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The Ubyssey Mar 29, 1951

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VOL, XXXIII
VANCOUVER, B.C. THURSDAY, MARCH M, 1951
NO 89
COSTUMED DANCE TEAM will be one of the features presented to UBC students when the touring Austrian students
and teachers invade the campus April 5. The troup will put on
a two hour show in the auditorium starting at 12:30 p.m. is 25
cents.
Students  To  Give
Opinions  Of  Profs
* Students may get a chance
to tell professors just what
they think of their courses, if
a motion introduced by Student Council receives the
green light from the Faculty
Association.
Spend Summer
At ISS Seminar
Four UBC students wif spend the
summer months at a miniature International community at Otawa,
and all expenses paid.
The UBC ISiS Committee an-
nounced plans Wednesday for the
Fourth International Summer Seminar, previously held In Eurape,
and this year for the first time
held in Canada. Four students
have been Invited to take part from
I'BC on an all-expense scholarships
during the six-week,seminar course
OContlnued on Page 3)
See ISS SEMINAR
Motion that a ltason committee
be set up to act as a medlary between students and professors was
brought up by the new council at
their meeting Tuesday night. No
committee will be struck 'till approval of the scheme is given by
President N. A. M. MacKenzie and
the Faculty Association.
By  the scheme, each  undergraduate society would have its own
liason committee which would be
directly  responsible  to  a  council
(Continued on  Page 2)
See OPINIONS
Students Organize
\
Spectrum Club' Here
~^ Pelitfctl Club Members Form
Club to Discuss Current Issues
***--*"l^r-
FREE TOTEMS
TO CAMPUS
ORGANIZATIONS
A free '61 Tetem will be
given te any organisation
whose members buy 20 of the
now outstanding* year books, Al
Goldsmith, chalrhnan of the Totem Sales Committee, announced today.
To get the free book send
in the names of 20 members
together with the numbers on
their Totem receipts to the
AMS office en or before Friday
April 20th.  ■
Tween Clems
Mardi Gras
Elections To
Be Held Friday
MARDI GRAS Elections will
be held on Friday noon in Ap.
Sc. 100. Members of all fraternities and sororities are
urged to attend.
Suggestions for the theme of
the '52 ball will be accepted
from the floor. f
* *      *
DR. W. I. ROSS, recently director of the London School of Slavonic and East European Studies,
will speak ln Physics 200T>n Thursday at noon, on "The Hope for
Peace ln Europe." He ls sponsored
by the Student Peace Movement.
¥      #      ¥
ALL THOSE interested In working with the International House
Committee are asked to attend a
meeting in Arts 208. at 12:30 noon,
Friday, March 30th.
* *       *
THE NEWMAN* CLUB will hold
its final Communion Breakfast of
the year on April 1st, at Sacred
Heart Convent, 29th and Highbury
after the 9 A.M. mass.
9fi *p v
PREMED ELECTIONS will be
held  In  Physics 201  at  12:30.
"Spinal Anaesthesia," a film, will
also be shown.
GOODWILL MISSION
Members of UBC political clubs banded together Wednes*
day to form an organization called the "Spectrum Club."
The club was organized to pro- $. •
vide an opportunity for students to
discuss polltioal Issues on a nonparty basis.
Contentious Issues on the local,
national and international level
will be discussed by the group.
Main advantage of the club Is to
allow students who are affiliated
with campus political clubs to express their opinions without being
hindered by their affiliation.
The Spectrum Club will be
headed by an executive of five,
members known as the "Rump"
whose Identity will be known only
to club members.
The "Rump" will be elected at a
special meeting and their names
Sedgewick
Award To
H
Winner, of the Garnet Sedgewick Award for outstanding
civil liberties work during 1950
is Professor Hupnter Lewis, of
UBC's English Department.
Award, made annually by cam*
pus branch, Canadian Civil Liber*
ties Union, was announced at a
must  be  kept  secret  so  long  as j jolnt meeting Friday of clubs sup-
(Continued on Page 3)
See POLITICAL CLUBS
A-Day Is Austrian Day
Thursday, April 5, Is A-day  on j Austrian poets
UBC campus.
On that day, a musical good-will
mission of Austrlans will entertain *      .and
students with gay Austrian melodies, folk dances and yodelling.
Their two-hour show, called "Visitors from Vienna," will be presented from 12:30 to 2:30 ln the
auditorium. Admission will be 25
cents.
This is the second Austrian goodwill tour to be presented on campus. Last year the troupe presented a program of songs and dances
and an hour of readings from the
ness   some   village   customs   and
Only two of last year's perform-  make  friends  with  the  mountain
ers will return this year. The  10 peasants.
boys   who  compose!    The spring scene wil be laid In
the troupe are all students and
teachers, representing every region of Austria from the Swiss Alps
to the Hungarian border.
Their show, a melodic tour of
Austria, will be arranged according to the seasonr of the year. A
great variety of authentic folk-
songs and dances will be strung
together by a simple plot.
an alpine village square, where
the beginning of spring is celebrated by festivities around the traditional maypole, The Viennese visitors (and the audience) accompany the Austrians through the various seasons, with their traditional
celebrations ln moods varying
from rollicking to sentimental.
Conclusion  of the  show  comes
porting Vancouver CLU's brief
dealing with suggested changes in
the federal Indian Act.
Featured speaker was Mr. Lewis,
who compiled the brief. He arrived at the meeting after the
award had been made public, and
expressed himself as "surprised
and honored.'"
DEFECTS IN LEGISLATION
In his main speech, Mr. Lewis
outlined the detects in legislation
to date dealing with the affairs of
Canadian  Indians.
He said Bill 79, which has just
gone through its first reading in
(Continued on Page 2)
See CLU AWARD
Acadia
To Become
Intl House
Acadia Camp will become an In*
j ternational House in Sept. 1951. A
1 hard working committee under the
direction of Peter Steckl has
obtained this major concession
from the University administra*
lion.
i This camp has been granted as
a temporary International House
directed by the Acadia Council and
the International House Committee.
The  plan  will  ask  for  at least
50 per cent of the camp residents
to  be   Canadian   students,   preferably those  who  are  Interested  in
(Continued  on  Page  3)
See INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
The story concerns some tourists with the winter scene, when a col-
from Vienna and the Burgenland orful peasant marriage takes place
who on their mountain tour wit- far out in the Alps.
SANDY ROBERTSON, form-
er four year letterman of the
Thunderbirds will lead his
Clover Leaf mates tonight,
Friday, and Saturday at. the
new Gym when they meet the
Edmonton Meteors in the best
of five series, for the Western
Canadian Title. All games start
at 9:00 p.m. Student tickets are
50 cents at the game with net
proceeds going to the Gym
Fund.
Open House Chairman
Applications Asked
Student Council is calling for
applications for chairman of Open
House Committee.
Open House was last held In the
spring of 1948 when over 50,000
paraded over the campus.
Students applying should be a
senior next year.
Deadline for applications is
April 9 at 4:00 p.m. and should be
given to the Secretary of Student
Council. Page 2
THS UBYSSflY
Thursdiy;Msrtfhaf,Wil
Elect Officers
Jack Barnet former President of the Kickapoo Pep Club
turned over his gravel to newly
elected president Bill St. John
Tuesday noon. Other members
elected to office were Vice-
President, Blair Little', Secretary Bobby Eskeatrand and
Treasurer Anne Willis.
Honorary awards, will be given
to the three most valuable Poo
members. Sleeted at the meeting
for these awards were Bill Sparling, Jack Barnet and Bill St. John.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE Society
president for the 19M-52 term is
Don Mawhlnney. He was elected
at a meeting held last week.
Chosen secretary was- Dorothy
Stewart.
In Law Undergraduate Society el
ectlons, Gordon Coghlln was named
second year president. Other executive members will be elected
next fall.
¥      ¥      ¥
THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS Club has elected Oeorge
Rowens, 4th year Arts student president for the forthcoming year.
Also elected was Tommy Korlcan,,
"1st year law, as vice-president,
Kitty Prime, secretary, Dave Cook-
«ey treasurer and Marie Morley,
social convener.
#.    I    S ''f'!'PT:
FOREST CLUB elections have
resulted ln Bill Sharpe as president for '51-'52. Also elected were
Selwn Fox, Jim McWilliams, Alf
Cuthbert, Don Johnston, Art Schol-
efleld, Tony Robinson, John MacQueen, Fred Waldle. Prof. H.
Haines was elected Honorary president.
CLU AWARD
(Continued from Page 1)
the federal house, was' "essentially a repetition" of Bill 267, which
was withdrawn last fall.
"Technically, It is a more effective bill," he said, "but it does not
contain provisions for a sufficient
degree of the right kind of ad
vancement  for the  Indians."
"The Indian situation has not
been kept abreast of the cultural
and social situation of the rest of
the country."
LET INDIAN DEVELOP
"It is simply a question of allowing the Indian to develop the powers already extant in him."
Clubs represented at the ment-
in.s; included.* Civil Liberties Union,
Progressive Conservative Club,
Student Peace Movement, Student
Christian Moveir.^nt, India Students' Association, Parliamentary
Forum. Social Problems Club, CCF,
Teacher  Training Society.
—w\mm~~
(Continued from Page 1)
committee. Students would convey
ideas about their courses to their
respresentativeg who would pass
them on to professors concerned.
One thing is definite, claims
council treasurer PhU Anderson.
The committee would not be a
gestapo. It would Improve courses
and education standard at VBC.
A similar scheme to that proposed by Council has been operating in the Commerce department
since November, With backing of
Commerce director E. B. MacPhee,
commerce students have formed a
llason committee made up of one
mehvber from each option1 in each
year,
Oeneral student suggestions are
brought to the committee, which
takes them before Prof. MacPhee.
He, in turn, discusses them with
professors of the department,
Most commercemen, said Anderson, working their way through
university, and want to get their
money's worth. While they ddn't
feel ln a position to dictate yet,
they can indicate what they like
or dislike in ther courses.
A large percentage of Commerce
voters during—council elections,
Anderson said, was attributed to
the spirit drummed up bf the
llason.
In the University of Washington, the llason scheme is so strong
that professors who are rated do
not dare buck recommondatlons.
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UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to'noon
Loose Loaf Note Books, Exorciso Books
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GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INK
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Owned and Operated by tiie University of B.C.
Graduation
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We  your  "TOTEM"  Photograpers  Extend   our
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MAIL GYM PLEDGI5WW,
«
In order to put the Gym Drive over the top, students
have been asked by AMS President Vaughan Lyon to mail
their pledges into the Brock as soon as possible.
Committee members wish to obtain the final total
before school closes.
Any student who did not receive a pledge in the mail or
in a class is asked to pick it up in the AMS office.
All students who cSn pay their pledges now are asked
to do so, as there are bills outstanding in connection with
the construction of the gym.
Convention In West
Canadian Federation of Newman Clubs will break precedent this year by holding their annual convention ln the west
on the campus of the University of British Columbia.
 <*>   Delegates from all part ot the
ISS SEMINAR
(Continued trom Page 1)
July 80 to September 6.
SXCHANOI Of IMAS
Object of the Seminar Is to pro-
mate an exchange of ideas between
Canadians, European* and Asians.
Fifty Canadian university students,
selected from all the universities
in Canada will meet with 65 students from South Cast Asja, the
United States and Europe.
Applications will be open from
today, said ISS officials. Selection
will be made pn the bass of academe ablliy, participation ln student affairs, character and leadership, so that the student can assume a lead ln international think*
ing on the campus. Only requisite
is that the student ls returning to
UBC for further study.
MOST COSTS COVERED
The scholarship covers food, lodging and tuition for the whole period and in addition the costs of
transportation to Ottawa.
Deadline for appllcalons will be
Monday, April 16 said Mike Hind-
Smith, ISS official. Further information and application forms can
be obtained from the AMS Office
or fconi Peter tie Vooght any noon
hour at the ISS office helilnd the
Brock.
dominion will converge upon the
UBC campy on September 5 for
the four day conference.
, Farthest west the convention bas
been h*M before was in Winnipeg.
, Special transportation arrange*
ments are being made to allow a
large number of delegates to attend the convention.
Ample time for relaxation has
In between business been planned for the delegates by the Vancouver committee ln charge, which
is under the direction ot Reg
Clarkson.
Tours of Vancouver and vicinity, dinner at Hollyburn Chalet,
luncheons, a talent * show, and a
closing banquet and dance on the
eve of Newman Sunday are scheduled by the committee.
(Continues frony Page 1)
International Affaifs and eager to
meet foreign students. It will also
be a guaranteed residence for
foreign students who have recently
arrived from abroad. However, the
camp is still open to any student.
Other International Houses operate as separate, permanent structures in Paris, New York, Chicago
and Berkeley.
It Is the hope ot the UBC International House Committee that
this campus .will at some date be
able to offer a permanet Interna-
POLITICAL CLUtS
(Continued from Page 1)
they hold office to assure them of
"complete freedom from Intimidation."
Only identified executive oficer
ot the Speotrum Club will be the
secretary, elected at the same time
as the "Rump" and also official
Public Relations Officer for the
organisation.
Secretary elected at the meeting Wednesday was Bob de Phyf-
fer. Honorary president is Speaker
of the Legislative Assembly, The
Honorable  Napcy  Hodges.
Membership is open to members
of all political clubs pr, to the holders of any recognised political belief.
Foster Isherwood, who ehaired
the Initial organising meeting, said
it was intended mostly as an organised "bull-session" where students would be free to discuss any
political Issue, on a seminar level.
Objects of the group are to "foster and preserve the ideals of
young Canadians," to stimulate
free political discussion, and to
provide "a vehicle for forthright
action to be taken to trie people
and students of Canada In a democratic  manner.
Now is the time before
exams for that
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TNE SHOE OF CHAMPIONS MEMBBH QANAD1AN UNlVfHSITY PRBSI
Authorised aa Second Class MaU Post Office Dept. Ottawa, Student iubscriptlons 11 per
year (inoluded la AMS Fees). Mail Subscrlptions-lJ.OO per ysar. Published throughout
the university year by tne Student Publications Board of tbe Alma Mater Society of the
Unirersity of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Ubyssey and sot
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Sooiety nor ot the University.
OHoes iii Brook Hall, Phone ALma 1684 For display advertising phone ALma B0»
■DITOMN-CHIBF        ...- RAY FROST
QKNIRAL STAFF: Senior Editors, Ann Langbeln, Mart Stainsby; CUP Editor, Joan
Churchill; Women's Editor, loan Fraser, Sports Editor, Alex MacGlllivray; Fine Arts
Edilor, John Brockington; Editorial Writers, Les Armour, Hal Tennant; Photography,
Tommy Hatcher.
Senior IS'tor This I mus- ALLAN GOLDSMITH
Aeseeiate Idltors— DIANNI LIVINGSTONE,
IRMA JANI FOSTIR, SHIILA   KEARNS
Another Global Stride
Word that Acadia Camp next year will
become a temporary International House for
the inter-mingling of foreign and Canadian
UBC students should come as cheering news
for a sizeable proportion of our student body.
No one by this time should need much
proof that we have more than our fair share
of students who are constantly thinking not.
provincially, not even merely nationally, but
thinking globally.
We -can foresee the time when Acadia
Camp, or more likely another such place like
it, will become the headquarters for the
"world diplomats" among us.
Evidence that world problems are becoming our problems (and that is as it should
be) is contained" in any one Week's list of
speakers who have been keeping student
audiences enthralled (and incensed) all year
with discussions of international affairs.
And our international clubs now, as
a group, occupy the spotlight once held by the
once-mightly political clubs. ,
The  establishment  of  an  International
House seems to us to be a laudable new tack
for the whole international movement to take.
It's a cliche to say that it will provide a
chance for Canadian-born students here to
discover that we are all "brothers under the
skin," but to us it's also the most concise way
we can think of to express an indisputable
tru,th.
There is a danger, of course, of becoming
smug and patronizing about our International
House after it begins to operate. Such organizations are inevitably peopled with some who
bend over backwards to be "tolerant" of
foreigners.
But even if such a fault should exist from
the outset, we cannot help but believe that
our International House will accomplish enough good to make up for such a shortcoming.
We suggest that the students responsible
for organizing International House see to it
that its opening is a widely-heralded affair, in*
order for it to get the public attention it
deserves.
The Great American Way
From The Daily Californian
WASHINGTON—(AP)—President Truman said today the basic principle of American foreign policy is this:
"To see that the people in the world have
the things that are necessary to make life
worthwhile and that they have and live by
the moral code in which we believe." —
Associated Press dispatch.
In fairness to our friend from Missouri,
it should be pointed out that the above remarks were addressed to a visiting delegation of clergymen, so perhaps he was just
clutching for a set of glory-words appropriate
to the occasion. But if the President really
meant what he said, it would seem that the
United States has taken a rather taU order.
The patronizing assumption that everybody in the world should just naturally think
and act exactly as we do (or rather, as we
profess to thing and act) has had all sorts of
varied consequences. It has been at least
partially responsible for a gamut of events,
including, among others, the Mexican war
and the wrapping in Mother Hubbards of
numerous South Pacific ladies who preferred
to adapt their apparel to the climate.
Trouble is, most other nations and cultures are also imbued with the idea that their
moral codes" are the ones which everybody
else in the world should "have, and live by."
Some of these nations and cultures are fully
as adamant about their "moral codes" as
President Truman says he wants us to be
about ours. And sometimes a row about
"moral codes" makes a convincing cover for
another row about politics or economics.
To explore the subject a bit further, just
what "moral code" was the President talking
about? The Ten Commandments, perhaps?
And perhaps he wants other nations to "live
by" them in such manner that they, too, can
have the world's highest crime and divorce
rates? Or was he talking about the idea so
common among Americans that freedom cpn-
sists of climbing to something known as "success" by stepping on the heads of those less
skillful at attaining it? Or was he talking
about the common motion that black people
shouldn't be allowed to associate with white
people?
Altogether, we think Americans generally and Truman in particular would get
along a lot better if they tried minding their
own business for a while and stopped trying
to make the whole world adopt the "American way"—whatever that is.
letter ta tha Iditor
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Although I am not a student ot
logic, I think I can point out a few
flaws ln the editorial "Campaign
of Truth?" reprinted from The
Dally Californian In the March 20
Issue of The Ubyssey.
There were still some who remembered that I*nln, Trotsky and
Stalin were not even in Russia at
the time of the Revolution of 1917,
remembered also, the hijacking of
the Revolution by the Bolshevik*,
remembered the fact that the Bolsheviks polled only 25 per cent of
the votes cast in the free election
of 1917, remembered the tragedy
of the parliament that lasted only
one day. Others had not forgotten
the Kronstadt Massacre of 1921,
the organized famine In 1932-HH,
the "liquidation of kulaks", or the
millions of "criminals" working as
slave laborers.
In answer to The Californian
correspondent, I urge every student to read "Verdict of Three Decades", either as condensed in the
Readers Digest of March, 1951, or
ln the unabridged form.
, Yours truly, .
*Terry Nlcholls.
THE
DOROTHY
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Lattar ta tka Ettar
Alitor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
We feel that this letter, wrlttet
to the editor of the New Statesman and Nation, published in the
issue of February 12, is noteworthy ot the students' attention
since lt expresses an opinion which
Is growing in strength throughout
Europe. One of the authors is Herbert Read, who survived World
War 1 with a distinguished military
record and ls now renowned as a
scholar and author ot numerous
books on subjects ranging from
art to philosophy.   '
Day hy day, as you readily ad
mit in our editorials, we drift
nearer to war, and though some
cry out in alarm, Now now, and
others Not there I (that ls to say,
not In the Bast) those who say No
war at any price are seldom heard,
and a virtual censorship of this
viewpoint exists today such ae has
never existed in the past But that
opinion exists, even where It ie
not yet vocal, and to ignore it is
to add unreality to an already unreal situation.
As two writers who occasionally
contribute* to youil columns,, and
who have many friends who share
our opinions, we would like to
state, with reason and urgency,
what we believe to be the only policy capable of averting the total
destruction of our country and ou>*
civilization. We believe In a complete reversal of the present national policy, and we advocate one
of complete and unilateral disarmament, though we would not reject
the possibility of an agreed polloy
of disarmament between the Western Powers and the USSR. We are
not simpletons, sentimentalists or
fellow-travellers. We are fully acquainted with the history, ideology
and practice of the Soviet regime-
more fully, we believe, than many
members of H.M. Government. We
express this view upon solid moral,
psychological and practical grounds, which we believe to coincide.
Either the Soviet Government
now Intends to overrun Europe or
It does not. If It does not, we are
going the best way to provoke lt
to do so. If lt does, then, however,
serious the threat, we do not believe that It approaches In gravity
M,WL
*MLkr* tm"in1iS%  jRmf3&&2m*Mim^lim*   'd ^^^*£**£k-     *
we mrent, ww wn^ji kobm
war, but'ef tin cooia>e;ueooe* of
mass rearmament and ot prolonged artificial war-toyateria.
At the extreme, the mof t serious
consequence we can Imagine to the
policy we advocate is domination
by an imperialist Russia. Europe
already rune this risk. "Defeat
would mean the end of Europe."
We see no realistic possibility of
preventing this destruction by any
military measures. War between
Russia and America could not be
won by'either side: it would Involve the Immediate occupation of
Europe by the Red Army, followed
by its devastation by the United '
States, on the model ot Korea.
We do not believe that total disarmament and neutrality would
add to the hazard ot our present
position, as indefensible allies of
an Irresponsible Power. In fact, we-
think lt possible that the moral
and psychological effects of the
action we advocate would avert or
limit the threat.
Assuming that they did not, the
task would become one of enabling
the largest possible part of the intellectual and moral tradition of
this country to survive an occupation. An occupied Britain might exert such an Influence. A totally devastated Britain could not. In our
view, the historical and psychological study of occupations makes it
plain that they are one of the processes through which tyrannies
are modified and cultural attitudes
perpetuated. We regard this possibility, together with all the hardships and losses lt entails as preferable In the present event to the
alternative, the re-enactment of
Korea ln Europe and the retaliatory butchery of the population of
Russia, which would destroy together our freedom, our consciences, our culture, our lives and the
chances of redeeming any of these
from the general ruin of Western
civilization.
We therefore state not only our
belief In the necessity of immediate disarmament, but our personal
Intention to refuse any participation, mofal or physical, In war between East and West.
Herbert Read
Alex Comfort
•f* * V
Thank you for being kind enough
to print this.
Yours truly,
The executive of the SPM
Silk Specialists
ffi
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628 Granville
Phone TA. 1221
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"old-faithful"
makes
in
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TJWB^fTTW
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Football A Lift
At long last, UBC football teams will be getting some help.
Plans for the fall football program, which will be outliped
completely in a series of Jour noon hour meetings next week.
include the extensive use of a training table and the scheduling
of late labs to fit football training schedules.
Acting football coach. Jelly An-*-—— ■	
Ubyssey Classified
" eerson, who worked as assistant
coach under Orville Burke last
year, is conducting the meetings
which begin at 12:80 p.m. Tuesday in Hut L2 and will continue
each noon hour until Friday to
Cover all aspects of the fall program.
Anderson disclosed to the Ubyssey what he intends to cover at
the meeting and what he hop a;, to
accomplish  next fall.
He said thatj the training tuble,
which Brock Ostrom asked the
student body to provide lasl fall
to help ont the football players
■While they are practicing will definitely be established In September when football practiced cau be
officially opened.
The table will acontmodatc about
thirty men, Anderson said when
Jail football training officially
•tarts September 1, as of Confer
•nee fates.
First game is tentatively scheduled with Western Washington on
September 19 down ip Bellingham.
What Anderson considers the
biggest boom to football beside*-*
the training table is the assurance
from Dean Gage that late labs dun
be scheduled so that football trainees cau attend both the labs and
the  practice  sessions.
"Many players Just couldn't turn
out to practice last year because
of badly scheduled labs," Anderson said. "We think that we can
get around that difficulty next
tall."
Complete schedule of games, still
tentative, and the proposed train
ing schedule for the fall will give
out In the course of the four days
of meets.
Anderson wants every man who
intends to play for UBC next fall,
•whether he ls an old veteran or a
novice, to be at the meeting in
order to get all of the routine matter of equipment, lockers, practice
fields, etc., out of the way now.
UHC will be using the split "T"
formation next year, Anderson
said, to enable the coach to get
the most vuluo ont of the material
available.
Anderson thought It would be
the best kind or offense for UBC,
since it offers a field or more deception.
Anderson plans to have daily
practlcf-s over early every clay so
that as many students as possible
will he able to attend practices.
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
t-soiwres, protractors,
SET SIJl ARES
mi:< iiank vi, irtr*i\Ei<;°ns
AMI
poi.ypii\se si.inn rii.es
       •
AM I.S LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
$ Dr.
On Radio In Juno
Dr. Leonard Marsh, ot the Department of Social Work and author ot 'Rebuilding a Neighbor
hood", will be interviewed by Lad
dy Watkins on the regular radio
broadcast ot the Vancouver Council ot Women, early In June.
Discussion, will be centred
around his book, which describes
rehabilitation of a semi-slum district In East Vancouver.
Arrangements for tihe 'Interview
were made by campus Social Problems Club.
TUTOftlNQ
TUTORING, lu 1st year English ft
Math, by McOill graduate. KE
77*80 L, 2211 W. 37th.
COACHING IN FRENCfl ft GERMAN: by Viennese born teacher.
FA 8869 M.
CAREER IN RADIO, Announcing,
Singing. Public Speaking, Continuity Writing. Phone Miss Ethel
Ann Wallace, PA 6601.
WANTIO
BUSINESS   FINANCE  LECTURE
NOTES, wanted to buy, rent, or
borrow a first class set ot notes.
Phone John at PA 7970.
FOR SAL ■
THE NEW WEAR-EVER
HEALTH METHOD of COOKING
ls now being represented in the
University Area. Morris Dauncey,
CH 4644.
HAVE YOU GOT EXAM TROUBLES? Get a talking BUDGERIGAR (Love-Bird). He will listen to
all your sorrows. Phone KE 3939 R.
GOLF CLUBS, miscellaneous
woods ft Irons. KE 3055 R, Gordon.
AUTO TIRE ft TUBE, 6.25-6.60;
17. Phone Gordon at KE 3055 R.
LOST
WATERMANS' PEN, grey. Phone
AL 0397R.
BIOLOGY   100   MANUAL,   Phone
AL 0897 R.
GERMAN  90   GRAMMAR.   Phone
AL 0397 R.
SLIDE RULE, Frederick Post, in
red case. Please turn into Lost ft
Found or phone AL 1611 R.
SEAGRAMS BAG containing TAN
LEATHER WALLET, compact
etc., In vicinity of Hut M-32. Finder please phone Donnalene at
AL1931 R.
BRACELET, Enamel Emblem, a
keepsake, on Thursday. Phone
evenings at North 1152 Y or return
to Lost & Found.
REWARD for return of GREEN
WATERMANS' PEN, with chrome
cap, 2 weeks ago. T. Cartwrlght
c-o Campus Legion Office.
ONE BLACK LEATHER GLOVE,
please phone AL 0397 R.
upm
mmm*
ZIPPER RING.ROOKS
Cornpli'le willi Sheets nnd Index
Erom $2.6!)
IOl MAIN PENS
Clarke & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
STVI'IO.NERS himI PRINTERS
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Your shots will be cleaner, sharper and crisper.
Chrome plated,, longer lasting finish. Flanged
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Men's RIGHT or LEFT hand and ladies' RIGHT hand models.
Numbers 2 to 9 and putter. 19 (
Each ,,  *•«
MERCURY GOLF WOODS—Highly, finished hardwood heads
with a "True Temper" step down shaft and perforated leather
grip. Men's right or left hand and ladies' right hand A iQC
models. Each  W9W9
"MERCURY GOLF BALLS'—Guaranteed to conform to
aU rules and regulations of the British golf &%C
committee. Each	
Plus 4's, Olympics, Warwicks, 7A*C
Each  	
Par Flites, Blue Goose, Silvertowns. ftflfi
Each      VWV
GOLF BAGS—Made from hard wearing, moisture-proof
"Tolex." Light and strong with large hood; 0|  Off
ball pockets and score card holder	
Tournaments, Sixty-fives, North 115
British SS. Each     *•*«*
Tees, packet of 50 2SC
Each	
• SPORTING GOODS
• SECOND FLOOR
VANCOUVER'S    FAMILY    SHOPPING    CENTRE fliu»ta*^*to«Ha*fi«ir
Mm%
A LONG, LONG TmE AGO, nobody is just
quite sure when, Herman 'lee Lines" Fry*.
denlund was one of the feW people who didn't
escape the trap set to catch new pubsters.
. . . Been A-fice To Know Yoii
' most colorful writers. Above cartoonist b*a
sports editors from Chuck Marshall to 'jftfr
sent day Alex MacGillivray wish Herm a
good by, while staff looks on.
And as a result he stayed with the Ubyssey
sports department for five years writing ice
hockey.
This year Herm will graduate and with
his leaving thi Ubyssey will lose one of its
Track
Finals
Go
Field
Today
By DOUG HAWKES
Four Intra-Mural teams will be working hard to attain first
place in the coming track and field and softball competitions.
 ^   Redshirts,   Kappa   Sigs,   Betas,
and DCs are all trying for the
coveted Governor's Trophy which
Is awarded to that 'Mural team
with the most total points.
mesas nr
TO VICTORIA
So far this season the UBC
Thunderbird Rugger squad has
not managed to take any trophies but are well up in the
running for the McKechnie
Cup by virtue of three wins
and twe losses.
Saturday they fly to Victoria to play that city's rugger team.
Having just completed a
series with California Golden
Bears the Birds are In good
shape for Saturda'ys game.
World Cup went down South
after 3 straight wins. It took the
Birds four rugged matches before they played the brand of
ball of which they are capable.
In that fourth game the
teams tied 6-6.
REDSHIRTS ON TOP
At present the Redshirt clan is
on top with 318 points and are not
favoured to win the track and field
events.
Affable director Dick Penn said
the Betas might clean Up "that
evenj and If they win a few soft-
ball games may be seen out on top
after the dust settles. But the Redshirts look like champs."
However, the Redshirts only
need about 20 more points to cinch
the trophy and are reputed to hsfve
a fair softball team organized.
FINALS TODAY
Today the finals In track and
field will be held ln the Stadium
at 12:30. Only three events were
held yesterday: the medley realy,
the javelin and broad jump contests.
SPORT
Sports Editor—ALEX MacGILLIVRAY
Associate—SHEILA KEARNS
LEAFS, METEORS START
cage sum mam
Tickets for the Clover Leaf-Edmonton Meteors basketball finals
will be on sale at the New Gym.
Games go tonight, Friday and Saturday at the same place.
Series Is best of three for Western Canada title.
Student tickets are 50 cents. The proceeds from the games go
toward the gym fund.
UBC graduates make up the heavy scoring section ot the Clover
Leaf team. They are: Ole Bakken, Sandy Robertson, Bob Scarr,
Dave Campbell, Ron Weber, and Art Stilwell.
JOGS Intramural softball team
were threatened with defeat Tuesday when they were at the long end
of a r>-2 score piled up In,the first
Inning  by  Fort  Camp.    ,
34 YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE  UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
PRINTING CO. LTD.
. I 1 Ft'HON t       PA c   ! (  I l     O I 71
1035 SEYMOUR ST.
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Football Moat
Sat Tuesday
Coach Jelly Anderson has
called a meeting for all those
who are Interested in turning out for football next fall.
Hut L2 is the place and 12:30
the time, on Tuesday, April 3.
Anderson >ald .the points to
be covered are:
1. Schedule   of   practice.
2. Organizational obligations.
GOES APRIL 7
By   ALEX   MacGILLIVRAY
GENE SMITH, burdened by
a huge trophy which
threatened to topple him, managed a quick look at his watch.
"Do you know," said he, a
man not ready to mince words
unless they concern his one
and only sport soccer, "that in
exactly 10 days, 13 hours and
12 minutes, we will be playing
for the Imperial cup?"
We answered quite Innocently, "No."
"Migawd," screamed, he almost dropping the cup," whit
After That
B
kind of a department do you
call this? Here we are playing
the Imperial Cup final on April
7 at Brockton and you say you
know nothing about lt."
We attempted to calm him
down by asking him about the
cup he was holding.
"Oh, this," he said, "Is a
cup which we are presenting
to the winner of the intera-
mural soccer league. First was
given way back in 1931 and has
collected .nothing but dust
since.
Cup
UT   NEVER   mind   that.
Let's talk about our game
on the 7th."    j
"Who are ypu playing," he
was asked.
"Either Coljingwood or S.
Burnaby," he said scornfully to
the questioner, "and you should'
know that by now If you're
a sports  reporter."
"You know," he continued,
"we have heard a lot about
the only winning team on the
campus but look what happened. Now we have a winning
team ,an<J we';*e going to take
that cup." Page 8
mm~~a^+—-m——*——*—m*m
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Tfcur*d*yr*t»^ 2M*M
ii    i  a ml m,|i uiiini ^»-»«»^»—.
■i'i ii n ' "nn
HERE ARE LISTS
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Stage Set for Girl Athlete Awards At
WOS-WAA banquet at "12:30
today will see the presentation
of the WUS Actlvitities cup to
Klhe outstanding women's  un-
~, dergraduate society, and ot the
major    and    minor    athletic
.   blocks awarded to the    most
, {prominent feminine athletes
on the campus.
AWARDS
■Ifl  Blocks;   Grass  Hockey
—LHa   Scott,   Dree   Stewart.
k Carol MacKinnon, Doreen Armour, Elisabeth  Abercrombie.
, Basketball — Miml Wright, Eleanor Nyholm, Sheila Moore,
Janet Crafter, Eleanor Cave.
Swimming — Mureen Bray,
•kling — Ted Harper.
v   Badminton — Maureen Bray,
, Pat Gray, Claire Bowyer, Anne
\ "Munro.
, Small Blocks: Grass Hockey—
Doree McKee, Dawn Thomson.
, BJleanor Cave, Phyllis Leiter-
man, Marie Harrison, Maween
Bray,
Basketball — Doreen Brinham.
Pat Donovan. DoloreB Hart-
man, Adele Aseltlne, Doreen
Ciwnmlng.
Swimming — Diane Johnson,
Peggy Hennlger, Betty Smith.
SkllnQ — Mary Ward, Anne-
Marie "Leuchte.
Badminton —- Pat Crumb, Jean
Young. ~~
Round letters: Grass Hookey-
Pat Strange, June Taylor,
Brenda Day, Pat McEwan.
Basketball—Erma-Jane Foster
Margot "Salter, Eleanor MacKensle, Jean Schaefer, Blanche Banerd.
Swimming  — .Dree   8tewart,
Elisabeth Abercomble, Esther
I^eir,  Mary Harrison.
Skiing — Betty Ball.
Badminton — none.
8INI0R MANAGIR AWAROS
....Doreen Brinham, Diane John-..
son, Tad Harper.
JUNIOR MANAQBR AWARDS
Pat Oray, Claire Bowyer, Pat
Gray,   Claire   Bowyer.
HONORARY  BlQ BLOCK
Awards
Eleanor MacKensle, Mimi
Wright, Jean Bardsley, Lois
Reid. *~
In Intramural cumpetytlon
Phys. Ed. I topped the teams
with "530 points. The next seven In order were: VOC, 515;
Aggie, 480; Newman. 470; Arts
I   blue,   450;   Residence,   445;
WOMENS SPORT
SHEILA KEARNS
Dear Pa,
Bein' as to how Brother Joe
ain't writcha fer a long time,
I thoiight I'd better let you
and Ma know what's going on
around here.
Say, Pa, the ghis are always
complaining that they don't get
enough Tnibllclty for their sports
in the "Ubyssey. But, y6\i know.
Pa, there are a lot less girls on
the campus than boys, and even
fewer that are Interested In girls
sports. Add to this the fact that
It is the male Intercollegiate athletics that get the lion's share
•of available newsaper space, not
men's Intramurals, and you can
see that the girls get at least as
much representation on the
sports pagfl an the boys, considering the amount and the
sphere of their activity.
*        *        *
8UFERIN' succotash. Pa. the
girls here dont realize how lucky
they are In their sports. Why, iu
the States most colleges forbid
any women's athletic competition
on the university level. Seems
that by the time they reach college age, the average girl is Interested  In other things!
(Ed:   note—HOW   TRUE.
Now, Pa, I'm not trying to start
a fight. Most of us agree that
the girl's athletic budget Is pretty
small We've got a winning has-
ketball team here, but they couldn't stretch their money to covet-
any road trips. This situation is
too bad, because? thoso girls have
given a lot of time to practising
ami they deserve something for
it.
*r *r *S*
I'M telling jrou, Pa we've got a
good WAA president for next
year Joan MacAthur, and although she doesn't mention an
increased budget in her platform,
it niny be In her future plans.
Joan's biggest Item In. her cam
paigning was expansion of intramurals and the provision of practice .facilities for girls entering*
Intramural competition. (Now
pa, If they had something sensible like hay pitching contests,
I wouldn't need any practice!)
Weepers, Pa, there Is one really
fine organization around here
for my money. That's the Intramural setup at UBC. This intramural business gives a lot of
girls, who don't have the time or
ability for the major teams, a
chance to participate in athletics.
We can play grass hockey, tennis,
basketball volleyball, badminton,
and soccer at noon three times a
week. Only trouble ls, Pa, running around with a basketball in
one hand and a sandwich in the
other often gives you Indigestion,
and you can hardly ever make
your 1:30 class. So don't be surprised if I fall French and History. (Just, preparlug you, Pa.)
#       *       *
IN passing Pa, I noticed some
pretty good uthletes around here
this year. Eleanor Cave can sure
pop in those hoop points. Also
Eleanor Nyholm, Miml Wright,
and Doreen Cummings, Pat Mc-
ewan and Jean Lelper sparked
the volleyball team. Peggy Hen-
nlger and Maureen Bray are doing alright In the swimming line.
('lair Boyer is running this Intramural schedule well, Pa, and
Miml Wright is guiding WAA on
a straight and steady course.
*r Sp qp
WELL, Pa, guess I'd better
close now. Gotta run out and
play a soccer game while I eat
my Fort Camp cookies. If th«
game goes too badly I can drop
oue on somebody's toes. That'll
fix them!   •
So long, Pa. Keep the farm safe
till  I  get  home.
Your  little  sweet  patootle,
JOAN COLLEGE,
Arts I! red, 42*6 and Phys. Ed.
II, 410.
Oamma Phi Beta led the sororities with 276 points, followed closely by Alpha Phi
with 267, Alpha Oamma Delta
171, Delta Oamma 108, Helta
Phi Epsilon 74, Kappa Kappa Oamma 84, Alpha Delta Pi
-SI, Alpha Omicron Pi 41, and
Kappa Alpha Theta 27.
Intramural cups were won
by: Tennis, Carole Evans and
Cynthia Clark: volley/ball,,
Arts I blue; Oras Hockey,
VOC; Ping Pong, Arts. I blue
Traok Met, Aggie; Basketball, Phys. Ed. I; Ski Meet,
and Arts 2 red (tie); Indoor
VOC; Archery, Arts HI, blue;
and Badminton, VOC.
Intramural blocks were won
by: Adele Aseltlne, Doreen
Armour, Beverley Birklnehaw.
•Claire Bowyer, Rosaline Bradley. .Doreen Brluham,     Anne
Bi-^ridge, Frances Cameron,
Shirley Campbell.
Anne Oatherwood, Eleanor
Cave, Anne Cooper, Doreen
Cummings, Ellen Dumeresq,
Beth Estey, Carol Evans, Val
Girling, Marie Harrison, Dolores Hartman, Peggy Henning-
er.   .'
Jean Hood, Sheila kearns,
Zella Kendrlck, Pat McEwan,
Marilyn McOlnnls, Eleanor
MoKensle, Kay MeUish, Mae
tiling, Maureen urphy, Barbara Netleon. .Dorothy Rush,
Betty Smith, Sally Tenenbaum,
Frances Verchere, Norma Walker, Anne 'Winter and Marcia
Young.
Intramural Managers Awards
went to: Betty Hall, Rosa*
line Bradley, Tad Harper, Marie Harrison, Sheila Kearns,
Anne Lenox, Shirley Lewis,
Jean Lelper, Llla Scott, Sheila
Toban and Fran Verchere.
!-**%*Hg"?f!'W"
4  HOUR
CLEANING SERVICE
PRITCHARD
9744 w»»t 10th at Alma
mmmmmmmmmm
r     ";   ..a  %f-   n nil. %j  * ^ i   t-'i.j.ey"
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LEARN TO DANCI
• ©JJJCJKJLY ;
• PASILV
• MIVATILY      .;':,<
• Lewen. 16.00-10 Lessens *tt.0Q
Francis Wni||^
I Alma Hell     ISTI Wr»*e|*-*fi
FA-6MMA       *—;■■• -
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FOR THE GREATEST EVENT OF THE SEASON
See Todays SUN and
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