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The Ubyssey Jan 23, 1951

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 Pledge Now
Pay  Later
The Ubyssey
Juilliard Quartet
Tonight
VOL. XXXIII
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1951
NO. 39
Brickbats
by Jim Banham
The reported sufferings of a
fraternity pledge last week re-
mined me of a curious paradox
in Greek life which might be
pointed out at this time since
I understand that the so-called
"hell week" is on in some
groups. .
The pledt ln question, I am
given to understand, was put
aboard a barge ln Vancouver's
harbor and discovered himself in
the Vancouver Island metropolis
of Nanaimo a few hours later. At
other times during the year young
men with blackened rocks ln their
hands and diamond shaped blocks
around their necks have been seen
around the campus.
Whenever vitriolic attacks are
levelled at fraternities, they Inevitably counter with the arguments
that they stand for fraternal brotherhood, the dignity of the human
being and other high Ideals. Yet,
In the same breath, they submit
their own prospective members to
what I frankly regard as Indignities.
For any fraternity to maintain
that spending the night on a barge
to Nanaimo or wearing a block
about one's neck is dignified Is to
argue lllogically in the extreme.
I point this out, not in heat, but
merely as an amusing paradox between the avowed principles of a
powerful group and their practical
actions. These very things can, and
have, been used to some advantage
by those who would Uke to sec
Greek life eliminated entirely from
the campus.
J ILLY?
Last week I was shown a petition by Brock Ostrom, chairman of
the Men's ..thletlc Directorate,
algned by more than 15 campus
athletes, requesting that close consideration he liven to the application of HJelmar "Jelly" Anderson,
as head coach of the Thunderbird
football team next year.
Mr. Anderson, who bas been associated with the UBC department
of physical education for some
years now, has the advantage of
having dally contact with the players who will make up his team.
He has a wide background and
came to UBC from the University
of Washington where he was a first
string man lor thc Huskies.
Last year he was a big factor
In teaching many newcomers the
fundamentals of football. He now
has tbe support of the Ostrom Plan
and he can look forward to Increased aid to athletics next year.
UBC will be missing a good bet
if Mr. Anderson slips through our
fingers.
I'll go so far as to predict that
the Men's Athletic Directorate will
approve him as head coach next
year.
New VOC Ski Cabin
Officially Opened
By Dr. MacKenzie
More than 250 hardy alpinists.
Including UBC's president, braved
the worst week-end of the year
to officially open the Varsity Outdoor Club's ski cabin on Mount
Seymour Sunday.
Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie officially opened the ultra-modern structure at ceremonies at 2:30 p.m. He
was accompanied by bin wife.
Also present at tho opening was
Krlc Brooks, past president of the
Alpine Club of Canada who addressed  the gathering.
The Sunday ceremonies were preceded by u party in the louii'.e
of Brock Hull for club members
past and present Saturday night.
Special feature of the Saturday
party was the presentation of a
watch to Don Manning, senior architecture student who assisted
members of the club In the con-
structure of the cabin. Manning
has donated every week-end to the
building of the cabin since las!
June.
Mr. Brooks read a coiigrutula-
tory speech to club members Saturday from Brigadier Sir Oliver
Wheeler, president, of the Alpine
Club of Canada.
Party guests Included Ian Schie-
del, honorary president of the VOC
and a member of the I'BC department  of forestry.
—Ubyssey Photo by Bob Steiner
BEGUILING SMILE of AMS president Nonie Donaldson may
have been the reason. Dr. George Davidson, deputy minister of
health and welfare, was signing a pledge of $3.43 towards finishing the War Memorial Gymnasium, pr. Davidson could have
been donating because it is a worthy cause, but we'll give thc
credit to Nonie. '
EVEN   REGISTRAR   HAS
BOOK SUPPLY PROBLEMS!
Don't ask the registrar's office for a copy of the current
calendar—as a matter of fact, they'll probably ask you
if you've got a copy to spare. -.>.,.
A request has been issued asking those students with
extra copies of the calendar for this year to bring them to
the registrar's office, "so that urgent requests for the Calendar may be filled."
The notice adds: "It is expected that the 1951-52 issue
will be ready for distribution, as usual, before the end of
the sessional examinations."
Aggies Aid Gym Fund
At Frolic, Pep Meet
Student drive to provide funds to finish the War Memorial
gymnasium will get an additional shot in the arm this wool:
with the proceeds from the Farmer's Frolic, sponsored by the
Agriculture Undergaduate Society.
A pep meet will precede the hay
steed dance Thursday at noon when
a giant- parade will swing down the
mull  to  the   Armor;'  to  advertise
the   affair.
KICKAPOOS IN PARADE
Six groups will tuke part in the
parade. They are: the AUS, Kickapoo Club. Big Block Club, CISC
Scotch Dance Club, the VOC Hqua-
nilsh Band and the orchestra of
Claude Logan. .
Jack Barnet, executive member
of the Kickapoo Club, is in charge
of all arrangements I'or tho pep
meet.
All students are welcome to *he
dance  which   will  take place from j
it p.m. to 1 a.m. in lhe UBC Arm-j
ory    r'riday    night.    Admission    is j
'■*1.7">  per  couple, _ ■
COSTUME   PRIZES I
Music for the dance will lie pro- |
vltlod hy the orchestra of lt-g'
Korbos, himself a professional
square dance caller. Modern (lain!
ing will also be featured. Prize■<
will be awarded for the most, ori-,
giiinl dress. |
Dean  Blythe  Kagle-;, head of 'he
I'BC department of agriculture ha.s j
been   named   patron   of   lhe   frolic.
Chairmen     of    committees     a. r >::
Norm     Hansen,     chairman;      Don;
Clcrkson, entertainment;   Mae   Milling,   decorations;    Ruth    Memlng, ,
refreshments   and   Liz   Money   anti]
I.os   Crosby,  advertising.
Back To Farm
For Teachers
UBC's teacher trainees will spend
a night, on the farm right in Vancouver  Friday.
The annual barn dance of the
department, planned by the I'STS
social committee will be staged
at. tho Peter Pan Ballroom from
!) p.m. to 1 a.in, witli orchestra and
refreshments !pI.",(> per couple.
Pledging Campaign
'Keeps On Rolling'
Frosh and Soph English Classes
Pledge Close to 100% of Quota
MODELS NEEDED
FOR LATEST
IN INDIAN WEAR
Tall girls are needed Immediately to model Indian costumes In the display to be presented Friday. Twenty-two girls
ranging from 6'6'' to 6' are required.
Interested students are asked to see Mrs. Hawthorne In
the anthropology museum in
the library.
UN Brief
May Go
To N.Y.
A United Nations Club resolution urging Canada's delegation not to support the resolution for the condemnation of
Communist China for aiding
aggression may be forwarded
to Lake Success this afternoon
Approval of this move will be
asked of the UBC United Nations
Club today at 12:30 p.m. when they
hold their semi-annual meeting in
Arts 100.
The Club will also forward their
recently-approved brier calling tor
.recognition or China to the Cana-
\\\ii\ delegation at the linked Nations headed by minister of external affairs Lester 15. Pearson.
TELEGRAM   SENT,
Telegram calling on the Canadian delegation not to support I'.S.
claims of aggression on the part
of Communist China was approved
by an executive meeting of Ih"
IN Club Monday al noon. They
will seek general membership approval at noon today.
Complete   text   of   the   telegram
which  will  he sent  if approved  is
as  follows:
TEXT  OF  WIRE
Newly acquired aid of the Big Block Club in the Gym
Fund pledging campaign helped Bill Haggart's committee lo
keep the pledging campaign rolling, as they contracted and received "pleasing" results from five frosh sections and three
second year Arts sections Monday.
Two  hundred  and  thirty  sevens : ■
students ln the first and second
years were contacted Monday to
pledge a total of $824.18.
The drive has been very succor-
ful so far among the classes contacted, said Iloy North, tabulator
on Hill Haggart's campaign committee, but he showed disappointment at the large number of registered students not taking in the!-.'
lectures, .
BY MAIL
"But ir/ we don't get them the
first time we go around we'll get
them by mall," North said.
Three sections of frosh subscribed to a man while in the two other,)
contacted, 98 percent oi the c,aHS
subscribed  to the fund.
Two other second year classes
were spoken to by volunteer students but their results were not
available at press time. •
100 PERCENT SUBSCRIPTIONS
Sections 1, 3, and 4 of tbe
frosh class reached 100 preceut
subscriptions, contributing 94.9
percont, 112.7 percent, and 122.:*
percent respectively of their quota
of $3,43 per man.
Sections 7 and 11 raised themselves to 98 percent contributions,
pledging 96.5 and 105.2 percent.5*
of their quotas respectively.
Much praise I'or tbe success of
tbe campaign so fur must go to the
volunteers on the speaker's committee, North sai'l Monday after
lhe day's results showed the value
of their of forts.
•GREATLY PLEASED"
"I am greatly pleased with what
they have accomplished so tar."
North fiiid. "and we can credit tlii
"May we strongly urge tho Cana-1 SU(,,.eHH 0r the campaign to their
tliun delegation not to support
the resolution for the condemnation of Communist China tor aiding
aggression, No one would support
Chinese action in Korea. But precipitate action on resolution would
terminate chances of peaceful settlement. More positive policy is
surely possible on tbe basis of the
Peace Commission and nn suggestion of Indian delegation. Uriel'
follows separately suggesting this
policy. Respectfully, United Nations Club, University British Columbia."
Resolution referred to in the
telegram is the U. S. -sponsored
resolution to he voted on lu the
political committee on Wednesday.
Text of the resolution has not yet
been  released.
work."
Results of the third year Knglu
coring groups which were to be
contacted Monday us well as Ihe
Artsmen, were not in the (hands of
the tabulating committee at press
time.
Hopes were high among committee members that the engineers
would get behind this campaign as
they have other drives in the past.
Today, fourth year Kngineors
will be contacted and spoken to
by campus personalities while at
the same time, the rest, of the
thirty sections of frosh and twelve
sections ol' second year Artsmen
will he asked to pledge themselves
for $3.43 too.
'Tween Clouts
SPONSORED BY SPC
Saturday
Broadcast
Town
From
Snow  Costless
University Building and ('rounds
department reports that as yel
snow conditions have not caused
any  extra  expense.
Kxcept   for .shovelling   snow  and
preparing simw plows, work is ion-
fine and   no  extra   lalnu
employed,
Canada's famed opinion
Town MetjIiHg of the Air, will originate from I'BC's Block Hall
lounge Thursday al   3:30 p.in.
An all student panel w ill discuss
thc topic "Should Religious l.duca-
tion he Incorporated In a I'uiversity Curriculum," officials of the
sponsoring Social Problems Cluh
announced today.
Thursday's public meeting will
he tape recorded for broadcast on
a Vancouver station Saturday
night.
Stud.Mil panel will include Phi!
Brocking. a graduate studies student in social work, Don Molr.
third vear law, Les Armour. Ubyssey columnist and fourth year arts
has been ; student and Henry Hicks, execit-
'■ live   member   of   Ihe   I'BC   United
forum, i Nations   Club   and   a   social
studen
ARTHUR W. HELPS
, . .  Town   Meet ing   founder
Meeting
Brock Hall
work Progrbin will be welcomed to the
campus by Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, president of UBC. Tins will
be (lie first lime in two years that
Town Meeting has originated from
I Hie uiiiv/%si!y.
I Moderating the program Thurs-
1 day will be Arthur \V. Helps, 1'oim
j tier   of  Town   Meeting   in   Canada.
Since the program's inception sev-
' en   years   ago   il   has   done   more
broadcasting  in   ils  field  than  any
other show.
The Institute of education by
Ifadio at Columbus, Ohio, has given
the program an award for present,
ing public Issues. It is the only
program of its kind that bas originated entire broadcasts outside
of Canada.
Jimmy Sinclair
Liberal Club
Guest Speaker
"Taxation and Defence" will
be the topic of a well known
member of parliament today at
12:30 p.m. in Engineering 202.
Speaker will be Jimmy Sinclair,
MP. for Coust-Capllano and parliamentary assistant to the minister
or finance. His talk here will bl
sponsored by the student Liberal
Club.
UBC 8YMPHONY Orchestra will
rehearse in Hut 03 behind Brook
Hall Wednesday at 6 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL Relations
Club will meet today at 12:30 p.m.
ln the reception room in -the north
wing of Brock Hall to choose six
members to journey to BellinfhatB
February al for a Pacific ndrtH
west conference entitled "AebJ|t>
ins Peace Through the United
Nations."
VOC GENERAL meeting tomorrow In Engineering 200 at
12:30 p.m. where films of the Canadian Dominion Ski Championships
and color slides of Sun Valley will
be shown.
"THE THINGS WE 8E*E" will b«
title of a lecture sponsored by III*
Visual Art Club at. noon In Physics
1*0(1 Thursday. Speaker will be
Oliorlunder.
TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE at
tlio CBC art gallery and, will be,
available at the door tonight tor
the'concert hy the Juilliard String
Quartet at 8: SO in Hrock Hall
lounge.
UBC De baton
Lose Twice
In Cup Trials
By  DOUG  UPEX
UHC lost both onds or Its McColm cup defence over the weekend. Debating against University
of Alberta in the Brock Hall Friday night, a two-man CBC team
was set down on a split decision
two to one.
At tiie same time in Winnipeg
a second two-nmn team, co-defenders of the trophy, was being argued to u unanimous defeat by
the University of Manitoba.
I'IK' has never successfully do-
fended tbe McOoun Cup after any
of Its three victories iii tbe annual
debates, Tho cup heads east, again
I llis year, to Manitoba, the only
team to win both Its at homo and
away debutes.
I'lSC's iif-lioine debating team,
poster Isherwood. I bird year ImM),
and Joe Nold. I'irsU'lnss J,aw, ar-
gued the affirmative of the resolution "thai llie activities of the
labor unions are detrimental trt
Iho  welfare of Canada.
On llie negative side were Terry
Nngeiil, third year Law, hold-over
from Alberta's I'.'fiu team, and Carroll Wenaas, third year honors economics.
Debate judges were Mow Dean
Cecil Swanson, rector of Christ
Church Cathedral. Alderman llal-
fretl D. Wilson of the Vancouver
City Council and T. 0. Morris, Vancouver barrister and solicitor.
In Winnipeg CMC was represented by Ktlsel Olsen. third year I .aw,
and Vanglian I.yon, fourth year
Arts, who debuted the negative
side of Ihe same resolution, Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 23, 1951
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as Second Class Mall Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student Subscriptions fl per
year (included in AMS Fees). Majl Subscriptions—$2.00 per year. Published throughout
the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of ths
University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily thoso of the Alma Mater Sooiety nor of tho University.
Offices In -Brook Hall, Phone ALma 1021 For display advertising phOffe ALtM-UUM)
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF     RAY FR08T
GENERAL tfTWFF: Copy Editor, Jim Banham; CUP Editor, Joan Churchill; Women's
Editor,  Joan  Fraser;   Fine  Arts  Editor,  John  Brockington;   Editorial  Writers,  Les
Armour, Hal  Tennant; Photography Director, Tom Hatcher.
Senior Editor—ANN LANGBEIN
Assistant Editors—MARY RAW80N, DON OLIVBR
Sifting the Cinema
Writers this issue:
JOAN CHURCHILL
JOHN NAPIER-HEMY
DON OLIVER
JIM BKNTHXIVI
He Said To Hell
It's time artsmen quit pretending they
have an undergraduate society .
For 40 students to gather together nnd
presume they can lay down the policies of
UBC's 3000 artsmen is not only a waste ol
time. It's also sheer lolly.
Executives of the nebulous AUS are not
to be blamed for what is past being called
lethargy. They have been put to a test of
patience that would have the Sphinx itself
biting its finger nails in frenzy. Now, quite
understandably, they are almost ready to
throw in the towel.
To this,' The Ubyssey says: Let thr>m
throw it.
One fact that our present AUS has only
now begun to realize is this: Artsmen DON'T
WANT to be organized.
But therein lies more logic than lethargy.
Why should a student concerned with biological research wish to cast his lot with a
person whose chief concern is the analysis of
Great Britain's dollar crisis? What can they
offer one another if they are induced to become real and active members of AUS?
We hold great respect for the executive
ability of Bill Neen and many of his aides.
But the fact of the matter is that they have
been wasting their time.
Mr. Neen was prompted to remark at
the last attempted meeting of artsmen that lie
"ought to join the engineers, where my work
would at least be appreciated."
Yes, Mr. Neen, if it is undergraduate organizational work you are seeking, you might
well join the engineers, after the fashion of
the redshirt hero who "said to hell with
both of them."
Mr. Neen could put his enormous quantity
of good common sense to best use by stepping down to let artsmen go their own various ways.
Well Make Do, Thanks
We note with some gentle amusement
that Mr. George Murray, M.P. for Cariboo,
ha ssuggested that UBC ought to have a
school of journalism.
In fairness to Mr. Murray, we must point
out that what he most likely meant was that
B.C. could use trained journalists and that
UBC is a good place to train them.
Nevertheless, we fear that there are some
among us who might be inclined to take
hltn literally and, what's a lot worse, to agree
with the idea.
Maybe most people are not quite aware
as to just what the newspaper business involve^. ("Journalism" is a highbrow word
used only by bright young men who shave
every day and run for tho door when they
hear the city editor bark.)
The mechanics of the trade can be learned in a few months in any good city room. The
judgment which makes a great newsman can
be had only after long years at service-club
luncheons, prowling around the cop shop,
chasing fire engines, and poring over the
city directory. The love of stringing words
together and the insatiable curiosity which
has helped to drag man out of the caves
are things you are just born with.
Journalism schools which teach the kiddies how to write 127 different types of lead,?
and what the line count for a banner in P3
point happens to be, serve only one useful
purpose: to give laughs to the boys to the city
room.
This is not to sugest that a university
isn't useful to a newsman—it can give a lot
of the depth and understanding which are
required every day to probe beneath the surface and come up with the significant facts
But the editors much prefer prospective
newsmen to combine a good sound arts
course with some hard work on the student
paper to having them sit through stuffy lectures by second-rate newsmen who couldn't
get a job and turned to teaching in despair.
Let's face it. UBC needs a lot of things
before a journalism school.
Guest Column
(Ed. Note—Tbe following column by Grant Livingstone, well-
known campus theology student,
has been printed because Ubyssey
editor* feel that the topic Is timely
and the author an authority on his
side of the question of religious
course at UBC. Ubyssey editors apologize for any lack of continuity,
since space limitations necessitated some severe cutting of Mr. Livingstone's copy.)
By GRANT LIVINGSTONE
The Student's Council last week
gave a positive lead which should
write one of the brightest chapters
ln the remarkable tradition of student leadership whicli has characterized and helped build this university. Your excollent news coverage of their reasons has already
stated the greater part of the case.
Except for a single very Important point, namely the negative factor of secularism. Unfortunately
on this very point your editorial
writer In the same Issue dragged In
a red herring, in the form of a
suggestion that only one course,
a "comparative religions" course
should be admitted to what he proclaimed to be "finite rightly" a
".strictly secular" university.
Secularism N that philosophy of
education which bas so disastrously
iniderminded the moral and spiri
tual basis of our democracy by its
presumption that an adequate public education could exclude tho vital field of religious truth values
and  mandates.
Secularism took two forms, the
extreme form lias been clearly antagonistic to religion, setting Itself ui> in the status of a religion
capable of judging and delimiting
basic truth, scorning the revealed
Truth of Uh adversary (!od, as Irre-
vclanl, out of date, unable to supply
positive   answer-;,   unscientific,   etc,
etc. ad nausoum. This blatant idolatry has spawned a host ot evils
ranging from moral relativism to
religious syncretism.
As in all too many universities
in the western world this secular-
Ism has bitten deeply Into our own
university, tterly false Ideas of religious truth,
The false Ideas have ranged
from Implicit teaching that religion Is something to be outgrown
or a matter of taste, to be taken
If on "progressive" social sciences.
The opportunity Is perfectly open,
(and not unused), for any professor to voice as academic doctrine.
bis personal prejudices against
God, but neither criticism nor reply is possible by those who know
God.
All the philosophic sons of men
can have their transient explorations of theories fondly explained.
Even enemies of Christ can have
their ancient and discredited ra-
not been able to resurrec
tionalizations and involutions resurrected. But the eternal words of
the Son of the living God have not
been able to grace the classrooms
of our university with their Incisive wisdom and certainty and
hope and simple foundational life-
giving truth, instead §f a challenge
lhe precious gift of life, which it
should be . . . religion is relegated
to the status of outmoded and dis-
pensible customs. Instead of truth
and service, for which an Alma
Mater should be fostering a living
faith lu God, our university offers
only relatlvistic confusion and materialistic technique (to the great
majority Who do not put forth the
extra interest and efforts in the
province In religious chilis.) The
results In the province, whose
leaders are being trained away
from instead of towards, the source
of spiritual strength needed for
true leadership, are apalllng. You
only need to see the effect In the
tender lives of the children of a
Sufhday School when they learn
their teacher ln public school
doesn't worship God, to feel almost
bitter about the leadership and
leadership training the teacher received. The net effect of the present exclusion of religion from its
curriculum Is to put our university
in a deeply Illiberal, misleading,
and antl-rellgious postlon, In regard to the most vital needs and
deepest hungers of the minds It ls
training for leadership. The basic
university Idea of higher training
tor higher service ls lost ln all but
deliberate teaching tbat the purpose of higher education is to get
a higher Income. This breeds class
distinction, privileges and snobbery
utterly foreign to anything good.
There Is another milder, form
of secularism which doesn't Intentionally attack religion, but tries
to exclude It from the schools because of real but grossly exaggerated fears of denominational differences. It ls also anti-rellglous,
however, that our minds tend to
worship and follow only one ultimate authority and the public
school on both school and university levels htts claimed.
There probably still are some
Protestants who think It worthwhile to exclude Christ In order
to keep the Pope out, ahd there
are doubtless some Roman Catholics and others who will be dissatisfied with half a loaf for their
point of view, but thafrks be to
God, these viewpoints are not in
the saddle and it seems perfectly
possible for a rational and balanced number of courses satisfactory to all to be worked out along
the lines suggested In the brief received by the Council.
By STANLEY FOX I
Those who enjoyed "The Happiest Days of Your Life" will probably get Just as much pleasure
out of "State Secret," for this first-
class melodrama was made by'the
same production team, Frank Launder and Sidney Gllllat. These two
British writers have been turning
out a' high percentage ot intelligent films during the past 15 years,
most of them sophisticated comedy-
mysteries with satirical overtones.
Although they have lost the humanity that marked their wartime films (Millions Like Us, Waterloo Road) their latest efforts
show no deterioration of their inventive wit. "State Secret" is Itr
the best Hitchcock tradition but
without the latter's heavy-handed
pretentiousness.
The plot Is not particularly plausible but it serves the purpose well
enough. Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., I
plays the part of an American surgeon who is lured into travelling
to the "iron curtain" nation of Vos-
nla (a enphlmlsm for Yugoslavia.)
Although he hav been Invited to
receive an award for his perfection of a delicate operation, he
finds that the actual purpose of his
visit ii to perform this operation
on the Vosnlan dictator whose serious Illness is the "State Secret."
The Dictator dies after the operation.
Government leaders are aware
that an uprising may occur If word
of this reaches the people and thus
Letter To
I IT©   CCI1
Editor, The Ubyssey,
dear Sir: ~        "~~    "*""""
In view of the recent disorganization in the staff of The Ubyssey,
apparent ln recent issues, some
constructive criticism might be In
order. The following criticisms and
suggestions are not entirely my
own but a compos It of the opinions
expressed by six of us on our way
to and from the University in an
Austin.
First, the number of Issues
should be cut to two per week.
Those most likely to object would
be the ones who depend upon the
papers to carry their announcements. They would then have to
Insert them earlier. This would also
mean less work for the editorial
staff, and the four pages used for
the third Issue could be divided
among the remaining two.
This additional space might then
be used for printing literary efforts
worthy of the name, discussion of
current events and some better
photographs with artistic value.
This could raise the Ubyssey from
the level ot a long conglomeration
of announcements, classified ads
and advertisements to that of some
of the better university papers.
Students might even start reading
It. They have not shown a great
deal of Interest so far, as demonstrated by the lack of expressed
resentment at the shortage of copies near the beginning of the fall
term. I recall only two editorials
on the subject; no mass uprising.
These are two steps in the direction of a superior UBC publication. They would also make possible the printing of longer contributions by persons not on the
staff, which 'has thus far occurred
only infrequently.
W. Klassen,
4th Agriculture.
it becomes necessary to get rid of
Fairbanks. After this development
the Inevitable chase begins. It ls a
rather good one. Fairbanks is aided by Glynls Johns In his attempted escape over the mountains, and
several interesting characters pop
up from time to time. A fairly pat
ending winds everything up quite
hleeljr.
TOe principle Interest of the film
lies In Its excellent pace, (unusual
in a British mystery,) clever, If
conventionally superficial, characterisation and the crisp photography of Robert Krasker (Henry V,
The Third Man.) Fairbanks turns
ln a solid performance In a sympathetic role, retaining for the most
part that slightly reticent attitude which accounts for his boy
ish charm, in marked contrast to
tbe Ladd's and Bogart's of the
screen. As his playmate, Glynls
Johns is engagingly fresh, 'while
Herbert Lorn, as an utterly cynical
black-marketeer, ls hilarious. The
political inferences of the film are
only slightly less Idiotic than usual
but these are thankfully kept in
the background.
"State Secret" Is well designed to
appeal to all audience levels.
34
YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THEM'S A REASON
MNirmw co. m?
Sit JIYMOUH ST.   VANCOUVIII. I. C.
THE DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD REQUIRES SCIENTISTS
FOR FULL-TIME EMPLOYMENT
LOCATION „    ,
Excellent opportunities for qualified Scientists are available at
the following locations: Halifax, N.S., Valcartler, P.Q., Ottawa,
Kingston and Toronto, Out., Fort Churchill, Man,, Suffield, Alta,
Esquimau, B.C.
WORMING CONDITIONS
Each laboratory Is thoroughly modern, contains tbe latest types
of equipment, and provides excellent worklt: - conditions for the
individual 'scientist.
SALARY SCALES
Starting salaries will vary from $2,760 to $4,000 per annum depending on academic qualifications and experience and provision is made for regular annual Increments within each salary
range.
EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
(a) Group Hospital and Medical Insurance Plans,
lb) Retirement of Superannuation benefits.
(c) Generous leave benefits, Including:--
(1) Up to 18 days' vacation leave per year.
(2) 10 Statutory holidays per year.
(3) cumulative sick leave credit of 18 days per year.
(4) Other special benefits for specific purposes.
Full Information regarding positions now available may be
obtained by wrltltig to: —
THE DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH PERSONNEL,
DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD,
DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE,
"A" BUILDING, OTTAWA, ONTARIO.
dS
THE DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD'REQUIRES
PHYSICS ORADUATES
The Defence Research Board requires graduates, for full-time
employment In the following specialized fields of Physics: —
RADIO PHYSICS
ELECTRONICS
ENGINEERING. PHYSICS
AERODYNAMICS
These positions are for the Hoard's Laboratories located at
Halifax, N.S., Valcartler, P.Q., Ottawa, Out., and Esqulmalt, B.C.
The initial salaries for applicants with Bachelor Degrees will
not he lower than $2,760 per annum. Allowances will be made for
those applicants having experience and additional academic quall-
catlons.
Apply to: DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH PERSONNEL,
DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD,
DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE,
"A" BUILDING, OTTAWA, ONTARIO.
 ,—„,„„- _. ^xr-r-^=*=__^=!z_Zz______________
_v_wS__
THE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PLAN
OF THE
DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD
FOR 1951-52
The Defence Research Board is now accepting applications for financial assistance from high ranking Canadian students registered in Science or Engineering, who
will graduate from University in 1952, preferably at the
Master's or Ph D Levels.
The conditions of acceptance will be the same as for
1950-51, but the monthly payment will be $182.00.
Application forms may be obtained from the Registrar
or Placement Officer.
Apply to: The Director of Research Personnel,
Defence Research Board,
Department of Natibnal Defence,
"A" Building, Ottawa, Ontario.
Save Wisely TODAY..
for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience ill budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
HARVEY STRANG
PETER MATHEWSON
JOHN TENER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
J. R. BRANDON
PACific 5321
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
UFE ©PCANADA Tuesday, January 23, 1951
THE UBYSSEY
Pap 8
' —Photo Courtesy Denver Apt Museum
TRADITIONAL NORTH AMERICAN Indian costumes will be
exhibited at two showings at UBC this week. Showing will
include this Naskapi sports costume of painted deer skin. All
COSttfm'es are from the collection of the Denver Art Museum.
COED MODELS NEEDED
Indian Costumes
On Display Friday
By JOHN NAPIER-HEMY
Indian costumes dating back as far as 200 years will l.«
displayed at UBC Friday.
Costumes, from tbe Denver
Museum of Art, one of the finest
anthropological museums on the
continent, have been shown in o<'er
fifty centres in North America.
Thirty will be shown at UBC Including those of the Iroquois, Hop!.
Navajo, and NaBkapi, a tribe from
B.C.'s northwest coast.
LQ8T
SlLVES WAIST WATCH. Ladles'
Hamilton, please phone Trudy Thomas at NW 1806L, or return to Lust
& Found.
SLIDE RULE, Hemml Mannheim
type, lost In vicinity of Chem Bldg,
Return to Lost & Found or S. C.
Soss, 4th year Chem. Eng.
PARKER 51 lost on Sat. p.m. Please
return to Lost & Found, ahd claim
REWARD.
WALUET, will person who phoned
West 965R regarding wallet, please
return lt to lx>st & Found Immediately,
PARKER '51 PEN, initials on barrel, JGGU; lost near main parking
lot. Please return to Lost & Found.
LADIES RONSON LIGHTER, Initialled PGH. If found please contact Pat at CE 2920 or return to
Lost & Found.
BLACK WATERMAN'S PEN lost
on Thurs. Please return to Lost &
Found.
BIRK'S SILVER WATCH at Mardi
Gras, Friday. Reward. Please phone
Bill Sparling at AL 2072R.
POUND
INITIALLED CIGARETTE lighter,
found ln Caf on Thurs. Phone John
at AL 0403.  .
LAWRENCE SLIDE RULE In paper holder. May be Identified at
Lost & Found.
KEYS still await identification nt
Lost & Found.
FOR 8AUE
TYPEWRITER, Underwood Standard 10", good condition, $60. 3d
W 19th.
1950 FIAT STATION WAGON, low
mileage, excellent condition, most
economical car on the road. $!»n5,
terms. May be seen anytime, anywhere. DE 1774.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE  WANTED  by   several   persons, vicinity of 64th & Granville.
KE 5687L.
RIDE WANTED from 16th and Arbutus for 8:30s. CE 6761.
:j. RIDERS WANTED for 8:30s,
Mon. (brough to Sat., via S.W. Marine from Dunbar. Phone Gordon
at KE 3065R.
HOUSEKEEPING ROOM, $5 and
up. CH 7206, 1845 Dunbar St.
WELL FURNISHED BASEMENT
suite or single bedroom, breakfast
optional. Phone AL 1842U
LEARN TO DAHCI
• QUICKLY
• IA8ILY
•  PRIVATELY
3 Lessons $5.00-10 Lesson* $1MJ0
Frances Murphy*
Dance School
Alma Hall
FA-5932-M
3*79 W. ■reaaVwa)-
—        BAY-3428
By Mm 0n tin Cmptttf
'    The man who smokes a pipi
rates high with tht Campus
Queens... especially when
he smokei PICOBAC.
You'll find tht fragrance of
PICOBAC is as pleasing to others
as it is mild and cool fotyotftj
ALSO OOOD FOR ROLUNO YOUR OWN
MCOIAC fs iwr/ey Tobacco-fhe eoo/esf, mfMetf Hk*m at*** §mn
COED MODELS
Mr. Eric Douglas, curator of the
Denver Museum, specializes ln collecting and bringing his costumes
to a state of perfection. Thirty
coeds, some of them anthropology
students, will model the costumes.
Four anthropologists from the
University ot Washington will
present authentic Indian dances
during the Intermission. Plains Indian dances will be shown, as well
us dances from the North nnd
South West. The costumes worn
will be the finest from each tribe.
TWO PERFORMANCES
There will be two performances,
at 12:30 p.m. in the auditorium
which will be free to students, and
one longer, more Inclusive show in
Brock Hall at 8:15 p.m. Tickets to
the latter are one dollar to the
general public and 50 cents to
students.
Sponsors for the display are the
Women's Auxiliary of the Vancouver Art Gallery, the fine arts committee and the museum of anthropology.
Leonard Foundation
Scholarship Renewal
Holders of Leonard Foundation
Scholarships who intend to apply
for their renewal are asked to consult Professor F. II. Soward, Room
303 Auditorium, as soon as possible ln order that their applications may be completed before the
end of January.
Other students who are interested In applying for these scholarships are also asked to Interview
Professor Soward as soon as possible.
The New Canadian Five Cent Coin .
is a piece of
Pure Nickel...
THE CANADIAN METAL
msmmm
MM
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-s«u\nEs, protractors,
SET SM'ARES
MfECIIAN'irAL ENGINEERS
WD
POLYPHASE  SLIDE  RILES
ZIPPEinii\7T BOOKS
AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
Complete  with  Sheets and In(I*•
From $2.1*!'
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
•STATIONERS and I'll* VI ERS
.'."II Seymour si,   Yuncouvor, II.C,
It was in thc year ,1751, that a Swedish scientist named Cronstedt obtained from
a piece of ore a nfetal hitherto unknown to science. He named the newly-discovered metal "Nickel.*
Since that time, nickel has become the metal of a thousand uses,
in industry and in the home. Because 80% of the world's nickel comes from Canadian mines,
nickel can truly be called the Canadian metal.
The new Canadian nickel, commemorating the discovery of nickel 200 years ago,
is minted from pure Canadian nickel.
The new coins are being minted from material processed prior to nickel rationing.
Issued to commemorate the 200th anniversary
of the discovery of nickel by Cronstedt
MHE    INTERNATIONAL    NICKEL    COMPANY    OF    CANADA,    LIMITED    •    TORONTO Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 23, 1931
'Birds Defeated In
Hamber Ice Series
LOOK BJTKR
'Birds Lose
Twice On
Weekend
•y DOUG  HAWKI8
The UBC Thunderblrd's basketball team may not have broken It's losing streak Ust weekend but. they certainly proved
once underway they could
knock holes in any squad's
record^.       • »
Friday night UBC 'travelled
to Olympia and were subdued
by Bt. Martins, 69-51. But Saturday's game told a different
•tory. Playing tbe impressive
CoUege of Puget Sound Loggers ,the locals rolled up 62
points as against the victors
83 ln a battle which was nip
and tuck all the way.
T>lce the Loggers had to come
from behind to catch up to
the 'Birds in the second half.
Half time score was 82-28
in favour of the Americans but
three quick baskets by Maury
, Mulhern put UBC ahead 39-36.
Then the Loggers rallied to go
out In front 39-86, but minutes
later the score was tied till the
end of the match the taggers
held a narrow lead which was
only widened In the closing
seconds of play.
•^1 m t^p
Jake Mayberry was the big
gun for Puget Sound, collecting an impressive 84 points
and sparking his team in accurate first half shots.
Phillips was finally fouled
out with seven minutes to go.
In We7 first game 'Birds went
against a St. Martin's team
which Just wasn't taking any
chances and drove relentlessly till the final horn. Playing
an effective zone defensive
the winners were ahead at the
half 38-28. With five minutes
to go Birds pulled within three
points of tying the score. In
that brief time, however, St,
Martin's chalked up 11 points
to Varsity's 6.
* * *
Art Phillips was high man
for UBC, collecting a total of
18 points during 'the evening's
workout. Five fouls forced two
of the Thunderbirds mainstays
off the floor. Ron Stuart and
Ron Blssett left the game at
the tihree-quarter mark.
SATURDAY
CPS—Gilchrist 3, Mayberry 24,
Rtngstad 1, Frazler 8, Mallland 1,
DanlelMon 13, Rothnle 2, Gibbs 10,
Ritchie 2. Sater 9.
U8C—Stuart 9, Blsset 15, Phillips 6, Hudson 7, Ixnile 3, Desaul-
nler 4, Upson 1, Mulhern 14, Hind-
march 3.
alibi for their defeat. It was a cane
of too few replacements to cope
with a smart hustling Goldqn Bear
crew.
SPORTS SCORES
Alberta Bears Take
Cup With 7-5 Win
UBC 3; Alberta 3
UBC 2; Alberta 4
By HERM FRYDENLUND
UBC's Thunderbird hockey team failed in their bid tc
defend the Hamber trophy, emblematic of Western Canadian
Inter-Collegiate hockey supremacy, in Edmonton last weekend
losing a two game total goal series 7-5, to Alberta Bears.
The first and best game of the.-
tieries   ended   In   a   3-3   tie.   Goal
getters for the Thunderbirds were
Lindsay, Young and Hood.
UBC had a large margin ot play
in the contest, outsboottng Bears
26-20. Game was played ln 20 bo-
low zero weather ln the Varsity
rink. The Bears took an early 2-0
lead btit the Birds fought back to
tie the score with two quick goals
by Lindsay and Young.
LINDSAY GOOD
Bob Lindsay was the big gun in
the 'Bird attack scoring one goal
and two assists and played an outstanding two way game. Al Hood
fired the equalize* at ten minutes
of the third period when he tipped
In a Lindsay pass. Hood also turned in a hustling performance
throughout the series.
In the second contest the 'Birds
drew first blood after Haas Young
stlckhandled his way through the
entire Alberta team and blasted
the puck Into the net,
Bears clicked on a fast passing
attack to tie the . score. Haas
Young picked up his second, and
the final Bird tally on a beautiful
shot to the upper hand corner
which gave Moran no chance to
make the save.
YOUNO DANGEROUS
Young was the most dangerous
player on the ice for either club:
Goalie Don Adams also turned in
sparkling performances coming up
with some tremendous saves.
Golden Bears have a fast skating hard checking club and gave
the 'Birds few opportunities to use
their smart passing plays. Jim
Flamming captain of the Bears wan
a tower of strength, playing close
to sixty minutes of each game. His
play backed up by the ever dangerous Bob Causgrove made up a
large portion of tbe Alberta power.
Of the forwards Ed. Klesueskl,
Rlngrose, Kryscha and Kirk were
tbe outstanding performers.
Second game of the series was
perhaps the roughest contest ever
participated In by the UBC hockey
team. The Bears took advantage
of the four extra players they had
stripped for the games and played
a close hardchecklng contest. The
locals withered under the sustained pressure after the first two
periods.
INJURIES
UBC suffered tour Injuries. Gunner Bailey and Ken Hole received
eye cuts, Mai Hughes a shoulder
separation and Al Hood bruised
ribs.
Thunderbirds however, need no
TOP TEAMS
Gals' Hoop Goes In
Gym at Noon Today
By SHEILA KEARNS
Two of UBC's top women's basketball teams, the Intermediate A and Senior B Thunderettes, will battle it out Wednesday in the gymasium.
Tbunderett :i hold first place in
the Senior H league, nnd their
sister team has lost only two
games In the Intermediate A i:oc-
tion.
Game time Is 12:;**i nt  the gym.
Last year the Thunderoltes defeated the world famous chocolate
Co-eds In an exhibition .name here.
This year, the teani hopes to take
part in tho Women's Western Canadian Collegiate Basketball tournament In Edmonton early February,
but the trip depends largely on the
support given the game on Wednesday.
CKAFTER   COACH
Hlg Block winners In Mimi Wright
and Eleanor Nyholm. Sheila Monro
was awarded a small block last
year, and Do Brinham won a round
letter. New to the team this year
are Eleanor Cave, high jump star
and a consistant scorer for ber
team and Pat Donovan, Erma-.Innc
Foster, Dolores Hurtnum, Janet
Crafter, and Margot Salter, a nlnt-
sized  spark  plug.
LINEUP
Inter A lineup will include Doreen Ciinnulngs , nu all - round
smooth player with a deadly under-
t he-basket shot; Adele Aseltlne.
high scorer for the team;   Elennof
JoanMacArtluir.   who   played   for   MacKenzie,   who  is  us  fast  on  the
years with tbe Edmonton Grad-
ettes and in Vancouver leagues, Is
coaching tbe Thunderettes this
season. Second year Physical Education sUidnn' .Ian frailer is competently guiding the Inter A girl.i
towards their league championship.
Thunderettes   bave  two  previous
basketball floor as on the cinders.
Ann Winters, hetter known for her
swimming ability; Jean Scbafov,
Dot     VVorsely.     Blanche     Banard.
< Nancy   Bolton,   Marvlln   McGlnui.-i.
and   Mary   Ward.
i     The   contest   promises   to   be  ox-
citing with the two teams meeting
I for the first  lime.
BASKETBALL
Bvergreen Conferenoe
UBC vs St. Martins 61-59.
UBC vs CPS Loggers 62-83
Intercity League
UBC 38, Arctic Club 37
Inter A Girls
UBC 29, Richmond 33
SOCCER
Vancouver 4 District
Varsity vs Kerrisdale postponed.
HOCKEY
UBC 3, Alberta 3 Friday
UBC 2, Alberta 4 Saturday
Alberta wins Hamber cup series
7 goals to 5.
GAMES
Films will be screened lb Physics 200 on Tuesday, Jan. 23, at
3:30 In Engineering 200 on Thursday, Jan. 25, at 12:30 and also in
the Auditorium at 3:30 on that
same day. Admission will be a silver  collection.
AT THE very early hour of
7 a.m. Sunday morning the second intramural Ice hockey game of
the season was begun. After an
hour of fierce and rather clumsy
playing the Engineers found themselves on the bottom of a G-3* score
with the Artsmen carrying off the
honors.
SPORT
Sports Editor—ALEX MacGILLIVRAY
SOUTHERN   VOLLEYBALL
TEAM   HERE   THURSDAY
Dick Penn's UBC volleyball team will meet University of Washington Thursday noon this week in a set of
games in the gym.
The University of Washington and UBC have played
two sets of games before with both teams getting a victory.
UBC has played and beaten Powell River.
There will be a 10 cent charge at the gym door for
admission.
Penn has as yet not released his starting lineup but
two sure starters will be Pete and Bill Walker.
Other details will be reported in this paper Thursday in
regards to to both teams.
Redshirts, Frosh
'Square Off Today
In Grudge Clash
Red-shirted Engineers predict
a "slaughter" today when they
meet freshmen to settle their old
differences ln a basketball game In
the UBC gymnasium at noon.
The engineers were replying to
a challenge directed at them by
Freshmen last week.
"We'll settle hasn, not differences," an engineer's spokesmen
said Monday.
UBC's Kickapoo Club announced
that they would carry on their secret Initiation rites ln conjunction
with the feud at noon. "We need
lots of fresh blood," a Kickapoo
spokesman said, "and we know
the engineers and frosh will provide It."
INTRAMURAL SOCCER
Monday, Jan. 22
1 Anglican Col vs Teacher Tr.
Tuesday, Jan. 23
1 Kappa SIg vs Eng 1
Wednesday, Jan. 24
1 ATO vs Alpha Delt
Friday, Jan. 26
1 Newman vs Fiji
CHIEFS WIN
'Told You So'
Says Penn's
Hoopsters
The words fired with the
rapidity of a hair trigger
around Dick Penn's basketball
league, today were "I told you
so."
Reason for the excitement ls
merely that the Chiefs have won
their second game in league play.
Saturday night they nipped the
New Westminster Luckies, 38-37 ln
one of the tightest games ot tbe
season.
Jim Carter with nine, Dan Za-
harko and Max Bertram with eight,
sparked the winners.
Chiefs led at the half 21-14 and
relied on their zone defence in the
final period to keep the Luckies
away from the hoop.
"All we have to do now," said
Penn, "Is win four more games and
we're In the playoffs."
at
at
at
THE DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD REQUIRES
ENGINEERS
The Defence Research Board requires graduate Engineers, for
full-time employment in the following specialized fields:—
Electrical   Engineers—Five   positions—for   Laboratories
Halifax, N.S., Valcartler, P.Q., and Ottawa, Ont.
Mechanical   Engineers—Ten   positions—for  Laboratories
Valcartler, P.Q., Halifax, N.S., and Suffield, Alta.
Chemical   Engineers—Four   positions—for   Laboratories
Halifax, N.S., and Valcartler, P.Q.
Metallurgical    Engineers—Two   positions—for   the   Board's
Laboratory at Halifax, N.S.
The Initial salaries for applicants with Bachelor Degrees will
not be lower than $2,760 per annum. Allowances will be made for
applicants having experience and additional academic qualifications.
Apply to: DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH PERSONNEL,
DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD,
DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE,
"A" BUILDING, OTTAWA, ONTARIO.
EATON'S Campus Favourite of the Week
Copy by JOAN ...
... Modelled by BETTE BROWNE
reath of spring  in your January
rdrobe — a   fresh   blouse   fronn
EATON'S.   Whether  you  want  a
perky tailored blouse or a bit of
frothy   femininity,   you'll   find
it   in   EATON'S   Sportswear
Department.
Sprightly white eyelet — a preview of
things to come. Cap-sleeved, cleverly
buttoned, a Magee blouse. 8.95
James Chambers of Vancouver makes
this .smart bat-wing blouse in red velveteen. Note the elbow-length sleeves and
the snappy stand-up collar. Self-covered
buttons. 13.&5
Practical tailored blouse *just right for
UHC wear. Material In this Tan Jay
creation is a combination ol* acetate and
nylon. 4.98
Pretend pearls button this La Dear
blouse which has a pretty combination
ot* lace and tucks. Lace-trimmed sleeves
add a special touch. 10.<b;
EATON'S—Sportswear, Second Floor
T EATON C°
Photos by Sklpsey Studios.
v-(^A^-V

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