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The Ubyssey Nov 18, 1920

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, NOVEMBER 18, 1920
Number 6
A.M.U.S. Stages
Social Triumph
A MODEST TRIBUTE
We, the Arts men, feel ourselves
rather clever in making our issue of the
"Ubyssey" coincide with the writing-up
of our largest contribution to the year's
events, the Arts dance. Yet perhaps our
careful planning has been unnecessary,
for now that it is over we feel that even
if our worthy Laurel Street foes had been
in charge of the paper, our dance would
have received nothing but praise — in
fact, it might have gained tributes which
our modesty compels us to omit.
The gaiety of the event beggars
description. After getting into the spirit
of the evening by the far from easy task
of squeezing sideways through the throng
on the stairs to the programme box in
section A, we proceeded to book our
dances with extreme care from the bevy
of beauty which graced this annual function of ours. Then, just as we had filled
our programmes and were thinking sorrowfully of the girls who we knew were
longing to dance with us but wouldn't be
able to, the music started and drove away
our gloom.
From then on we were happy, with the
exception of twenty-one brief periods,.
during which the animation on our faces
was replaced by troubled anxiety as the
music of a new dance burst forth and we
left one fair maiden to go dashing this
way and that in search of the next victim
of our practised wiles. But as we found
her and led her out among the dancers,
we were at once our old dashing selves
again. We were ready with a gay reply
for her first remark about the awfulness
of the crowd; and when she waxed eloquent in praise of the music, we could
acquiesce as heartily as we had done to
the partners before. When the music
died away we applauded vigorously, and
received generous response from the orchestra. After the final encore, we conversed with our partner on the mutually
interesting subject of the unusual number
of waltzes on the programme; then on
with the giddy glide.
We enjoyed the whole dance thoroughly, and we flatter ourselves that our
guests pronounced it a success. We must
congratulate our executive on the choice
of Lester Court as the scene of festivities, on the music, the supper, the punch,
the moonlight waltzes —on all the features of the excellent arrangements,
which required ho little effort. We feel
that these efficient gentlemen should have
their names in print. Their personnel is
as  follows:     Mr.  Jimmie  Lawrence,   Mr.
Soccer Offensive
Routs Enemy
RAID PROVES SUCCESSFUL
Jumping-off    place —  Cambie    Street
grounds.
Zero   hour—1.45   p.m.,   Saturday,   November  13th.
At 0 hour 'Varsity attacked in three
waves and at 0 plus IS seconds had
stormed the Army and Navy Veterans'
lines of defence, on Lundie sending a
whizz-bang true to the mark. The first
half was characterized by fierce attacks
and counter-attacks. 'Varsity showed a
marked superiority over the Vets, in
speed, combination and aggressiveness,
keeping the ball well into the enemy
territory. The Vets, found it impossible
to storm the 'Varsity defence. Their
sporadic rushes were dissipated on the
barbed wire entanglements of the Crute-
Wolverton line. Near the end of this
period the 'Varsity front wave raided and
Lundie, by a brilliant piece of head work,
after a perfect centre on the part of
Marcel, effected the second count for
'Varsity. The end of the half found
Varsity consolidated on the favorable
end of a 2-0 score.
The second half was marked by looseness and lack of co-ordination on the
part of teams. Desultory raids were
launched, with no apparent gain to either
side. Again the Vets, found it almost
impossible to storm the 'Varsity defence;
the few who did were successfully disposed of by Henderson. Crute, near the
end of the half, kicked a foul, which one
of the opponents intercepted. Crute
rushed in and slammed the "obus" between the posts twenty yards distant.
The whistle sounded, with the score 3-0
in favor of 'Varsity.
'Varsity missed Rushbury, a casualty
from the previous game, who was convalescing on the side-line.
Croix  de Joue—Crute  and  Wolverton.
Medaille Maconachie — Marcel and
Lundie.
Y.M.C.A. (with Palms) — Cant and
Mitchell.
Line-up: Henderson, Cant, Wolverton, Cant, Mark, Mitchell, Mensel, Jackson, Lundie,  Marcel, MacLeod.
Melville Saunders, Mr. Joe Schell, Mr.
Alex. Usher, Mr. Johnny McLeod, Mr.
Jack Wilson, Mr. Mickey McDougall and
Mr.  Harold McLean.
The patronesses, Mrs. L. S. Klinck,
Mrs. Coleman, Mrs. Larsen, Mrs. Logan
and Mrs. Robertson, lent dignity and
charm to the occasion.
Join Inter-
Collegiate Press
EDITORS RETURN FROM
OREGON
The U. B. C. representatives returned
on Monday from the inter-collegiate
newspaper conference which was held at
the University of Oregon, Eugene, last
Thursday and Friday. According to
their report, the gathering was a real
success, the participation of British Columbia being fully justified. Editors and
business managers from most of the
Pacific Coast colleges were present.
Those represented included California,
Oregon Agriculture College, Oregon-,
Whitman, Gonzales, Reed, Washington,
and B.  C.
Four sessions were convened, at which
addresses were delivered* by various
members of the conference. The following subjects formed the nucleus of the
programme: "An Inter-Collegiate News
Service," "The Small College Paper,"
"The Editorial Page," "The Independence of the College Paper," "Attitude of
the Advertiser Toward College Publications" (by P. N. Whitley), "A Round
Table on Business Problems." Greater
results were gained from the brisk discussions which followed the prepared
presentations than from any other portion
of the meetings.
At the final session, on Friday, the organization of the Pacific Inter-Collegiate
Press Association was completed. A constitution was adopted, and officers for
the year were elected. R. W. Bender,
Washington, was chosen president; H.
Smith, Oregon, vice-president; L. Block-
man, California, secretary; A. Webster,
British Columbia, treasurer; G. Yancey,
Whitman, member of executive committee. Dean Allen, of Oregon, and Dean
Spencer, of the Washington School of
Journalism, were elected honorary presidents of the association. It was decided
to accept the invitation of the Washington delegates, and to hold the next conference in Seattle some time in the fall
of 1921.
Thursday evening the delegates were
the guests of the School of Journalism
at a banquet held in the Osborne Hotel.
The main address was given by Dean
Dyment, of the Department of Education
at Oregon. The programme also included short speeches, in which the
achievements of the many colleges were
assiduously presented, the U.B.C. men
never losing an opportunity to sing the
praises" of their Alma  Mater. THE   UBYSSEY
November 18, 1920
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
Corner Tenth Ave. and Heather St.
Where you meet your College friends
at lunch or tea time
LUNCHES, TEAS, ICE CREAM
CANDY AND TOBACCO
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,  Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
We    carry   a    complete    stock    of
LOOSE-LEAF FOLDERS
LOOSE-LEAF REFILLS
EXERCISE BOOKS
WATERMAN PENS
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
DEAN TALKS TO Y.M.C.A.
"Religion and the College Man' was
the topic of the address which Dean
Coleman delivered at the first general
meeting of the University Y.M.C.A. on
Friday. There was an encouraging attendance at this first meeting, and the
men listened with interest. The speaker
declared that students were alike the
world over; that their problems were the
same, and that they had a great heritage
in these same problems.
Perhaps the greatest of these problems
is that which centers in religion. The
studies of the University student bring
him face to face with many problems;
they force him to be broad-minded, and
to study his problems from all angles.
And so it is that the attitude of the student to religion is not one of unquestioning acceptance, but rather that of probing, questioning — an attempt to get to
the fundamentals. And this attitude
should be frankly met and encouraged,
said the speaker. The Bible study group
of University students would and should
deal with its studies in a different manner than would the ordinary group.
Dean Coleman expressed himself as
pleased to meet with the students and to
become more intimately acquainted with
them personally and with their problems.
Mr.  Frank Studer presided.
NEW   CLUB  FORMED
The first meeting of the Junior
Economics Club was held at the home of
Dr. Boggs, Point Grey, on Monday
evening. To say that it was a success is
to be very conservative in one's praise.
Sir John Fowlds, who addressed the student body, was the speaker of the evening. He gave more detailed reports of
the success of the New Zealand Government in enacting advanced legislation,
strongly emphasizing the improved conditions, which, he thought, were a result
of the adoption of the single tax system.
He also outlined the arguments in favor
of the single tax, and urged the members
of the club to study Henry George. A
lively discussion followed his address,
the club members showing a great deal
of interest in attempting to discover to
what extent the industrial and social progress of New Zealand was due to the
single tax enactment. Tea was served,
and everyone left for home in the drizzling rain, satisfied that an enjoyable and
a profitable evening had been spent with
the Junior  Economics Club.
Freshman (coming excitedly up to
Senior)—I have just taken my first lecture in English.
Senior—Is  that  so?
Freshman—Yes; and, do you know, I
could understand everything the professor said.—'Varsity.
Walter—Mr. Smith's left his umbrella
again. I believe he would leave his head
if it were loose.
Robinson—I dare say you are right. I
heard him say only yesterday he is going
to Switzerland for his lungs.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
WHY GO TO
CHINATOWN?
WE   ARE   NOW   SERVING
CHINESE   DISHES  UPSTAIRS
6 to 3 A.M.
DELMONICO CAFE
704 ROBSON STREET
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA ROOM BAKERY   ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY, WEST
SHIRT
SALE
English Silk, and Silk
and Wool Taffeta Shirts.
Values to $11.00.
Sale price .., $8.50
Ben Petch
LIMITED
898 Granville Street
Cor. Smythe and Granville November 18, 1930
THE   UBYSSEY
RUGGERS SCORE ANOTHER
SUCCESS
'Varsity II. ruggers added another
scalp to their belt last Saturday when
they took the Rowing Club into camp
for the third consecutive time. The lineup has been changed considerably since
last game, and, as a result, the Seconds
fielded a stronger team and played their
best game of the season. Although considerably outweighed, the scrum held
their own, heeling the ball quite as often
as their weightier opponents. In the
line-outs and dribbles they even surpassed the oarsmen. The three-quarters
were working like a machine and made
rush after rush, which put the R.C. constantly on the defensive.
For some time after the kick-off there
was little to choose between the two
teams. Soon, however, 'Varsity's superior back division began to make themselves known. By some splendid combination they carried the ball down to
the opposing two-bit line, where most of
the play took place. After several scrums
and line-outs, Arkley passed the ball to
Hedley, who dived over for the first try.
The kick went wide. Encouraged by
their success, our men kept pressing hard,
and it was not long until Palmer, our
speedy wing three-quarter, after a long
solitary run, planted the ball down for
try No. 2. Again the convert failed. This
ended the scoring for the game; and, although 'Varsity continued to attack, they
could not get over.
At half-time it was discovered that
Hedley had broken his nose. The accident occurred early in the game; but
Hedley was unaware of it, he said, until
somebody called his attention to it. Art
Lord rushed him to the hospital in his
car.
The second half was played with fourteen men, and, consequently, 'Varsity
was  unable to  score,  and  was  quite  fre-
HARRY    CARTER
Bicycles and Accessories
General  Repairs
Cab,   Buggy  and  Invalid   Chairs
Re-tired
Charges Moderate
C.C.M.
Agent for
"RAMBLER"  BICYCLES
632 Broadway, West
Phone,   Fairmont   1386
INTER-CLASS BASKETBALL
Science '24, Science '23 and Arts '23
are all tied for the first place in the Inter-
Class Basketball League. On Thursday
evening Science '22 won from Arts '24 by
a 27-17 score. The Freshmen started in
the first half like champs, running up a
16-6 count. But the Anderson brothers
came to the rescue in the second half,
and, by some pretty combination work,
saved the day. The standing in the league
is now as follows:
Won    Lost    Pts.
Science   '23        2 0 4
Science   '24        2 0 4
Arts  '23        2 0 4
Arts  '21         1 0 2
Science   '22         1 2 2
Arts  '22        0 2 0
Arts  '24    •.     0 2 0
Agriculture        0 2 0
No games were played on Friday on
account of the Arts Men's dance. This
evening, at 5.15, Arts '23 and Science '22
will play; at 6.00, Arts '24 and Agriculture are scheduled to meet.
Friday's games—5.15, Science '24 vs.
Arts  21; 6.00, Arts '22 vs. Science '23.
GIRLS' B.B. ANNOUNCEMENT
Girls' Basketball—First League Match
vs. Crofton House, at Crofton House,
Nov. 23 at 4 p.m.
quently put on the defensive. Nevertheless, the}' more than held their own, and
demonstrated that they can do almost as
well on a muddy field as a dry one.
The players wish to extend their
hearty thanks to the fourteen rooters who
braved the horrors of a little mud on the
ground and an admission fee of twenty-
five cents. Their splendid efforts were
highly appreciated.
The line-up: Anderson, Peter, Solloway, Wooten, Palmer, Russell, Purdy,
Arkley, Wallace, Hatch, Swanson, Gunning,  Gregg,  Hedley  and  Barnwell.
PITMAN BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Established 1898
INDIVIDUAL     INSTRUCTION
Day and Evening Classes
422 Richards Street
Corner Hastings Street
Phone, Sey. 9135
U.B.C.   STUDENTS
U.B.C. students will find this store carries'the largest stocks of Guns, Rifles,
Ammunition, Fishing Tackle, Golf, Hockey, Soccer, Rugby, Basketball and
Athletic equipment in B. C.—and most moderately priced.
We give special discounts to Clubs.
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
AGGIES BRING HOME PRIZES
According to a wire received from
Prof. King on Tuesday, the U.B.C. stock-
judging team which took part in the
inter-collegiate dairy cattle judging competition at the Pacific International
Livestock Fair at Portland, last Saturday, has won second place. There were
five colleges competing, the highest
honors falling to Oregon Agricultural
College.
The U.B.C. team won first place in
judging Jerseys, winning placques and
special prizes. They also secured second
place in judging Holsteins, and third in
Guernseys. Bert Sweeting won first
place in the individual judging of Jerseys, and second place for individual
judging of all breeds, thus winning gold
and silver medals. He also won the $50
prize donated by the B. C. Dairymen's
Association for scoring the highest total
on the U.B.C. team.
H. Riddell came second on the U.B.C.
team and fifth on the individual list,
while Miss Mounce came tenth in individual score. They receive $30 and $20,
respectively, from the B. C. Dairymen's
Association.
Democracy is based on the theory that
what fifty-one per cent, of people believe
is true. It is therefore firmly committed
to the doctrine that "I seen' is a past
tense of "I see," that one bath a week is
enough, and that Friday is an unlucky
day.—The  Manitoban.
The barbers cut your dangling hair
And charge you fifty cents;
I let my hair grow long and cut
The overhead expense.
•—Chapparral.
Sports Outfits
from Tra$er
Lisle Fraser is a Sports Outfitter.
No end of pains are taken to
see that athletic garments fit
properly and have the quality
that plays the game.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor. Robson and Granville Streets THE   UBYSSEY
November 18, 1920
MAPLE PECAN
A NEW CANDY
Mr. PURDY has made a
new candy—MAPLE PECAN.
Its basis is Ontario maple
sugar and freshly-shelled Pecan  meats.
He has never created a more
favorable  candy.
Per pound,  $1.00.
Purbys
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
Stationery reflects one's taste
The choice of personal correspondence paper is an important
detail in the life of a young
woman.
K e n m a r e   Linen   has   a   rich
appearance,   and   comes   in   all
shapes  and  sizes.
It is not expensive, although it
appears so.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers and Wholesale
Paper Dealers
VANCOUVER   AND   VICTORIA,   B.C.
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
.In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch  Office
AVENUE THEATRE
THE   B. P. O.   ELKS'   BAND
Presents   the   Great   Comedy   Succe&s
"HELLO, BILL!"
4 Nights, Com. Nov. 17. Mat. Saturday
Coming   December   15:
"EXPERIENCE"
(Member  Pacific  Inter-Collegiate  Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,  $2.00 per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.    N.    Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
[A.   H.   Imlah
Associate Editors I S.  M.  Scott
I Miss  R.   E.   Verchere
Chief  Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
fMiss A.  Anderson
J.  C.  Clyne
Reporters .->! Bert   Sweetinc;
CHITe  Mathers
I Miss  P.   Stewart
Exchange    Editor	
Literary   Editors ' \£-   Jr1   Steven.on
J ( G. G.  Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising   Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
(D.  A.  Wallace
*     ■ A I Wm. McKee
Assistants \ P   v. McLanc
I H.  G.  Scott
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor for the Week Miss  R.  E.  Vereheve
AN IDEAL
"Mens sana in corpore sano'—a sound
mind in a sound body; a strong, sane,
right-thinking, right-judging mind in a
healthy, vigorous, right-acting body—for
this one of Rome's most brilliant writers
bade his fellow-men strive and pray as
for the highest good. What finer aim
could we, as University students, set ourselves than the attainment of this ideal,
which, though remote, perhaps, as all
ideals must be, so long as they remain
ideals, is yet within the reach of every
one of us.
See what it means — development of
mind and body, step by step, together, as
colleagues, co-workers, each requiring
the very best from the other to enable
each best to do its own proper tasks. It
forbids over-study, over-working the
mind at the expense of the body; equally
it forbids over-play, over-attention to our
social enjoyments and physical development to the neglect of our minds. But
it is positive, laying upon us the plain
duty of making the most both of our
mental and of our physical nature.
Here at the 'Varsity we arc preparing
ourselves for citizenship, for transacting
the business of our common life. We are
training our minds in accurate thinking
by the discipline of study. We are storing the treasure-house of memory with
the incomparable riches of knowledge,
whether of language, literature, science
or history. But we can't hope to keep
our minds clear nor our courage high
unless we give attention to our social
needs and observe the common rules of
a healthy, normal life.
Don't be a book-worm; go in for some
branch of student activities and for some
form of sport, according to your ability
and interest, even though it is only crosscountry walking. On the other hand,
don't be a mountebank, tumbling about
among sports and activities till by no
stretch of the imagination can you be
called a student.    Try for that poise and
balance of the mental and physical without which we cannot successfully face
the stern and serious problems of everyday  life.
OUR  HONOR  ROLL
The University of B. C. can not boast
her buildings nor grounds, but she can
and has every right to boast of her
faculty and Alma Mater. Our University is a "war baby," and we are proud
of it. In France we took our stand, and
stood well. Our honor roll will show
that.    (Where is it?)
Owing to the efforts of our Honor
Roll Committee, a practically complete
honor roll used to hang in the main hall
of the Arts  building.
A few weeks ago, a bronze tablet—a
very fine piece of work—was presented
to the University. It contained the names
of the men of D Company of the 196th
Battalion.
We admire the efforts of the Ladies'
Auxiliary of the 196th for endeavoring
to keep verdant the memory of these
men. But why should such a tablet,
beautiful as it may be, be allowed to displace our University honor roll, which
now rests in obscurity?
The 196th tablet contains the names of
men who never saw the inside of this
University. Further, it does not contain
the names of those who enlisted as reinforcements  to the  196th.
Then what of those men who enlisted
in the Princess Pats, the Air Force, the
Artillery, the Engineers, the Navy, and
various other units? If any names are to
be imprinted on our walls, as to who
fought and died in the great war of
1914-18, then we must inscribe not only
the names of those of one unit only, but
of every unit.
A DISTINGUISHED  VISITOR
Sir John Fowlds, Chancellor of the
Auckland University, addressed the student body in the Auditorium on Monday
at noon, speaking on the subject, "Progressive Legislation in New Zealand."
He gave a short outline of the progress
which New Zealand has made in various
legislative enactments, declaring that, although his country had tried many social
experiments, none had been really harmful, and many had proved of positive
benefit. He outlined the attitude of his
Government in the passing of measures'
for State ownership of railroads, coal
mines, the establishment of State fire insurance, and the establishment of compulsory conciliation and arbitration in labor  disputes.
This distinguished visitor was given an
excellent hearing, but we regret to report
that there were certain features amounting almost to discourtesy. In the first
place, the great majority of the students
were late in arriving. During the meeting a few men disported themselves in
the halls, making as much noise as possible. And, to add a poor finish, a large
number of students left the Auditorium
before President Klinck had concluded
his expression of thanks to the speaker.
Surely, such discourtesy should not be
permissible in a university. November 18, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
<Bo
rrcspo
T>a«.i>
ce
A   DEMOCRATIC   UNIVERSITY
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—May I be allowed the temerity
of criticizing some of the judgments expressed in last week's editorial, headed "A
Democratic University"? The writer affirms
that "it is proper that the skilled artisans
who pay a large part of the-expense of our
education, and to whom higher education
tends to become of greater interest year by
year, should have some say in how their
money is to be spent and their families
educated." He goes on to discuss the various
means of securing for these "skilled artisans" a more direct share in the administration of the University.
In the first place, it is open to question
that "higher education tends to become of
greater interest year by year" to this class
of the community. It is tempting to say
these things—they sound rather well. But
often they are false, or they mean nothing
at all.    But this by the way.
In the second place, have not these same
"skilled artisans," by reason of their voice
in the Provincial Government, which appoints the members of the Board of Governors, a real participation in the conduct
of the University? An indirect participation,
certainly; but eventually effective, nevertheless. On the analogy of his argument,
the growing class of motorists, who pay a
large part of the expense of the up-keep of
our highways, and to whom better roads
"lend to become of greater interest' year by
year," ought to be consulted as to the best
methods of constructing and repairing the
public highways; whereas it is our narrow
policy to entrust such affairs to those whose
only qualification consists in their having
made a study of that work.
Similarly, it seems, the Government should
consult the lay opinion as to the appointment of a principal of a high school, for
instance, or the direction of a public hospital, or the choice of the public school
text-books.
Now it may be that I am prejudiced,
reactionary, unprogressive, and all the rest:
but it seems to me eminently reasonable
that public education, which is after all perhaps as important as the highways, should
be controlled as far as possible by experts
—that is to say, by those who, not untouched themselves by education, have made its
science and practice in some degree their
study, and who therefore know whereof they
speak.
But if democracy consists in such theories
as this of the advisability of electing artisans to the board of governors of a university, then the term "democracy" is a
euphemism for inefficiency, for retrogression,
for all the folly of waste.
From all such democracy, good Lord,
deliver us. K.   M.  P.
INITIATION
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—I would like, through the medium of your paper, to show Arts '24's stand
as regards the action of their president and
vice-president   in   initiating   C ,   of   Arts
'23. He was initiated as a delinquent from
the initiation and not as a member of Arts
'23. At the first meeting, mentioned by G.
Orlando, he claims that a better "excuse"
was given by the Sophomore than by the
Freshman. The "reason" forwarded by the
Freshman for his absence from initiation
was accepted by the men of Arts '24 and
that of C  was not. Whether their decisions were fair or not is neither here nor
there; they had the right to judge, and the
whole matter was in their own hands and
in those of no one else. Some few impetuous
spirits, composed of Agric.  '24, Arts '24, and
many  others,   made   C    sing   for  a   few
minutes in front of the Arts building. This
action was not an action of Arts '24, and G.
Orlando is writing in ignorance of the facts
when he said that it was. In the meantime,
the initiation had been set for the following
Tuesday and was carried out with regard
for the regulations ruling the real initiatio
When speaking of the "burning chemicals,"
G. Orlando is either deliberately misrepresenting or is in ignorance of the facts. The
doctor in the emergency ward at the hospital said that the precautions taken were
entirely unnecessary. He also makes a great
deal of the fact that C  was not presentable for two hours.   He forgets, though, that
many men of Arts '24 spent a great deal
more than two hours in getting rid of the
signs  of  their initiation.
We wonder what G. Orlando hoped to a"
complish by his letter.    We  cannot see  any
purpose, save to stir up trouble and ill-feeling between Arts '23 and  Arts  '24.
Again I wish to impress the fact thai,
L.ough some irregularities may be apparent
in this initiation, it was done with no attempt to insult or disparage Arts '23.
H.  PURDY.
WHICH  WAY?
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—As I stood in a street car,
through an advertisement, I learned the
difference between the "Cumfy Way" and
the "Old Way." I became interested at
once. As I walked past the mortuary up to
the University I meditated on the subject.
I looked with a new and speculative interest
at several of our fair co-eds. Were they
suffering the Hades of the Old Way, or had
they entered the Elysium of the Cumfy
Way?    I  was doomed  to remain  unsatisfied.
Tne unanswered question haunted my
dreams. I could not sleep at nights. Altruism urged me to become a missionary. I
wanted to spread the gospel of the Cumfy
Way.    Where was I to begin?
I went to a dance. As I stepped into the
ballroom, I stopped agape, my eyes glittered,
my breath came in gasps, my pulses raced,
I could feel the throb of my temples; I felt
the satisfaction of a demon sending another
soul to eternal torment, of a biologist formulating another conflicting theory of heredity,
of a street-car conductor slamming the
gates in an old lady's face, of a girl sloping
a partner at a dance, of a profiteer charging
three dollars and a-half for a two-dollar
text-book. The reaction set in. I felt weak.
I sank to a convenient chair. Cumfy Way!
i—* Way!    Bah!
Mr. Editor, not one of those girls had a
vestage of anything on which to hang the
Cumfy Way. Their bare arms »nd shoulders
peeped out of lacey nothings. I felt tricked.
Why are deceitful, misleading advertisements allowed?
A MERE MAN.
Concerning College football teams,
Too oft it comes to pass,
The man who's half-back in the field
Is 'way back in his class.
Umbrellas
Of Excellent Appearance
and Quality
At $5.50 Each
A moderate price to pay for good
Umbrellas, with fine gloria tape edge
covering and good, substantial steel
frames. These have various style
handles in the popular short lengths,
with cord strap or ring. Some are
silver-mounted. All are provided with
cases.     See  these.
Each
    $5.50
—Main Floor
■^fodcfivfl^
MITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
Arkley—Are you a pianist of merit?
Giegerich—No, of Kaslo.
©RPHEUM
Week Commencing
Monday,   November 22nd,   1920
VICTOR MOORE
EMMA LITTLEFIELD
AND COMPANY
In a Revival  of the  Original
Bare   Stage  Skit
"CHANGE YOUR ACT OR BACK TO
THE WOODS"
DANCING KENNEDYS
IN THEIR OWN CREATIONS
IRVING— —RHEA
GOSLAR & LUSBY
In   Artistic   bits   of  Vaudeville
Special   Songs  Written   by   Mr.   Goslar
OLE— —CHIC
OLSON & JOHNSON
LIKEABLE    LADS    LOADED    WITH
LAUGHS
PETTY REAT & BRCX
Assisted  by Twenty  Li'l  Bottles
JACK LA VIER
"All  in the  Spirit of Jest"
"HELLO, HUSBAND"
A   Satirical   Comedy   by   William
Anthony  McGuire,   with
LULU  McGUIRE  and   HAMILTON
CHRISTY
British  Weekly
Concert Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF   BOOKS,   Etc.
(Elark* Sc Stuart OIo.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial'
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
November 18, 1920
Take the Opportunity
presented by
SPENCER'S
DECEMBER
SILK SALE
to   provide   yourself   with   material
for a rich Dance Frock
Starting Friday, Nov. 19
DAVID   SPENCER
LIMITED
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
— of —
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE.A SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
DANCING AT WOMEN'S LIT.
On Wednesday, November 10th, at 3
o'clock, the poor little Auditorium was
crowded to its utmost. The securing of
Miss Mollie Lee, the gifted and charming
danseuse, for their programme was indeed a triumph for the executive of the
Women's Lit. A delightful paper, written
by Miss Lee, on "The Art of Dancing,"
was read by Miss G. McKinnon. Miss
Lee dwelt on the effort required to create
anything realty beautiful—on the hours of
work and pain spent on producing masterpieces. She showed how the art of
dancing was the first to develop among
our savage ancestors, and how its rhythm
and grace tamed their fierce hearts.
Though its beginnings were rude, dancing as an art steadily progresses. Its
rhythms were used by the great masters
in music—sometimes unconsciously. It
has always, on account of its ease and
simplicity, been the natural outlet for
man's  emotions.
When the paper had been read, Miss
Lee and a few of her pupils interpreted
it by a set of widely differing dances,
which were most enthusiastically received. Miss Lee herself opened the programme, and was followed by Miss Nan
Walker in a vivacious Spanish dance;
Miss Rita Ripstein, in an Egyptian
dance; the Misses Taylor, in a nature
dance, and a hunting dance by Miss Isadora  Cohen  completed the programme.
AGGIE DEBATERS DISCUSS
TARIFF
The A.D.C. met in the Auditorium on
Wednesday evening, November 10th.
Mr. H. R. L. Davis was elected treasurer. Professors H. M. King, F. E.
Buck and N. S. Golding acted as judges
of a most instructive debate on the subject, "Resolved that the present customs
tariffs are not injurious to the best interests of the Canadian farmer."
In opening the debate for the affirmative, Mr. G. H. Harris outlined the objects of a tariff, and emphasized the
beneficial effects of a protective policy
on the agriculture of Norway and Sweden. He was ably supported by Mr. G.
Landon, who showed that even the
prairie farmers benefited in many ways
from the present tariff system.
For the negative, Mr. W. H. Riddell
refuted several "excuses" for a tariff.
Mr. E. C. Hope also presented a strong
case, citing the inferior quality and increased price of Canadian, as compared
with American-made plows and tractors,
as definite proof that a protective tariff
placed the farmer in the grip of the manufacturer.
The judges awarded the decision to the
negative.
The schedule of allotments of the
Auditorium for the session, published in
the "Ubyssey" and now on the Alma
Mater notice board, is still only tentative. Several minor changes have been
and may yet be made. The Men's Lit.
are trading some of their evenings with
the Agricultural Discussion Club, the
Musical Society has changed to December 4th for its concert, and the Men's
Lit. are taking the evening of the 3rd for
their annual "Ladies' Night."
V
ancouver
Citizens' Club
(Non-Membership)
UNDER  THE  BIG  CLOCK
We serve a 60-cent
MERCHANTS'  LUNCH
TABLE  D'HOTE  DINNERS,   $1.50
SUPPER  PARTIES  and  BANQUETS,
with  private  rooms,  our  specialty
SUPPER   DANSANT  Wednesday  and
Saturday evenings,  from 9 to 12,  $1.00
Phone, Sey. 796 A. WATTS, Mgr.
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and  Evening  Classes
Phone,  Seymour 1810
R.   J.   SPROTT,   B.A.,  Manager.
A Sayings Account
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We   welcome   small   accounts:
The
Canadian Bank of Commerce
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
C U S I C K
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cusick.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West November 18, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450  Granville  Street
CLOTHES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J.W.Fosler
Limited
WE   SELL   CLOTHES   FOR   YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For    Light    Refreshments
Ice  Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
UNIVERSITY  STUDENTS
We carry a large assortment of
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Fillers, Waterman Fountain Pens, and all requisites to complete your records in your
studies.
Ok Uancouw Stationers Ltd.
SOCIETY STATIONERS AND
PRINTERS
683 Granville St.    Phone, Sey. 5119
DACCA LURES
DR.
EASTMAN
An interesting and attractive invitation
has been received by Dr. Mack Eastman
to accept the chair in History in the new
University of Dacca, Bengal. It is rather
surprising to learn that Bengal, which
has about the same population as the
British Isles, has an equal number of
University students. Yet there is only
one university in the presidency, that of
Calcutta, with a resident attendance of
25,000, two-fifths of whom attend affiliated colleges. In India the university is
the only path to a public career, and it is
expected that the new institution will
play an important part in forming the
political sense of that Empire at this critical stage of its history.
Dacca is 17 hours northeast of Calcutta, near the River Ganges, and has a
population of 120,000. Its university is
to be a model for all of India. It will
receive only students who have completed two years in some other university.
While special facilities are offered to Mohammedan students, its privileges are
open to all. It is expected that the university will be opened in July, 1921, with
a student attendance of 1,500. Salaries of
professors are to begin at from $4,500 to
$6,000, rising by annual increments to
$10,000.
We understand that Dr. Eastman will
not leave U.B.C. during the present session, if at all.
TICKETS FOR CHRISTMAS PLAYS
Final instructions to students regarding the Players' Club performances have
been  issued, as follows:
Students' nights will be Thursday and
Saturday. Friday evening is guests'
night, and no students will be admitted.
Tickets can be secured for either Thursday or Saturday evening. Each student
is entitled to one ticket for either evening. Tickets must be presented at the
door. These tickets will be distributed
on Friday (to-morrow), noon, as follows:
First year—Men, room Y; women,
room X.
Second year—Room Z.
Third and fourth years and Agriculture—Room 23.
Science—Physics building.
Green tickets are for Thursday; pink
ones  for  Saturday.
Players' Club members will not be
given  tickets.
One Beauty of Our Shoes
Is their perfect comfort. Built, as they are, in the latest models, with every
attention to style detail; nevertheless, comfort has not been sacrificed in the
slightest degree.
Our new Winter Footwear is smart, indeed, yet as comfortable and long-
wearing as shoes can be made.
Their prices represent the Biggest Shoe Values in Town.
THE INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
SIX-SIXTY-SIX GRANVILLE ST.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
MISS LOWE ON
SOCIAL SERVICE
The first of the series of vocational
lectures under the auspices of the W. U.
S. was given by Miss Lowe on Tuesday,
November 9th. Miss Lowe spoke of the
many positions open to women in the
field of social service. She gave the girls
an idea of the great need for earnest
workers in public health nursing, in child
welfare work, in factory inspection, and
in many other departments of social
service.
The girls were much interested in the
scope of the work and the opportunity
it offers for workers with varied talents
and inclinations. Miss Lowe will be here
for a week, and will be pleased to meet
any girls  who are  interested.
COMMENCE DRIVE
NEXT WEEK
It would be both unfair and ungenerous
if U. B. C. students should leave to the
members of the University Service Club
all the work of raising the $10,000 for the
Leroy scholarship. Success in the drive
means for 'Varsity an annual scholarship
more valuable than any intra-mural one
we now have. There can be no better
way of honoring the memory of those
fellow-students who gave us all they had.
Shall we leave it to the returned men to
pay even so small a portion of our debt?
Most of us are pretty hard up; but there
are few who can't spare a little, and all
of us can get in touch with people who
can spare a bit more. Choose your team
and get working on Monday morning.
A final organization meeting of Comrade H. T. Logan's team will be held in
the Geology lecture-room on Friday
evening, at 5 o'clock. All the men of the
University, whether members of the
University Services Club or not, are invited to attend and co-operate in the
drive. The greater the number of workers, the quicker will the objective be
reached. Don't forget the time and
place — to-morrow, at 5 p.m., in the
Geology  lecture-room!
Subscriptions are invited, to be sent to
Dean R. W. Brock or Prof. II. T. Logan
at the University.
At a meeting of Arts '24 men held on
Thursday, November 11th, it was decided that their class party would take
place on the evening of December 10th,
in the Auditorium.
A class fee of $1.00 will be collected
from the men of Arts '24.
Mr. J. A. Grant was appointed class
reporter to the "Ubyssey."
Heard at the Junior Ec. Club
The Hon. Mr. Fowles—It takes five
years to grow a flax crop in New Zealand.
Question—Why does it take so long
for a flax crop to grow there?
Mr. Fowles—Probably on account of
the fact that the flax grows so long in
New  Zealand.
Jim—I'll have to work hard next year.
Jam—Why, aren't you coming back to
college? THE   UBYSSEY
November 18, 1920
NOTES FROM OLD FRIENDS AFAR
Miss Helen Reid writes us that she is
now studying piano and harmony at the
Toronto Conservatory of Music, and likewise attending English lectures at Victoria College. She speaks of Joe de Pencier and Graeme King, who are now in
Toronto at Hart House, which is affiliated
with the University of Toronto. It
appears that all three have wasted no
time in becoming connected with the
Players' Club there, and Joe and Graeme
have already secured minor parts in one
of the coming productions. The theatre
of Hart House has only one rival on the
American continent, namely, the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. It
contains absolutely the last word in staging effects and electrical equipment, and
is therefore able to put on performances
five days running, with a change of programme every month. The following
plays are to be produced during the coming year: "Matsuo, the Pine Tree," Ta-
keda Izumo; "Rasmus Montanus," Lud-
wig Holberg; "You Never Can Tell,"
George Bernard Shaw; "The Chester
Mysteries of Nativity and Adoration";
"The Alcestis of Euripides' (Gilbert
Murray's version); "The Romancers,"
Edmond Rostand; "Pierre," Duncan
Campbell Scott, and two other Canadian
plays; "Cymbeline," Shakespeare. I
mention these merely to illustrate the
vast scale on which other universities are
entering into the study of dramatic art.
The director at Hart House receives a
salary of five thousand dollars a year for
his services. Our director would indeed
be in his element in such a place as I
have just described. Perhaps the future
holds something of the sort in store. We
may at least be optimistic.
Though our Players' Club has had a
comparatively short career, it is already
making its impression upon the world at
large. For instance, Miss Jessie Tod-
hunter, the leading lady of the first Players' Club production, has been a performer on Broadway for the last two seasons,
appearing with Henry Miller s company,
and later with Norman Trevor in "Toby's
Bow."
Mr. Jim Ellard, who played in "Merely
Mary Ann" and "Alice-Sit-by-the-Fire,"
after spending some time at voice-training in San Francisco, is now a member of
a musical company on tour in the Western States.
Miss Viva Martin, well remembered as
Alice and as a member of the first three
casts, is now taking further work in dramatics in New York City.
Thus do our friends scatter. Who will
be the next to attract our attention?
The judges are still undecided over the
allotment of certain roles. Perhaps next
week will bring a definite announcement
of the characters for the Christmas plays.
Some Station!
The trials and tribulations through
which a presidential candidate has to
pass are a severe tax on their mental and
physical powers. While passing through
Illinois last week, Governor Cox was
routed out of his sleeping-car berth at
sunrise, and addressed a waiting crowd
at a small station, attired in pyjamas and
an overcoat.—Province.
THE FELLOWS ARE TALKING
ABOUT CLELLAND
Yes, Mr. Clelland says he's sure customers
are telling their friends about him, for he gets
quite a few orders from fellows who come in
and mention names. But it isn't any wonder,
is it?
Several days ago a young fellow, admiring
his new suit in front of the mirror, said it was
the first made-to-measure he'd had since coming to Vancouver eight years ago, and—"Great
Scot! after this," he said, "never a ready-made
again for me. '
There s a model to suit every figure and a
dandy range of patterns to select from, and it
costs no more than a ready-made.
In less 'n a minute you're up in Clelland's
room on the 12th floor—five elevators.
Special reduction given on suits with extra
pants.
He stays open till 6 o'clock on Saturdays.
James Clelland
1225 Standard Bank Bldg.
510   Hastings Street,  West Vancouver,  B. C.
Phone, Seymour 7280
The Barron Hotel
and
Restaurant
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Phone, Seymour 2011
HAS IT OCCURRED
TO YOU f
—that your Photograph as a Christmas gift would be highly appreciated
by your friends, especially the absent
ones?
Pictures are very easy to mail, very
inexpensive, and very appropriate.
You'll get the quality kind at
Bridgman s Studio
413 GRANVILLE STREET
3?agfofltt - (graft
Quality Clothes
FOR YOUNG MEN
STYLISH
GUARANTEED
Vancouver, B. C.
The Shop of Fashion-Craft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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