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The Totem 1947

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Published by the students qi the University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, Canada.
JEAN MacFARLANE
PHILIP ASHTON -
JOAN GRIMMETT
Editor
Associate Editor
Associate Editor DEDICATION This University, doubtless to as great an extent
as any school on the continent, has reason to
respect the spirit ot its undergraduate classes.
There are few cases to parallel the vigour shown
in University of British Columbia student enterprises. A review of the University history will
indicate the active part that student endeavour
has taken in the development of this institution.
Development here implies not only the important
but abstract ideas of general tone, disposition
and prestige, but also the material examples of
new sites, buildings, and faculties. To the 7975
fo 7947 Undergraduates we offer our sincere
gratitude. To the 1947 Undergraduates, in whose
charge rest the traditions of student achievement
and the opportunity to apply these traditions in
building a greater University in the future, we
dedicate this book. MlEWORD
W:t-*8f.
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II
From the day he steps info his first registration line-up to the
moment when he receives his precious sheepskin, the University
student, consciously or unconsciously, is busy acquiring a vast collection of new experiences. Freshman or senior, he is continually
adding to this collection—new friends, new ideas, new studies—
actually, a new mode of living.
Years from now, these experiences will be labelled "memories
of the best years of my life," and will be carefully tucked away in
the back ot the mind, to be brought out at nostalgic reunions with
other grads.
Inevitably, many ot the experiences will be forgotten. Only the
highlights will be remembered. In a similar manner to the way in
which the student acquires his memories, the Totem acquires its
material. Only the highlights are mentioned. Naturally it would
be impossible to collect all the experiences of every student of the
University of British Columbia in one book. It is possible, however,
to imitate the memory and cover the highlights of a Varsity year.
There is, somewhere in the Totem, something included in the
experiences of every U.B.C. student—be it class mates, professors,
a club production, fraternity brothers, a formal, or perhaps some
favourite spot on the campus. These aspects of University life, and
many more, are found in the Totem; they all add up to one thing—
a year at U.B.C.
V^^"«___H____U___
' * •' • T€__p__twn_H_i
•f.   > K_qr_?_V_fA__'l__^_.
v?^S_i_w3J3_w_.
■v- •A\w__mT_M'_J3^_«_ Each volume of the Totem represents one year of memories. And the 1947 graduate will
have much to remember of the last few action-packed years.
In his life as a student he has seen immense changes in his University and the world. He
has seen a campus at war, with co-eds knitting for war-stricken people, with secret research in
the laboratories with marching squads on the Mall. He has experienced the end of the war, and
seen veterans with be-ribboned battle dress mix with freshmen in the Quad.
He has seen hundreds of squat army huts spring up among the dignified stone buildings.
He has watched the enrollment leap from 3,000 to 9,000 in three short years. He has lived next
door to his professors in the first residences the campus has ever known. He has witnessed expansion in every  educational department, the development and opening of new faculties.
He has seen the death of Chancellor R. E. McKechnie and the retirement of President L. S.
Klinck. He has welcomed Chancellor Eric W. Hamber and President N. A. M. MacKenzie. He has
rejoiced at a $5,000,000 government appropriation for new buildings. He has seen the start of
the construction of  a permanent Physics Building, and the beginning of a Library extension.
These and many other important changes he has seen in his quickly sped years at U.B.C.
These events he will never forget. Other things he will remember—vivid experiences that are
perhaps in themselves unimportant, but to the individual mean much.
A brilliant lecture, early morning coffee in the Caf, pepmeets, the beach on a warm spring
day, a Mardi Gras, the deserted bus stop at night, the stacks, labs, Brock dances—hundreds of
small,  unclassified   impressions—are  remembered by the individual.
To help recall such impressions in those reminiscing moods of later years, the Editorial Board
presents the 1947 Totem with the hope that it will give you pleasure when remembering ONE
YEAR AT U.B.C. §m
tijwety   The   Totem   brings   you   an
Jl _! *'
—if1
Section   as   fhe   opening   feature
61 the book. This history of the University has, in fact, been developed as a
theme  throughout the  volume.
The most obvious reason for this choice
resuffs from fhe very name—Tofem. As
the Totem pole was the historical record
of the tribe, so, The Totem is the record
of U.B.CV
Secondly, including fhis history of nof
only fhis year but of all past years of
U.B.C.'s existence, may bring to your attention our magnificent heritage of tradition at this, a most critical time.
Our University, faced with postwar
problems is now at the crossroads of its
development. We feel that a knowledge
of the great work and faith that made it
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.Tents which the students used for lecture rooms at the fairview "Shacks"   University  of   J9I5-I924.
John Jessop First Suggests A
In 1877, when the white population of British Columbia was less than
25,000, the dream ot a University for this province was suggested firsl
.  by John Jessop, the Provincial Superintendent of Education at that
time.  A mere dream, however, it had to remain for 73 years.   The
Provincial Legislature took the first definite steps towards founding
the University in 1890, establishing a body politic and corporate, named
_^__
ffrsity of British Columbia".   Dr. I. W. Powell ot Victoria
tpyinted Chancellor, and a Senate was elected.
^kyiising activity, nothing was accomplished until 1898,
Vancouver High School affiliated with McGill University
^Lar Arts and took the name of Vancouver College.   First
Wpas offered by Victoria High School when it became
ictorid College   by   affiliation   with   McGill  University   in
Mi further step was taken when an act was passed
Rbyal Institution for the Advancement of Learning of British
CoUtr ^a, which the  same year established the McGill University
College of British Columbia in Vancouver.
Over 700 students attended this college during the next eight years.   The
scope of work was gradually increased until the College was
PAGE    TEN A  tree-planting ceremony performed by fhe class of  1919, on the Point Grey campus.
University For B. C. In 1877
offering three years in Arts and two years in Applied Science.   In the
meantime, interest in the idea of a Provincial University was growing.
In 1907, an Act was passed endowing the University with 2,000,000
acres of Crown lands, and in the following year a new University Act
was passed, repealing the old Act of 1890.   This new Act, with
amendments, determines the present constitution of the University.
Early in 7970, the Provincial Legislature passed an Act authorizing the _
Lieutenant-Governor in Council to appoint a Commission fo <fr_j_t#j
a site for the proposed University.   This Commission, a
of distinguished educationalists from outside the Province,
summer thoroughly examining the Province, and in the autumn
presented a report recommending the vicinity of Vancouv
suitable.   The Executive Council decided to place
Point Grey—the site which the Commission had name
In 797 7, fhis site was granted.   The grant was later 'mere
consists of 548 acres.   The 3,000-acre fracf ad)
campus  proper was  granted  in   exchange  for  the  Crown
previously  given.
In February, 1912, the Hon. H. E. Young, Minister of Education, called for
PAGE     ELEVEN One  of fhe  rugger teams  who played for the  glory of their Alma Mater at the fairview "Shacks".
War Halts  Point Grey Building
compel/five tenders which should include plans in detail for four
buildings to be erected immediately, and a block plan showing all the
proposed buildings on the campus.   Messrs. Sharp  and Thompson, of
-■fever, were the successful competitors, and were appointed
Bifecfs.
ion met in  7972 and chose Mr. F. L. Carter-Cotten as first
■r of fhe University.   The following year, Dr. F. F.
appointed President.   Steps were also taken to create the
y.   Clearing operations were undertaken, and in 7974
s begun on the Science building, The University of
int Grey seemed a thing of the immediate future,
he outbreak of World War I put a stop to the
lor building.
ner, was fhe need for a Provincial University, that, in
ot scanty funds, the University of British Columbia at
as/ opened its doors as an independent institution on September 30,
7975, fhe second year of the war.   The memory of those war
years is perpetuated by one small symbol.   The yoke of the undergraduate
gown is edged with khaki cord.   This symbol is intended as a perpetual
PAGE    TWELVE The First Block of Semi-Permanent Buildings,  and the Mall,  Utilized as a Parking Lot, in  the Early Days at Point Grey.
But Varsity Opens At Fairview
reminder to the students, to symbolize for them  fhe birfh  of fhe
University during the war.
U.B.C. was first housed  in the crowded Fairview "Shacks"  of fhe Vancouver
General Hospital.   The staff of those days included several members  of
the present faculty.   The enrollment the first year was 379,
in the main, co-eds, because the war depleted the male student
body.   The first student publication, Anon, a monthly magazine  of a
literary nature, appeared in 7976.
Despite the cramped conditions, the students of the "
leadership of Sherwood Lett, the first president of
Society, carried on  many  activities.   In   7975,
formed, and the following year, the Musical Society.   In the
the first Frosh initiation was held, there being no initiation f
as then "everyone was a freshman".    The freshette rece
included speeches, a musical program and a reading
ot the evening was "spent in dainty conversation".
The name of the student newspaper was changed to Ubicee,  and, finally
in 7978, fhe first issues of a weekly Ubyssey appeared on a Fairview
campus, promising to  bring the students the news while ll
l'AGF.    Till 11 TEEN The first fuming ot the  sod of fhe  student-built University Stadium, which was completed in  1937.
Students At "Shacks" Active
was "hot".  The paper featured articles on the merits of ragtime,
and letters to the editor complaining that some freshman wore
short pants.
The students were always conscious of their inadequate facilities, and, in
the Ubyssey among the reports of dances and debates often appe
pleas for their "permanent dwelling in  Point Grey"
Just before Armistice, the University lost its first President on ff
of Dr. Wesbrooke.  He was succeeded by Dr. L. S. Klinck.  Th
Mr. Carter-Cotten retired, to be succeeded by Dr. R. E.
During the influenza epidemic of 7978, students assisted in
nurses and orderlies.  A.M.S. fees were $2.00.   The Playe
announced that they would present Oscar Wilde's
of Being Earnest" for their spring play of 7979. a fact
Ubyssey deplored as showing trash under the guise of student
entertainment.   Examinations were reduced to one hour in lengtfXM
Varsity held its first Victoria Invasion, spending the week-end alter
winning and losing games with Victoria College.   Final score—
four wins each.   A student song book was published that year,
containing "British  Grenadiers," "Ye Mariners of England" and
PAGE     FOURTEEN The partially-completed Stadium,   which,   with   fhe   wooden   bleachers, will hold 2,600 spectators.
Despite Crowded  Conditions
"Sentimental Songs".   A  new yell  was written, beginning
"U. Jazz Jazz".   All women except Freshettes were ordered by the Women's
Undergraduate Society to wear their hair up.  The women held their
first Hi-Jinx in February, 7979.  One lone man appeared, but was
quickly vanquished.
U.B.C. played Stanford in 7920, losing 8-0, but beat them in a return game
the foffowing year, 72-0, causing editorial rejoicing at having
niversity".   New departments of Nursing, Forestry and
fictnicai Engineering were added that year, and Wilson
British Columbia's first Rhodes Scholar.  Critics claimed that
gP'was "unnecessary, dull, weak, anaemic and sensational",
-eds held the first pepmeet in the history of the University,
r of fhe Arts men.  On February 6, 7925, an asfroiogisf
e end of the world.   The engineers protested, because
night of the Science Ball.  The Players Club, tor their
enth anniversary, presented "You and I," by Phillip Barrie.   Two
men crashed Hi-Jinx.   W.U.S. termed their actions as an "utter lack
of sportsmanship and college spirit."
In the meantime, students sat on radiators and kitchen chairs, and had
PAGE    FIFTEEN The  Point Grey campus,  whose  then ivy-less  buildings  were  first  used  by the  students  in   1925.
Student  Campaign  Of '22  Spurs
lectures in tents.   The enrollment continued to increase each year
Finally, in desperation, the students, led by Ab Richards, president
ot  the  A.M.S., organized  the now-famous  Student  Campaign   ot
7922.   To bring to public  attention  the  stifling  conditions  at the  Fairview
"Shacks," they held mass meetings   and parades.   They canvassed
the Province and obtained thousands of signatures  on
to the  Legislative Assembly, asking for a  grant to  comply
buildings at Point Grey.   Six page boys were needed to pres
to the  House.
The climax of the campaign came on October 29, when the
the "Great Trek,"   staging  a  monster parade throu
Vancouver, then riding in street cars to Tenth and Sasa
marched to the campus and perched on the skeleton^
the Science Building.  In the parade they carried stones, laf
in the construction of fhe Cairn, at which the Frosh gather each year
tribute  to the  class  of  '22.   Campaign  delegates  addressed
the Legislative Assembly, where Ab. Richards made "a stirring
and convincing speech to the House".
As a direct result of this campaign, the government, on November 9, granted
PAGE     SIXTEEN Part of today's campus,  whose  well-landscaped lawns  are  a  pleasant place to relax on a spring day.
government To Complete Campus
the University $1,500,000.   The Ubyssey ran jubilant headlines
announcing that at last the government "Saw the Point".
Building was resumed the  following  year.   An  editorial optimistically
that when the University moved to Point Grey "every student will be
to find a seat in the library".
In the fall ot 1925, fhe first session  of the University at Point Grey
t commenced.   The  President  and Chancellor  welcomed  the  students
_ their new home at the first meeting ever held in the Auditorium.
Thte s tikpnthusiasm at this meeting was not dimmed by the
fact thai i icfd fo sit on the floor of the uncompleted building,
pite such ih$i    veniences, the students were jubilant over their new home,
and  to imffl   I its, at that time, rugged appearance, they held  a
"Fres4wa<Vt\Field   Day",   in   which   the   Freshman   classes
enf the day k^pring stones off the playing fields, while  Freshettes
muf, swepwand polished".
^^ffr. official inauguration ceremonies were held, and the
ferred its first honorary degrees.   In 7925, fhe Ubyssey,
edited by Earle Birney, became a bi-weekly.   The first official
Homecoming was held in the fall of 1926, complete with theatre night,
PAGE    SEVENTEEN Part of fhe  facilities  of fhe  Agriculture faculty,  whose  research   is important in the history of  U.B.C.
Students Build Gym In 1929
bonfire, McKechnie Cup game and basketball dance.   That year
e Publications Board members formed the "Society of Thoth,"  a
|k journalistic  discussions  group.
In 1927, the "U.B.C. Annual" became the Totem.   Mock Parliament gave
te for the first time.   Students were dancing the Charleston
ack Bottom.    At Homecoming,  the Alumnae  presented
with the two Totem poles which stand now in  the
Lectures in several courses were begun at 8:45,
ual 9:00.   Students moaned at the idea  of going to
a' hours".   The Mamooks were formed.   The Society
nfed a ballet at Homecoming.   A student poll
es  are  here to stay,
he University Gymnasium was completed and officially
ar, U.B.C. students attended the Pan-Pacific Conference,
A"  women's  basketball team  won  the Championship  of
, the Olympiad at Prague, and the Muck-a-Muck humour page
he Ubyssey published a fore-runner of the Goon Issue, stating that
thousands rejoiced as the  library burns, and advocating the safe of
beer on fhe campus to raise college spiril.
PAGE    EIGHTEEN The  student-built Brock   Memorial  Hall which   was  dedicated  to  Dean   and Mrs.  Brock  in   1940.
And Begin Stadium Campaign
The financial depression of 7929 reduced the enrollment, but  despite the
scarcity  of  money, the students  began  a  campaign  for the  Stadium
Men promised not to shave until the Stadium
torchlight processions, tag days and horse races were emplo
raise funds.   Co-eds passed  a  ruling  against women
campus.   In 7937, Harold King wrote "Hail U.B.C."
the Ubyssey suspended publications in support of the Edit
been suspended for two weeks because of controv
It resumed publications, however, only "to fight
Free Speech".   A student petition was circulated
Universities, stating that the next disarmament confer
Despite  student  campaigning,  in   7932,  fhe  University  bu\
cut.    A bursary fund for needy students was founded
discussion was raised in 7933 over fhe choice of <
and after discarding B.C. Beetles, Golden Eagles an
the students chose the Thunderbirds.   Phrateres was founded
editorial forebodings as to the success of fhe endeavour.
Gwen Pym was elected the first Junior Prom queen.    In 1936, the students
started the University Student Union Building campaign, with
PAGE    NINETEEN The  amphitheatre   of  fhe   as  yet  uncompleted  $700,000  permanent Physics     building,   begun  in   1946.
War  Brings Military Campus
$75,000 from fhe former Women's Union Building Fund.  That year a mumps
epidemic emptied the campus for several weeks and left only  the
orts staff to publish the Ubyssey.  Women's fashions on the Society pages
gtlttgtftmd informal afternoon dresses  of ankle-length velvet,
tjfan was built and over $45,000 was raised for the
Ming.   A feature story on the extravagant amount  spent
■nfs,   carried   by  Canadian   Press,   was   reprinted
H and the U.S.A.  Students objected to what they termed
.<-rations" of fhe sfory.   A Vancouver newspaper
Billy fhaf women only came to U.B.C. fo get a husband.
Hne paper with letters of indignation and denial.
reached 2,227, and faculty  deplored the overcrowding.   The
oard of Governors limited enrollment, and the students held
protest meetings and succeeded in their campaign.   At the outbreak
of Worlds-War II in 7939, fhe University pledged its resources to the
government.   The C.O.T.C. became compulsory, and the U.N.T.D. and U.A.T.C.
were formed.   Co-eds began   voluntary war work.   The  Brock
Memorial Building was officially dedicated in  1940, and the building,
PAGE    TWENTY A few of fhe 250 reconverted ormy huts  utilized for lectures and labs to relieve post-war overcrowding.
And Great Postwar Expansion
primarily designed as the social centre of the campus, became,
in those serious war times, the centre of Co-ed war work.  The first Red Cross
Ball realized $2,000.   The War Aid Council was formed.
Dr. McKechnie died on May 24, 1944, and was succeeded as Chancellor
by the Hon. Eric W. Hamber.   President Klinck retired and was,
followed by President Norman A. M. MacKenzie.    The~gov^rnment
granted the University $5,000,000 for buildings and expansion    The
Physics Building and Library wing were begun* in 7946.   The
Memorial Gymnasium  Drive for $500,000 vfl|
Perhaps the fullest chapter of the University's history isBj
Such problems as those presented in the overwhelm
the lack of facilities which necessitated the addition to rflj
of over 250 army huts, the scarcity of tutorial staff
expansion in  all departments, must certainly become a
U.B.C.'s chain of development.   The vigour with which the odShB
of fhe past year have been surmounted well exemplifies an adherence
to the U.B.C.'s magnificent fabric of tradition.   With such a heritage, the
future of the University is assured.
PAGE    TWENTY-ONE rtft{mini£fr20|bn is the controlling influ-
institution. The U.B.C. Admin-
divided into two distinct gov-
g bodies—faculty and student.
Strong student government has been
encouraged since the inception of the
University. The undergraduates have controlled student affairs with a minimum
of faculty intervention.
The history of U.B.C. is closely linked
with student endeavour. The spirit of fhe
students has continually spurred new
campus developments. In these enterprises the students have always had an
able and energetic faculty to guide them.
The present Faculty Administration has
already successfully surmounted the imposing difficulties ot rapid post-war expansion.
The challenge of "Tuum Est" will be
heeded by both faculty and students as
the watchword of the future. > 2
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Ii       k  President
MacKenzie's
Message
I am glad to again have the opportunity of
writing a short statement for the Totem, and I
would like to extend my congratulations to the
members of your staff for the excellent work they
have done and are doing in connection with this
publication. I would like, too, to extend my greetings and good wishes to the Graduating Class of
1947 and to the Student Body generally. For those
who graduate, I hope that as they go out into the
community they may find interesting and creative
opportunities, and that they will have happy and
successful lives. Our world is still an uncertain and
an uneasy one, and it has need of all the young men
and women of intelligence and goodwill that the
universities can train. This is particularly true in
respect of the fields of human relations and international affairs. There is a great deal of misunderstanding and suspicion abroad in the world between groups and classes of people and among
the nations. This misunderstanding and suspicion
makes effective co-operation difficult and may lead
to strife and conflict locally and internationally
with all the loss and suffering that accompanies
such conflict. Everything that we can do as individuals to prevent this and to promote understanding and goodwill will benefit all of us. To
those who continue at the University, I would
expect that the next two or three years will continue to be as stimulating and as interesting as
the past one has been. I hope, however, that it
will be possible for those of us in administrative
and teaching positions to be able to provide better
opportunities and more facilities for the Student
Body generally, for we are all of us aware of the
difficulties that the students have had to contend
with during the past two years. In any event, I am
sure that we will all, students and staff alike, do
our best to meet any demands that are made
upon us.
-N. A .M. MacKENZIE.
PAGE     TWENTY-SIX *W *^ T Wt___t_IfFl
Part of U.B.C.'s new Alumni who graduated last October at the largest Fall Congregation in the University's history.
Fall Congregation Graduates
Two hundred and six students received degrees
in October's Fall Congregation, the largest in the
history of the University. Most of the graduates
were ex-service men and women who completed
their courses during the special spring and summer
sessions.
The two hundred cap-and-gowned graduates
then marched in solemn procession across the
stage to receive their sheepskins in front of a capacity crowd of parents, friends and relatives.
Following the ceremony, a tea was held in Brock
Hall for the fledgling alumni, and all those who
attended the ceremony.
The ceremony began with a brief address by
Chancellor Eric W. Hamber, former Lieutenant
Governor of British Columbia, followed by the
conferring of two honourary degrees by President
MacKenzie. The first, Doctor of Science, went to
Dr. W. G. Penfield, eminent neurologist and surgeon. Dr. Penfield gave the graduating address.
A second honourary degree, Doctor of Laws, was
conferred to Samuel J. Willis, B.A., LL.D. Dr.
Willis was associate professor at U.B.C. from
1916-1918.
PAGE   TWENTY-SEVEN Deans Solve
Many Postwar
Problems
Contrary to the opinions of many sciencemen
on the campus who express doubt as to the value
of an Arts course, the Faculty of Arts continues
year after year to prove its worth for the many
students who flock to its banner. The Arts faculty,
more than any other, provides students with a
thorough and well rounded education. Its courses
range from mathematics and biology to the study
of philosophy and social problems. As well as
providing the cultural background for an enjoyment of life, it enables a student to step out immediately into his chosen profession or affords a
sturdy basis for study of engineering, law, and
other academic fields.
Courses in modern languages prepare the stu-
WALTER H. GAGE
Assistant Dean
DANIEL BUCHANAN
Dean of Faculty of Arts and Science
dent not only for teaching but also for government
and diplomatic posts.
Working in close co-operation with the Arts
faculty, the Department of University Extension
offers various courses to interested persons off the
campus.
Dean Buchanan, popular head of Arts and Science, this term completes his twenty-sixth year at
U.B.C. This year more than ever before he has
had to use his foresight and experience in handling
the many complex difficulties peculiar to the
campus. The Dean and his assistant, the amiable
Professor W. H. Gage, have had the tremendous
task of interviewing and advising prospective students, arranging timetables that would not clash,
and co-ordinating the work of various departments,
as well as performing their regular duties. The
university has this year distinguished itself for its
generous policy of accepting all comers largely
through the efforts of these two men, guided by
the democratic ideals of President MacKenzie. ■
Despite the overwhelming increase in enrollment, the number and variety of the courses offered
have been greatly increased.   A Chair of Music
PAGE    TWENTY-EIGHT F. M. CLEMENT
Dean of Faculty of Agriculture
has been established under Violinist Harry Adaskin,
who has given lectures on musical appreciation
as well as well-attended recitals.
The Faculty of Agriculture, under the able leadership of Dean F. M. Clement, has been expanding
rapidly and attracting an ever increasing number
of students. The number of courses has also increased and new faculty members have been
appointed.
To augment the already varied work of the
faculty, which offers a four-year course, special
short courses for those interested in the practical
aspects of farming have been added. The extension department works hand in hand with the
faculty to increase agricultural knowledge by
offering courses to outsiders. The new course of
Farm Mechanics, a combined course in Agriculture
and Commerce, a fundamental course in nutrition,
a beginning course in Food Technology, and expansion of work in the soils and in fur animals
have been added to the curriculum this year.
When we remember that such studies as cultivation and treatment of the soil, scientific study of
plant nutrition, and the care and feeding of do
mestic animals all deal with mans basic need for
food, we cannot overestimate the importance of
the work being done by the students and faculty,
particularly in view of the seriousness of the present world food shortage.
In the six years since she succeeded Dean Mary
L. Bollert as Dean of Women at U.B.C, Dorothy
Mawdsley has won the respect and friendship of
thousands of women attending the university.
Always willing and eager to assist, in the capacity of advisor and friend, she solves innumerable
problems which loom large in the life of the perplexed co-ed.
Included in her activities are the inspection of
all boarding houses and housekeeping rooms and
the listing of the approved accommodations for
the aid of the out-of-town student.
Besides providing a source of enthusiastic assistance in the many activities of which women
students partake during the year, she holds the
positions of honourary president of Phrateres and
the Pan-hellenic Council.
The Faculty of Law, organized at the commencement of the fall term in 1945, fills a long-felt
DOROTHY MAWDSLEY
Dean of Women
PAGE    TWENTY--NINE J. N. FINLAYSON
Dean of Faculty of Applied Science
need of the Province for the training of lawyers
within its boundaries.
Under the leadership of Dean G. F. Curtis, the
expanding faculty now boasts four permanent faculty members. In addition, President MacKenzie
is a part-time lecturer. The greater part of the
lectures, however, are given by well-known lawyers
of the city of Vancouver who take time out from
their business to come to the campus and pass on
their knowledge and experience to the students
and to emphasize the practical aspects of the profession.
The aim of the faculty is to prepare students for
the practice of law and business and government
service. The curriculum is based upon that adopted by the Canadian Bar Association and leads to
the degree of Bachelor of Law (LL.B.). Among
the more interesting features of the three years'
course are the moot courts in which each student
must argue one case each year.
The Faculty of Applied Science has given Canada and the world a great number of talented
engineers whose work, especially during the war,
is a matter of record. The head of the faculty,
Dean J. N. Finlayson, and his staff, which includes
many of the top Canadian scientists of the day,
feel sure that among the huge enrollment there are
many students who will keep up the well-established tradition.
With the great task of reconstruction in Europe,
as well as the future construction here in America,
there will be ample opportunity for graduates to
exercise the abilities which their engineering training has given them.
This year the Department of Architecture has
been founded and many undergraduates have been
attracted to this branch of engineering. The new
course of Agricultural Engineering and Engineering Physics have also appeared.
Because of the large number of undergraduates
there is not as much time or space as would be
desirable for graduate research work, but in years
to come this will be given greater attention. With
the completion of the Physics building now under
construction, much of the strain of overcrowding
will disappear, and Applied Science looks forward
to greater development.
G. F. CURTIS
Dean of Faculty of Law
PAGE     THIRTY DEPARTMENT   HEADS
F. M. CLEMENT
Agricultural Economics
J. R. YOUNG
Agricultural Engineering
™"™™™™_M-_W
G. G. MOE
Agronomy
MAXWELL A. CAMERON
Education
G. G. SEDGEWICK
English
JOHN EDWARD LIERSCH
Forestry
ROBERT H. CLARK
Chemistry
JOHN NORISON FINLAYSON
dtil Engineering
O. J. TODD
Classics
PAGE    T III R T Y - O N E DEPARTMENT   HEADS
DAVID OWEN EVANS
French
M. Y. WILLIAMS
Geology and  Geography
MISS ISABEL MacINNES
German
ELLIS H. MORROW
Commerce
BLYTHE EAGLES
Dairying
HENRY F. ANGUS
Economics, Political Science
MISS DOROTHY LEFEBRE
Home Economics
A. F. BARSS
Horticulture
W. N. SAGE
History
PAGE   THIRTY-TWO H. M. KING
Animal Husbandry
F. LASSERRE
Architecture.
ANDREW H. HUTCHINSON
Biology and Botany
DANIEL BUCHANAN
Mathematics
HECTOR JOHN MacLEOD
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
FRANK A. FORWARD
Mining and Metallurgy
H. ADASKIN
Music.
C. E. DOLMAN ESLI LONGWORTH WOODS
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine Pharmacy
PAGE    THIRTY-THREE DEPARTMENT   HEADS
F. S. N.  CHANT
Psychology.
E. A. LLOYD
Poultry Husbandry
R. F. OSBORNE
Physical Education.
CORDON MERRITT SHRUM
Physics
ST. CLAIR SOBELLI
Slavonic Studies.
CHARLES  VYNER BROOKE
Spanish
MISS MARJORIE J. SMITH
Social Work
W. A. CLEMEN
Zoology
PACE    THIRTY-FOUR DEPARTMENT   HEADS
C. B. WOOD, Registrar.
A. MacLUCAS, Bursar.
The University staff has had its hands full of
problems with the record enrollment this year and
must be commended for the efficiency and patience with which it combatted these problems.
Registrar C. B. Wood was kept busy with his
multiple duties which included keeping detailed
records of each student, distributing examination
results, giving information on U.B.C. courses, and
answering questions about entrance requirements.
Bursar A. MacLucas had an enormous job attending to the difficulties of handling the fees of 9,000
students, and distributing annual bursaries and
scholarships, as well as rounding up students who
forgot to pay their fees on time.
In his second year on the campus, Major Mac-
Lean has done an excellent job of advising and
giving information to veterans, as well as acting
as head of the Employment Bureau, which placed
hundreds of students on jobs both in the Christmas
and summer holidays.
In the overcrowded Library, W. Kaye Lamb,
guardian of some 250,000 volumes, pamphlets and
serial publications, keeps a firm, efficient hand
over the organization, and looks forward with
pleasant anticipation to the day when the library
wing now under construction will be completed
and undergraduates will have ample room to satisfy their thirst for knowledge.
W. KAYE LAMB, Librarian.
MAJOR J. F. MacLEAN, Veterans' Advisor.
.    PAGE   THIRTY-FIVE Governors and Senate
The Board of Governors.
The Board of Governors consists of a group of
eleven prominent citizens,—men and women who
have not only assumed professional leadership in
their respective fields but also have devoted their
time and ability to the furtherance of education.
In addition to the important task of maintaining
the reputation and improving the academic standard of the University, the Board has such varied
duties as establishing bursaries and approving
scholarships, sanctioning erection of new buildings
and improvement of old ones, appointing of the
president, deans and faculty members, and deciding the size of the student body.
The governing body of the University is known
as the Senate and consists of thirty-eight members,
each appointed or elected for a term of three years.
In five annual meetings the Senate discusses and
attends to many varied duties.  It provides for the
government, management and carrying-out of the
curriculum; determines the qualifications required
by students entering the University and in which
Faculty each student shall register; grants degrees,
including honorary degrees and certificates of proficiency; advises and consents to the establishment
and recommends the discontinuance of any Faculty,
department, chair, fellowship, scholarship or course
of study; considers and revises the courses in all
Faculties and departments of the University, and
extramural instruction; provides for the affiliation
with any college established in the Dominion for
the promotion of arts or science or for the instruction in law, engineering, or agriculture; makes
rules and regulations for the management and
conduct of the library; and provides for the preparation and publication of the calendar.
The Senate.
PAGE    THIRTY-SIX  Eleven Students Council
Ted Kirkpatrick, President.
Back Row:   Buzz Walker, Jerry Macdonald, Bill MacKay,
Bob Harwood, Phil Evans.   Front Row: Barbara Kelsberg,
Joy   Donegani,    Ted   Kirkpatrick,    Pat   Macintosh,    Don
McRae, Keith MacDonald.
Frequently heard from but less often seen in all
their black-robed splendor, eleven members of the
Student Council spent a fairly smooth-running year
as the top executives of the Alma Mater Society.
From their offices centred in Brock Hall, the
Council members directed all the routine business
of the Society, settled matters of Society policy,
and provided the link between Administration and
students in extracurricular matters.
As head of Council, student political veteran
E. T. "Ted" Kirkpatrick made himself at home to
minor officials and students-on-the-campus alike,
and managed AMS affairs with a minimum of fuss,
Second of the AMS hierarchy, Treasurer Don
McRae, managed to juggle at least two things at
once. The juggling act included keeping an eye
on a record budget of more than one hundred and
twenty thousand dollars in AMS fees.
Pert Joy Donegani, Council Secretary, kept up
with the minutes and her knitting at one and the
same time. Within the Council itself, Miss Donegani was one of the most popular members, driving
half the Council home at late hours Monday nights.
PAGE   THIRTY-EIGHT Members Solve Problems,
Bob Harwood, Junior Member; Joy Donegani, Secretary; Jerry Macdonald, L.S.E.
Women's Undergraduate Society President Barbara Kelsberg, in addition to keeping an eye on
the welfare of all the women, through the agencies
of WUS, Phrateres, and Pan-Hell, managed to
look after the men by arranging numerous tea
dances.
Third of Council's nicest attractions, Pat Macintosh, president of the Women's Athletic Association, turned up every Monday night, cheeks rosy
from basketball practice, to fight the good fight
for everything athletic.
In his unofficial capacity as assistant to the
president. Junior Member Bob Harwood managed
to ask more pointed questions than a barrel of
politicians. The questions came after he had
effectively disposed of his numerous glamorous
duties, such as chairman of Homecoming.
In his traditional role as Council water-boy
and provider of olives, Sophomore Member Phil
Evans was the trouble-shooter for all other departments, and struggled against insurmountable odds
in his ISS campaign.
Don McRae, Treasurer.
PAGE   THIRTY-NINE Show Executive Ability
Barbara Kelsberg, WUS; Buzz Walker, CSA; Phil Evans,
Soph Member.
Bill  MacKay,   USC;  Pat  Macintosh,  WAA;
Keith MacDonald, MAD.
The man with his hands full of clubs,
Jerry MacDonald, guided the activities of
the Literary and Scientific Executive so
well that he, like WAA Prexy Pat
Macintosh, was asked back for a second
helping.
A staunch lover of the outdoors, Men's
Athletic Directorate President Keith MacDonald ran his outfit with discipline of
iron and used his happy disposition to
good advantage in charming thousands of
dollars out of Council.
Suave, debonair Buzz Walker, Co-ordin-
ator of Social Activities, worked to keep
the social calendar free of embarrassing
conflicts, as well as to watch over IFC
and the interests of the Mamooks.
When the Undergraduate Societies Committee
seemed to be going under for the lack of a leader,
Council shopped around and called in Bill McKay
to serve as an appointed USC Chairman. In that
post, the tasks of Discipline Committee and Eligibility Committee chairmanships fell to him.
Twelfth man at Council's table every Monday
night was Member Ex-officio Jack Ferry, editor-
in-chief of publications, who took elaborate notes
to give the members adequate publicity for their
pet projects.
These eleven members of the often abused, and
always overworked Council held the reins of
student government this hectic post-war year. To
their lot fell many unpleasant duties and many
thankless jobs, but they executed them all with
finesse, leaving behind them a memory of a year
capably and efficiently handled.
PAGE   FORTY U.S.C. Has Successful Year
The Undergraduate Societies Committee.
Official conscience of the Students' Council, the
two-year-old Undergraduate Societies Committee,
came of age during 1947.
Under the able chairmanship of Bill McKay, the
body competently carried out its duty to act as a
bridge between the undergraduate mass and their
elected representatives.
Other members of the executive were Bert Shore,
vice-president, and Heather Blundell, secretary-
treasurer.
Under their leadership, the 30-odd members of
eight organized graduate societies functioned to
"advise the Students' Council on matters affecting
general student welfare," and to co-ordinate council
action with student opinion.
In its completely democratic method of procedure the USC approves a motion brought before
and passed by an undergraduate executive. The
USC chairman then brings the item before the
Council and tries to get it voted upon, passed, and
carried out.
Leaderless until sometime in November, the
USC chose McKay as their chairman during a general meeting. Immediately laying out a concrete
policy, the new chairman caused the weight of
the hitherto somewhat defunct body to be felt in
controversial campus issues.
Included in the membership of the Committee
are the executives of the Arts, Agricultural, Engineers, Pre-Medical, Nurses, Commerce, Law, and
Home Economics undergraduate societies.
Bill MacKay.
Bert Shore.
Heather Blundell.
PAGE    FORTY-ONE L. S.E. Manages All Clubs
Upper: Jerry Macdonald, President.
Lower:   Rosemary Hodgins, Secretary.
The Literary and Scientific Executive.
The Literary and Scientific Executive under the
capable leadership of President Jerry Macdonald
devoted much time and energy toward the organization of campus activities with a number of new
innovations.
Chief of these new plans was the assembly of
the club representatives on the lawn outside the
Administration Building at the beginning of the
year to enable Freshmen to get a comprehensive
view of the club organization on the campus. At
this time, over a thousand new members were
added to the ranks of extra-curricular devotees.
After some serious consideration by the members of the committees involved, the Major Executive, the Stage Committee, and the Special Events
Committee, LSE accepted the Radio Society as a
Major Club.
During the year, more than a dozen new clubs
took shape to augment the half dozen which were
declared defunct and inactive. In a great many
cases, the new clubs were of a discuss ional nature,
dealing with problems of modern life.
Secretary Rosemary Hodgins spent much time
investigating the constitutional proposals of the
dozen new clubs which formed on the campus.
The Stage Committee, under the vice-chairmanship of Lome Butterfield, and with Chester Taylor
as secretary, devoted much of its time aiding the
LSE in special events and other activities, with
the extension of the Committee's equipment as
a help.
PAGE    FORTY-TWO W.U.S. Governs The Women
Joan Feast, Roma McDonald, Nancy Macdonald, Rosemary
Byrn,   Barb   Kelsberg,   Bodie   Baxter,   Nora   Clarke,   Pat
Mayne, Joan Park, Audrey Jutte.
The main purpose of WUS is to undertake the
promotion of extra-curricular activity and to
increase student interest, and by doing this it has
provided a great deal of amusement for everyone.
The biggest job of the year was to conduct freshette week at the beginning of the term and to issue
the characteristic green frosh regalia. Wearing the
green armband, emblazoned with the significant
WOOF (WUS Organized to Outlaw Frivolities),
its members acted as Stern Disciplinarians for
recalcitrant freshette, and applied green lipstick
plentifully to any offenders. This gay week was
topped off by the traditional big-little sister supper.
Other WUS-organized activities throughout the
year included several tea dances, featuring a Sadie
Hawkins affair in January, to which co-eds "Brung"
their own men, by brute force if necessary.
During the fall term, WUS, in co-operation with
several downtown department stores, presented a
very successful fashion show. Hi-Jinx, an all-female
gathering, featured a hard times theme, and boasted
a large attendance of fantastically dressed co-eds.
In a more serious vein, WUS was responsible for
distributing and collecting Red Cross knitting, and
aiding the Health Service clerically during the
annual TB checkups.
President of WUS this year was Barb Kelsberg.
Barb Kehberg, Nora Clarke.
Nancy Macdonald, Pat Mayne.
PAGE    FORTY-THREE Pre-Meds Ask For School
Pre-Medical Undergraduate Society.
The Pre-Medical Undergraduate Society this
year continued its policy of striving for the establishment of a Medical School at U.B.C. The campaign  was  conducted  not  only with  a  view to
providing a Medical School for the students, but
also of setting up a Medical Centre which could
be of service to the entire province. Because of
the wide scops of such an undertaking, what has
formerly been wholly a student endeavour became
a public effort throughout British Columbia.
The campaign work done by the members of the
Pre-Medical Society did not fall solely on the
shoulders of the executive. Every student realized
his personal implication and lent his support to give
the overall effect of a strongly united faculty.
Pilgrimages were made to Victoria to approach
the government, and letters were written to
M.L.A.'s. Press publicity reached a high point
when the Pre-meds published a Ubyssey supplement during the spring term.
Further service to the students consisted of
presenting them with the opportunity of taking
aptitude tests for Medical School.
Social activities this year included a unique
mixer in Brock Hall, and a Medical Ball at the
Commodore in March.
President of PUS this year was Bob Wilson.
Engineers Always Active
Engineers Undergraduate Society.
Meeting every Tuesday noon, the Engineers'
Undergraduates handled the professional, social,
and general activities of the large group of Science
undergraduates. It was responsible for a series oi
speeches given by practising engineers and presented weekly for the benefit of first and second
year students to aid them in choosing their particular branch of engineering. This was regarded by
most students as an extremely valuable service.
Tom Preston was the redman that was responsible for the Engineers' Ubyssey, published in red
ink, during the spring term. Preston was assisted
by Gordon Genge and a number of other interested
sciencemen.
In conjunction with Major McLean, the EUS
ran its own employment bureau and signed up its
members for summer work in engineering fields.
The executive also arranged for such events as
the Engineers' Informal, the Science Banquet, and
the highlight of the year, the Science Ball.-
President of EUS this year was Gordon Genge.
PAGE   FORTY-FOUR    .    .    . Special Events On Campus
The Special Events Committee devoted a great
deal of its energy and influence at the beginning of
the year to the War Memorial Gym Drive campaign.
During the Fall term a concert by Miss Thom-
asina Talley was well received by the student
body. This was followed by a Symphony Concert
conducted by Albert Steinberg, with Jan Cherni-
avsky as guest soloist.
The Armory was used for the latter occasion,
and the use of seating facilities of Mr. Gordon
Hilker was of considerable assistance.
Under the guidance of Mr. C. Hadyn Williams,
the University Glee Club also produced a program
of merit.
During the spring session, the visiting Australian
conductor, Bernard Hienze, appeared, also in the
Armory, with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.
His informal remarks on the selections offered
were of particular interest to the record student
attendance.
Another  offering of the  Special  Events   Com-
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Special Events Committee.
mittee was the talented pianist, Louise Meiszner,
who played for a noon-hour audience in the auditorium. The effect of her recital was well evidenced
in the number of students who missed their 1:30
lectures.
A.M.S. Office Staff Busy
Some of the most tireless workers on the University campus are to be found in the AMS office,
where the girls are smiling and ready to help
numerous undergraduates in a multitude of ways
at all times of the day.
Bev Shepherd, friendly office manager, takes
care of petty cash, and helps the elected student
treasurer to learn the routine of his duties. She
also allots work of her four office assistants, Janet
McKerricher, Jane Lyle, Vere Young, and Mavis
Walton.
Another busy person is Mr. Grantham, acting
procter of the Brock Hall, who is responsible for
the upkeep of the building, the commissionaires,
the check room staffs, and catering arrangements.
Mr. Grantham was assisted by Ted and Joe,
who helped in the maintenance of Brock Memorial'
Hall. Both were immediately accepted as friends
of the many students using the building.
Janitorial work in the building was, to a large
The AMS Office Staff.
extent, attended to by parties of part-time student
workers. This service was arranged through the
Employment Bureau.
PAGE    FORTY-FIVE e University of British
often expressed amaze-
amount of activity of
fhe student bodies ■ here. They do so
justly, for on few other campi is student
activity so intense nor does if cover so
wide a scope. The Alma Mater Society,
a 125,000 dollar a year corporation, is
fit enough example of the responsibility
resting in student hands. The Players
Club and the Mussoc have consistently
offered annual presentations that often
approach professional standards. The
Pub has faithfully served the University
since its inception over thirty years ago.
And all on no further incentive than
student spirit. The articles and pictures of
the major of these activities, published
in the following section, may serve to
illustrate the present phases of fhis spirit
so manifest in our history. ~1M IB
5? ft
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1     I.
1     J
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■—1  2,000 Frosh Welcomed To
.^**
Hoslv
1.    Fnwn coirning traditionally.  2.    0# the Zctun, freshies!
3.    Freshman inundated.
Around the last week of September, the sight
of ten inches of hairy, masculine leg or greeu-
begoggled girls excited no more than a sophisticated nod from knowing upperclassmen.
These things, they realized, were manifestations
of the orientation process that had been prepared
for the largest army of freshmen and freshettes
ever to establish a beach-head at U.B.C.
Stoically accepting the invasion of the campus
by green-bedecked frosh, upperclassmen energetically set about breaking in the 2,000 impressionable
newcomers, drafted from the ranks of both the
Canadian armed forces and Provincial high schools.
In spite of frowns from the Discipline Committee, heckling of the newcomers continued
throughout Frosh Week. During the traditional
clash of the Green and Red, packs of prowling
Sciencemen welcomed the Frosh with the good old
water-treatment—and lived to find that they themselves were wet behind the ears.
To see that all Freshettes obeyed the rules of
Frosh Week, WOOFS (W.U.S. Orders Out Frivolities)   roamed the  campus.   At  the  Big-Little
PAGE     FIFTY Campus By Upperclassmen
Sister supper, non-conformists were hauled before
a tribunal to be sentenced, then later entertained
with a new chapter from "The Saga of Dan
McGrew".
Judgment of the boys came the night of the
Frosh Smoker, when the green army were punished for their crimes. Later, Frosh lit up a peace
pipe with their persecutors, and laughed together
over the antics of comedian Fran Dowie.
Participation in the annual Cairn ceremony, at
which newcomers learned the story of the Great
Trek to Point Grey, and a little bit of the history
of U.B.C, was another highlight of the orientation
period.
A huge reception was held in the Armory at
the end of Frosh Week. Here the newcomers were
formally introduced to members of the Faculty
and the Students' Council.
After doffing their regalia during the traditional
snake parade past a replica of the Cairn, the Frosh
became full-fledged members of the Alma Mater
Society, and were granted the privilege of tormenting next year's influx of Freshmen.
Frosh and friends gambol at reception.  2.   Frosh fun
at smoker.   3.    No, no, not the whip.
.    .    PAGE    FIFTY-ONE Princess Ball Initiated bj
Most unique formal and first
affair in the fall social calendar
was the Princess Ball, held at
the Commodore cabaret on
October 17.
Held for the first time this
year, the event was heralded
with lavish publicity that included a frustrated attempt by
yelling braves on horseback to
reclaim U.B.C.'s campus for the
Indians.
The horse-play occurred during a gigantic noon-hour pep-
meet, which followed a solemn
declaration of war, published
in the Ubyssey.
Led by their thundermugging
Chief, a dozen redskins swooped
onto the campus, carried off
several co-eds — candidates for
the Princess contest — and conveyed them to the Armory
pepmeet.
Fran Dowie, Vancouver's
comedian with the chewing-gum
facial muscles, convulsed a
5,000-student audience as star
of the meet. His act included
a pantomime routine of what a
co-ed gets into when preparing
for an 8:30 class.
After donning a garish alpine
playsuit, Mr. Dowie mimicked
a German singing master, with
student participation in the act
"1st das nicht ein?" Dowie asked the assembly.
To which the students roared back the chorus,
"Au du schone!"
Seven co-eds, one from each faculty, were chosen
princesses-elect of the Ball. They were then voted
for by ticket purchasers.
June Lawrence from Pre-Med was the successful
candidate who reigned as queen for the evening.
Other candidates included: Peggy Aveling, Arts;
Bernice Baxter, Agriculture; Verda MacGillivray,
Home Economics; Elaine Twilley, Nursing; and
Anita Henderson, Freshette.
Lavish entertainment at the "pow-wow" included
a professional dance program and a baritone
rendition of "Waters of Minnetonka" by Ernie
Adams.
PAGE   FIFTY-TWO   .    .   .
TOifKCMO DoJu)
Two choruses, one composed of six male dancers,
one of a score of white buckskin-clad girls, executed
a choreography designed by Josephine Slater. Both
troupes performed by courtesy of Stuart MacKay's
Jubilee show.
The Indian theme, traditional at U.B.C, was
carried throughout the program decorations.
Medicine men, dusky maidens, and braves,
cavorted through a native setting, to the throb of
tom-toms and the flutter of eagle-feathers. Cappa Sig,s This Fall
1. D.G.'s—Siwash Chapter. 2. The horse knows it's a joke. 3. Chief Franklin gives the sign. 4. Indians take over-
first time. 5. Princess June Lawrence and Big White Chief. 6. German made easy. 7. June again—and pow-wow.
8. Pin-up Gal. 9. Indian Love Call. 10. Kappa Sig Serenaders. 11. Nancy, Ole, Chas, and that Sweet Man.
12.    The Tom-toms Beat.   13.    Redskin Rumba—B.C. School of Dancing cuts up.
Of the three ballets done in the floor-show, one
was based on an authentic Indian ritual, "Pale
Moon". It featured a solo routine against a background of a mixed male and female chorus. Next,
two painted Apaches executed a war-dance theme
accompanied by the beat of gourds.
A medicine man in full regalia continued the
ritual with the ancient ceremony of installing an
Indian princess.
Miss Lawrence was presented with a floral
bouquet and a gold brooch carved with the motto
"U.B.C. Princess."
First dance with the newly-crowned princess
went to Dr. Norman A. M. MacKenzie, the president of U.B.C.
Kappa Sigma fraternity sponsored the affair.
Patrons included: Chancellor and Mrs. E. W.
Hamber, Dr. and Mrs. N. A. M. MacKenzie, Dean
and Mrs. P. Buchanan, Dean and Mrs. J. N.
Finlayson, Dean Dorothy Mawdsley, Dr. J. Allen
Harris, Dean F. M. Clement, Dean G. F. Curtis,
and the alumni of Kappa Sigma fraternity.
.    .    .    PAGE    FIFTY-THREE Homecomin
Leading the Parade.
The annual homecoming had a new wrinkle for
several thousand alumni, who flocked to their old
nesting-ground on Point Grey on Saturday,
October 26.
Program of the day's activities began with a
mammoth car parade arranged for by the Memorial
Gym committee, complete with colorful flags,
floats, brass band, and color party, the Army, the
Navy, the Airforce, and the mayors of two cities.
A luncheon for men and women of the Big
Block Club, held in Brock Hall, entertained guests
from as far away as Rhodesia, Africa. Afterwards
the bronze plaque dedicating the Brock Memorial
Building to Dean and Mrs. Reginald W. Brock,
was unveiled.
Later the graduates witnessed their first Homecoming American football game, and saw the
Thunderbirds take the lame end of a 14-13 score
against the University of Idaho.
The Jabezian classic, "Her Scienceman Lover,"
was again dusted off and presented.
Much, much later, with their "dates" at the Big
Block-sponsored dance in the Armory, the visitors
were saluted by neon lights winking out a "Welcome Grads" and "Tuum Est" in gold and blue.
Executives who held the overall responsibility
for the arrangements were Bob Harwood, student
chairman, and Alum Walter Lind. Aiding them
were Phil Evans, Bill McKay, Keith MacDonald,
Herb Capozzi, Pat Mcintosh, and Harry Franklin.
PAGE     FIFTY-FOUR    .    .    . Irings Grads To Campus
1. Pretty Forester. 2. Her Scienceman Lover. 3. Missed Him! 4. The Grad-Thunderbird Game.
5. Foolish Pastime. 6. Finishing Touches. 7. There! Now it's officially dedicated. 8. Hit Him!
9.   Wait! We may score yet!  10.   Glee Club at Potlatch.   11.   Pre-Med Float in the Homecoming
Parade.
.    .    .    PAGE    FIFTY-FIVE «lfc™K*ttf
King, Desbrisay, Hamilton deck the hall.
Clusters of autumn leaves and flowers bedecked
the Commodore cabaret last November 7, as one
of the University's first formal affairs of the postwar era was launched.
This distinction went to the 1948 Fall Ball,
which was held in aid of the Memorial Gym Fund.
Acting on a spare-the-wealth social policy, the
Ball committee decided to proclaim the affair a
Dutch treat. This was necessitated by the year's
extensive social program and the run on the pocket-
books of the men about the campus.
Rescued from the naphthalene of the war years,
staid tuxedoes appeared everywhere, contrasting
with feminine shoulders bared above decollete
evening gowns.
Mystery raffles, tickets for which were sold by
the yard, awarded strange and wonderful prizes
every fifteen minutes during the evening. Dance
music was provided by George Calangis' orchestra.
The use of the cabaret, the music and refreshments were donated for the ball by Nick Kogos,
proprietor of the Commodore, while free services
were supplied by the Commodore staff. Sale proceeds from corsages were donated by the Point
Grey Florish Shop—all of which went into the
Memorial Gym Fund.
Committee in charge of Fall Ball arrangements
were: Bill McKay, Don Newson, Dudley McGeer,
Taddy Knapp, Don Ferguson, Casey King, and
Booty Hebb.
PAGE   FIFTY-SIX
1. Pubsters Delight.
2. Floorshow Duo.
3. 50, count 'em, 50.
4. Exhibit A.
5. Equipped to watch floor show. PAGE    FIFTY-SEVEN One never knows to what a flair for writing
can lead.
A letter to their hometown newspaper from
seven disgruntled Saskatchewans, deploring U.B.C.'s
lack of feminine beauty, precipitated the first
peacetime pulchritude contest among the nation's
colleges, caused a U.B.C. freshette to be judged
Western Canada's loveliest co-ed, and eventually
led to the auction of the first post-war kiss on
North American campi.
The contest was even more unique in that all
entrants wore evening gowns, to avoid any hint
of "vulgarity".
All benefits from the affair went to the Memorial
Gym Fund.
The students who started the affair were Dick
Crump, Harry Lidster, Gray Gillespie, Roy Olsen,
Rob Hill, Alan Blythe, and F. W. Dakin.
Carried out before the largest crowd that filled
the Armory, the contest resulted in regal, brunette
Marion Albert being picked—by impartial American
judges—from among two contestants each from the
Universities of Alberta, Manitoba, B.C., and Regina
College.
The kiss was auctioned off during a subsequent
pep-meet in the Armory, at which Marion Albert
and Rhonnda (Miss Australia) Kelly were guests
of honor. For a $10 donation to the Memorial
Gym Drive, Dave Hayward won a kiss from each
of the girls.
The half-dozen "prairie lovelies" who took part
in the finals here were, Rosalie McHaffie and
Norma Shearer from Alberta, Lee Armstrong and
Pat Lebbeter of Regina, and Marie Blondal and
Jean Rogers from Manitoba.
While here, the girls were guests of the Vancouver Daily Province. Gowns and coiffures for
the occasion were supplied by downtown stores.
U.B.C. entries Tina Howard and Marion Albert
were picked from sixty-four contestants, nominated
by campus organizations.
"C"-night for the co-eds was Saturday, November
16, when, gowned in formals, they appeared at
the final judging in the Armory.
Queen Marion gasped for the edification of
radio audiences.
The mammoth decoration job was handled by
Mamooks, who transformed the barnlike Armory
into an attractive cabaret.
Central backdrop consisted of five Grecian
pillars, each bearing the crest of a competing
university, from which gold and blue bunting
stretched fanwise. The rafters were hung with
streamers and hundreds of balloons.
MARION ALBERT
Western University Beauty Queen.
PAGE    FIFTY-EIGHT 1. Preliminary beauty line-up. 2. The judges, before
they try to make a decision. 3. Beauty Queen Marion
Albert   gives  her   thanks.    4.    The    candidates    parade.
5. Judges, when they try to make a decision. 6. Marion
Albert and Tina Howard, U.B.C.'s pulchritude. 7. Eastern
gal.   8.    Walker ogles.  9.    We liked her, too.
PAGE   FIFTY-NINE 1.    War Gym Committee.  2.    The Cossacks fill the Armory.
3.   Vocalist Charms Students.   4.    Legion Float.   5.    Niosi
Plays.   6.   Princess aids Drive.
A year of intensive campaigning on the part of
students and alumni ended successfully.
Although the drive fell short of its half-million
dollar objective, the $200,000-odd that it netted
was sufficient to take steps for the draft of architectural plans and to consider flotation of a loan up to
$100,000 by the Alma Mater Society.
Master plans for the first unit of the gym, an
amphitheatre with balcony of good capacity, have
already been drawn by a staff, advised by Professor
Frederick Laserre of the Department of Architecture.
The completed gymnasium, whose building style
PAGE   SIXTY ~&MAH/
has not definitely been decided on, will include a
memorial altar to the war-dead of B.C.
A special 8-page edition of the Ubyssey was
circulated throughout the province.
An intensive student canvass held during the
week of November 14 was sparked by a giant
student car parade through the downtown area,
with floats donated by various faculties and organizations.
Other contributors were: Proceeds from the
Beauty contest, the Princess ball, the Fall ball,
the Bert Niosi dance, student sales for Henvy V
tickets, and rents for the Auditorium by Hilker
Attractions.
1.    Our Majorettes Strut.   2.    Lower Slobovia's Delegates
Lend Support. 3.    Marion Albert, Western Canadian University Queen. 4.    Homecoming Parade.  S.   Niosi and Clarinet.
6.    Pre-Meds  Campaign for   the  Gym.
.    PAGE    SIXTY-ONE 1.
2,
3.
4.
5.
6.
Careful, it's hot.
So there we were.
Head Table Guests.
Turn around!
Clarence! stop  that.
Table 2, left centre.
PAGE
S
I X T Y - T W O    .
I^^'Kh^I" 0  QJwWtf
1. Jt reaHt/ t_ can't t/wrt funny.
2. Ven/ high /ira:.
3. Btocfc /ace, _t aZ.
4. Check the finger, mmmm.
5. Somewhat  physical.
6. Kelsberg MC's.
7. Won't anyone play with me.
PAGE    SIXTY-THREE Commodore Cabaret Gala
1. Commodore transformed. 2. Lots of water.
3. 'Taint the way I heerd it. 4. Don Robertson and
Friends. 5. Pretty flowers. 6. Excess of women.
7.    Money and  Banking.
(mAtsytmumfywiw
PAGE   SIXTY-FOUR   . Lawyers Like Law Ball
They never come out evenly.
See what I mean?
He's—no—yes—he's—yes—he's    winning!
There's    a surplus of men at U.B.C.
Table, Water, 1-Up and People.
Who the hell is that guy?
7. Oh, you say that to all the girls.
8. Chee, ain't it grand?
PAGE    SIXTY-FIVE Greeks7 Mardi Gras Uses
A novel Oriental note set the decorational
theme for the annual two-day Greek Letter festival
of January 23 and 24. But the words and background music were traditional—nine lovely candidates for the "queen" title, and a hand-picked
Mardi Gras chorus.
Fierce dragons and gay Chinese lanterns sparked
the fete, were used to decorate the balloon-hung
Caf, student cars, and the queens' campaign posters
displayed in prominent places about the campus.
Carrying out the Chinese-Balinese theme, the
queen-candidates wore Oriental costumes during
a preliminary rickshaw parade around the Armory.
Pat Drope of Gamma Phi Beta sorority was voted
queen, and crowned during the last night of the
festival.
The gala two-night dance held at the Commodore cabaret included a fashion show, a lottery
whose prizes had been donated by downtown
stores, two orchestras and a quartet, besides the
main floor-show.
The short girls' chorus did an interpretation of
a Javanese dance, which was followed by a modern rendition of an ancient Chinese routine from
the "tall" chorus.
Casey King and Hank Sweatman were co-chairmen of the committee in charge.
Net proceeds of $3,894.22 went to the Women's
Auxiliary at Shaughnessy Hospital fund.
I. Drope receives crown. 2. Sunday School is oner.
3. Who's your friend? 4. Solo dancer, Tish McLeod.
5. Final Plans. 6. Pubsters Revel. 1. Ice Cubes?
8. Tina    Models.    9.    Up    in    front.    10.    Tall    Girls.
II. Candidate  Comes  Out.    12.    Committee  in  Charge.
PAGE    SIXTY-SIX    . Oriental Motif As Theme
PAGE    SIXTY-SEVEN Engineers Forget Labs
The symbol of graduate engineers throughout Canada, the Iron Ring, provided the
name for this year's Engineers Formal, the
Iron Ring Circus. The ball was held in the
Commodore towards the end of February.
There, over 1200 people took a night and
following morning reaction from studies to
help make the frolic one of the most successful in years. Sciencemen left their slide rules
and test tubes in the labs and entered into
the spirit of the evening.
Rumours from back stage intimated that
the heroine of the Engineers' Ubyssey supplement, Lady Godiva, was scheduled to
appear on the program. It was later found
that she had been detained because someone
had stolen her horse. As a last-minute stop
gap, the Wig and Bustle Revue, took over the
spot, giving a bizarre second-string version
of the Mardi Gras Chorus. The chorus's
shapely legs were somewhat despoiled by
verdant growths of hair.
The annual award for the best model
engineering project was copped by the Electricals' reproduction of the Bridge River
Power project. Second prize was taken by
the Chemical's synthetic rubber plant, while
a smoking volcano constructed by the Dawson Club took third spot.
1. Patrons Revel. 2. Silver Collection. 3. Engineer and Friend
Enter Iron Ring. 4. No Godioa Here. 5. Mauler. 6. Introductions. 7. Some People Watch Photographer. 8. Stander.i-hi/.
9.    Prize Winners.   10.    Also Good.   11.    One Night of Freedom.
PAGE    SIXTY-EIGHT At Iron Ring Circus
12.    Late Comers.   13.    7-Up.   14.      Tut, tut.   15.    Wanna watch
the wheels.   16.    Embryo Rubber Plant.   17.    And so, goodnight-.
18.    Sciencemen Frolic.
.    PAGE    SIXTY    NINE Stars Appear On Campus
1. Lauritz Melchoir Meets His Audience. 2. The Cossacks
After the Show. 3. Serge Jaroff Enters. 4. Russian
Dances.   5.    The Cossacks in Action.   6.    Just Relaxing.
A successful experiment was undertaken by
Gordon Hilker, who several times during the year
proved that the Armory was an acoustically-perfect
background for the presentation of his Attractions.
During the year, capacity adult and student
audiences heard Paul Robeson, Lauritz Melchoir,
and the Don Cossacks.
The Danish-born Metropolitan star visited the
campus during the Fall term. So did the multi-
voiced croon kings, the Don Cossacks.
Paul Robeson came to the campus on February 15.
PAGE   SEVENTY Pass Features Popular
Living up to their policy of more pass features
during 1947, the Special Events Committee of the
Literary and Scientific Executive brought an
impressive fist of artists to the campus.
Chairmanned by Jerry MacDonald, the committee worked in close co-operation with the
Memorial Gym Committee, the Legion, and various
campus organizations to present their programs.
The Vancouver Symphonic Orchestra gave three
campus concerts during the year; once under the
baton of Albert Steinberg with Jan Cherniavsky as
featured soloist; conducted by Bernard Heinze in
a February concert; and featuring Jacques Singer,
on a concert given March 6.
PAGE   SEVENTY-ONE Junior-Senior Prom A Hit
1.    This was not posed.   2.    The end of a sad tale.   3.    The King's pause to refresh. 4.   "Omlet" seeks his fair maiden.
5.   Yea, and even the Iiead table—.   6.    Hey you, look at the  camera.   7.    Cappozzi Picks a Winner.   8.    Bill and
Mardee look it over.  9.    Oh, my lovely Ophelia.
*JuMMh-^Qmt>* n
PAGE   SEVENTY-TWO  Scholarship
Patrick C. T. White
Selection of Patrick C. T. White as the outstanding scholar of 1947 will serve in some way to
culminate Pat's career at U.B.C. Climaxing four
undergraduate years of outstanding scholastic
achievement, he was awarded, early this spring,
the I.O.D.E. overseas scholarship on the merit of
his graduation results.
Coming directly to U.B.C. after excelling at
Lord Byng High School, his undergraduate years
were interrupted when he joined the R.C.N.V.R.
on completion of his second year. The war over,
he returned to the campus on D.V.A. to graduate
last spring in history honours. Oliver Cromwell
was the topic he chose for his graduation thesis.
This year, Pat has been working towards his M.A.
Pat's interests are not limited to his studies. He
has served with distinction in student activities,
chief of which are the Parliamentary Forum and
the Historical Society.
He hopes to apply his scholarship to continue
his study of history at Cambridge University,
specializing in the Tudor and Stuart period. After
receiving his Cambridge M.A. he will probably
return to profess history at a Canadian university.
Research
Dean Fisher
Nationally acclaimed for the contribution his
study of hair seals will make to the fishing industry,
Dean Fisher has been selected by the Totem to
represent outstanding U.B.C. research workers of
the year.
After receiving his Master of Arts at spring
graduation, Dean will go to Ottawa, where he has
been appointed Administrative Assistant of Wild
Life, under the Department of Mines and Resources. Dean, 25 years old, who claims Kamloops
as his home town, received his education there,
prior to university. He graduated from U.B.C. in
1944, majoring in zoology, and has continued
university on a scholarship for graduate studies
from the B.C. sugar refineries.
Field work for his research was accomplished
while working during summer holidays for the
Pacific Biological Station of Fisheries at Nanaimo.
Last summer, following the animals in a launch,
he traced their movements to the head of the
Skeena River. He discovered their main areas of
birth, previously known only to Indians. His study
of hair seals, in relation to the fishing industry, is
of much economic importance.
PAGE    SEVENTY-FOU-R Most Beautiful Co-Ed
Seventeen-year-old Marion Albert may justly
claim the distinction of being not only prettiest
girl at U.B.C, but Western Canada's most beautiful
co-ed. Overnight, Marion's name was known from
coast to coast when she was chosen winner at the
Western Canadian University Beauty Contest. The
competition was sponsored by the Province newspaper in aid of the U.B.C. War Memorial Gym
Drive. There were eight competitors, two university girls chosen as outstanding beauties from each
of the four western provinces.
Not only beaut)', but charm of manner, speaking
voice, personality and poise were contributing
factors to the judges' decision. Gowned in a Schick
Grecian-style evening dress, Marion, five feet nine
inches tall, appeared "every inch a queen".
Vancouver-born and educated, Freshette Marion
has above average scholastic ability. She completed
two years of high school in one, graduating from
Prince of Wales high school last year. She plans
to direct her studies toward social service work.
Interested in "just everything," Marion is the personification of an "all round" college girl.
Marion Albert.
Best Citizen
AMS president-elect, and immediate past president of the U.B.C Legion, Grant Livingstone has
been selected as the student who has contributed
most to campus affairs.
Although a "Blue nose," born in Halifax in 1922,
Grant came to Vancouver from Nova Scotia in
1938. He entered U.B.C. in 1939. The summer of
1940, Grant went to Gordon Head, officers' Training School, and proceeded overseas in 1941 with
re-inforcements for the Canadian Scottish Regiment (1st Division). Injured in a training accident
which cost him his right hand, he returned to
Canada in 1942, and served for the remaining war
years as an instructor in Canada.
Since his return to U.B.C. in 1945, Grant has
been a prominent member of the Parliamentary
Forum, The Legion, and the War Memorial Gym
Drive Committee. He led the 1945 Fall Mock
Parliament, as Conservative Prime Minister. Vice-
president of the Legion last year, Grant conducted
a survey of the cost of living, housing, and employment for veterans. This report was used when
Grant appeared before a Parliamentary Committee
on Veterans' Affairs in 1946.
Grant Livingstone.
PAGE    SEVENTY-FIVE Womens' Athlete
Irene Strong.
Leading athlete of the year was Irene Strong,
a comely 18-year-old freshette, who seems destined
to enhance the reputation of her Alma Mater, as
a probable contestant in the 1948 Olympic Games.
Voted the most outstanding sportswoman of the
year in the annual Vancouver News-Herald poll,
Irene is an all-round athlete who has lately skyrocketed to international fame as a result of her
amazing prowess in the water.
She holds over 15 senior Canadian swimming
records,—one world mark besides: the 50-yard
breast-stroke swum in a 50-yard pool at Kelowna.
A mainstay of the feminine bracket of the
Varsity Swimming Team, she was recently complimented by Ray Daughters, world-famed coach
of the Seattle Swimming Club, who rated her as
"one of the three top swimmers in America," a
generous comment that had no precedent in the
arena of Canadian aquatics.
Irene also includes riding, at which she has
excelled in local competition, and skating, among
her proficient sports.
Plans for the future of this first year student
are indefinite as yet, except, of course, for a date
in London in '48.
Mens7 Athlete
Herb Capozzi.
Standing head and shoulders above the 1946-47
crop of male athletes on the campus was husky,
popular, Herb Capozzi, honoring this year in
Chemistry.
Versatility sums up the university career of this
205-pound product of Kelowna, B.C., but it was
on the gridiron that he really shone.
Playing first string guard on the Thunderbirds,
he led them to the Hardy Cup in 1945, and was
co-captain of the team in its first season of American Conference play. He was chosen All-Conference Guard, and received an offer from the New
York Giants of the National Football League.
Capozzi included basketball in his repertoire,
and in his second season of a four-year stint with
the U.B.C. Chiefs he was nominated the most
valuable player in the Senior City League.
A student of high scholarship standing, Capozzi
is an initiate of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, and
he aided their intramural program with stellar
performances in swimming, wrestling, and rugger.
Among his activities were included membership
in the Big Block Club, Secretary of the MAD, and
election to Sigma Tau Chi Honorary Fraternity.
PAGE    SEVENTY-SIX  Players Club Members
Irene Gava, Beverly Wilson, Jim Argue
Plans for a freshman play, the annual fall and
spring plays, the Inter-Varsity Drama Festival,
and the erection of a scenery shop kept the Green
Room humming with activity this year.
Thespians started off the Fall term in a dramatic
fashion by introducing freshmen to the vagaries
of varsity life. An amused audience viewed the
revival of "Jabez" Eric Nichol's "Scienceman
Lover," which was presented at the Frosh Reception. Norm Campbell, back on the campus as a
physics instructor, played the role of John, a part
which was originally written for him. Norm, a
Players Club alumna, had a supporting cast of
active members, including Carol Aikins, Arnold
Watson, Beverly Wilson, and Jim Argue.
The Fall Plays presented a wide
variety of dramatic entertainment
which gave scope for all types of
Players Club talent.
"Solomon's Folly" was a satirical
comedy which treated the wisdom of
King Solomon in a refreshingly different light. Arnold Watson, as Sofar the
scribe, won Joan Powell, the lovely
Queen of Sheba, from Solomon the
wise, played by Dick Newman.
The second play was "House on
Fern Road"—a modern melodrama
centering around a cold-blooded murder. Donna Powers and Des Seymour
played the leading roles.
In "Riders of the Sea," reputed to be one of
the greatest modern tragedies, Norma Fieldhouse
played the mother who lost her husband and five
sons. The part of a sixth son, who was killed later
in the play, was taken by Murray Colcleugh. The
two daughters were played by Ann Galloway and
Greta Ward.
"Pierre Patelin," directed by Roth Gordon,
brought to the Players Club stage a medieval farce.
Ned Larsen played Patelin, Audrey Blanchard his
wife Guillemette, and Duke Saunders was the
draper.
Main production of the year was Sir James
Barrie's whimsical "What Every Woman Knows".
It is the story of a Scottish railway porter, who,
Mary McLeod, Warren Sutton,  Mrs. Elsie Graham
PAGE    SEVENTY-EIGHT    .    . through the efforts of his freakish and unmanageable wife Maggie, rises to the position of a cabinet
minister. The play mingles tragedy and comedy
in the most improbable manner, yet it is so skillfully done that it completely captures the imagination of the audience.
Heading an excellent cast were Ron Bates as
John, and Mary MacLeod as his wife Maggie.
James Argue, making his fourth appearance in
spring productions, played the part of David, a
humourous and sentimental old bachelor. Norma
Bloom was the Comtesse, and John Nieuwdorp
took the character role of Venables. 'What Every
Woman Knows" was skillfully directed by Mrs.
Elsie Graham.
This year the Players Club was host to the
second annual Inter-Varsity Drama Festival which
was inaugurated last year to stimulate university
interest in dramatic talent.
The University of Alberta brought out a five-
scene adaptation of the French play "Martine"
which was directed by Bob Orchard, an instructor
of English at U.B.C. last year. George Bernard
Shaw's "Dark Lady of the Sonnets," a satire on
Shakespeare, was presented by the University of
Saskatchewan. Manitoba did an adaptation of
"The Woodcarver's Wife"; and U.B.C. played
"Solomon's Follies".
Although the festival was on a strictly noncompetitive basis, the casts met afterwards for
private criticisms given by Miss Dorothy Somerset,
Honourary President of the club, and Professor
F. G. C. Wood, member of the Advisory Board.
During their stay in Vancouver, the out-of-town
students were entertained by the Players Club.
Climaxing their stay was the formal reception
given in Brock Hall by the university.
The social calendar included the Fall Formal,
three production parties — one of which followed
the festival, and bi-monthly play readings. The
reading of Noel Coward's "Private Lives" was
called a "grub for Ainsworth" party. Everyone
brought something which could be sent to Rhodes
Scholar Allan Ainsworth, who is now studying at
Oxford.
Honourary President of the Players Club is
Miss Dorothy Somerset. Professor and Mrs. F. G.
C. Wood and Professor T. Larsen are members
of the Advisory Board.
1. Her Scienceman Lover. 2. Gerry Williamson, Derek
Ralston, Carol Aikens, Robin Little, Lois Shaw, Joan Powell.
3. Joan Powell, Dick Newman, Arnold Watson. 4. Dick
Newman, Joan Powell, Arnold Watson. 5. Saskatchewan's
"Dark Lady of the Sonnets". Stage Autumn Plays And
1. Wally Marsh, Joan Powell, Dick Newman.   2. Riders to the Sea. 3. Nancy Davidson, Arnold Watson, Dick Newman,
Vivian Latsoudes, Pamela Butcher.    4. Dick Newnuin, Joan Powell, Arnold Watson.    5. Saskatchewan's "Dark Lady of
the Sonnets".
PAGE     EIGHTY... //
What Every Woman Knows
//
1. Marg McLeod, Rae Bates.   2. Mummers Eat.   3. Lois Shaw.    4. Bruce Smith, BUI Patterson, Mary McLeod, Jim
Argue.    5. Mummers Rehearse.
PAGE   EIGHTY-ONE Musical Society Presents
Walter Wasylkow, President.
Musical    Society    Executive:    Walter    Wasylkow,    John
Murray,   Gerry  Foote,   Lucill  Hawkens,   Jim   Smith   and
Bill MacDonald.
Expansion was the keynote of the Mussoc this
year. The members decided that it was high
time the campus realized that the most spectacular
activity of the club—the Spring production—was
not the only one. Their policy is to stimulate
interest and develop talent in several forms of
music.
The result of this over-all organization was the
highly successful presentation of the two Musical
Dorothy McLeod, Business Manager.
Jim Smith and Gerry Foote.
PACE   EIGHTY-TWO   .   . Rollicking Sea Chanties
Lucill Hawkens.
John Fish.
John Murray.
Reviews which featured the Glee Club and several
instrumentalists. To everyone's great disappointment, the newly-formed ballet group could not be
incorporated into the program because of the lack
of stage facilities. Particular difficulties were
encountered in the special type of lighting which
ballet requires.
The Glee Club has expanded, and became a
particularly enthusiastic group this year. Members
practised constantly, and as a result were able to
provide a Homecoming program and the background music for the Beauty Contest, as well as
take their part in the Musical Review.
After Christmas, the main efforts of the club
were focussed on the production of Gilbert and
Sullivan's "H.M.S. Pinafore". It was a success
which quite lived up to campus expectations.
David Holman, tenor, starred as the humble
seaman hero, Ralph Rackstraw, who eventually
wins his Josephine, proud captain's daughter, sung
by newcomer Shirley Gunn, lyric soprano from
Victoria. John Fish lent an authentic touch in the
baritone role of Captain Concoran, commander of
"Pinafore".
Bob McLellan, another bass baritone old-timer,
was an excellent Dick Deadeye. Among newcomers
were Hank Naylor, freshman baritone, who sang
the part of Sir Joseph Porter, K.C.B., who "polished
his way into the Queen's Navee", and Doug Whet-
more, baritone, as the boatswain.
The Portsmouth Bumboat Woman, Little Buttercup, was sung by contralto Bette Purvis. Gerry
Foote, mezzo-soprano, who first starred as the
witch in "Merrie England," was Sir Joseph's first
cousin.
A chorus of sailors and ladies supported the
dramatis personnae in this romantic tale of "The
Lass That Loved a Sailor".
Several of the scenes from the production were
filmed by the University Extension Department
for their historical library.
The entire cast, including stage crew and scenery, went on tour this year to White Rock and to
Seattle. The latter trip was an exchange with the
University of Washington Musical Society, which
in turn sent their members to U.B.C. to perform
in a Variety Show for the Canadian students^
Both productions were a great success. Everyone
enjoyed themselves immensely while they gained
valuable experience. It is to be hoped that the
same system will be carried out next year.
The Mussoc is most grateful to Mr. C. Haydn
Williams, who has worked with the Musical Society
for the past twenty-two years. It is his careful
guidance which has enabled the club to attain its
traditionally high standard of performance, for it
PAGE   EIGHTY-THREE At Spring
Production
is he who helped to develop the musical talent of
the members, and directed them through painstaking rehearsals.
Working in close co-operation with Mr. Williams,
and giving invaluable assistance, was the dramatic
director, Mr. E. V. Young, who has been associated
with the Musical Society since 1934. He was
capably assisted by Professor Walter H. Gage.
"Music From Varsity," directed by Lucill
Hawkens, has become increasingly well known to
radio audiences this year. It is a weekly half-hour
program of classical music over CJOR featuring
production previews and Mussoc artists. Among
those included was alumna Erico Nalos, Vancouver
winner on "Singing Stars of Tomorrow".
The October acquaintance banquet and the
yearly ticket dance were outstanding on the Mussoc
social agenda. The production party climaxed
the activities for another year.
Members of the Musical Society were delighted
to see a Faculty of Music finally established on
the campus this year. Although a regular schedule
of study had not yet been drawn up, Professor
Harry Adaskin gave informal lectures on the
appreciation and forms of music.
The permanent executive of the Musical Society
is composed of Professor Walter Gage, honourary
president; Dean Dorothy Mawdsley, honourary
vice-president; and Dr. W. L. MacDonald, honourary life member.
This year's executive were: Walter Wasylkow,
president; Gerry Foote, vice-president; Jim Smith,
secretary; Dorothy McLeod, business manager;
John Fish, production manager; John Murray,
advertising manager; Lucill Hawkens, musical
appreciation director; and Bill MacDonald, Glee
Club representative.
1. C.   Haydn   Williams   Directs   the   Student   Singers.
2. Dead Eye Dick Plays His Part. 3. Rollicking Gilbert
and Sullivan. 4. Josephine and Her Humble Seaman
Hero. Next page 1. The Male Chorus and Kibitzers.
2. Beverley Ann Widman Applies Her Make-up While
David Patterson Admires. 3. The Trio. 4. 4 Spades!
5.   Pulchritude  in  the   Chorus.    6.   Shirley   Gunn   and
John Fish.   7.    C. Haydn Williams in Conference.  Symphonic Club Culture
1.    Tom Mallinson, President.  2.
Attentive Listeners.   3.    Joyce Newman and Martin Brown.   4.
5.    John Bargus.
Lorraine  Gadbois.
The University Symphonic Club was formed in
the spring of 1945, by a number of students who
believed there was room on the campus for an
organization devoted to the promotion of an interest in symphonic music. The activity and popularity of the club has raised it to the level of a
major club under L.S.E.
This year the Symphonic Club presented a
series of programs dealing with music historically.
The programs took the form of brief talks about
the music to be heard, followed by recorded music
representative of a certain period in musical history.
Several times during the year the club sponsored
musical films which were open to the whole student
body. A few evening concerts were given, which
were devoted to the playing of a single long work,
or a group of compositions from the pen of a single
musician.
The members of the Symphonic Club regularly
contributed articles to the music column in the
Ubyssey.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Tom Mallinson; vice-president, John Bargus; secretary, Lorraine Gadbois; publicity director, Jean
Thomson; and program managers, Jim and Eva
McGregor.
PAGE    EIGHTY-SIX Film Society Is Active
The Film Society, one of the really modern
clubs on the campus, is training its members to
handle movie projection equipment. The far-
distant dream of the club is to take part in the
actual production of moving pictures, but at the
moment both training and equipment are quite
inadequate.
A more immediate hope, however, is for the
installation of arc projectors in the auditorium so
that films may be shown in a smooth and professional manner. The present necessity of placing
the camera down in the audience should be alleviated by equipping the present balcony film booth
to suit the club's 16 mm. projectors.
The members of the Film Society have gained
invaluable experience through close co-operation
with the University Extension Department. After
they have been trained and written an exam, they
are qualified to work with Extension films in
showings all over the city.
Quite independently, the club has rented films
each week from downtown distributors, and shown
them on the campus. Two of the better-known
productions were "I Know Where I'm Going" and
"The Wicked Lady".
The services of the Film Society are available
to any club under the L.S.E.
This year's executive was: Honorary president,
Norman Barton; president, Harry Nicholson; secretary, Eleanor Cock; publicity manager, Ray
Steer; personnel manager, Brayden Roberts.
1.    Film Society Executive.   2.    Campus Colour.   3.      Harry Nicholson Operates.   4.    Also Ray Steer.   5.    So that's
what they do.
PAGE    EIGHTY-SEVEN' Mamooks Paint Signs And
1 and 2.    George Bloor Paints New Quad Sign.   3.     Stewart, Johnston, Sinclair and Stevenson Prepare Signs. 4.   Jerry
Galuin, Gloria Newell, Gord Stevenson, George Bishop, Jack Oldfin, and Ron Perks.   5.    Mardi Gras Sign Happening.
6.    See, it's simple.   7.    Cheer Leaders Rehearse.
PAGE   EIGHTY-EIGHT Supply Cheer Leaders
Bill  Smith.
George Bishop.
Maureen Auterson.
Don Kerley.
One hundred lively new "probies" at the beginning of the term infused the Mamooks with a high-
pitched enthusiasm which has carried the club
through the busiest year it had ever seen. The
Rainbow Room, under President Bill Smith, was a
combination work shop and public relations office,
as it became the central advertising agency for all
campus organizations.
In addition to painting 1,500 individual posters,
Mamooks took charge of the new Quad billboard
which headlined the most significant campus-wide
activities.
The most striking innovation of the year was
Don Kerly's organization of the five drum majorettes who made their first appearance before the
capacity crowd at the Homecoming football game.
Their colourful performance, complete with white
satin uniforms and twirling batons, drew a noisy
appreciation from the grandstand.
Ticket sales, coat checking, ushering, and the
ingenious decorations for all the Brock Hall dances
and the Western Universities Beauty Contest all
came under the jurisdiction of the energetic club
members.
President Bill Smith was assisted by Vice-President George Bishop and Secretary Maureen
Auterson. George Bloor was head yell man. Goldie
Goldberg took charge of ticket sales, and Jean
McMynn looked after the ushering.
Gordon Stevenson added a professional touch
to the post painting. Frank Heard supervised
decorations.
PAGE   EIGHTY-NINE Varsity Legion Branch Is
The Legion Executive:   Perry Millar, Colin Gourley, Mrs. Helen Noel, David Brousson, John MacKenzie, S. M. Hewitt
and Ray Dewar.
Organized in the interests of student veterans,
the University Branch of the Canadian Legion has
gained a reputation for intelligent and well-directed
action. Legion committees have investigated
grants and gratuities of students who are in danger
of having to discontinue their education, have
made financial loans available to members, and
have instituted an aggressive employment bureau.
Over 160 families have been housed, and vets in
hospital have enjoyed visits from Legion members.
The Legion Canteen was opened this year.
The University Branch of the Legion was represented at both Provincial and Dominion conferences, at the last two National Conferences of
Student Veterans and N.F.C.U.S., and is represented on the executive of the Vancouver District
Council.
Honorary president of the Legion is Dr. Norman
A. M. MacKenzie, C.M.G., M.M. and Bar; honorary
vice-presidents, Prof. S. N. Chant, O.B.E.; Lt.-
Col. Gordon M. Shrum, O.B.E., M.M.; Prof. Walter
H. Gage. Padre is Capt. John Stewart.
The year's executive was: President, Grant B.
Livingstone; first vice-president, Perry S. Miller;
second vice-president, David R. Brousson; secretary, F. M. Hewett; and treasurer, Colin C. Gourlay. Executive members: Mrs. Helen R. Noel, Rav
1.   "A   Hundred   Pipers."    2.   Those   Lighter   Moments       R Dewar> D™ald A. S. Lanskail; housing director,
With the Legion Members. John W. MacKenzie.
PAGE   NINETY Important Campus Entity
1. Homecoming Parade. 2. President N. A. M. MacKenzie Opens the Canteen. 3. At a Legion Dance. 4. The
Executive. 5 and 6. Scenes from the Armistice Ceremonies. 7. Marg Yule, Secretary. 8. John Morris and Ralph
Huene. 9. The Christmas Dance. 10. Smile for the Birdie. 11. The Canteen Opening. 12. Legion Float.
13.    Hoot Mon!   14.    Quick  March.    15.    The  Legionette   in the Making.   16.    The Legion Executive Party.
PAGE    NINETY-ONE Parliamentary Forum
Dave Williams. President.
The Executive of the Parliamentary Forum.
Debating reached unprecedented heights this
past year under the able guidance of David Williams. As president of the Parliamentary Forum,
he kept a watchful and directive eye over all
Forum activities.
First on the agenda came the weekly Thursday
debates, arranged by Bob Prittie, at which the
temporary "Prime Minister" and "Leader of the
Opposition" introduced the topic. The members
of the House then made their comments.
Next came the weekly Monday debates started
this year by Tony Scott with the intention of providing a less formidable opportunity for public
speaking novices.
Probably the most notable innovation was the
Radio Forum. Cliff Greer handled each Friday
night broadcast, aided by four student speakers
and a faculty moderator. Fifty-six students appeared throughout the year at the Radio Society
microphone.
Regularity of all these weekly features was
broken by the McGoun and Frosh Debates, contests with American Colleges, and the one Mock
Parliament of the vear, in March.
January saw the McGoun Cup Debates held
simultaneously in the four western Canadian university towns. Rosemary Hodgins and Jim Sutherland upheld the afiirmative at U.B.C. against a
Saskatchewan   team,   while   Gordon   Reed   and
PAGE    NINETY-TWO Debates, Moves, Ballots
1. The McGoun Cup Debaters, Jim Sutherland, Rosemary
Hodgins, Michael Creal, Gordon Reed.
Michael Creal journeyed to Winnipeg. University
of Manitoba won the Cup for the second consecutive season on the topic, "Resolved that Allied
Troop should be withdrawn from China and
Greece immediately." Rosemary Hodgins was the
third U.B.C. woman student to be chosen for a
McGoup Cup team.
Under Joan Fraser's careful supervision, the
Frosh Debates against Victoria College came off
in March, with Mary Leiterman, Catherine Robertson, Hugh Legg and Dennis Sheppard representing U.B.C. on the question, "Resolved that
the Veto Power in the U.N.O. be Abolished Immediately."
Colleges across the line which engaged in
"forensic struggles" with U.B.C. teams included:
Washington State, College of Puget Sound, Lutheran College, Linfield, University of Washington,
Stanford, and University of California at Berkeley.
Last and biggest Forum event on the campus
was the Mock Parliament, led, this year, by a
C.C.F. government.
The 1946-47 Forum executive consisted of:
President, David Williams; first vice-president,
Joan Fraser; second vice-president, Tony Scott;
historian, Rosemary Hodgins; treasurer, Cliff
Greer; publicity, Gloria Kendall; and program
director, Bob Prittie. Invaluable help was also
given by Isabel Cameron, Bill Cameron, John
Cowan, and Bob Dodd.
2.    Unaccustomed as I am  ...   3.    ... and furthermore
.    .    PAGE    NINETY-THREE Radio Society Expands
Few people are aware of the really professional
level of work accomplished this year by the U.B.C.
Radio Society. Main efforts of the club were
directed towards preparation of programs for
downtown networks. RadSoc members wrote their
own scripts, managed their own production and
technical directing, and made all announcements.
They provided talent for their drama program,
"Thunderbird Theatre," over CKMO. From the
same station came the university roundtable discussions.
"Music From Varsity" was a weekly feature
aired through CJOR, and CKWX carried a RadSoc
description of the fall Beauty Contest. All programs were directed through the campus studios
of the Society.
Broadcasts of the fall football games represented
an outstanding achievement of the RadSoc. It was
the first undertaking of this sort and was handled
through the campus studio and aired on CKMO.
During the Gym Drive the Radio Society
directed a full day's program from four lower
mainland stations. "Plugs" for the drive were
announced throughout the day.
The Radio Society played a major role in the
university Western Radio Conference, the first of
its kind in Canada.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Ray Perrault; treasurer, Phil Ashton; secretary-
director, Elaine Leiterman; drama director, Ernie
Perrault; chief announcer, Don Winchester; technical director, Al Goldsmith; and continuity manager, John Drysdale.
1. Tom Calvert, Howie Biehl, Lyn Sliaver, Phil Ashton.
2. Control Room Spectators.  3.    George Broatch. 4.  Ray
Perrault.   5.    Mikemen.
PAGE   NINETY-FOUR Campus7 Casting Service
1. Quick Rehearsal Before Broadcast. 2. George Barnes, Don Winchester and Esme MacDonald. 3. Gerry Batten
Announces. 4. Ray Perrault Directs. 5. Dr. Birney at a Roundtable Discussion. 6. Ernie Perrault, Program Director.
7.    Sound Effects.   8.    Broadcasting from tlxe Campus Studios.    9.    Elaine   Leiterman,   Phil   Ashton,   Roy   Kelsberg,
Ernie Perrault and Ray Perrault.
.    .    .   PAGE    NINETY-FIVE I.R.C. Group Discusses
Dacre   Cole,   President.    Right:    Irene   Grayston,
Muriel van de Valk, Allan McGill.
The International Relations Club is a discussion
group whose chief aim is to obtain a better understanding of the problems facing the world today.
The club is a non-partisan organization, one of
833 similar world-wide clubs sponsored by the
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. It
is hoped that the objective study of current affairs
will give members knowledge that will enable
them to become part of an intelligent and well-
informed public, a public better equipped to
analyze international problems, and therefore
better able to express opinions as to their solution.
Most important campus activity of the I.R.C.
was its presentation of authoritative speakers,
which enabled students to gain first hand information. Some of the topics under discussion included
"Is The U.N.O. Enough?", "The Pacific Theatre",
"Canada's Foreign Policy", "Indonesia" and "Holland's Problems". The new year saw the traditional
annual survey "Review of 1946" by Prof. F. H.
Soward.
Radio round table discussions on "Palestine, International Barometer" and "The Occupation Zones
of Germany" were presented by the U.R.S. over
CKMO.   The subjects of the student roundtables
were those spoken upon by Rabbi Goldman and
Dr. McKenzie at previous I.R.C. presentations.
Highlight of the year was the annual N.W.
Pacific Conference to which the club sent four
members. The Conference was attended by 90
delegates from Alberta, Saskatchewan, B.C., Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana. The subject,
"Can the U.N.O. Solve the World's Political and
Economic Problems?", stimulated some valuable
discussion. Much was gained from the variety of
opinions expressed. The guest speaker, Dr. F.
Munk, who played an important role in allied
co-operation, addressed the group on "The U.N.
from the Inside".
The University of B.C. delegates extended an
invitation to the Conference to meet next year at
U.B.C. It was unanimously accepted. The appearance of some 100 delegates on the campus in
November will be a significant event in the club's
history.
This year's active executive included: Dacre
Cole, president; Allan McGill, vice-president;
Muriel van der Valk, secretary; Irene Grayston,
treasurer; and Prof. F. H. Soward, faculty advisor.
PAGE    NINETY-SIX C.O.T.C. Reduces Numbers
Training in the Canadian Officers'
Training Corps started last fall with
the medical examinations for the new
recruits. Following these tests came
the regular parades, which included
such work as the writing of intelligence tests and a series of talks given
by senior Regimental Officers. Documentary films were also shown to the
Corps at various times during the
year. ,
Those candidates who were successful when they went before the
Selection Board will undergo a period
of Local Headquarters Training before attending their first summer
camp. The program of studies that
still faces the embryo officers is not
exactly an easy one. Among other
things, the Contingent will offer lectures in specialized study. These lectures, which
will be given in the succeeding years of training,
will be an additional amount of work added to
the regular training. The candidates will have to
attend two more summer camps, and the training
there, too, will become more and more technical as
Relaxing in the Officers Mess.
time goes by. ■
All in all, the course covers a period of three
years, and is sandwiched in along with the candidates' regular courses. When they have finished
their course and the summer training periods called
for each year, they will emerge as army officers.
U.N.T.D. Trains Sailors
The parades and training of the
University Naval Training Division
on the U.B.C. campus were once
again under the guidance of the
Division Commander, Lieutenant-
Commander Macllroy of the R.C.N.
V.R. The sailors left the campus for
their training this year, and received
it out at the Stanley Park naval base,
the well-known H.C.M.S. Discovery.
The    training    schedule    of    the
U.N.T.D.  takes  four years  to  complete, and included in it are weekly
parades, and the Saturday afternoon
instruction periods in such subjects
as  boat  drill,  seamanship,  and  the
old   sailor's   arts   of   knotting   and
splicing.     When    the    summertime
comes, the members of the U.N.T.D.
pack up their duffle bags and head
for  the  H.M.C.S.   Naden  at  Nanaimo.   In  this
Vancouver Island base they spend two weeks each
year, receiving training both on the station and
at sea in Royal Canadian Navy vessels.
Naval  Officer  Candidates  have  to  work  two
Instructions in Seamanship.
years in the Division before they are interviewed
by the selection board as to their fitness to continue the course. But, to those who are successful,
the U.N.T.D. opens the door to three different
divisions of the Royal Canadian Navy.
.    .    PAGE    NINETY-SEVEN S.C.M. Sponsors Talks
Through its program of discussion forums, study
groups, conferences, personal counselling, camps,
firesides and worship services, the Student Christian
Movement has tried this year to help students to
understand the basis of Christian life and to
develop a growing Christian fellowship and purpose in the world today.
The officers for the year: President, Stephen
Cribb; vice-presidents, Jack MacDonald, Michael
Creal; secretary, Doris Payne; treasurer, Leonard
Miller; general secretary, Alex J. Grant; chaplain,
Rev. John H. Stewart.
Steplien Cribb, President
1. Steve Cribb and Alex Grant.   2. Shirley Arnold.   3. Shirley Arnold, Len Miller, Marjorie Anstey, Alex Grant, Jack
MacDonald, Robin Andrews and Steve Cribb.   4. Jack MacDonald.    5. Joanna Green.    6. Robin Andrews.    7. Doris
Payne.    8. Len Miller and Marjorie Anstey.
PAGE   NINETY-EIGHT   . S.P.C. Examines Problems
Panel discussions on atomic power, scientific
socialism, co-operatives, divorce, juvenile delinquency, and current events, absorbed the interest
of the Social Problems Club members this year.
They met each week to discuss the causes and
effects of problems of contemporary society in our
own and other political and economic systems.
A large number of speakers were brought out
to address the students on many of these subjects.
Although the three mayoralty candidates aroused
considerable interest, the stormiest controversy
raged around Tim Buck, leader of the L.P.P.
Membership has increased considerably this
year, and any student who is interested in social
problems of the modern age is invited to join.
This years executive consisted of: Honorary
president, Professor H. V. Warren; president,
Gordon Martin; vice-president, Gordon Gray; secretary, Jack Howard; program director, Roy
Jeffries; social convenor, Robin Denton; and publicity director, Jean Christie.
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Gordon Martin, President.
Social Problems Club Executive:   Roy Jeffries, Joan Christie, Gordon Grey, John Howard and Robin Denton.
.    PAGE    NINETY-NINE Hams Establish Contact
Frank Ives, President.
The U.B.C. radio "hams", working towards their
amateur licences, are operating a 200-watt transmitter, soon to be exchanged for one of 500 watt
strength.
During the past year, members have been given
competent instruction through theory lectures and
code practise lessons.
Next ye.ir the club hopes to maintain regular
contact with ham clubs in other Canadian and
American universities.
The executive was: Honorary President, Dr. G.
G. Shrumm; President, Frank Ives; Vice-President,
Ed Hird; Secretary-Treasurer, Bill Cooper.
1.    Mike Kelcy and Gary Kinkaid.  2.    Ralph Gordon.  3.    Ed Hird.   4.    Bill Cooper.   5.    Doug Logie.
PAGE   ONE   HUNDRED  The Ubyssey Supplies
Jack Ferry, Editor-in-Chief.
Don Ferguson, Senior Editor.
The Ubyssey, tri-weekly campus newspaper, is
the recorder of student activity and opinion. This
year, however, in addition to presenting news, the
Ubyssey, in three instances, made news itself. The
paper was adjudged one of the top three in the
Bracken Trophy contest for the best college newspaper in Canada. It acted as president and secretary of the Canadian University Press, and thirdly,
it changes its form, returning to the traditional
newspaper style of make-up with column rules.
Jack Ferry, as Editor-in-Chief, held the responsibility for the operation of the various activities of
the Publications Board.  In addition to these wor-
Don Stainsby, Senior Editor.
Harry Castillou, Senior Editor.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    ONE    TWO 9000 Students With News,
■
1.    Nancy   Macdonald,   News   Editor.    2.
Laurie    Dyer,    Sports    Editor.     3.    Bob
Mungall, CUP Editor.   4.    Norm Klenman,
Features Editor.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   THREE- With Complete Coverage
Ruth Ketcheson, Pub Secretary.
Associate Editors Val Sears,  Jack Wasserman,  Bette
Whitecross and Hal Pinchin.
sheet were Joan Grimmett and Warren Darner.
Nancy Macdonald, News Editor, was aided by
her Associate Editor, Tore Larsson, in the compilation of all campus news, and the assignment
of reporters. Sports Editor Laurie Dyer, with
Associate Chick Turner, presented coverage of all
U.B.C. athletics. Norm Klenman, Features Editor,
dreamed up the feature stories, and kept tab on
the Ubyssey's columnists.
The Canadian University Press Editor, Bob
Mungall, handled the routine work of wire and
news, and acted as secretary of the CUP, compiling
a report of the CUP conference.
George Robertson, Laura Haahti and Warren Darner.
Chick Turner, Associate Sports Editor.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    FOUR In Three Issues Per Week
Upper: Associate Editors and
Staff Reporters at Play—George
Robertson, Ed Arrol, Joan
Charters, Don Robertson, Laura
Haahti, Hal Tennant, Joyce
Clough and Laurie Dyer.
Lower: Joyce Clough, Don
Robertson, Jacquie Hart and
Joan Charters.
Robertson,   Wasserman  and  Darvill.
Tore Larssen, Associate News Editor.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FIVE Campus Memories Compiled
Jean MacFarlane, Editor.
Phil Ashton, Associate Editor.
Joan Grimmett, Associate Editor.
This year's Totem, that you are even now reading, is one of the most ambitious ever attempted
by the Publications  Board.
The book is larger, has more pictures, more
reading material, and is printed in a more lavish
manner—complete with four colours—than any of
preceding years.
The central theme of the book is based on the
history of the University. This choice was made in
the hope that students might become more familiar
with heritage of the school. The University of
British Columbia has a tradition of which every
student should be proud. Certainly all students
should be at least aware of the past record of the
school.
The editor of the Totem this year was Jean
MacFarlane. As an associate editor of last year's
publication, Jean learned much to qualify her for
her post this year. There were long hours spent in
the Library last summer, compiling material for
the history section. There were still more long
hours spent in layout conferences at Clelland
Kent's, the engraving company, and in proofing at
Ward and Phillips, the printers, not to mention
the overall average of eight hours each day in the
Pub office.
Associate Editor of the book was Phil Ashton.
He also did extensive work with the Radio Society
and various youth movements in the city, was
responsible for the monumental task of sorting
and arranging all the class section pictures.
Assisted by Phyllis Reid, he also edited the section
on administration.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    SIX By Diligent Totem Staff
Left: Ray Ellard and Chick Turner, Sports Editors.  Right:
Jack Wasserman, Sales Manager.   Lower:  Staff Members,
Don  Wright,   Don  Ferguson,   Betty   Motherwell,   Phyllis
Reid,  Laura Haahti,  Jane  Seymour,  Maurice  Ayers.
The second Associate Editor was Joan Grimmett,
who handled the minor club section and the index
in the back of the book. She was assisted by
Maurice Ayes in compiling the written material
on each of the minor clubs.
Three Assistant Editors completed the staff.
First was Jane Seymour, who wrote and edited
the material on the major clubs. She was assisted
by Rosalie Haakenson and Dennis MacNeill. Laura
Haahti compiled the highlight section covering
all the noteworthy activities of the year. Laura
also wrote the copy for the report on the student
government. The third Assistant Editor was Betty
Motherwell. Betty handled the section on student
residences, including Fort and Acadia camps. She
also was responsible for the interviews and preparation of the Roll of Honour section.
In past years, the Totem sport section has always
presented a problem. This year, however, the
sport section was very capably organized by Ray
Ellard and Chick Turner, to bring one of the most
comprehensive records of the athletics of the year
that the Totem has offered in some years. Nev
Tomkins was assistant sports editor.
The sales and advertising departments were
smoothly operated this year by Jack Wasserman.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    SEVEN Photographers Shoot News
Tommy Hatcher, Photography Director.
An integral part of the Publications Board, the
Photography Department has worked in close cooperation with both the Totem and the Ubyssey.
Throughout the year, over ten student photographers have worked industriously to produce a
collective sum of nearly 8,000 pictures.
Tom Hatcher, second year veteran student taking
a chemistry course in Arts, has been responsible,
as photography director, for the effecient operation
of the department. The complex system of assignments whereby the work was delegated to the
most suited photographer was organized by
Hatcher.   He also filmed the Publications Board
Danny Wallace.
Mickey Jones.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    EIGHT For Totem and Ubyssey
Gus Worthington.
Jacquie Hart.
Bob Steiner.
shots and conceived and produced the outstanding
art montage appearing at the beginning of the
advertising section.
Among Hatcher's busiest bulb-snappers were
Hal Harris, Mickey Jones, Paul Jaffery, Bob Steiner,
Danny Wallace, and Gus Worthington.
Mickey photographed all action and team pix
used in the sports section, as well as several noteworthy section page shots. Bob Steiner handled
the student administration beat, as well as covering
many campus activities. Hal Harris filmed all
portraits of the faculty, and Danny Wallace busied
himself with class executives and scrap shots of
campus life.
Minor clubs were photographed by Paul Jaffery,
and major clubs by Gus Worthington and Hall
Harris. Dick Oulton handled the delightful assignment of Beauty-on-the Spot portraits.
Jacquie Hart and Marta Rolston added the
feminine charm to the photography department.
Roy Dougans, Ron Bruce and Ralph Huene took
occasional shots.
All work was done in the Publications Board
dark room in Brock Hall. Much new equipment,
including a condensing enlarger and an electric
ferrotype dryer, was added.
Paul Jaffery.
Dick Oulton.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    NINE Directory Date Bureau
Val Sears, Directory Editor.
The Student Director, edited this year by Val
Sears, is one of the most valuable publications on
the campus. It contains, the name, address and
telephone number of every student, as well as a
complete listing of the hangouts of all the major
and minor clubs, sports officials, council members
and, in fact, almost everything that can be reached
by picking up a phone.
The tremendous job of editing this pocket-size
date bureau was done almost entirely by Val
himself, as checking over endless lists of names
is by no means interesting work.
As one compensation for this thankless toil, however, Val learned the names and numbers of all
the beautiful women on the campus far ahead of
even the most persistent wolves. His job naturally
necessitated his phoning and checking up on these
girls to make sure he had spelled their names
correctly.
The work of typing out the lists of names received
from the Registrar's office was greatly speeded this
year by the hiring of a professional stenographer.
In former Directory work, this task was done by
the editor and his assistants, and the date of publication was usually quite late.
Tillicum Friend To All
In an effort to acquaint the newly-arrived Frosh
with the activities and schedules that the Alma
Mater Society has planned for them and to aid in
their introduction to campus life, the Publications
Board issues the Tillicum Handbook.
By working steadily at it through the summer
months, the editor, Rosemary Hodgins, managed
to have the 150-page booklet on the campus in
time for its distribution during Frosh Week. Hordes
of bewildered ex-high school students wandering
around the campus clutching the little yellow book
were a familiar sight during the first week of
Varsity.
The booklet was dedicated to the memory of
the late John B. Mitchell, the Proctor of Brock
Hall from 1940 to 1946, as a remembrance "for
the active and helpful interest which he always
showed in student activities."
The publication is useful not only to Frosh but
to every student at the University. It contains a
list and a short note on all the clubs on the campus,
a complete explanation of the athletic system at
U.B.C, and a hundred other details which will
enable a student in any year or faculty to have
a more enjoyable University career.
Rosemary Hodgins, Tillicum Editor,
PAGE   ONE     HUNDRED   AND   TEN    .    .    , Thunderbird Improves Minds
The campus literary magazine has survived and
prospered in this its second year of publication.
The two new editors, Alan Dawe and John Wardroper, worked together to keep the magazine in
publication, but in order to do this they found it
necessary to make several definite changes in th©
format, editorial policy and management of the
magazine.
The changes in format are the most obvious.
Instead of the flashy pictorial cover with its Thunderbird cut, there is now a subdued colour cover
with the name U.B.C. Thunderbird and the contents printed on it. The layout and the paper
have been changed as well, from a three-column
page on glossy paper to a two-column layout
printed in a more modern font on a more severe,
more literary, paper.
The policy of the editors this year has been to
publish a more homogeneous collection of articles
and poems, the criterion which they attempted to
employ being that of literary merit. Although they
had to struggle at times to maintain their high
standard (and sometimes they failed to do this),
they were successful in that they were able to
print several fine pieces of work. In the short story
field,  William  McConnell,   Dean  Bonney,  James
Alan Dawe, Co-Editor.
John Wardroper, Co-Editor.
Beard and L. H. MacKenzie are particularly
worth mentioning. D. K. Paul and N. L. Wilson
contributed essays, and among the poets, P. J.
Thomas, Hilda Halpin and J. S. Henderson were
steady contributors. Mario H. Prizek was the most
versatile contributor with his prose articles, cartoons, sketches, and poems. Ted Rashleigh helped
the editors considerably with his illustrations and
art fillers. Many other people contributed or
assisted in one way or another, among these, T. J.
Mallinson, Ernest Perrault, Peter Remnant and
Desmond Barton should be mentioned. There was
as well in every issue an article in the inimitable
Jabez idiom.
Two things seem particularly remarkable in
connection with the general management of the
U.B.C. Thunderbird this year. The first is that the
three editions of the magazine did not lose money,
even though extra pages were added to each new
edition. The second is that the magazine went on
sale the very day the editors promised it would.
This year has proved that the U.B.C. Thunderbird is a necessary possibility on this campus. It
is necessary because it is a medium for the encouragement and presentation of creative writing.
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVEN I the University of British
Coiius&Sp7 as at every college, have
played an important part in
fe=r student activities. From the yesterday of
the University at the Fairview "Shacks"
until the today of our ever-expanding,
hut-filled campus, the sportsmen of U.B.C.
have made champion Thunderbird teams
the rule rather than the exception. The
blue and gold Varsity colours have become known on every playing field as the
symbol of hard fighting ability and good
sportsmanship. This tradition is a spirit
that is a challenge for every student to
uphold, either by active participation in
sports or by support of the teams. And
this tradition has been upheld this year.
With the addition of American football
and the expansion of the many war-
curtailed activities, U.B.C. athletics have
again brought honor to their Alma Mater. _*
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cs Physical Education And
Athletics at the University made great strides
in 1946-47, and with the image of the War Memorial Gymnasium looming on the horizon, the
Athletic Administration took on new powers and
duties.
First recognition of the widening scope of sport
and athletics was the reorganization of the Athletic Department to a Department of Physical
Education granting a subsidiary degree in Arts.
Heading the Department was popular and capable
Bob Osborne, now British Columbia's representative on the Olympic Committee, a graduate of
UBC, and a former member of the Thunderbird
Basketball Team he coached to the Pacific Northwest Conference Title in 1945-46.
Assistant Director of Physical Education was
Doug Whittle, a native of Calgary, and a graduate
of Hart House, Toronto, in Physical Education.
Newcomers to the Department were Jack Pomfret,
former University of Washington athlete, and Ivor
Wynn, a product of McMaster University and
Hamilton, Ontario.
Top:   Bob Osborne.   Next:  Luke Moyls.
Bob Osborne, II. Douglas Whittle, Ivor Wynne, and Jack Pomfret.
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTEEN Athletic Administration
Misses Jean Carmichael, Marian Henderson, Isobel Clay.
Miss Marian Henderson.
Miss Marian Henderson, a graduate of the
University of Toronto was in charge of Women's
Physical Education. Aiding her in her chores were
Misses Isobel Clay and Jean Carmichael.
A further manifestation of the post-war boom
of Intercollegiate Sport was the creation of a
position of Graduate Manager of Athletics. Luke
Moyls, a former Sports Editor of the Ubyssey, and
well-known sports mogul on the West Coast, received the position, and in his first year put his
many contacts and abilities to good use.
Control of student athletics resides ultimately
in the hands of two student bodies, the Men's and
Women's Athletic Directorates.
Piloting the M.A.D. through a successful year
was Keith McDonald, Big Blockman, and well-
liked all-round student. The Directorate controls
its own finances, and has sweeping powers over
every phase of male sport.
Pat Mcintosh was the Chairman of the Women's
Athletic Directorate. The W.A.D. has powers
similar to those of the M.A.D. but functions, of
course, on a much smaller budget.
The Rugby series between the University of
California Golden Bears and the Thunderbirds
was renewed this year, and the World Cup, emblematic of collegiate rugger supremacy on the
West Coast was again offered for competition.
Rowing and cross country were again put on
an international scale, the former club competing
in the Washington Regatta during the summer of
1946, and the latter squad capturing the Pacific
Coast Cross Country Title for the fourth straight
year.
Controversy of the year in the field of Athletics
was Article XXIV of the A.M.S. Code. The Article
states in effect that no university student may
play for a team in direct competition with a
university squad unless previous permission has
been granted to him by the M.A.D. Various infractions of the law were met with during the
course of the year, resulting in minor friction in
the student heirarchy.
Intramural sport blossomed out again after a
five year lapse into a dominant aspect of the
University athletic picture.
Under the guidance of Ivor Wynne, the various
organizations on the campus interested in participating,—fraternities, faculties, Jokers,—arranged a
wide program which included such novelties as
a Roller Skating Derby, an Intramural Ski Meet,
and an Intramural Boxing and Wrestling Tourney.
Twenty-eight teams competed, and were led
down the point-trail by the Jokers who captured
a majority of the events, and completely dominated
roller skating and swimming.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTEEN Men's Athletic Directorate
Standing:   E. Larsen, Maurie Physik, Bud Harford, J. Hough, G. Gardom,
L. Dyer. Seated: D. F. Dickenson, H. Capozzi, K. MacDonald, Dave Com-
parelli, Bob Osborne.
The Men's Athletic Directorate, operating in its
second year as an autonomous body, controls all
athletic activity on the campus.   It is sustained by
a budget approximating $25,000, and
supports a variety of sports, varying
from the major athletic activities to
the minor sports clubs such as archery,
track, and swimming.
Chairman of the M.A.D. this year
was Keith MacDonald, rugged Big
Blockman and English rugger star.
Keith handled his mammoth chores
in stellar fashion, and combined his
Council and Directorate duties to the
benefit of Varsity's athletes. Members
of the Men's Athletic Directorate
were: Secretary, Herb Capozzi;
Treasurer, Dave Comparelli; Faculty:
Dr. Gunning, Dr. Dickson; Alumni:
Ralph Thomas. Senior Managers
were: Basketball, J. Hough; American Football, Gardy Gardom; English Rugby: Maury Physick; Soccer,
Bud Harford.
Publications Representative, Laurie Dyer; Minor
Sports Representative, Ned Lawson; Alumni Association Representative, Ralph Thomas.
Women's Athletic Directorate
Phebe Manley, Miss Marian Henderson, Dean Mawdsley, Dr. J. Hallamore,
Jackie Shearman, Jean McKinnon, Pat Mcintosh.
Women Engaging in Athletics for the University
come under the jurisdiction of the Women's
Athletic Directorate. Clubs and individuals taking
part in sports on the campus or representing the
Alma Mater must abide by the rules
and regulations of the Directorate.
The constitutions of such clubs, as
well as their budgets, must first be
passed by the W.A.D. before they go
before the Council.
This year's executive consisted of
the following: Honorary president,
Dean Mawdsley; faculty member, Dr.
Joyce Hallamore; director of physical
education, Miss Marion Henderson;
president, Miss Pat Macintosh; intramural manager, Jackie Shearman;
clubs director, Phebe Manley; secretary, Jean McKinnon.
In the future, by revising the constitution, it
is expected that the W.A.D. will more closely
parallel the organization of the M.A.D.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    SIXTEEN Men's Big Block Club
Left:   The Big Block Club meets in regalia.
Right:   President Harry Franklin.
The main function of this club is to promote
willing helpers for organizing and promoting athletic activities at the university.
Big Block sweaters indicate ushers at most sport
events, either in the stadium or the gym.
Big Blockers held their ninth annual homecoming  banquet in the  Brock,  welcoming  graduate
members to homecoming. The club includes all
men who have received the major athletic award,
the large block BC, as a player or senior manager.
President of this year's club was well-known
Harry Franklin.
Women's Big Block Club
President Pat Mcintosh.
The Women's Big Block Club has served
women's athletics on the campus this year as in the
past. The girls entertained their graduate members at the Annual Homecoming Banquet last
October, presenting Miss Louise Stirk as guest
speaker. The banquet was arranged by Miss Mary
Ann    Norton,    president.     Other    members    are
Women's Big Block Club.
Yvonne French, secretary; Maisie Ewart, Nonie
Carrothers, Pat Macintosh, Nora McDermott,
Jackie Shearman, Jean MacKinnon, Phebe Manley,
Taddy Knapp, Audrey Thomson, Jenny Rodenchuck.
Miss  Norton  also  served  as  chairman  of  the
Women's Awards Committee.
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN '■IIUI-IUI"*-
41     p
l€___:_.i_[ai»
,■ *,«n_HftllWir
mrnm mmmm s
American Football
Coach Greg Kabat, Doug Reid, Herb Capozzi, BUI Pierson,
Don Nesbit.
The drama of the gridiron at U.B.C underwent
a change this year, as the Varsity Thunderbirds
bypassed their defence of the Hardy Cup, emblematic of Western Canadian University Football
supremacy, to enter the Pacific Northwest Conference. The move, inaugurated by the Athletic
Department in the spring of 1946 when the basketball edition of the 'Birds swept to the Conference
title, entailed a new brand of ball-a switch from
the Canadian to the American code.
Aiding the Blue and Gold in its revolutionary
adoption of unlimited blocking and the clockwork
precision of the American game, was its skilled
coach, Greg "Hardrock" Kabat (All-American,
Wisconsin, '32), the mentor who piloted the U.B.C.
to the Hardy Cup triumph the year before.
Assisting Kabat in his coaching chores were Jack
Pomfret, a former athletic prodigy of the Univer-
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEEN sity of Washington, and Dr. James Hutchison, a
Winnipeg Blue Bomber of old. Facing this triumvirate was the coach's greatest bugbear, inexperience.
After a desperate pre-season period which was
rendered more acute by the lack of spring training,
the Varsity football machines displayed its wares
before a home crowd on October 5. Employing
the Minnesota unbalanced line with a single wing-
back, the Thunderbirds electrified a banner crowd
at the Varsity Stadium by launching two touch-
towns in the same number of minutes against the
heavily-favored Willamette Bearcats to tie up the
half-time score 13-all. However, experience paid
off in the end, and the powerful Bearcats, who
later copped the Conference title, romped to a pair
of third-quarter  touchdowns  to  drop  the  'Birds
First-string performers included ends Bert Hor-
Wood and Dmitri Goulobet, tackles Alex Lamb and
Phil Nixon, and guards Herb Capozzi and Gordie
Genge. Filling the backfield slots were Freddie
Joplin in quarterback position, Phil Guman and
Don Nesbit as halfbacks, and Dougie Reid as
fullback.
The reserve players during the season were:
Jack Armour, Tom McCusker, Dick Penn, Harry
Mark, Rex Wilson, Nat Kalensky, Andy Fleck, Bill
Macintosh, Joe Capozzi, Ken Myers, Gus Sainas,
Hank Sweatman, Jack Caplett, Bob McLung, Jim
Fripps, Tony McLorg, Gordie Hogarth, and Junior
Tennant.
The managerial staff was headed by curly
blonde-topped Gardy Gardom, who handled all
equipment problems, as well as co-operating with
by a 26-13 score.
This unfortunate theme was maintained throughout the season, as a hard-fighting and determined
squad fell repeatedly before superior experience,
and later before a bumper crop of injuries, to finish
out a winless season.
The Athletic moguls on the campus, however,
see consolation in the form of an experienced
bunch of gridmen who are slated to return to
Point Grey next season, and whose wiser countenances will be facing the grid machines across the
border.
A post-season compliment to the coaching of
Greg Kabat, and to the spirit of the team, was the
announcement that big 210-lb. Herb Capozzi, likeable co-captain of the team (with Doug Reid),
had received a contract from the New York Giants,
a professional football club in the National League.
Bill Sainas, Bill Mcintosh, Harry Mark, Rex Wihon, Jim
Fripps, Dmitri Gaulobef.
.    .    PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETEEN Freddie Joplin.  2.    Phil Nixon.   3.    Alex Lamb.   4.    Don Warner.   5.    Bill Pierson.
launch the pigskin, as the Willamette line charges.
6.    Dave Story prepares to
the Graduate Manager of Sports in such matters
as train and hotel reservations, entertainment for
visiting teams, and so on.
Ably assisting Gardom were six assistant managers: Jim Evans, Gus Thodas, Paul Stockstad, Dick
Stewart, Rex Merritt, Ian Kenny, and George
Flagg. Johnny Owen, genial stadium manager, was
in charge of rub-downs and general conditioning
and repair work, and towards the end of the season
his time was fully occupied.
Spring training sessions were inaugurated this
year, and began on Monday, February 24, lasting
for four and one half weeks.
Coach Greg Kabat put his prospective candidates
through a brisk conditioning, and spiced his chalk
talks with movies.   Towards the end of training
period, the squad ran through some light scrimmages and some elementary plays.
COMPLETE SEASON SCORES
UBC Op'nt
Oct.    5-Willamette Bearcats  13 26
Oct. 12—Western Washington Vikings.   0 25x
Oct. 19—Whitman Missionaries  13 21
Oct. 26-College of Idaho Coyotes    7 19
Nov.   2-Coll. of Puget Sound Loggers   6 34
Nov.   9-Linfield College Wildcats    0 13
Nov. 16—Pacific University Badgers    0 31
xExhibition game.
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY 1. The Varsity line looks tough. 2. Whitman and U.B.C. reach for a pass down the flats. 3. Don Warner runs
interference, as Doug Reid cuts around left end against Whitman College Missionaries. 4. Lome Glendenning fingers
the ball while Ivor Wynn looks on. 5. Phil Guman over left tackle. 6. Capozzi laces the pads for the last time, as
Freddie Joplin left, and Rex Wilson watch. 7. Western Washington strikes for its first touchdown against the 'Birds.
8. A barbershop quartette, Ron Waiters, Bill Mcintosh, Lome Glendenning, and Jack Patterson. 9. On the way to
a touchdown. 10. Don Warner makes a tackle. 11, 12. Scenes against Western Washington. 13. The "Golddust
Twins," Reid and Nesbit.   14.    Gordie Genge    15.   Reid is stopped in his tracks     16.    Missing: the pigskin.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-ONE 'HMOIM-V
mm® fc_m mr b s
—   —— IfWIBIj/iSli'lliliyir11!'
Basketball
1.    Ron Weber. 2.    Dave Campbell 3.    Jerry Stevenson.
4.    Bob Haas.   5.    Harry Franklin.
The Varsity Thunderbird Basketball team
entered the season as defending champions in the
Pacific Northwest Conference.
At the season's end, after playing 33 games,
including exhibition tilts with the University of
Oregon, Portland University, and Western Washington, Coach Bob Osborne's 'Birds found themselves out of the top rung in the PNCC and in a
second place tie with the College of Puget Sound
Loggers.
Handling the management of the team were
Jack Hough, Senior Manager of Basketball, and
Dick Penn, Senior Manager of the Thunderbirds.
Johnny Owen acted as trainer.
Leading scorer on the team was diminutive
captain Ron Weber, who was followed by Harry
Kermode, Bobby Haas, Pat McGeer, and Nev
Munro in that order.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-TWO Thunderbirds
Jim McLean, Gordie Selman, Harry Kermode.
Other 'Bird hoopmen were Harry Franklin and
Ritchie Nichol, who did not finish the season, and
Dave Campbell, John Forsyth, Bobby Scarr, Jerry
Stevenson, Jim McLean, Gordie Selman, and Luke
Tostenson.
NORTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDINGS
W.   L.
PF
PA
Pet.
Linfield  College     	
, 10   4
._ 10   4
909
806
784
734
.714
College of Idaho  	
.714
BRITISH COLUMBIA .
__   9   5
729
711
.643
College of Puget Sound _
_   9   5
787
748
.643
Willamette University _
_   6   8
728
700
.429
Lewis & Clark College .
...   5   9
679
747
.357
Whitman College 	
x3   9
... x2 10
601
515
675
655
.2,50
Pacific University 	
.167
x Final   doubleheader
played
between
these
squads was decided on
March 6
, 7, i
ind ii
i not
included in standings.
COMPLETE SEASON SCORES
Played-33.     Won-18.     Lost-15.     Percent-.548
UBC Op'nt
Oct. 26-University of B.C Grads .  37 35
Nov.   9-Chilliwack Valleys   .48 27
Nov. 16-Alberni All-Star Aces  48 35
Nov. 20-Western Washington College .59 53
Nov. 22—Central Washington College ..40 54
Nov. 23-Central Washington College .44 50
Nov. 29—University of Oregon  41 88
Nov. 30-University of Oregon 37 73
Dec. 20-Western Washington College   51 36
John Forsyth
Bob Scarr
Pat McGeer
PAGE   ONE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-THREE Thunderbirds
Top: Dick Penn (Manager), Bob Haas, Nev Munro, John Forsyth,   Gordie   Selman,   Harry   Kermode,   Bob   Osborne
(Coach).   Bottom: Dave Campbell, Jerry Stevenson, Ron Weber (Captain), Bob Scarr, Pat McGeer, Jim McLean.
Coach Bob Osborne talking to a few of his 'Birdmen. Jerry
Stevenson, Gordie Selman and Ron Weber are seen clearly.
Trainer Johnny Owen looks serious, while Haas,  Selman
and Munro enjoy some half-time conversation.
Complete Season Scores
Dec. 21-Pacific Lutheran College  74 60
Dec. 27—Pacific Lutheran College  51 54
Dec. 28-Pacific Lutheran College  52 56
Dec. 30-Portland University  43 48
Dec. 31-Portland University  33 60
Jan.    3-Lewis & Clark College  x53 42
Jan.    4-Lewis & Clark College ... _..x56 52
Jan.   6—Pacific University    x45 34
Jan.    7—Pacific University ._  x55 41
Jan. 10-Linfield College  x58 54
Jan. 11-Linfield College  57 50
Jan. 18—Bremerton Rockets _ .51 41
Jan. 24-Seattle College    54 59
Jan. 25-Seattle College ......  49 47
Feb.    4^College of Idaho  x47 55
Feb.   5-College of Idaho   __.x43 52
Feb.   7-Whitman College _. x50 61
Feb.   8-Whitman College   x57 50
Feb. 14-Willamette University   x57 46
Feb. 15-Willamette University  x46 68
Feb. 21-Portland University  41 49
Feb. 22-Portland University 56 49
Feb. 28-College of Puget Sound  x38 57
Mar.   1-College of Puget Sound  x67 49
x Conference games.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-FOUR 1. Weber and Franklin wait for Pat McGeer to receive a taping job before the Bremerton Rocket tiff. 2. Ritchie
Niclwl goes down after the ball in Western Washington tiff. 3. Bob Baylor of the Vikings shoots and scores. 4. Trainer
Johnny Owen gives a little attention to Harry Kermode. 5. Pivot man puts the 'Birds out in front with a lay-up shot
against Bremerton Rockets. 6. Harry Kermode and Bob Scarr rush in to make sure of a rebound. 7. Ballet on the
maples, featuring Kermode, Haas and a Rocket.   8.    Campbell snags a rebound.   9.    Who got it?
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-FIVE Chief Basketballers
Varsity's No. 2 basketball team, the U.B.C.
Chiefs, won six and lost six games in regular season
play in the Senior A Intercity League this year.
They finished in third place behind the once-
defeated Meralomas and the Adanacs, and bowed
to the New Westminster aggregation in the semifinal series, two games to One.
Coaching the Chiefs was the Assistant Director
of Athletics, Doug Whittle. The manager of the
club was Sophomore Paul Plant, while Freddie
Bossons was elected team captain.
Reid Mitchell was the high scorer for the squad,
followed in order by Freddie Bossons, Herb
Capozzi, and Len Letham.
Other Chief hoopsters were Jack Amm, Doug
Bajus, Jim McKeachie, Dal Town, Gordie Broad-
head, Harvey Cook, Cam McLeod, and Bob Boyes.
The team played a post-season exhibition tilt
against Chilliwack, and defeated the Valley squad
by a 40-29 count.
Top—Standing:    Paul Plant (Manager), Dal Towne, Jack
Amm,  Cam McLeod, Doug Bajus,  Herb Capozzi, Doug
Whittle  (Coach).
Seated:    Harvey Cook, Jim McKeachie, Len Letham, Fred
Bossons (Capt.), Reid Mitchell, Bob Boyes, Gordie Broad-
head.
Bottom:    Action during the semi-finals.   Doug Bajus (8),
and Herb Capozzi vie with Adanac Pop Pay (66) for a
rebound.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-SIX Chiefs
Reid MitclieU.
Len Letham.
Gordie Broadliead.
Freddie Bossons.
Doug Bajus.
COMPLETE SEASON SCORES
U.B.C.   Op'nt
Dec.   4—Laurie Pierates ....  45 39
Dec.   7-Stacy's   _.. 52 44
Dec. 21—Meralomas     41 68
Jan.   3-Adanacs    _. 34 43
Jan.   4—Lauries   48 47
Jan. 12—Adanacs      46 50
Jan. 17-Stacy's   41 33
Jan. 18—Meralomas   39 45
Jan. 24-Adanacs      30 29
Jan. 25-Lauries     33 48
Jan. 29-Meralomas  __   45 60
Feb.    1-Stacy's     51 36
SEMI-FINALS
Feb.    5-Adanacs 38 45
Feb.    7-Adanacs   .              „ 35 34
Feb. 10-Adanacs _            48 52
FINAL STANDINGS
SEMI-FINALS
W.    L.    F.    A. Pts.
Adanacs     2      1    131    121 4
U.B.C   1     2   121    131 2
Capozzi (18) and Towne (4) go up for a rebound in the
New   Westminster-Adanac   semi-final.
Coach Whittle belabors his boys during the intermission.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-SEVEN Senior B Basketball
Coach McKay engages in a little half-time discussion while
Mylrae the Captain looks on.
Standing:  John McKay (Coach), O'Brien, Jasper, Gabrielse,
Mylrae, Baker, Robinson, Edwards, Anderson.   Next:  Edwards (16) and Robinson wait for a rebound in a game
against the West Vancouver quintet.
A hot and cold team coached by John McKay
spent a vigorous season on the maple floor. After
an unpredictable career during the season the
melon tossers lost by narrow margins to the top
teams in the league.
Final league standing of a tie for fifth place
with the lowly Victoria Athletes was no indication
of the brand of ball played by the Senior B's.
The team was managed by Mike O'Brien. Coach
McKay was the third coach to give the boys their
workouts for the season, which might account for
the erratic season of wins and losses.
Leading the lineup was Captain Frank Mylrea
who played a superb game all season and was
chosen as representative of the minor league
against the Harlem Globe Trotters. Dave Baker
also starred for the B's.
Other members of the team were: M. O'Brien,
C. Jasper, H. Gabrielse, J. Baker, D. Robinson,
I. Edwards, An. Anderson, D. Hayward.
League standing was: R. C. Motors, 1st; Hodgson-Clark, 2nd; Ryerson, 3rd; Dowlings, 4th. Other
teams were: P.M.BA.'s, Fraser Billiards, Victoria
Athletes and Varsity.
Varsity won six, lost eight games during the
season.
PAGE   ONE   HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-EIGHT   . Inter B Basketball
The boys gather in dressing room for pre-game conference.
Varsity's youngsters of basketball finished up the
season in fifth place after passing through the hands
of their coaches. Due to the efforts of Frank
Turner, who took over late in the season, the Inter-
B's provoked four overtime games, indicating even
matching of the teams.
In the Memorial Cup series the B's were eliminated by Dunbar after knocking out the Chinese
Dragons in the first round.
Quick overhead shot by Walt Manning.
Mike Puhach beats Dunbar man.
.    PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-NINE Inter A Basketball
Inter A Sophs:   N. Watt, D. Angell, H. Shugg, D. Hinds,
T. Shaw.   Front: D. Barker, D. Hoskins, L. Butcliart, D.
Swenson, B. Bell, P. Trim. Kneeling: Len Cuthill, Manager;
Jack Pomfret, Coach.
Top:   A scramble under the basket.   Lower:  Ballet Russe
down at the King Ed gym.
Inter A Frosh—Back Row:   J. Pavelich, G. Home, D. Seraphim, R. Ikeda, P. Walker, C. Kushnir. Front: Ivor Wynne
(Coach), H. Gould, D. Bell, B. Sutherland, R. Owen, D.
Johnson, J. Walls (Manager).
Promising material for future Thunderbirds was
discovered in this year's edition of the UBC Frosh
basketball team.
Although the team did not reach the Inter A
league finals, Coach Ivor Wynne produced a well
balanced and aggressive team, and considered the
season successful.
Captain of the team was Bob Sutherland, who
played centre last year for Tookes Inter B championship team. Rod Owen and Hugh Gould
proved an excellent combination as guards. First
string forwards were Doug Bell and Pete Walker,
both of whom maintained high scoring averages
during the season.
John Pavelich from Eburne, B.C., will be remembered as an ex-high school track and rugger star.
Bob Bartlett played capably as a reserve forward.
The Sophomore entry in the Inter A City League
was under the coaching of Jack Pomfret, and managed by Len Cuthill. The Sophs scored upset after
upset in the playoff series, after a mediocre season,
and succeeded in capturing the City Title after
subduing the Arrows A quintet three games to one.
The squad then went on to capture the Lower
Mainland Title as they romped over a disorganized
hoop squad from Abbotsford. At Totem Press time
the team was in the running for the provincial
title, with a Victoria entry next on their list.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY    .    . Women's Rifle Club
Joyce Clearihue,  Kay Worsfold,  Rosemary Bell-Irving.
Joyce Vawden, Maxine Lindow, Helen Trethewey.
One of the campus's most unique organizations,
the Women's Rifle Club, added to then curricula
during the year an increased number of practice
hours and lectures in the theory of shooting.
After receiving detailed rifle training from some
ex-serviceman, most of the 25 members of the
club were able to qualify for their Tyro and Marksman badges.
The club challenged the women of the C.N.R.
Rifle Club to a shooting meet in January and,
although the university girls were beaten, the
experience gained enabled the co-eds to win in
the return match.
Even the men of the Varsity Fish and Game
Club had to admire the girls when they engaged
them in a turkey shoot. Using converted 303's, the
female team gave the larger men's entry some stiff
competition.
The club also took part in the Dominion Marksman Competition for the Canadian Team championship.
The girls spent their shooting time on then-
range in the Arts basement and supplemented
these practices with noon-hour lectures on the
theory of shooting.
Executive of the Women's Rifle Club during the
year included: Helen Trethewey, president;
Maxine Lindow, vice-president; and Kay Worsfold,
secretary-treasurer.
Back row: Joyce Clearihue, Connie Dougan, Joyce Vawden.
Front row:    Helen Trethewey,  Kay Worsfold,
Maxine Lindow.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-ONE Women's Senior B Basketball
Back Row:
Mearnie Summers, Nora McDermott, Daryl Vincent, Eileen McKillop.   Front Row:   Pat Gardiner, Doreen
Campbell, Ruth Wilson (Coach), Pat Macintosh, Dorothy Vincent.
Varsity Senior Girls' Basketball team, the Thunderettes, have had a season marked with success.
Coached by Ruth Wilson, herself an ex-Varsity
basketeer, the girls have let nothing stand in their
way in their march to victory.
Although a Senior B team they participated in
a Senior A league and ended up in second place.
They were acclaimed City Senior B champions,
and from there the Thunderettes went on to cop
the Lower Mainland Championship by winning a
two game series against an Abbotsford quintet.
The next step is the B.C. championship which will
be played against a Victoria team. Their coach
and their supporters have high hopes and great
confidence that they will succeed in defeating this
next opposition and thus become the B.C. champions.
The team was ably managed this year by Nora
McDermott who acted as playing-manager, contributed much to the success of her team.
Left: Ruth Wihon, Coach, talks to her Thunderettes before the Inter A game.  Nora McDermott (8) beams approvingly
on her teammates.   Right: Action in tlxe Senior B - Inter A contest.
PAGE   ONE   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-TWO Women's Inter A Basketball
Back Roto:   Ruth Wilson (Coach), Marion Bemnet, June Brett, Marie Somers, Marion Nyholm, Beverley Burley.   Front
Roto:   Betty Crooks, Elaine DeLisle, Betty Gray, Jackie Shearman, Anne Carney.
This year the Intermediate "A" girls' basketball
team had a successful season, finishing second in
the Vancouver league with eight victories and four
losses. In the semi-finals the girls lost the series
to the Burrard Lions in two close tilts, 26-25 and
26-22.
Much credit is due to Ruth Wilson who coached
the Intermediates, as well as the Seniors. The
team was ably managed by Betty Crooks.
Climaxing the season the Intermediates travelled
to Kamloops where the trounced the Interior Inter
"A" champions 35-20.
Lower left:   Betty Crooks snags a rebound in a moment of a;tion in the West Van tilt.  Right: Ruth Brett, captain, checks
the score sheet with Ruth Wilson.
.    .   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-THREE English Rugby
Standing:    J. Wheeler, D. Nesbitt, M. Smith, G. Kirby, S.  Kerr,  H.  Wotherspoon,  B.  Curby,  R.  Latham,  G.  Corry,
B. Spiers.      Kneeling:    G. Biddle, G. McKeer, H. Allen, H. Crosby, B.  Morris, A. Carlylem, D. Reid.
The past year has proven to be very eventful in
the annals of English rugby on the campus of the
University of British Columbia. Play was highlighted by the undefeated streak of the Varsity
fifteen, the taking of all trophies in the senior
division, and the renewal of exchanges games with
American universities.
Large turnouts for early fall practices led Coach
Roy Haines to select two strong squads, Varsity
and U.B.C.
In the Vancouver City senior rugby battles for
the Miller Cup, the Varsity squad ran up an enviable record of ten straight wins and was awarded
the trophy at Christmas time. Meralomas and
U.B.C. battled for the second rung of the league
ladder, but the Lorna lads were able to nose out
the students, who lost three games. Winter weather
left the other three teams in the league, Rowing
Club, Ex-South Burnaby, and North Shore All-
Blacks, with uncompleted schedules.
Perhaps  the most  outstanding  feature  of  the
year was the introduction by U.B.C. to Vancouver
rugger fans of the thirteen-man side. A select crew
of Varsity All-Stars picked by Coach Haines and
chosen from the two university squads went down
to defeat in the first experiment to the tune of a
Top:    Maury Phystk, Manager; Russ Latham r
Below:   Brian Curby, Barry Morris 9-3 score at Brockton Point.   But revenge proved
PAGE   ONE   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-FOUR    . Top:    Bud Spiers, Gordie McKee, Don Nesbitt, Marshall Smith, Russ Latham. Bottom:
Kirby, Alec Carlijle, Geoff Corry, Hart Crosby.
to be sweet, for when the same two teams met
again on Boxing Day at Capilano Stadium, the
Blue and Gold men defeated a Vancouver representative squad by an 8-3 score.
Poor weather delayed competition for the Tisdal
Cup until late in January, when the six local squads
entered seven-man crews in the knockout contest
in the stadium. The Varsity aggregation ran up
the enviable record of winning three games in one
afternoon. First, they polished off Ex-South
Burnaby 13-3, then sweated out a close win over
their brother team, U.B.C, and finally took the
afternoon by earning a 12-5 victory over the
Meraloma men.
The McKechnie Cup was again retained by the
university All-Star rugger squad consisting of
players from both the U.B.C. and Varsity squads.
The first game saw the Vancouver Lions take a
34-3 drubbing at the hands of the University boys.
The Victoria Crimson Tide didn't fare much better
in the second tussle, when the biggest rugby crowd
of the season saw the Blue and Gold all-star
aggregation run up a 16-3 score. In an attempt to
redeem themselves in the third game, the Lions
fought hard, but were outclassed by the 'Birds
to an 8-3 score, which gave the university men the
George Biddle, Giriard
Top:    Harvey Allen, Hilary Wotherspoon
Bottom:    Doug Reid, Johnny Wheeler
.    .    .    PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-FIVE English Rugby
privilege to keep the McKechnie silverware on the
campus for another year.
Slightly overshadowed by the rugger play centered around the Tisdal and McKechnie Cup
matches were the weekly performances of the
second-division teams of the English rugby league.
The league comprised six teams, four of which
owe their allegiance to the University of British
Columbia campus. The Varsity Sophs, Frosh,
Kats (ex-Kits), and Engineers, cavorted on the
gridiron during the past season in competition
with Meralomas and Ex-Brittania squads. At the
end of the season the Ex-Brit fifteen landed up
in top spot in the standings, but the Varsity Sophs
were a close second, having lost only one game.
In the round-robin tournament for the Carmichael Challenge Trophy, the Kats team managed
to shut out the Ex-Brit outfit 6-0 and walk away
with the silverware.
Rugby was well represented in the Marsh invasion of Victoria by U.B.C. students. The same
Thunderbird all-star aggregation that had brought
the McKechnie Cup to U.B.C. made the trip. As
an added attraction, a seventeen-man all-star
second division rugger team made the voyage
across the water to the provincial capital.
Players for the U.B.C. squad included: Dave
Braide, Dave Moon, Dave Kerr, Charlie Flavelle,
Bob Kirby, Harry Kabush, Ron Edmonds, Bob
Pegues, Gordie Lott, George Biddle, Jack Rowe,
Doug Reid, Keith MacDonald, Jim McKeachie,
Jack Armour, Bob Williams, and Hilary Wother-
spoon.
The undefeated Varsity fifteen included: Barrie
Morris, Barney Curby, Gordie McKee, Russ
Latham, Don Nesbit, Johnny Wheeler, Al Carlyle,
Hartt Crosby, Don Gardner, Geof Corey, Marshall
Smith, Don Kirby, Ron Grant, Bud Spiers, Andy
Johnston, Ray Grant, and Bill Dunbar.
Chief manager Maury Physick was greatly aided
by his assistant team managers, Dennis Crocket
and Hal Pinchin.
Rugger matches with the University of California
in the southern wonderland and in the U.B.C.
stadium topped off the year's activity.
1. Action during the Varsity-UBC game, as Harvey Allen
(4) races in to break up a play off the three-quarter line.
2. A throw-in, a leap, and the game is on again. 3. "Heel,
HeeV, and the scrums butt each other furiously, while the
three line waits. 4. Don Nesbitt is tackled, but manages to
slip the ball to a teammate during the Meraloma-Varsity
contest.
Next Page: 1. A dribbling attack. 2. President Larry McKenzie boots the oval at the opening ceremonies of the first
McKechnie Cup Try. 3. The Soph Ruggermen have a pre-
game session. 4. Ballet Russe. 5. Down for keeps.
6. Barry Morris scores on a penalty kick. 7. Nesbitt in
action. 8. Coach Roy Haines gives the boys the gun.
9. "Spoon" —the All-American English Ruggerman. 10.
Johnny Wheeler makes a spectacular dive for the ball.
11. But the ball is gone!  Soccer
Standing:   Dave Dyer, Eric Hodge, Fred Ells, Russ Guest, Bill Thomas, Dave Bremner, Bill Berry, Jack Stevans, Murdo
McLeod, Stewart Brown.   Front Row: Hugh Ross, Elso Genooese, Gil Blair, Bill McKay (Captain), Jack Blackball.
The University of British Columbia entered two
teams in the Vancouver and District Soccer League
this year, Varsity, the senior team in Division 1,
and U.B.C, the junior team in Division 2.
The Varsity team had only two former Big Block
players   on   this   year's   team—Jack   Cowan   and
Coach, Miller McGill; Manager, Bud Harford;
Dave Comparelli.
Armand Temoin, both sophomores who starred
on last year's team. Gordy Sheperd, Stu Wilson,
and Bill Thomas moved up from the U.B.C. squad
into the ranks of the Varsity team. The remainder
of the Varsity aggregation was composed of ex-servicemen who joined the team this season or in the
latter part of last year.
Captained by Bill McKay, the U.B.C. team
enjoyed one of their better seasons. U.B.C, this
year composed of many eager freshman soccer
enthusiasts, had much talented material who have
been catching the eye of Coach Millar McGill.
Murdo McLeod, Jack Blackhall, and a pair of ex-
Magee High School forwards, Hugh Ross and
Bob Moulds, have been deserving special attention.
Much of the credit for the successful showings
of the roundball crews this year goes to ex-Varsity
and Coast League soccer star, Millar McGill.
Coach McGill improved immeasurably the defensive tactics of the teams, and also developed the
scoring power of the squads, which previously
had been costing the squads close decisions, into
a high scoring aggregation, as the statistics show
in the "for" and "against" columns.
The Varsity team, captained by Angus Mac-
Sween, is one of the outstanding soccer teams in
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-EIGHT Top Row:   Jack Stevans, Dave Bremner, Bill McKay, Hugh   Ross.    Second Row:
Brown, Bill Berry.
B.C. this year. The great achievement so far this
season is the impressive showing the team made
in the Mainland Cup playdowns. After defeating
Vancouver United 3-1 and dropping the strong
Collingwood club 1-0 in a crowded playing schedule, the students drew the former Dominion Cup
holders, North Shore Reds, for the semi-finals.
The game was played on Christmas Day under
poor conditions and saw the Blue and Gold team
drop a close 3-2 decision. The well-drilled McGill-
men led the Reds well into the second half before
the champions' experience began to take its toll,
This Cup game was the last showing in Varsity
colors for Henry Sager, who moved to California
shortly after. Hank, an expert at ball control and
checking, was one of the best players ever to
enroll at U.B.C.
The Varsity squad is studded with potential
stars. There is netkeeper Grant Moreton who has
six shutouts to his credit in the twelve league
games played and only eight goals scored against
him. There are fullbacks Ken Myers and Jack
Cowan. Cowan last year won the Ed Bayley
Memorial Rookie Award and his Big Block.
The halfback positions are held down by three
capable men. At left-half position there is Armand
Murdo McLeod, Russ Guest, Stewart
Elso Genovese, Jack Blackball, Gil Blair, Fred EUs
.    .    .    PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-NINE Soccer
Top:   Ken Myers, Stewart Wilson, Stuart Todd, Grant Moreton.    Bottom: Captain Angus MacSween, Dave Thompson,
Bill Thomas, Stan Nicol.
Temoin; in the centre-half slot there is captain
Gus MacSween. Holding down the right-half hole
is Stan Nicol, a former St. Andrew's player.
While most of the other sport teams have completed their schedules, the university soccer squads
have at least seven more games to play. When the
schedule is completed, the Imperial Cup play-
downs come into the limelight.
Organization of the teams was in the hands of
senior manager Bud Harford, Varsity mentor, and
Ernie Hodge, who handled the U.B.C. outfit. Dr.
0. J. Todd and Dave Comparelli were faculty
representative and president respectively.
Here  are  the  standings  in  Division   1  up  to
Totem deadline time:
P. W.    L. D. GFGAPts.
South Hill  16 9     3 4   38   19   22
Varsity     12 9     1 2   46     8    20
Collingwood       12 6     2 4   32   24   16
North Burnaby  13 7     5 1    33   22    15
Grandview Legion .10 5     3 2   23   24    12
Vancouver United ..12 4     6 2   27   28    10
North Shore 12 3     9 0    15   38     6
Chinese Students .... 15 0    14 1     7   58      1
In Division 2 the U.B.C. showed up like this:
U.B.C 13 3     7 3   25   37     9
Pat Harrison, Jack Cowan, Armand Temoin, Gordy Shepher I, Jimmy Gold.
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY 1. He charges too late.    2. Gil Blair manages to foil a Nort h Shoreman with a sharp dribble.   3. Heads up.   4. Fullback
Ken Myers starts a rally.   5. A penalty kick.   6. Watch who you're pushing.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-ONE Men's Grass Hockey
Coach  Lort  outlines a little strategy.
Top Row,  left to right:   Stefan Arnason, Joe Augustus,
Fred Joplin, Ned Larsen, Gus Decoque, Stan Tower, Nigel
Rothwell.   Bottom Row:   Dor\ Currie, Nick Harrick, Bruce
Benham, Dave Pudney.
Two teams from the University of British
Columbia, Varsity and U.B.C, were among the
four teams that constituted the Vancouver Men's
Grass Hockey League.
In the battle for first position in the League it
was mainly a struggle between the two university
squads.
On the campus itself, a full year of intramural
activity was run off in which teams representing
Arts, Applied Science, Agriculture, Jokers, and
Geology participated.
Players  on  the   U.B.C.   team  included:   Norm
Dave Pudney breaks through a rugged  U.B.C.  defence,
while Captain Ned Larsen waits for tlie pass.
Bruce Benham and Fred Joplin fight it out during the
Varsity - U.B.C.  game.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-TWO    .    . Top Roto: Mr. Lort, Don Grieve, Arnold Greenius, Lester Bullen, Malcolm MacDonald, Norm Grieve.   Bottom Row:
Joe Piercy, Elmer Cheng, Eric Greenius, Tom Wilkinson, Art Hill.
Grieve, Tom Wilkinson, Les Bullen, Norm Tupper,
Joe Piercey, Don Grieve, Elmer Cheng, Arnold
Grenius, Eric Grenius, Art Hill, and Mai MacDonald.
Among the players on the Varsity squad were:
Nigel Rothwell, Nick Herrick, Joe Augustus, Fred
Joplin, Ned Larsen, Stan Tower, Bruce Benham, ''. >. -"W   ..  " '-'■ '•
Don Curry, Dave Pudney, Stefan Arbeson, and
Gus Decoque.
Following   are   the   final   Vancouver   League       7     \^ _ i
standings:
U.B.C   11      7     2     2    16
Varsity   _.   11     7     3     1    15
Vancouver     11     5     6     0    10
North Shore  11     2     8     1     5
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.    .    .    PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY- THREE Women's Grass Hockey
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Standing: Peggy Bowe, Mary Sainas, Connie Liddell, Vivian
Spicer, Isabel McKinnon, Sheila Hicks, Barb Coles, Anne
Munro,   Sheila  Flight,   Nonie  Carruthers.    Seated:    Beth
MacKay, Ev Walling, Barb Seymour.
Top:   Yvonne French faces off with Peggy Bowe.
Bottom:    Peggy Bowe, Shirley Ellison.
This season has been one of the most successful
ever enjoyed by the girls' hockey teams, Varsity
and U.B.C. Under the very able management of
hard-working Yvonne French, the Varsity team
never lost a game in the Women's Lower Mainland
and District Grass Hockey League.
From the very fine collection of individual players, Pam Fish, captain of the team, stands out as
the star of the year, being responsible for most
of the goals scored. She was aggressively supported in the forward line by inners Isabel MacKinnon, and Audrey Thomson, and wings Peggy
Bowe and Anne Munroe. The defense was excellent. Yvonne French, Sheila Stewart, and Barb
Seymour composed the half-back line, while fullbacks Connie Liddell and Barb Coles, and goalie
Shirley Ellison completed the team.
The U.B.C. must not be overlooked. Although
short-fielded, they played very ably. Sheila Hicks,
Ev Walling, Sheila Flight, Mary Sainas, Mary Anne
Norton, Joan Robinson, and Gene McMynn all
contributed their share.
The girls travelled to Victoria with the Invasion,
and soundly trounced Victoria College, 3-1.
PAGE   ONE   HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-FOUR Ice Hockey
Mac Porteous, Dave Baker (Manager), Stu Johnston, Sid Macleod, Hugh Berry, Jim Rowledge, Walt Wilde, Bill Husband,
Bus Alger (Assistant Coach); Terry Nelford, Bob Saunders,   Bob Smith, Murray Wiggins, Fred Andrews, Lloyd Torfason,
Owen Woodside.
Varsity's Ice Hockey squad branched out into
stiff competition this season, joining the Pacific
Coast Junior Hockey League. Acquiring the famed
Frank Frederickson as coach, and the addition of
several experienced ex-prairie players, the club had
a promising future at the start of the season.
However, a determined bid for second place was
grounded during the Christmas holidays when
many players were absent. The resulting losing
streak dropped the squad from playoff contention.
Punch line of the team was the trio of Stu
Johnson, Hugh Berry, and Fred Andrews. Berry
garnered 20 goals and 15 assists to lead the team's
scoring.
Dave Baker was the manager of the team.
FINAL STANDINGS
W.
New Westminster Cubs  18
Vancouver White Spots  11
Nanaimo Clippers  .... 10
U.B.C  ._.--     5
Victoria Red Raiders     0
L. F. A. Pts.
6 186 105 .750
9 109 102 .555
8 109 112 .530
14 94 135 .263
7 20 59 .000
Stu Johnston breaks from Reid and mooes in on goal.
Smith comes out of his cage to block a White Spot
scoring rush.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-FIVE Boxing
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1
1. Bill Moskovitz lieaves leather at the bag prepping for the Intramural Boxing Tourney.    2.  Terry Field  (left)  and
Dan Oliver mix it up a bit.    3. Golden Glovers Phil Olson (left) and Wally Grey sparring. 4. Seymour Adleman (right)
and Art Beaumont doing likewise.
U.B.C's hard-working Boxing Club had two
real chances to display their wares during the
year. One was at the annual Vancouver Golden
Gloves tournament, the other time at the first
university intramural boxing and wrestling tournament.
Among the Varsity pugilists that entered the
Golden Gloves tournament were: Phil Olson, Bill
Campbell, Pete Worthington, Johnny Granda, Jim
Bryant, Art Beaumont, Malcolm Gillespie, George
Wilkie, Walt Gray, Terry Field, and Jim Casey.
Phil Olson was eliminated from the Gloves affair
by doctor's orders. Malcolm Gillespie won his first
two fights by decisions, but was eliminated by
technical difficulties. Terry Field lost his fight
when knocked out by Golden Boy Eddie Haddad.
The biggest event on the club agenda was the
intramural boxing and wrestling tournament held
early in March.
During the year, the Club acquired a new and
very able coach, Jim Gove, and a new ring for the
stadium.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-SIX    . Wrestling
1. The Wrestling Squad.    2. Mitchell lips the 135 lb. bell.    3. Claude Simpson seems to have Ian Sprinkling in fait
control.   4. Pomfret tries to make a decision.   5. Sprinkling and Thurgodd in one of their more serious moments.
Although not officially recognized as a club,
wrestlers on the campus of the University of British
Columbia have enjoyed their best year of grunting
and groaning in a long time.
The biggest event of the year for the wrestlers
was the intramural boxing and wrestling tournament held early in March. Four wrestling and nine
boxing bouts were the feature attractions of the
tournament.
In the lightweight class there was Floyd Eno, a
former British Columbia champion.   Howie Thur-
good, runner-up in the Canadian finals of 1940 for
the 145-pound class, was the university's welterweight mainstay.
In the light-heavyweight class, there are Pete
Greer and Wally Walling. Contending for heavyweight honors were Herb Capozzi, Ian Sprinkling
and Claude Simpson.
The wrestlers have been practicing three times
a week. It is expected that Howie Thurgood,
Floyd Eno, and Wally Walling will represent the
university in the Olympic wrestling trials.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-SEVEN Track
1. A half mile trial run featuring Al Pierce (10), Bob Piercy (11), Al Bain (7), Pat Minchin (3), and Ken McPherson
(4). 2. The start of the 440 grind: Johnny Owen officiates with the gun. 3. Bob Piercy, sensational freshman after his
victory in the Intramural Mile.    4. Trainer Owen gives Al Bain a rubdown after a practice session.
Varsity's track stars experienced their first season
in the Pacific Northwest Conference, when they
competed at the regular conference meet at Walla
Walla, Washington, at the end of May, 1946.
The Blue and Gold striders placed second to
the harriers from Whitman College, although they
captured first place in every event they entered.
Unfortunately for U.B.C. title chances, the summer
interim had occasioned the absence of many of
the university's top trackmen.
U.B.C. competed in the following events:  100
yards, 220 yards, 440 yards, 880 yards, 1 mile, 2
miles, broad jump, high jump, 120-yard hurdles,
1-mile relay.
The team was coached by the Director of Men's
Athletics, Bob Osborne, and included Len Jenkins,
Roy Aspinall, Ron Weber, Bill McCubbin, Tony
Dare, Pat Minchin, Al Bain, Ken McPherson, Ray
Grant, and Dave Blair.
The Intramural Track Meet was held on March
29, and was captured again by the Jokers.
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-EICHT Swimming
Four lovely aquabelles:  Irene Strong, Lily Dunlop,  Kay
Worsfold, Ruth Stevens.   Holder of 15 Canadian records,
Irene Strong comes out of the pool after a workout.
Right: The U.B.C. Swim Team: Standing: Fred Oxenbury,
Don Morrison, Bob Stangroom, George Darby, HaU Brodie.
Kneeling:    Bob  Marshall,  Jim  Hawthorne,   Lew   Attwell,
Dick Ellis.
Coach Whittle chats with his two stars, Jim Hawthorne
and Fred Oxenbury, before the Puget Sound Meet.   Puget
Sound swept a double-header, 34-30 and 40-27.
Swimming was given a big impetus on the
campus during the 1946-47 season by the formation
of the Varsity Swimming Team, and by the first
meet in the Pacific Northwest Conference.
One of the highlights of the aquatic year was
the Annual Intramural Swim Gala, sponsored by
the Club. The Jokers captured the Seaweed Crown
for the second straight year, gaining their margin
through a well-balanced strength in the relays.
Doug Whittle again coached the U.B.C. natators,
who included Hall Brodie, Lew Attwell, Don
Morrison, Jim Hawthorne, Fred Oxenbury, Bob
Stangroom, Bob Marshall, Bob Whitlam, and Dick
Ellis. Heading the feminine bracket were Irene
Strong, Kay Worsfold, Bev Beurly, Kay Eastwood,
Peggy Winter, Gwen Avery, Lily Dunlop, Pat
Mcintosh, and Rosemary Bell-Irving.
Preseason meets included the B.C. Championships at Victoria on November 9, and a dual affair
with the Y.M.C.A. on January 18. In the latter
swim fest, the Blue and Gold captured first place
in every event entered and won an exhibition
Aquabolo game, 4-1.
PAGE   ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-NINE Cross - Country
Pat Minchin.
Al Bain.
Bob Piercy.
Preseason Favorites Limbering Up.
Coach Bob Osborne talks with his team.
Cross Country emerged as one of the most
successful sports on the campus during the year.
Climaxing the fall training period, Bob Osborne's
fleet-footed charges invaded the Washington
Invitation Tourney and captured their fourth
straight Pacific Coast Intercollegiate Cross Country
Championship.
The season was inaugurated on November 6,
when over 125 candidates for distance fame
rounded the 2.6 mile course in the Annual Intramural Roadrace.
Freshman Bob Piercy led the pack over the
grind in the sensational time of 13:44:8 to pace
the Jokers to their second successive triumph.
Trailing by 25 yards was Pat Minchin, and in third
place, Al Bain.
On Wednesday, November 20, Coach Osborne
picked his squad for the Seattle Meet. This time,
volatile Pat Minchin paced the Blue and Gold
striders over a difficult four-mile course, outdistancing Piercy by 10 seconds in the time of 22:08.
The following team represented the university
in the Pacific Coast meet: Pat Minchin, Bob Piercy,
Doug Knott, Pete de Vooght, Al Bain, Gil Blair,
and Ken McPherson. It was McPherson's fourth
year on the Varsity which he has captained for
the last three.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY Gym Club
Jeff Heal and Don Moore co-operate on a back-layout
while  Bill  Johnston,  Roy  Siber  and  Bill  Boyd  stand
at ease.
Coach Doug Whittle.
Don Moore.
Under the direction of Coach Doug Whittle,
the U.B.C. Gym Club indulged in its first real
season of gymnastic activity during the past year.
Highlighting the year's activities was the Gym
Club-sponsored Inter-Faculty Gymnastic Competition in which teams from the faculties of Arts,
Applied Science, Agriculture, and the Physical
Education participated.
The club also did their share towards aiding the
War Memorial Gymnasium fund drive. The U.B.C.
gymnastic enthusiasts provided some displays on
a float during the gym drive parade.
Three members of the U.B.C. Gym Club entered
the Pacific Northwest Gymnastic Competition held
at Vancouver's Exhibition Gardens.
At four different Northwest Conference basketball games, Gym Club members offered the hoop
fans some half-time gymnastic displays.
Other members of the Gym Club executive
included: Jeff Heal, president; Don Moore, manager. Faculty representative again this year was
Mr. Heslop of the civil engineering department.
Among the members of the Gym Club during
the past year were: Joe Rioux, Gerry Heal, Don
Moore, Wally Boyd, Joe Gilbert, Pete Wakefield,
Norm Harrick, Ole Olafson, Al McMartin, Dave
Roxbourgh, Tom Meagher, Gil Bancroft, Martin
Edwards, George Hobson.
The members of the  Gym Club  form a giant pyramid
on the parallel bars.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-ONE Left:   The Chivalry of Fencing demonstrated by Rae Bates  (left) and Rod Wilks (right).   Centre:   Dan Lambert and
Rod Wilks in a corps-a-corps.  Right:   Touche!  Right on the button!
Rae Bates,  President;  Dan Lambert, Vice-President;
Rod Wilks,  Secretary.
Most of the activity of the U.B.C. Fencing Club
took place in the second term after a reorganiza-
tional meeting in the Christmas holidays put the
club back on its feet.
Under the direction of Club President Rae Bates,
the Varsity sword wielders engaged in competition
with the Blades Club of Vancouver in a home-
and-home tournament. Later they partook of some
inter-collegiate fencing competition with a team
from the University of Washington.
The university swordsmen also came to be
known by fans at the Thunderbird basketball
games. Sabre, epee and foil class displays were
put on for hoop fans at half-time.
This year, club members had access to two huts
on the campus. Regular club meetings were held
on Wednesday afternoon, club tournaments on
Tuesday and Friday afternoons, and the Physical
Education fencing classes took place every
Thursday.
Fencing Club executives for the year included:
Rae Bates, president; Dan Lambert and Jim Warr,
vice-presidents; and Rod Wilkes, secretary.
Maitre d'Armes Hale Atkenson again this year
coached both the Fencing Club and the P.E.
fencing classes. Mr. Atkenson lent his own equipment for club use and also donated a trophy which
was to be presented to the high man of the year
in club competition.
PAGE   ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-TWO Badminton
1. UBC badminton team. 2. Thompson
follows through. 3. Barb Twizzell. 4. A
sharp set of doubles featuring on the far
court Bruce Bentham and Meredith, Norman Mustart and Alan France.
League matches with other Vancouver teams,
participation in the Vancouver City, British Columbia and Washington State championships were
th_ highlights of the year for the U.B.C. Badminton Club.
In the British Columbia championships, Darry
Thompson demonstrated his usual fine calibre of
play by reaching the men's singles finals. In the
Washington State tournament, Ken Meredith and
Jimm Watt retained their men's doubles championship. Nancy Raine, partnered with Jim Watt,
brought a new title home to U.B.C. by taking the
mixed doubles crown.
Regular players on U.B.C.'s first team in the
Vancouver and District Badminton League were:
Barb Twizzell, Nancy Raine, Noni Carruthers,
Alan France, Mary Tucker, Jim Watt, Ken Meredith, Darry Thompson, and Murray Creighton.
Players on the second team were: Joan List, Leslie
White, Connie Liddell, Peggy Fullerton, Barbara
Simpson, Howard DeBeck, Denny Thompson,
Bruce Bentham, Bob Nilan, and Bill Taylor.
Executive of the U.B.C. Badminton Club this
year included: Jim Watt, president; Nancy Raine,
vice-president; Phyllis Travis, secretary-treasurer;
and Dave Hansen, team manager.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-THREE Rowing
George Lee,  Dave Moon,  Neve Smith,  Norm  Denkman,.
Bill Ross, Ague Kayu, Bob Bennett, Mike Fitz-James, Harry
Castellou, Hall Atkinson (inset), Coach
U.B.C.'s Rowing Club paved the way for international competition last year by entering the
Pacific Northwest International Rowing Conference
at Seattle.
The Varsity scuttlers were up against teams from
American universities on the Pacific coast, as well
as teams from Harvard and Yale universities.
Hopes are that the university rowers will compete, after the exams are over, with teams from
Victoria, Washington and California. There is also
a possibility that the U.B.C. will have a team
entered in the International Regatta at Seattle
again this year.
Although they hold their regular rowing practices on the Fraser River, the U.B.C. scuttlers are
still able to practice on the campus. There are
two tanks containing one-quarter of a canoe. The
bow and stroke oarsmen are able to practice in the
miniature tank.
The Varsity rowers were coached by Harry
Castillou, and Johnny MacDougall and George
Lee acted as coxswains.
Skippered by Harry Castillou, members of the
U.B.C. crew were: Dave Moon, stroke; Neve
Smith, seven man; Norm Denkman, six man; Bill
Ross, five man; Dyne Kayle, four man; Bob Hughes,
three man; and Mike Fitzjames, two man.
PAGE   ONE   HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-FOUR Cricket
P. Hobson. A.  Hill. D. Pudney.
Top row: J. Beard, R. Webster, J. Fish, J. Pauper, L. Bullen, E. Larsen.  Bottom row* P. Hobson, D. Pudney, A. Hill.
Composed entirely of ex-servicemen, U.B.C.'s
two cricket teams, A and B, boasted one of their
best seasons of play during the past year. The
teams landed up in third place in the A division,
and in second slot in the B division.
After an early losing streak, the A team forged
ahead to earn a victory over the Rowing Club
squad, but went to defeat at their hands in the
final match. The university lads were edged out
of first position in the B section by the Vancouver
Juniors.
The season was highlighted by an exhibition
match with the Vancouver All Stars, and proceeds
went to the War Memorial Gym Fund.
In a final exhibition match of the season's play,
the B squad won out over the A team. Les Bullen
captained the A team, and Dave Pudney led the
B squad.
Games were played at Brockton Point against
the President's team, captained by Mr. Stanley
Remnant, and against the Vice-President's team,
under Mr. G. O'Hara, to a capacity crowd of 2,000
spectators.
Outstanding players during the season were Jim
Beard, Ned Larsen, Les and Deny Bullen, and
Dave Pudney.
Prof. Warren was again sponsor of the U.B.C
Cricket Club. Les Bullen and Dave Massey held
the respective positions of president and secretary-
treasurer. Dave Pudney will be president of the
Cricket Club for the coming year, and Joe Parker
will hold the position of secretary.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-FIVE Archery
Nancy Harvey, Owen Scudamore.
Don  Chant,  Dick   Swanton,   Joe  Stewart,   Eileen  Bacon,
Nancy   Harvey,   Owen   Scudamore,   Mary   Lou   Shannon.
Although practically unknown as a sport on the
campus, the U.B.C. Archery Club has really spent
a season of bustling activity.
Despite the fact that in the autumn there was
little shooting activity because of lack of equipment, many prospective male and female Robin
Hoods were taught the fundamentals of the game.
When the bows and arrows did arrive, a convenient time-table was worked out and practices
were held in a hut made available by the university
athletic authorities and in the area between the
tennis courts and the gym building.
A competition shoot was arranged by the club
executive with the Hiawatha Archery Club of
Vancouver, who were able to edge out the university men and women by a small margin.
Because of the lack of funds, the club executive
had to turn down invitations for competition with
out of town teams.
The club has been active on the campus for
the last two years and its growth is a general
indication of its popularity with the students.
The club also provided social entertainment for
their members after a club shooting competition
.and after the tournament with the Hiawatha Club.
The reshuffle of the executive because of
the pressure of studies resulted in the members
lecting the following executive: Owen Scudamore,
president; Basil Thompson, vice-president; Nancy
Harvey, secretary; and Don Chant, club manager.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    FIFTY-SIX   .    .    . Goll
Dottg  Bajus.
Ormy Hall.
Dave Dale.
Five members of Varsitv's famous six-man Golf
Team which travelled to California last year—Bob
Plommer, Ormy Hall, Hans Swinton, Dave Dale
and Dick Hanley—were back at school this year
forming the nucleus of what was reputed to be the
best team in the history of the University. Newcomers bolstering the squad were Doug Bajus, Bill
Esson, Bob Esplen and Ted Chambers.
Bob Plommer defeated Dick Hanley, 2 and 1,
for the 1946-47 University Match Play Golf Championship in a 36-hole match over the university
golf course.
Another tour of the west coast and probable
participation in the United States Intercollegiate
Golf Championships were being planned for the
late spring, while a six-man team played the annual
match against the Vancouver pros on March 17.
Proceeds of the play went to the War Memorial
Gym Fund.
Lessons in golf were given to classes of beginners organized under the Department of Physical
Education by members of the Varsity team.
Big Blocks were awarded for the first time in
the history of U.B.C to members of the squad.
The recipients of the coveted awards were Ormy
Hall, Bob Plommer, Dave Dale, Hans Swinton,
Dick Hanley, and Malcolm Tapp, a member of
last year's team, who is now a professional golfer
at Quilchena Golf Club.
Left   to    Right:     Dick    Hanley,    Ted
Chambers,  Bob  Esplen,  Bob  Plommer,
Bill Esson.
.    PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-SEVEN Outdoor Club
1.    Off to Garibaldi.   2.    On the Saddle.   3.    Showing their  stuff.
5.    "Whatcha lookin   at?'
4.    Elley   Rapelles  on  the  edge   of  the   world.
Next Page: 1. Preparing for the battle. 2. Roughing it V.P.O. style. 3. Human Fly? 4. Tallemask. 5. The
pause that refreshes. 6. Gellandesprung. 7. The survivors. 8. Are you scared to try it? 9. Skiers' Paradise.
10.    Maisie Ewart, Bob McLellan, Bob Compton stop for a breather.
Skiing and mountaineering became increasingly
popular this year with the welcoming of 130 new
members into the Varsity Outdoor Club.
After a busy summer on the local peaks and a
week in Garibaldi Park in September, the Club,
forced to look for increased accommodation, was
fortunate in being able to obtain the use of the
Vancouver Winter Sports Cabin, situated at the
foot of the "Big Hill" on Grouse Mountain.
With the help of prospective members, a gigantic
repair job was undertaken, and the entire club
of 230 members was able to move in by the time
the skiing season had begun.
The first major activity of the 1946-47 season was
the Fall Trip during which 55 of the 167 climbers
successfully scaled the West Head of the Lions.
This was followed up by hikes up Crown and
Goat Mountains, and rock climbing on Flint and
Feather.
In addition to the competitive skiing under
Coach Peter Vajda, members enjoyed the Christmas trips to Revelstoke and Garibaldi Park. Other
activities included the Spring Hike and the annual
Spring Camp at Garibaldi.
The executive for the year was: Honorary president, Fred Roots; honorary vice-president, Joan
Stevens; president, Roy Hooley; vice-president,
Ingrid Granberg; secretary, Jean Rennie; treasurer,
Harry Smith; marshal, Bob Christie; archivist,
Joyce Clearihue.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-EIGHT  Bottom:   Garvin Robinson, John Frazer,
Gordie   Cowan,  Arnie   Teasdale,   Gerry
Lockhart, Gordon Hall.
3. Doug   Fraser   and   Arnie   Teasdale.
4. Coach Peter Vajda. 5. Doug Fraser.
6. Jo Castillou. 7. Arnie Teasdale.
8. Gar  Robinson.    9.       Doug  Fraser.
Competitive
Skiing Competitive skiing took on a new lease of life at
U.B.C. this year, when, under their coach, Peter
Vajda, the members of the ski team captured the
Western Canadian Inter-collegiate ski crown at
Banff, January 25 and 26, against teams from the
Universities of Alberta, Manitoba, and Oregon
State College, and several other individual winning
spots in other tournaments.
The team was built around flashy Garvin Robinson, who managed to win the Western Canadian
Downhill and Slalom titles at Revelstoke.
Other U.B.C. skiers who were on the No. 1 team
at Banff were, Jerry Lockhart, Gordon Cowan,
Gordy Hall, John Frazee, and Arnie Teasdale.
Members of the No. 2 team included Doug
Fraser, Gordon Martin, John Barry, Don Anderson,
Jack Skinner, and team manager Jack Leggatt.
Down at Martin Pass, Wash., for the Northwestern Inter-collegiate tourney, the U.B.C. skiers
were hard pressed by the Washington Huskie
skiers, and both the No. 1 and No. 2 teams were
forced into second place in the four way combined.
In this event, the No. 1 team was composed of
Doug Fraser, John Frazee, Gordon Hall, Arnie
Teasdale, Gerry Lockhart, and Gar Robinson. On
the No. 2 team events, three new faces, Don
Fernside, Gerry Reynolds and Harry Smith, supplemented the regulars, Gordon Martin, Jack
Skinner and Don Anderson.
Feminine ski stars were also doing well last
season with Jo Castillou, Bev Roberts, Molly Burt.
Sara-Lee Tidball and Isabel McKinnon winning
the B class inter-collegiate event against the U. of
Washington. Intramural
The Intramural program this year was handled
by McMaster's gift to U.B.C, Ivor Wynn, a short,
stocky fellow from Hamilton, Ontario. Wynn and
his Intramural Council, comprising the representatives of all the intramural organizations, faculties,
fraternities, etc., staged a very successful year.
On March 1, the standings of the top ten were
as follows:   1, Jokers, 627; 2, Beta Theta Pi, 596;
3, Phi Delta Theta, 556; 4, Phi Gamma Delta, 541;
5, Alpha Delta Phi, 523; 6, Kappa Sigma, 432; 7,
Mu Phi, 418; 8, Commerce, 403; 9, Science, 396;
10, Delta Upsilon, 376.
Yet to be played when the Totem went to press
were touch football, basketball, track and field,
badminton, tennis, ping pong, skiing, boxing and
wrestling, and softball.
1. A few Psi U's and Beta's after a touch football game. 2. No, it's not the stock exchange, but some of the
participants at the annual swim gala. 3. Slim, Luke, and Dave at the Track Meet. 4. Cote at bat. 5. Jack Patterson,
Chick Turner, Boh Kerr, and "Cut" Cunningham prep for the Meet. 6. Jokers Dunbar and Allan in their skit, "The
Last Ride of Paul Revere. 7. Track stars Pat Minchin, Al Bain, Al Pierce, Ken McPherson, and Bob Piercy warm up.
8.    Pete de Vooght running 4th in Intramural Cross Country Race, followed by Doug Knott and Gil Blair.
PAGE   ONE   HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY-TWO Fish and Game
1.    A Big Catch.   2.    The Executive does a little preparing before the outing.   3.    Harry Castillou donates a couple of
birds to the Sports Desk, while scribes Hal Tennant and Chick Turner get out the cutlery.   4.    Skillful hands adjust a
cunning, lure.
The Fish and Game Club became another of
the new athletic organizations embellishing
U.B.C.'s widening campus. Established in the late
fall, the Club welcomes any activities in the realm
of forest and stream.
Weekly meetings were garnished by moving
pictures and by talks by representatives of city
sporting organizations.
President of the club, and largely instrumental
in its inauguration on the campus, is Ralph Shaw.
Assisting him on the executive are: Bill Bell, vice-
president; Buzz Francis, treasurer; Glyn Edwards,
secretary; Ernie Hannan, fish; Cy Crawford, big
game; Bill Cook, skeet; Bob Harris, birds; Dave
Rogers, .22 rifle; Clem Bulger, fly tying; Clarence
Ostium, publicity.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    SIXTY-THREE jf\*y*}»  , Knoyfjjftg\Mf/  from  the  major activities
IgBmpus   we   will   present   to   you
e more minor organizations which serve
to round out the undergraduate life of the
students ot 1947.
Although attracting less publicity during
the year, such features as Greek letter
societies, minor clubs, and student residences, presented in this section ot the
Totem, will long be remembered in the
campus lives of the students.
Friendships made in fraternities often
endure the years to become constant
reminders of happy college days. The
same will apply to student residences.
In minor clubs, students meet to discuss
and to practice the various chosen fields
which will later become fheir careers.
Such minor organizations have always
been an integral part ot the history ol
Ihe school and shall always continue
to be. BBJ
_i
'<*.
i
*'    E__   Pan-Hellenic Group Busy
The Pan-Hellenic Council has spent a busy
year in the furthering of their aims and in providing
a maximum of inter-sorority activities.
Under the capable guidance of Roma McDonald, the new system of rushing was inaugurated
and the clash with opening of classes successfully
avoided.
Under the new system of rushing used last fall,
women are chosen in about half the time which
the selection formerly occupied, with the difference
that actual rushing begins earlier.
Diane Reid, vice-president; Nora McGarry, secretary; Peggy Lipson, treasurer; and Mary Chambers,
as activities chairman, worked to promote the
bowling tournament and the bridge competition,
as well as to organize the Red Cross work for
the year.
Casey King, as co-chairman with Hank Sweatman
of the IFC, worked to produce a highly successful
two nights at the Mardi Gras held in the Commodore.
This spring, as in former years, the Annual
Workshop discussion group was held, with the
executive giving some aspects of work done during
the year in the organization.
Roma McDonald, Panhell President.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    SIXTY-EIGHT    . BROUGH, ROSEMARY
CHATWIN, MARY
CLARKE, NORA
COUGHILL,  JOY
HAWKENS, LUCILL
JOHNSTON, MAY
JUTTE, AUDREY
KELSBERG, BARBARA
McDONALD, ROMA
PEELE, ROHAN
ROULSTON, ALINE
WILSON, BEVERLEY
"Leadership, service and co-operation" —
with these three ideals the Women's Honourary
Sorority completed their fourth year on the
campus. Members are chosen for scholarship
and interest in campus activities. President of
the sorority this year was Joy Coghill.
4>*S*Z, St
6k,
PAGE   ONE    HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY-NINE BAMPTON, DIANA
BAMPTON, VIRGINIA
BELL, MARY
BLUNDELL, JUNE
BREADON, MARY
BRETT,   JUNE
CHARTERS, JOAN
COLLINS, JUNE
DALRYMPJ.E, JEAN
DE LISLE, ELAINE
DRIVER, MARGARET
EYRES, JOY
FEAST, JOAN
FERGUSON, JOANNE
FYFE, MARGARET
HARRISON, BERNICE
HODGSON, BETTE
KELSBERG, BARBARA
McKINLEY, EVA
MacMILLAN, KATHLEEN
McTURK, HELEN
MALCOMSON,   ANNA
MITCHELL, GEORGINA
MJOS, LILLIAN
MONTGOMERY, MARY
MOORE, JOAN
MORRIS, YVETTE
NICHOLSON, KAY
NORMAN, MARY
RATHLEF, LISBETH
RENNIE, JEAN
ROBINSON, KAY
RODENCHUK, JENNIE
ROSS, MARGARET
SCOTT, PEGGY
SHAW, BARBARA
WEBSTER, PAT
WILLOUGHBY, LORAINE
VAUGHAN, PEGGY
VOSS, HELEN
GUM^4fe«fc(E.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY    . BARTHOLOMEW, YVONNE
BISHOP, DORIS
BONE, MARGARET
BURBIDGE, EILEEN
BURNS, HELEN
CASTILLOU, JO
CHISHOLM, ANITA
COADY, MARGARET
COTTERALL, GERTRUDE
CUNNINGHAM,
CONSTANCE
DAVIES, MARGUERITE
DUGUID, MARY
ELLIS, CATHERINE
FORRESTER, SHIRLEY
HAZLEWOOD, JOAN
HOPKINS, ISABEL
HOWE, DAPHNE
IRWIN, LOUISE
JARVIS, JOAN
JOHNSON, LILY
KETCHESON, RUTH
LAWRENCE, JUNE
LINDSAY, HELEN
LOUTIT, KAY
MALCOLM,  ELIZABETH
MARE MARY,
MUNN, ANNE
McLEISH,   GLENNA
REID, DIANNE
ROWLLINGS,
MARJORIE
SALTER, PATRICIA
SANDERSON, JOY
SHARMAN, BEVERLEY
SMITH, EDNA
STOCKSTAD, DELORES
SUTTON, GWENDA
THOMAS, ETHEL
THOMSON, AUDREY
THOMSON, GRAHAME
THOMSON.MARGUERITE
TURNBULL,  MARGARET
WHITE, LESLIE
WOLFE, IRIS
SEAMAN, H. L.
Oti^U*»»^&*toz*
PAGE    ONE   HUNDRED   AND    SEVENTY-ONE ALLMAN, MARY
BROUGH, ROSEMARY
BASSETT, BEVERLEY
BURNS, MARGARET
CHISHOLM, SHIRLEY
CRAIG, MARGARET
FAWSITT, JOYCE
GLOVER, MARIE
GOODMAN,  JUANITA
GUILAMHOULIE, ANNE
HOWARD, TINA
JOHNSTON,  MAY
McCALLUM, JOAN
PAPPAJOHN, AGNES
PATTERSON, DOROTHY
ROGERS, MARY E.
SHAW, CATHERINE
SMITH, JUNE
STEPHENSON, JACKIE
STUART, ELIZABETH
TONNING, EILA
TORRENCE, LYN
TURNER, BLANCHE
av-,©
>**t/*iy>\
(j&
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED     AND    SEVENTY-TWO BAXTER, BERNICE
BELL, LOIS JEAN
BIRKINSHAW, ADELE
BRANT, BEATRICE
BUCKNELL,  JOY
CLARK, MARY
CORBITT, CHARLOTTE
DUNLOP, AUDREY
FARINA, MARGARET
FORBES, ALIX
GIBSON, MARGARET
HODSON, MARGARET
LANG, LORNA
LORD, HELEN
MILLS, RUTH
SMITH, DOROTHY
ROCHESTER, JANET
PATERSON, MARY JANE
PARKER, MARY
OUTERBRIDGE, HETTI
McDONALD, ROMA
MacFARLANE, JEAN
McLOUGHLIN,  KAE
TIEDJE, PATRICIA
VLAG, ANN
WOODMAN, MABEL
WOODWORTH, JEANE
Qitt*~<?L
.    PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-THREE. ARGYLE, CATHERINE
BARCLAY-ROSS, MIGNON
BAYNE, JOAN
BLUNDELL, HEATHER
COULTER, MAUREEN
COWAN, PAT
CUMMING, MARION
DAVIDSON,  NANCY
FAGAN, MARY
FRASER, JOAN
GIEGERICH, PEGGY
GREER, BETSY-ANN
GRIFFITH, GWYNNETH
GRIMMETT, JOAN
HARVEY,  CAROLYN
HODGINS, ROSEMARY
HUDSON, GRACE
JONES, BARBARA
KINCAID, MARJORIE
LEITERMAN, ELAINE
LEWIS,  NANCY
McALPINE, MARY
McGARRY, NORA
McKENZIE, JEAN
McTAVISH, SHIRLEY
RAYMUR, BEVERLEY
RICHARDS, BARBARA
ROLSTON, MARTA
SEYMOUR, JANE
STEVENSON, MARY ANN
WILKINSON, PEGGY
WILSON, CATHERINE
WOODWARD, TWIGG
YATES, MAUREEN
^^G*U"~*-
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-FOUR ARCHECK, LILLIAN
BAKER,  RENEE
BECK, FREDDIE
BECKER, RUTH
BRODY, FLORENCE
CHERNOV, EVA
DAVIDS, DOREEN
DIAMOND, RITA
EPSTEIN, ROCHELLE
GOLDBERG, AUDREY
HOCHMAN,  HARRIET
HORODEZKY, MIRIAM
KOCH, IRMA
LEVISON, MOLLY
LIPSON, PEGGY
ROSENBURG, NETTY
SIERS, HELEN
STIENER, IRENE
WEINSTEIN, RITA
*dlE,<Bfc S^JUrr^
PACE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-FIVE BAMFORD, GWEN
BLAIS,  ANDREE
BYRN, ROSEMARY
CARMEN, HELEN
CHAMBERS, MARY
CROW, MARY PAT
DOLMAGE, MARY
DONEGANI,  JOY
DROPE,'PAT
DUNFEE, EVELYN
DYSON,   SYLVIA
FAIRWEATHER,  PAULINE
FINNING,  JOANNE
HAMILTON,  JOAN
HILLIER,  FRANCES
HORNE, BETTY-JEAN
HUNT,  BETTY
IRVING,   LORNA
KNAPP, TADDY
LAMBERT, NONA
LEACH, SHIRLEY
MANNING, VALERIE
MARTIN, DEIRDRE
MOORE, DOROTHY
MacASKILL, BARBARA
MacGILLIVRAY, VERDA
MacLEOD, DOROTHY
McLEOD, TISH
McCLUNG, MAXINE
O'FLAHERTY,   JOAN
PARK,  PEGGY
PARKINSON, MARGUERITE
PRATT, JOAN
PRICE, TRUDIE
PYE, ELEANOR
QUICK, BEVERLEY
RAE, ELIZABETH
RENNIE, NANCY
ROBERTS, BEVERLEY
ROBSON, MARITA
ROSS, MADELINE
RUNKLE, PENNY
RYAN, RUTH
SCOTT, PAT
SOMERS, MARIE
SYMONDS, ANNE
TREMAINE, MARY
TWIZELL,  BARBARA
WHITE, DOREEN
WILLCOX, JEANNE
WILLIAMS, DOROTHY
^-«*w*Jh-- (jHA* J&JltvL
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    SEVENTY-SIX BAALIM, BARBARA
BAKONY, STELLA
BALDWIN, BETTY
CLARK, BEVERLEY
CLARKE, CALISTA
DAVIES, FRANKIE
DRYBURGH,  NORA
FULLERTON, PEGGY
HARTREE, BEVERLEY
HARTREE, SHIRLEY
HAYES, DOROTHY
HILL, SHIRLEY
KENNY, EDITH
LAIDLER,  DOROTHY
LIPSEY, BARBARA
MacDONALD, NANCY
MacINTOSH, JANE
MacKENZIE, MARIGOLD
McNaughton, margaret
millard, gloria
murray, kim
norton, g. m.
peyman, betty
reid, birnie
seyers, rosemary
smith, winsome
stedman, shirley ruth
vosper, gae
wallace, ardath
walton, vivian
weir, sheilla
wilson, lorna
^<4i^QV^1^fe-
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    S E V E N T Y - S E V E N AIKENS, CAROL
ANGUS, ANNE
BELL-IRVING, ELIZABETH
BLACK, DAPHNE
BOULTBEE, PATRICIA
BOWELL, JOANNE
CHEW, BARBARA
COOK, KATHERINE
DESBRISAY, DIANA
DE WOLF, GEORGIA
DIETHER, BARBARA
EWING,  FRANCES
GILLIES, BARBARA
GILLIES, MARY-LOU
GROLL, SHIRLIE
HALL, BEVERLEY
HAMILTON, PEGGIE
KING, KATHLEEN
LAIRD, ANNE
LANE, POLLY
LECKIE,  JEAN
LEES, HELEN
LEWIS, CAROL
McCLEMENT, PATRICIA
McDONALD,FRANCES
McGLASHIN, PAMELA
McLENNAN, ANNE
McTAVISH, MARY
NASCOU, SHIRLEY
PEARSON, EMMA
PHELAN, MARY
RIETCHEL, HELEN
ROSE, JOAN
ROSE, PEGGY ANN
RUSSELL, BETTE
RUSSELL, TOPSY
SHAW, LOIS
SNOW, DOROTHY
TRETHEWAY, HELEN
TURNER, PATRICIA
VANTREIGHT, ELSIE
WILSON, BARBARA
HC«>44»«~ HC«44**— ^4r***»**—
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    SEVENTY-EIGHT Inter-Fraternity Council Active
Doug Yates, I.F.C. President.
Inter Fraternity Council.
This year's Inter-Fraternity Council activities
have been mainly centred on the revival of many
of the pre-war period functions.
Early in October, Doug Yates, president, and
Jack Cunningham, vice-president, went to Seattle
for the Western Regional Inter-Fraternity Conference, which included almost the entire West Coast.
The traditional Smoker was replaced this year
by an Inter-Fraternity Banquet at which Alumnus
were given an opportunity to see the expanding
membership. Two hundred and sixty men were
added to the lists, and a new organization formed,
Tau Omega.
Mardi Gras activity this year was in the
hands of Hank Sweatman, secretary of IFC, in
co-operation with the executive of the Pan-Hellenic
Society. An Oriental motif was emphasized, and
the high attendance to this affair enabled the
committee to donate a large sum to Shaughnessy
Military Hospital.
Faculty representative for this year was Dr. L
E. Ranta.
Scholarship prizes were awarded at the annual
Song-Fest which was held in the late spring.
.    PAGE     ONE    HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-NINE ALLAN, J.
CUNNINGHAM, J.
DUFFUS, J.
FERRY, J.
FOWLER, P.
FRANKLIN, H.
GRANTHAM, R.
KIRKPATRICK, T.
NILAN, B.
McRAE, D.
PHILLIPS, F.
Sigma Tau Chi is an honourary fraternity,
the members of which are chosen from all
sections of the undergraduate body in recognition of their service and leadership in the
extra-curricular activities at the University.
President this year was Pat Fowler.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    EIGHTY BALDWIN, G. R.
BAYFIELD, J. T.
BEEBE, B.
BLAIR, D.
CAMERON, D.
CARTER, P. A.
DIETHER, R. L.
DISHER, I.
DUFFUS, J.
FIELD, R.
FILBER, R. M.
FLEMING, J. B.
FRAZEE, J. D.
FREEZE, G. A.
FREWER, P. G.
GERRARD, G.
GROVER, F.
JEFFREY, A.
KELLER, J.
KENNY,  E.
KENNY, I.
KER, J.
KING, M.
KIRKPATRICK, G. C.
MacDOUGALL, J. F.
McKEEN, G. B.
McLORG, T.
McTAVISH, W.
MELVIN, D.
MILLIGAN, G.
MILLIGAN, J. W.
MINTY, J. R.
MUIR,  W.
MYLETT, P. V.
NELLES, G.
PANTON, J.
PUDNEY, D.
RHODES, J.
RHODES, H. W.
ROWELL, H. J.
RYAN, A.
SEARS, V.
SEYER, F. H.
SMITTEN, F. A.
STANFIELD, B.
STIEL, W. M.
STOVALL, R.
ST. LOUIS, A. L.
WHITTALL, W. E.
WHITTAL, P. L.
WILKINSON, W.
th  L
_*__!_*
ajw^AftE-. (?„*.
.   PAGE   ONE    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-ONE ARGUE, H.
BARLOW, D.
BELL, F. S.
BLUECHEL, A. J.
BORTHWICK, J. W.
BOURNS, T.  R.
BURCH, W. G.
BURKE, H. H.
CANTY, J. L.
CHATWIN, J. C.
COLES, J. M.
COLLINS, K. S.
COTE, P. T.
COWLEY, R. D.
CUNNINGHAM, J. R.
FARR, R. M.
FERGUSON, D. C.
FOERSTER, D. K.
GILL, W. D.
GRANGER, H. M.
GRANTHAM R. D.
GUEST, G. R. R. G.
GUSTAVESON, S. E.
HAZLEWOOD, D. A.
HENDERSON, R. G.
HIRTLE, J. G. S.
HIRTLE, W. H.
JOHN, T. W.
JOPLIN, A. F.
KIRKPATRICK, E. T.
LISTER, W. G.
LOCKHART, K. W.
LYONS, E. H.
MANN, D. E.
MAXWELL, N. R.
MacKAY, J. W.
McGregor, f. c.
McGregor, d. w.
OLSON, E.
OLSON, P.
PENN, W. R.
REA, D. T.
RICHARDSON, D. W.
ROBINSON, M. C.
RUSH, W.
SAGER, S. M.
STEVENSON, G. H.
TURNER, J. N. W. G.
WALLACE, W. H.
WARNER, W. L.
WEBSTER, R. J.
WHITE, W. A. T.
WHITE, P.
WHITEHEAD, C. J. F.
WILLIAMS, D. R.
WILSON, D. A.
WILSON, W. L.
WOODS,  E. J.
^j-fciXfc Gk
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-TWO ALLAN, J.
ARCHIBALD, R.
BARTLETT, L.
BENTLEY, W.
BONNER, R.
BROWN, N.
CARLYLE, A.
COLLUM, J.
CROFTON, J.
CUTHILL, L.
DENKMAN,  N.
DRYER, L.
DYER, L.
EDWARDS, B.
EMBREE, W.
FAWCUS, G.
FENN, R.
GALT, D.
GALT, W.
GOSBEE, A.
HAMILTON, B.
HEENEY, D.
HENDERSON, C.
HYDE,  R.
JOSEPHSON, H.
LAYARD, C.
LEA, E.
LEE, D.
LISTER, R.
MITCHELL, R.
MacDONALD, J.
McDONALD, L.
McKAY, W.
McKENZIE, R.
McKINNON, N.
NILAN, R.
PAULIN, W.
PEACOCK, R.
ELANT, G.
SMITH, A.
SMITH, T.
SWEATMAN, H.
VARCOE, J.
WETMORE, D.
WETMORE, M.
WHEELER, J.
WICKSON, R.
WILLIS, T.
WILSON, R.
WINTER, W.
t9*to3lm ty»&rr~
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    EIGHTY-THREE ADKIN, T.
ARMOUR, J.
BARNWELL, J.
BROWN, R.
BUTTERWORTH, T.
CAMPBELL, C.
I   CASTILLOU, H.
CAWLEY, N.
COTTINGHAM, R.
COWAN J.
CROMPTON,  R.
DAVIDSON, K.
ELSEY, B.
FRANKLIN, H.
GEAR, I.
.GERRITY, E.
GLOVER, C.
HARRIS, G.
GREGORY, K.
KING, W.
KNIGHT, G.
KNUTSON, A.
LEES, J.
MOORE, J.
MOYLS, M.
MOYLS, J.
MUNRO, N.
MUIRHEAD, K.
McPHERSON, J.
McRAE, H.
PEDERSON, C.
PINCHIN, H.
PIERCE, A.
PRESTON, T.
SHEPHERD, G.
STEWART, R.
SISSONS, J.
SLARK, G.
STOCKSTAD, P.
TOYNBEE, R.
WOTHERSPOON, H.
YOUNG,  D.
•&*l4Kfc_. S**£*»-~
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    EIGHTY-FOUR ANDERSON, G.
BAGNALL, B.
BARKER D.
BARTLE,   J.
BEAMER, G.
BEQUIN, A.
BERGKLINT, B.
BLACK, P.
BURGESS,   H.
BUSHFIELD, R.
COLCLEUGH, M.
CUNNINGHAM, C.
EAGLE, M.
FITZPATRICK, T.
FUOCO, R.
GILMOUR, G.
HACKETr, T.
HARE, B.
HARFORD, B.
JAMES, D.
JOHNSON, G.
JOHNSTONE, P.
JOLLY, R.
LARKIN, G.
LAWSON, R.
LONG, C.
MacDONALD, K.
MacFADDEN, J.
McKRAE, D.
OLMSTEAD, D.
PEAGUES, J.
PERRY, F.
SHORTREED, J.
STEWART, C.
STROUD, R.
THOMSON, I.
THOMSON, J.
TOMLINSON, K.
WELLBURN, V.
WENSINK, R.
WOOD, B.
9L. ^**~- (ft
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-FIVE ABBOTT, A.  T.
AMM, J.
AMM, W.
ANDERSON, R.
ANNABLE, G. M.
ARMSTRONG, G. A.
CAINS, R. W.
CANTELL, T.
CARMICHAEL, H. A.
CARSON, P.
CLARK, E.
CORRY, G.
COULTHARD, W.
DALE, D.
DAVIDSON, I.
DEVOOGHT, P.
DYBHAVEN, T.
FAIRBURN, K.
FISHER, T.
GRACEY, W.
GRAHAM, P.
GRANT, R.
GRAY, R.
GREEN, R.
GUTTORMSSON, T.
HETHERINGTON, R.
HILL, W.
HORWOOD, B.
HOWIESON, D.
HUNTER, DALE
ISLAUB, K.
JACKSON, B.
KABUSH, H.
KERR, S.
KING, D.
__P^.
<_?.r.A.
QUH*****-?***^
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-SIX LAMB, J.
LOCKHART, G.
MANNING, R. D.
MASON, S.
MILNE, D.
MOULDS, J.
MacKENZIE, I.
MacDONALD, D.
MacLEOD,  D.
McCOLL, D.
McKEEN, J.
McPHERSON, K.
NAIRN, R.
O'BRIEN, J.
PARNUM, S. E.
PEACOCK, J.
PREVOST, E.
REDPATH, W.
REED, K.
RUDOLPH, J.
SCEATS, D.
SCOTT, H.
SELKIRK, R.
SHIER, P.
SMITH, B.
SMITH, D.
STEELE, R.
STIMPSON, A.
TALLING, R.
THOMSON, R.
TODD, P.
WILLS, C.
YATES, D. E.
YOUNG, A.
<?U ^i^^utw -Jfcfifc
.    PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-SEVEN ALEXANDER, D.
ANDERSON, N.
BODIE, R. T.
BOSSONS, F. H.
BUTLER, C.
CARMICHAEL, D.
CARTER, S. M.
CHEW, V. B.
CROSBY, B.
CUMBERBIRCH, P.
DOWNS, K.
ESTEY, R.
FRASER, D.
FRITH, P.
GARDOM, G.
GORMAN, D. G.
HAAS, D.
HOGARTH, G.
JONES, S. C.
KENMUIR, J. A.
LIPSETT, F.
(P^^feltte
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-EIGHT LONG, J.
McBRIDE, M.
McCUSKER, T.
McLENNAN, J. M.
McGEER, D. M.
McGILL, G.
McKENZIE, M.
McKIMM, D.
McLEOD, J.
NAFIEL, C. O.
MCHOL, J. L.
PEARSON, D. E.
PRATT, E.
RUSSELL, C.
RITCHIE, D. M.
SALLOWAY, J.
SAUDEIt, W. L.
SCOTT, W. G.
STEWART, R.
TOWN, D.
WALKER, R. E.
WEBER, R.
(F^^feiXfe
PAGE   ONE   HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-NINE AIRD J.
BAIN A.
BAIN, W. A.
BARRASS, C.
BARTON, G.
CAMPBELL, P.
EDWARDS, T. H.
GAMBLE, G.
GILLESPIE, G.
HOWARD, E.
KERLEY, D. R.
LLOYD, R.
MADILL, M.
LAWRIE, F.
MATSON, H.
McCALLUM, R.
McCULLOCH, D. G.
FARINA, A. J.
McLOUGHLIN, H.
PHYSICK, M.
PUDNEY, P.
ROSE, W.
SABA, A.
RODIN, N.
SLINGSBY, J.
SOROS, K.
TAYLOR, R.
TRONO, E. W. E.
VELAY, C.
WALLS, J.
WARD, D.
WINTEMUTE, J.
YOUNG, V.
(Pi. •&*•- &
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    NINETY ABRAMS, Di
BOOTH, D.
BROWN, A.
BRYANT, C.
BURGESS, H.
DENNIS, D.
DOWNING, M.
DUFF, W.
FORREST, I.
GREENWOOD, L.
GUMAN, P.
GUMMOW, J.
HAGGART, R.
HUGHES, R.
HUMMELL, B. C. W.
MORROW,  A.
MacLEOD, N.
PAPPAJOHN, J.
PAYNE, D.
RAYMOND W.
SMILLIE, H.
TATE, D.
THOMPSON, A.
WATKINSON, P.
WHITE, N.
WYATT, C.
<fc<\^*SL^
.    PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND     NINETY-ONE BAKER, F.
BATEMAN, W.
BRIDGES, R.
BURTON, J. A.
HAYES, J.
HESLA, E.
HUFF, B.
HUGHES, L. R.
JOHNSON, B.
LIGHTBODY, A.
MILLER, W. B.
MILLS, R. M.
MORRISON, J.
McEWEN, J. R.
McGinn, a.
McLEOD, D. F.
PIERCY, J. E.
PITMAN, D. L.
PRIDE, A. H.
ROSE,   D.   J.
ROSS, G.
SHOPLAND, H. J.
THORSON, A.
THORSON, E.
TUKHAM, F.
WARNER, K.
WATSON, A.
WINTER, W. H.
$
<?JU 4>*S*z.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    NINETY-TWO ABRAMSON, J.
BECKER,  W.
BERSON, M.
CHERCOVER, M.
COHEN, J. I.
DIAMOND, I.
GROBERMAN, L.
GUREVICH, B.
GUREVITZ, S.
HYMAN, L.
JAMES, R.
KLINE, C.
KOLBERG, J.
LEDERMAN, J.
LESHGOLD, J.
NAROD, L.
SHORE, M.
STEIN, D.
TRADEMAN, E.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED     AND    NINETY-THREE ATHERTON, D.
BELL-IRVING, H.
BELYEA, D.
BOYD, B.
BRADEN, M.
CARMICHAEL, B.
CHERNIAVSKEY, P.
COOPER, D.
EMERSON, E. .
FERRY, J.
GILLIES, D.
GILMOUR, W.
GRAHAM, P.
HANNA, J.
HAY, N.
HILL, R.
HOUGHTON, K.
LANE G
LANE, W.
LEE, G.
LONGLEY, D.
MANZER, N.
MARGACH, J.
MARTIN, J.
MICHAS, L.
MILLER, H.
McBEAN, W. A.
MacDONALD, A.
MacDONALD, M.
MacDOUGALL,  R.
McFEELY, C.
McNALLY, E. E.
McINTOSH, G.
O'BRIEN, T.
PAISLEY, J.
PATTERSON, H.
ROTHWELL, N.
RUSSELL, D.
SHINBEIN, J.
SCOTT, A.
SWINTON, H.
TALLING, G.
TIERNAN, P.
WALLACE, S.
WARK, B.
WATSON, B.
WATSON, A.
WELLS, J.
WHEATLEY, &
WHITELAW, G.
WILSON, A.
YOUNG, M.
® ,#,<A
/LtdCoZ (RU.
PAGE   ONE    HUNDRED   AND   NINETY-FOUR ANDERS,  B.
BERGSTROM, J. A.
CARMICHAEL, D. W.
DAVIS, D. A.
GREGG, H. M.
HELLIWELL, D. T.
ISAACSON, C. T.
MASON, F. B.
McLENNAN, R. P.
RIDDELL, W.  G.
SCOTT, J. C. M.
SIMS, N. C.
TRIP, O. H.
WILKS, E. J.
QrtW\<b
Tau Omega, a new local fraternity, was
officially recognized on the U.B.C. campus
during the 1946-47 session. The present membership of over 25 intends to follow a policy
of sound expansion and hopes for international
affiliation next year.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND    NINETY-FIVE The Phrateres' Over-all Executive.
Phrateres, Friends To All
Audrey Jutte, President.
To the harassed Freshette, the word Phrateres
means friendship and FUN. The club motto—
"Famous For Friendliness"—was carried on this
year to the fullest possible extent.
This year the club, larger than ever, spent an
active year, giving support to any campus organization or drive that needed help.
Twelve sub-chapters ushered a large new membership into their ranks following the pledge term
last fall. The ceremony for each chapter took place
at the home of some member with Phrateres executive and sponsors as guests.
On February 24, the Candlelight Formal was
held and new members initiated into the organization as active members. Beta sub-chapter was
represented from Seattle, and the pledge pins of
many were exchanged for the symbolic pin of
active Phrateres.
This year's executive and council was comprised
of Dean D. Mawdsley, Honorary President; Dr. J.
Hallamore, Honorary Vice-President; Audrey Jutte,
President; Ann Lowes, First Vice-President; Mary
Clarke, Second Vice-President; Jean MacKinnon,
Recording Secretary; Marnie McLellan, Corresponding Secretary; Flora Norris, Treasurer; Helen
Burd, Publicity; Nonie McGregor, Sub-Chapter
Chairman; Evelyn Walling, Social Service; Betty
Scott, Membership and Initiation; Marg Gamey,
Historian; Pat Mayne, Advisor.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   AND   NINETY-SIX Phrateres Spend Busy Year
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8.    Sub Chapter Executives.  6.    Everybody   Came.    7.    Maxine   Lindow   Queries.    9.    The   Lucky
Winner.
PAGE     ONE    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-SEVEN "Famous For Friendliness"
1, 2, 4, 7, 8, and 11.    Phrateres' Sub Chapter Executives.    3.    Fall   Formal.    5.    Watching   the   Crowd.    6.   Well
Attended.   9.    Time Out.   10,   President Audrey Jutte and Friends.
PAGE    ONE   HUNDRED   AND   NINETY-EIGHT    .  Jokers Operate Silently
Contrary to public opinion, the Jokers Club has
taken a very active interest in campus activities
this past year. In order to co-operate fully in War
Memorial Gym fund drives, the members of the
club had to work silently so as not to bring adverse
publicity to University students.
Joker members proved they could work silently
and still accomplish as much as, if not more than,
that which they did in their first highly-publicized
year.
Following the more mature trend exhibited on
the campus, the Jokers avoided crazy stunts and
antics which might unfavourably influence downtown citizens.
The Jokers Club also presented a large car
parade down to Portland, Oregon, in support of
our football team who ventured down to engage
the Portland team in a strenuous game of football.
In addition, the Jokers boosted the T.B. X-ray
drive by demonstrating the efficacy of modern
X-ray techniques in comparison with old and more
torturous methods.
Ace Joker Dave Hayward Amuses Bert Niosi.
During the fall term, the Jokers staged a free
dance at Tenth and Sasamat. The dance was
presented not only to raise varsity spirit but also
to advertise the Gym drive. Later in the year the
club held a spectacular initiation day, when Joker
initiates parade the campus in pyjamas and
dressing gowns. Throughout the day, new Jokers
could be found toasting hot dogs and fishing in
the pond in front of the Library.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED ™r_Pi5-iMSJ_
1.    Caf Chair Orator.   2.    Butts Eye.   3.    Hayward Incites  His  Mob.   4.    Caf  Facilities  are  Really  Crowded  These
Days.  5.    Ain't you ever seen a guy cook his own dinner before?   6.    Let X  Equal the  Unknown.   7.    Pyjamas  are
required attire for Joker picnics.  8.    Every gal can get her Joker at the WUS tea dance. 9.    Paper, Mister? 10.   Fishing
for Freshmen. 11.    Soup's On.  12.    Who's got the mustard? 13.    Obviously a Student.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND    ONE Dance Band Is Popular
1. Beat Those Drums. 2. The Sax Section. 3.
Leans Into His Work. 4. Hal Tenant Sings. 5.
Harlow and Al MacMillan, Executive.
Bob
Bob
Members of the Varsity Dance Band Club
played at those student functions not requiring a
union band in return for music and accessories.
These events included pep-meets, tea dances and
other social affairs.
Personnel included: Saxes: Bob Harlow, Cecil
Lewid, George Kyle, Bob Reeves, and Ron Mac-
Caully. Trumpets: Ron Cockroft, Hal Tenant, and
Warren Marshal. Trombones: Bob Hetherington
and Roy MacDonald. Rhythm: Al MacMillan at
the piano, Don Cunliffe on bass, Don Baird on the
drums, and Gordy Bell and his guitar.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   TWO String Orchestra Active
1.    The  Executive  in Discussion.    2.    Close-up  of  Technique.   3.    Performing at one of the Clubs'   Presentations.
.    .    PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND THREE Tyros Study Jazz History
1 and 2.    The Jazz Society Executive.  3 and 4.    Members
Relax to the Melodies of New Orleans.
Formed to promote the understanding of jazz,
and the appreciation of that type of music, the
Jazz Society has had a widely varied program
during the last year. In addition to their weekly
meetings, which were held in the Stage Room
of Brock Hall, this Society gave a number of shows.
Two of these productions were in aid of the War
Memorial Gym fund.
The Jazz Society featured Norman Granz and
many of the top musicians of the jazz at the Philharmonic show held in Brock Hall Main Lounge
during the fall term. This show was sponsored in
aid of the Gym drive. Also in support of this drive
was the pepmeet featuring the famous Mills
Brothers. The Jazz Society brought the brothers
out to the campus one noon hour.
Jazz Society selections were played weekly on
CKWX during the year. The Society also sponsored programs over CKMO and the University
Society's network.
The Society, during the year, gave its members
the opportunity of obtaining records through its
record loan service.
The Jazz Society's weekly meetings consisted
of the playing of recordings of all types of jazz in
order to make the members more familiar with
this type of music.
Programs were given in a "present to past" order,
starting with the music of contemporary musicians
and working back to the compositions of those of
earlier times.
Jazz music had its origin in the folk music of
the United States, with the bringing of negro
spiritual over from Africa. These songs were
blended into the music already existing in America
to develop what is now called "jazz."
Instrumental jazz began early in the 20th Century. Instrumentation was originally founded on
the blues mood and developed through its various
schools from there. Among these new schools of
jazz are the New Orleans school, the Kansas City
school, and the Chicago school. Modern schools
are very definitely coming into existence. New
York trends are characteristically different from
those of Vancouver.
The executive this year consisted of John Crofton,
president; John Wormsbecker, vice-president; Ross
Stroud, secretary; Wilma Moffat, program director;
Phil Ashton, publicity manager; Sylvia Crofton,
librarian; and Art Pearl, treasurer.
PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND FOUR Architecture
Club
Harold     Charlesworth,      Stewart
Wilson,    Rex    Raymer,    Frank
Bankes, Walter Scott.
Formed this year around the nucleus provided
by last year's Pre-Architecture Club, the Architecture Club's primary objective is to gather
together students of the new Department of Architecture and to correspond with their fellows at
other universities. Another important purpose is
to stimulate at U.B.C, and throughout the province, interest in town planning.
Through the medium of films, lectures and
exhibits, the Club presented contemporary com
munity planning ideas in the hope that, given
evidence of what the people can have, they will
actively support planning in their own towns.
Membership was open to all Architecture and
Pre-Architecture students, and the invitation was
extended to exeryone interested to attend club
events and functions.
This year's executive consisted of Rex Raymer,
president; Harold Charlesworth, vice-president; F.
L.  Bankes,  secretary;   Stewart Wilson,  treasurer.
El
Circulo Latino
Americano
Jim   McDonald,   Mr.   A.   Mattos,
Ron Webster, Carlos  Castro.
El Circulo Latino Americano or Latin American
Club, was formed to give students interested in
our South American neighbours a better understanding of their lives and customs. Guided by
their capable president who has spent many years
both in Chile and Bolivia, the members held
monthly meetings. At these meetings, which were
held in the evenings at the home of one of the
members, the club encouraged its members to
develop a proficiency in Spanish.   This aim was
furthered by means of Spanish films and group
discussions.
A weekly conversational meeting was also started
this year with very successful results, as these
meetings enabled club members to practice speaking in Spanish and also furthered the club's purpose
of fostering interest in Latin American countries.
The executive consisted of: Ron Webster, president; Jim McDonald, vice-president; Carlos Castro,
secretary; and Pamela Butcher, treasurer.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FIVE Psychology
Club
The purpose of the Psychology Club is to give
the members a clearer understanding of the growing field of psychology through addresses given
by outstanding psychologists and psychiatrists. The
experts speaking to the club during the year
included Dr. Hutton, Dr. Gundy, Prof. Belyea,
Prof. Black and Mr. Fleury.
The club also hoped to promote research into
some specialized fields of psychology by having
graduates and fourth year  honors students give
Jim    McGregor,    Gwen    Roberts,
Tom    Mallinson,    Ruth    Martin,
Evelyn Anderson.
papers, which were then followed by open discussion and criticism.
Of additional assistance to the students were
the field trips taken to such institutions as the
mental hospital at Essondale. These excursions
provided interesting and practical studies in the
application of psychology.
The executive was: Tom Mallinson, president;
Jim McGregor, vice-president; and Evelyn Anderson, Ruth Martin and Gwen Roberts, members.
***^» ii!        ____*^ni_t    ^m
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The Physics Society of the University of B.C.
is a club devoted to the presentation of scientific
papers. At the fortnightly meetings, faculty members and students presented papers pertaining to
some problem of interest to physicists.
Membership in the club consisted of the faculty
of the Department of Physics, graduate students in
the Department, and fourth year honor students.
Membership in the society was compulsory for all
Physics Society
Bob Codrington, Bill Paulin, Bert
Brockhouse.
these fourth year honor students. Each student
was expected to present a paper during his second
term. The papers formed a basis for later discussion.
The executive for the 1946-47 session was made
up of Bob Codrington, president; Bill Paulin, vice-
president; and Bert Brockhouse, secretary-treasurer. These members, in spite of the many great
difficulties occasioned by the extreme and rapid
growth of the university, filled their positions
capably.
PAGE   TWO    HUNDRED   AND    SIX American
Institute of
Chemical
Engineers
Margaret Stokkeland, Bert Shore,
Bruce Levelton, Mike Allen.
The object of the U.B.C. chapter of the American
Institute of Chemical Engineers is to provide
interest on the campus in Chemical Engineering,
and to this end all third and fourth year students
of chemical engineering are chapter members.
During the year the members presented technical papers to the chapter at the weekly meetings.
In addition, monthly meetings were held, when a
prominent graduate Chemical Engineer spoke on
his particular field.   Numerous field trips to local
chemical plants were sponsored by the Institute.
The social side was not neglected. The chapter
sponsored a dance held during the fall term, and
another function after the spring exams. In addition, fourth year students were guests of Dr. E. E*
Seyer at the annual "smoker."
Michael Allen was this year's president, with
Bert Shore as vice-president. John Simpson, Bruce
Levelton and Margaret Stokkeland were members
of the executive, and Dr. Seyer was counsellor.
G. M. Dawson
Club
A.  McGinn,   John Wheeler,  Don
Sutton.
The G. M. Dawson Club of U.B.C. includes
students in Geological, Mining and Metallurgical
Engineering, and Arts students majoring in Geology. The Club is a students' branch of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, and
attends its Western Annual meeting.
Weekly meetings were held throughout the year,
at which members presented papers. The reports
on subjects dealing with engineering problems
contributed to the furthering of interest in geologi
cal, mining and metallurgical engineering. At
monthly evening gatherings, talks were given by
outside speakers and faculty members. Following
these talks, discussions were held, and then members participated in social  gatherings.
Executive of the year consisted of Mr. H. M.
Wright, honorary president; John Wheeler, president; Andre Beguin, vice-president; Alex McGinn,
secretary-treasurer; Ken Warner, third year representative.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SEVEN Mathematics
Club
The Mathematics Club is open to all students
who are interested in mathematics, although most
of the members are in third and fourth years. In
the previous years of the club's existence, it has
had a membership of about 25 students, but this
year membership has reached the 50 mark. Formerly, meetings were held at the homes of the
individual members, but increased membership
this year forced the club members to hold their
meetings in Brock Hall. Meetings were held every
other week, the topic being chosen by the speaker.
Gordon   Latta,   Lorraine   Ourom,
Dick Gritten.
Conforming to precedent, the speakers were
chosen from the faculty for the first term, and
from the club members for the second term. Prizes
of books were awarded to those students giving
the best addresses of the year.
Executive was: Gordon Latta, president; Dean
Buchanan, honorary president; Richard Gritten,
vice-president; and Lorraine Ourom, secretary-
treasurer. Faculty members were honorary
members.
Gliding and
Soaring Club
A newcomer on the campus, the Thunderbird
Gliding and Soaring Club was formed last year
to further the interest of students in the building
and flying of gliders. All members, including veteran pilots with thousands of hours in the air, and
raw beginners, take part in this interesting sport.
They build and fly the gliders themselves.
In order to keep expenses down to a minimum,
most of the work is done by the members them-
Frank   Woodward,   Betty   Booth,
Chuck Webb.
selves.   They must maintain an active interest in
club activities to keep their flying privileges.
Membership this year had to be limited to fifty
students to permit each member to share in the
regular week-end flying trips to Lulu Island.
Executive for this year consisted of: President,
Frank Woodward; secretary, Betty Booth; treasurer, Chuck Webb. These students had the task
of organizing the various club activities.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   EIGHT American
Institute of
Electrical
Engineers
Bob   Lister,  John  Hannan,  Chris
McGregor, Bob Dundas.
The object of the American Institute of Electrical
Engineers Student Branch is to enable the students
to gain experience in the presentation of technical
papers and to introduce to them some of the subjects not included in the curriculum. To further
this end, the group featured a number of informal
talks by members themselves and arranged addresses by notable guest speakers.
Among the field trips made this year were a
trip to the B.C. Electric repair shops, one to the
Vogue theatre to study its equipment, and a weekend trip to the pulp mill at Powell River.
Guest speakers this year have included Mr. W.
Lind, who spoke on germicidal lighting, and M.
T. Ingledow, chief engineer of the B.C. Electric,
who dealt with the type of work an engineer may
expect on graduation.
This year's executive consisted of: Prof. W.
Coulthard, faculty counsellor; J. Hannan, president;
and Bob Lister, secretary-treasurer.
Pharmaceutica
Society
r,   J
Clxes Milles, Leonore Smith, Roy
Mank.
The Pharmaceutical Society is open to students
in the Pharmacy Department and to those first
year students planning to enter the department in
their second year. Membership in this past year
reached the 68 mark.
Meetings were held once every two weeks. At
these gatherings, guest speakers or members of
the faculty spoke on a phase of pharmaceutical
practice. These talks supplemented lectures and
gave the students some idea of what the pharma
ceutical field would offer them after graduation.
All the club's activities, however, were not consisted of the meetings. The members held a dance
and a banquet during the year, one in each term.
The Pharmaceutical Society's executive for the
year included Prof. Wood, honorary president;
Roy Mank, president; Leonore Smith, secretary;
Allan McArthur, treasurer; Ches Milles, vice-president; and Catherine Brown, publicity manager.
Mrs. P. Brewer was an honorary member.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   NINE Recognizing that the university, as a major centre
of learning, should also be one of the main centres
of chess in the province, U.B.C.'s Chess Club
increased its membership and planned new and
interesting activities to promote the popularity of
chess among the students.
These activities included the organization of a
mass chess meet of all lower mainland players,
radio matches with other universities, a continual
tournament among club members, instruction for
the newcomers, and lectures by local chess experts.
Chess Club
Frank   Phillips,   Gordon  Sanborn,
John  Lahti, Andy Malysheff.
One of the main chess highlights for the past
two years has been the tournaments between State
of Washington players and U.B.C. Another event
of ranking importance was the visit of George
Koltanowski to the campus. The blindfold champion gave lectures on chess and engaged in exhibition games.
This year's executive includes Frank Phillips,
president; Andrew Malysheff, vice-president; John
Lahti, secretary-treasurer; and Gordon Sanborn.
B.C. Teacher's
Federation
The University Branch of the B.C. Teachers'
Federation was formed in 1938 to interest students
of the education class in the B.C. Teachers' Federation. For the past three years the organization
experienced a slump and was not active until its
revival this year.
During the year the students of the education
class held bi-monthly meetings at noon hours. To
these sessions they invited guest speakers to talk on
subjects of interest to future teachers.  These talks
H. MacKirdy,  Fred Shirley, Jean
Pridham,   Hugh   Herbison,   Walt
Thumm.
were then subjected to discussion.  A purely social
evening was held during the spring term.
The B.C. Teachers' Federation is composed of
two types of members, active members or those
who have had previous teaching experience, and
many associate student teachers.
Executive for the 1946-47 session was: Harvey
McKirby, president; Hugh Herbison, vice-president: Jean Pridham, secretary-treasurer; Walter
Trumm, and Fred Shirley, executive members.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   TEN    . Forestry Club
Alan   Webster,    Trevor   Charles,
Bruce  Low,  Sam Parnum,  Dave
Ritchie.
The Forestry Club was organized to promote
interest in forestry among students by establishing
a closer contact between students and operators
in the lumber industry.
During the year, bi-monthly lectures were held
at which prominent members of the forestry industry spoke to the students. In the spring the club
published the annual "Forestry Club News Letter,"
outlining the year's activities of the club and
containing  addresses  of  members,  and  excerpts
from letters written by recent graduates in forestry.
During the first term the club sponsored the
"Foresters' Fall Frolic" in the Stanley Park Pavilion.
A banquet for all club members and guest speakers
of the year was the main social function of the
second term.
Members of this year's executive Were: Alan
Webster, Sam Parnum, Jack Roff, Bruce Low,
Trevor Charles and Dave Ritchie. Dr. R. G.
Griffith was honorary president of the club.
Civil
Engineering
Club
Bill   Robinson,   Ted   Greenaway,
Roy   Tinney,   Peter   Jones,   Eric
Jones.
The Civil Engineering Club was formed at the
beginning of the 1946-47 term by third and fourtb
year Civil Engineering students. Its main purpose
was to arouse interest in civil engineering among
students on the campus and to further professional
knowledge of club members through field trips
and talks given by practising engineers.
This year the club planned to take a long trip
outside Vancouver and several short field trips in
the city.  The meetings were held once every two
weeks, at which members heard addresses given
by practising engineers, and discussed topics concerning engineering problems.
In addition, the club sponsored several social
events such as dances and smokers. Athletics were
also included in the club's activities.
The executive of the club for 1946-47 included:
Mr. Heslop, honorary president; Ted Greenaway,
president; Peter Jones, vice-president; and Roy
Tinney, secretary-treasurer.
PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND ELEVEN Engineering
Institute
of Canada
The Engineering Institute of Canada, student
branch, is composed of students from all branches
of engineering. Its object is to foster interest in
the activities of the E.I.C. at the University and
to enable the students to become acquainted with
the members of the senior branch of the Institute.
During the year, the club sponsored addresses
by speakers on various engineering topics. Club
members were invited to attend the regular meetings of the Vancouver chapter of the E.I.C.   In
Bill   Bateman,   Al   Fletcher,   Ray
Pillman, Phil Herring.
the spring the Vancouver chapter held a student
night at which the student members were invited
to present papers on engineering subjects. These
papers usually dealt with engineering problems
and formed the basis for discussion.
The executive for this year consisted of: Phil
Herring, president; Bill Bateman, secretary-treasurer; Al Fletcher, vice-president; and Ray Pillman,
recording secretary. Prof. A. Peebles was the
Institute's honorary president.
The aims of Le Cercle Francais are to further
knowledge of the French language and culture
and to encourage students to take an interest in
the every-day life of the French people by learning
to speak the French language conversationally.
At the monthly meetings held at the homes of
members, guest speakers gave addresses on aspects
of French life and culture. Topics covered such
subjects as Art, Music, History, Poetry, and work
done at the French summer camps at Shawnigan
Le Cercle
Francaise
Iva Lisicka, Aline Ralston, Ricliard
Cooper.
Lake, Trois Pistoles and Banff. French music,
games, films and songs were introduced informally,
all of which enabled students to improve their
French. In addition, conversation groups were
held once a week for those who were interested,
and there was also a music group for those musically inclined.
The executive consisted of: Dr. D. Aish Metford,
honorary president; Aline Roulston, president;
Richard Cooper, vice-president; and Iva Lisicka,
secretary-treasurer.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   TWELVE American
Institute of
Chemical
Engineers
Margaret Stokkeland, Bert Shore,
Bruce Levelton, Mike Allen.
The local chapter of the American Institute of
Chemical Engineers purports, through its weekly
meetings, to give its members experience in presenting and discussing technical papers and to
foster interest in the development of the profession
of chemical engineering.
Comprised of all students in fourth and fifth
year chemical engineering as well as chemistry
students in arts, the group offers prizes for outstanding papers presented at the meetings.
Social events, instructional films and field trips
serve to round out the year's activities.
Because the Institute awards charters only to
universities with high standards, the members are
justly proud of their organization. It is the only
student branch in Canada.
The executive for the year 1946-47 was coin-
prised of: President, Neil Henderson; vice-president, Frank Black; and recording secretary-treasurer, Dave Downs. The honorary president was
Dr. J. Allan Harris.
:■'.-..
Letters Club
Grahame Thomson, Neil Wilson.
The Letters Club, the oldest discussion group
on the campus, formed to encourage the studv
of literature as a joy, extended its scope this year
to include other allied arts. Papers presented
during this last season covered a wide field and
included the following topics: "The Two Great
Mysteries of Wilkie Collins" by Sherwood Anderson; G. K. Chesterton's "Modern Art"; A. E. (G. W.
Russel) Hendrik Willem Van Loon; A. E. Hous-
man, "The Hollow Men" and "The Two Solitudes";
"Canadian Poetrv and Words on Words"; and the
"Critics Criticized".
According to club tradition, papers were given
at each of the bi-monthly meetings by fourth year
members. After the reading of the subject matter,
the topic was open for general discussion. Highlighting the year was the Original Contribution
Night. Executive: Dr. Edmund Morrison, honorary
president; Neil Wilson, president; and Grahame
Thomson, secretary-treasurer.
.    PACE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTEEN rr     ■» 'r,*-'^ <
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The Varsity Christian Fellowship having as its
motto "To know Christ and to make Him known"
has sought to witness the reality and power of
Jesus Christ in every sphere of life. In keeping
with this purpose, the group presented a well-
balanced program including meetings, discussions,
firesides and conferences. Through the year, meetings were held at which guests were invited to
speak about topics pertaining to the group's motto.
Besides Bible discussions, devotionals, and other
serious  events,  the  members  of   the  fellowship
Varsity
Christian
Fellowship
Jim Westman, Lenore Matheson,
Bob Cox, Jean Oben, Bob
Hampton, Joy Curran, Bill Taylor.
participated in intra-mural sports.
However, constant emphasis was placed on the
personal relationship of God through Christ as a
Saviour.
Executive members were Bob Hampton, president; Jean Oben, vice-president; Lenore Matheson,
secretary; Bob Cox, treasurer; Joy Curran, membership secretary; Bill Taylor, publicity manager;
Jim Westman, missionary secretary; John Hindle,
junior member; and Les Babb, engineers' representative.
The Chinese Students' Club was organized to
promote friendly relations among the Chinese students. All Chinese students on entering U.B.C.
automatically become members.
This year's program consisted of social gatherings, discussion meetings and projects for service
and charity. A Frosh reception to initiate Freshmen was held at the beginning of the year. During
the winter months, very successful nights of bowling, a campaign to sell Christmas cards for China
Chinese Club
Mun   Lum,   Vivian   Wong,   Wah
Wong, Gertrude Lee, Lily Chung,
Gilbert Thom.
Student Relief, and a matric social to acquaint the
high school students with the university and its
life, occupied the time and efforts of the members.
A final grad banquet which alumni, under-gradu-
ates, ex-students attended, completed the term.
Members of the executive were: Wah Wong,
president; Gertrude Lee, vice-president; Lillian
Chung, secretary; Mun Lum, treasurer; Vivian
Wong, literary director; and Gilbert Thom, social
convenor.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FOURTEEN The Economics
Society
Paul   Sultan,   Helen   Foster,   Bill
McKay.
The Economics Society was organized for the
purpose of discussing current economic problems
of local or world-wide interest. This year, several
members of the Faculty, as well as outside speakers, gave talks which formed the basis of the
meetings' discussion.
Dr. R. M. Clark spoke at the first meeting on
"The Municipal and Provincial Income Tax in
Canada," and Prof. DuVall of the Sociology Department, and Prof. E. H. Soward of the History
Department spoke to this group during the year.
It was the usual practice to have a paper presented
by some senior student on the subject of his thesis.
This year, to allow for greater participation with
an expanded membership, the club utilized the
panel procedure. Three students presented different aspects of the topic "The Economics of
Overhead Costs."
The executive for 1946-47 was as follows: Honorary president, Prof. H. F. Angus; president, Paul
Sultan; vice-president, Bill McKay; secretary-treasurer, Helen Foster.
The Historical
Society
Don Holms, Ken Meredith,  Don
Oliver.
The Historical Society this year was composed
of thirty honor students. The Club aimed not only
to provide an interesting series of discussions, but
also to stimulate the study of topics that would
prove useful to history grads in the future.
This year the Society chose as its topic "The
Study of Historical Writing." Interesting papers
were presented by both members of the faculty
and students. Each reading was followed by
vigorous   discussion   and   argument   among   club
members. It was felt that this concentration upon
one specific topic was of value to all students as it
provided a very necessary background for all
students interested in historical study.
Activities closed with a banquet at which members of the Historical Department were guests of
the Society.
Executive for the past year consisted of: Don
Oliver, president; Don Holms, vice-president; and
Ken Meredith, secretary.
PAGE    TWO     HUNDRED    AND    FIFTEEN The Newman Club is composed of Roman
Catholic students interested in promoting fellowship among the Catholic students. The purpose of
the club is to forward the development of Catholic
culture, a deeper understanding of the Catholic
faith, and the application of the faith to pertinent
problems in world affairs.
This year the Newman Club had a membership
of one hundred and fifty active members. The size
of the club demanded centralization of all activities.
Newman Club
Fred Hood, Vivian Verrall, Bernard
Beesley.
This was achieved by forming a set of discussion
groups small enough to hold bi-monthly meetings
in private homes. General meetings were held
once a month at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Hall
after communion and communion breakfast.
-Executive for the past year were Marguerite
Byrnes, president; Jerry McGuigan, vice-president;
Fred Hoad, treasurer; Bernard Beesley, corresponding secretary; and Vivian Varrall, recording
secretary.
The Christian Science Organization at U.B.C.
was formed this year under the provisions of the
Manual of "The Mother Church, The First Church
of Christ," by Mary Baker Eddy. The organization
is similar to others of its kind which are found at
most major universities, both in Canada and the
United States, and in countries abroad.
The U.B.C. Organization was formed so that
every student might have some opportunity of
learning more about Christian Science   and also
Christian
Science Club
Doug Leiterman, Merle Davidson,
Eric Hopkins, Norma Dillabough,
John  Barltrop,  Ben  Gibson,  Bob
Young.
to benefit students of this faith on the campus.
Activities of the organization this year have
included bi-monthly religious meetings and an
annual Christian Science Lecture. A number of
social evenings were also held during the year.
Officers of the Organization elected for this
year were: Robert M. Young, president; Douglas
S. Leiterman, vice-president; Merle Davidson, secretary; John Barltrop, treasurer; Ben Gibson, and
Norma Dillabough.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND    SIXTEEN Women's
Public
Speaking Club
Doreen  White,   May  Johnston,
Hazel Greenwood.
Enthusiastic interest was shown in the Women's
Public Speaking Club this year, with a membership
tripled over that of last year. Members were kept
busy with meetings held weekly in the Stage Room
of Brock Hall. During the fall term, Mrs. Elsie
Graham gave the class instruction in the methods
and the technique of public speaking. A short
speech was made by each member of the class and
criticized by the class and instructor.
In  the  spring,   discussions   and   debates   were
held, some being open to outsiders. Several guests
also addressed the club, speaking about the relation of public speaking to various professions such
as law, teaching, and radio-announcing. Public
speaking as an aid to leaders of clubs and organizations was also emphasized.
Executive for the past year consisted of May
Johnston, president; IDoreen White, vice-president;
and Hazel Greenwood, secretary. Mrs. Creighton
was honorary president of the club.
Men's Public
Speaking Club
Douglas Strong, John Archer,
Frank Phillips.
Promotion of self-confidence and self-assurance
through experience in public speaking and debating is the chief function of the Men's Public
Speaking Club. It was felt by the members that
the club had proven helpful and beneficial to them
by forcing them to get up and speak before their
fellow students and the instructor at the club
meetings. Subjects ranged from "Public Ownership of Canadian Railroads" to the "Practicability
of Women's Hats."
The experienced, constructive criticism offered
by the club's mentor, Mr. T. J. Baynes, was invaluable in improving the platform manner and speech
delivery of speakers. Many students, by entering
such organizations as the Parliamentary Forum,
have already fulfilled the club's aim that those
who participate will leave U.B.C. fully qualified
to express themselves before large meetings and
assemblies in a creditable fashion.
Executive was as follows: Frank Phillipps, president; John Archer, vice-president; and Douglas
Strong, secretary.
.    PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND    SEVENTEEN B'nai B'rith
Hillel
Foundation
Jewish students on entering the University of
British Columbia automatically become members
of B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation. The society's
aims are educational and cultural. Throughout the
year, general meetings were held every second
week, where guests were invited to speak to the
society on topics of interest pertaining to the
various phases of Jewish education, problems
affecting college students, and current events.
Plans to form informal discussion groups and
Bud    Gurevitch,    Ruth    Becker,
Audrey Goldberg, Marcia Steiman.
groups consisting of those members particularly
interested in Jewish music were conceived by the
executive. In addition, sports and social events
were held.
Executive members were Bud Gurevitch, president; Audrey Goldberg, vice-president; Len Hyman,
treasurer; Ruth Becker, secretary; Marcia Steiman,
educational chairman; Lil Archeck, social activities;
Will Becker, sports; Kelly Cohen, publicity; and
Molly Levison, circulation manager.
University
Band
Much of the pep and spirit at the University's
athletic functions could be attributed to the University Band.
The band, which consisted of about forty musicians, has played at the football and basketball
games throughout the year and has participated in
downtown parades sponsored by U.B.C.
In past years, John Bayfield has been the very
capable and enthusiastic leader of the band. The
University Band of today is largely the result of
Gordon Baum, Harvey Anderson,
Mr.   Arthur   Delamont,   Wallace
Robson.
his devoted labor.
It was regretted that this year Bayfield had
found his course too heavy to carry on his former
position, which was, however, in the hands of the
able president, Gordon Baum, who was also president of the freshmen class.
The members of the band felt they were
extremely fortunate in having such an excellent
director as Mr. Arthur Delamont, who has been
with the band for the last ten years.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTEEN  J£'asss
n n
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1. Trailer Camp at Acadia. 2. President MacKenzie Trips the Light Fantastic. 3. Play-time. 4. Christmas Comes
to the Camp. 5. Sunshine for Acadia Baby. 6. Time O ut for Coffee. 7. Dinner Line-up. 8. The Family Studies.
9. May I Have This Dance, Mrs. MacKenzie? 10. Mo re Dinner Line-up. 11. Mopping the Decks. 12. Home Ec
Students' Skill Is Appreciated Here.   13.    Bird'* Ej/. Vteu) of the Camp.
Camps Are Cosy . . .
U.B.C, as well as providing university education
for a student body three times her pre-war enrollment, has succeeded in housing comfortably more
than 1,000 students. This has been accomplished
by speedy conversion of army huts into living
quarters. Fort and Acadia camp, within a short
distance of the campus, accommodate the greater
proportion of the students, while camps for married
students on Little Mountain and at Lulu Island
house 70 and 37 families respectively. Although a
far cry from the ivy-covered stone structures
usually associated with a university residence, a
steam heated modern hut, students enthusiastically
agree, "be it ever so humble" to the exterior view,
makes a cosy home.
In consideration of the fact that the University,
prior to the war, took no hand in the housing of
students, this step is not a small one. Before the
war, students were expected to make their own
arrangements for board and lodging with outside
householders or  co-operative residences.
When such facilities proved inadequate, owing
to the tremendous veteran influx, the university
administration realized that unless accommodation
was found or created for the surplus of some 2,000
persons, these people simply would not be able to
attend the University. They realized at the same
time that they were undertaking a project considered by most to be utterly impossible. There
is today no record of any student having been
turned away because he could not find a place to
live.  A magnificent tribute.
Moving spirit behind organization of the units
is Dr. Shrum, in charge of temporary buildings.
Placement of the huts has been carefully supervised so that the scenic beauty of the campus is
not marred. Dr. Shrum sees in Fort and Acadia
camp the first step toward establishment of residences on the campus. Both camps are models of
co-operative community living.
Acadia, the larger of the two, has grown from
the nucleus of a former provincial government
forestry camp. It is situated just off university
Boulevard, a 15-minute walk from the campus.
Army huts at Acadia, and neighbouring Westbrook
Crescent, house approximately 400 single men, 90
single women, and 117 families. Many staff members, including Dr. MacKenzie, live at Acadia, and
Westbrook. A nursery school for 100 children
under five has been established.
Students and staff mingle together in dinner
line-ups, and many animated discussions are had,
lingering over after-dinner cups of coffee. Students
are from all parts of Canada, and many come from
other countries. Centre for community activity is
the large recreation hall. It is the scene of weekly
dances, and Sunday it is used for Sunday school
and an evening non-denominational church service
conducted by the resident padre, the Reverend
John Stewart.
.   PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-ONE 1.    Those Co-op Furnaces are Troublesome.  2.     Obviously He Doesn't Read Signs.   3.    Tomorrow's Lunches in the
Making.   4.    Myself, I prefer Redheads.   5.   Well, what do you want? Right: Glimpses of life in a Co-op house.
Co-ops Carry On . . .
Acadia kitchen is under the administration of
the Home Economics Department. "Lab work" in
Acadia kitchens gives student dieticians an opportunity to gain practical experience.
Unique feature of Acadia are two trailer camps
with approximately 45 trailers. The university
provides trailer residents with water, electricity,
and washing facilities.
Both Fort and Acadia have established self-
government, and hold camp meetings where stu-
___B*s~_aay--voice opinions -or-grievances. February
12, Acadia was constituted with a formal government. Prior to this, a student camp committee had
been in charge. Bob Currie heads the Acadia
camp executive, with Anne Galloway vice-president, and Betty Brown secretary-treasurer. Grant
Dow and Tommy Harris are liaison officers for the
camp proctor and university respectively. Dave
Witchell, Jack Stone, and Bill Crowe are respective
chairmen of entertainment, sports, and messing
committees.
Acadia camp council, as well as executive members, consists of a representative from each hut,
from each of the two trailer camps, and from
student householders.
Since the camp is not constituted under the
Alma Mater Society, much responsibility for the
operation of the camp is in the hands of this governing body. All matters of discipline and rules
governing behavior in the camp are handled
entirely by the organization. The laws of camp
procedure are not severe, and enforcement is left
largely to the honor of the residents. The fact
that the system actually works is alone a tribute
to the communal spirit of settlement.
In a less sober vein, the Acadia Council has also
been responsible for a full year of on-camp dances
and other social functions. The nightly discussions
of God, American beer, the afterlife, women, and
methods of cooking chem labs were usually of a
more impromptu nature.
Fort camp, nestling on a point overlooking
Howe Sound, has one of the best views in the
area. Arrangements at Fort are similar to Acadia,
but it is for men students only. The kitchen is
under the administration of Mr. Frank Underhill.
Three hundred and fifty men students live at Fort.
A student-run non-profit canteen provides funds
for camp improvement.
As is the case with Acadia camp, a student gov-
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-TWO  1.    Students Work at Union College.   2.    They Play, Too.    3.    Devotional.   4.    The College.
. . Anglican And Union
erning body has been set up at Fort camp. This
group holds the responsibility of enforcing a degree
of discipline among the resident students. Elected
from the enrollment by popular vote, the council
dictates laws of behavior for the settlement.
Boasting a full social year, the council also convened a series of parties, dances, and stag affairs
which became uniquely popular among the exam-
tired males.
Competitive games of basketball, badminton and
table tennis took place during the year between
Fort and Acadia. Dr. Shrum hopes for further
development of sports and debates between the
two camps next year.
Although probably unknown to many students
but warm in the hearts of the seventy-odd people
who commute daily along Broadway and up Oak,
U.B.C. also claims a third student residence. It
is the Little Mountain family residence encampment. Here, in a number of hutments abandoned
by the Canadian Army, dwell more than seventy
married couples and their children. In most but
not all cases it is the male members of the household that makes the daily pilgrimage to Point Grey
while the wives  stay home  and vie  with  their
neighbors in inventing new and different ways to
make a four-room army hut liveable.
A similar establishment is located on Lulu Island,
the sandy delta at the mouth of the Fraser. Here,
students say, the chief difficulty is that of transportation because the camp is situated at about
the centre of the Island and requires a ninety-
minute trip by streetcar and tram which, for 8:30's,
is "rough". An abandoned anti-aircraft gun emplacement, the group of drab huts now form cosy
homes for almost forty married couples and their
children.
Oldest student residences, the first to be organized on the U.B.C. campus, are the boarding
houses operated by the Students' Co-operative
Association. Financed entirely by the subscriptions
of the student residents, who become members of
the Association rather than simply pay rent, the
organization operated five large rooming houses
before the war. Now, because of high real estate
prices and the difficulty of obtaining buildings in
the Point Grey area, the Association owns only one
men's house and rents a second for women.
Applications far outnumber the accommodation
capacity   available,   and   the   Association   hopes,
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-FOUR 1.    Close Harmony.   2.    Memorial Window. 3.   Anglican  College.   4.    They'll pass.
Absorb Extra Students
some day, to own a number of their own buildings.
Each of the two houses are supervised by house
mothers who prepare the evening meal. Housekeeping, laundry, and the balance of the cooking
is done by the students themselves.
Friendly relations exist between the men and
women of the two houses. Each Thursday night
several of the girls dine at the men's house, while
a number of the men fill the vacant seats at the
girls' table. These exchanges are rotated each
week so that the students may become better
acquainted. The social program is carried further
by a series of dances and parties attended by the
members of the two houses.
To further supplement the sorely pressed housing
facilities on the campus, four of the Greek Letter
Societies now operate Fraternity houses. Phi Delta
Theta has had a house situated at the corner of
Tenth Avenue and Wallace Crescent for a number
of years, as has Phi Kappa Pi on Cedar Crescent.
During the summer of 1946, Beta Theta Pi purchased a house on Twelfth Avenue near Granville
Street. The local chapter of Zeta Psi also moved
into a house on Sixth and Blanca in the fall of this
year. These houses, while serving as meeting places
and social function accommodation, also house a
number of the members of the respective groups.
Union and Anglican theological colleges have
taken in other students to ease the emergency
housing situation.
Of these two affiliates of U.B.C, Union College
is the larger, being of the Gothic style. Its stately
spire is seen rising behind Brock Hall. Anglican
College is the stuccoed Tudor building that nestles
amid shrubbery behind Union College. Both
schools offer courses leading to the degrees of
B.D. and D.D. and work in close conjunction with
the University.
One generation ago, U.B.C. was founded in the
huts now nostalgically referred to as the "Fairview
Shacks". This was in the unsettled era following
the first Great War. Today, in the equally troubled
era following the second Great War, the cycle has
repeated, and U.B.C. again turns to huts in time
of emergency. This time it was the emergency of
student housing, doubtless the greatest single
problem presented.
Now that the peak enrollment has passed and
the University is beginning to settle back to a
regular strength of an estimated 4,000, the administration can justly look back on a monumental
task well done.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-FIVE universities fhe undergraduate
ifs'represent simply the enrollment of
students attending the school and proceeding to degree. At the University of
British Columbia, however, the undergraduate body is actually an integral pari
of the school. As is so well exemplified
in our history, it has always been fhe
students ot the time who have contributed
to the wealth of tradition which has made
British Columbia's only university what if
is today.
It has been through the industry ot
student drives and campaigns that U.B.C.
has gained the Stadium, Brock Memorial
Hall, the old Gymnasium, and is soon fo
gain fhe new War Memorial Gymnasium
and a Medical Faculty. It is with pride
that we introduce you now to the new
graduates of 1947 and to fhe current
classes of undergraduates. May they
continue to fulfill the heritage set for them. .
1
4
Ik
■ti^'"
I4
s
.• ,lV_'.»f
?     Af. Ralph Huene, Heather Blundell, Robert Call.
'47 Grads Gain B. A. Reward
Robert Cail, President.
This year, as in every other faculty, the graduating class in Arts and Science is the largest the
University has ever seen. Most of the responsibility
of running the expanded post-war campus fell, as
usual, to the graduating class, and the Arts '47
did not shirk its duty.
Typical of the hard-working senior was Joy
Donegani, who acted as secretary of the Students'
Council. Barbara Kelsberg headed all women's
activities as president of the Women's Undergraduate Society, and Mary Clark served as fourth year
representative. The position of secretary of the
U.S.C. was filled bv Heather Blundell.
On the Publications Board, Jack Ferry, editor-
in-chief, managed to put out three papers a week
with amazing dexterity, and placed the Ubyssey
high in the ranks of college newspapers. The editing of the Totem fell to Jean MacFarlane, pubster
of long standing, and Nancy MacDonald held the
important position of News Manager.
Pat Fowler, a Pre-Med student, has probably
done more than anyone else on the campus towards making a medical school at the University
of British Columbia a reality in the near future.
The executive was elected at the close of the
fall term and consisted of Bob Cail, president;
Ralph Huene, vice-president; and Heather Blundell,
secretary.
PAGE   TWO    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-EIGHT ABEAR, PETER T. - Kamloops
Maj., Bact, Zoo., Pre-Med., Co-op.
ADKIN,  EDMOND Y. -Vancouver
Maj., Math.
, AYERS, JOHN D. L. - Vancouver
Hon. Math.
BAILLIE, CHRISTINE M. - Victoria
Maj., Zoo.; Phrateres, Pre-Med., Badminton.
ALLEN, ELLA K. - Victoria
Hon. English, Latin.
ALLEN, HARRY J. - Vancouver
Maj., History, Political Sc.; Publications.
BAMPTON, DIANA  L. - Vancouver
Maj., Economics; Alpha Delta Pi.
BAMPTON, VIRGINIA F. - Vancouver
Maj.,  Gov't.; Alpha Delta Pi,  V.O.C,
Badminton, Tennis.
AMY, PETER R. - New Westminster
Maj., History, English; V.C.F.
ANDERSON, GEO. C. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Psych.; Phi Kappa Pi.
BARCLAY-ROSS, MIGNON L. - Vancouver
Maj., English, Psych.;  Delta Gamma,
Psych. Club, Badminton.
BARKER, JAMES F. -Vancouver
Maj., History, English.
ANDREWS, J. H. M. - Shawnigan Lake
Maj., English; S.C.M.
ANGUS, MICHAEL F. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., English; Kappa Rho Tau, Skiing.
BARRITT, DOROTHY E. - Chilliwack
Maj., English; Mussoc, Badminton.
BARRETT, IZADORE - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Psych.
ARCHER, DOUGLAS H. - Vancouver
Hon. Math., Physics; Physics Club.
ARMOUR, JOHN D. H. - Vancouver
Maj., English, History.
BARTHOLOMEW, MARION Y.-N'th Vancouver
Hon. Gov't; Alpha Gamma Delta, I.R.C.
BEARD, JAMES S. - Vancouver
Maj., English, Econ.; Radio Soc., Cricket.
ARNOLD, SHIRLEY J. - New Westminster
Maj., English, History; S.C.M.
ASHFORD, MINNIE - Vancouver
Maj.,  History, Psych.; Golf.
BELL, DOREEN C. -Victoria
Maj., Commerce.
BELL, GERTRUDE M. - Ladner
Maj., Zoo.; Alpha  Delta Pi, Pre-Med.
Mardi Gras Chorus Material.
Hoarding Sugar.
PAGE   TWO    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-NINE BELTZ, JOHN E. - Vancouver
Maj., Math., Physics; Skiing
BENNIE, JAMES R. - Vancouver
Maj., French; Table Tennis.
BROCKHOUSE, BERT N. - Vancouver
Hon. Math., Physics; Pari. Forum
BROUGH, ROSEMARY J. -Vancouver
Hon. Psych., Soc; Alpha Omicron Pi, Swimming.
BERRINGER, DONALD A.-Victoria
Maj., English, Hist.
BETHUNE, WINONA J. -Victoria
Maj., Zoo.
BROWN,  BETTY  B. -Vancouver
Maj., Econ.
BROWN,  DONALD G. -Vancouver
Hon. Phil.; S.C.M., Badminton
BLAIR, GORDON H. -Vancouver
Maj., Zoo.; Pre-Med.
BLAIS, ANDREE U.-Vancouver
Hon. French; Gamma Phi Beta; Newman Club.
BRUCE,   CHARLES   A.-Vancouver
Maj., Math., Physics.
BUNTING, ISOBEL J. G. - Fort Fraser
Maj.,   French,  English;   S.C.M.
BLACK, FRANK - Kelowna
Hon. Chem.
BLUNDELL, HEATHER - Vancouver
Maj., French, Spanish; Delta Gamma,
Archery,  U.S.C.
BURDEN, MARJORIE D. - Victoria
Maj., History, Econ.
BURKE, HAROLD H. -Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Bact.; Beta Theta Pi.
BOBBITT, WALTER P. - Penticton
Maj., Math., Hist.
BOOTH, ELIZABETH A. - Vancouver
Maj.,  Math., Physics; T.G.S.C.
BURNETT, A. - Nanaimo
BURNS, MARGARET M. -  Vancouver
Maj., Psych., English; Alpha Omicron Pi,
Newman Club.
BOULTBEE,  PATRICIA H. - Vancouver
Maj., Econ., Psych.; Kappa Kappa Gamma.
BOYLE, FRED A. - Vancouver
Maj., Math., Biology; Basketball
BURTON,  JOHN   A.-Vancouver
Hon. Math.; Sigma Phi Delta, Golf, Skiing.
BUTCHER, PAMELA A. - Saanich
Players Club.
And It Works, Too.
Night Life in the Library.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY BYRNES,  MARGUERITE  L. -Vancouver
Maj.,  History,  English;   Newman,
Phrateres, Mussoc.
CAIL, ROBERT E. -Vernon
Hon. History.
COLES, JOHN M. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Psych., Golf, Tennis.
COLLINS,  JUNE  V.  V. -Vancouver
Maj., Psych.,  Soc; Alpha Delta Pi.
CARRE, HILARY M. - Westbank
Maj.,  Physics,  Chem.;   Swimming
CASTER, GARNET H. -Zephyr, Out.
Maj., History.; Film,  Psych., Badminton.
COOLS, ADRIENNE E. - Okanagan Centre
Maj., Zoo., Bact.; Pre-Med., Players, Badminton.
CORBOULD, SHIRLEY M. - New Westminster
Maj., French, German; Language Club.
CASTILLOU, HARRY G. -Vancouver
Hon. Botany; Kappa Sigma, Ubyssey,
Pari. Forum.
CHAMPION, WILLIAM - Vancouver
Hon. Chem.; Chem. Soc.
COSTLEY,  LLOYD   J. -Vancouver
Maj., Math., English.
COURT, REGINALD A.-Vancouver
Maj., Math., English.
CHOW, RICHARD H. - Vancouver
Hon. Physics, Math.; Physics Soc.
CHUNG, LILIAN B. -Victoria
Maj., French, English; Chinese  Varsity,
Phrateres.
CRAIG, MARGARET H. - Chemainus
Maj., French, History.
CRAPKO, ONYSIA -Eburne
Maj., English, French; French, Psych. Clubs.
CLARK,   BEVERLEY  M. - Victoria
Maj., Psych, English; Kappa Alpha Theta, Golf.
CLARK, MARY E. - Ocean Falls.
Maj., Soc; Alpha Phi, Mussoc, Phrateres,
Mamooks.
CROOK,   LOIS   M. -Vancouver
Maj., English, History; Letters, Archery Clubs.
CUPPLES, JAMES F. B. - Victoria
Maj., Zoo., Biology; Biol. Disc. Club.
CLEARIHUE, JOYCE G. - Victoria
Hon. Bact., Zoo.; Pre-Med., V.O.C, Skiing.
COLE,  DESMOND W.-Vancouver
Maj., English, History; Tennis.
DAIN,   DORIS   M.  R. - Kelowna
Maj., English, History; Mussoc, Letters Club.
DARLING, JOHN G. - Victoria
Hon. English; Players, Letters Clubs, Golf.
Last Bus Home.
Camera Shy.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-ONE DAVIDSON, IAN J.-Vancouver
Maj., Gov't, History; Skiing.
DAVIE, JESSIE M. - Vancouver
Maj., Biology, English; Mussoc.
DUNFORD, FRED A. - Vancouver
Maj., English.
EBERLEIN,   EDWARD   G. - Cranbrook
Maj., History, Geog.
DAWE, ALAN E. - Vancouver
Maj., English, Phil.; Letters Club, Thunderbird.
DAYKIN, PHILIP N. - Vancouver
Hon. Math., Physics; V.O.C.
EDWARDS, THOMAS HARVEY - Vancouver
Hon. Physics, Math.; Phi Kappa Sigma, Tennis.
ELLIS, CATHERINE D. - Vancouver
Maj., English; Alpha Gamma Delta.
DINWOODY,  WILLIAM   H. - Vancouver
Hon. History; Hockey.
DOBBIN, MARY M. - Westbank
Maj., Psych., Soc; Phrateres.
EPSTEIN, ROCHELLE - Vancouver
Maj., Psych., English; Delta Phi Epsilon;
Radio Club.
EVANS, ALFRED E. - Vancouver
Maj., English, History; Publications.
DOLMAGE, MARY E. - Vancouver
Maj., English, Psych.; Gamma Phi Beta,
Phrateres.
DONEGANI, JOYCE A. P. - Eburne
Maj., Zoo., Bact.; Gamma Phi Beta.
FAGAN,  MARY S.-Capilano
Maj.,  English, History; Delta  Gamma,
Dramatic Club.
FARINA, MARGARET R. - Vancouver
Maj., English, Psych.; Alpha Phi.
DOWN, DAVID C. - Vancouver
Hon. Chem.
DOWNMAN, LORNA M. S. - Duncan
Hon. French, English.
FERRY, JACK - Vancouver
Maj., Comm.; Zeta Psi.
FIDDES, I. H.
DRIVER, MARGARET W. J. - Kamloops
Maj., Zoo.; Alpha Delta Pi.
DRYBURGH, NORA A. - Victoria
Maj., English, History; Kappa Alpha Theta.
FLEMING, ROBERT E. - Nelson
Maj., Math., Physics.
FOERSTER, DARRYL K. - Nanaimo
Hon. Zoo.; Beta Theta Pi.
Drugstore Ad.
Lovely Group,
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-TWO FORD, MARGARET J. - New Westminster
Maj., English, Psvch.; Phrateres.
FOSTER, HELEN G. - Calgary
Hon. Econ.; S.C.M.
GILMOUR, WILLIAM S. - North Vancouver
Maj., Geog.
GOODWIN, GWENDOLINE F. - St. Catherines
Maj., Bact., Zoo.; Phrateres, V.O.C.
FOWLER, PAT S. C - Riondel
Maj., Zoo., Psych.; Sigma Tau Chi,
Players, V.O.C.
FRANCIS, DONALD W. - Ganges
Maj., Chem., Zoo.; Swimming.
GOWANS, JOHN R. - Grand Forks
Maj., Math., Chem.
GRAHAM, JOHN F. - Vancouver
Hon. Econ.; Pari. Forum, Tennis.
FROLIC, GORDON E. - Port Arthur
Maj., Econ.; Jokers, Swimming.
FUOCO, JOHN R. - Kamloops
Maj., Zoo.
GRANBERG, INGRID H. - Britannia Beach
Hon. Biology, Botany; V.O.C, Skiing.
GRANHOLD, ELLA M. - Port Coquitlam
Maj., French, English; Phrateres, Basketball.
FYFE, MARGARET N. - Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Soc; Alpha Delta Pi.
GALT, WILLIAM T. -Vancouver
Maj., English, Econ.; Delta Upsilon,
Publications.
GRANT, GORDON B. - Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Econ.
GRANT, KENNETH H. -Vancouver
Maj., Chem., Biology; Band.
GAY, WILLIAM G. -Vancouver
Maj., History, English.
GILBERT, SHIRLEY E. - North Vancouver
Maj., French, Psych.; Phrateres, Mussoc.
GRANT, PATRICK C. - Vancouver
Maj., English, History.
GRANT, WINIFRED D. - Whonnock
Maj., French, English; Cercle Francais,
Badminton.
GILLIES, MARY L. - Vancouver
Maj., Bact.; Kappa Kappa Gamma.
GILMORE, JOHN W. -Vancouver
Maj., History, English; Jokers, Pari. Forum,
Tennis.
GRATTON-SMITH, DOROTHY G. - Victoria
Maj., Soc,  English; Golf.
GRAVLIN,  RAYMOND  G. -Victoria
Maj., English; Swimming.
!_/ ^
Nonsense, won't  hear  of it
Dr. Sage and North America.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-THREE rr- .- -•
GRAY,  DUNCAN S. - Trail
Hon. Econ.; S.C.M., Golf.
GRAYSTON, IRENE  K. -White Rock
Maj., English, History; I.R.C.
HAYES, EAN - Vancouver
Hon. English;  Jazz Soc.
HEISE, JACK K. -Vancouver
Maj., Math., Physics; Mamooks.
GREENAWAY, ELLEN U.-White Rock
Maj.,  History,  English.
GREENWOOD, HAZEL V. E. - Fort Langley
Maj.,  French, Gov't; Phrateres, W.P.S.C,
Basketball.
HENDERSON, JAMES S. -Vancouver
Maj., English,  History;  Golf.
HENDERSON, NEIL J. - Kelowna
Hon. Chem.
GREGORY,  DORIS - Vancouver
Hon. Psych., Phil.
GRITTEN, RICHARD A. - Powell River
Hon. Math.; U.S.C, V.O.C.
HICK, WM. B. M. - Victoria
Hon. Zoo.; V.C.F., Pre-Med.
HILL, ERNEST D. O. - Vancouver
Maj., English,  History;  Radio Soc.
GROVER, FRED W. -Vancouver
Maj.,  Chem., Zoo.; Alpha Delta Phi;
Pre-Med., Golf.
HANSON, MARY V. - Victoria
Maj., Math., Physics; Jazz Club.
HILLIER, FRANCES C. - Vancouver
Maj., Bact.; Gamma Phi Beta, Newman.
HINES, RONALD G. - Vancouver
HARKNESS, ALAN C. - Victoria
Hon. Chem.; Chem. Inst.
HARRIS, IAN W. E. - Victoria
Hon.  Chem.; Badminton.
HO, ARTHUR - Vancouver
Maj., Bact.
HO, HENRY J. - Vancouver
Maj., Chem., Zoo.; Chinese Varsity, Soccer.
HARTLEY, G. - Victoria
Basketball.
HAWKENS, LUCILL - Vancouver
Maj., German; Mussoc.
HOLDER,  CLINTON  E. - Victoria
Hon.   Econ.;  V.C.F.
HOLMAN, DAVID T. - Vancouver
Maj., History, English; Mussoc, Radio Soc.
&M
Chant Speaks at Legion Initiation.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-FOUR
Bridge 200. HOLMES, KATHLEEN - Raymond, Alta.
Maj., English, French; Mussoc.
HOLMGREN, ERIC J. - Nekon
Maj., History, English; Mussoc, Camera Club.
JAMES, MORTON S. - Vancouver
Maj., English, Psych.; Tennis.
JANZEN, WESLEY H. - Vancouver
Maj., History, English.
HOLT, BERNARD C. - Vancouver
Hon. Econ.; Golf.
HOLT, MARGARET C. - New Westminster
Maj., History, Geog.
JENVEY,  GERALD J. -Vancouver
Maj., Math., German; Mussoc, Rugby.
JOHN, THOMAS W. - Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Zoo.; Beta Theta Pi.
HORWOOD, BERTRAM I.-Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Psych.; Phi Gamma Delta, Football.
HOURSTON,  WILLIAM  R. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Chem.; Golf.
JOHNSON, GLADYS M. -Victoria
Maj., English, History.
JOHNSTON, ALEX C. -Vancouver
Maj., English.
HOVELAQUE, JOSEPHINE M. - Victoria
Maj., English, French; Badminton.
HUDSON, JESSIE M. -Vancouver
Hon. Bact.;  Phrateres.
JOHNSTON,   MAY  S. - Ladysmith
Maj., English, French; Alpha Omicron Pi,
V.O.C, W.P.S.C
JONES, BARBARA M. - Vancouver
Hon, History;  Delta Gamma, Hist. Soc.
HUGHES, HILDA W. -Victoria
Maj., History, English; Badminton.
HUSTON, MAVIS R. - Ashcroft
Maj., History, Psych.
JUTTE, AUDREY D. - Vancouver
Hon. Bact.;  Phrateres,  V.O.C.
KEAST, RUSSELL R. - Vancouver
Hon. Chem.
IDSARDI, WILLIAM F. - Vancouver
Maj., English; Publications, Cercle Francais.
JAMES,  FRANCES E. -Victoria
Maj., English, History; V.O.C.
KELSBERG, BARBARA J. - Vancouver
Maj., Bact.; Alpha Delta Pi.
KENDALL, RICHARD A. - Gibson's Landing
Hon.  Physics,  Math.
____r
Adaskin  Concert
Milkshake.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-FIVE KENNEDY,  GERALD B. - Vancouver
Maj., Math., History.
KERR,  JANET  M. -Vancouver
Maj., English.
LECKIE, JEAN F. -Vancouver
Maj., English, Psych.; Kappa Kappa Gamma.
LEDDY,   LELAND - Vancouver
Hon.  Hist; V.O.C, Hist. Soc.
KERSHAW, DENNIS - Victoria
Maj., Math., Physics.
KILBANK, ALFRED C.-Vancouver
Hon. Econ.; Tennis.
LEE, DOUGLAS H. T. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Psych.; Delta Upsilon; Track.
LEE,  GERTRUDE - Victoria
Hon. Math.; Chinese Varsity.
KITOS,  HELEN A.-Vancouver
Maj., Psych.;  Newman.
KLENMAN,   NORMAN - Vancouver
Maj., History, English; Publications.
LEE, HENRY W. C. -Victoria
Maj., Psych., Zoo.
LEE, SYBIL - Victoria
Chinese Varsity.
KOERNER,  NICHOLAS T. - Vancouver
Maj., Econ.
KYLE,   DONALD  L. - Vancouver
Maj., English, History;  Mussoc
LEITERMAN, DOUGLAS S. - Vancouver
Hon. Econ., Pol. Sc; I.R.C, Pari. Forum.
LIDDELL,  CONSTANCE  A.-Vancouver
Maj., English, French;  Hockey.
LAMB,  JOHN  F. -Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Psych.; Pre-Med., V.C.F.
LANE, MARY E. - Victoria
Maj.,  French,  German.
LIDSTER, FREDA B. - New Westminster
LIESKE,   EWALD A. - Chilliwack
LARSON, J. E.
LAUBACH, ANNA L. - North Vancouver
Maj., Geog., English; Badminton.
LOCK, GLADYS M. - Prince Rupert
Maj., English, Soc.
LOFT,  ALFRED   E. -Victoria
Maj.,   English,   History;   Tennis.
_£_**
V.I.P.'s.
Scratch One Aggie.
PAGE   TWO    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-SIX LORD, MURIEL H.-Vancouver
Maj., Biology, Botany; Alpha Phi.
LOUCKS, JOHN E. -Vancouver
Maj., Chem., Math.
MAYNE, PATRICIA E. - Vancouver
Maj., English; Phrateres.
MEHLING, AGNES E. - Vancouver
Hon. Bact., Prev.Med.; Phrateres, Glee Club.
LUBZINSKI,  JAMES   S. - Steveston
Maj.,   Physics.
LUCAS, RONALD F. -Vancouver
Maj., Math., English; Golf.
MENZIES, DORA K. - Vancouver
Maj., Bact.
METFORD,  L. -Salmon Arm
Hon. French.
LUNDELL, FRED W. - Revelstoke
Maj., Bact.; Pre-Med., Jokers.
LYMBERY, ALICE  R. - Gray Creek
Maj., Chem., Math.; V.O.C, Chem. Soc.
MICHAS, LUCAS T. - Vancouver
Maj., Econ., Psych.; Zeta Psi.
MILLARD,   GLORIA   I.-Victoria
Maj., Psych., Soc; Kappa Alpha Theta.
MALLINSON,  THOMAS  J. -Vancouver
Hon. Psych., Phil.; Psych., Letters Clubs.
MARTIN, DIERDRE - Vancouver
Maj., Bact., Zoo.; Gamma Phi Beta, Badminton.
MILLER, HUGH S. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo.; Zeta Psi, Pre-Med.
MITCHELL, GEORGINA H. - Vancouver
Maj., English, History; Alpha Delta Pi.
MARTIN,  RUTH  E. -Vancouver
.Maj., Psych., Soc; Phrateres, Psych. Club.
MASON, HUGH B. - North Vancouver
Maj., Zoo.
MITCHELL, IAN A.-Ferme
Maj., Zoo., Biology.
MITCHNER, MORTON - Vancouver
Hon. Physics, Math.
MASSON, RENE J. N. - Vancoucer
-  Maj., Zoo., Psych; Newman.
MATHESON, JOAN I.-Victoria
Maj., Phil., English.
MOORE, DOROTHY P. - Vancouver
Maj., English, History; Gamma Phi Beta.
MORRIS, YVETTE M. - Vancouver
Maj., English, Psych.; Alpha Delta Pi,
Phrateres, Mamooks.
Fowl Play.
I ll ¥ ''
Don't  Quote Me.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-SEVEN MOTHERWELL,  ELIZABETH L. - Victoria •
Maj., French, English.
MUNN, ANNE C. -Vancouver
Maj.,  English,  Econ.;  Alpha Gamma  Delta,
Psych. Club.
MACDONALD, NANCY K. - Penticton
Maj., History, Pol. Sc; Kappa Alpha Theta,
Phrateres.
McDONALD, ROMA F. - New Westminster
Maj., English; Alpha Phi, Pan-Hellenic
MUNRO, DAVID A.-Vancouver
Hon. Zoo.; Biol. Disc. Club.
MURRAY,  KATHERINE  I.-Vancouver
Maj., English.
McDONNELL, CHARLES E.-New Westminster
Maj., Zoo., English.
McDOUGALL, EDNA M. - Penticton
Maj., Psych.
MUTTER, ARTHUR K. -Vancouver
Maj., Chem.
McCAHILL, MICHAEL J. -Victoria
Maj., History, English.
MACFARLANE, THOMAS G. - Vancouver
Hon.  Physics, Math.;  Physics,  Math.  Clubs.
MacFARLANE,  JEAN -New  Westminster
Maj., Zoo., Chem.; Alpha Phi, Phrateres,
Jazz Club.
McCALLUM, JOAN M. - Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Soc; Alpha Omicron Pi, Players,
Psych. Clubs.
McCALLUM, MARY F. -Vancouver
Maj., Soc, History.
McFARLAND, WILLIAM D. - Penticton
Maj., Econ.
McGLASHAN, PAMELA D. -Vancouver
Maj., Bact.; Kappa Kappa Gamma, Badminton.
McCUSKER,  THOMAS - Vancouver
Maj., Bact.; Phi Delta Theta, Football.
MacDONALD, DONALD A. - New Westminster
Maj., English; Phi Gamma Delta.
MACINTOSH, JANE M. -Victoria
Maj., History; Dappa Alpha Theta, Hist. Soc.
McKAY, ANNA I.-Victoria
Maj., History, English.
MacDONALD, JOHN A. - Trail
Maj., History, Econ.; S.C.M., Basketball.
McDONALD, MARY F. - New Westminster
Maj., English, Psych.; Kappa Kappa Gamma.
MacKENZIE, DAVID M. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo.; Phi Delta Theta, Pre-Med.
MACKENZIE, VERNA C. - Woodstock
Maj., English.
Butter Makers.
Which One Is Coca-Cola?
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-EIGHT   . McKILLOP, EILEEN - New Westminster
Maj., Chem.; Newman, Mamooks, Hockey.
MacKIRDY, DANIEL H. -Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Math.; Tennis.
NICHOLSON,  KATHERINE  M. - Golden
Maj., Soc, English; Alpha Delta Pi, Phrateres.
NIEUWDORP, JOHN L. - Vancouver
Maj., Econ.; Players, Newman.
MacKIRDY, KENNETH A.-Vancouver
Hon. History; Hist. Soc.
MacLEAN, HAROLD - Victoria
Hon. Chem.; Basketball.
OLIVER, WILLIAM D. - Victoria
Maj., History; Hist. Soc.
OLIVIER, FLORENCE E. -
Maj., Soc.
MacLEOD, NORMAN K. M. - New Westminster
Maj., Econ., English; Psi Upsilon, Basketball.
MacMILLAN, KATHLEEN R. - Vancouver
Maj., French, English; Alpha Delta Pi, V.O.C.
OUROM, LORRAINE  I.-Battrum
Hon. Math., Physics.
OUTERBRIDGE, HENRIETTE - Regina
Maj., Zoo.; Apha Phi, Pre-Med.
McNALLY, EDWARD E. - Lethbridge
Maj., Zoo., Chem.; Zeta Psi.
McNaughton, mary m. - ioco
Maj., English; Kappa Alpha Theta.
PAGE, PERCIVAL E. - Calgary
Maj., Geol., Chem.
PALING, FREDA M. - Salmon Arm
Maj., Econ., Psych.
McPHERSON, KENNETH F. -Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Psych.; Phi Gamma Delta, Track.
McTAVISH, MARY E. - Vancouver
Maj., History, English; Kappa Kappa Gamma,
Players.
PAPPAJOHN, AGNES -Vancouver
Maj., Psych., English; Alpha Omicron Pi.
PARKER, MARY E. - Merritt
Maj., History, English; Alpha Phi.
NAIRNE, RONALD S. - Vancouver
Maj., English, Phil.; Phi Gamma Delta.
NEWMAN, RUSSELL G. - Vancouver
Maj., Econ., Gov't.
PAUL, FRANK - Kelowna
Maj., Zoo., English; Newman.
PAUL, YVONNE L. - Vancouver
Maj., Bact., Zoo.
■
■**
*'
Whose Chicken?
No Bull.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-NINE PAULIN, WILLIAM P.-Vancouver
Hon. Physics; Delta Upsilon.
PERRAULT, RAYMOND  J. -Vancouver
Maj., Econ., Gov't.; Radio Soc.
RADCLIFFE, ROLAND W. -Vancouver
Maj.,   Psych., Zoo.;  Rowing.
RAGLIN, GORDON A. - Vancouver
Maj., English, History.
PHAIR, HAROLD A. E. - Vancouver
Maj., History, Geog.
PHELAN, MARY E. - Rounds
Maj., Psych., Soc;  Kappa Kappa Gamma.
RAINE, N. I. - Chilliwack
Maj., English; Badminton.
RAMPONE, ALFRED J. - Keloivna
Maj., Zoo., English; Newman, Track.
PHILLIPS, SYDNEY - Struan
Maj., History.
PHYSICK,  MORRIS  C. -Vancouver
Maj., Math.
RAMSAY, WILLIAM F. - North Vancouver
REED, THOMAS G. - Vancouver
Hon. Econ., Pol. Sc; Pari Forum.
PLATER, ROY E. - Victoria
Maj., Math., English.
POTTER, WILLIAM S. - Langley Prairie
Maj.,  History, English.
REID, DIANNE E. -Vancouver
Maj., English, French; Alpha Gamma Delta.
REMNANT, PETER - Vancouver
Hon. Phil.; Publications.
PRESCOTT, PAULINE M. A. - Salmon Arm
Maj., English.
PRITTIE, ROBERT W. -Vancouver
Hon. History; Pari. Forum.
RENNIE, JEAN M. - Vancouver
Maj., Bact.; Alpha Delta Pi, V.O.C.
RICE, ERNEST T.-Coalmont
Maj., Zoo., Biology; Newman, Golf.
PURVIS, AUDREY B. - New Westminster
Maj., English, History; Swimming.
PYRCH, WILLIAM J. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Psych.
RIFFER, LOUISE H.-Kitchener
Maj., English, History.
ROBERTS, GWENDOLYN E. - Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Soc; Phrateres.
Alan and Friend.
Time 12 Seconds.
PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND FORTY JL-.-1
v^A
V-- V
ROBERTSHAW, ARTHUR M. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo.
ROBERTSON, JAMES H. - Fanny  Bay
Maj., Bact.; Pre-Med.
SCHOFIELD, FRANCES L. - Vancouver
■ Maj., English; Mussoc, Players.
SCHROEDER, CHARLOTTE H.-Sardis
Hon. Psych.; S.P.C
RODENCHUK, EUGENIA - Eburne
Maj., Psych.; Alpha Delta Pi, Letters Club.
RODIN, NICHOLAS W. - Cloverdale
Hon. Econ.; Phi Kappa Sigma.
SCOTT, ANTHONY D. - Vancouver
Hon. Econ., Pol. Sc; Zeta Psi, Pari. Forum.
SEGUR, DELPHINE C. - Revelstoke
Maj., Gov't, Econ.; Phrateres, Basketball.
ROSEN, LINDA C. - Vancouver
Hon. English; Letters Club.
ROSS, JOHN D. -Vancouver
Maj., English.
SELKIRK, DARYL R. - Victoria
Maj., Botany; Mussoc.
SEYMOUR, JANE D. - Vancouver
Maj., English; Delta Gamma, V.O.C.
ROWELL,  DOROTHY  M. - Vancouver
Hon. French.
ROWELL, HEDLEY J.-Victoria
Maj., Zoo., Psych.; Alpha Delta Phi.
SHANTZ, CECIL R. -Vancouver
Maj., Chem.; Soccer.
SHAW, JUNE E. - West Vancouver
Maj., English, History.
SALTER, PATRICIA M. -Vancouver
Hon. Bact.; Alpha Gamma Delta, C.I.G.
SANDERSON, JOY E. - Vancouver
Maj., Bact.; Alpha Gamma Delta.
SHAW, GWENDOLYN M. - Victoria
Hon. Chem.; Phrateres.
SHEPHERD, ETHEL B. - Steveston
Hon. French.
SCAGEL,  ROBERT F. - Vancouver
Hon. Biology, Botany.
SCEATS, DONALD J. - Victoria
Maj., History.
SHERRITT, NORMAN A. - Cloverdale
Maj., History.
SMITH, DONALD A. - New Westminster
Maj., Chem., Zoo.; Phi Gamma Delta, Golf.
Muscular Aggie.
Conference.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FOB TY -ONE T)
SMITH, FERN G. -Vancouver
Maj., German, Spanish; Phrateres.
SMITH, BRUCE M. - Vancouver
Maj., Zoo.; Phi Gamma Delta.
TENER, ROBERT H. - New Westminster
Hon. English, Phil.
THOMAS, ETHEL B. - Vancouver
Maj., Econ., English; Alpha Gamma Delta,
Badminton.
SMITH, WINSOME C. - Victoria
Hon. Math., Physics; Kappa Alpha Theta.
SOWARD, D. M. - Vancouver
Hon. History.
THOMSON, ALEXANDER - Victoria
Maj., Zoo.; Psi Upsilon, Pre-Med.
THOMSON,   PATRICIA   G. -Vancouver
Hon. English; Alpha Gamma Delta,
Letters Club.
STACEY, BETTY H. - North Vancouver
Maj., History.
STEWART, JOHN R. - New Westminster
Maj., English; V.C.F.
THOMSON, AUDREY W. - New Westminster
Maj., Bact.; Alpha Gamma Delta, Hockey.
VANDRICK, SYDNEY J. A. - Chilliwack
Maj., English; V.C.F.
STEWART, VICTOR V. - Vancouver
Maj., French; Players.
STUART, WALTER H. - Eburne
Maj., English, History.
TRETHEWEY, H. C
Maj., Bact., Zoo.; Kappa Kappa Gamma.
VAUGHAN, MARGARET K. - Vancouver
Maj.,  English, History; Mussoc.
SULTAN, PAUL E. -Vancouver
Hon. Econ.; Econ. Soc.
SWISTOON,  JOSEPH  B. - Vancouver
Maj., Econ.
VESTERBACK, CARL G. - Vancouver
Maj., Math., Physics; Soc. Prob. Club.
VOSPER, CATHERINE E. - Vancouver
Maj., English; Kappa Alpha Theta.
TALBOT, ROBERT - Vancouver
Maj., English.
TAYLOR, WILLIAM R. -Vancouver
Maj., History, English; V.C.F.
WALLACE, WINNIFRED N. - Chamberlain
Maj., English, History.
WASHINGTON, EMMA E. - Vancouver
Maj., English.
Business Is Booming.
It Just Didn't Add Up.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-TWO ___a_ft
WEBB, NORMAN H. - Nanaimo
Maj., History; Mussoc.
WELLS, JOHN R. H. - Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Econ.; Zeta Psi.
WINTER, ROGER C. - Vancouver
Maj., History, English.
WINTER, WALTER E.-Port Alberni
Maj., Chem.; Delta Upsilon.
WESTINGHOUSE, MARGARET V. - Saanichton
Maj., Psych., Phil.; Mussoc.
WHITE, ROBERT D. - Cloverdale
Maj., English.
WONG, VIVIAN M. -Vancouver
Maj., French, Gov't; Chinese Varsity.
WOOD, WILLIAM S. - Vancotwer
Maj., Psych., Zoo.; Phi Kappa Pi.
WIDMAN, CHARLES R. - Vancouver
Hon. Econ.
WIEBE, JOHN - Huntingdon.
Maj., History.
WOODMAN, THOMAS - Vancouver
Maj., French, English; Fencing.
WOODWARD, MARY T. - Vancouver
Maj., English; Delta Gamma.
WILDE, GEORGE D. - New Westminster
Maj., Zoo., Chem.
WILKINSON, MARGARET C. - Vancouver
Maj., Psych., English; Delta Gamma.
WORTHINGTON, A. E. - Vancouver
Hon. Chem.; Jokers, Publications.
YATES, DOUGLAS E. - New Westminster
Hon. Bact.; Phi Gamma Delta, Track.
WILLIAMS,  DOROTHY E. D. - Vancouver
Maj., Bact., Zoo.; Gamma Phi Beta.
WILSON, DAVID A. - Victoria
Hon. Biology, Botany; Beta Theta Pi.
YATES,   MAUREEN   S. - Victoria
Maj., French, English.
YOUNG, ALBERT C. -Vancouver
Hon. History.
WILSON, NEIL L. - Vancouver
Hon.   Phil.,  Math.;   Players.
WILSON, ROBERT G. - West Vancouver
Hon. Bact.; Delta Upsilon.
YOUNG,  ARCHIBALD   D. -Vancouver
Maj., Zoo., Bact.; Phi Gamma Delta, Track.
YOUNG,  MARGARET M.-Victoria
Maj., French, English.
Hidden Ball Play?
Morning in the Caf.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-THREE YOUNG,  MICHAEL G. - Vancouver
Hon. Econ.; Zeta Psi, Players.
ZUK, P. — Vancouver
Maj., Math,
One Day It Snowed.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-FOUB Eva Chernov, Teno Genis, Dorothy Moore.
Juniors Support Activities
The Juniors of today—the graduates of tomorrow—the class of '48. This is the class whose arrival coincided with the announcement that the
University was to have a new president, Dr. Norman MacKenzie.
Bob Harwood was Junior member on Student
Council, and Pat Macintosh was president of
WAD. Phil Ashton was an associate editor on the
Totem. Norm Klenman held the position of features editor of the Ubyssey and also acted as publicity chairman of the Gym campaign. Don Ferguson and Don. Stansby filled the positions of
Thursday editors, and Thursday respectively.
Beverley Wilson was this year's president of the
Players Club. Ned Larsen appeared as Pierre
Patelin in the fall play of that name.
In the sports section, Pat McGeer and Bob Haas
starred as members of the Thunderbird basketball
team.
Nora Clarke was vice-president of WUS.
Rosemary Hodgins, secretary of the Literary
and Scientific Executive, was a McGoun Cup debater this year, and also edited the Tillicum.
The executive of Arts '48 this year included
petite Eva Chernov, as president; Dorothy Moore
as vice-president, and Teno Genis as secretary-
treasurer.
Eva Chernov, President.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-FIVE ABRAMSON, JACK J.
ADAMS, WINIFRED S.
AISH, JANE ANITA
BECKER, RUTH R
BEESLEY, JAMES F. B
BENNETT, RAY N
AITCHISON,   KENNETH M.
ALLESTER, WILLIAM V.
AMY, ROZEL J.
BENSON, EDITH M.
BENTLEY, WILLIAM F.
BERISFORD, ROBERT
ANDERSEN. IRENE C. J.
ANGUS, ANNE S.
ARCHECK, LILLIAN D.
BEST, HELEN L
BIRKINSHAW, ADELE G
BLAIR, DAVID C
ARMSTRONG, ROBERT J.
ARMYTAGE, MARGARET E.
ARNESEN, GEORGE B.
BLACK, ALLAN P
BOGAS, KENNETH P
BORTHWICK, JOHN W
ARTHUR, JOHN W. S.
AULD, JEAN T.
AVELING, MADELINE B.
BOURNS, T. KENNETH R
BOWELL, NANCY E
BOWER, FRANCIS J
AVERY, E. GWENDOLYN
BAKER, ROWENA
BAKONY, STELLA C.
BRAIDE, DAVID I. W
BRANDT, BEATRICE E
' BROOKS, ALLAN C
BAMFORD, GWENDOLYN J.
BARGEN, PETER F.
BARTLETT, LESLIE H.
BROOKS, DIANA E
BROWN, GILBERT G
BRUMMITT, WILLIAM M
BASSETT, BEVERLEY A.
BAYNE, M. JOAN
BECK, FRIDELLA
BRYANT, CHARLES W
BULMAN, LOLA M
BURD, HELEN D
Modest Man In Women's Coop.
Huts, Gym, Disgorge.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND    FORTY-SIX _4r___n&k
See, they ain't so hard to find.
BURNELL, JOAN C
BURNS, HELEN M.
BURNSIDE, A. DEANE M.
CLARKE, O. NORA J.
CLERKSON, GLADYS
COADY M. MARGARET
BUTLER, ALFRED J.
BUTLER, R. MICHAEL T.
BUTLER, WILLIAM A. N.
COFFEY, DORIS M
COLE,  DACRE P
COLLISON, JOCELYN M
BYRNES, JOHN L.
CAMPBELL, MARY
CANTRILL, FREDERICK
CONNOLLY, MURIEL A.
COOK, CECIL W.
COOK, KATHERINE
CAPSTICK, EDWARD A.
CAREFOOT, JOYCE E.
CARMICHAEL, KATHLEEN
CORMIER, BEVERLEY M
COURT, JAMES E. O
COWIE, LILLIAN M
CARTER, DONALD C
CHALLIS, THOMAS W.
CHAMBERS, JOSEPH E.
COWLEY, ELIZABETH M
CROMPTON, ROBERT G
CUMMING, MARION S
CHAMBERS, MARY L.
CHERNOV, EVA T.
CHISHOLM, ANITA G.
CURTIS, JOHN S
CUTHILL, LEONARD D. J
DAMER, WARREN R
CHRISTIAN, C. JOAN
CHRISTIAN, PATRICIA M.
CHRISTIE, DONALD A.
DARBY, GEORGE H
DAVIDSON, ELIZABETH M
DAVIES, MARGUERITE E
CLARK, DOUGLAS H.
CLARK, GEORGE W. P.
CLARK, JOHN S.
DAY, ALISON E
DEMPSEY, WILLIAM G
DENHOLM, ISABELLA M
Where the mountains meet the sky.
.    PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-SEVEN DENHOLM, MARY P.
DENKMAN, NORMAN H:
DENTON, ROBIN M.
FINEGOOD, I. MICHEL
FINLEY, RUSSELL H.
FISH, JOHN A.
DESAUTELS, ODILLE M.
DESTRUBE, FRANCETTE M.
DORE, BURNELL V.
FOOTE, GERALDINE
FORSYTH, BEATRICE
FRASER, G. JOAN
DRAZICK, JOSEPH
DROPE, PATRICIA J.
DRYSDALE, JOHN A. W.
FREEZE, GEORGE A
FULLERTON, PEGGY A
GAMEY, MARGARET D
DULLER, JACK A.
DUNDAS, O. JUDITH
EFFORD, ROBERT J.
GAVA, JUNE P. E.
GEAR, WILLIAM I.
GIEGERICH, MARGARET A.
EGAN, THOMAS, J.
ELART, ALICE J.
ENG, HARRY
GILLESPIE, JOHN T.
GILMOUR, WILLIAM A.
GOULSON, CARLYN E.
EWART, ELIZABETH M.
EXEL, F. LEIGHTON
EYERS, R. JOY
GRAHAM, JOHN A
GRANT, DOUGLAS R
GRANT, JOHN W. R
FAIRFAX, E. MERCEDES
FARLEY, ALBERT L.
FEAST, JOAN E. C.
GREEN, MARY C.
GREENIUS, ERIC O.
GRIFFITH GWYNNETH M.
FEDOROFF, LUDMILLA
FERGUSON, DONALD C.
FERGUSON, JOANNE S.
GRUNLUND, BARBRO E
GRUNLUND, JEAN M
GUBBINS, PATRICIA M
Enthusiastic Crowd.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-EIGHT
Stones for the Physics Building. Sciencemen Study.
GUILHAMOULIE, ANNE M.
GUNN, SHIRLEY A. M.
HACK, OTTO H.
HODY, REGINALD E.
HOOPER, FRANK J. B.
HORNE, BETTY JEAN
HADLEY, ARTHUR J.
HALCROW, JEAN D.
HALL, BEVERLEY E.
HORTON, JOHN H. M.
HOTHAM, GEOFFREY A.
HUDSON, GRACE B.
HALL, ROSS H.
HALLSOR, JUNE C.
HAMILTON, S. BRIAN
HUMMEL, BRIAN C. W.
HUNT, EDWARD G.
HUNT, EDWIN S.
HANSULD, MARY K.
HARRICK, NICK
HARRIS, L. HAROLD
HUNTER, ALLAN J.
HUNTER, JOHN M.
HUTCHISON, COLIN C
HART, SUZANNE M.
HARTREE, BEVERLEY M.
HAUGAN, HOWARD J.
IRISH, RUTH I.
IRWIN L. BEATRICE
ISAAC, JAMES E.
HEAPS, PHILIP A.
HENNENFENT, EARL H.
HERTIG, LUCIENNE B.
JACKSON, JAMES   I.
JARVIS, N. JOAN
JEFFREY, MARY LOU E.
HEYWOOD, JOYCE
HILL, AUBREY G.
HINDS, DAVID B.
JOE, RUBY
JOHNSON, FREDERICK J.
JOHNSON, JOAN I.
HIRTLE, WALTER H.
HOBBS, BARBARA J.
HODGINS, ROSEMARY E.
JONES, NEVILLE C.
KATARENCHUK, WALTER
KAYLL, DYNE A.
Sky blue waters, foreground.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-NINE KELCEY, MICHAEL F.
KENNY, EDITH W.
KERLEY, DONALD R.
LOMAS, NANCY B.
LONGLEY, J. DONALD
LOUCKS, HAROLD G.
KERR, ARTHUR C
KETCHESON, HELEN R.
KING, PHILIP J.
LOWES, BETTY D.
MACEY, JOHN  K.
MALCOLMSON, SUSANA
KINGWELL, KENNETH G.
KITSON, JOHN A.
KNAPP, KATHERINE
MALENSEK, CLEMENTINE
MALYSHEFF, ANDREW
MARSHALL, ROBERT E.
KOUCHES, MARY
KURZ, ARTHUR E.
LAIDLER, DOROTHY M.
MASSY, DAVID H
MATTHEWS, HERBERT L
MAY, GILBERT A
LAIRD, ELIZABETH A.
LANG, ELIZABETH J.
LANGFORD, JUNE V.
MERCER, MARGARET E
MERTZ, JAMES G
MESSUM, ROY P
LARSEN, EDWARD R.
LEE, GEORCE N.
LEES, HELEN M.
MILES, ELWOOD R.
MILL, M. MARGARET
MILLAR, THOMAS P.
LEITH, MARY P.
LEMON, ERNEST A. J.
LESLIE, ALEXANDER A.
MILLS, RUTH C
MINCHIN, PHARIC W.
MOORE,  JOAN
LEWIS,  F. NANCY
LIPSEY, BARBARA MAE
LOGAN, JUNE R.
MORSE, HUGH F.
MOSKOVITZ, ISRAEL
MOUAT, MARGARET M.
Tina Mugs for  Gym.
Trailers Nuzzle at Acadia.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY MULLIGAN, MAURICE W.
MUNGALL, ROBERT W.
McALPINE, MARY
McCRAE, EDWARD D.
NATION BERYL A. O.
NEKRASSOFF, M.
McCLUNG, PAULA M.
McCONNELL, CATHERINE
McGARRY, NORA
NELLES, GORDON B.
NELSON, CHARLES D.
NEWPORT, VIOLET G.
McGILL, ALLAN S.
McGregor, iona m.
mackay, bruce s.
NIGHTINGALE, FRANK H.
NOEL,  HELEN R.
NORTHROP, DAVID N.
McKAY, DONALD
McKEOWN, ROBERT J
McKIMM, DENNIS S.'
E.
O'CONNOR, MARION I.
OLIVER, JEAN E.
ORME, C. ERIC
MacKINNON, JEAN B.
MacKINTOSH, MURRAY F.
McLEAN, WINIFRED P.
OWENS, NOEL A. S.
OXLEY, MARY H.
PALMER, JOHN H.
McLELLAN, MARNEY P.
McLEOD, CONSTANCE D.
McLEOD, JOHN F.
PARKER,  FAYE  V.
PATERSON, HUBERT M.
PATRICK, WILLIAM N.
MacLEOD, MALCOLM G.
McLEOD, MARILYN J.
McLOUGHLIN, KATHLEEN
PATTERSON, WILLIAM J.
PAUL, N. J.
PAYNE, DORIS D.
mcmechan, melville y.
McMillan, william d.
McMYNN, ROBERT G.
PEARSON, EMMA  S.
PEARSON, GWENDOLYN M.
PERKS, RONALD L.
Power.
Dinnertime at Acadia.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-ONE PERRAULT, ERNEST G.
PHILPOTT, ELIZABETH J.
PIKE, MARGARET U. M.'
SANFORD, ROBERT M
SCHINBEIN, JOHN E
SCHMID, MANFRED C
PREVOST, EDWARD C.
PRICE, TRUDIE
PYE, ELEANOR M. A.
SCOTT, BRUCE
SEARLE, MARION E.
SELKIRK, ROBERT B.
QUAIL, WILLIAM D.
QUIN, JAMES W.
RAINE, NANCY IRENE
SHAW, CATHERINE
SHEARMAN, JACQUELINE
SHEPHERD, GORDON W.
RAYMOND, WILLIAM F.
REDLICH, ALINE BERTA
REED, BERYL C
SHIER, ROBERT P
SHIRLEY, FREDRICK S
SHOTT, GRAHAME, B
REID, M. R.
REITLO, EUNICE M.
REYNOLDS, I. MARY
SHUMKA, V. EDWARD
SIBLEY, I. MARY
SIGURDSON, HERBERT R.
RICHARDS, VIRGINIA J.
RIETCHEL, HELEN E.
ROGERS, MARY E. M.
SIMPSON, MARGUERITE G.
SLADE, G. RAYMOND
SLARK, GORDON A.
ROUTLEY, [OHN V.
ROWLEY, CHARLES E.
RYAN, J. EUGENE B.
SMALL WOOD, EFFIE I. C
SMILLIE, HOWARD W.
SMITH, DONALD, A
RYAN, RUTH C.
SALTER, JAMES  M.
SAMPLE, JOHN T.
SMITH, HELEN A
SNAPE, M. ANNE J
SOUTH, DONALD L
One Day It Snowed.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-TWO
Freshman Meets Lily Pond. Add One Bacillus.
SPENCER, HERBERT W.
STAINSBY, DONALD O.
STEDMAN, SHIRLEY R.
TKACH, JOHN S.
TOMLINSON, KENNETH Y.
TOMLINSON, NEIL
STEELE, JOHN A.
STEWART, CATHERINE A.
STEWART, SHEILA F.
TRAVIS, PHYLLIS T
TUBBS, DOROTHY M
TURNER, JOHN J
STILES, JOHN G.
STONE, DAVID R.
STONE, JAMES S.
TURNER, LEONARD J
TURNER, PATRICIA A
URQUHART, HELEN M. A
STONE, LORNE MURRAY
SULLIVAN, GERALD J.
SUMMERS, C. ERNESTINE
WALDICHUK, MICHAEL
WALLACE, ARDATH S.
WALLACE, STUART H.
SWEENY, DOROTHEA M.
TAMBLYN, JOHN P.
TANNAR, NORMAN E.
WARDEN, GEOFFREY
WARDEN, STELLA P.
WARDROPER, JOHN E.
TANNER, AUBREY C
TEMOIN, MAURICE
TENER, JOHN S.
WEAVER, KENNETH R.
WEIR, C. SHEILA
WEIR, K. MARGUERITE
THOM, MARGARET H.
THOMSON, ANNA J.
THOMSON, IAN GIFFORD
WELCH, HERBERT G
WHITE, DOREEN L.
WHITE, DOUGLAS A,
THOMSON, MARGUERITE
TIEDJE, PATRICIA A.
TIERNAN, PATRICK A.
WHITE, MASSIE L.
WHITEHEAD, CALVIN J.
WILKINSON, E. JOYCE
Pixies Await Developments.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-THREE WILLCOX, JEANNE M.
WILLIAMS, CLAYTON
WILSON, BARBARA  R.
WONG, WAH
WOODWARD, SHIRLEY A.
WORMSBECHER, JOHN H.
WILSON, BEVERLEY
WILSON, CATHERINE A.
WONG, ELSIE
WUNDERLICH, RAYMOND J.
YOUNG, EDITH B.
1   *1
\ **    /
k]A
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-FOUR Sophs Carry
On Traditions
With all traces of green erased, the unsure, impressionable freshman of last year has emerged
as the poised, sophisticated sophomore of this year.
This year's second year class, Aits '49, is a test
case. It is the first homogeneous mixture of postwar high school graduates and older ex-service
men. The complete ease with which these two
apparently divergent groups have assimilated each
other to take their places in, at best, an abnormal
post-war campus proves them well worthy of the
fine traditions of U.B.C.
In both studies and extra-curricular activities
this class has proved conclusively that the veterans
and younger students can unite and work together
for the betterment of the university.
In all campus activities the soph class may boast
leading members. Within the consecrated confines
of the Publications Board, Pubsters Laura Haahti,
Helen-Mary Gowans, Joan Grimmett, Val Sears
and Phyliss Reid have held positions as associates
on both the Totem and The Ubyssey. Soph Chick
Turner has gloried as associate sports editor, and
Tommy Hatcher has held the key position of
photography director.
Nancy Davidson, Norma Bloom, Vivian Lat-
soudes, Birnie Reid and Dick Newman are a few
of the sophs who represented their class in the
Players' Club.
The Mussoc acknowledge soph talent by awarding lead roles to Betty Purvis and Doug Whitmore.
There are, in fact, few aspects of campus life
left untouched by members of the soph class.
In administrative positions were WUS member
Rosemary Byrn and soph council member Phil
Evans.
The class executive was comprised of president
John Kelman assisted by commerce man Bill
Dunbar and Irma Koch.
Upper:   Bill Dunbar, lima Koch.   Lower:   John Kelman,
President.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-FIVE ABBY, N. DOUGLAS
ADAM, FRANK C.
ADAMOVICH, CLAUDETTE
BARTON, DESMOND H.
BAYCROFT, BERNICE W.
BECK, J. M.
ALDERDICE, ERNEST T.
ALEXANDER, DONALD L.
ALLDER, FRANK H.
BECK, JAMES M.
BECKER, WILFRED H.
BEDUZ, LOUIS B.
AMM, JOHN J.
ANDREW, F. G.
ANNABELLE, GEORGE M.
BELL, JOHN M.
BELL, JOHN N.
BELL, KENNETH E.
ARGYLE, CATHERINE M.
ARLIDGE, BRUCE K.
ARO, KOSTA V.
BELL, LOIS JEAN
BELL, OLIVE M.
BELL, WILLIAM J.
ASHMORE, EDWARD J.
ATKINSON, DONALD J.
ATKINSON, WILLIAM A.
BELL IRVING, ROSEMARY
BERGSTROME, BRANT E.
BERRY, SUSAN
AUSTENLEIGH, L. V.
BAALIM, BARBARA I.
BAILLIES, JOHN A.
BIGGS, FLORENCE E.
BIRO, LOUIS
BLAKE, ROY
BAKONY, CHARLES E.
BALDWIN, GEORGE W.
BANDURA, ALBERT
BLANCHARD, JACK D.
BLANCHARD, R. AUDREY
BLACK, MARGARET M.
BANKS, GEORGE N.
BARGUS, JOHN W.
BARKER, THOMAS W.
BLACKHALL, JOHN A. G.
BLOOM, NORMA E.
BLUNDELL, JUNE ROSE
Lily Pond in Repose.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-SIX   .
Students  and Dance Decorations. BODIE, DONALD O.
BOLTON, JANE E.
BONNEY, GORDON E.
CAMPBELL, THOMAS J.
CARNEY, ANNE
CARSON, PATRICK J.
BOWELL, JOANNE E.
BOWKETT, MARY F.
BOWER-SMITH, B. M.
CARTER W. B. DOUGLAS
CASEY, JAMES J.
CASTILLOU, JOSEPHINE
BRAY, MARSHALL P.
BRETT, A. JUNE
BROATCH, GEORGE K.
CASTILLOU, SHEILA C.
CAVE-BROWN-CAVE,  ROBERT
CHARTERS, JOAN C.
BRODERICK, ERIC L.
BROWN, BEVERLY MARY
BROWN, JACK M.
CHELL, RICHARD A.
CHEW, BARBARA K.
CHISHOLM, SHIRLEY
BROWNING, JOHN R.
BROWNJOHN, SYDNEY E.
BRUCE, MARIAN D.
CHIZIK, NICHOLAS T.
CHRISTIE,  B. JOAN M.
CHURCH, ROBERT W.
BRYCE, JOHN R. G.
BUNKER, ALAN P. S.
BURNS, ROBERT L.
CLARK, DENNIS M.
CLARK, EARL
CLARK, NIGEL H.
BURROUGHS, GLORIA B.
BYRN, M. ROSEMARY
BYRNES, MARGARET J.
CLARKE, CALISTA
CLEMENTS, GORDON G.
CLINK,  MIRIAM  S.
CAMERON, KATHELENE
CAMERON, L. DIANE
CAMERON, PATRICIA A.
COATES, GEORGE D.
COCKING, RAYMOND E.
COLCLEUGH, MURRAY
Homecoming Parade,
Guy Faint and Partner.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-SEVEN COLEMAN, MAVIS E.
COOPS, PARZIVAL
CORKER, BARBARA D.
DERRICK, JACK B. D.
DESBRISAY, DIANA E.
DEVITO, ROBERT V.
CORSAN, GRAHAME D.
CORY, ALLAN M.
COTE, MAURICE N.
DEWOLF, SUSAN G.
DICK, NORMA M. M.
DICKSON, RONALD G.
COURTICE, GORDON L.
COWEN, STANLEY C
COX, BETLEIGH C
DOBBIN, NANCY C
DODD, ROBERT R.
DOWNING, MICHAEL E.
CRAWFORD, RONALD
CRABB, JOHN J.
CRACKNELL, MAVIS G. A.
DOYLE, G. ANNETTA
DUGUID, MARY K.
DUNFEE, EVELYN M.
CREERY, LESLIE J.
CROSSLEY, NORMAN M.
CROWE, MARY P.
DUNLOP, RUBY DOREEN
DUNN, FREDERICK G. C. C
DUNN, WILLIAM D. F.
CRUICKSHANK, J. M.
CURRAN, JOY M. R.
CUTCHER, ALLEN C.
DUXBURY, JAMES H.
EAST,  GORDON B.
ECKERSLEY, E. PHYLLIS
DAIN, KATE NOREEN R.
DAVIDSON, NANCY M.
DAVIES, JOHN L.
EDGAR, MAUREEN
EDWARDS, GLYN M.
EDWARDS, MARTIN fl.
DAWSON, E. TREVOR
DEMPSTER, J. R. HUGH
DENNETT, THOMAS T.
EDWARDS, ROBERT
ELLIOTT, BARBARA J.
EMMONS, MARGARET J.
The Mall.
It's a Cinch!
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-EIGHT EMSLIE, ROBERT B.
EPP, DAVID HENRY
ETCHELL, CHARLES T.
FORSYTH, JEAN
FORWARD, CHARLES N.
FRAMPTON, WALTER R.
EVANS, B. H. PHILIP
FAGHIN, JACK
FAHLMAN, PATRICIA
FYFFE, GORDON J.
GAMACHE, LUCE
GARDINER, PATRICIA A.
FAIRBAIRN, J. KENNETH
FAWCETT, LOUISE A.
FAWCUS, GEOFFREY C.
GARDNER, LOIS M.
GARDNER, ROBERT R.
GARVIE, LESLIE A.
FAWSITT, JOYCE T.
FEARN, D. RODNEY
FELL, RALPH C.
GENSCHOREK, HERMAN W.
CEOFFREY, BARBARA M. V.
GILMOUR, HUGH S. A.
FERGUSSON, ELEANOR J.
FETHERSTON, WILLIAM H.
FIELD, ROSS B.
GILMOUR, ROBERT F.
GLENNIE, DOUGLAS W.
GOLDBERG, AUDREY D.
FINNING, JOANNE E.
FISHER, ELEANOR J.
FITCHETT, LEONARD E.
GOSBEE,  ALAN W.
GOULD,  I.  M.
GOWANS, HELEN MARY
FITZPATRICK, MARGARET
FLOOD, JOYCE
FOGAL, L. ALAN
GRAHAM, BARBARA ANN
GRANGER, HARRY M.
GRANT, GORDON G.
FORBES, ALIX MARY
FORREST, HUGH L.
FORRESTER, ANNE L.
GRANT, NORMA
GRAY, ALEXANDER
GRAY, M. BETTY ANNE
Turning of the Sod.
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Turning of the Sod.
PAGE    T WO   HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-NINE GREEN, ROBERT J.
GREENSWORD, LEWIS H.
GREENWOOD, LIONEL S.
HARSTONE,  JOAN
HARTREE, SHIRLEY A.
HARVEY, NANCY F.
GREER, BETSY ANN
GREGG, HAROLD M.
GRIFFITHS, MYFANWY
HASSELL, ROSE L
HATCHER, THOMAS G
HAWTHORN, JAMES W
GRIMMETT, JOAN A.
GUREVICH, B. SYDNEY
GUTTORMSSON, PETER T.
HEENEY, DENIS A.
HEMPSALL,  JEAN
HENLEY, IAN GEORGE T.
HAAHTI, LAURA K.
HAAS, JANE M.
HAGE, KEITH DONALD
HERRMANN, GEORGE G.
HESLOP, MARJORIE
HESS, FOREST G.
HALCROW, WILLIAM T.
HALLATT, G. EARL
HAMILTON, CHRISTINA A.
HICKS, GERALD F.
HINCHCLIFFE, MARJORIE
HJORTH, C. ERIK
HAMILTON, ELEANOR J.
HAMILTON", JOHN D.
HAMILTON, ROBERT R.
HODSON, MARGARET P
HOGARTH, GORDON L
HOLM, THELMA M
HAMM, DONALD C.
HANLEY, RICHARD W.
HARDER, GEORGE
HORNE, G. T.
HORTH, ALAN
HOWARD, HAROLD E.
HAROLD, DOUGLAS W.
HARPER, BARBARA R.
HARRIS, MARION B.
HOWE, DAPHNE D.
HUGHES, PATRICIA M.
HUNTER, DALE STUART
Mills Brothers.
1.5  Grams.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY HUNTER, JOHN LLOYD
HUNTER, WILLIAM R.
HURST, MAUD HAZEL
KING, DAVID JOSEPH
KING, ROBERT A.
KISS, FRANK M.
HUSTLER, JOHN W.
HYDE, CHARLES M.
ISAAC, JACOB
KITCHEN, JOAN K.
KITTLESON, MORRIS E.
KOCH, IRMA
IVERSON, BRIAN J.
JENVEY, GEORGE E.
JOHN, M. GLORIA M.
KOCHER, PAUL E.
KOOP, JACOB F.
KOSS,  MICHAEL J.
JOHNSON, ALICE S.
JOHNSON, E. SHARON E.
JOHNSON, J. D. LAIRD
KYLE, GEORGE B.
LAIDLEY, ALBERT E.
LAING, DAVID A.
JOHNSON, LILY ANNIE
JOHNSON, MAUREEN L.
JOHNSON, VIOLET
LAIRD, JOAN P.
LAKIOTIS, JOHN W.
LANE, POLLY
JONES, ARNOLD R.
JONES, JOHN C.
KAY, DONALD W.
LANE, ROBERT F.
LANGFORD, ALBERT E.
LANGILLE, ALEXANDER R.
KEETLEY, KENNETH E.
KELLETT, RUTH E.
KENNY, IAN B.
LATSOUDES, VIVIAN
LAWRENCE, JUNE L.
LAZAREFF, ELSIE A.
KENT, C. EARNEST
KILVERT, JAMES L.
KINCADE, MARJORIE M.
LEBLANC, RAYMOND L.
LEDERMAN, JACK J.
LEITERMAN, ELAINE H.
Lethargic Fall
Tim Buck Issje.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY-ONE LENARDON, J. ROBERT
LENETT, NORMAN H.
LEONARD, BARRY M.
MIAZGA, FRANK
MILLER, JOHN G.
MILLER, OLIVE MAY
LEVISON, MOLLIE
LIBIN, MORTON L.
LINDHOLM, HARVEY R.
MILLS, ALAN W.
MOFFATT, NORAH JEAN
MOFFATT, WILMA A.
LINDSAY, ELLIS G.
LINDSAY, HELEN M.
LITTLEWOOD, CHARLES A.
MONTADOR, PETER A.
MONTGOMERY, C
MONTGOMERY, MARGERY K.
LOUGHEED, HENRY V.
LOWE, W. E.
LUNN, DAVID J.
MONTPELLIER, ALFRED L
MOORE, SHEILA B
MORRISON, JOHN S
MACOR, DONNA J.
MADILL, MERVYN F.
MAGLIO, EUGENE A.
MORT, BEVERLEY
MORTON, DAVID C.
MUIR, THOMAS W.
MANSON, HELEN E.
MARE, MARY E.
MARKHAM, WILLIAM G.
MUIRHEAD, KENNETH
MUIRHEAD, MARY L.
MUNRO, G. NEVILLE
MARSHALL, ELMO M.
MARSHALL, HAROLD E.
MARTIN, RUSSELL L.
murphy, c. francis
murray, john g. y.
McAllister, john b.
MARTIN, STEWART W.
MATHESON, MARION H.
MAYON, JUNE O.
MACAULEY, RONALD A
McBRIDE, GERALD P,
McCANNEL, JOHN A
Hmmmm!
Soulful Students.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY-TWO ***$.
i ta i
ISA
!.!S
McCLEMENT, F. PATRICIA
McCONNELL, W. J. C.
McCONVILLE, M. SHIRLEY
McLEAN, MARGARET E
McLEAN, SINCLAIR N
McLEISH, JOHN A
McCOSHAM, BEVERLEY J.
McCREIGHT, CHARLES T.
McCULLOCH, WILLIAM
McLELLAN, PETER D.
McLEOD, DOROTHY J.
McLEOD, MARY
MacDONALD, FRANCES L.
McDonnell, geraldine
McEachern, Alexander
McMYNN, AUDREY G
McNAIR, DAVID L,
McNAIR, MARJORIE H.
MacEWEN, PAUL R.
McGLADERY, KATHLEEN M.
McINTYRE, HELEN E.
McOUAT, W. GORDON
McWILLIAMS, V. BERNICE
NAGLE, BEVERLEY
McINTYRE, PETER R.
MacKAY, F. DOUGLAS C
MacKAY, WILLIAM M.
NASCOU, SHIRLEY L
NEIL, DOUGLAS C
NELFORD, T. E
McKELLAR, ROBERT G.
McKENZIE, DONNA M.
MACKENZIE, FERGUS E.
NEWBY, JACK DEAN
NICHOLS, JACQUELINE B.
NICKEL, WILLIAM J.
MACKENZIE, MARIGOLD A.
McKENZIE, ROBERT H.
MACKENZIE, SHIRLEY M.
NIMMONS, ARLENE A
NORMAN, MARY T
NYHOLM, MARION H
MacKINNON, ISABEL F.
MACKINTOSH, ALEX F.
MacLEAN, JACKIE M.
OATES,  J
O'CONNOR, GERALD F
O'FLAHERTY, JOANNE B
I
Library Windows.
Going Upl
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY-THREE OTTEWELL, JOAN G.
OWENS, NANCY E.
OWENS, THOMAS
PRITCHARD, CATHERINE
PRITCHARD, MARY  G.
PURSE, DOROTHY A. S.
PALMER, JOAN E.
PARKE, MARGARET I. E.
PARKINSON, M. H.
PURVIS, DOROTHY B.
RAYMUR, BEVERLEY
READ, WILLIAM R.
PARTON, IRIS L.
PATERSON, WILLIAM P.
PATTERSON, DOROTHY M.
REEVES, PETER M.
REID, BIRNIE  E.
REID, JAMES GORDON
PATTISON, JAMES P.
PAVELICH, J.
PEARSON, HARRY L.
REID, PHYLLIS M.
RENNIE, NANCY J.
REYNOLDS, WARREN L.
PELTER, GEORGE A.
PERKINS, G. ALBERT
PETERS, HUGO
RHEUMER, GEORGE A.
RICHARDS, JOHN L.
RICHARDSON,  G. I.
PETERS, KENNETH R.
PEYMAN, ELIZABETH S.
PIERCE, ALAN F.
RIDDELL, ROBERT H
ROBERTS, BEVERLY A
ROCHESTER, JANET B
PITCAIRN, E. MARGARET
POOLE, JOHN K.
POWELL, DOROTHEA U.
ROCHFORT, CONSTANCE A.
ROLSTON, MARTA S.
ROSS, AILEEN P.
PRESCESKY, PETER
PRETTY, JONATHAN A.
PRINGLE, W. ALAN H.
ROSS, SHIRLEY J.
RUSSELL, B. ALAN
RUSSELL, DALTON L.
Lower Slobbovia Meets the President.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY-FOUR
Sunshine on the Campus. RUSSELL, DONALD C.
RUTT, BYRON R.
SAMPSON, HUBERT
SKIPP, HERBERT L.
SCUBBAY, M.
SMETHURST, ROBERT G.
SANFORD, DONALD M.
SAUER, ILDON V. N.
SCANLON, VIVIAN D.
SMITH, DOROTHY O.
SMITH, ERNEST H.
SMITH, J.
SCARR, ROY W.
SCHOLEFIELD, ARTHUR J.
SCOTT, G. PATRICIA
SNOW, DOROTHY C. H.
SOWERBY, RAYMOND
SPENCER, ANN  M.
SCOTT, PRISCILLA R.
SCOTT, WILLIAM M.
SEARS, VAL C.
STAMBUSKI, VELMA J.
STEEN, WILLIAM R.
STEIN,   DAVID   J.
SEDDON, JOHN W.
SEIBOLD, ERVIN A.
SEIBOLD, MARY G.
STEPHENSON, DOROTHY
STEVENS, JOHN K.
STEVENSON, MARY ANNE
SEYER, ROSE MARIE
SHARMAN, B.
SHAW, M.
STEWART, J.
STEWART, JAMES W.
STOCKSTAD, DELORES E.
SHEPP, ROBERT J.
SHORE, MARVYN A.
SHULEY, MARGARET E.
STONE, RENNETH E.
STRANG, HARVEY A.
STUART, ELIZABETH
SIGURDSON, ALBERT L.
SIHOTA, DEDAR S.
SKELDING, ELIZABETH E.
STUART, JAMES D.
SULYMKA, WILLIAM
SUTHERLAND, JEAN
Looking for the Noonday Special.
Some Will Pass.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND    SIXTY-FIVE SUTTON, GWENDA R.
SWAIN, THELMA JEAN
TAIT, MARGARET M. M.
VOSPER, JANET MARY
WALDEN, FRANK C.
WALMSLEY,  LAWRIE  S.
TAIT, WINIFRED G. M.
TANNER, BENJAMIN F.
TAPLIN, ARTHUR C.
WARD, DONALD K.
WARNER, DONALD L.
WARTNOW, FLOYD C
TENER, GORDON M.
THOMPSON, G.
THOMPSON, PEGGE J.
WATKINS, RICHARD W.
WEBB, MAY
WEBB, PHYLLIS JEAN
THOMSON, EDITH A.
THURSTON, K. JUNE A.
TIFFIN,  M.  MADELINE
WEBSTER, PATRICIA
WEINSTEIN, RETA R.
WENS1NK, RAYMOND A.
TOGNOTTI, LORNE A.
TOMLINSON, RAYMOND
TOMPKINS, NEVILLE C.
WESTMAN, H. JAMES
WETMORE, DOUGLAS T.
WIDMAN, BEVERLEY ANN
TOPHAM, ERNEST A.
TOYNBEE, RICHARD M.
TREMAINE, MARY C.
WILKINSON, THOMAS D
WILLIAMSON, DONALD A
WILSON, JOHN R
TULL, THOMAS J.
TUNIS, JOSEPH
TURNBULL, MARGARET L.
WILSON, LAWRENCE L.
WILSON, PHYLLIS M.
WINTON, JOHN L.
TURNER, JOHN N.
VARTY, THOMAS N.
VIGAR, SYDNTE C.
WOLFE, HARRY B.
WOLFE, HOWARTH L.
WOODLEY, J. LYLE
Campus Cupboard Bottles.
Hi-Jinx, of Course.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY-SIX WOOD WORTH, M. JEANE
WORRALL, GLADYS E.
WORSFOLD, CATHARINE E.
WRIGHT, J.
WRIGHT, VICTOR F.
YOUNG, SUE N.
WORTH, EDWARD J.
WRIGHT, DONALD S.
WRIGHT, JACK C.
YUSKOW, WALTER
ZAHARKO, MAX C.
ZIMMERMAN, HAROLD W.
Join  the  Mamooks,   Hmmml
Lovely Shot!
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND    SIXTY-SEVEN Upper:    Gordon  Baum,  president.   Lower:    Bob  Piercy,
Mack Stone, Margaret Stevens, Gordon Baum.
Frosh Invade
U.B.C. Campus
This year the largest Freshman class in the history of the University of British Columbia invaded
the campus.
Initiation week found ex-service students and
younger high-school grads enjoying a whirl of
social activities and joining forces to fend off the
assaults of upperclassmen.
This year's Frosh took their part in the social
and extra-curricular life of the campus. As soon
as clubs, sport and other activities got under wav,
it was evident that the freshmen were out to make
a name for themselves.
In the sports world, swimmers Irene Strong and
Freddie Oxenbury chalked up points for the Blue
and Gold. Bob Piercy outpaced the favourites in
the cross-country event, coming in for an easy win.
Willowy Marion Albert brought fame to the
Freshman class when she was chosen as one of
the two most beautiful co-eds on the campus, and
carried off the laurels in the widely-publicized
Western Inter-Collegiate Beauty Contest to be
chosen Western Campus Queen.
On the Ubyssey, Charles Marshall, George Robertson, Jackie Hart and Carol Dent attained prominence on their respective issues.
Mamooks Gloria Newell, Sara Lee Tidball, Lois
Whimster ably represented the Freshman Class
as Majorettes, while Enid Sinclair, Maureen Auterson and Gordon Stephenson produced outstanding posters, for the campus service club.
Radio Society newcomers Esme MacDonald,
George Flaggs and Blake Sratton gave invaluable
service to the campus network.
Early in November, Freshman elections were
held, and the class executive consisted of Gordon
Baum, president; Mack Stone, vice-president; Margaret Stevens, secretary-treasurer; and Bob Piercy,
athletic representative;
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY-EIGHT   . ADAMS, ALVIN M.
ADDEMS, AUDREY H.
AITKEN, WILLIAM J.
BEAMER, MARGARET J.
BEAN, JOHN S.
BEEK, B. LOUISE
ALBERS, MURIEL E.
ALLAN, GIFFORD  A.
ALLAN, JOHN ROSS
BELL, INGLIS F.
BENNETT, JOAN C
BENNETT, MARION L.
ALLEN, JOYCE C
ANDERSON, NORMA P.
APPS, E. KATE
BENWELL, AUDREY P.
BICKELL, LORNA J.
BINGS, EDWARD A.
ARCHIBALD, M. BETTY
ARNOLD, EUGENE L.
ARROL, EDWARD B.
BINNS, ALLAN S.
BLAIR, JOAN F.
BLAKE, OSMO HARRY
ASHLEY, EDMUND W.
AUDET, MARY R.
AUSTROM, CLARENCE J.
BLACKHALL, ROBERT J.
BOLDT, THEODORE
BOLTON, FRANKLIN B.
AUTERSON, MAUREEN C.
AYERS, MAURICE J.
BABB, NORMAN S.
BONGIE, LAWRENCE L.
BONNEY I. DEAN
BOUSQUET, ALBERT E. J.
BACKMAN, RONALD
BAILE, BLAKE
BAILEY, WILLIAM J.
BOWER, RICHARD S
BOWERING, RICHARD H
BRADLEY, DOUGLAS S
BAIRD, THOMAS S.
BAKER, DIANE O.
BATTERSHILL, DAVID S.
BRACKEN, M. MARGARET
BRIDGE, ELIZABETH A.
BRIGGS, THOMAS I.
Dirty Work.
—* x;
£5 (3
Kebberg and Clarke Torture Freshette.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY-NINE BROOKS, LESLIE C
BROOKS, SHIRLEY J.
BROWN, CHESTER S.
CAVERS, JOHN K.
CHARTRAND, PHILLIP J.
CHILTON, ROBERT B.
BROWN, ESME MARJORIE
BROWN, J.
BURGESS, JOYCE I.
CHRISTENSEN, RALPH M.
CHRISTENSON, RUTH A.
CHRISTY  D.  NELL
BURGESS, THOMAS A.
BURTON, DOROTHY M.
CALDWELL, HARRY E.
CHURCH, WILLIAM A.
CLAGUE, NORA J.
CLARK, E. BLAKE
CALVERT, THOMAS M.
CAMERON, MARGARET J.
CAMERON, OLIVE B.
CLARK, PETER N
CLARK, ROBERT H
CLARKE, OPAL E
CAMPBELL, DOREEN M.
CAMPBELL, DOUGLAS G.
CAMPBELL, MARGERY J.
CLARKE, WILLIAM H.
CLEMENTS, BARRINGTON
CLYNE, ELSPETH A.
CAMPBELL, ROBERT L.
CAMPBELL, WILLIAM D.
CAPSTICK, ROBERT H.
COATSWORTH, RONALD
COCK, ELEANOR F.
COLEMAN, UNA Y.
CARMICHAEL, SHIRLEY I.
CARR, ASHLEY M.
CARR, D. P.
COLWELL, ELIZABETH M.
COOK, HARVEY ROBERT
CORNISH, NORMAN C.
CARSON, JOHN T.
CATES, MAR\ LOUISE
CAVERS, JOHN A. L.
COULTER, THELMA T.
COULTHARD, ROSEMARY M.
COURSIER, E. DOREEN
Freshmen Beware!
Birney Jests.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY CRAWFORD, JEANANN D.
CRABB, MARGARET S.
CREECH, ROBERT E.
DUERKSEN, WALTER D.
DUFTON, WILLIAM C
DUKE, DARYL J.
CRIPPS, W. DALE
CRONIN, ELEANOR F.
CROPPER, RONALD J.
DYER, JOAN LILIAN
EASTWOOD, CATHERINE J.
ELGAARD, KNUD
CUMMINS, SHIRLEY P.
CURRIE, ROEERT S.
CUTHBERT, ROBERT A.
ELLERTON, JANE
ELLIOTT, ISABELLA M.
ELLIS, JACK A. N.
DALY,  NAIDA J.
DAUM, SHIRLEY G.
DAWE, ARTHUR G.
ELRICK, DOUGLAS F.
ELSEY, E. JOYCE
EWING, WALTER M.
DAWSON, PHYLLIS M.
DEACON, BETTE MARIE
DEMARCOS, EARL C.
FALT, ALBIN G.
FERRIE, H. A. JEAN
FINDLAY, ROBERT G. K.
DIAMOND, PAULINE E.
DICKIE, DELSA D.
DISHER, WAYNE H. T.
FISH, PAMELA B.   M.
FLAGGS, GEORGE L.
FLETCHER, GORDON JOY
DONNELLY, WILLIAM E.
DORMAN, M. PATRICIA
DOUGAN, CONSTANCE R.
FONG, DEXTER
FOOLKES, RICHARD G.
FORRESTER, JOHN A. W.
DOWDING, ROBERT W.
DRINNANj RONA HELEN
DUDDLES, JOHN R.
FRANKLIN, DOUGLAS B.
FRASER, NANCY E.
FRENCH, DONALD A.
Meet President MacKenzie.
^m^^^^^ Anyone seen my shirt?
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-ONE FRIEDEL, FREDERICK
FRIESEN, JULIUS R.
FYNN, ROBERT M.
HAAKONSEN, ROSALIE
HAACK, AUDLEY M. L.
HACK, H. WALTER
GALLAGHER, DOROTHY E.
GAMEY, PATRICIA M.
GARDNER, DOROTHY S.
HACKWOOD, ROBERT J.
HALL, PATRICIA G.
HAMILTON, HELENE L.
GARDNER, RACHAEL MAE
GAUTSCHI, EDWIN H. M.
GILCHRIST, HARRY A.
HANTON, A. MARTIN B.
HARDY, JOHN E.
HARRISON, WILLIAM F.
GLENDINNING, LORNE
GOLDSMITH, ALLAN
GOODALE, ELIZABETH J.
HARTT, JACQUELINE V.
HARWOOD, DONALD G.
HAY, GEORGE D. E.
GOODMAN, SHIRLEY W.
GOODWILL, JOYCE M.
GOODWIN, SHIRLEY J.
HAYES, ELEANOR O.
HAZELDINE, GLENNA M.
HEBERT, RAYMOND O.
GORDON, WILLIAM J.
GRAINGER, WILLIAM D.
GRANT, BEVERLEY M.
HENDERSON, DOROTHY M.
HENDRICKS, JOHN R.
HENN, HOWARD H.
GRANT, DENIS C.
GRANT, MICHAEL A.
GRANTHAM, PHYLLIS M.
HENRY, WILLIAM
HERRING, BLYTHE A.
HICKEY, JUNE P.
GRIMMETT, RICHARD H.
GRUCHY, CHARMAINE M.
GUIMONT, CATHERINE A.
HICKS, HENRY A.
HOLLETT, RENNIE H.
HOLMAN, RUSSELL C.
See Any Frosh?
Put Me Down!
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-TWO HOLMES, ARTHUR T.
HOLMES, BETTY MAE L.
HOPKINS, RETA M.
JOHNSTON, PAMELA D.
JOHNSTONE, MARGARET M.
JOKISCH, ALFRED
HORIE, JOSEPH K.
HOSKYN, GLENVILLE A.
HOWARD, ROBERT W.
JONES, ARTHUR E,
JONES, DAVID E
JONES, KENNETH A
HOWARTH, LIONEL D.
HOWELL, EDWARD M.
HUDSON, ROBERTA E.
JONES, MICHAEL O.
KAHN, HENRY
KEARNS, JOHN A. C. B.
HUSOY, FOSTER P.
HUTTON, JOHN M.
HYDE, ALAN W.
KEEN, CHEW HARRY
KELLEY, CORNELIUS M.
KELTON, PATRICIA J.
IBBOTT, JOHN WILLIAM
IKEDA, RONNIE M.
INWARDS, FRANK J.
KENNEDY, JOHN P
KERR, KENNETH R. E
KIRSHFELT,  IRENE  L
ISFELD, VICTOR L.
JAMIESON, DONALD H.
JOHNSON, BYRON O. S.
KNAPPETT, HERBERT L
KNEAL, CHARLES W
KNIGHT, JOHN F
JOHNSON, DOREEN P.
JOHNSON, KENNETH H.
JOHNSON, ROBERT G.
KONDRAT, STELLA
KRUPA, JOHN E.
KYLE, LESLEY J.
JOHNSON, ROSS A.
JOHNSON, WILLIAM M.
JOHNSTON, DONALD R.
LADD, KATHLEEN M.
LAIDMAN, DAVID J.
LAMPORT, GEORGE
Everybody Goes To Armory Dances.
Stalwart  Sciencemen.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-THREE LANGMUIR, ALLAN
LARTER, GLADYS I.
LAWRENCE, RICHARD H.
LYNCH, SHERLE
MABLESON, W. THOMAS
MANNING, LAWRENCE W.
LEARY, SYDNEY GRACE
LEE, MONTY
LEITERMAN, MARY I.
MANNING, SHIRLEY P.
MANNING, WALTER L.
MANUEL, JOYCE
LESLIE, RONALD M.
LEVEY, GERALD S.
LEVY, AUBREY A.
MANZER, GEORGE R. E
MARCOTTE, RAYMOND O
MATHERS, GRETCHEN G
LEWIS, JULIETTE
LIASKAS, M. AGORITA L.
LIGHT, MARGARET I. S.
MATHESON, JOAN A.
MAURICE JEANNETTE
MAYRS, J. COLLEEN
LIM, LILY
LIM, WALTER W.
LININGTON, GRANT W.
MEILICKE, JOYCE
MICHAS, ALEXANDER T.
MILLER, JOAN M.
LIPSIN, EDMUND D. S.
LIVERANT, ROBERT B.
LOCKE, MARY ALICE
MINTAK, JOHN
MITCHELL, NORMAN
MONTGOMERY, IRENE E.
LOCKWOOD, ALFRED R.
LORT, WILLIAMS ROSS
LOUIE, BEATRICE
MOORE, JOAN A.
MORAN, FRANK  P.
MORRIS, JULIA MAY
LOWBEER, MARGARET P.
LUCAS, KENNETH C.
LUNDEEN, MARVIN A.
MORRISON, CLARK A.
MOSCOVITZ, WILLIAM
MOSLIN, RALPH S.
Traditional  Cairn.
Slightly Crowded Frosh Reception.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-FOUR MOWATT, JEAN G.
MOYLS, EILEEN M.
MULLINS, NORMAN D.
MACKAY, FLORENCE M
MacKINNON, WILLA C
MACKOFF, ALBERT A
MURPHY, JOHN C
MURRAY, JOHN L.
MURRAY, WILLIAM
McLACHLAN, DONALD C
McLEAN, JAMES C. J
MacLEAN, MARY L
MacASKILL, JOAN I.
McCALLUM, KENNETH K.
MacBRIDE, ELIZABETH A.
MacLEAN, M,
McLELLAN, PETER G
MacLEOD, ELIZABETH I
McCLUNG, ROBERT M.
McCORKELL, PAMELA J.
McCORMACK. THERESA M.
McMASTER, DONALD
MacMILLAN, GLEN ALLEN
McMillan, margaret c.
MacDONALD, ELAINE M.
MacDONALD, ESME
MacDONALD, JAMES R.
McPHEE, MALCOLM D
MacPHERSON, E. M
MacRITCHIE, NORMAN D
MacDONALD, M. KAY
MacDONALD, WILLIAM J.
McDonnell, allen l.
NAYLOR, GLENN I
NAYLOR, HENRY F
NEMETZ, ALVIN S.
McEACHEN, ELIZABETH H.
McFADYEN, W. NEIL
McFARLANE, KATHLEEN I.
NEUFELD, JOHN H
NEWCOMB, DIANE L
NEWELL, GLORIA L
McGEE, FRANCIS G.
McGIVERON, JACQUELINE
MacGOWAN, JOHN
NEWELL, WINONA P.
NICHOLS, JOAN P,
NICHOLSON, EVA M.
Drink Up.
The $700,000 Physics Building.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-FIVE nordlund, Raymond l.
norman, d. roberta
north, roy a.
PIERCY,  G.  ROBERT
POP,  ALICE
POWELL,  JOAN  A.
OGG, SHEILA M.
OLDAKER, VINCENT G.
OLDFIELD, F. ARTHUR
PRESTON, DORIS IRENE
PRICE,  MANLY
PRINCE, WILLIAM W.
OLIVER, DANIEL M.
ORR, ROBIN J.
OSWALD, JOHN G.
PRINGLE, JOHN  B.
PROKOPCHUK, WILLIAM
PURVIS, HUGH G.
OWEN, DENNIS B.
OXENBURY, JOHN F.
PAINTER, ELIZABETH R.
QUARTERMAINE, ALBERT
QUIGLEY, MERLE D.
RADCLIFFE, ELAINE C
PALFREY, JEAN F.
PALMER, GEORGE A.
PAPOVE, NICOLAI N.
RITTBERG, DORIS
ROBERTSON, BEVERLEY M.
ROBERTSON, CATHERINE
PARKER, W. GORDON R.
PATTERSON, DAVID G.
PATTERSON, THOMAS J.
ROBERTSON, D.
ROBERTSON, W. MARCUS
ROBINSON, GARVIN H.
PAULINE, MURRAY A.
PAXTON, ARTHUR T. C.
PENDLETON, JAME F.
ROBSON, WALLACE M
ROEDDE, WILLIAM A
ROGERS, DAVID T
PETERS, MARY
PETURSSON, MARGARET F.
PHARE, D. ROWINA
ROGERS, DOUGLAS A.
ROSE,  BARBARA ANN
ROSS, E. PATRICIA
Just Try To Escape.
Sidewalk Show,
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-SIX ROSS, HUGH F.
ROSSE, JACK D.
ROTHSTEIN, ROSALI G.
SHAVER, MARILYN A.
SHAW,  FRANK  H.
SIMONSON,  MERRIEL
RUCK, HAROLD
RUDOLPH, HILDEGARDE A.
RUSSELL, NANCY R.
SINCLAIR, D. ENID R.
SKALING, THOMAS R.
SKENE, OLIVE
RYAN, FRED C.
SAGER, MELVIN ALLAN
SANDISON, JAMES M.
SMART, WALTON W,
SMITH, DOLORES J
SMITH, ELSIE  R
SAWDER, FRANCIS H.
SAYCE, ELIZABETH C
SCOTT, ANGUS M.
SMITH, IRENE
SMITH,  JULIAN  B.
SMITHSON, BEVERLEY J.
SCOTT, A. NINI
SCOTT, JOHN A. A.
SCOTT, KENNETH N.
SMYTH, WILLIAM H.
SNIDER, RUTH
SNYDER, JOHN L.
SCOTT, M. PAULINE
SCOTT, RONALD F.
SEARCY, EDWIN M.
SONES, WILLIAM A. P.
SPARKES,  SHIRLEY E.
STEUART, VELMA J.
SENAY, GEORGE W.
SENINI, JAMES T.
SERAPHIM, DONALD P.
STEVENS, M. RUTH
STEVENSON, GORDON H.
STEWART, E. RUTH
SETCHELL, JACK
SEYMOUR, BARBARA A.
SHAPIRO, LIONEL M. I.
STEWART, JEAN M
STODDART, DAVID G
STRONG, IRENE E. G
Freshman's First Pipe.
Stripped For Action.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-SEVEN SWAN, HAROLD F.
SWANSON, WILLIAM J.
TAIT, RALPH H.
TOWNSEND, M. ELAINE
TREHEARNE, TERENCE G.
TREMBATH,   WILLIAM   J.
TAIT, ROBERT M.
TANNER, GILES C.
TASSIE, WILLIAM J.
TREWIN, HENRY E.
TRIP,  OVE  HANSEN
TUCKER, HUGH  N.
TAYLOR, EDWARD N.
TAYLOR, GORDON D.
TAYLOR, JOAN E.
TUDDENHAM, STANLEY F,
TWILLEY, DELDA J.
UMBACH, GORDON T
TEASDALE, DIONE I.
TEMPLE, ALLAN C.
TENCH, STANLEY E. G.
VAWDEN,  JOYCE   C.
VIVIAN, B. JOAN
WADDS, ETHEL A.
TEPOORTEN, LEONARD B:
THIBAUDEAU, DENIS U.
THOMAS, JACK H.
WAKELY, DOREEN L.
WALKEM, CLARENCE I.
WALKER, G. WILLIAM
THOMAS, WILLIAM D.
THOMPSON, DOROTHY M.
THOMPSON, JOHN F.
WALKER, JOANNE
WALKER, ROBERT P.
WALL, DAVID E.
THURSTON, ROBERT H.
TIDBALL, SARA LEE
TINGLEY, RUFUS N.
WARNE, DOUGLAS F
WATKINS, JOHN R.  P
WATT,   CALVIN   L
TOPORCHAK, FRANK J.
TOPPING, WILLIAM E.
TOUGH, NORMAN J.
WATT, J. EARL
WATTS, JOHN L.
WEIR, H. MOIRA
Nora   Clarke   and   Freshette   Victim. ^^^^_^^^W
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND    SEVENTY-EIGHT
Trainmen Mungall and Ferry with Tourist Dyer. WEST, GODFREY A.
WHIMSTER, LOIS ANN
WHITEHEAD, GWLADYS E.
WOOD, SHELAGH T.
WOODHEAD, KATHLEEN M.
WOOLLAM, ANNE MARY
WHITMORE, JANET M.
WHYTE, FLORA L.
WILCOX, L. JOAN
WORRALL, ERNEST
WRIGHT, WILLIAM J.
WYNNE, WILLIAM E.
WILKS, EVERITT JOHN
WILLIAMS, MARY J.
WILLIAMS, ROBERT S.
YOUNG, IRENE E. D.
YOUNG, RAYMOND A.
BRADEN, M. H. Jr.
WILLIAMSON, LOIS M.
WILSON, M. JOAN M.
WILSONBUSBY, BRUCE H.
EDWARDS, J. C
GEMMELL, R. H.
JOHNSON, J. S. P.
WINTER, MARGARET G. B.
WITHERS, CHARLES P.
MERCIER, L.  H.
ROTHWELL,  N.  M.
Scenes from the Greek Letter Societies' Gala Mardi Gras.
.    .    .    PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-NINE •
George McKeen, John Archer, Gloria Kendall, Charlotte  Christopher, Frank Phillips, Fred Jeffries, Alec Lambe,  Ben
Anders, Thomas Grant.
Commercemen Learn Business
The Commerce Undergraduate Society this year
has achieved several goals under its president,
Frank Phillips. Frank, with his quiet, executive
touch, lifted the fledgling undergraduate society
to a position of stature on the U.B.C. campus. The
present enrollment of seven hundred and eight
students has encouraged the hopes of Commerce
of becoming a recognized faculty within a short
time.
Besides being active in canvassing for the Gym
Drive, Com students found time to organize and
attend three Pep Meets, form a Commerce Alumnae Association, and take part in Intramural
Sports.
Commerce is also distinguished by many prominent campus figures among its ranks.
Commerceman Don McRae was treasurer of the
Students' Council, Bob Harwood served as Junior
member, and Buzz Walker as social co-ordinator.
Blonde Tina Howard was chosen as one of
the two most beautiful coeds on the campus as
a candidate for the Western Campus Beauty
Queen.
Bill McKay took over the reins of the Undergraduate Societies Committee when he was elected
president in November.
j7_S_t!
mm
1   T ■
__________! B^^^l
1   "K-3^    JL
Franjfc Phillips, President.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY AIRD, Jackson W. - Calgary
Phi Kappa Sigma, C.S.F.E.
ANDERS, BENJAMIN - Nanaimo
BODIE, ROBERT T. - Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta.
BOOTH,  RICHARD D. - Vancouver
Psi Upsilon, Golf.
ANDREWS, ERNEST H. -Vancouver
ARCHER, JOHN-New Westminster
BOSDET, JOHN D. -Victoria
BREWSTER, DONALD A. - Vancouver
ARGUE, JAMES H. - Cranbrook
Beta Theta Pi, Players, Badminton.
BARLOW, DOUGLAS W. -Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi.
BURCH, THOMAS P. - Vancouver
CARTER, KENNETH A.-Vancouver
Fencing.
BARNWELL, JOHN A. - Vancouver
BARTLE, JOHN G. - Vancouver
CARTER, STEWART M. - Vancouver
CHEW, VERNOR B. -Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta.
BATES, ELMER W. -Vancouver
Tennis, Golf.
BEAMER, GORDON H. - Hollyburn
Phi Kappa Pi, Skiing.
CHU, JENNIE - Vancouver
Chinese Club, Swimming.
CLERIHUE, WILLIAM R. - Vancouver
BIRMINGHAM, WILLIAM P. - Vancouver
V.O.C, Tennis.
BISHOP, LLOYD G. - Nelson.
Theta Xi, Mamooks.
CLIFFORD, RICHARD L. - Vancouver
Players Club.
CLUCACH, MOROS - Vancouver
Well,  according to my  calculations.'
Discarded?
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED     AND   EIGHTY-ONE COHEN, ]ACK-Vancouver
]&tz Society.
COUTTS, JAMES W. -Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi.
FERRY, JACK A. - Vancouver
Zeta Psi, Editor-in-Chief, Publications.
FLEMING, THOMAS K. - Victoria
CRIBB, JOHN M. -Vancouver
Jokers.
CROSBY, BOYD T. -Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta, Rugby.
FREUDIGER, RONALD - Vancouver
Jokers, Jazz Society.
FREWER, PHILIP G. - Vancouver
Alpha Delta  Phi,  Hockey.
D'ANDREA, JOSEPH A. - Fernie
DEAR, WALLACE - Brighouse
FUNDY, WALTER - Pathfinder
Soc. Prob. Club.
GAFFNEY, RICHARD F. - Vancouver
DIETHER,   BARBARA - Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma.
DOUBLEDAY, DOUGLAS C. -Vancouver
GOODMAN, JUANITA V. - Vancouver
Alpha Omicron Pi, V.O.C.
GOODWIN, GORDON V. - Plenty
DYKE, DAVID C L. - Calgary
Tennis,  Skiing.
ERICKSON, EVERETT, R. -Wartime
GOURLAY, COLIN C. - Ladysmith
GRANT, THOMAS C. - Vancouver
ESTEY, ROBERT M. -Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta, Ping-Pong.
EVANS, DAN S. - Vancouver
GREEN, ARTHUR R. - New Westminster
Hockey.
GREER, FREDERICK J. - New Denver
V.C.F.
Contemplation.
After the Debate is Over.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY   TWO GUMAN, PHILIP G. - Vancouver
Psi Upsilon, Football.
HARFORD, IAN M. - Vancouver
Phi Kappa Pi, Varsity Band, Ubyssey.
KENNY, ERIC  L.-Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi.
KERSHAW, STEPHEN C. - Vancouver
HARRIS, KINGSLEY F. - North Vancouver
V.O.C, Skiing.
HARRISON, PAUL H. - Victoria
Swimming, Archery.
KIRK, ANDREW P. - Vancouver
Skiing, Skating
KNUTSON, ALVIN L. - Prince Albert
Kappa Sigma.
HEIDT, ANTHONY A. - Regina.
HILL, WILLIAM M. -West Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta.
KUEBLER, FRANK G. - Vancouver
Volley-ball.
LAM, PAUL - Steveston
HODGSON, ELIZABETH J. - Vancouver
Alpha Delta Pi.
HOWIESON, ROBERT D. - West Vancouver
LANGDALE, LESLIE  A.-Vancouver
LEW, ANN - Vancouver
S.P.C, Chinese Varsity.
JAMES, RALPH B. - Vancouver
Zeta Beta Tau.
JAUCK, JOHN F. -Vancouver
L.S.A., Tennis.
LOCKHART, KEITH W. - New Westminster
Beta Theta Pi.
LOWE,  ROBERT  H. - Victoria
Badminton.
KENDALL, GLORIA E. - Victoria
Pari. Forum.
KENMUIR, JOHN A. - Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta, Badminton.
MARSHALL, WARREN E. - Vancouver
MILLER, ALEXANDER K. - Edmonton
Golf, Tennis.
The President.
Our Majorettes.
PAGE     TWO    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-THREE MILLER, DONOVAN F. - Vancouver
Archery,  Tennis.
MOLSON, DAVID H. - Victoria
V.O.C, Track.
McLENNAN, JOHN M. - Nelson
Golf, Badminton.
McMillan, Alfred c.-Ponoka
MUIR, ERIC W.  A.-Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi.
MYLETT, PATRICK V.-Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi.
McRAE, DONALD A. - Victoria
Treasurer, A.M.S.
McRAE, HARRY NORMAN - Vancouver
C.U.S.
MacASKILL, BARBARA J. - Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta.
McCONNELL,  THOMAS W. -Vancouver
Forestry Club.
NAFTEL, CECIL O. -Victoria
Golf.
NICOLLE, WILSON R.   -Vancouver
Track.
McCUBBIN, WILLIAM D. - Vernon
V.C.F., Track.
MacDOUGALL, JOHN F. F. - Banff
Alpha Delta Phi, Econ. Club.
NOBLE, DAVID A. - Vancouver
Swimming.
O'BRIEN,  M.  J.
McGREGOR, DUNCAN W. -Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi.
McKEEN, GEORGE B.-Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi.
OUIMETTE, WILLIAM  M. - Eburne
PAISLEY, JOHN K. -Vancouver
Zeta Psi.
McKILLOP, DESMOND G. -Vancouver
McLEISH, GLENNA G. - Vancouver
Alpha  Gamma Delta.
PARKER, ALBERT M. L. - New Westminster
Golf, Tennis.
PEACH, STEWART B. - Vancouver
Gala Caf.
Watch Closely.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-FOUR PENSON, NORMAN H.-Vancouver
PRATT, JOAN F. - Vancouver'
Gamma Phi Beta.
ROBINSON, NORMAN A. - Vancouter
ROFF, JACK W. -Vancouver
Forestry Club.
PRICE, ROBERT S. - Victoria
QUICK, BEVERLEY C. - Squamish
Gamma Phi Beta.
RUSH, WILLIAM L. -Vancouver
Beta Theta  Pi.
SABA,   ALBERT   H. -Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma, Swimming.
REA, DAVID T. - Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi, Badminton.
REED, KENNETH W.
Phi Gamma Delta.
■ Salmon Arm
SCOTT, JOHN C. M. - Vancouver
SCOTT, MARGARET C. - Victotia
Alpha Delta Pi.
RHODES, JOHN A. - Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi.
RICHARDS, REES - Vancouver
SCOTT,  GRAEME W. -Victoria
Phi Delta Theta.
SIMMONS, HARRY R. - Vancouver
ROBB, RUSSELL - Victoria
Football, Lacrosse.
ROBINSON, DONALD A.-Victoria
Camera Club, Publications, Tennis.
SLOAN, WILLIAM M. - Vancouver
Fishing.
SOMERVILLE, WILLIAM R. - Vancouver
ROBINSON, R. L.
ROBINSON, GRANT T. - Vancouver
Jokers.
STANFORD, STEPHEN E. - Vancouver
STEWART, JACK - Vancouver
Jokers.
Estey and Friends,
B.T.O.'s.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-FIVE STIMPSON, ARTHUR W. - Radisson
STRANG, DOUGLAS M. - Victoria
I.R.C, Badminton.
WALLACE, CHARLES H. - Vancouver
Rugby.
WALLACE, FRANCIS J. -Vancouver
Swimming.
STUART, STANLEY W. - Vancouver
TALLING, ROBERT H. - Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta.
WARDROPER,  WILFRID  K. -Vancouver
Pari. Forum.
WATKINSON, ARTHUR P. W. - Vancouver
THOMPSON, THOMAS D. -Vancouver
Tennis,  Badminton.
THOMSON, DOUGLAS T. - Vancouver
WATT, JAMES M. - Vancouver
Badminton.
WEBB, TERRANCE G. - Vancouver
THORNICROFT, STANWAY E. - Vancouver
TOWNSLEY, WILLIAM - North Vancouver
Badminton.
WEBER, RONALD J. - Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta, Basketball.
WELSH, ROBERT L. - Lawson
USBORNE, JOHN S. - Vancouver
Jokers.
VARCOE, JOHN B. - Vancouver
Delta Upsilon, S.P.C,  Hockey.
WILLIAMSON, HUGH J.
WILSON, ERIC P.
VAUGHAN,  MARGARET E. - Vancouver
Alpha Delta Pi.
WALKER, ROBERT E. - Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta.
WILSON, WILLIAM L. - Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi.
WYATT, ROBERT C. - Vancouver
Football.
Esme Frolics in the Snow.
• Vancouver
Vancouver
Playir.g Rough.
PAGE   TWO    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-SIX BAKER, JOHN E. W.
CLARKE, THOMAS G.
COHEN,   JACK I.
COLLEN, WILLIAM D.
BALDWIN, G. R.
BANNING, STANLEY E.
BARKER, JOHN D.
COUSINS, FREDERICK T.
COWAN, PATRICIA
CUMBERBIRCH, PETER R.
BARRACLOUGH, LILA P.
BEEBE, BRUCE W.
BERGMAN, ELMER O. E.
CUTHBERT, BETTY JEAN
DAVIS, DOUGLAS A.
DUFF, WILLIAM T.
BERGSTROM, JOHAN A.
BLAKE, F. GORDON
BOSSONS, FREDERICK
DUNCAN, MARY L
DYER, LAWRENCE N
ELGAARD, BERGE U
BOTHAM, ARTHUR D.
BROMAN, KURT I.
BROMLEY, GORDON F.
EMERSON, ELLIOTT
EVANS, LIONEL D.
FALK, ELMER
BROWN, ALAN W.
BROWN, ROBERT D.
BROWN, LEE
FORRESTER, SHIRLEY
FOSTER, WINSTON M.
GALT, THOMAS D.
BRYCE, ALLAN A. W.
BUERGE, MEL
BURDETT, RAYMOND
GARDINER, JOHN G.
GARRARD, RICHARD A.
GEE, JOHN W.
CAMERON, CECIL H.
CARMICHAEL, DONALD B.
CARTER, K. BRUCE
GENNIS, EMERSON H.
GLUSKA, WILLIAM
GOODMURPHY, RALPH M.
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V       Mli, irJ-H!
vanuBflAij        g
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Tru That Tube.
Don't be afraid, son!
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-SEVEN ft £* §1
_A____T_i.
GOURLAY, ROBERT A.
GRACEY, WILLIAM H.
GRAHAM, JOHN W. M.
HOOKER, HARVEY F.
HOWARD,  E.  IAN
HOWARD, MALVINA M.
GRAHAM, PETER W.
GRANT, FRANCIS J.
GREENAWAY, JEAN E.
HRIGOREW, ANDRO
HUDSON, WILLIAM H.
IANNACONE, ERNEST M.
GROBERMAN, LIONEL
GROLL,. S. N.
HAAS, ROBERT L.
IANSON, JACK L
ISAACSON, CLARENCE T
ISLAUB, STANLEY K.
HACKETT, THOMAS L.
HADWEN, COLLEEN V.
HALL, JEAN E.
JOHNSTON, E. ROBERT
JONES, STANLEY C.
KEENAN, ROBERT G.
HANSON, ALBERT L.
HANTKE, ALLAN P. R.
HARDY, STAFFORD L.
KING, DONALD N
KING, E. ILENE N
KIRK, ANDREW P
HARE, WILLIAM A. D.
HARWOOD, ROBERT S.
HENDERSON, C
KIRKPATRICK, CROCKETT
LADE, GORDON W.
LAUDREM, WILLIAM A.
HENDERSON, PHILIP
HERRING, STEPHEN H. E.
HETHERINGTON, RON M.
LAWRENCE, H. BROOKS
LECHTZLER, MERTON R.
LISTER, WILLIAM G.
HILL, J. ROBERTS
HOAD, FREDERICK A.
HOGG, DAVID M.
LOISELLE, HAROLD A
LONG, JOHN H
LORD, BRUCE S
Adaskin and Marr.
Ham Operator and Licenses.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-EIGHT MALTBY, RICHARD .G.
MASON, FRANK B.
MOORE, FRANK H.
PINCHIN, HAROLD R.
POWELL, PATRICK A.
REDPATH, WILLIAM E
MOORE, RAY JOHN
MORETON, GRANT K.
MacAULAY, ARCHIBALD R.
RIDDELL, WILLIAM G.
ROBERTS, HARRY A.
ROSE, THOMAS F.
McBRIDE, RUSSELL M.
MacDONALD, A. DONALD
MacDONALD, HAROLD M.
ROSS, BRUCE D.
ROSS, MARGARET J.
ROTTLUFF, ROBERT G.
McDONOUGH, DONALD
McGEER, DUDLEY M.
McGRATTEN, ROSS C. N.
SANDERSON, JAMES H. W.
SHAW, BARBARA P.
SHORT,  PETER W.
MacGREGOR, HECTOR C.
McKAY, WILLIAM T.
McKEACHIE, JAMES C
SHUGG, HAROLD F.
SIMS, NORMAN C
SMITH, JAMES H.
MacKENZIE, HUGH A.
MacKINNON, ROBERT R.
NEELANDS, D. JACK
SMITH, KENNETH O.
SMITH, WILLIAM H.
STEVENSON, GERALD H.
OLMSTEAD, L. DENNIS
PAINTER, JOAN M.
PANTON, J. A.
STEWART, GEORGE C.
STLOUIS, ARCHIE L.
TATE, WILLIAM W.
PAPPAJOHN, JAMES P.
PATERSON, HERBERT F.
PHILLIPS, FRANCIS A.
THOM, H. GILBERT
THORNE, ALICE G.
TODD, HAROLD B.
-K-^J
Rock-a-bye Arts Man.
Hong Kong  Blues.
PAGE   TWO   HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-NINE WALL, WILLIAM B.
WALLS, LEWIS J.
WEST, CHARLES J.
t_       *
ATTWELL, LEWIS S.
BARRACLOUGH, HENRY N.
BARRIGAN, DONALD B.
WHELEN,  GEORGE E.
WHITE, WILLIAM A. T.
WHITTALL, WILLIAM E.
BLACK, DAPHNE J.
BLAINE, JOHN  J.
BLOCKBERGER, R. J.
WILCOX, EDIE A.
WILKINSON, F.  CAMERON
WILKS, RODERICK  j.
BLOOMER, TERRANT O.
BOUCHER, DOUGLAS A.
BOURNS, STEWART A.
WILLIAMS, ELMER
WILSON, ALAN j.
WOODMAN, MABEL E.
BOYKOWICH, LEON S.
BRAY, RONALD C.
BROLLY, PETER G.
WOODSIDE, PAUL
WRIGHT, KENNETH  M.
YOUNG, ROBERT M.
BROWER, STUART R.
BROWN,  JAMES  A.
BUNKER, JACK L.
YOUNG, W. MAURICE
BURBIDGE, EILEEN M.
BURGESS, WILLIAM H.
BUSHFIELD, E. DOREEN
ADAMS, J. RAYMOND
ADDISON, HUGH P. F.
AIKINS, CAROL
BUTLER, CHARLES F.
CAMPBELL, DARELL
CARMICHAEL,  BRUCE  F.
ALGAR, LLOYD G.
ARCHER, ELMER R.
ATKINSON, CHARLES M.
CASTLE, ROBERT G.
CHIORANDO, FREDERICK
CHURCH, DONALD B.
Student Lobbyists and the President.
-An \„,'
t&_...      •-
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pTr>»-  ...  r
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Exercise Your Franchise.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY CLIFF, RONALD L.
COLLIER, EARNEST J.
COOK, FLORENCE A.
FRANCIS, ALAN J.
FRAZEE, JOHN  D.
FULLERTON, DONALD R.
COOPER, DONALD R.
CORSE, MARY D.
COSSACK, WILLIAM
FULTON, NORMAN A.
GARNER, DONALD
GERRARD, W. G.
COWAN, DOUGLAS V.
COWPER, I. HOWARD
CROFTON, JOHN E.
GILLESPIE, GRAY A.
GILLIES, DONALD M.
GODEFROID, JOHN J.
CROWTHER, F. W. P.
CRUMP, RICHARD O.
CULOS, PETER
GOOK, PETER R.
GORDON, RALPH M.
GOSLING, DAVID E. L.
DALE, DAVID W.
DALGLEISH, WILLIAM H.
DOBNEY, MILLICENT E.
GOULET, LAWRENCE S.
GOURLAY, JAMES L.
GRAVELLE, HENRI O.
DOWNS, KENNETH W.
DUNCAN, CHARLES I.
EASTON, MELVIN D.
GREEN, HAROLD M.
GREER, SINTON B.
GRIFFIN, BRUCE A.
EDGETT, JAMES R.
ELLIOT, THOMAS S.
FAIRWEATHER, DAVID  M.
GUREVITZ, SHELDON
GUTHMAN, MICHAEL
HAGGART, RONALD B.
FIELDING, GREESON C
FLEMING, JOHN R.
FORREST, IAN M.
HALL,  TERENCE
HAMILTON, DRUMMOND G.
HANNA, J. M.
Balinese, Hmmm?
Phi Kap Table.
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND   NINETY-ONE HARRIS, THOMAS F.
HEAN, A. F. C.
HELLIWELL, DONALD T.
LIVINGSTONE, KATHLEEN
LYONS, VIRGINIA M.
MANUEL, LLOYD
HENNIGER, EZRA C.
HERMON, RICHARD B.
HEWITT, PETER T.
MARTIN, PATRICK H. T.
MASSON, J. N. GERARD
MELVILLE, JACK A.
HICKENBOTHAM,  HAROLD
HILL, WILLIAM R. W.
HOPE, N. C. E.
MELVIN, RONALD M.
MERCER, GEORGE E.
MILLER, H. F. HERBERT
HOEL, LESLIE C.
HUNDLEBY, D. REX
HUTT, RITA M.
MILLS, JOHN B.
MILNE, LAMOND A.
MOE, KENNETH G.
KELLMAN, JOHN D.
KELLY, MICHAEL J.
KELSBERG, WILLIAM
MOON,  DAVID A.
MORFEY,  MONTEGUE  H.
MORRIS,  BARRIE  A.
KAYLL,  D. A.
KING, H. STEPHEN
KIRKLAND, JAMES W.
MORRISH, FRANK A.
MOYNES, JAMES H.
MULRONEY, JOHN A. C
KULYNYCH, ERNEST J.
LAHTI, JOHN W.
LANGDALE, GLYN H.
MUNRO, JOHN
MURDOCH, GEORGE
MURPHY, ROBERT H.
LEES, JOHN C.
LEVY, ALAN D.
LINDSAY, MacGREGOR
McCALLUM,  ROBERT  C.
McCARTEN, DANIEL F.
McCURDY, D. KENNETH
Effie Smallwood Is Honored.
l ___Bk    t     i_f*
__________    ___________
fifl
piM_m
-'
Don't Exert Yourself.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND    NINETY-TWO MacDONALD, HENRY A.
MacDONALD,  M. A.
McFarlane, harold e.
RANDALL, ROBERT M.
REID,  ROBERT  R.
RIGBY-JONES,  ROY J.
McGILL, GORDON W.
MacKlNNON, RICHARD G.
Mclaughlin, robert g.
RIOUX,  JOSEPH N.
ROSE, ANDREW H.
ROSS, JOHN
McLENNAN, ROBERT P.
MacPHERSON, STANLEY
McRAE, DUNCAN
ROWLLINGS, MARJORIE
RUMFORD, VERNON J.
RYAN,  ARTHUR B.
McRAE, LOIS MAY
NELSON, ROBERT E.
NELSON, WILLIAM B.
SAINAS, MARY
SATTEN, MORLEY
SCHRAMM, WILLIAM  A.
NEMETZ, MILTON M.
NICHOLSON, DONALD A.
O'BRIEN, THOMAS L.
SEALE, REGINALD C
SEVERIDE, NORMAN
SHAW, EDWARD
OLDS, W. W. GLEN
OLSON, E.
PARKER, BYRON H.
SHELLEY, RAYMOND
SKILLING, SAMUEL W.
SMALLACOMBE, L. GORDON
PEACOCK, JAMES R.
PEART, ARTHUR E.
PETTIGREW, STUART J.
SMART, ARTHUR D.
SMITH, LESLIE  F.
SMITH, WALTER J.
PILLER, GORDON K.
POTTS, DAVID B.
PUDNEY, J. W. DAVID
SOMERS, D. MARIE
SPRINKLING, PAUL H.
STANDFIELD, BARRY
Profs' Huts at Acadia.
Derrek'll Do It.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED     AND    NINETY-THREE STEVENS, SHIRLEY A.
STEWART, RICHARD A.
STOCKAND, MARIAN G.
WATSON,   BRUCE
WATT, TERRENCE R.
WEBSTER, RONALD J.
STRACHAN, NORMA H.
SUNDBERG, LYALL M.
SUTHERLAND, ELIZABETH
WELDON, RICHARD C
WESTMORELAND, THOMAS
WETMORE, MICHAEL S.
SZENDE, PETER P.
TEMINSKY, JOSEPH
TENNANT, JOHN M.
WHITNEY, NANCY  A.
WHITTALL, H. V.
WIDMEYER, ROY W.
THODOS, CONSTANTINE  N.
THOMPSON, NORMAN A.
TODD, PATERSON A.
WILKINSON, JOHN W.
WISHART, ALAN
WOODLAND, VICTOR C
TOPELKA, CARL
TOWN, DALBERT A.
VIK, NORMAN
WOODMAN, RALPH H.
WORTON, LEONARD W.
WOTHERSPOON, ARTHUR
WALLACE, WILLIAM P.
WARNER, E. RONALD J.
WATKINS, GEORGE D.
WYLIE, T. MILTON
YATES,  ROY
ZEZULA, JOSEPH F.
Bi" Business Men.
Commerce  Lab.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-FOUR    .    . Mike Allan.
John Allen.
Bill Matheson.
Engineers Finish Long Grind
About to embark on their way to fame and fortune in the cruel world, the hardy souls of Science
'47 have spent a good deal of time this year in the
completion of the last steps of their long and difficult course. Studies, however, have not been the
hardworking redshirts' only contribution to campus
life.
■Naturally,   the   most   famous   contribution   of %
Science '47 to Student Government is in the person
of Ted Kirkpatrick, president of the AMS.
Another of the busy men has been Gordy Genge,
who, along with his multifoliate duties as president
of the Engineers' Undergraduate Society, has
found time to be in the starting line-up of the
American Football team. Also helping out in the
fine was Gus Sainus, one of Gordy's electrical
classmates.
Stepping out from the ranks of the Geological
Engineers this year, John Wheeler won the George
Pringle Memorial Bursary for his brilliant scholastic abilities. He also figured among athletes on the
campus as a member of the English Rugby team.
Roy Hooley has done a splendid job as president
of the Varsity Outdoor Club. Another notable
man of the outdoors is Jerry Lockhart, who is
known for his fine endeavours in the ski meets.
The enthusiastic executive of Science '47 this
year was composed of Jack Hannan, American
Institute of Electrical Engineers; John Allen,
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Mike
Allan, American Institute of Chemical Engineers;
John Wheeler, Dawson Club; Ted Greenaway, Civil
Club; and Al Webster, Forestry Club, who worked
together to co-ordinate class activities.
Upper:  Jack Hannon, Ted Greenaway.
Lower:   Al Webster, John Wheeler.
PAGE   TWO    HUNDRED   AND    NINETY-FIVE MILAN, ALBERT R. - Port Alberni
MURRAY, GORDON S. -Vancouver
Skiing,  Golf.
ALLAN, MICHAEL H. S. W. - Vancouver
A.I.C.E., Soccer.
AMES, GORDON W. - North Vancouver
A.I.C.E.
McCALLUM,  THOMAS G. M. - Vancouver
McDONNELL,  BASIL - Vancouver
BORTOLIN, LINDO G. - Powell River
Mussoc, A.l.C.E.
COWIE, ALEXANDER - Vancouver
jazz Club.
McLELLAN, HAROLD  D.-Ioco
Soccer.
NEILSON,   ALLAN   P.-Vancouver
A.I.C.E., Soccer.
ELLISON, GORDON D. - Trad
HUFF,  WALTER-West Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta.
NEWMARCH, THOMAS F. R. - Vancouver
Rowing.
OSBORNE, WILLIAM M. - Medicine Hat
Mussoc, Golf.
HUGHES,  JAMES  H.  C. - Vancouver
Rugby.
HUGHES, ROGER C.-Courtenay
Psi Upsilon.
PEDERSEN, CHESTER H. - Vancouvei
Kappa Sigma, Golf.
POLOWY, JOSEPH - Vancouver
Tenni.,  Skiing.
LARSON, LAWRENCE N. - Ocean Falls
LEVELTON,  BRUCE H. - Bella Coola
A.l.C.E.
REAVILLE, ERIC T. - Vancouver
ROSS, GEORGE A. - Victoria
Sigma Phi Delta.
Peter and the Rabbit.
Which floor, please?
PAGE    TWO   HUNDRED   AND    NINETY-SIX SEYER, FRANCIS H. -Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi, Newman.
SHERMAN, DEANE D. - Vancouver
Publications, Track.
DAVIES, LLEWELYN B.
EVANS, DONALD J. - New Westminster
SIMPSON, JOHN D. - Vancouver
A.l.C.E., Badminton.
WOODSIDE, OWEN W.
Hockey, Rugby.
- Vancouver
GENGE, GORDON M. - Vancouver
A.I.E.E., E.I.C.
GILL, LAWRENCE - Nanaimo
GILL,  WILLIAM  D. - Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi, A.I.E.E.
GLOVER, NELLES H. - New Westminster
BEAL, EVAN S. - Vancouver
Jazz Club, Tennis.
BUSHFIELD, ROY - Vancotiver
Phi Kappa Pi, Skiing.
HANNAN, JOHN G. - Victoria
V.O.C, A.I.E.E.
HAYES, JOHN - Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta, A.I.E.E.
CARTER, ARNOLD G.-Trail
Mussoc, A.I.E.E.
COOK, ROBERT E. - Smithers
A.I.E.E.
HAZLEWOOD, DAVID A.-Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi.   .
HESLA, ERLING C. -New Westminster
Sigma Phi Delta.
COOPER,  ERNEST  E. -Vancouver
Jazz Club, Hockey.
COX, ROBERT A. - Vancouver
V.C.V., Badminton.
HILL, ROBERT H. - Nanaimo
HRYNCHUK, WALTER - Vancouver
Girls' Calisthenics.
Interesting Shapes.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-SEVEN JAMES,   RODNEY A.  IS.-Vancouver
KIRKPATRICK, GUY G. - Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi, A.I.E.E.
RALSTON,   GORDON  B. - Victoria
Swimming.
ROBINSON, WILLIAM G. - Vancouver
LEWCHUK,   Micliael - Vancouver
LISTER, ROBERT W. - Vancouver
Delta Upsilon, A.I.E.E.
SAINAS, CONSTANTINE - Vancouver
Jokers.
SEPPALA, KEIJO H. W. - Hammond
A.I.E.E., L.S.A.
MARZOCCO,  EDO - Kimberley
V.O.C.
MILLER, WALLACE  W. - Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta.
THOMSON, STANLEY G. - White Rock
Mussoc.
WARD,  GEORGE A.  H. -   Vancouver
I.V.C.F., A.I.E.E.
MORRISON, EDWARD S. - Vancouver
V.O.C.
MACDONALD,  RODERICK  M. - Courtenay
WOODS,  ERIC  J.  H.-Vancouver
' Beta Theta Pi.
MCCARTHY,  ALBERT - Vancouver
V.O.C, Skiing.
NAYLOR, THOMAS K. - Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
ANDREW,  FRED  J.-Vancouver
BATEMAN, WILLIAM A.-Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta.
PARICH, MICHAEL - Vancouver
A.I.E.E., Rowing.
RACINE,  REJEAN  W. - Vancouver
Mussoc, Basketball.
BERSON, MORRIS J. -Vancouver
Zeta Beta Tau, Pari.  Forum.
COVENTRY, WILLIAM V. - Vancottvei
WUS Executive.
The Iceman Cometh.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED   AND    NINETY-EIGHT GALLON,  ALAN  V. - Vancouver
S.E.I.C
GREENAWAY, NORMAN E. - Eburne
BAKER, FREDERIC B. - Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta, Forestry Club.
FORRESTER, ANDREW G. - Ladysmith
Swimming, Tennis.
HERRING,  PHILIP S. - Vancouver
E.I.C.
HORNE, EDGAR B. - Vancouver
PARNUM, EWART -West Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta, Skiing.
KERR, ROBERT G. - Vancouver
E.I.C.
MANNING,   DAVID
E.I.S.C
Vancouver
SLANEY, FREDERICK F. - Vancouver
THOMSON, THOMAS M. - Sydney
Forestry Club.
QUIRK, EDWIN T. - Nelson
REDMOND,  HOWARD  C. -Vancouver
WEBSTER,  ALAN  W. - Lillooet
Forestry  Club.
FRITH,   PATRICK  V. -Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta, Rugger.
TANNER, GORDON A.-Vancouver
TINNEY, EDWY R. -Vancouver
PEARSON, DONALD E. T. - Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta.
RITCHIE,  DAVID   M. -Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta, Forestry Club.
WONG KWONG JACK - Vancouver
Men With a Purpose.
Prize  Winner.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-NINE ALLAN, JOHN D. - Vancouver
Delta Upsilon, A.S.M.E.
CAINS, RICHARD W. - Sooke
Phi Tau Delta.
MacLEAN, FRASER A.-New Westminster
A.S.M.E., S.M.E.I.C.
OEHLERKING, ROY F. - Vancouver
CAMPBELL, PAT - Vancouver
LJtii Kappa bigma, Soccer.
CHECKO, ANDREW - Victoria
Camera Club.
QUAN, BEN - Vancouver
A..SM.E., Chinese Students Cub.
ROSS, WILLIAM J. -Vancouver
Rowing.
DOUGLAS, COLIN M. - Vancouver
E.I.C, A.S.M.E.
FENN,  RAYMOND  A.-Vancouver
Delta Upsilon, Newman, A.S.M.E.
SLINGSBY,   JOHN   C. -Victoria
Phi Kappa Sigma.
TUKHAM, GODFRED W. -  Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta.
KIRKPATRICK, EDWARD T. - Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi, A.S.M.E., V.O.C.
KLOMPAS, NICHOLAS - Andrew
TWEED, WILLIAM J. - Vancouver
WATSON, ARTHUR S. - Vancouver
Sigma Delta Phi, A.S.M.E.
LA YARD, CAMVILLE P.-Sydney
Delta Upsilon.
LOCKHART, GERALD P. - New Westminster
Phi Gamma Delta, A.S.M.E.
WATTS, JAMES A. - Vancouver
WINTEMUTE,  JOHN  R. - Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma, V.O.C.
McBEAN, WILLIAM A. - Vancouver
Zeta Psi.
MacKAY,  JAMES W. -Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi, Camera Club.
WILSON, JAMES P. D. - Grande Prairie
Tennis.
Macdonald Dickers.
Hey, that's a fire in there!
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED BEVERIDGE,  JAMES  A.-Vancouver
Boxing, Swimming.
DICKSON, PETER - Vancouver
V.O.C.
ADIE, LAWRENCE - New Westminster
LEA, EDGAR R. - Vancouver
Delta Upsilon.
FYLES, JAMES T. - Vancouver
GREENIUS, ARNOLD W. -Vancouver
LEE, JAMES  W. - North Vancouver
V.O.C, Sailing.
McFEELY,   CAMERON   ].-Qualicum
Zeta Psi.
JOHN, JOHN G. - Cranbrook
Dawson Club, Hiking.
McGINN, ALEXANDER - Vancotwer
Sigma Phi Delta, Badminton.
WHEELER,  JOHN O. - Banff
Delta Upsilon, Rugby.
WHITNEY, GORDON E. - New Westminster
Dawson Club.
McPHERSON,  DUGALD - Vancouver
Dawson Club.
MAGEE, JAMES B:- Vancouver
Hockey, Softball.
MATHESON, WILLARD E. - Kelowna
ROBINSON, JOHN W. - Coquitlam
Boxing.
STARCK, LOUIS P.-Vancouver
PITMAN, DUNCAN L. - Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta, A..SM.E., E.I.C.
ROSE, DAVID J. -Victoria
Sigma Phi Delta, A.I.E.E.
Genge Harangues.
What say, Doc?
.   PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   ONE Ken Warner.
Bert Shore.
Peter Jones.'
Third Year Engineers Active
Bill Baron.
Bob Dundas.
Nearing the end of the journey toward the
degree of Bachelor of Applied Science, the members of Science '48 admit that it feels good to be
getting in sight of the much-desired object.
The class has now divided itself into the various
sections of engineering, and the range of subjects
has been narrowed to the requisites for the chosen
course.
Mining Engineering this year boasts an enrollment of twelve, which, surprisingly enough, seems
to be a record. Metallurgical Engineering has a
similarly large enrollment.
An increase in mining activity in Canada during
the past few years has doubled the demand for
trained field and mine geologists, and as a direct
result, more and more students are taking advantage of the fine courses offered to students in
Geology.
Despite the numerous labs and exacting timetables of the redshirts, many of them have had
time for participation in campus affairs and
activities.
Various executives in Science '48 included Gerry
Burch, Class Representative of Forestry Engineering; Ken Warner, third year representative of the
Dawson Club; Hubert Gabrielse, Athletic Representative on E.U.S.; Mai Robinson, class representative of Geological Engineering.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   TWO ARCHIBALD, ROY W.
BLUECHEL, ALLAN J.
BRODIE, MALCOLM N.
BURGESS, HAROLD N.
BABB, ALBERT L.
BEGGS, ADRIAN E.
BRIDGES, RUSSELL B.
CRAIG, R. ALEX
DAVIS, EVAN THOMAS
DUNDAS, ROBERT M.
JOHNSON, ROBERT W.
JOLLY, ROY D.
KOLBERG,  JOSEPH
EAGLE, MALCOLM
GRAY,  WALTER   J.
HARRISON, ROLAND S.
LANG, LORNA
MARSHALL,  JAMES
McLELLAN, GORDON N.
KERR, J. S. STEVENSON
KRMPOTICH   MICHAEL E.
MORRISON, R. JOHN
McLELLAN, JOHN W.
PHARE, G. ROWLAND
ROSE, WILLIAM E.
McGregor, f. c
nastich, milan
pell1cano, joseph
SCHOENING, M. ALLAN
SHORE, ALBERT G.
STOKKELAND, MARGARET
PRIOR, CHARLES A.
ROBERTSON, PHILIP W.
TAYLOR, CHESTER C.
YOUNG, WILLIAM H.
WINTER, WALLACE  H
ATHERTON, DON L.
BAIN, WILLIAM  A.
BARTLET, A. WILLIAM
BARRASS, CYRIL W
COTE,  PAUL  T
DENLUCK, ROBERT N
_fc    ■'■
l_~_j§B
gl
la. "'"                          __» i   A \
Radio Ham.
Just follow the simple directions.
. PAGE THREE HUNDRED AND THREE GORDON, ROBERT N.
GRANTHAM, RONALD D.
GRAY, ROBERT V.
ARMSTRONG ,H. BRUCE
HIRTLE, JAMES G.
JONES, CYRIL P.
JOPLIN, A. FREDERICK
BAKER, WILLIAM H
BARRON, WILLIAM A
BAUDER, EDWARD M.
MATSON, HERBERT M.
MILLIGAN, GEORGE B.
NAROD, LEONARD K.
BENE, JOSEPH
CAMPBELL, COLIN, G.
CHERNIAVSKY, PETER A.
PETERSON,  EARL R.
PILLMAN, RAYMOND A.
ROBERTSON, JAMES D.
CHOATE, DERYCK C.
DENNYS, RONALD G.
DOBIE,  THOMAS  T.
SMITH, THOMAS F.
THOMPSON, MAVOR S.
THORSON, EMIL
ELIA,  NICK
FORBES, ROBERT N.
FULTON, ANDREW W.
WOLFRAM, GORDON
HARBELL, JOSEPH L
HARRISON, JOHN H
HOBSON, GEORGE W
BURCH, W. GERALD
HOLMES, DAVID C.
SOBINSKI, ROMAN K.
LEITH, WILLIAM C
LIGHTBODY, ALEXANDER
MacDONELL, ALEXANDER
VELAY,   CHARLES
WELLBURN, GERALD V.
McLEOD, DONALD F.
MacLEOD, DONALD M.
NEWALL, NORMAN
Ah,   my life work.
000%  elasticity," they  said.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    FOUR RICE, JAMES A.
SISSONS, WILLIAM J.
THOMSON, JAMES G.
RODDICK, JAMES A.
RUDOLPH, JOHN C.
JAMES, DONALD H.
ADAMS, WILLIAM S.
CAWLEY, NEVIL B.
WARNER, KENNETH M.
PARKER, JOHRN M.
ROBERTSON, ROBERT W.
STITT, JOSEPH M.
JEFFERY, CHARLES B.
BURNS, CECIL AL
GABRIELSE, HUBERT
NELSON, SAMUEL J.
LAMBE, EDWARD B. D.
LAWRIE, WILLIAM E.
LAWSON, ROBERT D.
POLLOCK, WILLIAM O.
ROBERTS, ARTHUR K.
ROBINSON, MALCOLM C.
LIPSETT, FREDERICK R.
MORGAN, DAVID W.
PIERCY, JOSEPH E.
The Quad on a Rainy Day
This Cooking is a Complicated Business.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FIVE Daynard Welsh, Hugh Buckley, Rex Merritt, Doug Turland, and Dave Brousson.
Science '49 Expands Course
With the addition of a forestry section to the
second year Applied Science class, the faculty now
consists of twelve sections. This prodigious number of Redshirts on the campus makes a great deal
of personal friendship among students in the faculty impossible, so that most of its members are
still only on nodding terms with classmates in the
other sections. However, in spite of this handicap,
the class has no lack of spirit and, under versatile
Rex Merrit, all class functions and undertakings
have been fully supported.
In spite of the incorporation of surveying in the
timetable this year, many of the classes have spent
a great deal of time and energy in outside activities. Members of the faculty of Applied Science
hold prominent positions on many of the executives of the University organizations.
Don Laskail figures as an executive member of
the Campus Branch of the Canadian Legion, while
Don Dewar ably directs the affairs of 350 students
as President of the Fort Camp Committee.
Officers for this year were: President, Rex
Merritt; vice-president, Doug Tuland; secretary-
treasurer, Hugh Buckley; and sports representative,
Daynard Welsh.
Rex Merritt, President.
PAGE THREE HUNDRED AND SIX ADAM, JAMES C
AHO, AARO EMIL
AHRENS, R. H.
BUTCHART, LEONARD G.
BUTTERFIELD, FLOYD N.
CAMERON, DONALD I.
ANDERSON, DAN E.
ANDERSON, LLOYD H.
BAAL, GEORGE G. G.
CAMPBELL, MALCOLM H,
CARLYLE, ALEXANDER M,
CHARLES, T. A,
BAGNALL, ROBERT F.
BAILEY, JAMES M. M.
BAKER, DAVID J.
COOK, RICHARD M.
COPLICK, WALTER I.
COWLEY, ROY D.
BEAUMONT, EVAN A.
BERRY, HUGH E.
BIGSBY, FLOYD W.
CRAVEN, JOHN HAROLD
CURRIE, IAN  H.
DAYTON, MARTIN J. J.
BLAKELY, W. JOHN
BOURNS, WILLIAM T.
BRADWELL, OWEN K.
DIETHER, ROBERT L
DILWORTH, LOUIS R.
DOW, WALTER H,
BRAWN, RICHARD E.
BREDT, MALCOLM D.
BROTHERTON, LORNE W.
DUNLOP, R,
EDWARDS, INGLIS W
EDWARDS, JOHN S,
BROWNE, J. E.
BROWN, WILLIAM M.
BUHLER, WILLIAM A.
ELLIOT, CHARLES W,
ENG, THOMAS S
ENGLISH, ALLEN J. M,
BURCHELL, ERNEST J.
BURMEISTER, RUSSELL M.
BURWELL, JAMES D.
FELMAN, A.
FISHER, DONALD C. M.
FORD, B
Life in the AMS Office.
Documentary, 1947.
PAGE     THREE    HUNDRED   AND   SEVEN FOX, CHARLES R.
FRANKOVITCH, JERROLD
FRASER, FRANK S.
JACKSON, BRIAN
JACKSON,  C.
JACKSON,  LAURENCE
FREY, JOHN D.
GARDNER, JOHN S.
GATENMEYER, JOHN L.
JAMIESON, ROBERT D,
JOHNSON, EUGENE M,
JOHNSON, E. I
GERMANIUK, STEPHEN A.
GOOD, RUSSELL J.
GORDON, JAMES S.
JOSEPHSON, HELMER W.
JOYCE, J. F.
KANWISHER, WILLIAM
GORDON, MERRITT E.
GRAY, KENNETH P.
HAMILTON, S. F.
KAYLL, S. JOHN
KNAPPETT, ALAN H.
LAWRENCE, JAMES E.
HANDEL, ROBERT D.
HARTMAN, GEORGE F.
HATCH, WILLIAM R.
LINGAARD, HAROLD C.
LOW, JOHN
LUM, MUN  G.
HEADRICK, S. D.
HEWLETT, CECIL G.
HOLBROOK, DOUGLAS R.
MAIDMENT, HOWARD
MALCOLM, ROBERT A.
MARTIN,  JOHN
HOLDEN, RICHARD C
HOLTBY, L. GWYNN G.
HOOVER, GEORGE L.
MASON,  ROY  B
MEHLING, FRANK R
MERRIFIELD, GLEN S
HOPKINS, CHARLES N,
HOWARD, JOHN M.
INGRAM, MAURICE S.
MERRIFIELD, SAMUEL S
MERRITT, REX D. V
MILBURN, JAMES  V
Obviously   Chem Engineers.
Must Be Interesting.
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED    AND   EIGHT MILLIGAN, JACK W.
MILLS, ROBERT M.
MONTEGANI, ANTHONY L.
OZOL,  NELDA
PARKER, ERIC G.
PATTERSON, ARTHUR M.
MONTGOMERY, ROY W.
MORRILL, G. LLOYD
MORTON, DAVID S.
PEARSON, HANS L.
PETERS, ERNEST
POOLE, WILLIAM H.
MOUL, ALBERT A.
MOULDS, JAMES H.
MOULSON, DONALD C.
POPE, STEPHEN H.
POTTS, IAN
REDEL, WALTER
MRACEK, ALBERT U.
MUNGALL, ALLAN C.
McADAM, JOHN R. G.
REID, JOHN
RICHARDSON, DONALD
ROBERTSON, JAMES D.
MacBRIDE, JOHN F.
McCOLL, HOWARD S.
McCONACHIE, CHARLES E.
ROKOSH,  JOHN  P.
ROPER, GORDON J.
RYMER, K. W.
McCORQUODALE, WILLIAM
MacDONALD, JERRY A.
MacDONALD, ROBERT G.
RUSSELL, CHARLES H.
SANDRIN, JOSEPH O.
SAUNDERS, ROBERT H.
MacFADDEN, JACK H.
McGregor, charles a.
McLENNAN, DONALD J.
SCHJELDERUP, HASSEL C
SCOTT, SAMUEL A.
SCOWCROFT, THOMAS H.
McPHERSON, JOHN D.
OLIVER, WELLS R.
OWEN, D.
SMITH, JAMES A.
SMITH, JAMES E.
SMITH, KENNETH W.
Sightseeing Tour.
His best friend, too.
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND    NINE SMITH, NEVILLE
SMITH, ROBERT R.
SMUIN, EUGENE G.
TAYLOR, RALPH E.
THOMAS, STANLEY L.
TOEWS, FRANK F.
SNOWLING, RICHARD G.
SOROS, KNUTE
SPRAY, DONALD R.
TRIBE, ERNEST T.
TUFTS, RICHARD C
TURLAND, DOUGLAS  J.
SPRUNG, DOUGLAS L.
STACHON, JOSEPH A.
STEELE, R. G.
VALLEE, LLOYD H.
WALKER, ROBERT L.
WALLACE, ROBERT
STORY, DAVID M.
STIELL, W.
STREET, GEORGE T.
WEBB, LESLIE E.
WEBER, ROBERT G.
WELSH, DAYNARD M.
STUART, ROY A.
STUCKEY, LESTER R.
SUTHERLAND, JAMES G.
WILLIAMSON, DANIEL F.
ZILLER,   W.
ZITKO, HENRY
SWEENEY, W. ALAN
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   TEN    . Peter Townsend, Ken Noble, John Rome, and Norm Kirkpatrick.
First Year Science Crowded
John Rome, Ken Noble.
Of the record that Science '50 may leave behind
it when it graduates, the one it is most likely to
be remembered by is that it is the largest Applied
Science class in the history of the University of
British Columbia. Numbering over eleven hundred, the class is exactly double last year's class.
Although the members of the class are not yet
segregated into the various branches of engineering
they will eventually follow, the preference among
students seems to be greatest for mechanical and
electrical engineering. Interest in chemical and
civil engineering follows a close second, and geological engineering is not without its adherents.
But Science '50 had other interests apart from
the scholastic. They were among the gayest of the
celebrants at the Science Ball and the Science
Banquet, and thoroughly proved their belief in the
old adage about work and play.
Nor were sports and clubs neglected. Science
'50 claims members on several intramural teams
as well as members in nearly every campus organization from the Players' Club to the Radio Society
and players on rugby and football teams.
The executive this year consisted of two general
representatives, Ken Noble and John Rome, and
two sports representatives, Norm Kirkpatrick and
Peter Townsend.
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   ELEVEN ADAMS, N. C.
ABERCROMBIE, EVAN W.
ABRAHAMSON, MICHAEL R.
BLENKARN, KEITH I.
BLENKARN, KEITH I.
BOWERS, GEORGE W.
AITKEN, JAMES, DRYNAN
ALEXANDER, J. F.
AMM, WILLIAM S.
BOYES, ROBERT C.
BOYKO, PETER
BRAYBROOKS, FRANK M.
ANDERSON, ALLAN H.
APPS,   GEORGE  E.
APPS, JOHN C.
BROSTER, JAMES D.
BROWN, E. W.
BROWN, MELVIN M.
BAIN, ALASTAIR S.
BANCROFT, GILBERT L.
BARAGAR, W. ROBERT A.
BROWN, NORMAN G.
BROWN, RICHARD B. M.
BROWN, ROBERT
BARRY, J. S.
BAYLIS, ARTHUR E.
BEAN, JOHN M.
BURDEN, HANFOBD P.
BURNS, BRUCE JAMES
CADEL, S. J.
BELROSE, JOHN S.
BENNETT, EARLE G.
BERGKLINT, L. ROBERT
CAMPBELL, GEORGE G.
CAMPBELL, IAN McKEAN
CANOVA, ROBERT P.
BERTRAM, DONALD W.
BIDDLE, GEOFFREY R.
BILLINGS, JOHN
CANT,  JAMES  C
CAREY, DOUGLAS A
CARMICHAEL, JOHN D.
BISSELL, GLENN E.
BITCON, ROBERT K.
BLACKEY, JOHN H.
CARSON, JOHN A. H
CAULFIELD, ROBERT S
CHAPMAN,  RANDALL  E
Engineers and Friends.
More Engineers.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   TWELVE CHARLESWORTH, N.
CHASE, HARRY J.
CHENG, ELMER M.
DIXON, THOMAS D.
DMYTRYSHYN, STANLEY R.
DONALDSON, HERBERT L.
CHERCOVER, MERWIN
CLARKE, KENNETH I.
CODVILLE, DONALD C.
DONATT, NORMAN L.
DORAN, WALTER HENRY
DOUGHTYDAVIES, JOHN H.
COLLICUTT, JAMES
COOK, WILLIAM C.
COOMES, GERALD D.
DOUGLAS-TOURNER, P. W.
DUDLEY, ROBERT S.
DUNLOP, WILLARD G.
COTTON, GEORGE N.
COULTHARD, FREDERICK
COWAN, JOHN
DUNN, HUGH R.
DYBHAUN, THOMAS S.
EATON, GEORGE H.
CREBER, ERNEST B.
CROUSER, EARL E.
CURREY, HENRY D.
ECKMAN, HOWARD W.
ELLIOTT, HENRY V.
ENGELHARDT,  N.
DAHL, GEORGE MORTON
DANARD, DOUGLAS C.
DAVIDSON, ALBERT S.
ERHARDT, B.  E.
ESPLEN, ROBERT W.
FALKNOR, C. V.
DAVIES, GEORGE B.
DELANE, HARVEY H.
DENNIS, DONALD D.
FAWKES, NORMAN
FEDORUK, NICHOLAS A.
FIELDER, R. L.
DEVOOGHT, PETER J.
DIAMOND, ISADORE
DINSMORE, G. E. RALPH
FLANAGAN, R.
FORBES,  IAN  G.
FORD, J. GORDON
Man and Machine.
U_^_r*
at
Sailor Boys.
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTEEN FORRESTER, JAMES H. A.
FOTHERINGHAM, D. H.
FREEBAIRN, A. L.
HERMANN, RICHARD C.
HEWETT, FELLOWES   M.
HILLIARD, HENRY F.
FRIESEN, OSKAR
FROUD, JOHN LEONARD
GARDINER, STEPHEN G.
HIRD, EDWARD V.
HOLDSWORTH, JOHN E.
HOLKESTAD, HELGE P.
GEE, A. E.
GIBNEY, WILLIAM H. R.
GOLDBERG, MYER A.
HOLLAND, HAROLD E.
HOPE, KEITH G.
HORCOFF, JOHN
GOOLD, ALEXANDER C
GORDON, NORMAN F.
GOUGE, JOHN W.
HORNER, ALAN C.
HORSLEY, TREVOR L.
HOSKINS, ALFRED D.
GRAHAM, R. S.
GRANTHAM, JOHN L.
GRAY, E. C.
HUBBARD, T.
HUGHES, LAWRENCE R.
HUGHES, PETER G.
GREER, JAMES H.
GRIEVE, DONALD M.
GRIFFITHS, PETER G.
HUNSAKER, W. G,
INKIN, GEOFFRY L
JAMES, ROBERT C
HAAN, J. B.
HALL, KENNETH W.
HALL, WILLIAM H.
JAMES, W.
JASPER, C. MONTY
JENKINS, DAVID L.
HANSON, ALTON K.
HATHERLY, ALLAN L.
HEENEY, REX BAIN
JOHNSON, WILLIAM L.
JOKISCH, CARL R.
JONES, RONALD T.
Smoothie Sweatman.
1 ■■ {        S
■r
^^_M   Jl
Leave your money here.
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FOURTEEN KELSBERG, ROY P.
KING, ARNOLD E.
KIRBY, C. L.
mullen, frederick r.
myros, charles v. s.
McAllister, Gordon e.
kolbeins, norman e.
lamb, john d.
lambert, daniel c.
McBRIDE, ROY D.
McBRIDE, ROBERT W.
McCOLL, D. J.
LAMBERTON, CONRAD H.
LANCHESTER,  FRANK
LANDERS, JAMES C.
McCONNELL, STALLARD W.
MacDONALD, GORDON M.
MacDOUGALL, NEIL A.
LANDERS, WILLIAM B.
LANG, MARVIN R.
LOCKWOOD, ERNEST J.
McEWEN, W. DUNCAN
MacGREGOR, ALLISTER I.
McINTYRE, DONALD J.
LONG, EDWIN E.
LUND, JOHN
MAIR, W. V.
MacKAY, DAVID L.
McKEAN, JOHN R.
MacKENZIE,  A.
MANNING, D. M.
MANNING, LUARD J.
MANUEL, ERIC
McKEOWN, WILLIAM J.
McLAUCHLIN, DONALD L.
McLELLAN, DANIEL F.
MELLISH, DONALD
MEREDITH, H. R.
MILLS, WILLIAM J.
McLORG, ANTHONY F.
MacNAB, G. F.
MacNAB, S. J.
MILROY, RODERICK J.
MORLEY, WILFRED
MULHOLLAND, R.
McNICOL,  WILLIAM  J.
Mcquillan, d. h.
McTAVISH, W. BRl CE
No Groom!
Watch for Short Circuits.
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTEEN NAYLOR, JOSEPH Y.
NESBITT, C. FREDERICK
NEWTON, CLIFFORD G.
PORTER, KEN H
PRATT,   LORNE   A
PRESTON, JOHN  F.
NICKLOM, JULIUS A.
NORTH, PETER H.
NOVAK, N.
PRESTON, ROBERT T,
PYNE, MELVILLE R,
QUINLAN, B,
O'BRIEN, JAMES M.
O'BRIEN, ROBERT N.
O'GRADY, ROBERT H.
RAMSEY, D. V.
RASHLEIGH, ARTHUR  S.
RAYMER, M.
OLSEN, MARK T.
OPSETH, ARTHUR O.
OSEN, E. H.
REDPATH, DONALD C
RENNIE, CLIFFORD C
RHODES, HUSH W
OSLUND, G.
OTTE, PRED JAMES
PAINTER, M.
RILEY, JOHN P
ROBERTS, JOSEPH S
ROBERTSON, LLOYD  D
PASKUSKY, J.
PATTERSON,  FREDERICK J.
PAUL, MELBURN
RUSSELL, DOUGLAS W.
RYWAK, JOHN
SACUTA, NORMAN C.
PEELE, H. R.
PETTEM, FREDERICK D.
PIKE CHARLES R.
SAUGSTAD, ERIC F.
SCOTT, H. M.
SCHON, H. A.
PINSKY, GEORGE A.
PLANT, GEORGE E.
POLOS, JAMES
SCUDAMORE, OWEN S.
SHAW, GEORGE C.
SHOPLAND, HAROLD J.
Life in the Darkroom.
These Are Traditional.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   SIXTEEN SHRUMM, ARTHUR R.
SHUGG, A. GORDON
SHUMKA, JOSEPH H.
TAYELOR, F. ALAN
TAYLOR, STANLEY K.
THOMAS, R. D.
SIDDALL, ARTHUR C.
SIMMONS, GEOFFREY E.
SLEE, FREDERICK C.
THOMPSON, DOUGLAS G.
THOMPSON, FRANCIS D.
THOMPSON,  FRANCIS  D.
SMITH, D.
SMYTH, HARRY E.
SNOWBALL, JOHN E.
THOMPSON, GORDON M.
THORP, W. R.
TIBBITT,  HARRY R.
SOLHEIM, OTTO I.
SOUTHWELL, P. L.
STANFIELD, EARL R.
TIERS, CHARLES A.
TODD, I. R. G.
TOFFDAHL, K.
STANHOPE, J. HUGH
STEVENS, CHARLES L.
STEVENSON, ROBERT J.
TOROK, WILLIAM
TOWNSEND, PETER C.
TREACY, LINTON E.
STONEY, CARDIFF P.
STORY, JOHN WALLACE
SUME, RAINO R.
URQUHART, DONALD J.
VAUGHAN, V.
VOGEL, HENRY B. A.
SUTHERLAND, RUSSELL
SUTHERLANDBROWN, A.
TAGGART, NORMAN
WADEY, ROBERT H.
WALKER,  JAMES  T.
WALLIS, G. W.
TAIT,  BRUCE
TALLING, GORDON T.
TASSIE, PETER
WARD, RICHARD J.
WATT, LEONARD JOHN
WAITERS, R. C.
Think It Over.
Stoodent.
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTEEN WEBBER, EUGENE D.
WEST, DONALD R.
WESTBERG, RALPH R.
WILSON, DONALD J.
WINGERT, FRANCIS A.
WOOD, H. JAMES
WHISTLER, ARTHUR H.
WHITE, CYRIL S.
WHITESIDE, FREDERICK
WOODCOCK, JOHN R.
WOOLLEY, MELVIN G.
WOROBEC, DANIEL M.
WHITLEY, FRANK R.
WICKSON, R. ROGER J.
WIGGINS, W. FRASER
WORTHEN, LEONARD P.
YORGASON, FREDERICK, C
YOUNG, ROBERT A.
WILLIAMS, NORMAN L.
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   EICHTEEN Scientific Farmers Spirited
With the second highest enrollment of Agriculture in any Canadian university, the Faculty of
Agriculture continued this year to take its usual
prominent position on the campus.. Students working under crowded conditions have once more
fulfilled the traditional Aggie spirit of friendliness.
The increased enrollment, together with the retaining of this tradition, have made this year one to
be remembered in the history of the faculty.
Owing to the enlargement of the faculty, it was
decided early in the session that a more comprehensive social program be put before the undergraduate body. This new policy resulted in an
extremely successful dance in the Commodore
Cabaret following the Informal Fall Banquet.
November brought forth a skating party, and
with Spring came the traditional banquet and
dance in the Brock Hall.
The Fall Field Day had an enthusiastic reception by the students, thanks to the efficient organization by Flora Norris and Ian Greenwood.
Early in the Spring, a dance, sponsored and
planned by the Freshmen Class, was held in the
Brock Hall.
Highlight of the Aggie social calendar was the
Aggie Barn Dance, famous throughout the years
for its highly informal atmosphere. Arrangements
for this affair were in charge of Ken Davidson,
fourth year president.
Under the direction of Bill Taylor, Norm Tupper
and Doug Knott, Aggie men's Intramural teams
have had a success year. In the cross-country race,
a speedy Aggie team placed second, losing to the
Jokers.
Under the capable and enthusiastic leadership
of Sheila Hicks, the Aggie women's teams have
participated in a large variety of intramural sports.
With a view to stimulating interfaculty competition, the students of Agriculture donated a trophy
to be called the "Agriculture Soccer Cup," and
awarded annually to a winning soccer team.
The executive of Agriculture included Neil MacKinnon, president; Grant Larkin, vice-president;
Joyce King, secretary; John Day, treasurer; Doug
Knott, athletic representative, and Bodie Baxter,
women's representative.
Assisting this executive were the executives of
each class, which consisted of fourth year president,
Ken Davidson; secretary, Marg MacKay; third year
president, Ian Greenwood; secretary, Flora Norris;
second year president, Gerry Somers; secretary,
Marg Norris; and first year president, Norm
Galloway; secretary, Nan Hardy.
Upper:   Neil McKinnon, president.
Lower:   Doug Knott, Grant Larkin, Joyce King, John Day,
Neil McKinnon.
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   NINETEEN ARCHIBALD, ROBERT D. - Edmonton
Anim. Husb.; Delta Upsilon.
BARBER, LOU E. - Vancouver
Horticulture.
DAY, JOHN H. - Vancouver
Agronomy; A.U.S.
GEE, WING K. - Vancouvei
Dairying; Chinese Student Club.
BAXTER, BERNICE M. - Vancouver
Horticulture; Alpha Phi, Rifle Club.
BAYFIELD, JOHN T. - Hollyburn
Agronomy; Alpha Delta Phi, University Band.
GOODMAN, CHARLES E. - Osoyoos
Horticulture.
GOODWIN, DONALD E. - Victoria
Ag. Econ.
BULHAK, GEORGE A.-Vancouver
Ag. Econ.; Fishing.
BURDOCK, ROBERT A. - Nanaimo
Agronomy.
GRAHAM, PHILIP D. -Vancouver
Anim.  Husb.
GREGORY, KENNETH F. - Vancouver
Agronomy; Kappa Sigma, V.O.C.
BUTTERWORTH, EARL M. - Kamloops
Dairy Bact.; Kappa Sigma, Rugby.
CARSON, DOUGLAS J. - Kamloops
Anim. Husb.; Badminton.
HADLAND, RICHARD E.
Hockey.
HEAL, RONALD  R. - Armstrong
Agronomy;   Players.
COTTINGHAM, REGINALD E. - Vancouver
Dairy Bact.; Kappa Sigma.
CUNNINGHAM, CHARLES C. - New West'r
Anim. Husb.; Phi Kappa Pi.
HUFF, HARRY L. - Ceepeecee
Ag.  Econ.
KITTS, WARREN D. - Vancouver
Anim.   Husb.
CUNNINGHAM, FREDERICK M. - Chilliwack
Agronomy; Badminton.
DAVIDSON, KENNETH E. - Cloverdale
Dairy Bact.; Kappa Sigma.
LAMBERT, NONA C. - Vancouvei
Agronomy; Gamma Phi Beta, Mussoc.
LARKIN, GRANT B. -Vancouver
Phi Kappa Pi, Rowing.
Attentive Audience.
Now, about that bacilltts.
PAGE  THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTY LEE, JONE K. D. - Prince Rupert
Agronomy; Tennis.
MAXWELL, JAMES S. - New Westminster
V.O.C, Jokers.
RICHARDSON, JOHN H. - Vancouver
Agronomy.
RICHARDSON, WILLIAM B. - Chilliwack
Anim.  Husb.
MOYLS, MAURICE C. - Vancouver
Horticulture; Kappa Sigma.
MOYLS, WALTER J. -Vancouver
Agronomy; Kappa Sigma.
RIDEOUT, ELDON F. - Sardis
Agronomy; Archery, Track.
ROSE, MARK W. - Mission City
Agronomy; Phi Kappa Sigma.
■Eburne
■ Kelowna
McCRADY,  ELWOOD  R
Horticulture.
MacDONALD,  DOUGLAS K
Phi Kappa Pi, Rugby.
SHORTREED, JAMES F. - AJdergrove
Agronomy;  Phi Kappa Pi.
SMITH, DERWARD - Vancouver
Agronomy.
MacDONALD, MALCOLM A. - Vancouver
Zeta Psi.
MACKAY, MARGARET C. - Vancouver
Anim. Husb.
STEPHENSON, LOIS J. - West Vancouver
Alpha Omicron Pi.
TAYLOR, JAMES W. - Abbotsford
McKINNON, NEIL C. - New Westminster
Delta Upsilon.
MacLEOD, DOROTHY M. - Vancouver
Horticulture;  Gamma  Phi  Beta,
Badminton, Mussoc.
THOMSON,  MELVILLE G. -Vancouver
Entomology; V.O.C.
WAKELY, WALTER J. -Vancouver
Poultry.
OLIVER, WALTER J. - Lynnmour
Anim. Husb.
PAULSEN, ALBERT - Vancouver
Agronomy.
WALLACE, MYRON T. - New; Westminster
Anim. Husb.
WHITE,   JACQUELINE   N. -Vancouver
Dairying; V.O.C.
Living-tone Addresses.
PACE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-ONE GILLESPIE, DOUGLAS C
GREENWOOD, IAN F
GUEST, CHARLES R.
YOUNG, DAVID B.
YOUNG, HOWARD W.
YOUNG, SOOMEE
GUMMOW, JOHN B.
HENDERSON, ARTHUR D. H.
HICKS, E. SHEILA
HORSFIELD, ELEANOR M.
HYDE, RONALD B.
IRWIN, ROBERT E. T.
AKEROYD, JAMES H.
ARNASON, STEFAN B.
AUGUSTUS, JOSEPH
JACKSON, ELIZABETH A.
KENDALL, C. JILL
KING, JOYCE V.
BELL.  FRED  SIMPSON
CAPLETTE, JOHN F.
CORBITT, CHARLOTTE W.
KLINE, CECIL M
KNOTT, DOUGLAS R
LAUGHTON, DAVID B
COULTER, MAUREEN A.
CRAWFORD, DONALD H.
DEAN, ROBERT E.
LLOYD, ROBERT E.
MADDIN, CAMERON A.
MARLOW, DIANA JOAN
DODWELL, PETER L.
FERRIES, CLARKE H.
GAYTON, RAYMOND R.
MARSHALL, FREDERICK L
MAXWELL, NOEL R
MILAN, BETTY E
GEDDIE, TALBOT
GIBSON, DAVID L.
GIBSON, MARGARET P.
MacDONALD, DONALD H
NEWTON, DONALD W
NORRIS, FLORA C
Vive  la reine.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-TWO    .
Huts and Transformers. PETERSON, SIGURD B.
PICKLES, NORMAN R.
REYNOLDS, ROBERT T.
BLAIR, GILBERT J
CHRISTIE GLADYS W.
COLES, BARBARA M
RUCK, JOHN A.
SMITH, ERIC S.
SPICER, VIVIEN A. M.
COOK, WESLEY H
CRAM, WILLIAM T.
CROSBY, RICHARD H
STEVENSON, DONALD B.
STEWART, RICHARD
STOCKSTAD, PAUL L.
CROW, WILLIAM O.
DAVIDSON, A. JOHN
DICKSON, STEWART C. V.
TALBOT, MARY KATHLEEN
TONNING, EILA M.
TOWNSLEY, PHILIP M.
ELLISON, KENNETH V
ELSEY, COLEMAN L,
ESLER, JOHN A
TRIGGS, ROSALIE E.
TUPPER, NORMAN E.
VERNON, JOAN K.
FARYNA, GENE W
FLETCHER, HARRY F
FRASER, DAVID S,
VINCENT, RONALD J. A.
WIGGINS, MURRAY M.
WILSON, GEORGE A.
FREEMAN, JACK ALLEN
FULTON, WALLACE G.
GROSS, ALFRED
HAMMOND, RUSSELL  H.
HAZLEWOOD, JOAN I.
HENNELL, PAUL V.
ALLEN JAMES
BARKER, ARTHUR J.
BERRY, GORDON H.
HILL, GUIDA E.
HORODEZKY, MIRIAM
JINKS, LIONEL K.
Some Basketball Games Have Everything.
Cafeteria Jokers.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-THREE JONES, PHILIP A.
KITOS, PAUL ALAN
KNIGHT, URSULA H.
UNDERWOOD, ERIC f. E
WAKEFIELD, PHILIP D
WARBURTON, ROGER H
KYLE, WILLIAM S.
LARKIN, DORIS EDITH
LECKIE, DAVID F.
WEETMAN, PHILIP H.
WHITE, DOREEN ANN
WILLIAMS, RONALD S.
LITTLER, ALAN E.
MOLONEY, JAMES V.
MORTON, JACK E.
WILSON, WILMA J
YOUNG, ROBERT J
McDONALD, I. MARGARET
McDONALD, PATRICIA
McINTOSH, DAVID L.
NORRIS, MARGARET E.
OWEN, RICHARD R.
RACEY, KENNETH A.
BISSETT, HELEN M.
EEDY,  GERALD T.
GABRIEL, ELFRIEDE
RUSSELL, DONALD A.
SIEBURTH, LOUISE R.
SOUTHCOTT, BURNETT A.
GALLARDO, ROBERTO
HARDIE, NENA C
HOLDING, FRANK R.
STARRAK, H. I. LLOYD
STEPHENS, J. MARCELLE
SWENSON, PAUL A.
JENKS, REITA MARY
JOHNSTON, LESLIE G.
LADDY, M. SOPHIE
TAMBOLINE, LLOYD F.
TATE, DOUGLAS U.
TOWNSLEY, DAVID S.
LAW, G. R. JOHN
LLOYD, JOHN A.
.   LOCKHART, SHIRLEY R.
I'll take the brunette.
Optimitt with Paint Can,
PAGE THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOUR MAIN, GEOFFREY E.
MASON, A. MARIE
MINCHIN, ELSPETH MARY
RICHARDS. MELBOWRNE, D.
SWAN, NORA
TRETHEWEY, PHYLLIS L.
McCARLEY, DEAN R.
MacDONALD, JOAN E.
MacNEILL, ALLAN C.
UNWIN, ROBERT V.
PATON, IAN DAVID
FUNK, ABRAM B.
1.    Physics  Building  Begins.    2.    Ahhhhhhh.   3.    Robeson  Captivates.   4.    Sport Page News Men Pillage.
.   PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-FIVE Home Economics Active Group
Pat Boyes, Dorothy Pearson, Sheila Wolstencroft, Joan Park, Gloria Norton.
Joan Park, President.
For the second time in the history of the University of British Columbia, Bachelor of Home
Economics degrees this year are awarded to graduates at the 1947 spring congregation. The graduating class was double that of the 1945-46 session.
Athletic representative Peggy Bowe supervised
a wide variety of sports, including volley ball,
basketball, grass hockey, tennis, table tennis,
bowling, golf, and swimming, and the girls of Home
Ec were enthusiastic in their support and participation in these games.
A tea for the new Home Economics students
was held in the Mildred Brock Room in the middle
of October, which gave the new girls a chance to
get acquainted with their upperclassmates and
instructors. Another tea was held in April for the
Home Economics graduates.
During the year, the girls in Home Economics
gave practical demonstrations of their courses.
These demonstrations were usually in the form of
fashion shows.
Highlight of the year's social activities was the
Home Economics Dance, held in Brock Hall early
in February. Decorations for this dance, made by
the girls themselves, proved that they were taking
full advantage of their course.
PAGE THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX ALLMAN, MARY B.
ANDERSON, EVELYN M.
IRVING, LORNA E.
KING, KATHLEEN
BARBER, GWENDOLYN M.
BRODY, FLORENCE V.
LEACH, SHIRLEY A
LEWIS, MARGARET A
DAVIDS, DOREEN A.
DUNLOP, AUDREY M.
LOWES, H. ANN
MJOS, LILLIAN
DYSON, SYLVEA
EDDY, GERALDINE M.
MacGILLIVRAY,  VERDA I.
McKENZIE, JEAN B.
GADBOIS, LORRAINE M.
GAFF, BERYL A.
McRAE, MILDRED D
NORTON, GLORIA M
GEORGE, CATHERINE B.
HAYES, DOROTHY W.
RATHLEF, LISBETH
ROSENBERG, NETTY C.
Very Domestic.
Cutting the Birthday Cake.
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-SEVEN RUSSELL, E. M.
SIMPSON, BARBARA
WHITE, LESLIE A. H.
WILLIAMS, VALERIE A. M.
SYMONDS, ANN P.
TORRANCE, E. E.
VOSS, HELEN
WALTON, V. M.
WILSON, H. ROSEMARY
WILSON, IRENE
WILSON, LORNA M.
WILSON, M. JEAN
1.    Two grains will do it.  2.    Miss LeFebvre receives a fa rewell gift from the Home Ec girls. 3.    Busy Little Students.
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-EIGHT   .    . BALDWIN, MARJORIE B.
BENNETT, MAVIS G.
RUSSELL, ETHEL M.
SMILLIE, ELSIE R
SMITH, EDNA A
BERRY, FRANCES E.
BIGSBY, E. JEAN
BISHOP, DORIS M.
TECHY, MARGARET T
TREDAWAY, EDNA P
TURNER, BLANCHE M
BONE, MARGARET M.
BOWE, MARGUERITE W.
BREADON, MARY L.
WOLFE, M. IRIS
BEAN, LOUISE A.
CAMPBELL, MARION E.
CHRISTIE, EILEEN A.
CLARK, CATHERINE M.
BROWN, ELIZABETH M. Q.
CARMAN, HELEN A.
CARNSEW, H. MURIEL
COTTERALL,  GERTRUDE
DIAMOND, RITA
DYRNDAHL, LILLIAN C
CUNNINGHAM, CONSTANCE
DALRYMPLE, JEAN W.
DOW, MARION ELLISON
GEE, E. ROBERTA
HARRISON, M.  BERNICE
HOPKINS, M. ISABEL
FAIRWEATHER, PAULINE
FINLAY, GLADYS M.
FLETCHER, LEONA A.
KIRK, EVA WINIFRED
KLUSENDORF, EDITH M.
LOUTIT, KATHLEEN A.
HARVEY, MARY L.
HATFIELD, HELEN E.
HINDMARSH, L. MAY
MONTGOMERY, MARY M.
McKINLEY, F. EVA
MacQUEEN, MARGARET J.
HUNT, BETTY M.
KERR, MILDRED E.
LONG, CATHERINE B.
Thank you.
All this and intellect, too.
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   TWENTY-NINE MORRIS, LEILA K.
MURRAY, IRIS E. E.
McCOLL, DAPHNE J.
BEAN, LAURA ISOBEL
BRAY,  ORMA E.
BROADLAND, PATRICIA E.
McMAHON, DOROTHY E.
McMANUS, HELEN
McTAVISH,  SHIRLEY A.
CARSON, MURIEL J.
EDGAR, ELEANOR R.
FAZZOLARE, ELIZABETH
NEILANS, MARY N.
OLSEN, SHIRLEY W.
PATERSON, MARY JANE
FINGARD, BARBARA M.
HEFFERNAN, GWENYTH T.
JOHNSTON, PHYLLIS M.
PEARSON, DOROTHY B. H.
RICHARDS, BARBARA J.
ROSE, JOAN F.
LECKIE, R. BARBARA
LITTLE, JUNE M.
MARTINSON, V.
ROSS, MADELEINE L.
RUNKLE, PENELOPE A.
RUSSELL, BETTE ANN
MYERS, C.
McLEOD, JEAN H.
PENNY, NANCY H.
TERRACE, IVY A. J.
TOWNSHEND, SUSAN D. E.
WILLOUGHBY, LORENE E.
POWERS, DONNA F.
SCRATCHLEY, LILA M.
SMITH, FIONA E. H.
WILSON, KATHLEEN M.
ANDERSON, SHIRLEY E.
TARABOCHIA, JEAN
TAYLOR, MARGARET E.
WARREN BARBARA JEAN
ASHWORTH, E.
ATRILL, PHYLLIS MARIE
BALD, IRENE M.
WELLS, MARGARET ANN
WONG, HELEN
Soft and Low.
Fold in one egg.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY Sue Harrison, Elaine Twilley, Barbara Gillies, Betty Scoones, Margaret Armitage, Carolyn Harvie, Elaine Delisle.
Activities Keep Nurses Busy
Although hidden away in a quiet corner of the
campus, the Nurses' Undergraduate Society has
not passed without notice this year. Serving not
only to direct the numerous activities of the Nursing undergraduates on the university campus and
to provide them with a varied social program,
but also to keep them in touch with their sisters
down at the Vancouver General Hospital, it has
led its members in a very complete social and
scholastic life.
A large membership, including seventy-six in
public health, teaching, and supervision; forty-one
Degree students in training at the General Hospital;
twenty in second year, and nine in nursing D,
has been largely responsible for the success of the
year's activities by its enthusiastic participation in
them.
As future nurses, the girls realize that continual
mental work and serious studies can be very detrimental to health and happiness, and insist on a
suitable balance between study and relaxation.
They also realize that much benefit and good
experience can be gained from membership and
participation in clubs and societies, and have certainly lived up to their beliefs by showing keen
interest in both major and minor clubs on the
campus and taking active parts in club affairs.
Betty Scoones, President.
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PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-ONE CARROTHERS, WINONA L.
CHANG, ZOE
GILLIES, BARBARA B
RAE, ELIZABETH B
DAVIES, FRANCES K.
HARRISON, SUZANNE
SCOONES, A. ELIZABETH
COLWELL, MARGARET B.
IRWIN, I. ELEANOR
JENKINS, MARGARET R.
DAVIES, KATHLEEN M.
FAIRBANK, ETHEL
MURRAY, BERNICE V.
OGILVIE, SHEILA M.
HAYDEN, ELIZABETH E
JOHNSON, SIGNE E
READ, JOYCE M.
TAYLOR, E. MARGARET
mVWli
MAIN, NORA M
MAWER, DOROTHY M
TUCKER, NORMA M.
COCHRANE, RUTH C.
McCANDLESS, BEATRICE
McFARLAND, NORAH A.
Leaning into their work.
Intermission.
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-TWO McINTYRE, KEITHA G.
Mclaughlin, marjorie
taylor, edith a.
webster, jean ii.
RANDALL, LILLIAN M.
SHAW, AILEEN A.
WHITECROSS, BETTE
FIELDHOUSE, NORMA G.
SHEASBY, IRENE V.
SMYTH, KATHRYN
FORGRAVE, GARETH A.
KIRKPATRICK, FLORENCE
WOOLNER, MARGARET E.
Student Nurses in Training.
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-THREE CREAMER, RUTH M.
DELISLE, ELAINE M.
EARNSHAW, E. MARY
GRAHAM, JOAN G.
GRIFFIN, PAULINE M.
HARVIE, CAROLYN F.
JACKSON, VIVIAN M.
JONES, ESTELLE P.
KERMODE, RUTH L,
mitchell, beverly j.
McCarthy, noreen a.
plumer, betty g.
PULLEN,  BETTY P.
ROSS, RUTH R.
TWILLEY, M. ELAINE
WARD, GRETA L.
WILLIAMS, JANET R.
WILLIAMSON, EVA M.
In Training.
K.P. Duty.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-FOUR David Tupper, Jean White, Lloyd G. MacKenzie, Bill Roach.
Lawyers Have Successful Year
Lloyd G. MacKenzie, President.
U.B.C.'s Law School, under the able leadership
of Dean G. F. Curtis, in its second year on the
campus has a total enrollment of two hundred
and thirty-eight students. To accommodate these
increased numbers, the school was moved to a new
site on the East Mall, north of Brock Hall, at a
point on the campus overlooking Howe Sound.
The two converted Army huts, which contain
lecture hall, library, common rooms and offices,
house a comprehensive legal library of reported
cases, text books, digests, and periodicals.
During the academic year, in order to acquire
the skill of arguing a case, the students take part
in moot trials. At this time, students become counsels before the Supreme Moot Court, and senior
students are elevated to judges.
All students are required to be articled to lawyers in the province, and during the summer
months they act as apprentices in law offices,
thereby gaining useful experience in the practice
of law.
Besides excelling in studies, Harry Franklin and
Gus Carmichael have been recognized by Big
Block awards for athletic achievement. Prominent
in Legion affairs are such law students as Perry
Miller, Stu Chambers, and human dynamo and
housing authority, John McKenzie.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-FIVE ALEXANDER, ERNEST A.
BEAVAN, RODNEY
LANE, WILLIAM T.
LAWRIE, FRANK D.
CAMPBELL, WILLIAM E.
CANTELL, EDWARD T.
LEWIS, CECIL J.
LONG, CHARLES F.
CARMICHAEL, HERBERT A.
CARROTHERS, ALFRED W.
MARGACH, JOHN A.
MILLAR, PERRY S.
CROSS, GERALD H.
CUNNINGHAM, JOHN R.
McDONALD, LESLIE M.
McINTOSH, GEORGE B.
ELLIS, HUGH M.
FISHER, THOMAS K.
PLOMMER, ROBERT D.
RITCHIE, HUGH J.
FRANKLIN, HENRY J.
GOURLAY, JOHN L.
TUPPER, DAVID W. H.
WALSH, JOHN W.
HALL, ORMONDE J.
HANNESSON, RICHARD S.
WARK, BRUCE E.
WARNER, WILLIAM L.
HUNTER, DOUGLAS L.
LANE, WILLIAM G.
WHITE, E. JEAN
WHITELAW, GLENN R.
Moot Court.
Order! Order!
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-SIX ABBOTT, ARNOLD T.
ABRAMS, DOUGLAS E.
ANDERSON, J. ROSS
GRIFFIN, JAMES A.
HARVEY, ROBERT J.
JOHNSON, ROLAND W.
ANDERSON, JOHN
ANDERSON, JOHN J.
ANDERSON, RICHARD P.
KER, J. ROSS
KING, MALCOLM G.
LONG, GEORGE R.
BELL-IRVING, DUNCAN H.
BELYEA, A. DOUGLAS
BIANCO, PAUL R.
LORIMER, JAMES G.
MANNING, VALERIE J.
MILNE, DENNIS D. G.
BLAKE, FRANCIS H.
BOYD, BRUCE L.
CARMICHAEL, DUNCAN W.
milner, allan ralph
murray, richard d.
Mcculloch, ross g.
COLLINS, FRANKLIN K. S.
COMPARELLI, DAVID E.
COWAN, JOHN C.
MacFARLANE, ALAN B.
McLOUGHLIN, HAROLD
SMITTON, FRANK A.
DEWDNEY, EDGAR
ELLIS, RICHARD C
FLEMING, JOHN B.
TAGGART, JOHN D.
TRONO, EARL W.
WATSON, ARNOLD W.
GARDOM, GARDY B.
GERRITY, ERNEST
GILMOUR, GORDON H.
WHITE, CYRIL
WILLIAMS, DAVID R.
WILLS, CHARLES H.
GRANT, J. RONALD
Student Jurors.
Legal Discussion?
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-SEVEN Social Service Class Active
Upper: Joe Francis, President.
Lower:  Dorothy Boond, J. M. Putnam, Joe Francis,
Jack Kirkpatrick, Joyce Moll.
Today a new conception of social work is being
realized, not only by authorities on the subject, but
also by everyone connected with the profession.
The social worker is no longer a mere giver of
charity. On the contrary, he is, instead, a professional person whose contribution is no less important to society than the contribution of the doctor
or the scientist. The meaningful words of Miss
Marjorie J. Smith, head of the department of
Social Work at the University of British Columbia,
are indicative of this important new understanding.
"The basic attitude in all social work is a respect
for people as human beings and the deep consideration for the personality of every man, woman,
and child." Here lies the foundation stone of
democracy. It is upon a belief in these words that
the social worker bases his program for betterment and aid of the unfortunate people in modern
society.
Through carefully planned courses which include academic training, field work in some social
work agencies in greater Vancouver, and field trips
to other centres in the province, Miss Smith and
her staff are carrying out a progressive plan of
training. The social worker of today is well prepared to take his place in society as an intelligent,
understanding person who has as his goal the furthering of the democratic process and the abolition
of age old prejudices and ignorance.
Social work has attracted an increasing amount
of attention in the past few years and promises
an excellent future and endless opportunities for
its graduates, who may enter into a great number
of different occupations in which social work can
be applied.
The enrollment in social work reached a new
high this year. Ninety-five graduates, twenty-five
men and seventy women, will receive their Social
Work degree in May, 1947. Of this number, twelve
will receive their Master of Social Work degree.
As well as these graduating students, there are
forty-seven undergraduates enrolled in social work
classes.
Several social gatherings were held during the
year. At a class party in November a hilarious
preview of Social Case Work in 1995 was presented by members of the group work class, and in
December a banquet was planned for the students
by the Alumni group.
The executive, elected in the fall term, consisted
of Joe Francis, president; J. M. Putnam, vice-president; Joyce Moll, secretary-treasurer; Dorothy
Boond, and Jack Kirkpatrick, members ex-officio.
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-EIGHT chatwin, mary k.
bell-irving, elizabeth
bucknall, margaret a.
moll, joyce e. m.
McGregor, b. r.
McLENNAN, ANN H.
CHOWNE, AUDREY M.
CLARK, RICHARD J.
COLQUHOUN, JANET L.
NICHOLS, DOROTHY
PRITCHARD, PHYLLIS E.
RICKABY, JOHN D.
COOK, F. WARD
CULHAM, L. J.
CULTER, BARBARA A.
ROBERTS, EVELYN M.
ROBSON, MARITA H.
ROSE, MARGARET ANN
DAVY, I. SHEILA
DEBECK, BETSY ANNE
ELLINGHAM, JOAN C.
SEAMAN, HELEN L.
SMART, CATHERINE J.
SMITH, DOROTHY B.
EWING, FRANCES M.
FARINA, ALFRED J. O.
FOWLER, RAE E. E.
STEINER, IRENE R.
THOMPSON, S. ELIZABETH
TUCKEY, GRACE D.
HAUGAN, WILBERT M.
JOHNSTONE, BERTHA M.
LIPSON, PEGGY
VANTREIGHT, ELSIE E.
WELSH, DOROTHY A.
WESTLAKE, CHARLES A.
MARTIN, MURIEL E.
WORTH, HELEN C.
At the Home Ec Tea.
$1.50 per couple, please.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   THIRTY-NINE '
William Fleck, Mary Ann Norton, Aline Rauhton, Hugh II erhison, Fred Limey.
Future Teachers Work Hard
Education '47, popularly known as Teacher
Training, with an enrollment of twenty-three men
and twenty-three women, offered an extremely
varied curricular and social program this year.
Newly numbered courses consisted mainly of
lectures in the philosophy and psychology of education, school administration, tests and measurement of intelligence and ability to learn, and modern methods of teaching. To supplement this
theoretical work, periods of practise teaching were
arranged for students in several of the junior and
senior high schools in greater Vancouver. This
affords an opportunity to apply the theory learned
at university to an actual teaching situation, and
these trips, one of the most interesting features of
training, were eagerly anticipated by all the prospective teachers.
Besides these visits to Vancouver Secondary
schools, many other field trips were planned for
the student teachers during the year. Among these
were visits to schools in Bellingham, to the Deaf
and Blind School in Vancouver, and to the Essondale Clinic for Mental Health, where they carefully studied any conditions applicable to the
profession.
Hugh Herbison, President.
PAGE THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY BISHOP, FRANK L.
BUNKER, JACQUELINE L.
OBEN, JEAN D.
PALLAS, ETHEL
CALDER, SHEILA H.
CAULDERWOOD, JOAN M. D.
PETERSON, NANCY F.
REIMER, DAVID P.
CHARTERS, JOHN A.
DAYKIN, HAROLD C.
ROULSTON, ALINE M.
RUMSEY, JANE S.
GULLOCH, MURIEL I.
JONES, W. J.
SINCLAIR, JEAN G.
STRACHAN, JESSIE
LINDOW, MAXINE L.
MOORE, D. EILEEN
WEBB,   HALCYONE
WILSON, DONAL S.
NORTON, MARY ANNE
YEO, SHIRLEY ANNE A
Kelly flips at Gras.
The doors swing in
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-ONE Post Grads
BROADHEAD, RONALD L.
Arts.
BUCKLAND, JOHN A. C
Applied Science.
BURTON, MARGARET OLIVE
Agriculture.
CHATWIN, JAMES C.
Arts.
COCHRANE, JAMES A
Applied Science.
EMBREE, WILLIAM H.
Arts.
HAMMOND, RAYMOND
Applied Science.
McKERRICHER, DAVID A.
Arts.
NOBLE, JOHN V.
Arts.
TAYLOR, A.
Arts.
WILLIS, THOMAS G.
Agriculture.
Pharmacy
CLARKE, J. G.
DOCSTEADER, A.
GLOVER, R. M.
MacDONALD, R. E.
PEARSE, K. M.
ROWLEY, E. F.
melville, w. w.
miller, g. a.
McAllister, m. m.
SCOTT, J. F.
SMITH, J. L
WESSON, M. I.
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-TWO    . 1
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REATER opportunities are  needed  here for those who have trained and equipped
themselves.
The B.C. Electric is actively sponsoring, as a public service, the "Business Is
Moving to B.C." campaign so that more young men and women will find in this province increased scope for their talents.
Business executives all over the world again this year will be reading in such
magazines as "Fortune" and "Time" advertisements of the B.C. Electric calling attention to the advantages of locating their industrial  plants here.
Our Industrial Development Department will help them
with market data, statistics and information on suitable plant
locations.
Already, this department has assisted in locating here, industries with an annual payroll of
$5,000,000.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-FOUR Ingledew's
FOR OVER 32 YEARS SELLING SHOES OF
UNQUESTIONED INTEGRITY FROM THE
FOREMOST MAKERS OF AMERICA
• Women's Shop
• Campus Shop
• Men's Shop
Ingledew's
623-629 GRANVILLE ST.
General Index
Adleman, Seymour       146
Akeroyd,   James              95
Albert,  Marion           58,    61,    95
Alger, Bus     145
Allan, Harvey   ----- 134, 135, 162
Allan,   Michael    	
Allen,  John    	
Allen, Mike 	
Amm, John —
Anders, Benjamin .
Anderson, A	
Anderson, Evelyn .
Anderson,   Harvey
Andrew, Fred 	
Angell,   D .,—
Archer,  John  	
Arneson,   Stefan  ...
Arrol,   Edward   .—
Ashton,   Phil   	
Attwell, Lew 	
  295
  295
  207
  126
  280
  128
  206
  218
  145
  130
217, 280
  142
  105
Barnes, George        95
Barron, William      302
Bateman,  Bill       212
Bates, Rae     152
Batten,   Gerrard    _    95
Baum, Gordon 	
Baxter, Bernice 	
Beaumont,   Arthur
Becker,   Ruth   	
Beesley,   Bernard  .
Bell,  B 	
Bell, D.	
Augustus,  Joseph  ..
Auterson, Maureen
Ayrs, Maurice 	
Bacon,   Eilleen	
Bain,  Alastair  	
Bajus,  Douglas	
Baker, David 	
Baker,  J.   _
Bankes, Frank 	
Barker,   David
Barltrop,   John   ......
94, 95, 106, 204
   149
  142
 1  89
  107
„  ,  156
Bell-Irvins,   Rosemary
Benham,  Bruce  	
Bennett, Marion  ...
Bennett,  Robert 	
Berry, Hugh 	
Berry, William 	
Biddle,  George  	
Eiehl,   Howard  	
Bishop,   George
... 212, 268
     43
  146
  218
.--. - 216
  130
  130
  131
148, 150, 162
126, 127, 157
:.--  145
  128
  205
  130
  216
    172, 153
  133
   154
     145
   138 ,139
    134, 135
   94
     88, 89
Blackhall,  John       133, 139
Blair,   Gilbert        138, 139, 162
Bloor,  George      88
Blundell,  Heather         71, 228
Boond,  Dorothy       338
Booth,   Elizabeth     ._   ____ 308
  -•-  126, 127
     144
  — _. 326
    126
Bossons,  Frederick
Bowe,   Peggy   	
Boyes, Pat 	
Boyes, Robert 	
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-FIVE Armstrong & Monteith Construction Company
LIMITED
ENGINEERS AND GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
1449 HORNBY ST. VANCOUVER, B.C.
Bremner, David
Brett, June 	
Brice, Murray
Broadhead, Gordon
Broatch, George —
Brockhouse,  Bert  _.
Brodie,  Hall  	
Brousson, David _.
Brown, Stewart —
Euckley, Hugh 	
Bullen, Lester 	
Burley,   Beverly   —
Butchart,  L.   	
Byrn, Rosemary —
Byrnes,   Marguerite
Cail,  Robert  	
Calvert, Thomas —
Campbell, David —
Campbell,  Doreen  .
Capozzi,  Herb 	
Capozzi,  Joseph
Carlyle,   Alexander
Carney,  Anne 	
Carrothers, Nonie
... 138, 139
  133
  95
... 126, 127
  94
   206
  149
  90
138, 139
  306
  343
  133
  130
  43
  216
  228
94, 95
122, 125
  132
76, 121, 126, 127
  117
  134, 135
  133
144
Castillou, Harry   102, 154, 163
Castillou, Josephine
Castro,   Carlos   ...
Chambers,   Mary
Chambers,   Ted   .
Chant, Don 	
Charles,  Trevor  	
Charlesworth,   Harold
Charters, Joan 	
Chernov, Eva 	
161
205
168
157
156
211
205
105
245
Christie,  Joan      99
Christopher, Charlotte         280
Christopher,  Robert   129
Chung,   Lily    214
Clarke,  Nora      38,   43
Clearihue, Joyce   131
Clery,   Elmer       343
Clough, Joyce   105
Codrington,   Bob     206
Cole,   Dacre        95
Coles, Barbara  _. 144
Comparelli, Dave   116
Cook,  Harvey   126
Cooper,   John     212
Corry, Geoffrey   134, 135
Cote, Paul  , r  162
Coupland, Knox   129
Cowan, Gordie   160
Cowan, John       140
Cox,   Robert      214
Creel,   Michael       93
Creighton, Murray   153
Crofton,  John  ...  204
Crofton,  Sylvia    204
Crooks,  Betty-   133
Crosby, Hart  ,  134, 135
Cunningham,  John    162, 179
Curby,  G   134
Curran,   Joy     214
Cuthill,   L   130
Dale,  David   157
Darner,  Warren    104
Darby,  George    149
Darvill,   David      105
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FORTY-SIX Symbol of QUALITY
flettdonj &zq
106A
WHEREVER VALVES
ARE USED
JENKIN5 BROS. LIMITED    617 ST. REMI ST. MONTREAL
Sole- office. :     Toronto     Winnipeg     Vancouver    «nd
6   Great   Queen   St,   King, way,   London   W.  C.   2,   Enjlon.   47.14 A
JENKINS VALVES
I,   engineering,    marine    and    power    plant    service
■or.,    Casr    Steel    and    Corrosion-Resisting    Alloys.
SOLD   THROUGH   RELIABLE   DISTRIBUTORS   EVERYWHERE
.    PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    FORTY-SEVEN _%M^ft«««-
Wait %>isN__y
"Gee, Vm Glad Vm Me
You don't wonder that Sylvester, the bear,
congratulates himself! After doing with
so little "Gold Seal" Salmon for years, you'd
feel that way too. But now that this high
quality brand is more plentiful, you can enjoy it more often. In "Gold Seal" you get
all the rich, zesty flavor of red sockeye salmon at its delicious best. Look for "Gold
Seal" at your grocer's.
GOLD  SEAL Fancy   Sockeye,    deep
red color.    Finest salmon for every use.
RED SEAL—*— Fancy Cohoe Salmon —
medium red color.   A salmon of many uses.
PINK SEAL Fancy   Pink  Salmon —
lighter in color. Ideal for fish loaves, cakes,
etc.
95
Gold Seal
Salmon
A Product of
THE CANADIAN FISHING CO.
LIMITED
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Davidson, Merle 	
Delisle,   Elaine  	
Denkman,   Norman
deVooght, Pete 	
Dewar, Raymond ...
Deyton,  Robin  	
Dillabough,   Norma
Donegani,  Joyce  ....
Drope,   Pat
Dugan, Connie 	
Dunbar, William 	
Dundas,   Robert    __
Dunlop, Lily 	
Dyer, David  	
Dyer, Lawrence  	
Edwards,  Inglis    	
Eedy,  George  	
Ellard, Ray 	
Elliott, Rodney 	
Ellis, Dick 	
Ellison,   Kenneth   	
Ells,   Fred   	
....... 216
..  133
.  154
..  150
.  90
....... 99
..  216
33, 39
....... 66
....... 131
Eno, Floyd A. 	
Epstein,  Rochelle
Esplen, Robert —
Esson, William 	
Evans,   Philip   ....
Feast,  Joan
Ferguson,  Donald
Ferry,  Jack
....  162, 255
  209, 302
  149
  138
103, 105, 116
  128
  95
  107
   129
  179
  144
  138, 139
   147
  95
   157
  157
  38, 40
  43
  102, 107
  102
Field,   Terence        146
Fish,  John       83,    85
Fisher, Dean   —      74
154
340
212
144
82
123
129
215
338
125
161
160
144
129
88
132
116
Genge,   Gordon    121, 301
Fitzjames,   Michael
Fleck, W. J.  	
Fletcher,   Al   	
Flight,   Sheila  	
Foote, Geraldine 	
Forsyth,  John  	
Forward, Peter 	
Foster, Helen 	
Francis, Joseph
Franklin,  Harry   . I  117, 122;
Fraser,   Doug     _ 	
Frazee, John    	
French,  Yvonne    	
Gabrielse, Hubert 	
Galvin, Jerry 	
Gardiner, Patricia 	
Gardom, G   	
Genis,   Teno
Genouese,  Elso
Gibson,  Ben  	
  245
138, 139
  216
Glendinning,  Lome    121
Gold, Jim    140
Goldberg,   Audrey       218
Gordon,  Ralph    100
    130
    95
     90
    95
  280
   133
Gould, H	
Gowans, Helen
Gowley,   Colin
errant, Gordon .
Grant, Thomas
Gray, Betty
Greenaway, Ted —
Greenills, Arnold _
Greenills,   Eric   	
211, 295
  343
  343
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    FORTY-EIGHT __■________________-*■
A  MESSAGE
TO
THE CLASS
OF '47
There was a time when secondary and university education was generally viewed as existing solely for the personal advancement of the person who
received it.    This concept justified the claim that a very large measure of
the cost of such education should be borne by the student and his family.
Gradually society came to realize that its progress in all fields of human
thought and endeavour was dependent upon an adequate supply of highly
trained young people. Further, that this supply could be assured only if the
State were willing to contribute to the support of  institutions of  higher
learning.
You have now been graduated from the University of British Columbia.
Aside from your own ability and industry, this significant achievement represents a considerable investment of money by you and by the State.
May this joint investment yield both parties a rich return in satisfaction
and service.
GEORGE M. WEIR,
Minister of Education.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-NINE IF YOU WISH TO SUPPLEMENT
Vour University Education
By
A COURSE OF PRACTICAL TRAINING
which will assist you in making the most of your Academic preparation.
THE
SPROTT-SHAW  SCHOOLS
Are at Your Service — Four of Them
They have been successfully serving your  predecessors for well nigh forty-five years.
You need not worry about your location.    They have brought their services almost to your door.
At the time of "going to press," there is not a Sprott-Shaw student, boy or girl, out of a position.
HEAD OFFICE AND MAIN SCHOOL:
812 Robson Street
MArine 3038-3023
9 KITSILANO BRANCH:
2460 Alma Street
President: MRS. R. J. SPROTT BAyview 2740
Greenwood,  Hazel
Greer, Clifford 	
Greer, James 	
Greer,  Peter 	
Grey, Gordon 	
Grey, Wally 	
Grieve, Donald
Grieve, Norm 	
Grimmett, Joan —
Gritten, Richard —
Guest, Russel 	
Cuman, Philip —
Gunn, Shirley 	
Gurevich, Bud —
Haahti, Laura —
Haas,  Bob
217    Herbison,   Hugh
Hall, Gordon —
Hall, Ormonde ._
Hampton, Robert
Hanley, Richard .
Hannan, John —
Harmon, Jack —
Harford, Bud —
Harlow, Robert .
Harrick, Nick —
Harris, Harold —
Harrison, Pat
  156
  147
     99
  146
  343
  343
  106
  208
138, 139
  121
    85
  218
104, 105, 107
  122, 125
  160
 157
  217
  157
  209
  295
  116
  202
  142
  108
140
Hart,  Jaqueline    105, 109
Harvey, Nancy —.  156
Harwood, Robert     38,   39, 287
Hatcher, Thomas   108
Hawkens,  Lucille      82,    83
Hawthorn, James   149
Hayward, David 162, 200
Herring, Phil
Hewitt, S	
Hicks, Sheila
Hill, Art	
Hill, Ernest 	
Hinds,  David  	
Hird, Edward 	
Hoad, Fred 	
Hodge,  Eric  	
Hodgins, Rosemary
Holms,   Don  	
Hopkins, Eric 	
Home, Gerald 	
Hoskins,   D	
Hough, Jack 	
Howard,   John   	
Howard, Tina 	
Huene,  Ralph  	
Husband, William
Ibbott,  Bill 	
Ikeda, R. 	
Ives, Francis 	
Jaffary, Paul 	
Jasper, Charles 	
Jeffries,   Roy   	
Jefferies, Wilfred ..
Johnson, D	
Johnston,   May  	
Johnston, Phyllis 	
Johnston,  Stu  	
Jones,  Eric  	
Jones,  Micael  	
Jones, Peter	
210, 340
  212
...    90
  144
  343
    95
  130
  100
  216
  138
42,   93
  215
  216
  130
  130
  116
     99
     67
91, 228
  145
  129
  130
  100
  109
  128
     99
  280
  130
  217
    88
  145
  211
  108
211, 302
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY Ike Stqt% of Rn« E1tiefci4Uttne.it
CHOICE   PRESENTATION  OF
BRITISH and AMERICAN PRODUCT
Joplin,   Frederick
Jutte, Audrey —
Kastt,  Doug
120, 121, 142
43, 196, 298
  162
Kayle, Dyne   154
Kelcy, Michael   100
Kellman,  John    255
Kelsberg, Barbara     38,   40
Kendall, Gloria   280
Kerby,  a    134
Kerley, Donald      89
Kermode, Harry
Kerr, Robert —
Kerr,  S.
Ketcheson, Ruth
Kincaid,  Gerald
King, Casey 	
King, Joyce 	
Kirby,  Girard
Kirkpatrick,  Edward
Kirkpatrick, John A. .
Kirkpatrick,  Norman
Klenman,  Norman ...
Knott, Douglas 	
Koch, Irma 	
Kushnir, C. 	
122, 123, 125
  162
  134
  104
  100
    67
  319
  135
    38
  338
  311
  103
  319
  255
  130
Lamb, Alexander   120, 280
Lambert, Daniel
Lane,  Robert  	
Larkin, Grant 	
Larsen, Edward .
Larsseh,  Tore 	
Latham, Len —
Latham,  Russell
Latta, Gordon 	
  152
  150
  319
142, 116
  105
  126
134, 135
  208
Lee,   George    154
Lee, Gertrude   214
Leiterman, Douglas   216
Leiterman,  Elaine      95
Letham, Leonard   127
Levelton, Bruce   207
Liddell,   Constance     144
Lindow,   Maxine    131, 299
Linsey, Frederick   340
Lipson,   Peggy     168
Lisicka, Iva   212
Lister, Robert   209
Livingstone,   Grant       75, 121
Lockhart,  Gerald   160
Logie,   Douglas     100
Low, Bruce   211
Lum,  Mun   214
Mallinson, Thomas   206
Maylsheff, Andrew   210
Mann, Roy   209
Manning, Walter   129
Mansfield, Albert      95
Marshall, Robert     149
Martin, Gordon     99
Martin, Ruth   206
Matheson,   Lenore      214
Matheson,   Bill   _'_  295
Mayne, Patricia      43
Meredith,  Kenneth    153, 215
Merritt,  Rex      306
Millar, Chester   209
Minchin, Pharik   162, 148, 150
Mitchell, Richard   147
Mitchell, Reid   126, 127
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-ONE MGIMMDIHIPPI1 COMPANY
STEAMSHIP AND CHARTERING AGENTS
Marine Building
Vancouver, B.C.
Moffatt, Wilma .
Moll,  Joyce 	
Moon, David 	
Moore,  Dorothy
Moreton,   Grant
Morris, Barrie ...
Morris,  John
Motherwell, Elizabeth
Moueson,   Don  	
Mullen, Terry 	
Mungall, Robert 	
Munn,  Anne 	
Murray, John
  204
  338
  154
  245
  140
  134
    91
  107
  149
    90
  103
  144
82,    83
121, 140
  129
  132
     95
  205
38,   39,    42, 300
    38,      116
Myers, Kenneth 	
Mylrea,   Frank   	
McDermott, Nora   —
MacDonald,  Esme  — 	
McDonald, James 	
Macdonald, Jerry 	
MacDonald, Keith   _.
MacDonald,   Malcolm       343
Macdonald,  Nancy       43, 103
McDonald,  Roma        43, 168
MacDonald, William        82
MacFarlane, Jean    .-. 106
McGarry,   Nora    ,  168
McGeer, Pat   _..   — 123, 125
McGregor,   Chris      ..  209
McGregor, James       206
McGuire, Cyril .      129
Macintosh, Patricia
40, 116, 117, 132
Macintosh,  William       121
McKay, Bill  T    38,   40,   41, 215
McKay,   Beth       144
MacKay, John 	
McKeachie, James
McKee, Gordon 	
McKeen,   George   .
MacKenzie,  John
  128
  126
134, 135
  280
  90
McKenzie,  Lloyd    _ 335
McKay,  Bill        139, 138
McKillop,   Eileen  __.      132
   - 144
      116
    319
    210
    123
  126
       82
       67
     138, 139
      145
 202
MacKinnon, Isabel
MacKinnon,  Jean  ...
McKinnon,  Neil  	
McKirby, Harvey ...
McLean, James 	
McLeod,  Cameron .
MacLeod,   Dorothy
McLeod, Tish 	
MacLeod,   Murdo   _
MacLeod, Sid 	
MacMillan, Allan ...
McPherson, Kenneth
McRae, Donald 	
MacSween,  Angus  ...
Nelford,   Terry
148, 162
33,    39
  140
  145
Nesbit,   Donald     121, 134, 135
Newell, Gloria      88
Nichol,  Richard      125
Vicholson,  Harry         87
Nicol,  Stan       140
Nixon,   Philip        120
Noble,  Ken         311
Norton,   Gloria      326
Norton,  Mary    340
Nyholm,   Marion     133
Oben,  Jean    214
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-TWO... PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   FIFTY-THREE SINCE 1888
The following list of "Yorkshire" facilities will
indicate some of the services we have made
available to our clients in British Columbia for
over 59 years:
Executors and Trustees
Insurance Stocks and Bonds
Mortgages Property Management
THE YORKSHIRE
The Yorkshire Building ;
Vancouver,  B.C. Victoria,  B.C.
Congratulations to the Graduates of 1947
It  is our  sincere wish  that  in  this year of
peace, success and good fortune be yours.
Bloedel, Stewart &
Welch Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
O'Brien,  Michael  :_._..'. ...... 128
Oldfin, John _        88
Oliver,   Don    _  215
Ourom,  Lorraine   :  _  208
Outerbridge,  Hetti  _ _      67
Owen, R _ _      130
Oulton,  Richard  . 109
Oxenbury,  Fred  .  149
Park, Joan   ...  ... 43,326
-Parnum,  Sam  — .'...    . .     . 211
Paterson, Mary   ..      88
Paton,  David   , .'.    85
Patterson,  Jack    _   121, 162
Paulin,  William .:_  206
Favelich,  John    : _.  130
Pearl,   Arthur '. _  204
Pearson, Dorothy  326
Perrault,  Ernest  _ r    95
Perrault,  Raymond     94,    95
Phillips, Francis   _ _.. 210, 217, 280
Physick, Morris  _  134, 117
Pierce,   Alan    _  148, 162
Piercy, Robert _  ..   ._.. 148, 150, 162, 268
Pierson, Bill ,...,_ 120, 121
Pillman, Raymond .  ^.. 212,
Pinchin,  Hal  _ _  104
Plant,   Paul    _ t...  126, 127
Plommer,  Robert  157
Pomfret, Jack  _    147
Forter, Anthony _ _  150
Porter, Art _ 150
Porteous, Mack _...:  145
Pridham, Jean     210
THE UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
The Book Store was established for the convenience of the Students and has effected a considerable saving to the Students in time and
money. It is prepared to supply all Text
Books required for the various courses offered
in the University, also such articles as Note
Books, Loose-Leaf Sheets, Fountain Pens,
Drawing Paper and Instruments.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    FIFTY-FOUR Everybody's
Newspaper...
East to West, North to South in the Vancouver metropolitan
area, more people in all walks of life read and enjoy the Vancouver Sun ... a wider and wider cross-section of ALL the
people. More and more and day by day The Sun becomes
EVERYBODY'S newspaper, the West's most interesting and
alive.    Phone MArine 1161  for your daily home delivery.
■^^V'^-V^V:^^
hnsurpassed
News-Services
THREE great world-wide news-gathering organizations serve Sun readers . . .
Canadian Press, British United Press and Associated Press, plus special correspondents in many chief cities. For Canada's outstanding news coverage—international,   national   and   local—look  ta The Sun.
Vancouver's  Home-Owned Evening Newspaper
*^UUt0Ut\tt
Sun Tower—Phone MA. 1161  for Home Delivery
Read
ELMORE
PHILPOTT
and JACK
SCOTT and
many other
outstandi n g
com mentat-
ors daily in
the
Tfattrnuopr
&tm ...
Phone   your
order now!
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-FIVE. ■M
THE   INSIGNIA OF
CANADA'S FINEST
ENTERTAINMENT
FAMOUS      PLAYERS      THEATRES
CAPITOL  ♦  ORPHEUM
STRAND  •   DOMINION
ALASKA PINE SALES
Ltd.
401  Marine Building
Vancouver, B.C.
SAWMILLS
PLANER MILLS
BOX FACTORIES
SHINGLE MILLS
Tel. MAr. 4111 Cables Alaskapine
Pudney, Dave
Puhach, Mike .
Putnam, James
Raine, Nancy .
Raymer, Rex u.
Recoque, Gus .
Reed, Gordon .
Reid, Birnie ...
Beid,  Dianne  .
  142
 .  129
  338
    153
---.-  205
    142
 : - :  .......      93
-_ _.       .95
  ..  '.  168
Beid, Douglas    ..... 134, 135, 121
Beid, Phyllis  ... ., ~ .7   107
Ritchie,   David   r    1  211
Roach,   William   335
Roberts,  Gwen   I    __    206
Robertson, Donald   105
Robertson, George     104, 105
Robinson,   D.   _  :,__ 128
Robinson,   Garvin     160, 161
Robinson, Wallace ,    218
Robinson,   William    211
Roff,  Jack    _ , .     211
Rome,   John    ... 311
Boss,  Hugh _  138, 139
Ross, William     :.... -......'   154
Ross, William  ,.  „_L    154
Ross, William    ; —■    154
Rothwell,   Nigel     i vdb
Roulston,  Aline    212, 340
 _   ,.  145
  _  144
  ;  210
   : ...  145
    125
Rowledge, Jim  ...
Sainas, Mary 	
Sanborn, Gordon
Saunders, Robert
Scarr, Robert _.
What you save
is the
most important
part of
what you earn.
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
"Caterpillar" Diesel
B.C. DISTRIBUTORS
FINNING
TRACTOR AND EQUIPMENT'
CO. LTD.
Vancouver, B.C.
NELSON — CRANBROOK — VERNON
PRINCE GEORGE — PRINCE RUPERT
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-SIX ARCHITECTS . . and PRINTERS
Of course there are a great many printers in any city, but we at
Ward & Phillips like to think ourselves ARCHITECTS ....
where all  printed  production  is  PLANNED according  to  basic  principles
of good typography and geared to fit the needs of each
individual customer.
The planning and designing of advertising in all its forms ....
brochures, booklets, folders, catalogues, letterheads, has been
of a specialized character with us for many years.
A telephone call will be the beginning of a service that will convince
you of our ability to produce printed advertising that will create consumer demand.
ADVERTISING IS NOT AN EXPENSE, BUT A CAPITAL GAIN ...TO BOTH PRODUCER AND CONSUMER
Producers of Fine Printing and Lithography
PRINTERS OF "THE TOTEM" YEAR BOOK OF THE U. OF B. C. SINCE 1938
TELEPHONE FAirmont 7605-7606
PAGE     THREE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-SEVEN For All Your Activities
Courteous, Prompt Service
STAR CABS
MArine 2121
To the Student Body . . .
OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND
BEST WISHES
& MITCHELL LTD.
541 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
0. B. ALLAN
LIMITED
Jewellers
Silversmiths
Diamond Watches
GRANVILLE at PENDER, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Scott,  Walter  	
Scudamore,  Owen
Sean, Bob 	
Sears, Val 	
Selman, Gordon 	
Seraphim,  D	
Seymour, Barbara 	
Seymour,  Jane  	
Shannon, Mary 	
Shaver,  Marilyn  	
Shaw, T.  ". i
Shearman, Jacqueline
Shepherd,  Gordon ....
Shirley,  Fred   	
Shore, Bert 	
  205
  156
 123
  104
 123
  130
  144
  107
  156
  94
  130
116, 133
  140
 : 210
Shugg,   Harold ■_.
Simpson,   Claude
Skene, Olive 	
Smith,  David 	
Smith,  David  	
Smith, James  ..
Smith,   Lenore   ...
Smith, Marshall ~
Smith, Robert 	
Smith, William _.
Somers, Marie 	
Spicer, V.   —
Spiers, • Bud
41, 207, 302
  130
  147
..    95
 _ 154
....  154
 1    82
  209
Spinkling, Ian 	
Stainsby, D.  O.  	
Stangroom, Robert
Steer, Ray
Steiman,   Marcia
134, 135
  145
  89
  133
  144
154, 135
  147
 .102
  149
  87
  218
E. A. LEE LTD
THE FINEST IN WEARING APPAREL
623 Howe St. Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 2457
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    FIFTY-EIGHT PHOTO    BY   HUSH    AIKENS
FDR   BEAUTY  IN   REPRDDUCTIQN       *       *       *        *       PRINT IT  LETTERPRESS
CLELAND-KENT ENGRAVING CD. LTD.
534   CAMBIE   STREET
PACIFIC   1351 VANCOUVER,   B.C.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-NINE. Whether for Home or Business Office, our
Stationery and Printing Departments will
serve you in many ways.
GEHRKE'S LTD.
566 Seymour • PAcific 0171
COMPLIMENTS OF
BEVERLY
Hosiery & Lingerie Shop
648 Granville St.
Vancouver   B.C.
Steiner,   Robert   _	
Stevens, John  K	
Stevens,  Margaret   	
Stevens, Ruth 	
Stevenson,   Gerald  	
Stevenson,   Gordon   ...
Stewart, Joseph 	
Stokkeland,   Margaret
Stone,  Mack  	
Story, David _	
Strang, Doug 	
Stretton,  Blake  	
  109
  139
  268
.._..... 149
  122
._._., 88
  1   88, 156
 _  09
     268
 _   120
 _   95
Strong, Irene ..   __.   76, 149
Stroud, Ross    ■..  204
Sultan,  Paul    215
Summers, Mearnie  .  ^  _ 132
Sutherland,   B    130
Sutherland, Jim        93
Sutton,   Warren        95
Swanton, Richard   156
Sweatman, Henry    121
Swenson,  D _   __ 130
Taylor,  William   214
Teasdale, Arnie  J  160, 161
Temoin,  Armand    140
Tennant,  Harold   105, 163
Thom,   Gilbert     214
Thomas,  William    _  138, 140
Thompson, Darry   ;   153
Thompson, David D.    _  140
Thomson,  Graham  213
Thurgood,  Robert     ...   147
Tinney,  Roy    _  211
COMPLIMENTS
EMPIRE MOTORS
Limited
BURRARD AND DUNSMUIR
AUTHORIZED FORD AND MONARCH
DEALERS
MACAULAY, NICOLLS,
MAITLAND 8 CO. LTD.
INSURANCE, FINANCIAL AND ESTATE
AGENTS
435 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:
PAcific 4111
VHWAy is sumer/.
Delnor Frozen Foods
. . . western-grown and
packed ... are tempting,
delicious, summer-fresh.
Order Delnor regularly.
■■-~~~*fWV__
DELNOR
FROZEN  FOODS
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   SIXTY EVERY STUDENT
. should answer these questions:
"HOW SOON DO I NEED TO HAVE
LIFE INSURANCE?"
In most cases the answer is: "Just
as soon as you are earning, or earlier
if there is a need. Your life insurance
should provide savings for yourself,
and protection for those dependent on
you, now or in the future. Remember that the earlier you start your
Mutual Life Insurance program, the
easier it will be for you to carry . . .
•
"DOES IT MATTER WHICH LIFE INSURANCE
COMPANY I CHOOSE?"
Life insurance companies are much alike as to
policies and rates, but actual long-term results vary
widely. We invite you to compare The Mutual Life
of Canada's record with that of any other company.
Evidence of the satisfaction of our policyholders is
furnished by the fact that whole families and succeeding generations have entrusted their life insurance
programs exclusively to The Mutual Life of Canada,
and each year approximately 35% of its new business
comes from our policyholders. Ask your Mutual Life
representative to explain the special features of this
Company.
LOW COST LIFE INSURANCE SINCE 1869
THE
I OF CANADA I
HEAD OFFICE - WATERLOO, ONTARIO
BRANCH OFFICES IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
402 WEST PENDER ST VANCOUVER
201-4 TIMES MLDG VICTORIA
Todd, Stuart 	
Torfason, Lloyd 	
Tower,  Stan  I	
  _.._  140
  145
   142
Town, D'Albert     126, 127
Townsend,   Peter      311
Trethewey,   Helen  131
Trim, Peter   130
Trumm,  Walter    210
Tuland, Doug   _.'.__ 306
Tupper, David   335
Turner, John    104, 107, 162, 163
...  , : 153
-  131
  216
  132
   i    82
     130
   130
      38,   40
  108
   144
    147
Twizell,   Barbara
Vawden, Joyce 	
Verrall, Vivian 	
Vincent, Dorothy .
Vosylkow,   Walter
Walis,  J	
Walker, Peter 	
Walker, Robert ....
Wallace, Daniel ...
Walling, Evelyn ...
Walling, Wally
Warner, Don   , 120, 121
Warner,  Kenneth   „  302
Wasserman,  Jack   _ _ 104, 105, 107
Watt, James      153
Watt,  Norman      _. 130
Watters, Ron     121
Webb, Charles   __ 208
Weber, Ronald   - _ 125
Webster,  Alan    __ .!  295
Welsh, Daynard ,   306
Westman,   Jim      214
VANCOUVER'S
Progressive Laundry
and Dry Cleaning
Service
FA irmont 6611
PAGE     THREE    HUNDRED   AND    SIXTY-ONE ASSAY, INDUSTRIAL AND EDUCATIONAL
LABORATORY SUPPLIES — CHEMICALS
CAVE  & COMPANY
Ltd.
567 Hornby St.
Vancouver, B.C.
FREDERICK GOERTZ
Ltd.
CERTIFIED  INSTRUMENT MAKERS
Specialist in the Repair of
Instruments for Engineers, Aviators
Surveyors and Navigators
All Work Guaranteed
564 Howe St., Vancouver     -     MArine 3822
Wheeler,  John       134, 135, 295
White, Doreen     217
White,  Jean     l  335
White,  Pat _._..    74
Whitecross,   Betty    ..._  104
Whittall,  Doug   r  126, 127
Widman, Beverley      ._      85
Wiggins,  Murray _  145
Wilde, Walter   ._.  145
Wilkinson,   Thomas   ..  .... 343
Wilks, Roderick      152
Williams, David  1 _       92
Wilson,  Neil   _ _..  213
Wilson,   Rex   .....   121
Wilson,   Stewart    _. 140, 205
Wilson,  William     _ ■  132, 133
Winchester, Donald     95
Wolstencroft,   Sheila     326
Wong, Vivian   _ _  214
Wong, Wah     214
Woodside,  Owen       145
Woodward,  Frank       ■_  208
Wormsbecker,  John      204
Worsfold, Catharine   _ I  131, 149
Worthington, Pat   109
Wotherspoon,  Arthur      134, 135
Wright,  Donald  _ _   107
Wright,   Paul   '.  .'..     95
Wynne, Ivor   130
Yates, Douglas ...   v   179
Young,  Robert  . *.  :  _   216
Yule, Marj  _      9_
COLUMBIA
PAPER CO. LIMITED
Wholesale
Paper Merchants
Manufacturers of "Columbia" Quality
Scribblers and Exercise Books
Vancouver    B.C.
Victoria,  B.C.
SMART
DRESSERS
APPRECIATE
BETTER
CLOTHES
Quality with Style
ALWAYS A SAFE INVESTMENT
YOU WILL LIKE OUR
PERSONAL SERVICE
ZMie, R. 2>eem
498 Seymour Street
Corner Pender
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    SIXTY-TWO BUILDINGS ROADS
AIRPORTS DOCKS
EARTH-MOVING
)ne of the Company's recent projects
ii« consTftucTion comm ltd.
ENGINEERS and CONTRACTORS
470 Seymour Street
Vancouver, B.C.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    SIXTY-THREE "SOMETHING  NICE   INSIDE  FOR YOU"
Uaitit   o-teu   cJia-Wea o)i}cm
'YOUR CAMPUS FLORIST"
4429 West 10th Ave. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone ALma 0660
YOUR COMMUNITY GREEN GROCER
Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Brought In For You Daily
FREE DELIVERY
VARSITY PRODUCE
10th at Sasamat ALma 1141-2
Graduates Index
■
Arts ...
Abear, Peter T.
229
229
229
Adkin,  Edmond  Y.  .      	
Ayers, John D. L. •. 	
Baillie, Christine H  .'.   229
Allen, Ella K.       229
Allen, Harry J.  .  229
Bampton, Diana L.   229
Bampton,  Virginia  F.   ___.   229
Amy,  Peter R.      229
Anderson,   Geo.   C.   .-   229
Barclay-Ross,  Mignon L  T_. r : ... 229
Barker, James F   229
Andrews, J. H. M    229
Angus, Michael F    ..... 229
Barritt, Dorothy E.   229
Barrett,   Izadore     229
Archer, Douglas H   229
Armour, John D. H.       229
Bartholomew,  Marion Y _...  229
Arnold, Shirley J -   229
Ashford, Minnie  „'    229
 , ,. 229
     229
Bell, Doreen  C  , ,	
Eell,  Gertrude  M _-~   	
Beltz,  John  E      230
Bennie, James R _  230
Brockhouse, Bert N. ..   230
Brought, Rosemary J.              .230
Gestetner
(Canada) Limited
Manufacturers ot the
World's Premier Duplicator
Fine Papers, Stencils
and Ink
660 Seymour St. Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 9644
HEAD OFFICE FOR CANADA — TORONTO, ONT.
FACTORY — LONDON, ENGLAND
EMPIRE SHIPPING
COMPANY LIMITED
WORLD-WIDE
FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
PAcific 7121
966 W. Hastings St.      Vancouver, B.C.
•      PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    SIXTY-FOUR iiiilllllllllll»
Woodward's la*ge variety and complete
selection of quality mctAaiidise ia every
Department will help balance your budget*
Consistent Evety-day Low Prises
VASCOU V-IS.' $■   1, AI0SST    &BW A'l T *t: &** T   S 1*: O.R H
::£:^£;3;#£:£S£>:,:':^^
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-FIVE Your Campus Service Station
Students' Car Repairs Our
Specialty
l. B. C. Service Station
(Jutr off University Boulevard)
ROY HAND, Prop.
2180 Allison Road ALma 0524
Derringer, Donald A.
Bethune, Winona J. .
Brown, Betty B.	
Brown, Donald G. ...
Blair, Gordon H	
Blais, Andree M. 	
Bruce, Charles A. 	
Bunting, Isobel J. G.'
Black, Frank 	
Blundell, Heather 	
Burden, Marjorie D.
Burke, Harold H	
Bobbitt, Walter P. J:
Booth, Elizabeth A.
Burnett, A.  	
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Boultbee, Patricia H.     230
Burns, Margaret M.
Boyle, Fred A _.
Burton, John A. 	
Butcher, Pamela A. ...
Byrnes, Marguerite L.
Cail, Robert E .....
_1  230
   230
  .._  1 _  231
_  231
Coles, John M. ..    231
Collins, June V. V >..: _  .-- 231
Carre, Hilary M  —  231
Caster, Garnet H _     231
Cools, Adrienne E     231
Corbould, Shirley M.      231
Castillou, Harry G   — 231
Champion,   William    _   231
Costley, Lloyd I.   231
Court, Reginald A  231
Chow, Richard H.     231
W. & I. WILSON
IMPORTERS OF FINE BRITISH WOOLLENS
Hotel Vancouver
SWEATERS from Braemar of Scotland.   New
line COATS and SUITS from Jaeger and
Chester Barrie of London.
SHIRTS, SOCKS, TIES, etc., from well-known
Old Country Makers.
WE'LL KEEP THEM FILLED!
YOUR FUEL BIN—Whatever type of fuel you
burn—coal, wood, sawdust or oil—give us
your order and it will receive prompt and careful attention. We make deliveries anywhere
in Greater Vancouver and in North or West
Vancouver.
YOUR ICE-BOX—With our All-Year, Winter
or Summer Ice Contract, you save money on
ice supplies. Phone us for details of our
Special Ice Refrigeration Service Plan.
New Modern Steel Ice Refrigerators Now in
Stock
Telephones: FA. 6707 — West 788
GARVIN ICE & FUEL
Co. Ltd.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-SIX A Continuous Chronicle of the
Lower Mainland for 87 Years
THE
BRITISH
COLUMBIAN
ESTABLISHED 1860
DAILY AND WEEKLY EDITIONS
The authoritative source of news for the hundred thousand progressive citizens of New
Westminster and the Fraser Valley — people
who keep up to date on local and international
happenings and who look to "The Columbian" as their shopping guide for all their
purchases. Whether one is a homekeeper, a
merchant or a national advertiser, "The
Columbian" meets the need of a thoroughly
established medium.
I. G. MacFARLANE, Publisher
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND    SIXTY-SEVEN DISTINCTIVE HAIR STYLING
<JaWnnau&e. UJnauXu  G)_ucm
Proprietrist
EDITH M. WALL
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
ROYAL
STANDARD
AND
PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
BYRNES TYPEWRITERS LTD.
592  Seymour St. PAcific 7942
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE
Miss Marguerite Byrnes AL. 0538Y
Arts '47
Chung, Lilian B. ~
Craig, Margaret H.
Clark, Beverley M.
Clark, Mary E.	
Crook, Lois M. 	
Cupples, James F. B.
Clearihue, Joyce G. ..
Cole, Desmond W. ..
Dain, Doris M. R. 	
Darling John G. 	
Davidson, Ian J	
Davie, Jessie M. 	
Dunford, Fred A	
Eberlein, Edward G.'
Dawe, Alan E. 	
Daykin, Philip N.
Edwards, Thomas H. .
Ellis,  Catherine  D.  	
Dinwoody, William H.
Dobbin, Mary M. 	
Epstein, Rochelle  	
Evans, Alfred E	
Dolmage, Mary E	
Donegani, Joyce A. P. ..
Fagan, Mary S.
  231
  231
 231
 231
  231
  231
  231
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  231
  231
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I.  232
  232
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— -  ,  232
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Farina,  Margaret  R.'  _. 232
Down, David C.
Downman, Lorna M. S.
Ferry, Jack 	
Fiddes, I. H	
Driver, Margaret W. J.
Dryburgh, Nora A.
232
232
232
232
232
232
Fleming, Robert E _     232
C. P. FOSTER
& CO. LTD.
ENGINEERS' AND SURVEYORS'
INSTRUMENTS
DRAWING AND TRACING PAPERS
COMMERCIAL STATIONERS
BLUE-PRINT AND OZALID
PAPERS AND CLOTH
631 SEYMOUR ST.
PAcific 5841
Our Studio of Furs features smart fur Coats
and jaunty Jackets priced to college budgets.
Your are invited to drop in anytime and inspect
this fine collection of quality pelts and latest
styles.
R. I. POP
FUR STUDIOS
LTD.
GRANVILLE at SIXTEENTH
BAyview 8311
Largest Fireproof Refrigerated  Fur Storage Vaults
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-EIGHT MORE and MORE,
it's
II
BRITISH
COLUMBIA"
"British Columbia offers an unlimited field of industrial and
commercial opportunity. Nature has given it much; initiative has
given it more."
—Leslie H. Eyres.
1947 is big with promise for British Columbia. Never in its history was
there a keener interest than there is today in its opportunities and attractions. In all parts of the world there is an eagerness to know what it
has to offer to the capitalist, industrialist, and homeseeker.
It is safe to say that British Columbia was never in healthier or more
robust condition, that never has a keener or more soundly-based optimism prevailed.
We are entering a new era, in which new demands will be made upon
us all. We face a future of splendid promise to the young men and
women of today.
Business and industrial leaders are of one mind—that this is the day and
age of specialized knowledge, that the key positions, the worth-while
posts, in the business and industrial world will go to those whose minds
are trained and disciplined, whose perceptions have been quickened to
grasp the intricacies of the new techniques.
BUSINESS IS MOVING TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. The tide of settlement is definitely flowing to the West. With its many advantages,
British Columbia has become the Mecca for settlers from every part,
the chosen field for industrial and commercial enterprise.
MORE AND MORE, IT'S "BRITISH COLUMBIA," to industrialists, investors, home-, health-, and pleasure-seekers.
THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B.C.
G. ROWEBOTTOM
Deputy Minister
HON. LESLIE H. EYRES
Minister
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-NINE NAN ASHWORTH
The Coed's Choice tor
SPORTS
AFTERNOON
DINNER
COCKTAIL
EVENING
GOWNS
SPECIALIZING IN LARGE AND SMALL
SIZES REASONABLY PRICED
Gowns and Sports Salon
3763 West 10th Avenue
ALma 1162
Foerster,  Darryl  K.    232
Ford, Margaret J     233
Foster,  Helen G.    _     233
Gilmour, William  S    .-.  233
• Goodwin,  Gwendoline F     233
Fowler, Pat S. C    233
Franfis, Donald W.     233
Gowans, John R.       233
Graham, John F   ,  _  233
Frolic,  Gordon  E.   .  _.. ...„ _..    233
Fuoco, John R       233
Granberg, Ingrid II   _  233
Granhold, Ella M _._.  233
Fyfe, Margaret N.     233
Gait, William  T '.   233
Grant,   Gordon  B.       233
Grant,  Kenneth  H.    __ .,... 233
Gay, William G  233
Gilbert, Shirley E       233
Grant, Patrick C. ..: .   233
Grant, Winifred D  233
Gillies, Mary L.    233
Gilmore, John W.         233
Gratton-Smith, Dorothy G.    233
Gravlin, Raymond G.   ,-.  _.__ 233
Gray, Duncan E.        234
Grayston, Irene K.      234
Hayes, Ean    234
Heise, Jack K  :    234
Greenaway, Ellen M.        234
Greenwood, Hazel V. E _'..._.  234
Henderson, James S   234
Henderson, Neil J. _        234
Challenger Watches
are known throughout
Canada for
dependability and
long service
SELECT YOUR CHALLENGER
at
Jewelers
Silversmiths
Vancouver, B.C.
YOU MAY DO BETTER WITH
KEYSTONE
BRAND
Looseleaf Sheets
and Binders
Choose Keystone Brand for all
Your class and study work
Smith Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
VANCOUVER — VICTORIA — EDMONTON
CALGARY
PAGE    THRE'E    HUNDRED     AND    SEVENTY EXCLUSIVE APPAREL FOR MEN
RICHARDS & SMITH
Ltd.
"The Shop with Young Men in Mind"
Custom Tailored Shirts
Imported Sweaters
Made-to-Measure Suits
Jarmen Shoes
577 HOWE ST.
PHONE PA. 6724
BEST WISHES TO THE STUDENTS FROM
J. C. WALBERER
TOTEM PHOTOGRAPHER
Res.: 5 West 7th Avenue
FA. 1157
AH Totem negatives will be kept on file for any size
photographs you may want to order.
BEST WISHES TO THE
STUDENT BODY AND GRADUATING
CLASS OF 1947.
KER 8 KER LTD.
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
475 Howe Street
PAcific 3241
Gregory, Doris 	
Gritten, Richard A.
Hick, Wm. B. M.
  234
  234
  234
Hill, Ernest D. O.   234
Grover, Fred W.  ..  234
Hanson, Mary V   234
Hillier, Frances C   234
Hines, Ronald G.   234
Harkness, Alan C   234
Harris, Ian W. E.    234
Ho, Arthur  7  234
Ho, Henry J   234
Hartley,  G.   234
Hawkens, Lucill _
Holder, Clinton E.
Holman, David T.
Holmes, Kathleen
Holmgren, Eric J.
James, Morton S. .
Janzen, Wesley H.
Holt, Bernard C. _
Holt, Margaret C	
Jenvey, Gerald J _.
John, Thomas W. 	
Horwood,  Bertram  I.
Hourston, William R.
Johnson, Gladys M. ...
Johnston, Alex C.
Hovelaque, Josephine M.
Hudson, Jessie M	
Johnston, May S. 	
Jones, Barbara M 	
Hughes, Hilda W. 	
234
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235
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_. 235
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... 235
B.C. Distributors for
DODGE
DESOTO
Passenger Cars
DODGE
"Job-Rated" Trucks
Begg Brothers
LTD.
1190 W. GEORGIA
MA. 8281
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    SEVENTY-ONE WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
SHARP and THOMPSON
ARCHITECTS
626 W. Pender St.
Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
SHEARS 0 CO. LTD.
PRINTERS
FAir. 2202        Vancouver        2218 Main St.
Huston,   Mavis  R.
Jutte, Audrey D. .
.._..     235
   235
Keast,  Russel R.  .     235
Idsardi, William F  ,.  235
James, Frances E    L  235
Kelsberg, Barbara J   235
Kendall, Richard A     235
Kennedy, Gerald B. ..._ .   236
Kerr, Janet M.  .     . 236
Leckie,  Jean  F.       236
Leddy,  Leland    ;  236
Kershaw,   Dennis      236
Kilbank, Alfred C.     _.    236
Lee, Douglas H. T.     236
Lee,   Gertrude          236
Kitos, Helen A. ..._      236
Klenman,  Norman  .      236
Lee, Henry W. C     236
Lee,  Sybil   238
Koerner, Nicholas T      236
Kyle, Donald L     236
Leiterman,  Douglas  S     238
Liddell,   Constance   A     236
Lamb,  John  F.       236
Lane, Mary E.       236
Lidster, Freda B    236
Lieske, Ewald A.        236
Larson, J.  E _       236
Laubach, Anna L;    _   236
  236
      -...  237
Lock, Gladys M.  	
Loft,  Alfred  E.    	
Lord, Muriel H.       	
Louck's, John E.     .  .. 237
IWUai CMfaa4t<**v&
Booking and Presenting the
World's Greatest Theatrical
Attractions Throughout the West
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA CALGARY
Ask
tor
FELIX
ITS  TOPS
In Ginger Ale
or Club Soda
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-TWO s k __
h     Con
You'll Find The Bay Staff
Always In The Cheer Section
"Service with a smile" . . . it's not just a motto
. . . it's an integral part of the feeling The BAY
staff has for its work.
Satisfaction with your purchase is not enough for
us ... we want you to feel that our friendly,
courteous attention is always available ... always gladly given.
So our staff stays in the cheer section . . . ready
to tackle the knottiest problem with good humor
and a genial desire to be of friendly service.
at      The      A A v
INCORPORATED   2ff M«,Y 1670
Mayne, Patricia E. ...
Mehling,  Agnes  E.  .
Lubzinski,  James   S.
Lucas, Ronald F	
... 237
... 237
._ 237
... 237
Menzies, Dora K   237
Metford, L. _  237
Lundell, Fred W   237
Lymbery, Alice R   237
Michas, Lucas T.
Millard, Gloria I	
Mallinson,  Thomas  J.
Martin,  Deirdre	
Miller, Hugh S. 	
Mitchell, Georgina H.
Martin, Ruth E	
Mason,  Hugh  B.  	
Mitchell,   Ian   A	
Mitchner, Morton 	
   237
     237
   237
.._  237
      237
.__  237
...:_. _   237
  237
     237
   237
Masson, Rene J. N. __        237
Matheson,  Joan I    237
Moore,  Dorothy  P     237
Morris, Yvette  M    237
Motherwell, Elizabeth L    238
Munn, Anne C   .. 238
Macdonald, Nancy K.       233
McDonald, Roma F.       238
Munro, David A.   238
Murray, Katherine I   238
McDonnell, Charles E   238
McDougall, Edna M   238
Mutter, Arthur K __.  __  238
McCahill,   Michael  J    233
Macfarlane,  Thomas  G    238
MacFarlane,   Jean    __  238
238
  233
.... 233
..... 238
McCallum, Joan M	
McCallum, Mary F	
McFarland, William D.
McGlashan, Pamela D.
McCusker, Thomas  .. 238
MacDonald,   Donald  A  233
Macintosh,  Jane   M.     _     238
McKay,  Anna  I.     _   238
MacDonald, John A     238
McDonald, Mary F     238
MacKenzie, David M.   - 238
Mackenzie, Verna C _      238
McKillop,  Eileen  _       239
MacKirdy,  Daniel  H.   .. ._ 239
Nicholson,   Katherine   M.
Nieuwdorp, John  L.  	
MacKirdy, Kenneth A.  ...
MacLean,   Harold
  239
...... 239
  239
  239
Oliver, William D  ,    239
Olivier,  Florence  E.   _  239
MacLeod, Norman K. M.   239
MacMillan, Kathleen R.     239
Ourom, Lorraine I.    239
Outerbridge,   Henriette         239
McNally, Edward E   _ _          239
McNaughton,  Mary  M       239
Tage, Percival E.    239
Paling, Freda M.        239
McPherson, Kenneth F.  239
McTavish, Mary E. _   ■.  239
Fappajohn,   Agnes       239
Parker, Mary E. ...  ■.   239
Nairne, Ronald S   239
Newman, Russell G     239
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-THREE.., WEDDINGS
FAMILY GROUPS
CHILDREN
•
GLAMOUR
PORTRAITS
TAKEN IN YOUR HOME OR OUR
MODERN STUDIOS
2715 GRANVILLE
(At 11th Ave.)
BA. 1750
Paul, Frank   239
Paul,   Yvonne     239
Paulin, William P   240
" Perrault,  Raymond  J   240
Radcliffe, Roland W   240
Raglin, Gordon A.   240
Phair, Harold A. E.  .  240
Phelan, Mary E.   240
Raine, N. I   240
Rampone, Alfred J.   240
    240
  240
  240
  240
 '.  240
  240
  240
  240
   240
Phillips,  Sydney
Physick, Morris C. 	
Ramsay, William F. 	
Reed, Thomas G. 	
Plater, Roy E. 	
Potter, William S. 	
Reid, Dianne E 	
Remnant,  Peter  	
Prescott, Pauline M. A.    	
Prittie, Robert W   ...   240
Rennie, Jean. M.    240
Rice, Ernest T   240
Purvis, Audrey B.    240
Pyrch, William J.   240
Riffer, Louise H.  ...   240
Roberts, Gwendolyn E.     240
Robertshaw, Arthur M.   -~ 241
Robertson, James H    241
.Schofield,  Frances L.       241
•Schroeder, Charlotte H      241
Rodenchuk,  Eugenia      241
Rodin, Nicholas W    241
Scott, Anthony D _   241
The biggest name in
Swim Suits
Sun Clothes . Sweaters
Wherever you find the Jantzen label—you
have found the best design, in tailoring and
fit. Look for the Red Diving Girl, your assurance of quality.
JANTZEN KNITTING MILLS
of Canada Limited
Canada's Best Known Apparel Name
Vancouver, B. C.
Congratulations and Best Wishes
to
UBC CLASS OF '47
taSSBBJEEf
ESTABLISHED  1888
VANCOUVER'S OLDEST AND LARGEST
COAL DEALERS
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND    SEVENTY-FOUR Segur, Delphine C      241
Rosen,  Linda  C __     241
Boss, John D       241
Selkirk, Daryl R.       241
Seymour, Jane D. _..   241
Rowell, Dorothy M.      24L
Rowell, Hedley J   241
Shantz, Cecil R _      241
Shaw, June E.  ._      241
Salter, Patricia M _   -  241
Sanderson, Joy E.     _  241
Shaw, Gwendolyn M.       — 241
     241
   __ 241
 1  241
    241
    _ 241
      242
 _. __..  242
      _.    242
242
     242
    242
Shepherd, Ethel B.	
Scagel, Robert F   	
Sceats, Donald J. 	
Sherritt, Norman A. .   	
Smith, Donald A    	
Smith, Fern G     	
Smith, Bruce M   _. —
Tener, Robert H _       	
Thomas,  Ethel B     ,	
Smith, Winsome C.   ..-.-.  	
Soward, D. M.   	
Thomson,   Alexander      242
_ _  242
    242
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     242
     242
_     242
   242
.__    242
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Thomson, Patricia G. _
Stacey, Betty H	
Stewart, John R —
Thomson, Audrey W. ..
Vandrick, Sydney . A.
Stewart, Victor V. 	
Stuart, Walter H. 	
Trethewey, H. C. _
Vaughan, Margaret K.
TR AER and DICKIE LTD.
DRESSES from $19.75
SUITS AND COATS from $39.75
627 Howe
MAr. 0631
DOMINION SECURITIES
CORPORATION LIMITED
Established 1901
TORONTO - MONTREAL - WINNIPEG - VANCOUVER
NEW YORK - LONDON, ENG.
510   HASTINGS  STREET  WEST,  VANCOUVER,  B.  C.
Phone PA. 7454
PAGE   THREE   HUNDRED   AND    SEVENTY-FIVE DiCKSoirs impoRTinG co. ltd.
Blenders & Packers
Tea — BLOSSOM — Coffee
Sultain, Paul E.
242
242
DeLuxe Bowling Centre
MAr. 9940    Hastings at Homer     PAc. 0956
Downtown Recreation Centre
For U.B.C. Students
Compliments of
MR. GORDON FARRELL
Swistoon, Joseph B.
Vesterback, Carl G.   242
Vosper, Catherine E   242
Talbot,  Robert  .
Taylor, William
R.
Wallace, Winiufred
Washington, Emma
Webb, Norman H. .
Wells, John R. H. .
Winter, Roger C. ...
Winter, Walter E. .
N.
E.
Westinghouse, Margaret V.
White, Robert D 	
Wong, Vivian M	
Wood, William S	
Widman, Charles R	
Wiebe, John	
Woodman, Thomas  	
Woodward, Mary T. 	
Wilde, George D.
Wilkinson, Margaret C.
Yates, Douglas E.	
Williams, Dorothy E. D.
Wilson, David A.	
Yates, Maureen S. 	
Young, Albert C. 	
Wilson, Neil L 	
Wilson, Robert G.	
Young, Archibald D.	
Young, Margaret M. 	
Young, Michael G. 	
Zuk, P 	
242
242
242
242
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243
243
243
243
243
243
243
243
243
243
243
243
243
243
243
244
244
Clarke Simpkins
Ltd.
$
;V
5*
Q^
y
.<*•
Your Community
Style Centre
for . . .
COED'S
TOGGERY
AFTERNOON AND EVENING GOWNS
4353 West 10th Ave.
ALma 2161
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-SIX Commerce . . .
281
281
Aird, Jackson W.  ...
Anders, Benjamin 	
Bodie, Robert T  281
Booth,  Richard  D     281
Andrews, Ernest H   281
Archer,   John     281
Bosdet, John D. .... .'.  281
Brewster,  Donald A.    281
Argue,  James  H   281
Barlow, Douglas W   281
Burch, Thomas P     281
Carter, Kenneth A   ._.. 281
Barnwell, John A   281
Bartle, John G   281
Carter, Stewart M.     281
Chew, Vernor B   281
Bates, Elmer W  .-.  281
Beamer, Gordon H   281
Chu, Jennie   281
Clerihue, William R   281
Birmingham, William P   281
Bishop,  Lloyd  G.    281
Clifford, Richard L.      281
Clucach,  Moros    ___  281
Cohen,  Jack    282
Courts, James W   282
Ferry, Jack A   - 282
Fleming, Thomas K  :  282
Cribb, John M     282
Crosby, Boyd T   282
Fieudiger,  Ronald      282
UNION STEAMSHIPS LTD.
Offer a variety of trips throughout the season to Howe
Sound, the Gulf Coast, Alaska and Northern B.C. Ports.
Steamers leave Union Pier in Vancouver as per schedule
for—
BOWEN ISLAND
EAST and WEST HOWE SOUND
SECHELT
GULF COAST
NORTHERN B. C.
Bowen  Island  Inn and Sechelt Hotel
provide   comfortable  accommodation   for a   day  or
longer visit.
Enquire at Union Steamship ticket offices or from
Agents for rates, etc.
tern
Union Pier
Foot of
Carrall St.,
Vancouver
PAc. 3411
City Ticket Office, 793 Granville St., MAr.  5438
To the Graduating Class of the
University of British Columbia we
extend heartiest congratulations*
feu      UfittitfU? rVtffc    «-—|&y^
:'   "3
__^tes==__3_, - .   ■
THE VANCOUVER DAILY PROVINCE
Always a better Newspaper IN B. C. IT'S
B-A
ALL THE WAY!
BRITISH  AMERICAN  OIL CO.  LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
YOUR CAMPUS BARBER SHOP
Union Shop (A.F.L.)
Save   yourself   valuable   time   by   dropping   in   at   your
convenience.     Minimum waiting time with
FOUR chairs to serve you.
PETER DYKE
Proprietor
Formerly with  Hotel  Vancouver  Barber Shop
South  Basement
Brock Hall
Frewer,  Philip  G.  —
D'Andrea, Joseph A.
Dear,  Wallace  	
Fundry,  Walter  	
Gaffney, Richard F.
Diether,   Barbara   	
Doubleday, Douglas C. .
Goodman, Juanita V. .	
Goodwin, Gordon V	
Dyke, David C. L. ..._..
Erickson, Everett R	
Gourlay, Colin C	
Grant, Thomas C	
Estey, Robert M. 	
Evans, Dan S	
Green, Arthur R	
Greer,  Frederick J	
Guman, Philip G	
Harford, Ian M 	
Kenny,  Eric  L.   	
Kershaw, Stephen, C. ..
Harris, Kingsley F	
Harrison, Paul H	
Kirk, Andrew P. 	
Knutson, Alvin L.  	
Heidti Anthony A	
Hill, William M	
Kuebler, Frank G. ..
Lam,   Paul  ._
Hodgson, Elizabeth J.
Howieson, Robert D. .
Langdale, Leslie A. ...
Lew,  Ann  	
.. 282
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282
282
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_. 282
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NABOB
Famous
COFFEE
Favorite tor Over 30 Years
KELLY DOUGLAS & CO. LIMITED
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND    SEV EN TY-EIGHT. James,  Ralph B.	
Jauck, John F. 	
Lockhart, Keith W.
Lowe, Robert H. 	
Kendall, Gloria E. _
Kenmuir, John A.
  283
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Marshall, Warren E.   283
Miller, Alexander K.   283
  284
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Miller, Donovan F. .
Molson, David H	
McLennan, John M.
McMillan, Alfred C. .
Muir, Eric W. A	
Mylett, Patrick V.	
McRae, Donald A. _.
McRae, Harry Norman    284
MacAskill, Barbara J       284
McConnell, Thomas W   284
Naftel, Cecil O  284
Mcolle, Wilson R   284
McCubbin, William D.   284
MacDougall, John F. F   284
Noble, David A    284
O'Brien, M.  J.      284
McGregor, Duncan W.   284
McKeen, George B   _  284
Ouimette, William M.   284
Paisley, John K 	
McKillop, Desmond G. 	
McLeish, Glenna G 	
Parker, Albert M. L _....
      284
  284
   284
   284
Peach, Stewart B _  284
Penson, Norman H —  285
2>eaHii
DISTINGUISHED NAME
IN CHOCOLATES
4493 West 10th Avenue
Vancouver, Canada
Engineers . . .
When you graduate to  problems involving high grade sand
and gravel, True-Mix concrete
and  other  building   materrals,
consult
DIETHERS LTD.
Granville Island           MA. 6231            Vancouver, B. C.
shoes alive with YOUTH!
608 GRANVILLE ST.
"Canada's
LARGEST exclusive
Ladies' shoe store..."
■■
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED   AND   SEVENTY-NINE EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY
LOOSE LEAF BOOKS, SLIDE RULES
FOUNTAIN PENS, SCALES
DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
CLARKE 8 STUART
CO. LTD.
Stationers,  Printers,  Bookbinders
550 Seymour - Vancouver, B.C.
BEST WISHES
TO THE STUDENT BODY OF U.B.C.
FOR SUCCESS IN
1 947
McLennan, McFeely &
Prior Ltd.
VANCOUVER   -   VICTORIA   -   NEW WESTMINSTER
British Columbia's Pioneer Hardware Supply House
Deal With Specialists for Satisfaction
Fast, Expert Service on
WHEEL ALIGNMENT AND COLLISION
REPAIRS
16   Years'   Experience
BOB BODIE Limited
Look lor the new Neon Sign with fhe Wobbly Wheels
now of
1150 Seymour St.
PA. 9267
New Address
SWEET SIXTEEN Limited
Vancouver, Victoria, New Westminster and Prince Rupert
NINE STORES TO SERVE YOU
Purchase  Your  Complete  Outfit
on Sweet Sixteen's Budget Plan.
Terms  in  Accordance  with  Wartime  Prices  and Trade
Board   regulations.
Sweet Bitxieen
Pratt,  Joan  F	
Robinson,  Norman A.
Roff,  Jack W	
Price, Robert S.  	
Quick,  Beverley  C.  ...
Rush, William L	
Saba, Albert H	
Rea, David T	
Reed, Kenneth W	
Scott, John C. M	
Scott, Margaret C	
Rhodes, John A	
Richards, Rees  	
Scott, Graeme W	
Simmons, Harry R.
Robb, Russell 	
Robinson, Donald A.
Sloan, William M	
... 285
... 285
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.._ 285
... 285
Somerville, William R.   _..   285
Robinson, R. L      285
Robinson, Grant T   _.   285
Stanford, Stephen E     285
Stewart, Jack   .... 285
Stimpson, Arthur W _  286
Strang, Douglas M     286
Wallace, Charles H   _  286
Wallace, Francis J    286
Stuart, Stanley W.   286
Tailing, Robert H     286
Wardroper, Wilfrid K. ._      286
 _  .   286
 ,  286
  286
  286
  286
 .  286
   286
Watkinson, Arthur P. W. 	
Thompson, Thomas D	
Thomson, Douglas T 	
Watt, James M. 	
Webb, Terrance G 	
Thornicroft, Stairway E.
Townsley, William
Weber, Ronald J     286
Welsh, Robert L    286
Usborne, John S.       286*
Varcoe, John B ._    286
Williamson, Hugh J   286
Wilson, Eric P   286
Vaughan, Margaret E   286
Walker, Robert E   286
Wilson, William L.    ,  286
Wyatt, Robert C.     286
Engineering
Milan, Albert R	
Murray, Gordon S	
Allan, Michael H. S. W.
Ames, Gordon W.
McCallum, Thomas G. M.
McDonnell,  Basil 	
Bortolin,  Lindo  G.   	
Cowie, Alexander 	
    296
   296
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  396
„   296
      296
    296
     296
McLellan, Harold D   296
 _.    296
    296
   296
     296
   296
    296
 1.   296
 •.  296
Neilson, Allan P. ...
Ellison,  Gordon D.
Huff,  Walter
Newmarch, Thomas F. R.
Osborne, William M	
Hughes, James H. C —
Hughes,  Roger C.  	
Pedersen, Chester H	
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND   EIGHTY. It's
not what you
wear but how
you wear it!
. . . It's being spotless, crisp, and un-
ciHimpled, keeping smart and up-to-
date that counts. It's
Sanitone, the modern
drycleaning process
that turns the trick.
For Sanitone restores
brilliance to colours,
firmness of texture to
materials of all kinds
and makes clothes
look like new.
LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANERS
LIMITED
MArine 1321
Polowy,   Joseph   1	
Larson,  Lawrence  N.
Levelton, Bruce H.
Reaville, Eric T	
Ross, George A	
Seyer, Francis H.
.... 296
..... 296
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.... 296
.... 296
.... 297
.... 297
.- 297
... 297
Sherman, Deane D.    	
Davies, Llewellyn B   	
Evans,  Donald  J.     _....  	
Simpson,  John  D.       297
Woodside, Owen W     297
Genge, Gordon M     297
Gill,  Lawrence      297
Gill, William D     297
.--■    297
    _•__  297
-      297
     297
     297
Carter,  Arnold  G.        297
Cook,  Robert  E   _ 297
    297
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-..   297
    297
   298
.--     298
  —   298
_      298
Glover, Nelles H.
Beal, Evan S	
Bushfield,  Roy  	
Hannan, John G.
Hayes,  John
Hazlewood, David A:
Hesla, Erling C. 	
Cooper, Ernest E 	
Cox, Robert A	
Hill, Robert H	
Hrynchuk,  Walter  	
James, Rodney A. N.
Kirkpatrick,  Guy  G.   _.
Ralston, Gordon B.
Robinson,  William   G.
DUFFUS
SCHOOL OF COMMERCE
Secretarial and Administration Course
Dale Carnegie Executive Course
Dale   Carnegie   Institute
Industrial Cost Accounting
522 Pender W.       PA. 7567       Day or Night
Lenses must accurately interpret the findings of your
optical prescription. The frames and mountings must
position these lenses to hold them in the proper alignment to secure the fullest seeing comfort possible.
Each step, from the lenses to the finished eyewear, must
be taken with no tolerance for what is commonly known
as a safe margin for error—Optically speaking there is
none. Remember for your convenience — our two
offices.
• Plastic Contact Lenses • Plastic Artificial Eyes
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL
CO. LTD.
424 Vancouver Block       -      413 Medical Dental Bldg.
Exclusive  Opticians to the   Eye  Physician  for Over 20
Years.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-ONE. CAMPBELL and GRILL
LTD.
Rooting & Sheet Metal
Contractors
EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
GRADUATES OF 1947
122-124 6th Ave. W.
FA. 2920
Lewchuk, Michael ~
Lister, Robert W. __..
Sainas, Constantine _
Seppala, Keijo H. W.
Marzocco, Edo 	
Miller, Wallace W. .._
Thomson,  Stanley  G.  ...
Ward, George A. H. ..._
Morrison, Edward S.	
Macdonald, Roderick M.
Woods, Eric J. H.	
McCarthy, Albert 	
Naylor, Thomas K.	
Andrew, Fred J	
Bateman,  William   	
Parich,  Michael  	
Racine, Rejean W	
Berson, Morris J. 	
Coventry, William, V	
Gallon, Alan V	
Greenaway, Norman E. ...
Baker, Frederic B	
Forrester, Andrew G	
Herring, Philip S. 	
Home, Edgar B. 	
Parnum, Ewart 	
Kerr, Robert G. 	
Manning, David J. 	
Slaney, Frederick F	
Thomson, Thomas M.	
Quirk, Edwin T _.
Redmond, Howard C. —
Webster, Alan W 	
298
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TBI.IF...
Still Boasts the same Informality . . . although the Brock Memorial
Building Lunch Room is getting some of its business. Eat in either
place, depending on the mood you're in . . . but don't forget to
patronize Campus Merchants. Your undergrad- idiosyncrasies
will be understood and overlooked.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-TWO Frith, Patrick V.   299
Tanner, Gordon A     299
Tinney, Edwy R     299
Pearson, Donald E. T    299
Ritchie, David M.  .. 299
Wong Kwong Jack ..
Allan, John D	
Cains, Richard W	
MacLean, Fraser A.
Oehlerking; Roy F. .
Campbell, Pat
  _. _  299
    300
_ 300
 '.  300
_.!  300
    300
Checko, Andrew     300
Quan, Ben  .....    300
Ross, William J. .._   300
Douglas, Colin M   .'    300
  __. 300
     300
   300
    300
     300
   300
  _      300
 ..  300
  _.  300
    300
Fenn, Raymond A.  .	
Slingsby, John C.	
Tukham, Godfred W.,_
Kirkpatrick, Edward T.
Klompas, Nicholas	
Tweed, William J	
Watson, Arthur S. 	
Layard, Camville P	
Lockhart, Gerald P	
Watts, James A.
Wintemute, John R. _  - 300
McBean, William A.   300
MacKay, James W  300
Wilson, James P. D __  300
Beveridge,  James A     301
Dickson, Peter   301
Adie, Lawrence .  301
Lea, Edgar R   301
Alcock, Downing & Wright
Wholesale  Plumbing  and  Heating  Supplies
896 Cambie St.       - Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
BOWELL-McDONALD Ltd.
PONTIAC — BUICK — CADILLAC
Good News! There is more film available . . .
KODAK FILM
Once again you can make the pictures you
want—outdoors with Verichrome Film—indoors with Super-XX Film. Stop at our store
for the film you've been wanting, and plan
to return it to us later for expert finishing.
EASTMAN
Photographic   I Til
Materials       L I Ui
610 Granville St.
Vancouver, B.C.
GRADUATES . . .
KEEP POSTED ON YOUR FELLOW GRADS AFTER GRADUATION
THROUGH YOUR
GRADUATE  CHRONICLE
The 40-Page Alumni Magazine Mailed  to  All Active  Members
Editor—ORMY HALL
Features—BOB  BONNER
Women—MARY FALLIS
Sports—BILL DUNFORD
Personalities—ARCHIE  PATTON
BRUCE BEWELL
FOR INFORMATION,
WRITE YOUR SECRETARY
MANAGER:
FRANK J. E. TURNER
c/o Alumni Office
Brock Hall, U.B.C.
Alumni Membership $3 Annually, Includes Your  Subscription  to  Grad  Chronicle  and  Correct
Recording.
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-THREE COMPLIMENTS OF
DAN McLEAN MOTOR CO. LTD.
B.C. Distributors of Nash
1148 West Georgia MArine 2277
COMPLIMENTS OF
Hewer Hardware Ltd.
4459 W. I Oth ALma 1552
Feel Fresh . . . DRINK . . .
ORANGE CRUSH
"Canada's Most Famous Orange Drink"
COMPLIMENTS OF
LISLE FRASER
SPORTING GOODS
545 Granville St. MA. 2471
Greetings . . .
TO THE GRADS OF '47
0 We have served you during your Varsity
years.
0 May we continue to serve you in your
Business and Professional years that will
follow your graduation.
"PRINTING FOR EVERY PURPOSE"
Anderson Printing Co.
LIMITED
PAcific 5838
455 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
COMMODORE RECREATIONS
838 Granville St.
OLYMPIC RECREATIONS
777 Granville St.
Frank   Panvini,   Prop. Vancouver,   B.C.
Anne Muirhead Florists
Your Personal Attention Florist
Evenings to 9 p.m.
810 Howe Street MArine 6923
B-A PRODUCTS
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED
FOR THE STUDENT
PIGOTT'S
SERVICE STATION
10th at Imperial
AL. 0250
First in Canada with 140°F. Dry Cleaning System—The Most
Advanced Method in the Industry
1115 Richards St.
MArine 4131
QUALITY LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING
PAGE   THREE    HUNDRED   AND   EIGHTY-FOUR...
PRINTED   BT   WABD   *   PHILLIPS   LTD.
382   West  Broadway
Vancouver, B. C.

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