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The Ubyssey Sep 30, 1954

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 THE UBYSSEY
VOLUME 27
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1954
SCENTS
NO. 6
AMS General Meeting
To Hear Bray, Athl
EDITORIAL
TRUE BLUB 3 "B" Dr. Gordon Shrum, head of UBC's
Physics Department, leaves no doubt in anyone's mind that
ho is a booster from away back. Like all loyal Thunderbird boosters, the Profesor is sporting a beanie, a button
Mid « balloon. Incidental to the proceedings is his demon-
, station of the sound physics principle concerning hot and
cold air.
RAH   RAH
Pepsters To Stage
Gigantic Meet
The Pep club's first pep meet this year will be staged in the
Auditorium Friday noon.
The   production   is   designed
to entertain and to promote
school spirit among the usually
spathic members oi U.B.C.
WYltODWTIOff	
Bob Solloway will introduce
the Master of Ceremonies, Dal
Richards, orchestra leader at the
Hotel Vancouver.
Lorraine McCallister, wife of
Richards, and popular singer
at the "Roof"'will do musical
comedy, numbers
BOP BANJO
Wally Peters and his bop
banjo, the feature entertainer
at the recent "Frosh Reception,"
will also appear at the gala show.
Two more added attractions
of the show will be Bud Henderson and his piano interpretations and Bus Totten, comic
violinist.
DONATION
All time at the show has been
donated and the ten cents admission fee will be used to pay
the union cover charges.
In the corridor outside the
auditorium, the members of the
Big Block Club will be selling
Athletic Cards.
Mussoc's
Operetta
Big Secret
An air of mystery surrounds
this years UBC Music Society
operetta scheduled for February.
The name of the operetta, only
twice before produced, is being
withheld, Mussoc president
Gerry Lecovin said Wednesday,
"until promotion gets underway,"
The yearVprogram was out.
lined at the first meeting of the
Music Society Wednesday noon
and was described by Lecovin
as "one of our most ambitious
years."
The first concert, a combined
effort of UBC Glee Club and
Symphony, will be staged the
third week in October. An increase in concert numbers, CBC
concerts and perhaps a bid from
CBU television, is anticipated
by the executive.
University  of  California
Institutes   Loyalty  Oath
BERKELEY—(CUP)—Signing a loyalty oath is now a
compulsory requirement for physically fit American male students at U.S. Universities which have Reserve Officers' Training Corps,
In an editorial, The University of California "Daily Cali-
fornian" cogently rips apart another piece of American legislation which is, in the opinion
of the editorial, setting a dan-
gerouse precedent.
As the paper points out, "the
university atmosphere is traditionally one of free and unhampered enquiry," the loyalty
oath demand Ls little more than
martyrdom for a few especially
idealistic  students ..."
The editorial was prompted
by a test case at the University
of California involving an English student who refused to sign
the oath.
UBC Grad Posted
The appointment of UBC grad
Carl Tolman to tiie post of vice
chancellor and dean of faculties
of Washington University in St.
Louis, Missouri was announced
last Fridav.
Frosh Urged
To Vote
For Council
Jerome Angel, co-ordinator
of activities, urged Wednesday
that all frosh take part in the
Frosh Undergraduate Society
Executive elections to be held
Friday.
One election sign is allowed
in each polling booth. All other
signs must be down by Thursday nt 4 p.m., warned Angel.
Polling booths will be located
in the Brock, Library. Quad and
in  front of the  bus stop.
Voting will take place from
10 a.m. lo 4 p.m. Library cards
will have lo be presented when
voting,
This newspaper today will ask student support in what is
a matter of vital concern to them.
If the Men's Athletic Committee continues to proceed in
secret, students will continue to be left in the dark as to the
athletic situation at UBC. It is a very interesting situation.
It always has been.
The Ubyssey was disappointed when the MAC barred Its
news editor. We knew there is hardly an administrative body
in existence which would pot prefer to conduct its meetings
in camera. But here is hardly one in existence which would
dare to attempt to.
Barring the press is barring the public. At UBC this is
particularly reprehensible, because a lack of politics on the
campus has left students without any way of considering
issues except by reading—in The Ubyssey—reports of opinions and decisions handed down at meetings.
The committee argues that its minutes are open to scrutiny by anyone—that they really do not operate in secret.
However, those of you who are familiar with the drafting of
minutes know how much they really do—or don't—contain.
The very fact that MAC wishes to meet in camera guarantees
that much goes on which does not appear in its minutes.
MAC also argues tMat it is a president's committee, and
hence entitled to meet in camera. But it is a president's
committee only because students asked it to be.
Complete student autonomy was relinquished because
students realized they could not operate an adequate athletic
program without the co-operation of the administration.
Ihe committee is  still  concerned   almost   solely with
student athletes.
MAC contends it can best conduct student business with
the absence of reporters; that some issues discussed—such as
the capabilities of individual coaches—are best kept from the
glare of publicity.
Here, we believe MAC is entitled to a concession. There
are some things, such as discussions of personalities, which
should not be aired in the press.
But there is nothing to stop MAC from adopting the procedure used by all administrative bodies—including Student
Council—when such subjects arise: Committee of the whole.
This device allows a council to conduct parts of its business in camera on the ground that the subject is really a
committee matter.
If not abused, this is an excellent solution. The Ubyssey
would not oppose its reasonable use.
But a cloak of secrecy over all proceedings is a violation of all democratic principles.
In fact, AMS treasurer Ron Bray has admitted that MAC
wishes to remain aj "benevolent dictatorship."
There is no such thing.
Ubyssey To Present
MAC Protest Motion
Athletic organization,, fraternity discrimination, Tbe
Ubyssey's financial setup, and treasurer Ron Bray's budget ate
the main issues to be considered at today's semi-annual general
meeting of the Alma Mater Society.
In addition, The Ubyssey will present a resolution asking
that reporters be allowed to cover meetings of the Men'i Athletic Committee. $r. 7~;r_;, -»_: *"~r
Th.   mMfln.     ♦«   H_,   1..M    .*   Uo»»«*   MAC.   This  mMM  COW-
The meeting, to be held at plet» C(mtrol Qf aU ^mMmin.
Three Names Appear
On USC Election Slate
Three nominations for Undergraduate Societies 'Chairmanship were entered Tuesday after the deadline had been ex
tended.
The deadline was first set for
Monday, September 27, but was
extended when no nominations
had been filed by 4:30 that afternoon.
NOMINEES
The three nominees are Jim
Killeen, Teacher Training; Victor Leo Isfield, AS4, and Walter
Douglas Young, Arts 4.
Young, a scholarship winner
is an executive member of Parliamentary Forum and last year
won the Legion Cup Debates
at UBC.
A bursary and scholarship
winner, Isfield served for three
years as a missionary in Brazil
before  returning  to  UBC.
Killeen last year served as
chairman of the High School conference committee He is a graduate studies student on scholarship.
OPENING
The post was thrown open
when Monte McKay, elected
chairman last year, was declared
ineligible for the position.
Candidates will deliver campaign speeches at Thursday's
AMS General Meeting which
will be held in the Armouries
at noon.
Election of USC chairman will
be  held  Friday.
Exchange
Students
Greeted
Five exchange students from
Eastern Canadian Universities
were welcomed to UBC Wednesday by National Federation of
Canadian University Students
Committee Chairman Jim Craig.
At a meeting in Brock Hall
Ihe students discussed problems
regarding scholarships, academic
courses, and participation in student activities.
Exchange students at UBC are:
Janet Goodman, McGill; John
Rayburn, Waterloo College- Lillian Forgrave, George Francis
and Gerard Van Tets, University of Toronto.
Under the same plan, three
UBC students are attending eastern Universities. Daniel McDonald and Sarah Robertson are
now enrolled at McGill; John
Bovey at the University of Toronto.
Tip.s for Teens: To hide those
unsightly adolescent blemishes
simlpy cover your face with a
twong   pouch.
12:30 in the Armory, will also
include campaign speeches from
candidates for the chairmanship
of the Undergraduate Societies
Committee, Introduction of exchange students, a presentation
to the Rowing Crew, and an-
nouncements.
Here are the main considerations:
1. Men's Athletic Directorate
chairman Bob Brady will seek
approval of a new constitution
for the Men's Athletic Committee-composed of faculty members as well as students.  *
At present, the School of Physical Education is responsible
for, both the physical fitness of
students, and for extra-mural
athletics.
The new plan will switch intercollegiate sport to the jurisdiq-
Committee Conducted
The Committee has conducted
a survey hy mail of all large
American universities in an effort to determine how they
coped-and are coping—with the
discrimination problem. Their
findings will be revealed.
3. The Ubyssey's new advertising contract will be submitted
for approval. Formerly, all advertisements in the Ubyssey
were sold by Standard Publishing Co., an affiliate of College
Printers Ltd. printers of the
Ubyssey). and revenues retained by the firm in exchange for
reduced publication bills for The
Ubyssey.
Under the new contract, all
advertising revenues go to The
Ubyssey, which now pays College Printers Ltd. the full costs
of printing The Ubyssey.
In effect, The Ubyssey is now
published by the Alma Mater
Society rather than Standard
Publishing.
USC to Receive Cut
Another highlight of Bray's
budget is a cut in the grants to
undergraduate societies of 10
cents per student. Undergraduate Societies will now recieve
$1 per student.
5. The Ubyssey will ask the
AMS to request MAC to lift its
ban on the press. The move follows the ousting of Ubysey news
editor Stan Beck from a MAC
meeting last week.
Resolution will be presented
on the ground that MAC is
conducting student business-including the spending of $16,000
of student money-and hence
must be prepared to allow students to know of all its activities
and proposed activities. The
Ubyssey contends that this can
only be done through The Ubyssey, published by students for
this very purpose.
First item on the meeting's
Agenda is the speeches to be
made by candidates for the
chairmanship of the Undergraduate Societies Committee. These
eluding gate receipts and the
hiring and firing of coaches.
Most of the direction will be
given by the group's executive
secretary, who will be Athletic
Director Bus Phillips. He will
act Independently of the Admin-
istration.
2. Report of the Fraternity
Investigation Committee will be
given by temporary Undergraduate Society Chairman Monte
McKay.
The Committee was formed
at the special general meetjnf
last April, following a motira
from the floor. It is composed
of representatives of the I«Mf-
Fraternity Council, Student
Council, the Civil Liberties
Union, and is hoaded by the
USC chairman.
Survey
The Ubyssey could coiteetf-
ably be self-sufficient within
three years time, "this Is aln»»t
a certainty," predicts Ubysse/
advertising manager Geoff Conway.
4. Ron Bray will ask students
to approve a budget whjeh
boosts the MAD grant from 18.10
to $3.20 from each studenVs
$16 fees, and cuts the total Literary and Scientific Executive
budget by only $20, according to
Bray.
Since 15 LSE clubs failed to
file budgets with the treasurer
by last week's deadline, Bray
was able to give LSE clubs more
money while leaving the LSE
budget relatively unchanged,
The MAD increase ls automatic, because of a clause in the
old Ostrom Plan which stipulates that the MAD grant must
be boosted as soon as enrollment surpasses 0800.
are: Walt Young, Jim Killeen,
and Vic Isfeld.l
Four foreign exchange students, here on World University
Students exchange scholarships,
will be introduced to the meeting.
Members of UBC's famed rowing crew, who upset the powerful British eight in the British
Empire Games, will also be introduced. They will be presented
with commemorative silver trays
by AMS President Dick Underhill.
Public Relations Officer Danny Goldsmith wil tell students
about the forthcoming UBC
blood drive, and urge their support.
A motion will also be introduced to close the agenda. If
passed, it will mean that no
business other than that on the
agenda can be taken up.
This is to prevent small factions from railroading resolutions through after most people
have left the meeting.
As approved by Student Council September 27, 1954.
Budget   Actual Figs.   Budget
53-54 53-54 54-55
INCOME
Full Students   $62,800.00
Partial Students   898.00
Nurses   180.00
$66,000.00
Fees, Other Income, Rentals,
Coll. Shop, etc  1,200.00
$63,000.00   $63,878.00
$63,000.00   $63,878.00   $67,200.00
(Continued   on   Page   3)
See BUDGET
\
/ Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 30, 1954
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Tost Office Dept., Ottawa.
EdltOX-ln-Chitf   PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editor—Raymond Logie     News Editor—Stanley Beck
Advertising Mgr.—Geoff Conway Sports Editor—Ken Lamb
tWO Editor—Bert Gordon Feature  Editor—Pai  Carney
Senior Editor this Edition—Jean Whiteside
Desk and Reporters: Marge McNeill, Delores Banter, Jean
Shorthouse, Sandy Ross, John Hogarth, Brian Guns, Judy Thor-
tnahaien, Pat Carney.
■ports: Pete Worthington, Maurice Gibbons.
Two Hours
The two hours from 12:30 to 2:30 today are the most important two hours of the fall term as far as the 5700-odd
feef-p»ying| students on this campus are concerned.
The semi-annual meeting of the Alma Mater Society, the
Society which takes $18 from each And every one of you to
run atudent affairs, will take place during these two hours.
Far too many students are content to let the AMS carry
on their business without knowing just what that business is.
As in all forms of democratic government, the governed
muet keep a constant vigil on the governors. If the students
are not interested in the AMS, its workings will ultimately
reflect this disinterest.        •
Students CANNOT afford to be disinterested in today's
meetii-g.
Tht 1954-55 budget will be presented by Treasurer Ron
Bray lor your consideration. This is the only chance you will
h*ye to register approval or disapproval of how your money
la being spent. It will be too late tomorrow to complain that
your money is being misused.
Tha first report of the committee set up at last year's
living meeting of the AMS to investigate discrimination in
fraternities will be given. This is one of the most contentious
llfcMes to be put before the student body in the history of the
University. Today you will have a chance to hear just what
Kb* AMS intends to do about it and once again register your
approval or disapproval.
The new constitution of the Men's Athletic Committee
wlH be presented. This constitution if .passed, and The Ubys- #
ley feels it should be passed, will replace the Ostrom Plan.
T^il constitution heralds the advent of a completely new
deal in student athletics. Every student should be in the
armoury today to hear just what this "new deal" is, and add
his voice in assent or dissent Of it.
The Ubyssey will present a resolution that if passed will
allow a reporter to attend Men's Athletic Council meetings.
Only tjhen will you, the students who provide the funds for
tha maintenance of the athletic program, know how that program is being implemented. We urge your support for the
of this resolution.
See you at the meeting.
MARCH 18.   APRIL 2
Minutes  of   AMS  Meetings
My Dog
Has Fleas
By ROD SMITH
and
SANDY ROSS
I never gave much thought to buying a pair of white
buck shoes, but it seemed the next logical step after I learned
to play the ukulele.
All the boys at the big Eastern colleges wear them. I
saw them in a battered copy of Esquire I found at work last
summer . . . Handsome ivy-league fraternity men, lolling on
the steps of their ivy-covered fraternity houses, nostalgically
strumming ivy-league songs on their ukuleles, as the harvest
moon cilmbs slowly over the ivy-covered Library tower.
—They were wearing white bucks.
... I was jolted from my reveries by my boss who snatched
the "Esquire" from my hand. "Get back to work," he snarled,
and make sure the urinals are clean this time."
Decision Made
But I didn't care what he said; that afternoon I scrubbed
and shined with a will, singing as I worked. For I had decided
that I too was going to own a pair of White Buck Shoes.
As soon as I had sold the hubcaps from the family car, I
went downtown, and walked into a shoestore. Already I could
see myself, walking hand in hand with my sorority sweetheart,
down stately tree-shaded walks, swinging my tennis racquet and
scuffing the piles of dead leaves—with my new White Buck
Shoes.
"I want a pair of white bucks," I said to the clerk.
"Hey, Larry," he shrieked, pointing his finger at me,
"C'mere and see the kid what wants white buck shoes!!!!"
Larry came from the back of the store, swinging his hips
and giggling. He passed one miostened finger over his eyebrow,
winked at  the other clerk, and motioned  me over to a seat.
"Well, Liberace, what is your pleasure?"
"I want a pair of white buck shoes," I said, averting my eyes.
I wondered if those boys back East went through this every
time they bought a pair of white bucks. Maybe they had them
sent from the factory in plain wrappers.
Larry stopped his simpering, and strode into the rear of the
store. In a moment he returned with a dusty box. "Here, put 'em
on," he said. I put them on and turned to a mirror to view the
effect. Six inches below my knees, my legs disapeareel into a
huge expanse of dazzling while. There was still room in those
shoes for the previous occupants..
"They're a wee bit. too big," I suggested shyly.
"Only pair we got." he said. "Wo don't get much call for
them since Mulligan  closed down  the Castle Hotel."
"But I'm from University,"  I  protested.
"So was Mickey Jelke, kid. Now give me your money and
scram. We got other customers."
I sauntered down the street undaunted, admiring myself in
every store window. Of course, I didn't look exactly like those
boys in Esquire, but then, they weren't wearing Caribou Brand
bib overalls. Perhaps, if f got a pipe. . .
As I gazed at my reflected ima«e, my eye caught another
pair of White Buck Shoes approaching me. A fellow sophisticate,
I thought. With that instinctive eatnerndie thai distinguishes the
true cosmopolitan from the common herd. I extended my hand in
a gesture of well-bred welcome. 1 hoped he wouldn't notice mv
McGavin's Quarterback  Club  beanie.
(These   are   pertinent  ex-
erpts   from   the   minutes   of
last   year's   two   final   AMS
General Meetings.)
MARCH 18, 1954
Mr. Feltham in the Chair.
10. Moved Feltham, seconded Gpldsmith: "That By-Law
12, section 7, subsection (i) be
amended by the deletion of
"Judicial Committee after regular proceedings set forth in
section 8 below" and the substitution of the words "Student
Court" "That By-Law 12, Section 8 be deleted."  Caried.
13. Minute No. 35 of March
15, 1954: Moved Goldsmith:
Whereas it is in the best interest of the University and Alma
Mater Society to commence
construction of a roof to the
Memorial (B.E.G.) Swimming
Pool as soon as possible after
the British Empire Games of
1954 in order to prevent deterioration of a valuable asset,
and to provide immediate use
of a swimming pool for the
University and the adjacent
community- and whereas in the
event that the University cannot raise sufficient funds to
commence immediate construction it is desirable that the
Alma Mater Society be in the
position, if necessary, to take
the appropriate action to ensure that a roof be constructed
immediately; and, whereas a
swimming pctol is part of the
approved plans of the War
Memorial Gymnasium for
which the students have already allocated $5.00 out of
the   AM.S  fee.
*
Therefore be it resolved that
the Students' Council be given
authority to negotiate with the
University or any other party
to ensure the roofing of the
Swimming Pool, and, if necessary, to borrow additional
funds on the security of fees
already allocated to the War
Memorial Gymnasium and
Pool'.'   Carried.
15. Moved    Lusztig:    "That
the meeting adjourn." Carried.
Ann  Cooper,
Secretary
APRIL   2.   1954
Mr.   Underhill  in  thc  chair.
1 Moved D. Goldsmith, seconded Lindsay: "That the rule
against discrimination shall not
prevent religious clubs from
restricting membership to those
of their specific religious beliefs."
"Hahvud?" I enquired^ casually, although he didn't really
look like Harvard in his laven-
suit. Yale, maybe.
"Listen, buddy," he snarled,
"my girls are working this section of fown. G'wan back to the
Penthouse."
Giving my beanie a swipe with
his switch knife, he sent me on
my way. Doubt was beginning
to enter my mind.
"SECLUSION" . . .
But suddenly I realized where
I belonged. I would go out to the
University, and live MY kind of
life, among MY kind of people,
dwelling in scholarly seclusion,
the casual, cloistered well-bred
environment of West Point Qrey,
far removed from the coarse
ugly life of downtown.
Ignoring a drunken tourist
who breathed heavily on me and
enquired about girls, I boarded
a bus, and assumed an air of
aloofness to the snickers that
folowed me down the aisle. I
even ignored the small boy who
asked, in loud tones. "Why has
that boy got girl's shoes on,
Momy?" "Shhh, dear, he's prob-
ajoly from University." she replied.
As I stepped off the bus the
late afternoon sunlight slanted
goldenly through the russet
trees, casting long shadows on
the close-cropped grass. White-
haired professors doddered across the Mall . . . healthy young
people strolled hand in hand,
their diamond-encrusted fraternity pins sparkling ... It was a
world •of peace, of quiet, and of
order . . . mine.
''Continued on Pago 4)
Sec—MY DOG
2. Moved Akesode, seconded
Lindsay: That the above motion be amended to read as
follows: "That the rule against
disrimination shall not prevent
religious clubs whose prime
purpose is the furtherence of
their religion from restricting
membership, where desirable,
to those of their specific religious beliefs."-Amendment carried. Motion as Amended'carried.
3. Moved Manson, seconded
Zilke: "That the Alma Mater
Society of the University of
British Columbia reaffirm its
opposition to unfair discrimination; and that the Society recognizes the present existence
upon this campus of unfair
discrimination in the form of
discriminatory clauses within
the Constitutions of certain
fraternities on this campus;
and that the Society directs its
Council to effect the removal,
or  assist   in  the  removal   of
these clauses, in the swiftest
and most intelligent way possible."
4. Moved Stoyva, seconded
Daniels: That the above motion be amended by addition
of the following: "and that one
of the methods employed be
that a committee be established
to investigate ways and means
by which certain fraternities
may be assisted in the elimination of discriminatory clauses
contained in their constitutions,
and that this committee correspond with other universities
on the North American continent with a view to fostering
co-operative action on the question of discrimination in fraternities, and that the committee
consist of three Student
Council members appointed by the Inter-Fraternity
Council and two members appointed by the Civil Liberties
Union, and the chairman by
the Chairman of the Undergraduate Societies Committee.
The Committee shall issue progress reports at the Fall and
Spring General Meetings of
the Alma Mater Society.
6. Moved D. Goldsmith, seconded Riopel: Motion as
Amended Carried.
7. Moved A. Goldsmith, seconded Angel: "That the meeting adjourn." Carried.
Diane  Driscoll,
Acting-Sec.
Vote
Walt YOUNG
M.A.D. for Victoria College.
Medal   for   Best   All-Round
Student in Victoria College
Executive   of   Parliamentary
Forum
Legion Cup Debate Winner
UBC Rep. in Washington Der
bate Championship.
A Good Man for
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MENU FOR STUDENTS
(Formerly Ben's Cafe)
4565 W. 10th Avenue
Next to Safeway
Enquire  about  our  Meal Ticket   Plan
i Thursday, September 30,1954  .
BUDGET
(Continued ftom Page 1)
Budget   Actual Figs, Budget
53-54 53-54 54-55
EXPENSE - \
Administration  ..._    15,000.00 $15,862.00 $16,340.00
Accident Benefit        3,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.
M.A.D.      16,090.00 16,315.00 17,600.00
Activities & Funds         6,800.00 1,695.00 4,850.00
W.A.D        2,100.00 1,853.00 2,000.00
Publications      10,200.00 10,900.00 11,155.00
U.S.C       3,100.00 2,729.00 2,950.00
Clubs        5,450.00 4,821.60 5,400.00
Depreciation            610.00 519.00 545.00
Margin 5%        3,150.00 — 3,360.00
$66,000.00 $57,694.00 $67,200.00
ADMINISTRATION
Office Salaries ..!    $ 8,700.00 8,728.00 9,365.00
Gen. Meetings and Elections
Student Council          840.00 273.00 945.00
Honoraria, Awards, Gifts
and Donations          875.00 898.00 900.00
Public Relations          150.00 54.00 100.00
Gen. Meetings _          340.00 398.00
Elections          120.00 263.00
Stat., Supplies, Off. Exp...      1,740.00 1,474.00 1,500.00
Postage            300.00 266.00 350.00
Tel. & Telephone          850.Q0 871.Q0 870.00
Insurance          585.00 560.00 560.00
Audit de Legal          885.00 '     800.00 800.00
Bank Charges .*.           15.00 47.00 50.00
General Expense          100.00 — 100.00
Loss en Sale of Equip  357.00 —
Repairs & Maintenance... 293.00 100.00
Class A Award Blazers...         — — 200.00
Class A Awards Blazers.. 580.00 500.00
Spedil Awards            -- — x     20000
$15,500.00 $15,862.00 $16,340.00
■ i . . _—.—.—i
ACCIDENT BENEFIT $3,000.00
ACTIVITIES AND FUNDS
Pep Club -  10Q.00
N.F.C.U.S       1,060.00 1,142.00 1,925.00
Brock Renovation           800.00 798.00 825.00
Frosh Orientation             — — — .
Homecoming ,           — — —
Special Events       1,000.00 632.00 800.00,
Women's U. Soc          200.00 52.00 200.00
Conferences           740.00 519.00 1,000.00
$ 3,800.00 $ 3,143.00 $ 4,850.00
W.A.D.   %
Administration        " 300.00 278.00 275.00
Archery              75.00 68.00 30.00
Badminton             85.00 82.00 65.00
Basketball            200.00 196.00 300.00
Big Block Club            85.00 71.00 75.00
Grass Hockey      300.00 386.00 275.00
Honoraria           270.00 265.00 300.00
Intramurals  .,          320.00 213.00 300.00
V. O. C            25.00 25.00 25.00
Ski Team           125.00 207.00 200.08
Swim Team            175.00 48.00 125.00
Tennis             40.00 14.00 30.00
$ 2,000.00 $ 1,853.00 $ 2,000.00
PUBLICATIONS BOARD
Administration         1,200.00 1,5533.00 1,520.00
Ubyssey Printing         5,300.00 6,186.00 13,000.00
Ubyssey Engraving           800.00 1,000.00
Totem     ._        1,700.00 1,928.00 1,700.00
Photography Dept.--.         1,00.00 832.00 935.00
Lit. & Humor Mag           200.00 181.00 200.00
Handbook .,              — 240.00 —    .
$18,355
Less Revenue from Advertising
7,200.00
$10,200.00    $10,900.00    $11,155.00
UNDERGRAD SOCIETIES
U.S.C.  Admin.      70.00
Agriculture     135.00
Arts   _.   100.00
Commerce  500.00
Engineering  860.00
Forestry     90.00
Frosh     50.00
Home Ec.    140.00
Law     220.00
Medicine     260.00
Nursing   145.00
Pharmacy     140.00
Phys. Ed   110.00
PPre-Med.   100.00
Social Work    90.00
Teachers' Training  90.00
Pre-Law ... .  	
Pre-Social Work   	
Cr
17.00
,135.00
500.00
860.00
90.00
120.00
140.00
220.00
260.00
145.00
140.00
110.00
90.00
90.00
100.00
135.00
485.00
785.00
91.00
155.00
190.00
232.00
165.00
138.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
104.00
20.00
50.00
CAMPBELL
CLEANERS
Across from Varsity Theatre
AL. 2460
Discount for Students
BROADWAY
MUSIC
—Musical Instruments—
Accessories
Lessons  on all Orchestral
Instruments
3673 W. Broadway (at Alma)
CEdar 7715
38  YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE   UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO LTD
TEIECHONE      PACIFIC   OI7I
1035  Seymour  St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
 THE UBYSSEY	
CLUBS
Microbiologist Soc.  —- —
Am. Inst, of Elect. Eng. .. — —
Radio Q TV Soc.  500.00 540.00
V.O.C.    ,._■  100.00 .100.00
L.S.E.  Admin.     300.00 260.00
Alpha Qmega Soc.  10,00 4.00
Amateur Radio      30.00 30.00
Botanical Gardens  1^00 -—
Biology   10.00 —
Camera Club   : 30,00 —
Chinese Varsity Club .._ 10.00 .45
Civil Liberties Union,,  50.00 50.00
Dance Club -  50.00 —
Economics Soc. -  10.00-. 8.00
El Circulo Latino Am  30.00 4.00
Eng. Inst, of Canada . 120.00 120.00
Eng. Physics ._.___  — —
Forestry Club  10.00 —
German Club  10.00 —
Geography Club  10.00 7.00
Historical Soc. -  10.00 8,00
International House  200.00 137.00
Jazz Society   60.00 60.00
Le Circle Francais . _  10.00 8.00
Les Cais Lurons _ 10.00 —
Letters Club  10.00 —
Mamooks   400.00 284.00
Music Appreciation  20.00 24.00
Musical Society  1,500.00 1,471.00
Parliamentary Forum  400.00 412.00
Players' Club  1,000.00 1,000.00
Psychology Club '.. __ 10.00, 10.00
Sigma Pi Alpha  — 82.00
Social Problems Club  50.00 —
Spectrum Club _  10.00 —
Student CCF. Club  15.00 12.00
do Liberal  15.00 12.00
doProg. Cons _ 15.00 10.00
do Social Credit  15.00 1.00
L.P.P   — —
Symphony Orchestra  200.00 77.00
iWCluh.--*,--  100.00 110.00
Visual Arts Club  50.00 9.00
Hillel Foundation    10.00 10.00
India Students  10.00 2.00
Newman Club  10.00 —
S. C. M.   10.00 7.00
V. C. F.   10.00 —
Student Peace Movement- lfl.00 2.00
Unitarian Society  — —
$ 5,450.00    $ 4,821.45
DEPRECIATION EXPENSE 610.00 519.00
**M
15.00,
20.00
750.00
150.00
300.00
50.00
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IT'S FROM BIRKS
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There's a wide selection of fraternal jewellery and
Insignia at Birks. We suggest a visit to our Insignia
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years to come*
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THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 30,1954
"Suds" and Shaving Cream
■
by  Pete Worthington
NOW
The World Series is come!
On Wednesday morning, Sept. 29, baseball enthusiasts on
the campus started searching wildly for radios, so they can
catch the latest Gillette razor statistics, and hear the basebally
twang of commentator Mel Allen tell the radio audience all
the personal secrets of the player who happens to be batting;
why he beats his wife on Tuesdays; and how much his mother-
in-law weighs during the rainy season.
Every yeaf about this time, America's national game captures the fancy of varsity in varying degrees. Cleveland Indians
and New York Giants do the honors in this year's classic, but
next year the Yankees and Dodgers will be back at each other's
throats. Some of the remarks made by UPC students indicate
just how intense interest is—or is not—-in the outcome of the
games.
WOW!
Miss Barbara Keeler, 37-22-37, whose phone number is a
secret has this to say:
"Gimme them Injuns; yessir, they got guts galore an' pitchers down the middle. Besides, Leo the Lip is already married-
up." She is offering two to one odds, and is considered an expert in her line.
Art Burgess, a first year arts student from Victoria, has
given the matter considerable thought. He says:
"After careful evaluation of the intangibles involved, I have
arived at the conclusion that unless the Giants win at least four
games they will lose the series. If my calculations are accurate
—and remember I'm just a freshy—this situation also applies
to the Clevelanders." His odds are slightly unorthodox.
THE CANCER KICK
A first year medico—John "Mad Dog" Woodward—said of
.the impending series
Badminton Season Opens,
First Meeting Tonight
Badminton holds is first organizational meeting tonight
at 7:30 in the Memorial Gym, with the election of officers
and complete reorganization of the club the theme.
Lfague teams, laddericompetition (for beginners and experts) and mixer tournaments form part of the schedule.
Eleven courts are available on Tuesday and Thursday
evenings and three on Sunday afternoons.
Fee is $6.50, with all birds supplied. '
Debris And VRC
Troubling Crew
By PETE WORTHINGTON
The Cinderella athletes of Canadian sport are plagued with
problems.
UBC's rowers—including the dark horse eight who captured the imagination of the sporting world in the 1954 British
Empire Games when they rose to imposible heights and de-
featefl England's great Thames Rowing Club eight at Vedder
Canal—are forced to train and practice under most inadequate
conditions. <$>
Through a rather tense affiliation with the Vancouver
Rowing Club, the UBC crews,
coached by the rigorous Frank
Read, strive and strain in the
city harbour off Stanley Park.
Here, in a $2900 lightweight
shell, the dogged rowers risk
life and limb to ply their sport.
DEBRIS
Drifting debris, semi-submerged logs, and other unmentionable Items of Vancouver's colorful waterfront combine witli
unpredictable currents, winds,
and climate to make rowing for
Varsity an unusually hazardous
occupation.
Added to these environmental
discomforts is the fact that the
VRC is tiring of having UBC use
their facilities. Don Laishley,
manager of the Varsity eight,
says that the VRC objects primarily to the cost involved in
allowing UBC on Rowing Club
premises.
"I cannot see it," says Laishley, "the VRC claims we cost
them $1000 per year in breakages-and other expenses I would
like to see a breakdown of these
costs. Our boys spend a great
deal of their spare time and
energy at the club doing maintenance and keeping things in
shape generally. The figure
quoted seems extraordinary to
me."
AND VRC
"When UBC was asked to join
the VRC in 1948 there were
but a few handful of rowing
enthusiasts in Vancouver," add"d
Laishley. "Today, largely duo
to UBC's excellent competitive
record and spirit, interest is keen
and membership on the upswing.
In publicity alone we have
proved a terrific booster for the
sport, and all we ask is the
chance to keep rowing under
reasonable conditions."
At best the Varsity Rowing
Club operates on a shoe string.
In 1953-54 they were alloted
$450 by the university. By sponsoring dances, soliciting donations, and such, the Club man
aged to finance trips to various
competitions and to purchase
necessary equipment. This year,
as BEG chamipons, and a real
threat for the 1956 Olympics.
their athletic grant was boosted
to $600
BUS FARE
"This,"   said   a   wistful   Laishley,   "will   more   than   pay   our
bus fare to a meel  in California
If it weren't for the generosity
of people like Col. Vic Spencer,
and our own money-raising activities, we'd be lost. I guess we
should have been football players."
Considering the difficulties
facing UBC rowers it is to their
credit that they even row, much
less win at it. With little money
for expenses; appalling harbour
conditions for training- and increasing resentment from Vancouver Rowing Club officials,
UBC'girds its figurative loins
this week for the coming rowing season.
At present one of the best
crews in the British Empire,
may someday prove to be one of
the best in the world. To do so
they .will have to survive the
Olympics; if they survive at
home, then anything is possible.
Odds nEnds
"A"   CARDS
Athletic cards which, after
their purchase, entitle students
to free admission to over fifty
games on the campus this year
can still be purchased at the
Memorial Gymnasium. They will
also be on sale this Saturday
at the stadium entrances prior
to the football game. Follow
U.B.C. athletic events for $5.00.
VOTE
KILLEEN
Martin's Bakery
& Delicatessen
5784 University Blvd.
SPORTS
MAC Budget
Distribution
By MAURICE GIBBONS
Bob Brady, president of the Men's Athletic Association, is
angry with factions that have suggested the Men's Athletic
Committee is being granted more money than it constitutionally
leserves. *
This year, the Alma Mater Society has allotted the committee $17,600 which is a considerable increase over last year's
amount. "We have not finangled these extra funds to support
a more extensive or expensive extramural, athletic program,"
Brady said. "We receive a fixed amount which is in a direct
ratio with the student enrollment. This year we have more
students so the grant for athletics increases to enable us to provide a representative program."
It appears that his anger is justified. Three years ago a
student assembly passed a motion under the famous Ostrom
plan to provide an automatic increase from $3.10 to $3.20 for
extramurals if the student attendance reached 5,500. This year
we have that many students—ipso facto the raise.
This is how the athletic money is spent:
Budget
53-34
Advertising  , —
Administration              1,000
Baseball    200.00
Basketball       Crl, 150.00
Club Activities          1,375.00
Football  .  2.200.00
Ice Hockey      ..            1,200.00
Minor Sports    ..          1,375.00
Athletic Equipment 	
Public Relations  100.00
Rowing   450.00
Rugby     320.00
Ice Skating and Kerr. Arena
Skiing     460.00
Soccer   520.00
Stadium    400.00
Swimming     670.00
Trainer's Supplies •_ 560.00
Payment on Trainer Table AMS        —
Track    480.00
Programs  Cr  400.00
"A" Cards     Cr 4,500
Salaries            8,800.00
Income from other sports
Margin     1,860.00
Actual Figs.
83-54
50.87
909.18
247.96
Cr 1,429.42
959.43
1,093.48
1,164.00
1.497.45
35.60
116.98
522.10
1,717.86
715.98
446.72
498.40
437.68
533.72
662.82
Budget
54-55
1,000.00
316.00
Cr 550.00
1,375.00
237.00
1,172.00
1,440.00
183.00
200.00
600.00
1,500.00
500.00
572.00
400.00
700.00
700.00
—     600.00
415.55    525.00
Cr 600.00
Cr 2,827.00 Cr 3,500.00
8,880.20
8,880.00
Cr 150.00
1,500.00
$16090.00 $16,649.56 $17,600.00
MY  DOG
(Continued f
"MONEY BACK?"
I wandered casually down the
Mall, glorying in my new-found
security.
Suddenly it happened. A mob
of red-shirted boors descended
on me, screaming, "Lookit!!! A
real Joe College! Feed him to
Smokey Annie!!!" I was seized
roughly, and passed from hand
to hand through a frenzied
crowd. "Geezt," they shrieked,
"Dig those shoes he's got on,
willya?"
rom Page 2)
After a scholarly intonation of
"Sic transit Fruit Boots" by a
scholarly looking youth in a
tweed jacket and a black gown,
I was dumped unceermoniously
into a large wooden tub, filled
with water.
I dragged myself from the
trough, amid hoots of laughter,
and sloshed over to the nearby
telephone booth.
"Hello, Bool Shop? ... I want
a pair of good substantial British boots" . . .
SASAMAT CABS
Alma   2400
ALMA'S COMMUNITY TAXI
21-Hour Service 10th and Trimble
Dressmaking and Tailoring to your own
individual suggestions.
Parisian Ladies' Dress Shop
Opposite Safeway on Tenth Avenue
"COME IN AND SEE OUR SEPARATES"
"We doctors have to be capable of making studied judgment. I am learning in medicine just which tobaccos to use,
and that more of us doctors die of Smokers-Lung than any 10
other popular brands of cigarettes. However, this is different;
I like the eventual winners myself, and consider them a cinch.
We doctors ..."
Joan Peterson, a graduate B.A. studying social work or
something equally intelligent, claims:
"I have been an avid baseball fan for years, and frankly
thel game bores me silly. How grown and supposedly mature
individuals can, for day after day, return to watch the same old
plot with the same old actors, is absolutely incredible. I suppose there must be something to the sport; personally, if it
weren't for the beer they advertise, I'd lose intrest."
WHAT'LL YOU HAVE?
From these few selected comments it can be seen that
opinions are quite varied at university. So remember to tune
in this week and next to the game, and to enjoy a cool glass
of Lucky Gillette whilst shaving with Budweiser—the smoothest smoke ever honed.
i      this fall be right In itvlt
It's really wonderful what a new pair of campus-Inspired
Ritchies will do for your suit, your appearance and your
personality! The leathers for Ritchie "Grandstanders"
# ere specially selected for Fall wear. Your feet dtstrvt
• pair! Most styles from $10.95 to $18.95.'
(fruCiihi. shoes for men
THE JOHN RITCHIE COMPANY LIMITED, QUIBIC, P.O.
i

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