPSILON
A. Maclaren, Trever Thorne.
DILTA UPSILON
Ron Nelson, Bob Richardson,
Ted MacDonald, Bill Davies, John
Springer, Bob Cave, Daniel Levy,
Bill Tracey, Jill Weatherall, Jim
Stewart, Greg Taylor Bill Fodfres,
Pat Hannan, Herb Shepherd, Barrie Flather, Jim Carter, Walter
Epp, Bob Hlndmarch.
KAPPA  tlOMA '
Gerry Savory, Dean Lundy,
Oeorge Papas, Gerry GUI, Bob
Burgess, Bud King, Don Harris,
Doug MacMillan, MIKe~ Puhach,
Peter Coates, Mike Smith.
LAMIDA  CHI  ALPHA
Ken Watson, John Molsey, Don
Jack,   Barry   Maldiwln,   Jean-Paul
Rlopel, Ken Jordan, Dave Campbell.
PHI OILTA THITA
(Brian Upson, Duncan Shaw, Jim
McNlcol, Jack Morrison, Boyd
Kelly, Tom Cook, John Atkinson,
Bill Maxwell, Richie Patterson, Pat
Alair, Robin Abercromble, Peter
Gregory, Bill MacKendrtck, Ian
Turnbull.
PHI OAMMA DILTA
Daniel Zaharho, David Purvis,
Clev**B Nell, David MacDonald,
Philip de la Giroday, Oeorge Des-
Brlsay, Oeorge Catherall, Lawle
Walmsley, John Pearkes, John
MacKay, Fred Haack, Gordon El
liott, Lome Clare, John Woodward,
Albert Plant, Pat McKenzie, Doug
Killah, Herb Forward, Tom Davis.
PHI KAPPA PI
William Parkin, Arthur Harvey,
Wllllani Hutchinson, Ted Thordar-
son, William Mulholland.
PHI  KAPPA SIGMA
Ian Williamson, George Rapanos,
Alec Robertson.
Harry  Killas,  Gerry  Phillppson,
Tom Boal,
SIGMA APHA MU
Harold   Austin,   Mitchell   Burn-
stein, Earl M liner.
SIGMA  CHI
Bob   Piper,   Len   O'Neill,   Bo1>
Dixon, Derry Cftrew, Clarence Gustavson, Pick Feutlman, John Antle,
Bob Donaldson, Lyle Balftent,
SIGMA PHI  ELTA
Tom Bird Dill McCormlck, James
Stdaln.
ZETA BETA TAU
, Sefton Levlne, Jerry Lecovin,
Jerome A.ngel. Milton Sky, Ted
Goldbloom, Allan Barad, David
Tessler, Irving Ul-issner, Morton
Klnkelsteln.
ZETA   P8I
Mac Morris* John Letson, Dill
Patey, Ken Jones, Tom Sterling,
Frank Carroll,
UNIVERSITY. OF .NEW BRUNS-
wick — (CUP) — Two University
of New Brunswick professors were
drowned in a tragic accident while
on a duck hunting expedition near
hero   last   week.
Drowned were Haeair Vldeto, 35,
of Berwich, N.S. und*Qrah*am Had-
ley, 35, of Frederlcton, both associate  professors  of forestry.
The men were thrown Into the
water when the canoo they were In
struck some rapids near the junction of the St. John and Oromocto
Rivers.
UBC  GRAD  WINS
$4000  SCHOLARSHIP
A University of British Columbia graduate, John M.
Morris has topped 500b applicants to win an American
Council of Learned Societies' Travelling Scholarship of
$4000.
Morris has been doing graduate work at North-western
University since receiving his masters's degree frorn UBC
He is the, second person to have won such a large scholarship at North-Western.
*  He plans to continue advanced graduate studies at the
University of London.
According to Dr. Walter Sage, he is one of the most
brilliant  hostory  students  ever  to  attend   UBC.   While
here he received the highest mark ever given to a graduating thesis in History, 145 out of 150.
Consulting EUctried Enginoor
for the
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
A. EDWARD SIMPSON
445 Richards Street
VANCOUVER, R.C.
TA. 4571
GEORGE SPARLING LTD.
FOR THE FINEST IN GYM EQUIPMENT
Outfitters for the Following Thunderbird Teams
• FOOTBALL
• BASKETBALL
• RUGBY
• GRASS HOCKEY
AND  MANY OTHER8
SPORTING GOobs
929 Granville Street
MArine 0277
Consulting Mechanical Engineer
for the ,
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
445 Richards Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
TA. 4571
Kicka poo's Meet
Stimulates Parade
A gigantic Homecoming Pep meet in the armories Thursday noon, which built student enthusiasm to a fever-high pitch,
precipitated the snake parade in downtown Vancouver.
More than 2600 students attend- •>
edethe meet, their cheers filled .with.    Roblne»   "dvlaed   the   students,
the spirit that was kindled at last 'Remember,  a  student  body   who
Saturday's game.
The show's star, Pat Morgan,
was greeted with enthusiastic applause aiid he and his Rythm Pals
played "My Rose of San Antone."
"Tumbling Tumbleweed."
Mike1 Paul, Introduced by Morgan as 'best accordlanlst In ah-h-h
Rhythm Pals .gave his Interpretation of "What Is This Thing
Called Love" and Julliette, greeted by a chorus of whistles, sang
"That's Why fhe Lady ls a Tramp."
Pianist Bud Henderson and Juliette
collaborated on their next number,
a dreamy arrangement ot "flow
High the Moon."
■PHCTIVI SOLO
Len Locke returned to Introduce
athletic director, Bob Robinett,
who admitted that Juliette had
done a more .effective job of stirring the crowd' than he could. He
stressed (hat a good football player must have the same qualities
as a good student—heart, aggressiveness, loyalty, good 'off-campus
representation', and good physical
and mental habits.
won't be beaten, can't be beaten,"
SPECIAL  VERSION
Pat Morgan and the Rhythm Pals
returned with "Up the Lazy River,"
"Somebody Loves Me" and their
own special version of "On the
Lone Prairie," which received en-
thuslaBUc* applause.
EVENING
MITTS
*
In
GOLD and SILVER
Short and 6 Button Length
%M   and    4-95
Ung Laos Mitts   J.2B
575 GranviUe St.
Likt a found education, a
sound lifo insurance program
can ntvor bt itarttd too toon.
f  CAN
# ... 1.1 * '
o t  *
C-41
Vancouver Branch Office — 402 W. Pender Street
ERIC V. CHOWN, LLB., Branch" Manager
EAT-HM'Q
*r%  I   \ar   Mm     «*•#
Modelled By
JOYCE MACPHERSON
Copy by JOAN
PICTURE BY  ERIC  SK1PSEY
THE UTTERLY FEMININE-touch of shadow,
whiff of perfume, swish of skirt-epitomized in
this season's crinoline fashion.
For you at EATON'S.
Extravagantly skirted platinum gray taffeta, a dress
for that "special date." Quilted pockets and neckline
trim add a distinctive touch. 39.98
Dress Department. Second'Floor
Unseen but not  unsung—the stiffened  underskirt,
Crinoline  to  make   the   season's  silhouette  yours.
At EATON'S. 5.9S to 17.50
Lingerie Department, Second  Floor
Rhinestone bracelets, here a single strand with four
leaf clover pattern of the brilliant stones.       4.00
Costume   Jewellery,   Main   Floor Page F(
our
THE UBYSSEY
Friday* October 26, 1051
i   *
New Since Homecoming Last Year
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE BUILDING has been completed and will
open for inspection by homecoming visitors this year. The modern building, costing more than $1,000,000, contains bacteriology, nursing and health
services. A "flying wing" type of construction, it has been designed in all
ex-
—Courtesy Dally Province
HAPPY SMILE to greet homecoming visitors is flashed by
Dr. Norman MacKenzie, president of UBC. Dr. MacKenzie
has seen thousands of graduates leave the university in his
years here.
Explore Modern Music
With Choral Group
Do you have a yen to sing; play the glockenspiel, kettle
drum, triangle or xylophone? Are you interested in exploring
modern music? If so, you will wish to attend the organizational meeting for "Les Noces
"Les Noces" ls an extraordinary
Exam
Date Set
The National Teacher Kxamin-
atlons, given annually by the Educational Testing Service, will be
held at 200 testing centres throughout the U.S. on  Kehruary  1'!,  1!>">2.
During the one clay test, candidates may take Common Kxainitiations, whicli Include tests in Professional Information, General Culture, Kngllsh Expression and Non-
Verbal Reasoning; and one or two
tests to indicate mastery of the
subject to be taught.
The college which a candidate
ls attending will advise him
whether to take the Examinations,
and  which of the tests to take.
Application forms and general Informal Ion may be obtained from
college officials, or directly from
the National Teacher Examinations,
■Educational Testing Service, I'.O,
Box  5!'.,   Princeton,   Xew Jersey.
Application forms, along with the
proper examination Ices, vvjll lie
accepted at the K'.T.S. office during
November, December and up to
January   18.
ARCHITECTS CAME TO  RESCUE
First Plaits For Memorial
Gym Favoured Gothic Style
By DINNI8 SLAKE
Looking at the fine." modern
Memorial Oym, it's hard to believe
that the original plan called for
medieval architecture, with sec-
lusive chapels and cloisters.
However, that -was the Idea of
the committee which originated the
campaign. UBC was to have a
building ln keeping with the "Collegiate Oothic" style then existing
on the campus,
REVISED PLAN
To the rescue came the Infant
School of Architecture, under the
leadership of Professor Fred Las-
sere, They succeeded ln having all
previous plans revised. The memorial theme was to be brought into
every day contact with thoso using
the building.
It was to be ln the form of a
picture window In the main lobby,
looking out on the panorama of the
mountains to the north of UBC,
8TAOI8
An Interesting feature of the
building is that It can be added to
in stages, each one complete in
itself.
Tliere are provisions for an addition of a block at the far end of
the gym to house other facilities,
such as a dance studio, squash
courts, and a second, small gymnasium for women.
Tne British Empire Games, to
be held In Vancouver ln 1954 has
greatly stimulated Interest ln the
completion of a proposed swimming
pool, This is to be a super affair,
accommodating about 200 people,
-^j«i-^xUui-jm JI...J ,m!,., pi,"' mi jujEjg
LIBRARY  CHAIRS  GONE
TO FALL CONVOCATION
The library was devoid of practically all chairs Thursday.
The chairs had been moved over to the gymnasium for
Friday's Convocation and Dedication Ceremonies.
Students were in a grumbling mood when they discovered that the chairs had heen moved 48 hours prior to the ceremonies.
RECREATION CENTRE
The gymnasium will be used for
dances, pageants, concerts and com
vocation..
In summer months^ lt is hoped
jthat the whole builnlng will be
used as a community recreational
centre for residents of the neighborhood.
McGill Shows
On Radio
MONTREAL — (OUP) — The
Radio Workshop of McQil/Unlver-
sity will feature a series of half
hour shows written exclusively by
McGill students this year,
Programs will'be produced in
CFCF and will alternate weekly
between dramMic and documentary shows.
All production jobs oil the show
wiil, be undertaken by students:
m+
Consulting Structurol Enginetr
for the
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
F. W. URRY
1264 West Pender Street MArine 78S4
VANCOUVER B.C.
Congratulations
from
VANCOUVER
ART METAL WORKS
. t
Ltd.
738 Powell St.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Students  May  Attend
Gym  Opening  Tonight
Students of the University of British Columbia can
obtain tickets for this evenings ceremonies at the War Memorial Gym by writing or phoning to the Registrar's Office.
Cong ratg lotions to the
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
J. T.
Painting ond Waterproofing
CH. 4012
1520 West 4th Ave.
FAir. 3883
Vancouver, B.C.
I —Courteiy Dally Province
cases to facilitate research work. Bacteriology labs are thermostatically
controlled to invent changes in temperature from interfering with
periments.       ]
mmm
n in
• • •
on the achievement 'that the
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
represents ...
Wo aro proud to ha¥o ioon aaodatod
In U's tonstmthn
CHAS. E. LONGLEY
Company Limited
Industrial and Commercial Electrical
Contractors
TAtlow 2241
1319 SEYMOUR ST. VANCOUVER, B.C.*
mmm
____________mm
ESSE
mm
mmmmmm
CeHftatulatfoHA
To the University of British
Co I-inn-bid on the Completion
of the
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
DARLINGTON HASH
Co. (IMS} Limited
CONTRACTORS FOR
TILE - MOSAIC - MARBLE - TERRAZZO
2144 Granville St. CEdar 6232
VANCOUVER, B.C.
—mmmm—mm
piece of music for chorus, four
pianos, soloists and percussion.
Composed originally for the Diag-
lielev Ballet Co., by the contemporary master Igor Stravinsky, this
work will be given ut a Canadian
premier through a student performance   next* March.
Tlio   •■tiulents   will   be   prepared
find   directed   by   Professor   Harry
Adaskin,   with   the   assistance   of
Vancouver  Junior  Symphony   eon-
! ductor, Colin Slim.
!     U   you   can   bellow   in   tune,   or
i tap your foot, iu rhythm, and huve
\ an   interest   hi   exploring   modern '
' music,   yon   can   he   trained   I'or   a
| part  iu  "l,es   .Voces''.
\     A   men ini*;   vvill   he   held   in   the
'Hrock    Double    Committee    Room,
Tliiii*.-*(l:iy   ;u    I:!: ::u,   for   nil   those ;
[ who   wi  h   lo   take   purl   either   as
siimef;     hi*     percussionists,
I ' " L-^;
Pick-up AMS Cards Now
AU   students   who   have   not      j
|     picked up their AMS curds are
requested   lo  do  so  as  soon  ;.■«      i
possible.     Students     are     also
<     ask   |o  leave  one  ceipy ol'  their     I
photograph    al     llie    "Totem"     ;
I     desk.
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
on the completion of
THE WAR MEMORIAL
GYMNASIUM
Spring Maple Floors Laid and Finished By
Fred AA. Beatty
LIMITED
204fi W. Broadway
CHerry 2525
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Build With
Concrete
For Durability
AND
Peremanency
Information Cheerfully Supplied Upon Application
British  Columbia  Cement
COMPANY  LIMITED
500 Fort St.,      Victoria, B.C.
WORKS: BAMBERTON
Saanich Inlet, Vancouver Island, B.C.
Capacity 1,200,000 Barrels Annually
Ocean and Railroad Shipments from our Docks at the Works. Fritfay,'Gettbtt 28,1951
THE UBYSSEY
Page Five
Students Get Scholarships
all Award List Announced
| Summer* Session)
, ihi ^Aficouvfir #ftW Qrtito Until F-ottnddtton ScttolarBhip, |J25
(Gra*$ate\ tfbrk, Airifultitre) .-
Donalft Ernegt Waldern, 4474 West
12th f#.
The PtiVtafr River Coropany
Limited Scholarship. $700 (for'research and* graduate 8tu<ly, Chemistry): relinquished to: — Gordon
Leslie KiHour, 2526 Wdst 7th Ave.
Vancouver by John Leonard Snyder.    ;
, - ■       ..*■■#       •*■
The British Columbia Electric
Railway Oompcny Limited Graduate Scholarship, $260.—Sheila Fe-
)i*ftf; Waited*, 2715 Dutlerin
A^e.. Vfctor^.;
The , Nancy Ryckman Scholar-
ship, #180 (But Kootenay *tudem
■with high standing)—Joseph Samuel Pforentlno, Box 831, Cranbrook,
§A). ? ;
Vancouver Sun Scholarship for
Carrikrs, $400 (Renewal, not an-
nounded with others In May Mat)—
Albert; George Mercer, 121 Bast
57th iAve., Vancoiver.
The .Osier, Hammond and Nan'
ton SchoUvrsMp, $180 (Commerce)
—Albert BSrrieat Harbottle, 27S8
Went* 11th Ave., Vancouver.
British Columbia Electric Railway iejOompany Limited Special
Schofershlpw, $200 each (Proflcl-
ency—sons and daughters of em-
ploye««)—Margeret Ann Oha*llen*
ger, 4f6$ McGuire Rd„ R.R.2, Sardls.
Raymond E, Couftsell, 404;2 Dunbar,
Vancpttver. >(Kenneth R,.E. Kerr,
2845 Hriit 14th AVe., Vancouyer.
Geor|grlt^W^*'" «?8 Eftit ttst
Ave., Vancouver. Edward T. Sort-
well, 306" Gurry St., Steveston,
ftC.
Stmihcona Trust Scholarships
ln Physical Education, $100 each—
Elmer; Seymiour   Matthews,   2536
Smith, 2716 West 36th Ave., Van
couver.
Thf John Ingli9 Company Limited Scholarships, $125 each (Mining and Metallurgy)—Geno Bis-
aro, 202 Baling St., ¥rail, B.C.
The Pharmaceutical Association
of the |Province of British Columbia 'Scholarship,- - $100 (highest
standing to y«*r °* practical train-
ing)-*Thomas f/ickham, 205 St.
Charles St., Victoria.
Royal Institution Scholarship
tor Senior Matriculation, $200—Relinquished to Charles Herbert Eas-
ton by It'n Moriey Duck, 5022 Pr.
Rupert St., Vancouver.
Special Scholarship for Univer-
rity Entrance, $400—Edward Pol-
gham, Manson's Landing, B.C.
British Columbia Forest Products Limited Scholarships, $300
each (proficiency—sons and daughters of employees) — Shirley E.
(Anderson, Youbou, B.C. Donald A.
MacKay, Youbou, B.C. Stuart A.
Beaver idge (to attend Victoria
College).
The Vancouver Sun scholarships
for Carriers, $400 each—Lyle Purine! Robertson, 1*308 Carnsew St.
to attend Victoria College). Douglas Norman Mclnnes, 1419 West
52nd   Ave.,   Vancouver.
The Summer Session Students'
Association Scholarship No. 1, $75
—No Award.        *    .
The Summer Session Students'
.Aasfflkftotton (Scholarship No. 2,
$75 (Proficiency Second Year)—
Geoffrey Pliny Mason, Box 48, Little Mountain Camp, Vancouver.
The British dolumbia Teachers'
Federation Scholarship, $100 (proficiency, Third Year)—Esme Alice
Beckett.
The Strathcona Trust Summer
Session Scholarships, $lfjO each
(proficiency, Physical Education)
—Lojs Evelyn Withers, Jean Norma Sanvido,
The T. E. and M. E. Ladner Memorial Scholarship, $3O0—John Edmund Umlker, Box 57, Ladner, B.C.
The Road Builders and Heavy
Construction Association Scholarship, $2.'»0 (Proficiency in Highway
Engineering Courses)—Wilfred Pe-
gusch, 7153 Fraser St., Vancouver.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship in Canadian History, $100—Relinquished by
Daphne Syson to Gerald Peter
Hrowne, 1312  Barclay St., Vane.
The   Vancouver   Women'.'   Canadian  Clul) Scholarship In Nursing,
$10(i~Re1inqulshed   by   Joan   Graham to ""Vivian Mona Jackson, No.
lt», 7S4 Thurlow  St., Vancouver.
BURSARIES
(In   All   Faculties)
The   Captain   LeRoy   Memorial
ftip ttiomy sefcfffftrship offered at University of British $
Columbia this fall has gone to Gordon Leslie Kilgour, 2526
West 7th. ' '..,;''■
Kilgour is winner of the $700 Powell River Company
L_imit'e<J Scholarship for research in graduate study chemistry.
WS award *#as r^fntiuii^ iy ibhh Leohlrd .Snyder. *   :   :
Complete list of awards to graduate, undergraduates^-d
summer session students follows: '    .
itkii  tndergra#lty . find
£_tm«fjj $*t2«^-Marg|ret Patricia
Lefen", 2829* Austin Ave., Victoria.
fhl ktiffli University and Voung
Men's Christian Assocle*tIon Memorial. #un$ -fiursarles, $1'00 each!—
Mnrjorle Ellen Dupont, Metchosin,
P.O., Vancouver island. Ivan Reld
.Feltham, 2086 West 35th Ave* Vancouver. Donald David Forsythe.
4255 West 12th Ave., Vancouver.
Kenneth. Alan Uuirle, 1496 Port
Mann Rd., R-R. ,1J,» New west.
Thosfnas Harry LegS, 228 Nicolas
at.. KILmTk>|»,»at5.    ''.
The American Woman's Club
Bursary, $1Q0—Mary Chalmers
Robertson, 203 armyn Ave., Penticton, B.C. ,
University Women's Club Bfurs-
ar***/, $100—Anne'/cochrane Robert-
soft, 8492 West 34th Ave., Vunc.
The Vancouver Panhellenlc Alumnae . Bursary $200 — Dorothy
Granville Scott, 405 West 13th
Ave., Vancouver.
The Mildred Brock Mtemorlal
Bursary, $76 — Isobel Anne Webber, 4518 West 13th Ave., Vane.
The Frances Milburn P.E.O.
Bursary, $150—Frances Mary Lip-
trot, 259 %*st 13th Ave., Vane.
The Lady Laurler Club Bursary,
$100—Patricia Anne Brooke, Chase,
B.C.
The Alliance Francalse -Bursary,
$100—Allstalr MacKay, 1806 Ada-
nac, Vancouver.
The Bacufty Women's Club Bursary, $125 — Lois Elaine Dunlop,
R.R.3, Kelowna; B.C.
The William MacKenzie Swan
Memorial Bursu*ry, $250—Qdmund
Wilfred Ashley, 6579 Angus Drive,
Vancouver.
The Phil Wilson Bursary in Forestry, $300—Selwyn Perrln Fox,
Box 276 Sidney, Vane. Island.   ,
The W* KM& #• DJcks Bursary,
$200—Thomas Grlsedale Atkinson,
Sulllvato Station, Surrey, B.C.
PRESIDENT'S RESIPENCE vfas this ioperRCAf' hut, im-
ported from up coast.' Dr^, Normap MacKenzie now has a
modernistic two-storey home oh Marine Drive.
The McLean Bursaries, $25J.jBachi l^o,jv. M'Rd- Victoria, $2E«!
—David Alexander Miftnj9ewi^«fet44onald J. Hancock, Naramata, B.q„
race, B.C. Sergio Mhssio. Box 44,T AlexM. K.JIannan. 4170 West 11th
Michel, B.C. Hugh Allen Macdoj)
aid,.Box 907, Creston, BC. Wil-
loilghby Trevelyn Roberts, R.R.I,
Nelson, p.C.
. The Pacific Meat Company Bursary, $200—James Carruthers Ryder, Mt. Lehman, P.O., B.C.
The Nat Bell Bursary, $150-^-Mil-
ton Daniel Oliver, 1861 East 14th
Ave.,  B.C.       ; :
The   RCAF   Veterans'
Fund, $100 — Carlton E. Benner,
3196  East 47th Ave.,  Vane.  Rob
9
Bursary
Ave., Vancouver, $260, Dorothy G.
Lambe, 3553 West 30th * Ave., Vancouver,' $100, Helen K. Linfoot,
Powell River, B.C., $260; Robert
M. Middleton, Vernon, B.C., $250,
Helen McLellan, 4006 A. St., Vernon, B.C., $100, Helen V. Plddingtontcmwmtttee are going to look Into.
1100 Burnside; 'Rd.*  Victoria, $200,
Helen G. Price, 1391 Victoria Ave..
Victoria, JfioO, Mary C. Robertson,
Penticton, B.C., $260, John R. Ross,
R.R.  12,  NeWi Westminster,  $250,
K.  Diane(Sawyer, 1866  Forrester
ert D. Bennett, 2949 West 4th AveC:8f„ Vlctorlar*|260, David L. Smith,
Vunc. Francis A. Kinley, Box 92, Vernon,) B.C.,  $260.
Little   Mountain   Camp.   Vatic.'      j.The    Summerland    Scholarship,
The Teamsters' Joint Council No. f $250,   Jacqueline   Trafford,   Sum-
The   flying.   Officer   Reverend
Priori 8t„ Victoria. EMta*«*h BnW- George 4*tob€*f 'PHngl* Memorial
Bursary, $200—Dona*ld James Hudson, 1626 West 57th Ave., Vane.
The Alberta Meat Company Bursary — Frank Martin, 7948 Argyle
Drive., Vane.
The Mary Lipsett Bursary. $300
—' Milena Nastlch, 875 Cook Rd„
Vancouver.
The Rotary Memorial Bursaries,
$200 each.—Dugald MacLean Baird,
3256 West 38th Ave., Vane. Bole-
slaw Boreysza, 2507 Tennis Cresc,
Vane—Charlotte Froese, 754 S, Su-
mt*s Rd., R.R.I, Sardls. Frank Powell, 327 Holmstead Rd., R.R. 5,
Langley Prairie, B.C. Hugh William Radford, 2610 Pearkes Rd.,
Vancouver.
The Vancouver Section National
Council of Jewish Women Bursary,
$100 — Maureen Evelyn Wadden,
4117 Ea/st  Hastings, Vancouver.
The Gambia Phi Beta Bursary,
$75—June Evelyn Kirk, 2348 East
39th Avei, Vancouver.
The Provincial Council of British Columbia Canadian Daughters'
League Burst ries, $100 each—Margaret Isabella Bell, 1061 Park Dr.,
Vancouver, Geraldlne FiUmaurlce
Dobbin, S. Pender Is., B.C.
The University Women's Club
General Bursary, $200—Helen Cart-
side, 2981 Waterloo St., Vane.
The Jack Cohen Burs&ry, $150
—Richard Avery Walpole, 274 Simpson Rdr. Vancouver.  '
36 Bursary $260 — Nels Edwin Net
son, 2110 East 2nd Ave., Vane.
The Lions' Ladles Club Bur-
srry, $200—Joseph Tobin, 128 President St., Passaic. N.J. 4407 West
l'5th Ave., Vancouver.
The Pattlson Bursaries, $100
each — George Aubrey Reed, 2826
West 42nd., Vane. June Anita Davis, 2117 Wesbrook Place, Vane.
The W. D. Shaffer Bursary, %iho
— Andrew Edwin Soles, Hut 11 A,
tittle Mountain Camp, Vane.
The Robert S. Day and Son Limited . Bursary, $150 — James Donald jMurr ay Mills, 2871 West 21st
Are?, Vane. '
Corporation Fellowships. $1200
each (study and research in Community and Regional Planning),
Gordon Rd Arnott, 1022 Davie St.,
Vancouver, Cllve L. Justice, 24G0
West 8th Ave., Vancouver, William
P. Patterson, 3136 Pt. Grey R:l..
Vancouver.
French Government S c h o lar-
ships, James Alan Halliard, James
Pllton.
Pacific Mills Limited Scholar
ship, $250, Deldre Anne Giles, 2851
Alma   Rd.,   Vancouver.
Canadian   Legion   (B.C    Provin-
merland, B.C. ,
The Women's Institute Scholarship, $260, Christine Weir, Inver-
mere, B.C.     '
Canadian Forest Industries Em-
tomaloglcal 8 c h olarshlps, $260,
each, John Walters, 6561 Torontr
Road, Roy Frank Shepherd, 432
20th Ave. N.W., Calgary.
The Vancouver "Bar Association
Bursaries, $100 each — Frederick
Anthony Lloya, R.R.3, Salmon Arm,
B.C. Frederick Howard Herbert,
3907 Blenkenson Rd., Vlctorh*.
Raymond Stanley Adams, Box 341
Kimberley, B.C.
The Plimsoll Club Bursary for
Law (donated by the Anglo Canadian Shipping Company Limited).
$300 — Gordon Wesley Young, 525
Northcott Ave., Victoria.
The North Shore Medical So:*
iety Dursary, $100 — Robert Riley Wilson. 053 E;:H 6th Ave.,
,Vanc.
The British Columbia, Medical
Association Bursary, $100—Henry
Pauls, 1053 Gladwyn Rd., Abbots-
ford, B.C.
The Plimsoll Club Bursary In
Medicine (donated by the, Empire
Stevedoring    Company    Limited).
clal Command(  Scholarships, $200  ?300, _ Margaret Dobson, 4118 W
each, : Isabel Anne McLeod, 440
West 6th, North Vancouver, Edward W. Rush-call,, jfernle, B.C. Donald J.rWh'ittle, *}0"38 Victory, Vancouver.
Canadian Legiop (Dominion Command) Scholarship, $400, Patricia
Mary McKinnon, 3775 West 2th
Ave., Vancouver.
United Odd Fellows Bursaries,
$200 each, Aurdrey Marilyn Adams,
27 West 20th, Vancouver, Donald
Edward Allison, West Summerland,
B.C., Frank Weetman ttower, 2026
Fernwood Rd., Victoria, Owen
Douglas Jones, Whonnock, B.C.,
Albert Milton McNeil, Creston,
B.C., Donald William Wlthraw,
Mission, B.C.,
Leonard Foundation* Scholarships, David C. Allen, 1135
Mcenzie St., Victoria, $250.
A,     Ronald     Forbes,   730    Craig-
12th Ave., Vane.
Further   awards
next week.
Invitation To AM     |
Foreign Studtntt
I internatlpnal House hae ex^i
{(ended-^'n Invitation to all for*""]
ilgn students for Sunday entertainment.
e Those who accept will spend
• day In a Canadian home.
House to house transportation
will be provided. Anyone interested Is asked to sign the -
list either it the AMS Office, '
or at*. Acadia Camp, giving
n«m5, address, telephone number and day preferred.	
Library Group
Aids Students
! Creation of a library com-
rjlijtee on tMeyJarfipus is pidving
vlry successful.
;There has never -been a library
utiinmlttee on the campus before,
out some of the College^ In the
lip have found such bodies vary
■TSlpful ln promoting use of' the
library, The Idea of the comm'lt-
tee is tt act as a llason between
students and the librarians.
a meeting of the new committee
nas neen held. Some suggestions
were "brought forward,  which tSe
Men Outnumber
Gals On Campus
Good news for co-eds \-)as released ffom the registrar's
office Tuesday; men outnumber women by about 2800. on the
UEC campus. ''*• ~~	
Total enrolment for 11151-52 is
5555, of -which 4171 or 75.09 ))Cr
cent are men and 1334 or 21.01 per
cent are women.
K I.?u re ii aro down somewhat from
last- yeu,  when 6394  students —,
decline since 1947, when 50 per
cent of students were vets, Last
year veterans made up 15.5 per
cent of the total; this year only
6.57 per cent.
As  usual,  Arts  leads a*U  other
for   enrolment   was   9.200   In
11A per cent mon and UA per ceh* facuUle8 w,{th fln enrolment of 3530.
women—were   registered.   All-time'.    „  ,„.        . ,    ,., „,.
- Applied Science is second with 915.
Others   In   order   are   Law,   266;
Graduate Studies, 261; Agriculture,
Percentage   or   veterans  on   J.ue 2.1C;    Pharmacy,    136;    Medicine,
campus   has  shown  a  progress.'vej 120; and Forestry, 85. *     •
t
hlKh
11)47
Two of the Ideas given were a
suggestion ""hoik In tfie. .Ujirary, and
a lounge inHiri cellar -__
The suggestion box would he tor
personal complaints of students.
All Idea's given would have to be
signed by the students. The lounge
would be for students wishing to
talk and sfaloke Without dlstutbing
;hoie who are studying.
A tour of the library for the
■jonVmlttee members Is to be held
at 1:30 p.A. Thursday.
alee Club Releases
Membership Lists
ConqhaJLubcdw
from #
Ellett Copper & Brass Co. Ltd.
02 West 2nd Ave., Vancouver, B.C.
SUPPLIERS  OF  ALL  METAL  FABRICATIONS
TO THE GENERAL CONTRACTING TRADE
will   be
ucmplete list of Glee Club mem
iers   has   been   released   by   the j
Mussoc.
Members are: !
Margaret Atchison, Elaine Capel, |
jetty Clark, Pat Ledgerwootl,
rlelen Welsh, Kathleen Telford,
Jill Plffppa, Georgina Lovegrave,
Jorothy Smithers, Connie Newman, Carol Winskill,
Sheila Madden, Betty Mulla,
Margaret Kiddoo, Marian Hall,
Sliflagh Rose, Lambertina Bueck-
art, Vivltn Soreoson, Bette Park,
Arlett Terrien, Douglas C'olllssoii,
Charles Longstaff, Dick White-
■side, William Olsen, John Beard,
Ken  Lelghton,   Peter  Scott.
Ken   Burke,   John   Perren,   Bob
Corrigan.    Kenneth    Kankin,    Bob
Beson,      l.orence     Beveridge,     J.
Meyer.   ,
PRACTICES   START
Glee   Club   practices   began   at
ti:30 on Wednesday evening. Regular   practices   will   be   held   Wed-
listed|nesdayg   at   12:3CT  and   6:30   and
Thursdays at 12:30.
•     •     •
University of British Columbia
arid thi
Student Body
... on the achievement that the
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
represents
we are proud to have been associdted
•   with it's construction
B. BOE
LIMITED
PLUMBING - HEATING - VENTILATION
EQUIPMENT
652 Seymour St. Vancouver, B.C.
CONGRATULATIONS
University of British Columbia
on the Opening of.the"
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Frank Darling & Company Ltd.
1636 West 4th Ave. Vancouver, B.C.
PUMPS — HEATING — STAIR TREADS
CenytatutatfonA...
to the
STUDENTS
and the
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
F. J. HILLHOUSE
SELLING SAFES FOR OVER 30 YEARS
770 Denman Street Vancouver, B.C,
University of British Columbia
on the completion of the
WAR
DAWSON and HALL
LIMITED
[ngineers and Contractors
i
775 CLARKE DRIVE
HAstings 2800
VANCOUVER, B. C. Page Six
iSaf
" -ft
||THE UBYSSEY    ,
■ft*      J v
Birds To
Clash In New Gym
cing
On Saturday night Charles hoe-
Wen won the. Senior Provincial
Fencing championship.
.He was first In u field of five,
tnd the competition was very stiff.
He beat Dean McKay, Hob Simpson, Jock Shaw and 3m Macheck.
Finals ended In a tie between
Jan Mftchecjt and Charles Loew-
* en, but in the fence-off Loeweh
won )>y a score of 5 to i.
, w       *       *
/       .*.*.-■•
In tht Novice class, Sum Altaian
' cam* second. He lost by a •u-e
of itw 5. There waa a field or IS
and Allman won 12 of his 14 bouts.
H|'fas the only UBC fencer to
lilllOh the finals. He was lieu ten
b> tarry Wong. Next week Allman
fences in junior, championships.
Other' yOC rencers who did Well
art l.yle Dfe«gent and Ray Salmon,'
who won three of eight bouts.
Considering that this was their
first tournament they performed
wonderfnlly. ,
Homecoming  Weekert
To Be Gala Affair
By CHARLIE WATT
Tomorrow night at 8:00 o'clock, coach Jack PomfrtMand
his boys will present a huge, star-studded Homecoming faffgtet
ball extravaganza!
All in all the team did well but
they were disappointed by the lack
of student support.
Buiy Weekend
For Soccer
Homecoming week-end will find
the Varsity soccer teams mi busy
as a fat man trying to get through
a narrow doorway.
In the feature match at Callister Pm* tbe thunderbirds will
meet the second place Dominion
Hotel squad.
The Hotelmen gave the birds
plenty of trouble last season and
.i tptigh game Is expected.
It is rt this time that the Old
Grads return to UBC to do or die
for their Alma Mater.
IVIN V.8 ODD
Former players between the
years If25-41 will tfand together
'o
while comrades. If' an Individual
from this group has earned his
Block award letter in -.basketball
during any of the odd years In
that particular era, (this is ancient
history folks,) he will pity on the
"odd years" Thunderbird squad.
These "odd year" 'Birds will meet
the "even year" boys In an exhibition game prior' to the regular
tussle. The oldsters fracas will
commence at 8 p.m. and will be
played In two 8 minute halves.
This game will be followed by a
regulation game Involving the
Freshmen Grads (from years 1941
to the present day) and the current edition of the Thunderbirds.
The 1026-41 basketball squad
will be cowhed by Heily Arkley,
assisted by Jim Bardsley. This team
will be loaded with such stars aa
Albert   Orauer,   William   Tufrpln,
Friday, October 26, 1951
Is
Football
Athletic Director Gives
His Idea Of Star Player
An Ideal
Player
■they
By R. H. Robinett,
Director of Athletics
Many   times   players   feel
nre discriminated against — that
player so-md-so received a "raw
deal." Put yourself In the coaches'
fhoes and analyse yourself on the
basis of the qualities listed below
so as to prepare yourself mentally
Weber   played   with   Pomfref In  '«"•. the eeason  that  lies  aUead.
days of yore. This starry trio frere TheM «* *he qualities tlyat coach
an outstanding factor in fotUfJJan-
adiitn championship hoop |#ms,
They,flayed \vith the title ww-ng
Vancouver Marilomas in lMtjanil
with the brilliant Cloveileaffl in
wreak mayhem .on their erst- Vanoo&ver's "Golden Age" ofjpas**
.  __   ,_.,..,._.  ketl,ajj    (0an    chtjnps^ l*f#D.
"Sandy", a real sportstnati,] pitches Tor th6 Vancouver CaplAnos
in the W. I. League. Dave limp-
bell, NevJlle Munro, John Faff'th,
and*.Reld Mitchell who are'Jiow
playing for Fillers, are all fainer
proteges of coach Jack Pomfift.
BIRDS ON VlfeW ' 1
Under fire for the first tlmelhis
season, and to receive the
test will be the following mei
of the 'Bird hoop squad now
ely engaged in pre-season pr
Don Hudson, Ralph Hudson,
Southcott, Bryan Upson, Ron Bis-
net, KImer Mathews, Art Philips,
erf flrelg, Mamie Mulherne, Scott
FI'i\Ser, Herbie Forward, Btfb Filynn,
Don .Iiiliurko, Jack McPall, Ron
Stewart, Nell DesaulnleV, J|ck
Hamilton and Phil Barter.
Jack Pomfret wil have an opper*
Wally Mayers and  Frank Alpen-tunlty to observe his 1951-52 has-' Missed assignments should not be
Al Orauer played .with; UBC's iVipv
sky squad which lost thi Domin-'
ion championships to Ottawa Rl-
deans. Walley Mayers was with
the old New Westminster Adanacs, the team that ruled the national hobp scene from 1925-32.
Walley, one of the most brilliant
players, to handle a ball .Is rated
with such all-time greats.as Norm
Baker.
WRIGHT BACK
Also to see action on the same
team will be Prank Turner', Ken
Wright, Rann Mathlson and "By"
Straight. Wright, is current coach
or the Duke of Connaught High..
Btskerteers,' who have dominated
the B.C. hoop scene for the last
tour years.
The 1941-50 Freshman Grads will
be   coached   by   Hprry   Franklin,
and  will  contain  on  their  roster
many former outstanding Thunder-
The UBC Chiefs of the V & D! ?)irf1   basketb.-!!   players.   such   ns
second division will gee action
against V.F.A.C, at Powell Street
grounds. After last week's Improved showing, the Chiefs we keyed
Up, and are Just liable to bring
jionte their first victory in a dog's
age,
Students Ply
At Virginia
Special to The Ubyssey
MOROANHTOWN, W.Va. — Students ut the University , of West
Virginia are being offered a now
course in {lying.
The flight training classes which
lead to the pilot's license are given
by the Department of Aeronautical Engineering and are open to
all students.
The department offers three courses for which students receive one
hour credit each.
SASKATOON — (CUP) — Ac
cording to a columnist for the University of Saskatchewan "Sheaf",
It was the great writer T. S. Eliot
who solved the riddle of why Engineers  could  drink  so much  beer.
They were obviously the Inspiration for his poem, "The Hollow
Men,"
There will be a meeting of all
Crops Country Traoksters In dressing room of New Oym at 11:30
Saturday.
i-i- -  ■
McGill Opens
New School
MONTREAL — (CUP) — Opening of the Institute of Air Law for
law graduates from all over tin
world ut McOill University this fall
marks the second unique graduate school to begin operatitrti at
the   Montreal   university   this   foil.
A short time ago President P.
Cyril James announced the opening of an Institute of Islamic Studies, the first or Its kiud ln North
America.
"Sandy'' Robertson, Ron Weber,
David Campell, Neville Munro,
John Forsyth, Reld Mltfchell and
Jim  McLean.
It  will  be  interesting  to  watch
Jack Pomfret put his current edition of the 'Birds against his farmer proteges and teammates.
FORMER TEAMATES
es look for ln ball players. They
are the qualities which make great
athletes   and   great   teams.
AGGRESSIVENESS
1. The most Important singly asset required of a football player.
I'ifty percent of a team's success
depends on the fight and spirit of
its members. No system of football has ever been devised which
can get along without this individual quality and still produce
a winner.
2. Many players are great In dummy scrimmage or form blocking,
but they fold under game or actual
scrimmage conditions. Don't be
one of these players.
3. Coaches are, pot looking for
pl&yerg who can take It and go
down fighting to defeat. While' this
is a fine attitude, coaches , want
touchdown, then the second, then
the third. This makes winning a
habit. Be on the giving end as well
as the taking end.
CONCENTRATION
1. Coaches look or intelligent
precision in the attacks each year.
ketball edition against these
Freshman grads, which should
develop Into s. first class contest
worthy of all expectations at this
time. See you at the game!
 -> , 1^ O-
f : ! <;i-"*
New Zealand
*  / '    \!:yy
Grad Arrives
'Homecoming was certainly a
coming home for Naomi Alnslie of
Journalism '49, University of Western Ontario. She travellerl ivll* the
way from New Zealand to celebrate the big week-end. ,,
In the past year, Miss Alitslie
has traveled half way arourfd the
tolerated.
2. The system should be- basic,
'sound and simple to learn. Study
and concentrate on It. Know your
assignments to the letter every
time a play is run, whether In
dummy scrimmage, actual scrimmage or at game time.
DETERMINATION
To achieve 'anything, you must
first have a goal. This applies to
life as *ell aa football.
Your goal first is to make the
team and second, to be determined
to do all In your power to make
that a better team.
Everyone has weaknesses In football technique. Some players
cannot tackle; some passers throw
off balance; sonie centres are in-
world and back, visiting some 28 accurate* on punts; some ball car-
foreign countries. In Europe* ^ghe j • '*ers eannot pivot; some linemen
visited Hritain and all but two of j leave their feet behind when they
the   continental   countries   outside
the Iron  Curtain.
charge.
Watch the man "ahead of.you,"
With a companion, she made her and  ask  yourself  "What  does  he
way from France to Italy, dttch-
Hiking most of the may, and spending nights In  youth hostels.
>From Italy they travelled to
Egypt, Ceylon. India, Australia and
New. "Zealand, working as tfeey
wont, risking radio broadcasts
and' writing freelance articles for
Both "Sandy Robertson and Hon* rorelgn publications.
FOOTBALL  SPIRIT     ~^
REACHES  NEW  HIGH
By PETE LUSTZIC
When the Central Washington Wildcats arrive herj>
Saturday, they will notice three things that were not
present the last time they visited. They will be facing a
Thunderbird teatn, inspired) tough, and with a win behind
' them they will see spirit in the students, alumni, cheerleaders, and in the Varsity band; and finally they will run
into an entirely new offense that the UBC squad will unleash for the first time.
It spite of all this however, the 'Birds are not rated
as favorites, for Central Washington beat Whitworth 19-7;.
For those who are trying to forget,-- Whitworth in tunj
dumped Varsity 41-0.
HUGE HOMECOMING CROWD [
Sure bets on the Thunderbird starting lineup are
George Puil, Cal Murphy, Al Ezzy, Bob Heindmarch, Leo
Sweeney, Bill Stuart, Ross Johnson, Dave MacFarlane an^
Bob Blackhall with Ceece Taylor and John MaeDonaldj
listed as probables.
Estimated crowd for the 1951 Homecoming Game is
over 5000 anti it promises to be a bigger and better attraction than ever before. Let's get out there!
do better?" Analyze your own method; study ways of Improving
and then determine to u-chleve
that improvement.
Remember,, it is your own per*
sonal  attitudes  which  determines
what you do with what you have.
This applies to all of life.
DEPINOASILITY
1. This is a great asset. Every
employer looks for it in men working for him. Cultivate this quality.
If you do a thorough job ln everything you attempt, you will acquire a trait of character that will
stand you in good stead throughout life.
2. Your coaches want to count
on your doing n* * good * job every
time they put you in a ball game.
Don't be an up-and-down bill play
er. ' y ' ■
OIEDIENCK
]. Every organisation'must have
leadership. Leadership in a footbull team rests on the captains
and eta those players who have a
burning desire to win.
2i Some players resent criticism
from their coaches. Remember
that coaches criticise because
they feel yod are not only a part
of the ffeajh; but 'that ,you have
something in you that has not' yet
been . shown.
3. Coaches realise . that, at
times, foot/ball • practice Is tire-'
some. Drill, drill and more drill
gets monotonous. However, sue-
eels' rests upon constant repetition and the building up of automatically right habits of play,
fhe pleasures of winning will far
outweigh these discomforts.
To   •<*  Continued
NtXT WIIK
SPORTS
ALEX MacGILLIVRAY, Sports Editor
mA
I drink w
I nave occasion
•. and sometimes when
1 nave no occasion
Cervantes' Don Qnimt$
A fair enough statement
and truly fitting to Coca-Cola.
It's not only the answer
to thirst, but a refreshing       •
pleasure any time.
HaveaCofcel
DRINK
(m$fii\
\T
^Uw>ier<ftoifW
3m
eed Hide fuss
COCA-COLA LTD.
CtHftatulatfoHA
On the Opening of
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
20 YEAR  BARRETT  SPECIFICATION
ROOFING J\ND SHEET METAL WORK
by
R.D. Bristowe Ltd
NEW WESTMINSTER nnd VANCOUVER
PROF.  FRED  LASSERRE
Comltmg Architect
SHARPE and THOMPSON.
BERWICK.  PRATT
Architects
for the
UNIVERSITY WAR MEMORIAL  GYMNASIUM

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