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 i Mr   "nr , Page 1 Page 2 TOTEM
1959
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, B. C.
Page 3 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
 Barbara Hay
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
 Debbie Brown
LAYOUT EDITOR
 Diane Watson
COPY EDITOR
 Nancy Paul
ART EDITOR
 Carolyn Wright
PHOTOGRAPHY
 Dave Vawter
Norm Pearson
ADVERTISING
 AlMar
REWRITE EDITOR
 Carol Stuart
PHOTO COORDINATOR
 Lorraine Rossiter
TOTEM
STAFF
Page A Page 5 Page 6 TABLE OF
CONTENTS
ADMINISTRATION .    24
AWARDS    38
GRADUATES
AND FACULTffiS .   52
CAMPUS LD7E 142
QUEENS 161
BUILDINGS 166
MEN'S SPORTS 180
WOMEN'S SPORTS .   218
FINE ARTS 236
ORGANIZATIONS..  254
PUBLICATIONS ...   293
GREEKS   302
ADVERTISING 336 Gateway To The University
\
Page 8 Each fall, college life soon settles into a regular pattern —
classes and labs interspersed
with coffee breaks, study periods, and club meetings. Relatively unimportant in themselves, in the aggregate these
familiar daily events make up
the background memories of a
year at U.B.C.
Page 9 Typical   8:30   traffic  congestion  at
the   gates.
Some   people   live   dangerously
Last    few    passengers    hurry    off
U.B.C. bus. A quick breakfast, a hurried dash
for books and the day begins. Along
Tenth Avenue and along Marine Drive
crowded cars form an endless procession, while once at varsity their drivers compete for parking space. As car
doors slam, students part ways for the
classroom, the Library, or the coffee
shop.
Parking permit holders find space behind Brock.
This   commi isionaire   has   a   regular
morning task:. A class in German  120 with Professor McNeely
Day-dreaming, note-taking, listening, learning—
class activities last for fifty minutes. Now the hourly
rotation begins again and the campus comes alive
as people scurry to the next class. From the Library
and the cafe the 9:20 crowd moves out as the 9:30
mobs move in.
Professor Leimanis' Math 402
Page 12 Across campus in seven  minutes — it can be done!
There's   always   time   for   a   short   talk—no   matter
what  the  weather.
Snow competes with professors
i.,     •/   •      X l*/-*^
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2«5
>> Industrious    students   use    spare   time   for
studying
?®e
Just relaxing is a more popular occupation
h.
Conversation   and   coffee  in   Brock Morning diversions are varied —
first comes the inevitable coffee ,then
perhaps a visit to the bank, the bookstore, or even the barber. A few of
the most studious retire with their
books to the stacks, the common
rooms or even parked cars; amongst
them are the not-so-studious frantically finishing those overdue essays.
Ice cream  with every  hair cut?
(CAMPUS BARBER SIOF
The  Ubyssey  pile  diminishes  in   the  quad Both sides of the counter at Acadia Camp dining room
The 11:30 class ends and the noon hour begins with
an activity of interest for everyone. Meetings, concerts,
intramurals all take place during these sixty minutes and
only the most ingenious can work everything in. For
those not inclined towards organized events, there is always the sport of finding a spot to eat lunch.
Page 16
The Brock lunch tables will always hold one more Harmonica   entertainment   by   one   of   the   Pete
Seeger trio
Lectures are given on a wide variety of topics
Intramurals   attract   many   to   the
Memorial  gym
Page  17 That drowsy  1:30 lecture
— it may be rehearsing for a play, writing a
news report, or even presenting a radio program. Now too is the time when the Brock
Hall games room opens its doors, and many
are those who are lured within.
Lectures and labs begin again, and the
university settles down to an afternoon of
work and play. Now is the time when many
students indulge in their own particular
hobbies—
U.B.C.  trains many of Canada's top scientists
Page  18 There   are   many   opportunities   to   develop   dramatic abilities
Perfecting skills in  the  games  room
Ping pong is always a  favorite pastime As the day progresses so the popularity of the Library increases. Many
stop and chat along the way, and the
famous lily pond is a favorite gathering place. Inside the same problem
always exists—everyone wants the one
book and some mysterious unknown
has it.
Walking with a purpose — destination the Library
Ivy  Leaguer visits with friends
Main  Hall  in   the  Library  and   groups  of  chatting
students
Page 20 -*'
jpiPlpaao^   70?
mr^-nmwf
The   'Dinosaur'   in    Ridington    Room
holds reference texts
In  pursuit   of   knowledge   —   students   search
card catalogue for needed books.
Wings   are    popular   study    halls   due
to their comparative quiet
Page 21 Volkswagens are always fair game for pranksters
Here it is!  Who got  ticket   12139?
A weary student heads towards the bus stop
Page 22 ^t!
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Intervarsity competitors in the
McGoun Cup debate
With classes over, Vancouver students are homeward bound and resident students return to their
dorms. Night descends on the campus but university activities are not yet over—every evening has
its meetings, its night lectures, and its special events.
Night  classes  in the Buchanan  Building  administration Board Of Governors
Page 26 All too often we forget our
University's Administrators
who strive to improve facilities for higher learning. In addition to these competent men
and women, there is also our
own student government representing and uniting the many
groups on the campus.
Page 27 CHANCELLOR, DR. A. E. GRAUER
MESSAGE TO STUDENTS:
The total enrollment at the University for 1958-59 is 9,950, and
the graduating class consists of 1,258 students. Three years ago—
1955-56—the total enrollment was 6,403, and the number of students
graduating was 950. A period of such fast growth is always one of
many problems.
These problems affect the administrative side of the University
as well as other sides. One problem is that of adequate physical plant,
particularly acute for U.B.C, which never did receive the usual endowment of permanent buildings. Another is to attract and keep the
additional faculty members needed and to maintain high standards
throughout the faculty. The requirements of research, the Library, University Extension, and other services all rise sharply with increasing
enrollment and a vigorously growing Province. For the administrator
these various needs are perhaps most completely reflected in the annual
operating budget, which perforce must increase each year as this expanding situation remains.
The Board of Governors and your administrative officers wish
to assure you that they are doing all they can to meet the complicated
requirements of this situation, and to thank you for your cooperation
in taking with good spirit those rough spots that must always be
present in a period of fast growth.
PRESIDENT, DR. N. A. M. MACKENZIE
MESSAGE TO STUDENTS:
As a pictorial record of the many events and activities which go
to make up a year in the student life of this University, Totem will
remind us all of the pleasant and rewarding experiences we have had
during 1958-59-
For the members of the graduating class the whole volume will
have a special significance, for as the years pass it will bring back
memories of all those things which are so closely associated with University life: the hours of work, the arguments around coffee tables, the
idiosyncrasies of professors, the excitement of the playing field, the
examinations, the good friends.
To all of you who are leaving us I wish success and good fortune
in whatever field of endeavour you select. I hope that your years at
this University have given you a new sense of spiritual well-being and
that you will always remember us with respect and affection.
Page 28 FACULTY ADMINISTRATION
Miss M. D. Mawdsley, Dean of Women
Miss M. Leeming, Assistant to the Dean of Women
W. H. Gage, Dean of Administrative and Inter-Facultj
Affairs
G. C. Andrew, Dean and Deputy to the President
Page 29 OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR
The Registrar's Office handles the statistics and records of all students, and all
information on student enrollment comes
from this source. During this winter
session the number of students, nearly
10,000, surpassed the post war high mark
and included students from at least fifty-
six different countries. Over the twelvemonth period, well over 20,000 students,
including those in non-credit courses, will
have been served by the University.
J.E.A.  Parnell,  Registrar
THE FACULTY ASSOCIATION
The Faculty Association is composed
of all the faculty members of U.B.C. with
the rank of assistant professor or higher,
and its main object is to promote the
welfare of the faculty and university. The
Association's area of activity includes preparing and presenting an annual brief to
the Board of Governors and setting up
committees on such matters as health
services, housing, membership, recreation,,
education of faculty children, academic
standards, and university government.
Page 30
Professor A. W. R. Carrothers, President of the Faculty Association THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Recently, the Alumni Association has changed from
being mainly a social organization to one which encourages graduates to show greater participation in the interests of higher education. Such interest is shown in the
new committee set up this year to study the impact of
increased enrollment on student orientation.
For Homecoming, the Association followed a policy
of keeping graduates up-to-date on educational affairs by
offering panel discussions by graduates and faculty members. Topics considered were Pacific trade and a comparison of Russian and North American education.
The Alumni also work with the students in sponsor
ing the Convocation Ball and help the graduating class
officers in an advisory capacity. Alumni delegates participate in the Leadership Conference and the Academic
Symposium.
John L. Haar, Director of the Alumni Association
An active discussion on education
during  Homecoming
PHOTOS  BY  VISUAL EDUCATION  SERVICE, U.B.C.
Members of the Class of 1928 meet in 1958
Page 31 STUDENT COUNCIL
Through Chuck's leadership, U. B. C. actively
participated in national and international student affairs. One major project undertaken was his protest
against the increase in student fees due to rising costs
of administration. Chuck contended that the provincial government should invest in B.C.'s future by
enlarging the grant, thus averting a fee increase and
avoiding discrimination against already handicapped
students.
President, Chuck Connaghan
Councillors at work
Page 32
As Vice-President, Jairus was chairman of the
standing committees for investigations and constitutional revisions, and during his term of office, he led
a study on the possibilities and problems of representative government at U.B.C. He was also active
in inter-university affairs, being a council liaison
member with both W.U.S.C and N.F.CU.S.
Vice-President, Jairus Mutambikwa
__ Wendy was a hard-working participant on various council committees. As well as being general
corresponding and recording secretary for council
meetings, she acted as secretary of the Accident Benefit and Finance Committees.
Secretary, Wendy Amor
(L  to  R):   George  Feaver,   Second   Member;   Brad   Crawford,   Executive
Member; Bob Ward, First Member; Jim Horsman, Co-ordinator.
John was chairman of a new standing committee of five which investigated all financial requests
made to council, thus relieving council meetings of
discussions on finance and insuring that such matters
were well considered before recommendations were
made to council. John was also chairman of the
Publications Investigation, Accident Benefit, and Fee
Increase committees.
Treasurer, John Helliwell
Page 33 THE A.M.S. OFFICE
The A.M.S. Office is the hub of all
student affairs. Mr. R. E. Pearson,
now in his third year as manager, is
assisted by a staff of four. The Office
gives out general information concerning the students, hears complaints,
and handles financial records and purchases made by the Students' Council
and all clubs and undergraduate societies. Student bookings for all rooms
and buildings on campus are made
through this Office, and cards, tickets,
and magazines are also available here.
Mimeographing is another service offered which helps maintain a smoothly
running Alma Mater Society.
Bookings, tickets, club accounts — the A.M.S.
handles   them  all.
A.M.S. Staff  (L. to R.): Miss A. Foxwell, Miss J. Harris, Mr. R. E.
Pearson, Miss J. Pollock, and Mrs. E. Holliday.
At the switchboard
Page 34 UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETIES
COMMITTEE
U.S.C., a liaison organization between
student council and the faculties, handles
matters which arise in council directly
affecting the undergraduate societies.
Ideas brought forward by the faculties are
also discussed and may later be taken to
council for recommendation. Requests
for organized drives on campus are referred to U.S.C. and from there are directed to particular faculties.
U.S.C. executive (L to R): Jolly King, Pete Haskins, Ross   Husdon, Dave Woodman.
ASSOCIATED
WOMEN
STUDENTS
This year, women students on campus
eorganized under the name of Associ-
ted Women Students. Besides such an-
mal events as the Big and Little Sister
Banquet in September and the Spring
?ashion Show, A.W.S. branched into new
ictivities. A Frosh fashion show introduced Freshettes to the clothes suitable
for campus occasions. In October, A.W.
>. invited Marie Moreau to U.B.C. and in
December they sponsored a drive to col-
ect food and clothing for Vancouver s
inemployed.
A.W.S.  executive   (L to R):   Marilyn Taylor, Gail  Carlson,  Patti Darling,  Sharon
Wright, and Lynne Grant.
Page 35 N.F.C.U.S. Executive  (L to R): P. Hazell, B. Bieley, R. Brink, and S. Ross.
WORLD UNIVERSITY
SERVICE COMMITTEE
During Thanksgiving weekend, the U.B.
C. Committee hosted a National Assembly for the first time on this campus.
W.U.S.C. tries to foster good international relations between students and
through its International Programme of
Action, it aids universities in underdeveloped countries. This year, with
help from W.U.S.C. bursaries, four U.B.C.
students are studying in Germany, Japan,
and Nigeria, and three foreign students
are spending a year here.
NATIONAL FEDERATION OF
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS
For the second year, the U.B.C. committee took charge of the national short
story contest. The local N.F.GU.S. also
headed an investigation into the interregional scholarships as well as supporting the overseas travel programme and
the photo contest.
W.U.S.C.  Executive   (L  to R):  N.  Gish, B.  Montgomery, and B. Scott.
W.U.S.C.   exchange  students   (L   to  R):    Tsutomu Takeda of Japan,  Inga
Waater of Germany, and Michael  Stcile  of  Germany,
Page 36 FROSH COUNCIL
A successful freshman class this year
won back the cheering cup from the Engineers, while its Homecoming float
placed second in the undergraduate section. The Frosh Council of representatives from each English 100 class, under
President Tom Annandale, took on a new
venture with the publication of a newsletter.
Tom Annandale and Secretary, Joan Haggerty, conduct a Frosh Council meeting
HIGH SCHOOL
CONFERENCE
COMMITTEE
On March 6 and 7, the twelfth annual
High School Conference was held on
campus, and for the first time students
came from the two Indian Residential
Schools. In planning the Conference an
effort- was made to show the delegates all
aspects of university life by means of lectures, tours, and evening entertainment.
Committee chairman was Bob Dickie.
High   School   Conference   Committee   Executive   (L   to   R):   Standing,   Bob
Dickie, Ann Martin;  Sitting, Bob Auld, Bob Ackland, Nick Bloom.
Page 37  awards Honourary Degrees Are Conferred At The Special Congregation
Page 40 Of the many students who attend a university, some desire
more than just a classroom education. This is a tribute to
those who, through persistent
effort, have achieved distinction in learning and in leadership.
Page 41 1959
RHODES
SCHOLAR
JOHN HELLIWELL
John Helliwell, U.B.C.'s 1959 Rhodes Scholar, will leave next fall
for Oxford, England. A native of Vancouver, John graduated from
Prince of Wales High School in 1955. On entering varsity he was
elected a Frosh Council representative, and since then he has been
Chairman of the High School Conference, Treasurer of the Commerce Undergraduate Society, and one of two representatives sent
to the 1958 McGill Conference. This year he served as Treasurer
of the Alma Mater Society.
John has also been active in sports, particularly basketball at which
he excels. Besides his athletic activities, his main hobby is debating,
and last year he and his brother won the Legion Cup in intramural
debates.
Throughout his university years, John has been a consistent scholarship student and has already won seven Commerce awards. Next
year at Oxford he will study Philosophy, Political Science, and Economics in the Final Honors B. A. program.
Page 42 AWARDS - GRADUATION 1958
AGRICULTURE
DAVID GROVES
David Groves is last year's winner of the Wilfrid Sadler Memorial Gold Medal in Agriculture. At
the present time he is studying for an M.S.A. in
animal nutrition after which he plans to take his
Ph.D. at another university. David's ultimate goal
is in scientific farming.
APPLIED SCIENCE
THOMAS NORDSTROM
At present Tom Nordstrom is continuing his
Engineering studies in Warwickshire, England,
where he will remain for another two to three years.
Upon graduating from U.B.C. last May, Tom captured both the Professional Engineers Gold Medal
and an Athlone Scholarship.
ARCHITECTURE
WOLFGANG THIERSCH
For outstanding achievement in the course towards the B. Arch. Degree, Wolfgang Thiersch was
awarded the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Medal. Since he left university he has been
gaining practical experience in the field of architecture at Santa Ana, California.
Page 43 ARTS & SCIENCE
JOHN GITTINS
John Gittins of Victoria was the winner of the
University Medal for Arts and Science. He is now
enrolled in Graduate Studies in the Department of
Sociology at Harvard University, and on completion
of his academic training, John intends to teach in
either a Canadian or American university.
ARTS & SCIENCE
GAEL STOTT
As last year's winner of the Governor-General's
Gold Medal and a National Research Council bursary, Gael has returned to the campus to earn her
M.A. in Zoology. In the future when she has completed Ph.D. studies in cellular physiology, she hopes
to instruct at the university level.
COMMERCE
DONALD COX
Don's university career was brought to a successful conclusion with the winning of the Kiwanis
Gub Gold Medal and Prize which is awarded to the
student topping the graduating class in commerce.
During the next three years he will take a course in
Business Administration at Harvard University.
Page 44 EDUCATION
VERA COSS
Vera Coss of Kaleden received the Dr. Maxwell
Cameron Memorial Medal and Prize in the elementary teaching field as well as the Dr. Evelyn Fen-
wick Farris Graduate Scholarship. With this she returned to the campus for the 1958-59 session, but
next year Vera will teach school while continuing
towards her M.A. degree.
EDUCATION
HADDEN WHITELAW
The winner of the Dr. Maxwell Cameron Memorial Medal and Prize in the secondary teaching
field was Hadden Whitelaw. He spent this past
year teaching high school in Port Coquitlam but he
will soon take advantage of the Exchange Teachers
plan in order to work and study in European
countries.
FORESTRY
ROBERT C. BROOKE
Robert came to varsity from Chase, B. G, and
after five years on the campus won the H. R. Mac-
Millan Prize in Forestry. He is continuing his studies on a fellowship and assistantship at Yale University's School of Forestry, and upon receiving his
master's degree, he will return to U.B.C. for a Ph.D.
Page 45 FORESTRY
EVERETT B. PETERSON
On graduating last spring, Everett was awarded
the Canadian Institute of Forestry Medal plus a substantial cash fellowship. At the present time he is
taking advanced courses at Yale University, and
when these studies are completed, he expects to return to U.B.C. for his Ph.D.
SOPRON
GYULA JUNASZ
Gyula Junasz came to Canada in January, 1957,
and was a member of the first Sopron class to graduate. During his time at U.B.C. he was a member
of the Sopron Student Executive, and on graduating
he was awarded a prize for his fine scholarship. At
present he is working for Western Plywood.
SOPRON
GYORGY LESKO
Gyorgy Lesko received the prize for excellent
scholarship in the Sopron graduating class of 1958.
He is now taking advanced courses in the Biology
and Botany Departments, and hopes to continue the
study of the correlation between forest types and environmental conditions.
Page 46 HOME ECONOMICS
EDA MARIE CIRIANI
Besides winning her B.H.E. degree last spring,
Eda received the Home Economics Graduation Prize
which is awarded to the top student in the graduating class. Majoring in Textiles, Eda is utilizing this
knowledge in her present work at the T. Eaton Co.,
and she is looking forward to a promising career.
LAW
GORDON BAILLIE SHRUM
Gordon's five years at University were brought
to a close with the winning of the Law Society Gold
Medal and Prize. This year he was articled to a local
law firm prior to his admittance to the bar and,
although he will practice law in Vancouver, he is
hoping for a year's graduate studies later on.
MEDICINE
WILLIAM A. WEBBER
Last May Bill was awarded the Hamber Gold
Medal and Prize for leading the class of candidates
for the M.D. degree, and he has spent the past year
interning at the Vancouver General Hospital. His
post graduate studies will be taken in physiology at
Cornell University Medical School.
Page 47 PHARMACY
IAN CALDWELL
At Convocation last May, Ian Caldwell was
awarded his B.S.P. degree and the Horner Gold
Medal which is presented each year to the student
at the head of the graduating class in Pharmacy.
This year Ian is registered in Graduate Studies where
he is working towards his M.A.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
IAN B. KELSEY
Physical Education is the field of study engaged
in by Ian Kelsey, last year's winner of the Canadian
Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation Prize. After obtaining his Master's Degree
in P.E., Ian intends to teach this subject while working towards his doctorate.
SOCIAL WORK
IRIS NORDMAN
Formerly of New Westminster, Iris is now a
parish worker for the Gethsemane Lutheran Church
in Seattle, Washington. Last year she received the
Moe and Leah Chetkow Memorial Prize, and in the
future she plans to enter doctorate courses in Social
Work.
MRS. JANET MOORE
Graduating at the top of the B.S.W. class, Janet
received the special prize presented for this achievement. She has recently been working at Essondale,
and in the near future she will enroll for courses
leading towards her Master's Degree.
Page 48 DELTA
SIGMA
PI
Membership in U.B.C.'s Honorary
Sorority and Honorary Fraternity is
based on participation and leadership
in campus activities and on academic
scholarship. This year eight members
were elected to Delta Sigma Pi, while
six members joined Sigma Tau Chi.
SIGMA
TAU
CHI
Wendy Amor
Gail Carlson
Theo Carroll
Gordon Armstrong
Bill Ballentine
Marc Bell
Chuck Connaghan
Brad Crawford
John Davidson
Rod Dobell
Barbara Hay
John Helliwell
Ted Hunt
Marlene James
Mike Jeffery
JjL \' f /
Margaret Mary Leeson
Don McCallum
Grant MacDonald
Barbara Leith
Jim MacFarlan
isk
Barbara Scott
Don Shore
Rod Smith
tjRlj&f^!jlaXn
Sharon Wright
Ben Trevino JOHN FREDERICKSON
Jazz Society President
Mussoc and Radsoc
CHRIS HUNTLEY
Radsoc Engineer
UCC.
AWARDS
U.C.C. awards are presented to those
students who have held several executive positions during the year and have
contributed much to the well-being
and development of their organization.
TERRY O'BRIEN
Conservative Club Executive
DAVE PEARS
Mussoc President
KARL RICHER
V.O.C President
BRUCE SOMMERS
Mussoc Executive Advisor
Page 50
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1 BARBARA LEITH
Academic   Symposium   Co-chairman
A.M.S. Secretary '58
CHUCK CONNAGHAN
A.M.S. President
Students' Exec.  Training Program
JOHN HELLIWELL
A-M.S. Treasurer
McGill Conference Delegate
H.A.A.
AWARDS
The Honorary Activities Awards,
the highest awards given on the campus, are given for outstanding contributions in the field of general student activities.
MIKE JEFFERY
Special Events Chairman
Open House Committee '58
GRANT MACDONALD
Publications Co-ordinator
A.M.S. '58
PETER MEEKISON
Leadership Conference Chairman
A.M.S. '$8
BEN TREVINO
A.M.S. President '5 8
A.M.S. Co-ordinator '57
BILL MCALLISTER
Leadership  Conference  Treasurer
Filmsoc President '58  graduates Graduation Procession
Page 54 With their scholastic careers
drawing to a close, seniors are
anticipating graduation with
mixed emotions. Feelings of
nostalgic regret for what they
are leaving behind conflict
with those of hope and confidence for what the future may
hold.
Page 55 faculty of agriculture
For their service project the Aggies
held a home cooking sale, the proceeds
from which were used to assist an African child with his education. The
Hayseed Hop, one of the most popular and well attended of the Aggie social events, was followed by the Commodore Banquet. Other typical successes, such as the Farmers' Frolic, Aggie Field Day, and the Spring Dance,
rounded out an active year.
Dean Blythe Eagles
St.  Clair Forde preparing sample for distillation  in  the Soil  Science  lab.
Page 56 Marilyn Goodall, Homecoming candidate
Aggies' gruelling Frosh Orientation
**■**; RHOTHER RGGfT FIRS
0|r REACHES MDON
v ifcA
I   ■    v-       *■
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Homecoming float
Page 57 agriculture
CAMPBELL, Ian G.; Poultry Science;
Treasurer, A.U.S.
CHALLENGER, George R.; Plant
Science
DYBLE, Christopher;  Mechanics;
A.S.A.E., Pres. Grad Class
EVANS, Richard H.j Forestry;
Phi Kappa Sigma
FORDE, St. Clair; Soil Science;
Caribbean Students' Association
GEEN, Gerald W.; Plant Science;
Curling Club
GODDARD, Raymond A.; Soil Science
GOLD, John W.; Horticulture
GOUGH, Neville  A.;   SoU  Science;
Soccer
HAY, George W.; Animal Husbandry;
Soccer, Phi Gamma Delta
JEFFERS, John P.; Mechanics;
A.S.A.E., Newman Club
KALYK, Nick H.; Plant Pathology;
Tennis Team
KELLY, Hollis; Plant Pathology;
Caribbean Students' Association
KOZIER, Leonard; Soil Science;
Richmond 4-H, Jr. A.I.C.
LANG, Larry L.; Economics;
Treasurer    of   Grad   Class,   Phi   Kappa
Sigma
LANGE, Dierk; Mechanics;
Secretary of A.F.S.A.
McGREGOR, J. C; Animal Science
MOLYNEUX, Fred A.; Plant Pathology;
Dance Club
NESBITT,   Wayne;   Animal   Nutrition;
Vice-Pres. A.U.S., Phi Kappa Sigma
PASCUZZO, Eugene; Soil Science;
Newman Club, Dance Club
PHELPS, Ralph; Dairy Bacteriology;
Soccer, C.S.A.
RAMSAY, James; Plant Pathology;
V.C.F.
RAMSDEN, R. O.; Poultry Husbandry
SCLATER, Elliot J.; Mechanics;
Secretary of Grad Class
SMITH, Kenneth; Beta Theta Pi
Page 58 TOHILL, Jevington; Nutrition;
Track, Civil Liberties, A.U.S.
TWEEDY, David G.; Agronomy
Treasurer V.C.F.
VAN ANDEL, Fred H; Economics;
International House
WILLIAMS, Paul H.; Plant Pathology;
V.C.F.,   International House,  Totem architecture
Professor Lassere, Director, School of Architecture
Executive   (L.  to R.); B. McLeod, B. Freschi, J.
Katnick, B.  Younge, R. Walkey.
Models by architecture students
Page 60 Third year students with Professor Jessiman
ANDEREGG, Marco; Beta Theta Pi
BOLICOCK, William E.
BROCKINGTON, David H; Rugby,
Architecture Club
CARFRAE, Walter J.; Lambda Chi Alpha
KINOSHITA, Gene
LAZOSKY, Daniel E.; Newman Club
LEE, Albert
MANNCHEN, Karin
MATSUBA, Donald
REDWOOD, Hugh C; Architecture Club
Page 61 faculty of arts and science
The largest faculty on campus, Arts
and Science, covers many fields of study.
This year lack of support for ASUS general meetings led to an amendment of the
constitution. The undergrad meeting has
now been replaced by a system of representative membership which, it is hoped,
will prove more efficient.
Dean S.N.F. Chant
Night descends on the usually crowded Buchanan Building
Mi
L Executive  of   the   Arts   and   Science   Undergraduate   Society.    (L.   to   R.):   B.
Boucher, G. Stevens, President M. Brown, D. Sproule, C. White.
.owercd heads lost in thought during exams.
Monica Loewi, Arts and Science Queen
became a Homecoming Princess. Concentration in a modern setting.
A relaxing way to study.
Fresh air helps to clear the mind.
Page 64 arts
AIRD, Charles A.; Geology, Math;
Dawson Club
ALA,  L. Gordon;  Economics, Geography;
International House
ALAFI, Seraphine;  Chemistry, Biology;
International House
ALLEN, Leonard C.; Honours
Economics
ANDERSEN, Frede; Physics, Math;
Baptist Club, Physics  Society
ANDERSON, Dave; Honours Economics;
Rowing Crew, Liberals, Zeta Psi
ANDERSON, Victor; Math, History;
Parliamentary Forum, U.N. Club,
C.L.U., L.P.P.
ARROL, Ian; English, Political Sc;
U.N. Club, International House
ASHWORTH, John F.; Honours English
AUSTIN, Harvey; Honours Geology;
Hillel, Jazzsoc, Sigma Alpha Mu
BAGSHAW, Ralph C; Zoology, Psych.;
VCF., Rugby
BAINBRIDGE, Roberta; Zoology,
Biology; Dance  Club
BAKSH, Howard; Zoology, Biology;
Newman, I.H.A., W. Indian Ass'n
BALL, Lome D.; Honours Chemistry;'
CI.C, T.A.P.P.I.
BALLENTINE, Bill; English, Psych;
Student Council, Alpha Delta Phi
BARNER, Lynn M.; English, History;
A.S.U.S- Council
BARRETT, Wesley; French, English;
Jazzsoc, Alliance Francaise
BAUMGART, Rita;  History, English
BDINKA, Norm F.;  Math, Physics
BECK, Allan; English, History
BELL, Barbara J.; English,
International Studies; Phrateres
BICKNELL, Rae J.; Sociology, English;
Gamma Phi Beta
BIELY, Barbara M.; Psych, English;
Ubyssey, N.F.CU.S.
BLACKMAN, Melville; French, History;
I.H.A., S.C.M., A.F.S.U.
BLED, Yves; Anthropology, Psych
&mtMmW
Page 65 BLOM, Nicolaas A.;  Math, Economics;
High School Conf., I.H.A.
BLOOD, Donald A.;  Zoology, Biology;
Biology Club
BOHANEC, Josip; Psychology,
Criminology
BOODOOSINGH, Lai;  Biochemistry,
Bact; India Club, C.S.A.
BORRADAILE, Anita;   Spanish,  History
BOUCHER, Barrie; English, Crim;
A.S.U.S. Sec, Delta Gamma
BOULOGNE, Jack; Physics, Math;
S.C.M., I.H.A.
BOULTER, Lawrence R.; Psych;
Psych Club President
BOWKER, Frederic; Eng., Psych;
Beta Theta Pi
BOYES, Alastair; Zoology, Biology;
Forestry and Biology Clubs
BRALL, Renate A.; Bact, Zoology;
Bacteriology Society
BRODIE, Robert;  Honours Psych,
Economics; Psych Club
BROWN, Blair; Geography, History
BROWN, Deborah S.; Honours French;
Totem, U.C.C.  Sec, A.F.S.U., U.N.
Club, Alpha Omicron Pi
BROWN, George A.; Economics; C.S.A
BROWN, Patrick M.; Zoology, Psych;
Pre-Med  Society, Psych Club
BROWN, Sally-Anne; Sociology, Eng;
Conservatives, Kappa Kappa Gamma
BUCHANAN, Donald L.; Chemistry
BUICK, Brian D.; Physics, Geology
BURKE, Philip N.; Honours Math;
Chess and Bridge Club
BURNETT, John C; Math, Physics;
Track, Cross-country
BURTON, Adrienne;   Eng, Hon.  French;
Pres. A.F.S.U., Players Club
BUSHEY, Edward E.; Chemistry,
Math; Alpha Tau Omega
BUTT, Jacqueline; Psych, English;
Psych Club, Mamooks, Alpha Phi
CAIRD, William K.; Psych, History
CAMERON, James;  Economics, Psych
CAMERON,  Ronald  L.;  Psych, Zoology;
Pre-Med Society
CAMPBELL, David H.; Psych, Zoology
Page 66 CAMPBELL, Robert A.; Economics,
Political Science; CCF., Debating,
U.N. Club
CARPENTER, John C; Geography,
Slavonic Studies; Jazzsoc,
Mamooks, Ramblers, I.H.A.
CARTER, Trallee B.; English, History;
Alpha Phi, U.N. Club
CARUTH, Daniel A.; Math, Chem
CHAPMAN, Joanne; Sociology, Psych;
S.CM. Cabinet
CHRISTIANSEN,   Linda   A.;   Economics,
History; I.H.A., Badminton
CLARK, Richard D., Honours English
COBB, Roland W.; Math, Physics
COLEMAN, Peter E.; Honours English
COLEMAN, Rosemary J.; English,
Sociology; Totem, Phrateres
COLLINGWOOD, Norm C;  Zoology,
Biology; Mamooks, Special Events
CONNAGHAN, Charles; Honours Psych;
President A.M.S., Sigma Tau Chi,
Beta Theta Pi
COX, Edward; Honours Bacteriology;
V.O.C, Critics, Microbiologists
CRAWFORD, Michael;   Zoology, Psych;
S.CM., C.L.U.
CRICHLOW, Benjamin A.; Biochem,
Zoology, Biology; Dance Club
CROSS, Ronald H.; Geology, Geography
DAHL, Woldemar W.;  Math, English
DAVIDSON, Anthony; Honours Geology;
Dance Club
DAVIDSON, Barbara; Honours Eng;
Letters Club, Tennis
DAVIDSON, George; Honours Chem;
CI.C, Pre-Med Society
DAVIS, Robert;  Eng., Pol. Science;
Ski Team, CCF., Beta Theta Pi
DELANE, Owen; Math, English;
Jazzsoc
DETTWILER, Werner; Math, Physics;
Hamsoc
DICK, Charles W.; Geography, History
DICKSON, Harry H.; Honours English
DOBELL, A. Rod; Honours Math, Ec;
Student Court, Sigma Tau Chi
DODD, Lela A.; Bact, Biochem;
Bacteriology Soc, I.H.A.
DONALDSON, Ailsa M.; Sociology,
English
Page 67 DOWLING, Valerie M.; English,
Philosophy; Players Club
DRDUL, Alexander; Math, Physics;
S.E.P., Phi Kappa Sigma
DRUERY, Donald W.; Chem, Math;
Filmsoc, CI.C
DUNCAN, Katharine;  Math, Chem;
Phrateres
DUNCAN, Malcolm M.; French,
Geography; Camera Club
DUNCOMBE,   Robert;   History,   International Studies; U.N.T.D.
DUNHAM, Charles B.;  Math, Phil;
Philosophy Club
DuTEMPLE, Barry; History, English
ELLIOTT,   Rosemary;   Bacteriology,   Biochem; Bacteriology Society
ELLISTON,  Graham;   Crim., Psych;
Psych Club, Badminton
ELLS, Audrey;  Hon. Bacteriology,
Immunology; Bacteriology Soc.
ENNS, Peter;  English, Sociology;  V.CF.,
Pres. Pre-Social Work
EVANS, Robert K.; Zoology, Psych;
Treasurer A.S.U.S., Psi Upsilon
EWERT, Henry W.; English, History;
5 th Year Representative Ed. U.S.
FALLIS, Robert; Honours Psych;
Psych Club,  Vice-Pres; I.H.A.
FARRIS, Ann; English, Fine Arts;
Mussoc, Lib., Kappa Kappa Gamma
FEAVER, George; Hon. Pol. Science,
History; A.M.S., Beta Theta Pi
FELL, Margaret; Intl. Studies, History;
Liberal, Delta Gamma
FINCH, Donna; English, Psych;
Basketball, Syn. Swim Team
FITZ-GERALD, Desmond;  English,
Pol. Science; Zeta Psi, Raven
FITZPATRICK, Joan; Psych, Sociol.;
Radsoc, Totem, Alpha Gamma Delta
FORD, Alvin E.; Honours French;
Alliance Francaise
FRIEDRICH,  Werner;  Chemistry,  Math;
Delta Upsilon
FRASER, Bruce; English, History;
Intramurals, Alpha Delta Phi
FRIZZELL, Lloyd E.; Geology
Zoology; Dawson Club
FUKUI, Dorothy; Honours Bact.;
R.C.A.F., Bacteriology Soc.
FUNG, Ping-Chi D.; Chemistry, Math;
Chinese Varsity
FUNK, Gloria; Hon. Bacteriology;
Bacteriology Society
Page 68 GALBRAITH,  Margaret E.;   English,
German; Mussoc
GEORGE, Phyllis L.; English, French
GERRATH, Joseph F.; Physics, Math
GIBSON, Gordon F.; Math Honours; Phi
Gamma Delta, Jazzsoc, Sports Car Club
GILGAN, Michael W.; Biochemistry;
Aquasoc, CI.L., Archaeology Soc
GILLIES, Robert; Crim., Sociology;
Newman Club, Federal Officer
GILLILAND, Robert; Psychology,
Criminology
GISLASON, James; Chemistry, Physics
GOOCH, Bryan; English, Psych;
International House
GOORDIAL,  Sonny;  Zoology, U.N.,
C.S.A., I.H.A., Biology Club
GRANEWELL,  Swen  G.;   Chemistry,
Mathematics
GRANGER, Maurice R.; Honours
Chemistry; CI.C
GREEN) Bruce S.; English, Psych;
Jazzsoc, Psych, Zeta Beta Tau
GROSSMITH   Patricia E.;  Math, Physics
GUEST, Gerald R.; Honours Psych;
Players Club, Psych Club
HAAVE, Marvin L.; Greek, Psych;
L.S.A.
HADDOCK, William C; English,
Psych.; Alpha Delta Phi
HADLEY, Michael;  Slavonic Studies,
German; U.N.T.D.
HAHN, Marie K.; French, History
HALL, Iris
HAMILTON, Robert; Geography, French
HANNAH, Theodore  H.; Sociology,
Psych.; Union College Society
HARA, Elmer H.; Honours Physics;
Pres. Physics Soc, I.H.A.
HARKER, Judith; English, Int. St.;
Ubyssey, Kappa Kappa Gamma
HAROLD, Shawn;  English, History;
Players, Letters Club, Raven
HARRIS, Robert; Math, Physics
HARROP, James; Economics, Pol.
Science; Soccer, Conservatives
HAWLEY, John D.; History, Psych;
Badminton, Commonwealth Club
Page 69 HAWTHORN, Margaret;  Asian Studies,
History; Raven, Letters Club
HEAL, Elveyn A.; Bacteriology,
English; Bacteriology Society
HEDLEY,  Joslin;   Sociology,
Criminology; I.H.A.
HELBEQUE, Raymond; Geography,
English
HENDERSON, Leah; Bacteriology,
Zoology; Jazzsoc, Bact. Society
HENDERSON, Patricia E.;  Political
Science, Asian Studies
HIGGS, David C; Honours History,
French; Letters, History, AFSU
HIGHAM, Elizabeth;  Zoology, Biology;
I.H.A., C.S.A.
HILLMER, Ken R.; English, History;
V.C.F., S.CM., Baptist
HO, Sze-Cheung; Honours Chemistry
HOPKINS, Derek; English, History;
Zeta Psi, CO.T.C, Conservative
HOPPER,  Valerie D.;  Bacteriology,
Zoology
HORNER, Geoffrey; Physics, Math;
Badminton Club
HOWARD,  Brian  W.;   History,  English;
Badminton Club
HUBBARD, W. R.
HUNDVIK, Rolf; Geography, Zoology
HUNT, Marlene; Honours Classics;
Classics Club
HUNTER, Myrna C; Honours Math
HUSTON, Margaret   I.;  History.
International Studies
INGHAM, Carol A.; English, History
INGLEDEW,   Nancy   M.;   Psych,   Crim.;
N.F.CU.S.,   Rep.   Gov.   Comm.,   Alpha
Gamma Delta
IRIZAWA, Rumiko;   English, French;
Nisei Varsity Club, Jazzsoc
IRVINE, William A.; Psychology,
Sociology, Criminology
JACOBSEN, Eva; English, History;
S.CM., Camera Club
JANZEN, Marvin J., Math, History
JENKINS, Barbara G.;  History, Math;
I.H.A., History  Club, Kappa Alpha
Theta
JENSEN, Hanne G.; Honours English;
Dance Club, Letters
JESSIMAN, John L.; Crim., History;
Badminton, Pub., Alpha Tau Omega
Page 70 JOHANSON, Fred E.; Math, Physics,
Chemistry; Dance Club, Chess
JOHNS,  Larry;  Zoology, Psych;
Mussoc, Players Club
JOHNSON, Betty H.; English, German
JOHNSON, John H.; Political Science,
History; Kappa Sigma
JOHNSON, Lael G.; English, History
JONES, Pamela;  Psych, Sociology;
Mussoc, Alpha Gamma Delta
JONES, Sylvia W.; Math, French;
V.O.C, Choral Soc, Alpha Phi
JONES, Valerie; English, History;
Baptist Student Union
JOYCE, Dorice; Psych, French;
Bowling
JUDD, Marvin L.; History, Psychology
KARPOFF,  James C; Criminology,
Psychology
KAVIC, Lome J.; History, Intl. Studies;
Sigma Chi
KEDZIERSKI, Virginia; Polish, English;
Archaeology Club
KENNEDY, Bruce W.; English, Psych;
Newman Club
KENNEDY, C. Dianne; English,
Sociology; Alpha Delta Pi
KENT-BARBER, Rosemary; English,
Sociology; Players Club, Ubyssey
KING, Judy M.; History, Intl. Studies;
Kappa Kappa Gamma
KRAMER, Horn G.; Math, Physics;
Physics Society
KRUGER, Florence E.; History, English,
Psychology; S.C.M.
KUCHLER,  H.  Albert;  English,  Psych.;
Sports Car Club
KUDINA, Irene A.; French, Russian;
Newman Club, Alpha Omicron Pi
LAFFERE, Marion L.;  Anthropology,
Sociology; Badminton Club
LAJEUNESSE, Gail F.; English,
Psychology
LANG, Keith S.; Chemistry, Zoology
LANGLEY, M. Constance; History,
English
LAWRENCE, N. Patrick; Economics,
Pol. Science; Phi Delta Theta
LEESON,   Margaret   Mary;   Anthropology
Honours; Delta Sigma Pi, Delta Gamma
LEWIS, Susan  A.;  English, Intl.  Studies;
Conservative Club
Page 71 <mmmm\
LIM, Gary M.; Math, Chemistry;
Chinese Varsity Club
LITCH, Miriam E.; History, Psych.;
Alpha Phi
LIVGARD, Egil; Geology, Physics;
Dawson Club
LOEWI, Monica; Zoology, French
McCALLUM, William S., Geology;
Alpha Delta Phi
McCAW, Malcolm H.;   Criminology,
Psychology; Alpha Tau Omega
English; Mussoc
McCOLL, Beatrice; Psychology, History
McDONALD, Archie N.; English,
History; Pres. Newman Club
McDONALD, Teresa J.; History,
Psychology
MacEACHERN, Diane E.;  Honours
Anthropology; Archaeology Club
Secretary, A.F.S.U., I.H.A.
MacFARLAN, James D.; History,
Geography; L.P.P. President, U.N. Club,
CL.U., Sigma Tau Chi
MatGILLIVRAY,  Rod;  Biochemistry;
Zoology; Phi Kappa Sigma
McINNES, R. B.
MacINTOSH, Richard M.; History,
Intl. Studies; Zeta Psi, Rugby
McKEE, Jean S.; English, Biology;
Pre-Med Society
MacKENZIE, Bridgie;  Honours Intl.
Studies; V.O.C, V.CF., Alpha Delta Pi
McLEAN, Pamela F.; French, Latin,
English; Alpha Gamma Delta
McLEAN, Robert D.; Psychology, Pol.
Science; Beta Theta Pi.
McLENNAN,  Alexander N.;  Physics,
Math; Alpha Delta Phi
MacLEOD,   Flora   A.;   English,   History;
W.A.D., Ubyssey
McPEEK, Leonard J.; Physics, Math;
A.S.U.S., Jazzsoc
McRAE, Mary K.; English, Intl. Studies;
I.H.A., V.CF., Delta Gamma
McSPADDEN, Daryl G.; Geology,
Zoology
McTAGGART, Jack E.; Zoology,
Chemistry; Phi Kappa Sigma
MADDEN, John C; Honours Physics,
Math; Rowing, Alpha Delta Phi
MAHON, Ian S.; Philosophy, Pol. Science;
Jazzsoc, I.H.A., V.O.C.
MARSHALL, James R.; Physics, Geology;
Dawson Club
Page 72 MASKALL,   Donald   W.;   Psych.,  Chem.;
Pre-Med Soc, Phi Gamma Delta
MAY, Frank C;  Mathematics;   I.H.A.,
Mathematics Club
MAYNARD, Temple J.; Slavonics,
Russian; Slavonic Circle Pres.
MAW, William S.; English, Economics;
CO.T.C
MEERES, C. Bevan; Classical St.;
Badminton Club, U.B.CS.CC
MERCER,  Norma  J.;   Honours  History;
Vice-Pres. Historical Society
MERLER, Grazia M.; French, Spanish;
A.F.S.U., Intl. House
MIMOTO, Eiko; History, Intl. and Asian
Studies; Historical Soc.
MINICHIELLO, Peter;  Physics, Math.,
Psych.; Hamsoc
MOLL, Maureen A.; Chemistry,
Bacteriology
MONEY, Susan J.; Geography; I.H.A.,
Kappa Alpha Theta
MONTGOMERY, Joseph M.; Geology;
Dawson Club
MORRISON, Brenda J.; Math, Geography
MORRISON, Gary E.; Bacteriology,
Zoology;  Vice-Pres. Pre-Med Soc.
MOSSOP, Helen M.; Geography, English;
Players Club
MULLENS, Hendrik J.; Philosophy,
Psychology
MUNRO, Frances M.; Geography,
English; Badminton, U.N. Club
MURPHY, James; Geology; Dawson Club,
Newman Club
NAKASHIMA, Luke A.; Chemistry,
Mathematics
NIAMATH, Kent G.; Bacteriology,
Zoology; Bacteriology Society
NIELSON, Wayne H.; Honours
Philosophy
NORRIS, Peter E.;  International Studies,
English;  I.H.A., Alliance Francaise
NORWICH, Joseph J.; Zoology,
Psychology; U.N.T.D.
OGLE, Isobel B.; Math, Latin;
W.A.D., Alpha Delta Pi
PAPAN, Mahabir; Zoology, Biology;
Debating, Cricket Club
PAYER, Omer A.; Math, Physics
PELLEGRIN, Victor B.; English, History;
Literary Ass'n A.T.C
PERKINS, Mary E.; English, Psych.;
Psychology Club
Page 73 PETERS, Margarite M.; German,
Mathematics
PETTENUZZO, Barbara J.;  English,
Economics; Economics Club
PHIPPEN, Peter; Geography, English,
Economics; Alpha Delta Phi
POHL,  L.  Adina;  German, English
POLLARD, Robert; Economics, Pol.
Science; U.N.T.D., Jazzsoc
PORTER, Robert L.; Crim., Psych.,
Sociology; Pre-School Work Club
PURDY, R. Robert; English, History
QUAIL, John W.; Chemistry
QUANCE, Eileen M.; English, History
QUINN, Patricia E.; Psychology
RAMADEEN, Michael B.; Zoology,
Biology
RAMCHARAN, Clifford; English,
Honours Geography; I.H.A., C.S.A.
RASMUSSEN, Walter H; Physics,
Math; Humanitarian Club
RAYNER, Gerald   H.;   Honours  Geology
REEVE, Lorna K.; Honours Bacteriology;
Pre-Med Society
REMPEL, Henry; Honours Psychology
RICHARD, Anne I.; Honours Chemistry;
CI.C, Dance Club
RICHARDSON, Noel C; English,
History; A.W.S., Acadia Council
RICKER, Karl E.; Honours Zoology;
President, V.O.C.
RIDEWOOD, Thomas W.; English,
Sociology
RIMMER, Alan K.; Geology, Zoology
ROBERTS, Guy L.; Honours Psych.;
Jazzsoc
ROBERTSON, Janet;  Bacteriology,
English; Panhell, Delta Gamma
RODD,  Sylvia M.;  Slavonic Studies,
Zoology; International House
RODGER, William S.; English, History;
Radsoc
ROME,  Tovie;  Honours Physics and
Math;  Hillel, Sigma Alpha Mu
ROSS, Susan; English, French; Delta
Gamma, N.F.C.U.S., U.N., Classics Club,
A.S.U.S. Council
ROSSITER, Lorraine; English, History;
Totem, Badminton Club
Page 74 RUSSELL, Eleanor; English, Sociology
SALONEN, Barbara; Math, Psych.;
Alpha Delta Pi, Acadia Council
SANDERSON, Barbara; Fine Arts,
History;  W.U.S.C, Kappa   Kappa
Gamma, Conservative Club
SANSON, Barbara; Honours English;
Chess, Tennis Club
SAUER, Charles; Honours Geology;
I.H.A., Camera, Dawson Club
SCHEFFER, Louise H.; Geography,
History
SCHUMANN,  Anna;   Russian,   Slavonics;
I.H.A., Filmsoc, Slavonics Club
SEARL,  Ralph;   Chemistry, Math;
Pre-Med, CS.A., I.H.A.
SHARZER, Lion; Political Science;
Economics; Jazzsoc, Debating
SHAW, Clifton,   Political Science,
Economics;   Lambda Chi Alpha,
Conservative Club, Slavonics
SHIMIZU,  Daniel; Math, Philisophy
SHRANK, Estelle;   Psych.,  French;
Phrateres, Pre-Social Work Soc.
*£~3   Iffi
SILVERMAN, John M.; Psychology,
English; Mussoc, Jazzsoc
SIMONS, Beverley A.; Theatre, English
SIMPSON, Sarah;  History, Math; S.CM.,
W.A.D., I.A.B.,  I.H.A.
SINGH, Karan C; Biochemistry, Zoology
SINTON, John; Sociology, Psych.;
U.S.C.A., Pre-Social Work Soc.
SMITH, Stewart; Honours Physics, Math;
Phi Gamma Delta, Rugby
SMITH,   Carol   A.;   Criminology,   Psych.,
Psychology Club
SMITH,   Harvey;   History, Econ.;   Socred
Club,   U.C.C,   Political   Science   Club,
Pari. Council
SMITH, James A.; Biology, Zoology;
Pre-Med Society
SOBERS, Godfrey; Chemistry, Zoology;
Camera Club
SOKALSKI, Alexander A.;  Honours
French; Alliance Francaise
STARK, Roy J.; Philosophy, French
STEELE, David C;  Zoology, History;
Newman Club
STEIN, Carole;   Psych,  Sociology;   Hillel,
Panhell, Booster Club, Majorettes, Delta
Phi Epsilon
STEVENS, George; Pol. Science,  English;
Phi Delta Theta, A.S.U.S.
STOBBE, Vernon; English, History,
German; V.CF., Debating Union
(* PC
Page 75 %cr  u^f
oF«
STOTHARD, David;  Math, English
SURUJNATH, Bashwar;  Honours Latin;
Classics, I.H.A., Debating Union
SYMONS, Philip;  Zoology, Biology,
Biology Club, Aquasoc
TAYLOR, Kenneth; Zoology, Biology;
Biology Club
TENNANT, Stuart; Honours Geology;
Dawson Club, Phi Delta Theta
TERAI, Karl K.; Math, Biology;
Treasurer, Nisei Varsity Club
THIESSEN, John H.; Psychology,
English;  Radsoc, Pre-S.W. Soc.
THOMAS, Diana M.; English, History
THOMAS, Janet M.; History, Psych.;
Totem, Kappa Alpha Theta
THOMAS, Marilyn J.; Psych; Psych Club,
Conservative Club
THOMPSON, L. Maureen; History,
Geography; Alpha Delta Pi
THOMSON, June M.; Criminology,
Sociology; Mussoc
THOMSON, Marguerite C; English,
Psychology; Players Club
THRIFT,  Shelagh;   Classical St., English;
Kappa Kappa Gamma
TJOKROSOEWARNO, Ot S.; Geodesy,
Photogrammetry;   I.H.A., I.S.A.C
TOFT, Patricia A.; Economics,
Psychology;  Mussoc
TURNER, Barry E.; Physics, Math;
Chess Club
TURNER, Raymond K.; English, History;
S.C.M.
UJIMOTO, Victor K.;  Physics; C.A.I.,
R.CA.F.
VERNON, F. David; History, Geography
WALCHLI, Frederick J.; Political Science
WANNOP, W. Brian; Intl. Studies,
Pol. Sc; U.N., Economics Club
WARREN, Wesley N.; English, History;
S.CM., U.C.T.S.
WEINSTEIN, Pauline; Philosophy, Math;
Delta Phi Epsilon
WHITE, Robert D.; History, Geography
WHITELEY, Denis A.; Economics,
Geography; Secretary CL.U.
WHITON, Geoffrey A.; Geology,
Geography
WHITTLES, A. Brice; Physics;
Physics Club
Page 76 WIGGS, A. James; Honours Zoology;
Biology Club
WILLISCROFT, D. Claire; English,
French; Delta Gamma
WILSON, K. E.
WILSON, Patricia M.; English, Spanish;
Kappa Alpha Theta, Mussoc
WONG, Peter; Chemistry, Math
WONG, William W.; Chemistry, Math;
Chess, U.N. Club
WOOTTON, Arthur E.; Geology; V.O.C,
Delta Upsilon, U.N.
WORTHINGTON, George; Bacteriology
YORATH, Christopher J.; Honours
Geology; Delta Upsilon
ZICKMANTEL, Rosalie;  Math,
Economics; Mussoc
ZIMMERMAN, Sunny M.; Psychology,
Economics
Fall Convocation—who got the black sheepskin?
Page 77 faculty of commerce
The Commerce Faculty, under the
leadership of Dick Cavaye, enjoyed a
most successful year. Such social
events as the Business Bounce, the
Commerce Banquet, and the Spring
Formal provided a diversion from the
more serious business of collecting for
the Red Feather blitz, contributing to
the Blood Drive, and producing the
"Ledger."
Dean E. D. MacPhee
Photo by Redivo Camera Centre & Studio
Bev Clarke, C.U.S. Queen
Russ Robinson, Phil Tingley and lady friend entertain at Commerce dance.
Page 78 Queen candidates and escorts at the Business Bounce.
BELL, Raymond L.; Marketing;
A.M.A., Varsity Demolay
BERAR, Abtar; Accounting; P.E.O.
Indian   Students   Association
BREMNER, David G.; Marketing;
V.O.C, A.M.A., College Shop,
Ledger, Psi Upsilon, Banquet
BRISCALL, Margaret;   Accounting;
S.CM., Pres. Commerce Women's
Undergrad Society
BROCKS, Hans D.; Transportation;
Acadia   Camp  Executive
BROWN, Ralph R.; Finance; Liberal
Club, Debating  Union, Zeta Psi
BUCKWOLD, Irving H.; Accounting;
Sigma Alpha Mu
CAMERON, Norman L.; Finance;
Phi Gamma Delta
CAPSTICk,   Robert;   Accounting;
Psi Upsilon
Page 79 CAVA YE, Richard R.; Finance; Pres.
C.U.S., Rep.  Government Comm.
CHAMPION, Alfred R.; Marketing
CLARIDGE, B. J.; Marketing
COCKING, PhUlip B.; Marketing;
A.M.A., Alpha Tau Omega
COLTMAN, Robert;  Marketing;  A.M.A.,
Alpha Delta Phi
COOK,  Donald C;   Marketing;   I.F.C,
President A.M.A.,  President, Delta
Upsilon, Leadership Conf.
COOPLAND, Gary N.; Finance; Beta
Theta Pi, Chairman Commerce
Liaison Committee
CROTEAU> Paul A.; Finance;
Phi Kappa Sigma
CURROR, Alex J.; Production;
President S.A.M., Delta Upsilon
DAWSON, Leslie B.; Accounting;
Coordinator of Dance Club
DOIG, Denis B.; Production; S.A.M.
DRUGGE, Carl F.; Transportation
ESTRIN, Teviah L.;   Production;
Zeta Beta Tau, Hillel
FAY, G.  Robert;  Finance; Golf Team,
Phi Delta  Theta
FERRY,  David  W.;  Marketing;  Liberals,
Sports Car Club, Zeta Psi
FINDLATER, Bryan L.; Newman Club,
Jazzsoc
FOLI, Karle; Accounting
FOOD, Robert A.; Accounting; Conservative Club, Mock Parliament,
Psi Upsilon
GEE, John H.; Psi Upsilon
GEFFCKEN,  Alfhart  H.;  Marketing;
Fencing,   Hamsoc,  Psych.  Club,
Alpha Tau Omega
GINGELL, Brian S.; Finance
GOSSE, Malcolm H.; Accounting
GREENWOOD, Jack B.;  Finance;   Rod
and Gun Club, Curling Club
HAMILTON,   K.   Mary;   Accounting;
A.W.S. Rep.,  Vice-President C.U.S.,
Conservatives
HANSEN, Alfred H.; Accounting
HAWES, F.  Merlin;  Marketing;   A.M.A.,
Liberals, Rugby Team, Phi Gamma Delta
HEIN, Dougal E.; Accounting
HELLIWELL, John F.;  Accounting;
Treasurer   A.M.S., Sigma Tau Chi,
Phi Delta Theta
Page 80 HEWLETT, Alan; Marketing; A.M.A.
Radsoc, Alpha Delta Phi
HOLMES, Alan D.; Production;
Psi Upsilon
INKSTER, W. Gordon; Accounting
KEE,  Sammy;   Accounting
KUJAWA, Daniel; Production
KULLA,  Kenneth J.;  Marketing; A.M.A.
LARSEN, Rodney K.; Economics;
Delta Upsilon
LEE, Allan J.; Marketing; A.M.A.
Delta  Kappa Epsilon
LEITH, Barbara;  Finance;  Pres., Delta
Sigma  Pi;   Alpha   Gamma   Delta,
Co-Chairman   Academic   Symposium
LINDSAY, Robert M.; Production;
A.M.A., Delta Kappa Epsilon
LOUIE, Allen W.;  Finance;
Vice-pres., Camera Club
McCALLUM, J. Donald; Transportation;
Sigma Tau Chi; Alpha Delta Phi
McCANDLESS, Henry E.; Accounting
McDIARMID, John N.;   Finance
McINTOSH, Kenneth A.; Accounting
McKITRICK, Robert M.; Transportation;
Treas.  I.F.C, Phi Kappa   Sigma
McNULTY, Donald C; Finance;
Alpha Delta Phi
MADILL, J. Peter; Finance;
Phi Gamma Delta
MANNING, Michael C;  Finance;  Sports
Car Club, Conservative Club, Zeta Psi
MEEKISON, Dougal M.; Marketing;
Jazzsoc, Rowing, Mardi Gras,
CO.T.C,   Alpha  Delta  Phi
MICHAELSON, Ross; Marketing
MOORE,   James   W.;   Commerce,
Actuarial Science; Track Team
MOORE, John; Finance; Delta Upsilon
MORRIS, D. Bruce; Accounting
NORDSTRAND, Earl V.; Accounting
OMELANIEC, Michael; Production;
Vice-Pres. S.A.M.
PALMER, Gary E.; Production;
S.A.M.; Psi Upsilon
PARKS, Lome A;   Accounting
titoml
Page 81 PARTRIDGE,  Michael A.;  Finance;
Commerce Banquet Chairman,
Beta Theta Pi
PEEL,   Alexander  L.;   Transportation;
Delta Kappa Epsilon
PIERCE,   Walter  W.;   Commerce,
Forestry; Delta Upsilon
PRICE, Edmond E.; Marketing;
A.M.A., Intl. House, Rugger
Team, Zeta Psi
PYPER, Gerald A.;  Finance;
Beta Theta Phi
RATCLIFF, Bill F.; Marketing;
Management; Phi Gamma Delta
RICHMOND, Christopher;
Production
ROY, Richard  R.;  Finance;   Zeta Psi
SMITH, Darrel G.; Marketing;
Delta  Kappa Epsilon
SMITH, Edwin R.; Transportation;
Delta Kappa Epsilon
SMITHSON,  Victor D.;  Finance;
Delta Upsilon
SPENCER, Joseph A.; Accounting
STEVENSON, Nicol  O.;  Production;
S.A.M., Phi Gamma Delta
SUSINSKI, Stan J.; Finance
THORLACIUS, Bui; Accounting
TOOR, Bachan S.; Accounting;
I.S.A., Intl. House
TOURAND, Ivor B.; Accounting;
Newman Club
VRANA, J. C;  Marketing
WARD,   Robert;   Finance;   Student's
Council, Beta Theta Pi
WATSON, George R.; Accounting
WESTWOOD, E. N; Production
WILLIAMS, Roy G.; Accounting;
C.U.S.   Ledger  Staff
WOOD, G.  Wallace; Marketing; Vice-
President, Marketing Club;
Phi Delta Theta
WOODMAN, A. David; Marketing; Vice-
President, CU.S.; Treasurer, U.G.S.
WRIGHT, Peter D.; Marketing;  Am.
Marketing Assoc, Newman Club
WRIGHT, Sharon J.; Vice-President,
A.W.S.; Mardi Gras Secretary;
Delta Sigma Pi, Alpha Omicron Pi
YUILL, Harry H.; Finance;
President, Beta Theta Pi
ZIVOT, G. S.; Marketing
Page 82 ADAMS, Barrie R.; Law; Kappa Sigma
ADAMSON, William R.; Law
BAKER, James D.; Law; Phi Delta Theta
BENSON,   Kenneth  S.;   Law;   Pres.,   S.C
Club, Parliamentary Council
BRYANT, Ray T.;   Law;  Jazzsoc,
Psi Upsilon
EADES, Robert F.; Law; Balance Sheet
Editor, Psi Upsilon
ELLIS,   Beverly E.;  Law;  Pres.,
Panhellenic, Alpha Phi
GAITENS, Albert J.; Law
GINTHER, James  L.;   Law;
Phi Gamma Delta
GREEN, Frederick S.; Law;
Psi Upsilon
MITCHELL, Warren J.; Law;
Phi Gamma Delta
O'REILLY, Michael H.;  Law;
I.F.C, Phi Kappa Sigma
PORTER, Robert S.; Law;
Conservative Club; Zeta Psi
ROSE, G. Ed.; Law; Phi Gamma Delta
ROSS, Murray J.; Law; Sect. I.F.C,
Zeta Psi
SIMSON, Robert C;  Law;
Phi Gamma Delta
SMALL, Daniel W.; Law; Newman Club
STEWART, Alexander B.; Law;
Liberal Club
SYMONDS, John R.; Law;
Phi Delta Theta
WILL, James M.; Law;
Psi Upsilon
WOOTTON, Robert D.; Law;
V.O.C, U.N. Club
commerce - law
These students will receive their degree in
Commerce after completing their second year
of law.
Page 83 college of education
Dean Neville Scarfe
The College of Education continued its
amazing growth with more students taking degree courses. Under the capable
leadership of President Ed Zydyk, Education students enjoyed many successful
events, highlighted by the Education-Engineering mixer, the Skating Party, and
the Spring Formal. Complementing their
social program was the enthusiastically
supported intramural sports schedule.
Page 84
Education Float Vicki Reichert,  Homecoming Candidate
inn
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Education students learn of the advantages
of the B.CT.F.
Congo line  weaves  in  and  out   at
the Education-Engineering Mixer.
Page 85 education
secondary
«**<^ i *
ABERCROMBIE, William E.; English,
History
AMOR, Wendy; English, Music; Sec. Student Council, Delta Sigma Pi
BELL, Patrick M.;  Hist., English,
Philosophy
BLACK,  Roland  M.;  Math, English;
Delta Kappa Epsilon
BOWMAN, Diane; Geog., Hist.; H.S.C.,
Kappa Alpha  Theta, N.F.CU.S.
BRYAN, John D.;  Geography, History
CAMPBELL, Colin J.;  Geography,
History; Vice-Pres. Ed. U. S.,
Phi  Delta  Theta
CARNEY, James F.; Physical Ed.,
History; Rugby
DUNSTER, Stanley J.; Commerce;
University Baptist Club
ELLWOOD, Thomas G.; History, P.E.
FARRELL,  Leagh; English, History;
Rugby
GOLF, A. G. J. Ted;   Geography, Music;
Jazzsoc, Phi Gamma Delta
HALLISEY, Cornelius J.; Geography,
History;  Newman Club
HAMILTON, Brian D.;  Honours
History, English
HARRISON, David R.; Geography,
History
KILLOUGH, Edward A.; History, English
KROEKER, Mary C; History, English
MacDONALD, Douglas B.; Geography,
History
MAHARAJ, Dolly R.; India Students'
Assn., Caribbean Students' Assn.
MASKOW, May L.; Home Economics,
Biology;  V.O.C, Alpha Delta Pi
MILNE, David R.; P.E., Geography;
Ruby, Football, Alpha Delta Phi
ORTON, Frederick J.;  Commerce
PATENAUDE, Maurice C; History,
English; Lambda Chi Alpha
PEDERSON, Roy A.; Math, Biology;
Ed. U. S. Sports Rep.
PRICE, John David; Delta Upsilon
Page 86 ROSENTHAL, Wilfred; Geography,
History
SHIELDS, Roy L.; History, English;
Treas.  Ed. U. S.
TERRY,   Douglas;   History,   English
WALKER, Heather A.;  Physical Ed.,
English; Big Block Club
WALLACE,  John H.;  Geography,
History; Delta Kappa Epsilon
WEBSTER, David A.; Math, Physics;
I.O.D.E.  Scholarship
ZYDYK,  Edward V;   Mathematics,
Chemistry;   Pres., Ed.  U. S.
4$fe*&i
Education   student,   Jeff  Bulcock,  instructing   a
Science  class.
Page 87 education
elementary
BAILEY, Evelyn P.; Combined Major;
Golf Club, Ceramic Club
BAIN, Margaret A.;  Kindergarten,
Primary; Alpha Gamma Delta
BOURNE, Carol; Elementary;
Alpha Delta Pi
BROWN, Margaret E.; Primary, Music
CARLSON, E. Gail; P.E.; Pres. A.W.S.,
Alpha Gamma Delta, Delta Sigma Pi
COSENS, Winifred;  English
EILERS, Eleanor J.; Music; Mussoc,
Kappa Alpha Theta
ELLEN, A. Sheila; Honours H. Ec;
Kappa   Kappa   Gamma
FLEET, Lettie C; Fine Arts
FRASER, Lyle W.; Intermediate
GERRIE, Shirley Mae;  Kindergarten,
Primary
GIBSON,  Janice  I.;   Intermediate,
H. Ec; Pres. Alpha Delta Pi
GRIMSTON, Evelyn; Kindergarten,
Primary; Delta Gamma
HICKS, Beverly R.;  Kindergarten,
Primary; Badminton Club
HOLDING, Grace; Primary
HOLMES, M. Jane; Kappa Kappa Gamma
HOWE, Pamela M.; Combined Major;
President Phrateres
JANZ, Wayne E.; Combined Major
KRASS, Sandra E.; Primary; Hillel
LYON, R. Donald; Honours Intermediate;
Membership Chairman, V.O.C.
McCURDY, Norma M.; Primary; Mussoc,
Conservative Club, Delta Gamma
MAH, Mona; Elementary
MANDELL, F. E. (Betty); Primary
MARSHALL, Kathleen H.; P.E.,
Geography; Kappa Alpha Theta
MARSHALL, Sonya S.; Primary; V.O.C,
Newman Club
Page 88 MICHELL, Beverley J.; Combined Major
MITCHELL, Jean; Music
MORRISON, Sharon L.; Primary;
N.F.C.U.S., Alpha Delta Pi
MUIR, Janet H.;  Physical Ed.;
Volleyball Team
OLAFSON, Wm. Garry; Elementary
PEARCE, Patricia R.;  Exceptional
Children
SEALE, Betty A.; Combined Major;
Jazzsoc, Primary Club
SHARROCK, Dorothy F.; Intermediate
SINCLAIR, Carol, A.; Intermediate;
Kappa Kappa Gamma
SLACK, Roberta A.; CCF.
STEVENSON, C  Betty;   Intermediate;
Gamma.Phi Beta
STYFFE, Sylvia V.; Exceptional Children:
N.F.C.U.S., Alpha Phi
WILKINS,    Deborah A.; English,
Library; Kappa Kappa Gamma
WILSON, Muriel A.; Intermediate; S.CM.
class of '59
Education students experiment in primary
handicraft. engmeermg
Dean Gunning, Faculty of Applied Science
Students in Engineering begin to
specialize in their third year and
choose one of the following branches:
agricultural, chemical, electrical, geological, mechanical, metallurgical, mining engineering, or engineering
physics. Much of the excitement on
the campus is caused by the high-
spirited engineers who are particularly
notorious for their hazing of innocent
freshmen. Under the able guidance of
President Don Thomson, they also
sponsored the March of Dimes and the
Engineers' Ball.
Mechanical Engineering lab in progress
Page 90 Deane  Whitehead of  Chemical  Engineering  performs an intricate operation.
The Civils survey on the Main Mall.
A steady hand and a cool head.
Page 91 Barb Wilkie—first Engineer's candidate, then Homecoming  Queen.
Engineers  and  nurses  combine in   a   lusty cheer   at
the Tea Cup Game.
A test of endurance.
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The Ubyssey gets its just desserts.
Pa,
ge 92 AULD,  Robert  G.;  A.I.CE.,   CI.C,
E.I.C,  High School Conference
BOTHNER, Vyrn M.; A.I.C.E., CI.C,
B.C.  Cement Co. Scholarship
BROWN, Alan C; Treasurer   E.U.S.,
Zeta Psi
CASWELL, John E.
CICCONE, Ronald A.; Sports Rep.,
A.I.C.E.,   CI.C
CORBISHLEY, Douglas A.; A.I.C.E.,
CI.C, Phi Gamma Delta
DAYSON, Philip L.; Hillel
JOHNSTON, Thomas R.; A.I.C.E.,
CI.C, Mussoc, Lambda Chi Alpha
KISS,  Mart;   A.I.C.E.,   C.I.C,
Lambda Chi Alpha
McDONALD, Tom J.
PROUGH, J. Robert; Mamooks
PURCHAS, Lome D.; President
A.I.CE., CI.C, Zeta Psi
SELLER, Ronald H; Secretary
A.I.C.E., CI.C
SLATER, Mark D.; A.I.C.E., Sigma Chi
TOPHAM, Gordon A.; A.I.C.E., C.I.C
YOUNG, M.  June;  A.I.CE., CI.C,
V.O.C, Alpha Phi
ALEXANDER, Charles W.
BAYNES, Duncan C; Rugger, Mussoc,
Phi Kappa Sigma
BEULAH,  Peter F.;   Civil  Club,
Finning Co.   Scholarship
BRIDGMAN, Edward D.; Civil Club,
Phi Kappa Pi
CAMERON, David M.; Dance Club,
Newman Club
chemical engineering
civil engineering
Page 93 COULTER, Douglas E.; Civil Club
FREMONT, John N.
HACKARAY, J. Alfred; Royal
Canadian Engineers
HIGGINS, Melvin R.
IRVINE,  Bruce W.
LAKER, Edwin T.; Civil Club;
Vice-Pres.,  Players  Club
LESLIE, George D.
LINDSAY, Russell M.
LONDON, Tampion  A.;   Civil  Club,
V.CF.
LOWOOD, John D.; E.I.C, Camera Club
LUND, Earl A.; Civil Club, E.I.C.
McLEAN, John A.; Aquasoc
MASSEY, George E.; V.O.C
MONTADOR, A. John; E.I.C,
Sigma Phi Delta
NEWSHAM, Arthur D.; Civil Club,
Lambert Scholarship
NICKEL, Jacob S.;  V.CF.
OLDHAM, William K.;  President,
Civil Club
PAYNE, C  Allan;  Civil Club
PRUDHOMME, Hector R.; Civil Club
RAE, J. Budd; B. C. Electric Scholarship
RANNALA, Raymond; CivU Club
RICHMOND, Kenneth M.;
Alpha Tau Omega
ROBSON, C.   Michael;   Civil Club,
Badminton,  E.I.C,  A.S.C.E.
ROSS, George F.; Civil Club
SHIELDS, Peter A.; P.R.O.-E.U.S.,
Alpha Delta Phi
SLINN, Peter
STEWART, G. Kelvin; Curling Club,
Sales Manager—E.U.S.
STEWART, W. Donald; Curling, Civil
Club, M.A.A., Curling Manager
Page 94 STOLZ, Herbert J.
TZVETCOFF, George A.;  Civil Club
VAN DAALEN, Edward
WEDLER, John W.
WILSON,  Kenneth C;  Civil Club,
Lambda Chi Alpha, Mussoc, Dance Club
WONG, Edmund; Chinese Varsity Club
WOOD, Raymond J.
ABELL, Harvey
BAILEY, James W.;   A.I.E.E., I.R.E.,
E.I.C, Camera Club
BEARDSELL,  Kenneth A.;   A.I.E.E.,
I.R.E.
BELL, William P.
BERNSTEIN, Larry A.
BROOKS, Gary  C; Hamsoc, I.R.E.,
A.I.E.E.
BROWN,  Peter M.;  Jazzsoc
CLARK, Stanley R.; Vancouver Electrical
Assoc.   Scholarship,  A.I.E.E.
DAVIES, Robert M.; I.R.E., Sigma Chi
DOLPHIN, Daniel R.
DOVEY, Robert J.
ERNSTSOHN, Felix A. K.; I.R.E.
FORREST, Douglas R.; E.I.C, I.R.E.,
Sec.   A.I.E.E.
FRASER, David
GAINES, Edward J.; Newman Club,
Mussoc, A.I.E.E., I.R.E.
GAMMIE, Alexander P.; Delta Kappa
Epsilon
HADWIN, Donald;  A.I.E.E.,
Phi Kappa Sigma
HAHN, Joachim E.; E.I.C.,
A.I.E.E.,   B.CA.P.E.
Page 95 HARDING, Patrick J.; A.I.E.E.,
I.R.E.
HATTON, James E.; A.I.E.E., I.R.E.,
Phi  Kappa Sigma
HECTOR, James S.; Aluminum Co. of
Canada  Scholarship
HOLZMAN, Donald K.; A.I.E.E.,
B.CP.E.
HUNTER, Perry J.
HUTCHINSON, Thomas C
JEZIORANSKI, Joseph; I.R.E.,
E.I.C, Newman,   B.CA.P.E.
KROEKER,   Cornelius   H.
KRUCHIO, Paul, I.R.E.
RULES,  Charles  E.;   Football,
Phi Gamma Delta
LIGGINS,  Allan;  Hamsoc, A.I.E.E.,
I.R.E.,    B.CA.P.E..
LOUIE, Edward G.;   Chinese Varsity
MACDONALD, John S.; Hamsoc
MACKENZIE,  Stuart C
MADDISON, Rodney R.;  Lambda
Chi Alpha
MAZZUCA, Edward J.;   A.I.E.E.,
E.I.C.,   Jazzsoc,  Filmsoc
ORNIK, Len;  A.I.E.E., S.M.P.T.E.,
Sigma Phi Delta
OUNPUU,  Evald;   A.I.E.E.,  I.R.E.,
Camera Club
PAVLOV, Boris A.; E.I.C, I.R.E.
POLATA, Bohumil; Camera Club,
A.I.E.E., International House
SAGE, Glen H.;   R.CA.F. Scholarship
SAKAMOTO, Roy; A.LE.E., I.R.E.
SAPERSTEIN, Manuel J.; Zeta Beta Tau
SHEARING, Cyril G.; I.R.E.
SMITH-GANDER, Nigel C
SPENCER,  Keith M.; Hamsoc, I.R.E.
STEEVES, John G.;  Fencing Club,
I.R.E., Alpha Tau Omega, Choir
STEPHAN, Leonard P.; A.I.E.E., I.R.E.
Page 96 THOM, Donald C;  Class  President,
A.I.E.E., I.R.E., E.I.C.
THOM,  Murray D.;  E.I.C,  I.R.E.,
R.M.C.
THOMSON, Peter F.; A.I.E.E.
TSAO,  Sai  H.;  I.R.E.,  Camera  Club,
Chinese Varsity Club
TYNAN, John M.; R.M.C
WARD, Ronald A.; I.R.E., A.I.E.E.,
Phi Kappa Sigma
WATSON, Donald A.
ZANON, Settimo C;  A.I.E.E., I.R.E.,
U.N.T.D.
IVERSON, Charles H.;
Sigma Chi
Forest Club,
forestry engineering
ADDISON, Richard;  Dawson Club
CATHRO,   Robert;   President    Dawson
Club, Delta Upsilon
CRAWFORD, W. James
DRUMMOND, A. Darryl; Dawson Club,
E.I.C
HYNDMAN, Donald W.; Dawson Club
JEWITT, John W.;  Dawson Club
LAWRENCE, Edward A.; Dawson Club
MILLER, David C; Dawson Club
OGILVY,  A.   C;   Dawson  Club,  Ed.
Mining-Geology Grad Book
REDIVO, Livio S.; Dawson Club,
C.I.M., A.I.M.E.
YESKE, Arthur R.; Dawson Club,
Badminton Club
YOUNG, R. J.
geological engineering
Page 97 mechanical engineering
BARNES, Gordon W.
CALDERWOOD, William M.; Pres.,
E.I.C.
CHAPMAN, Anthony G.
COLTMAN, Donald E.
DAVIDSON, Omar S.
DAY, George S.; Treasurer   A.S.M.E.,
Delta Kappa Epsilon
DICKSON, Eric I.; R.CA.F., Delta
Kappa Epsilon
DIXON, Donald'F.; Chairman,
A.S.M.E.
EASTON, John C
ERWIN, David;   A.S.M.E.
FINDLAY, Allan G.
FROMSON, Doug A.; Phi Delta Theta
GILMOUR,  John  P.;   A.S.M.E.,
Phi Delta Theta
GREENOUGH, Ronald L.
HILL,  Leslie
HIPP, Peter
HOOGE, Helmut H.
ISBISTER,   Gordon  A.;   A.S.M.E.,
Filmsoc
KESZTHELYI, Zsolt G.
KINCAID, David G.;  Badminton
KLASSEN, Harvey O.
LAMBERT, Michael C.
LAWSON, Victor B.; A.S.M.E., E.I.C.
McCLURE, R. N.; Rowing Club,
A.S.M.E., Eng.  Choir
MEEKISON,  J. Peter; Chairman   Leadership Conf., Phi Kappa  Sigma
Page 98 METZKER,  Richard;  Dance   Club,
Archaeology
MIDDLETON, Vic H.; A.S.M.E.
MITCHELL, Ian D.; A.S.M.E.
MOW AT, Hugh E.; S.A.E.
NAGAI, Ben; A.S.M.E.   E.I.C,
NELSEN,   Ron   J.;   A.S.M.E.,   Mussoc
Vice-President
NIXON, John R.
OMAND, James  C
PEDERSEN,   Robert E.;   A.S.M.E.
PETERSON,  Edwin  J.
PULLMAN, Art G.;  U.B.C. Golf Team
REID,  Neil  B.
ROWLANDS,   Robert   E.
RYCHKUN, Michael;  Alpha Omega
SAVAGE,  Richard  A.;  V.O.C,
Secretary A.S.M.E.
SELBY,   Joseph   C;   A.S.M.E.,
E.I.C,   B.C  Prof.   Eng.
SHARP, R. Murray; A.S.M.E., E.I.C
SHERLING, Norman D.; A.S.M.E.
SIGAL, George P.
STICKNEY, George; A.S.M.E.
THOMSON, Donald J.; A.S.M.E., E.I.C.,
President E.U.S.
TRUSSELL, Gerald  E.
VONDRUSKA, Charles; Tennis Team
WALIMAA,  Edwin N.
WALKER,  Ronald E.; Dance Club
WEBB, C Richard;  A.S.M.E.,
E.I.C.,  V.CF.
WILSON, Robert A.; U.B.C. Rowing
Crew, Alpha Tau Omega
WRIGHT, Clifford E.
Page 99 metallurgical engineering
AYLEN, Peter  E.; Dawson Club,
Sigma  Chi
BRAKE, George M.; V.O.C.
DAVENPORT, William G.;
Phi Kappa Sigma
DAVISON, George M.; Dawson Club,
A.I.M.E.
EVANS, Derry G.; Dawson Club
HARDING, Hugh J.; Dawson Club
MEADOWCROFT, Thomas R.; Secretary.
Dawson Club
ROBLIN, Murray  K.;  Conservative Club
ROMBE, Joseph L.; S.C.M.,
International House
RUSHCALL, Edward M.; Dawson Club
SHORE, John   R.
SNOWBALL, Robert F.; Beta Theta  Pi
STURGESS, Donald F.; Newman, Ski
Team Manager, Delta Upsilon
STURROCK, William R.; Dawson Club,
Academic Symposium
SWIERSTRA,  John;  Dawson Club,
Psi Upsilon
WARGANEGARA, Ram M.
AMSDEN,  Michael P.;  Dawson Club
BREAKEY, William S.
FRASER, Art R.;   Dawson Club
KNIGHT, Douglas A.;  Dawson  Club
MOZER, Ivan
Page 100 • •
AULD, Edward G.; Badminton Club,
Pres.;  E.P.S., Treasurer
BOSTON, Noel E.; E.P.S., Secretary
CHEEKE, John D.
DAU, Karl
ELCOX, Robert E.;  E.P.S.
GALLAHER, Donald F.
GRAHAM, Ronald L.; Editor,
"The Slipstick"
GRANT, Howard A.
HARDY,  William   L.;  E.P.S.,
Badminton Club
HELME, James F.; Sigma Phi Delta
HESLOP, Ian M.; E.P.S., Curling Club
JANKULAK, Francis E.; Newman Club
KELLOGG, Francis E.; Camera Club
KILLAM, David L.j Beta Theta Pi
MALLORY, Donald J.; Jazzsoc
MARRIOTT, Alan T.; Phi Kappa Sigma
MATSUSHITA, Jack Z.
MEPHAM, John H.
MERRITT, Roy S.
MORRISON, Anthony D.;  E.P.S.,
E.U.S. Executive
NISHIZAKI, Tom
OISHI, Tony; Phi Kappa Sigma
REIMANN, Michael A.
SMITH, Edward J.; E.P.S. President,
Ubyssey
SOMERVILLE, Daniel W.
SYDOR, M.; Alpha Omega
engmeermg
physics
Page 101 At work
and study
play .
The Woodchoppers' Ball launched
Forestry into its year's activities and
struck a note of friendly competition
when fourth-year students won the
model project contest. This rivalry
continued at the Slashburn where logging skills were proven. Spring Camp
ended a busy year.
Page 102 faculty of forestry
Sunrise
Dean G. S. Allen
Nka
*5*
Paul Bunyan spruces up the Forestry
float in Homecoming parade.
Page 103 ALDRED,  Alan  H.;   General;   Forest
Club, Camera Club
BARKER, John E.; Forest Management
Forest Club
BOAS, Henry K.; Forest Management;
Fbrest  Club,   Archaeology  Club
CHRISTENSEN, Aksel; Forest
Management; Forest Club
DOBIE, James; Forest Management;
Forest Club, Newman Club
DRIEHUYZEN,   Hein   W.;   Forest
Products and Wood Technology;
Forest Club, International House
ELSON, John   C;  Zoology
FARENHOLTZ, Alfred G.; Management;
Social Convenor Fort Camp
FERGUSON, Dene E.; Management;
Forest Club, Badminton Club
HARRIS, John W.; Forest Entomology;
Forest Club, PRO-CCF
HASKINS,  Peter S.;   Management;  Forest
Club, I.H.A., U.S.C. Pres.;
Students' Council
HELLUM, Kare A.; Management,
(Ecology); International House
JANSSEN, William P.; Management;
Forest Club
KAYLLj Albert J.; Management;
P.R.O.; Forest Club, Camera Club
NEILSON,  Bruce G.;   Wildlife
Management—Zoology; Forest Club
PEERS,   Laurence  C;  Management;
Pres.   Forestry  Undergrad  Soc.
QUINLAN,  Edwin J.;  Management;
Forest Club, UBC Rowing Crew
REID, Robert J.;  Business Admin.;
Secretary, Forest Club
RICHARDS, George R.; Management;
Treasurer, Forest Club
SMEELE, Frank J.;   Management;
Forest Club, Grass Hockey Team
TAYLOR,  David E.;  Forest Club
TRACHUK, George; Forest Club
TUOMALA, Maurice F.; Camera Club,
Forest Club
VANCE, William R.; Forest Club
VERCHERE, David G.; forest Club;
Phi  Gamma Delta
WEBBER, Garnet W.; Camera Club,
Phi Kappa  Sigma
WEIR, Lawrence C; Forest Club
WILKINS, Michael J.; Forest Club,
Mussoc
Page 104 sopron faculty
of forestry
Dean Kalman Roller
The Sopron Faculty of Forestry was
first established on this campus last
year. Members are now becoming active in various clubs and organizations.
However, while participating in
campus life, they still retain many
former associations and customs, thereby contributing colour to U.B.C.
Sopron   Student   Executive   discusses   coming   events
Sopron students march in the October sunlight
Page 105 sopron faculty of forestry
BAKO,  Jozsef;  Bodajk
BAKOS, Tibor P.;  Csokoly
BALATINECZ, Janos; Sopron; Sopron
Club;  International House
BODIG, Jozsef; Gone; Sopron Club;
Newman Club
BORSOS, Zoltan
BATAY,  John;  Sopron;   Sopron  Club
CSIZMADIA, Frank
DEMINGER,  Karoly;  Szigetbecse;
Volleyball Team,  Camera Club
FUR, Karoly; Camera Club; Gym Club
GROZDITS, Gyorgy; Balmazujvaros
HEJJ,  A.
HUDAK, Janos; Miskolc; Newman Club
HUSZAR, Karoly; Camera Club,
Fencing Club
IFJU,   Geza;   Pecs,   Sopron   Club,
Newman Club
JAKOY, Andrew;   Balatonalmach, V.O.C.
KISS, Gyula K.; Vac; Fencing Club
KISS, Janos; Sopron Club
KISTOTH,   Janos;  Kaposkeresztur
KORAN, Zoltan; Panyok
KOZAK, Antal; Szolnok;  Sopron Club
MALOLESEY, G.
NYERS, Ferenc; Balatonbereuy
OCSKO, Stephen; Nogradveroce
POPRADI,   Laszlo   G.;   Visegrad;
Secretary Class Four
RAB, Rudolf
Page 106 RAVAI, Janos
RONAY, Alexander
RONYECZ, Joseph; Camera Club, I.H.A.
SIVAK, Bela P.
SZAMOSI, Gabor
SZAUER, Janos P.
SZAUER,   Klara  M.
A wreath of remembrance is laid by Mik-
los Gratzer.
Traditional Hungarian dances entertain at Sopron Social Club
Page 107 Acting Director, Miss M.  Holder
U.B.C. PHOTO
home economics
The Home Economics Undergraduate Society held a varied programme of
sports and social activities with June
Brett and her executive providing enthusiastic leadership. Main events
were the Tea Cup football game, the
Forestry exchange, and the Spring
Formal.
Three for the money—A. Armstrong, M. Thompson, Si. Jeffreys.
Tea Cup game with Home Ec. and Forestry cheerleaders.
Hula   hooping   Home   Ec.   girls Can can dancers at the Calorie Catastrophe.
Our queen candidate, Sandra Holdsworth.
Scanning, then testing the cookies at the Home Ec.-Forestry exchange.
Page 109 home economics
^M^mf
TfT *p|
ARMSTRONG, Ariel A.; Dietetics;
H.E.U.S. Treasurer
BERKEY, Sherrolyn R.; Teaching
BEULAH, Frances; Teaching
BRETT,  June E.; Teaching, H.E.U.S.
President, Grad Class Vice-Pres.
CREELMAN, Patricia A.;  Teaching;
Alpha Phi
ESCOTT,   Audrey   H;   Teaching
FORBERG,  Myrtle R.;  Teaching;
H.E.U.S. Publicity Chairman
FRANCIS, Alice L.; Teaching and Design
HAMRE, Carole L.; Dietetics;
Mussoc,  Mammooks  Sec;
Pres. Kappa Alpha Theta
HILL, Carol M.; Dietetics;
Gamma Phi Beta
IKUTA, Noriko; Dietetics; Nisei Varsity,
Chinese Varsity Club
JOHNSTON, Mary-Ellen; Teaching
LAIDMAN, Ruth A.; Teaching,
Class Representative
LEE,  Marie;  Dietetics;  Totem,
Chinese Varsity Club
LOUIE,  Shirley B.;  Dietetics; Totem,
Social  Rep. A.W.S.
LYON,  Patricia  A.;  Dietetics;
High School Conference
MAIER, Anneliese; Dietetics; Class Rep.,
Kappa Kappa Gamma
OSBORNE, Verna A.; Dietetics
OVERHILL, Patricia J.; Teaching;
Totem, Sports'  Rep.  H.E.U.S.
PALLOT, Mary-Jean; Teaching;
Alpha Delta Pi
PARFITT, N. Marilyn; Teaching
PONTIOUS, Marcia J.; Teaching
RADATZKE, Joyce N.; Design; V.O.C.
RUMEN, Olga; Dietetics
SALSMAN, Barbara J.;  Teaching;
Alpha  Phi
Page 110 SCHELSTRAETE,  Albertine;  Teaching
SHIMIZU,  Reiko;  Dietetics;  Theatre
Apprentice Group
SWINGLER, Sydney C; Dietetics;
Varsity Outdoor Club
TAIPALUS, Diana  A.;  Teaching;
Sports  Representative of HEUS
VEDSOE, Anna I.; Dietetics; R.C.A.F.
WATERS, Diana E.; Teaching
Biology Club
WORTHINGTON, H. Ann; Teaching
WRIGHT, Sheelah L.; Dietetics;
Totem, Kappa Alpha Theta
U.B.C's modern Home Economics Building
The Home Management House
Page 111 faculty of law
Able President Sid Simons led the
Law Undergraduate Society in a year
of successful activities which included
such traditional functions as the Fall
Formal, moot courts, "Legal Notes,"
and the Law Ball. This year the Western Federation of Law Students travelled to Alberta to attend the conference which will be held next year at
U.B.C.
Dean   G.   F.   Curtis
Seminar in legal theory and legislation
Page 112 Moot Court conducted by L. W. Beadle
Law Undergraduate Society Executive in session
Guest speaker, Dr. G. Schwaszenberger
from University College, London, England AxA^fcx
ALLAN, D. Victor; Pari. Council;
Lambda Chi Alpha, P. C. Club
ARKELL,  Ken F.; Class Rep.  L.U.S.,
Kappa Alpha Society
ARMSTRONG, A. Gordon; President,
Sigma Tau Chi, Alpha Delta Phi
ARMSTRONG, William S.; Conservative
Club, Mardi Gras Committee
Phi Gamma Delta
BAUMGARTEL, Bernd W.; German Club,
Criminology Club
BIRKETT, Thomas P.; Lambda Chi Alpha
BORG,   Ronald P.
BRAHAN, Lawrence C
BROPHY, Jonetta G.
BURGE, David R.
BUTLER, Michael E.;  Rugger,
Kappa Alpha
CANDIDO, Lawrence M.
CARIGNAN, John J.
CASTLE, Gary C; Delta Upsilon
CLARE, Joseph
COCHRANE,  John G.
CONNELL, John G.; Beta Theta Pi
CRAIG, Ronald S.
DAVIS, Arthur M.; Delta Kappa Epsilon
FARAC, Dusan A.
FODCHUK, Boris W.
GILES,  Jack M.;  Conservatives,
Parliamentary   Council,   Debating
GOVAN, Philip R-; Conservatives,
Parliamentary Forum
GREEN, David H.; Debating Union
Alpha Delta Phi
HANSON, Leonard C. HARMAN, Robert H.;   Liberal Club,
Zeta Psi
HAZLEWOOD, Gordon A.
HEATHER, John R.
HUGHES, W. Grant; International House
HURST, John N.; Phi Gamma Delta;
Treasurer, Mardi Gras
JAMES,  Marlene  H.;   Mardi Gras
Coordinator, Alpha Gamma Delta,
Delta Sigma Pi
JEFFERY, Michael C; Special Events
Chairman, Sigma Tau Chi,
Beta  Theta Pi
KENNEDY, Anne C
LAUENER, John P.; Beta Theta Pi
LAVALLEE, Bernard C.
LAVALLEE, Nelson P.
LAXTON, John N.
LEE, Delias W.
LEVIS, David M.;  Treasurer,
L.U.S.
LEWIN, Lawrence; CCF. Club
LIGHTBODY, Walley P.;  Jazzsoc
LYONS, Alan L.; Delta Kappa Epsilon
MOLSON, John B.; Alpha Delta Phi
MONTGOMERY, William H.;   Alpha
Delta Phi, W.U.S.C.
MORIN, Gerald M.; Psi Upsilon
MORRISON, Glenn M.
MOSELEY, Graham; Debating Union,
Conservative Club, Zeta   Psi
McALLISTER, William B.; Filmsoc;
Leadership Conference
McCALLUM, Ian A.; President,
Alpha Tau Omega
McCROSSAN, Jack A.; U.S.C. Rep.
for Law, Phi Gamma Delta, L.U.S.
McDONALD, David A.; Delta Upsilon
MACDONALD, D.  Grant;  Publications
Coordinator, Beta Theta Pi
Sigma Tau Chi
MACKAY, John   R.;  Liberal Club,
Debating Club,  Phi Gamma Delta
tfMiiMt
ft
/Mtf.bi
it tM\ OLIVER, Gordon; Editor-in-Chief,
Legal Notes
ORNSTEIN, NeU M.; CivU Liberties
Union, Sigma Alpha Mu
PATTERSON, John D.; Sigma Chi
PEACOCK, John C; L.U.S., Kappa Sigma
PETRUNIA, John
RAY, Charles J.; Alpha Delta Phi
REECKE,  John P.
REED, Douglas C;   Liberal Club
ROBINS, William H.
SCHUMACHER,   Stanley   S.;
Conservative Club
SCOFFIELD, Robert A.
SHKURATOFF, Alex M.
SIMONS, Sidney B.;   Hillel, Debating
Union; President, L.U.S.,
Sigma  Alpha  Mu
SMITH, David J.
SMITH, Melvin H.; V.CF.
Social Credit Club
STEINER, Arnold W.
STUART, James A.
SUTHERLAND, George R.
TREVINO,  Ben;  Radsoc, U.N.  Club,
Letters Club, Sigma Tau Chi
VICKERS,  David H.; Debating
WASSON, Garth C; Conservative Club
WILLOWS, Brian L.; Sigma Chi
WOLFE, Isidor M.
Page 116 Law Library
Page 117 faculty of medicine
To lighten a year of intensified study,
the medical students planned a number
of relaxing social events. The year began
with a Splash Party at which first year
students were welcomed; this was followed by a Smoker in October, and in
December the fourth year interns took
part in the V.G.H. Christmas concert.
The Medical Ball was the big event of
the spring term, and the year ended with
a post-exam party.
Acting Dean, Dr. R. Robertson
Glenn   Smith   gives   Dougie   Vye   some
worldly advice.
R. Thiesson and D. Vallis in the Library Skip Pearless learns the fundamentals of surgery.
First year medical students use each other in  their experiments.
4bWi
Student  examines  blood  cell  cultures  and  records  movements  with  a  movie camera.
Page 119 medicine
ARCHER, Leonard T.; Psi Upsilon
BARKER, Arthur J.
BELL, H. Michael; Phi Delta Theta
BIRCH, John R.
BREEN, Harvey; Hillel, Zeta Beta Tau
BRUEHLER, Gustav; Medical
Christian Fellowship
CLEMENT, Douglas B.; Pres. M.U.S.;
Hon. Mem., Big Block; Sigma Chi
COWLEY, Marion V.
CUBBBAGE, John S.; Cams!
DALES, Michael; Sigma Alpha Mu
FAIRBAIRN, Robert; Beta Theta Pi
FENTON, Lawrence G.
FISHMAN, Sherold
FLATHER, Barrie; Delta Upsilon
GOERTZ, Edwin; Camsi
GORDON, Robert B.
HALTALIN, Kenneth; Beta Theta Pi
HANSLIP, Arthur R.
HARDER, David H.
HEINRICHS, Erwin
HEINRICHS, Peter D.
KARME, Alan B.
KROPINAK, Matthew R.
LANGER, Max M.; Hillel; CCF.,
Student Zionist Club
MADILL, Stewart; Phi Gamma Delta
Page 120 MELNYK, Clifford S.
MILNE, Glenn D.
MITCHELL, Peter; Phi Gamma Delta
MORRISON, Jack H.
MORROW, Kenneth A.
PAGE, Roger H.
PRICE,  George   E.;   Pres.,  Alpha   Omega
Alpha; M.U.S., Psi Upsilon
ROGERS, Roger H.; Psychology,
Sociology
SCHOENLE, June E.; Sec-Treas. of
Alpha Omega Alpha
SIGAL, Cecil; Sigma Alpha Mu
SMILLIE, Howard A.
SMITH, Glenn W.
STALEY, Norman E.
STEINSON, E. Bruce
THIESSEN, Nicholas
THOMAS, William D.; Phi Gamma Delta
TILSER, George
TODD,   Adrienne;   Alpha   Phi
VALLIS, Derek; Sec. M.U.S.,
Big Block Club, Rugby Club,
Thunderbirds
WEIR, Mervyn C
WICKHAM, Thomas
YOUNG, Andrew B.; Phi Gamma Delta
class of '59
Page 121 Miss Evelyn Mallory, Director of the School of Nursing.
school of nursing
The Nurses' Undergraduate Society took
a leading part in a number of campus
activities. The year began with the annual Blood Drive and continued with
the March of Dimes campaign to aid
Crippled Children. This event was marked
by the traditional Tea Cup game in which
the Nurses battled Home Ec to a draw.
Social events included a Fireside and a
mixer with the Engineers.
Ann Steele presides over the N.U.S. executive.
Page 122 Cheerleading  Engineers   and  Nurses  at   the  Tea  Cup  game.
Help!
That lowly chore! nursmg
**! tlf&W
^^l^f&r
J^^tJF
ANDREWS, Beth; Interfacuity
Representative on N.U.S.
ASPOL, Reta M.
BALL, Cynthia A.
BENNETT, Nancy L.;  Gamma Phi Beta
BISHOP, Diana J.; Music Circle,
Newman Club
BUCHANAN,   Helen   M.;   Treas.   N.U.S.
CARPENTER, Janet F.; Social Rep.
N.U.S., Delta Gamma
COPEMAN, Ann; Conservative Club
CORNWELL, Dorothy M.
DARCOVICH, Olga; Gamma Phi Beta
DAY, Ann F.
DENHOLME, Mrs. E. Maureen
DHILLON, Kulmindar
FLINN, Brenda J.
GEDDES, Beatrice A.
GIEGERICH, Daryl J.; Delta Gamma
GUTTORMSSON, Norma C; Int.
Admin. Bd.; Music Circle
GYOBA,   Joyce;   W.C.C.   in   Nursing
HAMBROOK, Rosemary; U.S.C. Rep.
on N.U.S.
KOCH, Mrs. Penelope A.; U.N.C,
International House
KYLE, Thelma E.
LEASK, Maralyn
LOREE, Alixe; Gamma Phi Beta
McDONALD, Joan A.; Jazzsoc
MacDONALD, Sheila M.; Liberals,
Jazzsoc, Kappa Kappa Gamma
Page 124 MacKENZIE, Barbara J.; Jazzsoc
MORRISON, Christina A.
PATRICK, Geraldine C. L.
RANDALL, Joan B.
RICHMOND, Sally P.; Pres.
Delta Gamma
ROSS,   Beryl   A.;    Sec.   Baptist   Club,
V.CF.
STEELE, Ann; Jazzsoc, Liberals.
Pres. N.U.S.
SUGIMOTO, Tomiko; Nisei Varsity Club,
Mamooks
THOMSON, Noreen; S.W.O.,
Vice-Pres. N.U.S.
THRELFALL, Margaret A.
TORNEY, Elizabeth A.
VINGE, Dorothy R.;
Lutheran Students' Club
WESTWICK, Irene
WOOD, Marilyn J.; Music Circle,
U.B.C. Extension Chorus
WOOLLEY, Margaret E.
Wesbrook  houses   the  University
Hospital. v.g.h. nursing
AIKEN, Catherine
BARAGAR, Elizabeth
BELL, Jo-Mary
BELL, Sydney
BETTS, Sally
BONIFACE, Judith
BOUGHTON, Allison
BROTHERTON, Eunice
BUCHAN, Elizabeth
CALVERT, Phyllis
CLANCY, Deanna
CRISALL, Sylvia
CUMBERLAND, Gail
DALY, Marni
FRIER, Laurie
FUNK, Joan
GILLELAND, Anne
GORDON, Ann-Shirley
HALPIN, Sheila
JACKSON, Mary
LEVIRS, Ruth
LEWIS, Margaret
McNAUGHTON, Joan
MORES, Margaret
MULHERN, Dana
A Ak
Page 126 OLDFIELD, Anne
ORTON, Ruth
SCHOFIELD, Jill
SEED, Lorna
SQUANCE, Valerie
SPROULE, Judith
STARK, Annette
STEWART, Anne
TURVEY, Jocelyn
WATERFIELD, Barbara
class of 59
Sydney   Bell,   Anne   Gilleland,   Laurie   Frier,   and
Margaret Lewis present nursing night life.
The nurses spend their first two years
on the campus and the next two getting
practical hospital training. Those graduating from the Vancouver General Hospital will return to U.B.C. in September
to obtain their Bachelor of Science degree. Activities included a Ball in November, providing a chorus line for the
Engineer's Ball, and taking part in the
Hospital Christmas Concert.
Pediatric nurse Marni Daly with Yvonne Loring. faculty of pharmacy
Under the leadership of their president, Ray Forrester, Pharmacy students
were active socially again this year. Their
schedule of events included participation
in the Red Cross Blood Drive as well as
in the many Homecoming activities.
Weekly bowling proved particularly popular, while the highlights of the year
were the Elixir Mixer and the Graduation Banquet.
Dean W. H. Matthews
Tired and hungry float decorators wait for refreshments.
Page 128 Rod  Loewen, Ed  Richardson,  and  Roy Forrester stir  the Homecoming  brew.
m
mmmWk\9&    HhII             ..
*i i\^W
"■^^H
f-^ v
Wm
n-^      B
A Studious Bunch
Gerry Kitson and Ernie Moon under the watchful eye of instructor Ken Kankin.
Page 129 pharmacy
BAILEY, George R.; Psi Upsilon
CHRISTENSEN, Cecil C; Ph.U.S.
Council
CLARK, Melvin W.
CLINE, Margaret A.; Lambda Kappa
Sigma
CRUIKSHANK, Conrad W.
DICKIE, David G.; Ph.U.S., P.R.O.
DOWNIE, Catriona P.; Lambda Kappa
Sigma P.R.O.
FORRESTER,   R.   Ray;   Ph.U.S.  Pres.;
Alpha Delta Phi
GAGNON, Jeanne A.; Grad Class Sec,
Pres. Lambda Kappa Sigma
HOOGE, John W.
INGVALDSON, O. Charles
KIHARA, Shiro
KUHN, George E.
LEWIS, Glendon H.
LI, Terry Y.
LOEWEN, Rodney P.; Grad Committee
MARTELL, Neil G.
MILLER, Jack A.
MOLYNEUX, Shirley J.; V.CF.,
Lambda Kappa Sigma
PATTISON, Harris G.
PLOTNIKOFF, Peter W.
RICHARDSON, Albert E.; Ph.U.S.
Publicity Rep.
RUNCEWICZ, Janina M.; Lambda Kappa
Sigma Secretary, Newman, Photog.
SANDERS, Harvey D.
SISKA, Margaret O.; Newman Club,
Alliance Francaise
Page 130 SLOBIN, Gordon
STEIN, Ronald L.; Phi Kappa Sigma
WARNER, Garnet C
WISE, Leonard M.; Grad Class Pres.;
Hillel, Sigma Alpha Mu
YUAN, Lilian
ZACHARIAS, Ernest L.
class  of '59
Bev Dallas, Homecoming Queen candidate
Page 131 school of
physical education
Two important events marked the year
1958—the tenth anniversary of the establishment of the School of P.E. at
U.B.C, and the offering of a Master of
Physical Education degree for the first
time in Canada. Social activities opened
with a very successful student-staff mixer
and this was followed by a Hard Times
dance, a ski trip to Mt. Baker, and a
volleyball jamboree. P.E. students also
organized the B.C. High School swim
meet and basketball tournament, and
refereed intramurals.
Dean R. Osborne
Homecoming candidate, Pat Power
P.E. Executive, Seated: J. Dennison, President P. Maclntyre.
H. Kent.    Standing: G. Doroschuk, S. Farrell, J. Buchanan,
E.  Boyd, H. Schindel.
Page 132 AIKEN, L. Wayne; Psychology;
Football Team, Big Block Club,
Kappa Sigma
BLACKABY, Robert W.; Psychology;
University Baptist Club
BUCHANAN, James A.; Rugby, U.S.C
Representative
CROSS, John A.; Psychology;
Rugby Coach
DENNISON, John D.; Psychology;
Rugby Coach, Newman Club; Vice-
Pres., P.E.U.S.
DOHM, Michael; Biology
DOROSCHUK, Glyndon;  Psychology;
Production Director of P.E.
DOWNING, Edward H.; Psychology
FARRELL, Shelagh; P.E.U.S. Executive
GRANT, Larrie A.; Math
HUDAK, John J.; History;
Rowing Club
JENNINGS, Douglas H.; Maih
Basketball
KENT, F. Holly; English;
Sec-Treas. of P.E.U.S.
KERR, Barry A.
McCALLUM, Heather; English,
Gymnastics
MacINTYRE, Peter W.; Geography;
Varsity Football, Rugby, Pres.
P.E.U.S., Beta Theta Pi
MAY, Gordon S.; Biology
Psychology; Beta Theta Pi
RICHARDSON, Patricia K.;
Geography, Manager Thunderettes,
Basketball, Manager of W.A.D.
SCHINDEL, Harley J.; Psych.
SCOTT, Sandra H.; Geography,
V.O.C, Sr. Intramural Mgr.
SHEARER, Elizabeth V; Psych.;
Tennis
SHORE, Donald J.; Physiology; Ski
Team, Rugby; Pres. Men's Athletic
Association
TUTTLE, Laurie W.; Biology;
Football, Rugby, Delta Upsilon
WALDIE, Jean V.; Skiing, Volleyball;
Pres., Women's Big Block Club
TOMLINSON, B. Jane; Psychology
VICKERY, Byron Lloyd; English;
Rugby
physical
education
£m£
Page 133 T^S^^^^^p
social work
An active year for the S.W.U.S. was
directed by President August Frauenfeld.
For the first time this Faculty participated in Homecoming festivities by entering both a queen candidate and a float
representing "The Old Woman Who
Lived in a Shoe." Part of the curriculum
of the Social Work Faculty was actual
case work with professional agencies.
Professor Dixon, Director of the School of Social Work.
President August Frauenfeld and executive
Page 134 I«|t4frte[*-
Homecoming  Candidate,  Debbie  Greenberg,   tours
the Armouries at Homecoming Pep meet.
Field work
Social Work Undergrads en masse
Page 135 social work
ALLISON, Barbara R.; Alpha
Gamma Delta
BARBERIE, Dorothy Joan; Alpha Phi
BARNES, Emery O.
CHATTERSON, Marlene
DAMM, Era B. M.
DAVIES, Edward L.
EPP, Edgar W.
ESAU, Ellen I.
EVANS, Marjorie G.
FRAUENFELD, August G.;
President, S.W. Society
FROMSON, Etaine; M.S.W.; Delta
Phi Epsilon, Delta Sigma Pi
FUNK, Elsie Anne; V.CF.
HANSEN, Joy Kristine
HICKS, Helga
JEWITT, Bernice L.
KOCH, Wolfram J.
LAMMER, Harvey M.
LAMQNT, Gwendy K.; Badminton,
Secretary of Alpha Phi
LENNIE, Doris C;  Alpha Gamma Delta
MacRAE, Rev. Robert D.;
Canterbury Club
MOORE, Beverlee A.
OSTERHOUT, Mrs. Constance E.
POOLE, Hope M.; Rep. to U.S.C
STEADMAN, Aletha A.; Badminton Club
TANABE, Patricia A.; Treasurer
Social Work Society
Page 136 TOMALTY, Shirley F.; V.CF.,
Sec. Social Work Society
WADE, Marion
WALLIS, Ian D.; Publicity
Chairman Social Work Society
WATSON, Eunice
WOZNEY, Margaret L.
class of '59 Dr. Woodhouse, Principal of Anglican Theological College.
theology
The Anglican and Union Colleges on
the campus are the homes and study halls
of students preparing for the ministry.
There has always been a close co-operation between the two Colleges both in
studies and midnight raids, and the two
groups of theologues met regularly for
discussion and for "friendly" games of
soccer.
J. Dingwoll, Chairman of Oratorical Contest, with winner G. Rumsey.
Anglican Soccer Team after a game with Union College.
Page 138 Theologue Orville Strong practices preaching.
Dr. Taylor, Principal of Union College, chats with
Archie Gaber.
Robert Scales, Glen Betts, Les Humphreys and Bob Dunsmore in
the throes of learning.
Page 139 faculty of
graduate studies
Master's degrees have been offered in
most Faculties for many years, but when
the Faculty of Graduate Studies was
established in 1949, there were only
three Departments sufficiently well-
equipped to offer courses towards a
Ph.D. Since then facilities have expanded
and graduate work is now carried on in
many other Departments. The Faculty of
Graduate Studies also includes degree
courses in Community & Regional Planning, a diploma course in Criminology,
an Institute of Fisheries, and the Institute of Oceanography.
Dean G. M. Shrum
U.B.C. PHOTO
Tom Croil, Ross Dey, and
Craig   Clark   erect   a   monster meccano.
Page 140 ABRAMS, Mabel H.; M.A.; English
DOWNING, Jean C; M.A.;
Community Sc Regional Planning;
Camera Club
KARPOWICS, Jadwiga; M.S.W.
MUTAMBIKWA, Jairus G.; M.A.;
Anthropology and Sociology;
A.M.S. Vice-President
PAPE, Siegfried W.; M.A.;
Community & Regional Planning
STEWART; Earl W.; M.A.;
Economics; Economics Society,
Camera Club
TODD, Mary E.; M.A.; Zoology;
Biology Club
WILES, Franklin A.; M.A.;
Economics and Geography
Another   English    100    essay    to
mark.
Tom Croil and Ross Dey in the
Unit Operations Lab.
Page 141  campus life . . . Behold our vast and glittering metropolis! Behold her life
and laughter, her wisdom and
folly, her spirit and liberty! Men
on the frontiers of experience
— learning, arguing, giving,
loving. Life conceived in registration, embryonic in orientation, born of initiation. Life
laughing with frosh trials, black
claws, mardi gras, parades. Life
giving with blood, buildings,
Springhill aid, dimes. Life lusty
with Engineers, complaints,
athletics, campaigns, campus
queens. Life creating with acting, composing, debating, arranging. Life wise with Ravens,
Elphinstones, symposiums, stu-
dent councils. Life foolish for
those who look for foolishness.
Life vivacious, vibrant, virile.
Life tried by exams, acquitted
by convocation. Life — part of
it by us, part of it in spite of
us, and all of it for us. U.B.C.
has not forgotten her precedence
of teaching men how to live . ..
Page 144 Modern architecture leads to modern thinking.
Page 145 Faculty advisor, Mr. Eliot, approves   student's program.
Registration fatigue begins.
Page 146
Frosh check courses and time-tables. REGISTRATION
1958
Throngs  elbow  through  Pressure   Row.
"Put your  feet  here and  smile!"
The endless line-ups and long hours
of waiting that characterize Registration Week are confusing to new students and tiresome to old ones, yet a
spirit of anticipation is evident among
the pushing crowds. A new year is
beginning and many still unknown
events will fill the days to come.
A student and his money are soon parted.
Page 147 Not  strictly  academic  exercise,  but  creating powerful  influence  in   one  direction or another!
Nothing like a little water to awaken Freshmen  to  life at U.B.C.
FROSH
ORIENTATION
Page 148 Agriculture   roughriders  educate  the  Freshettes.
Seven dances, a barbecue, a splash and dance party,
a fashion show, a banquet, a smoker, a football game,
a queen contest—thus the Frosh Orientation Program
introduced more than 1400 bumptious newcomers
to the superfluity of experience that is life at U. B. C.
Bewildered but eager Freshmen came through the
week with flying colours much the wiser for their
hazing and with a sadistic anticipation of the time
when they will be on the inside looking down!!
Big  and   Little  Sister  Banquet—one last  fling  with
adolescence.
Ahhhh!    The inspiration of the Seniors!
Page 149 ORIENTATION
President  MacKenzie  speaks  at  traditional  cairn  ceremony.
Splash and dance proved big success.
Aggie chicks woo Freshmen.
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Page 150 Gowned dignitaries make colorful spectacle.
SPECIAL CONGREGATION
In a Special Congregation on September 26, six Canadian
statesmen received honorary degrees from this University.
The colorful ceremony which marked U. B. C.'s Golden
Jubilee was held in conjunction with the opening of the
new Buchanan Building. Conferred by President MacKenzie, degrees were presented to the Rt. Hon. John G.
Diefenbaker, Prime Minister; Hon. Frank M. Ross, Lt.
Governor of B. C; Hon. W. A. C. Bennett, Premier of
B. C; Hon. Lester B. Pearson, Leader of the Opposition;
Hon. Brooke Claxton, President of Canada Council; and
M. J. Coldwell, Leader of the C. C. F.
Lt. Gov. Frank Ross walks with Chancellor A. E. Grauer.
Procession moves down Main Mall.
Page 151 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
Early October saw U. B. C.'s fourth annual Leadership Conference swing into high gear. The two-
day conference at Camp Elphinstone covered various
problems common to student leaders and faculty. A
relaxed atmosphere helped open the program discussions which included athletics, student apathy,
club problems, publications, communications, finance
and representative government.
Publications   group  deliberates   on  Ubyssey  problems.
Brad learns ins and outs of Leadership.
Dean Gunning leads informal discussion group.
Page 152 Sopron student  president  carries wreath  to War Memorial Gym.
HUNGARIAN
DEMONSTRATION
On October 23, 1956, thousands of young Hungarian men and women engaged in a bloody struggle
against Communist suppression in their homeland.
Now, two years later, U. B. C. realizes that her newfound colleagues have not forgotten their fight for
freedom.
Thoughts of another day.
«ss5£
Page 153 BLOOD DRIVE
►
The "Out for Blood" cry of the Red Cross
was once again answered by a multitude of
U. B. C. students. Anxious donors exchanged wisecracks and other morale
boosters while waiting their turn in the
Armouries which served as the Drive Headquarters. Inter-faculty, inter-fraternity and
inter-sorority competition sharpened the
spirit of the students and helped to make
the drive a success.
'Iffy              'Jy
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w
Nurses  ready   needles and  bottles  for student donors.
Information, please!
And you know—it didn't hurt a bitl
Page 154 CONVOCATION
More than a ceremony, more than a formal
piece of paper—graduation is a way of life
learned.   How well worth it all!
A large crowd views an impressive ceremony.
Honorary  degree  is  presented  to Dr.  J.   H.  Williams,
President MacKenzie, Lt. Col. E. Burns, and Chancellor Grauer chat
after the ceremony.
Page 155 HOMECOMING
Homecoming '58 was bigger and better than ever.
Thursday's Pep Rally, featuring the Happy Jesters,
started the festive mood for the weekend. Greeks
and faculties combined their efforts to make the
parade a success but, unfortunately, the well-attended
football game did not result in victory for the
Thunderbirds. Saturday night's Ball saw Engineering candidate Barb Wilkie crowned this year's
queen.
Here comes the Parade!
Pep band goes mobile.
Birds tried hard but lost to Central Washington Wildcats.
Page 156 Page 157 MARCH OF DIMES
Outnumbered  pubsters   bravely  take on  Red Shirts.
Thunderbird  backfielder Don  Vassos takes particular care  of his   charges.
I
Homewreckers in top form. And she's off and running!
U. B. C.'s annual female football fracas this year saw
the engineer-backed Nursing "Pan Handlers" hold
the Home Ec. "Homewreckers" to a 13-13 tie. Half
time entertainment was provided by beer guzzling
boat racers from Engineering, Aggies, Forestry and
Ubyssey—each team claiming a victory on technicalities.   Fun-making raised $700 for Hospital Fund.
Knobby-kneed   engineers   assist   nurses   in
cheer-leading duties.
Florence   Nightingales  to   the  rescue.
Page 159 EXAMS
Work periods become longer and coffee
breaks shorter as apprehensive students
cram for Christmas examinations. But the
interminable hours finally end, and weary
minds take respite till results are known.
Pens scratch in nerve-racking tension.
The outward serenity of the Library at Christmas gives no indication
of the frustrations within.
Page 160 ,V  -;
campus queens
Page 161 J/«
ontecomina
'ueen
Barbara   Wi(U
Jl
omecomint
L^ourt
Uichie  rCeichert
irlonica  oLoewi
(Lllamae Sharpe
Page 162
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Aoan   Cornell
f-'ennu   Ljaito
Page 163 Zrootbait
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oUonna   yet
Page 164 ^weetn
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Page 165  buildings  .    ...  ..   ■   ■-:
-■> .
"Despite its short life, the University is already a mixture of
the old and the new, and stately stone buildings vie with
those of modern design. For
many a student, however, a
shabby hut, a strange statue,
or even a bit of shaded lawn
presents a more memorable
picture of our campus.
Page 169 ■*~i
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L-Huts where English classes are still being held
In sharp contrast to the new Buchanan Building
are the many temporary buildings, chiefly converted
army huts, which were provided to accommodate the
influx of veterans after World War II. It had been
hoped that these shacks could be demolished as the
new buildings were opened, but the ever-increasing
enrollment has made it necessary to continue their
use.
The Biological   Sciences   Building   opened  in
1950.
Page 170 -    :
Early in 1940 the Brock Memorial Building was
dedicated to the memory of Dean and Mrs. R. W.
Brock, and in 1957 the Brock Extension was opened
by U.B.C.'s retiring Chancellor, the Honourable
Sherwood Lett. These buildings represent the centre
of student activity for they house the offices of the
Alma Mater Society and its growing number of subsidiary organizations.
The University Library is one of the original
buildings on the campus. The main part of this
beautiful building was completed in 1925, the north
wing was added in 1948, and work on the south wing
is expected to start this year. During the school
terms, students crowd around the huge tables in the
reading rooms; those doing more advanced work seek
the book stacks and study carrels.
Page 171 Another development in progress is the addition to
the Chemistry Building which is actually the oldest
building on the campus. Begun in 1914, its construction was interrupted by World War I and was not completed until 1925.
The new Faculty Club will replace the old frame
building which was in use for many years. Begun in the
fall, this structure has already assumed the shape of an
attractive modern building.
Page 172 The outside of the Auditorium
looks much the same to members of
the Class of '59 as it did to those graduating in '29. Inside, however, there
has been a startling transformation
with the colour scheme changing from
drab blue to brilliant red.
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Another of the original buildings,
the Administration Offices saw the
registration of the first students on the
present campus. An addition was
necessary after the war and space is
still insufficient for a University of
nearly 10,000.
The Fire Hall has changed but little
over the past thirty years. Fortunately
the Fire Department's work has been
mainly that of fire prevention, nevertheless the equipment has been kept
up-to-date and ready for any emergency. The trailer camp means heme to many of the married   couples   attending   university.
New faculty residences near Acadia Camp provide
modern living close to the University for many professors.
CAMPUS
RESIDENCES
Men's Residence on Marine Drive nears completion.
Page 174 The present women's residences —
the Mary Bollert, Anne Wesbrook and
Isabel Mclnnes Halls are intended primarily for first and second year students new to the campus. Acadia
Camp is the only university accommodation for senior students.
Anne   Wesbrook   Hall,   constructed   in   1950,   is   one
of   the   three   modern   women's   dormitories.
Fort Camp consists of converted army huts brought
to  the  campus   at   the  end   of   the  war.
Nearly 800 students live in the temporary dormitories known as Acadia
Camp and Fort Camp. No doubt
many will continue to do so despite
the construction of eight new residential units on Marine Drive which
should house approximately one hundred students each.
Page 175 Modern St. Mark's College with the
tower of Union College in the background creates an odd mixture of
architecture. St. Mark's College and
St. Andrew's Hall serve only as residences, while the older Union College
and Anglican College also offer degrees in theology.
For many years an old army hut
served as headquarters for the International Club. Much too small for the
number of students interested in the
organization, this shack has been recently superseded by a splendid new
structure.
Page 176
The new International House with
its attractive modern furnishings is
the centre for foreign students on the
campus. It is the first building to
be erected in Canada for this purpose
and much of the credit is due the
Rotary Club of Vancouver who donated a great deal towards the cost. The first gymnasium or what is now
the Women's Gym, was presented to
the University by the A.M.S. in 1929.
The Memorial Gymnasium was
built as the result of the student-
alumni campaign to honour the men
and women of B.C. who had served in
both wars. With its increased seating capacity and improved facilities,
it presents a big change from the
building of twenty years earlier.
Page 177 LANDMARKS
A most prominent landmark on the campus is
the high-diving tower. The open air swimming pool
with this diving tower was built for the British Empire Games of 1954 and afterwards donated to the
university. It is the only pool in Canada constructed
to Olympic specifications.
The stadium has long been a centre of interest
to sports fans. The first section of this structure,
comprising 1,600 seats was completed in 1937 and
served until the end of the war when an additional
2,000 seats were added. A television gondola suspended from the roof supports was a recent
acquisition.
Page 178 n
The Cairn
Looking north along Main Mall
The U.B.C. campus is made up of many beautiful scenes and monuments. Throughout the years
some of these, such as the cairn and lily pond, have
gradually become a traditional part of student life.
Others, however, despite their cultural or human interest have yet to be accepted as college symbols.
Statue of King George VI  sports Rooting Section At The Homecoming Game
Photo by Fred Schrack: first prize in the
Ben-Hill Tout competition.
Page 182 The importance of physical as
well as mental development is
exemplified in our extensive
athletic schedule. We are
proud of our sportsmen
whether they compete on university teams or in intramurals,
whether they are winners or
losers.
Page 183 Judy Dale, Dori Hodson, Jeri Wilson, Wendy Oates, Bonnie Engelbeen, Bonnie Galloway, and Mary-
Ann Elliott who, as Cheerleaders, kept spirits up no matter what the score.
Jim Moore—Cross Country
THEY EXCELLED
Bob Bagshaw—Swimming U.B.C. PHOTO
WEIGHTLIFTING
Don Ward demonstrates a cling and jerk
GYMNASTICS
Dieter  Weichert   executes   a   great   swing  on
the horizontal bars. Wayne Aitken, Halfback and Quarterback
THEY
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Roy Jokanovich, Tackle
Jack Henwood, Captain and Quarterback
EXCELLED
BASKETBALL
Ken Winslade, Guard
Norris Martin, Forward
Keith Hartley, Forward ..'■:'"     -' . •' i'
MEN'S
ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
Attending an M.A.A. meeting are: G. Castle, B. Phillips (Athletic Director), P.
Rolfe, G. Green, D. Shore, D. Stewart, D. Sturgess, B. Verchere, J. Goodwin, and
D. Sturgess.
The Men's Athletic Association is
composed of the managers from each
of the 22 men's sports teams as well
as representatives from those organizations closely connected with campus
athletics. Under President Don Shore,
it was the M.A.A.'s task to correlate
all sports activities both intramural
and extramural.
BIG
BLOCK
CLUB
The Big Block Club presents
awards to athletes who are outstanding in their particular
sport. At the beginning of the
session, this group sold "A"
cards and held a stag in order to
introduce Freshmen to the
coaches and captains of all the
university teams. Each spring
the Club has a banquet for its
award winners.
Men's Big Block Club — Front Row: B. Drummond, D. McLure, T. Dubberley, D. Huntley, J. Henwood, D. Howard. I. Stewart, R. Phelps, A. Jagdeo. Second Row: B. McKerlich, B. Allardyce, B. Wilson, G. Hoar, D. Vassos, T. Trevor-Smith, P. Sloan, D. Arnold, J. Burnett, D. Weichert. Third Row:
V. Warren, G. McGavin. D. Main. T. Hunt, E. Pederson, N. Martin, D. Milne, T. Lewis. Fourth Row:
G. Puder. P. Dohm. B. Verchere. W. Aitken, P. Bugg. B. Crawford, F. Sealey, L. Loomer, D. Shore,
L. Levy. ■E^l
A   large   crowd   watches   U.B.C.   Thunderbirds   play   Central
Washington in Homecoming game.
Laurie  Tuttle  walks  off-field   during  a  Homecoming  smoke
bomb break.
FOOTBALL
Back Row: G. McRae, P. Plummer, J. Hudak, G. Bruce, J. Henwood (captain), B. Cherpeta, R. Towers, D. Vassos, G. Hoar. Middle
Row: J. Dang (manager), D. Argue, D. Knight, B. Turpin, G. Turpin, B. Homola, W. Aiken, D. Fromson, L. Tuttle, R. Jokanovich,
B. Crawford, P. Donald, J. Mountain (Ass't. Manager). Front Row: F. Gnup (coach), G. Home, R. Mayberry, A. Bianco, D. Barker,
W. Osborne, F. Baillie, R. Bianco, D. McNamee, J. Barberie, M. Hughes, D. Sturrock, B. Hindmarch (Ass't. Coach). Missing: J. Beck,
P. Mclntyre.
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ft % This year the Thunderbirds' participation in the Evergreen Conference consisted of four exhibition games against
College of Puget Sound, Whitworth,
Western Washington and Central Washington. Games against Southern Oregon
College, Victoria Drakes, and Oregon
Central College of Education completed
the schedule. The year proved to be one
of U.B.C.'s most successful resulting in
more wins and closer scores.
On the bench — waiting!
U.B.C's passing attack and powerful running offence helped defeat Oregon College.
Page  189 The second half begins in the game against Central
Washington in which U.B.C. leads in everything but
the scoring
Coach Frank Gnup briefs Frank Baillie and Don McNamee prior to the Whitworth College
game.
Pre-game  coaching  proved  almost  successful   for  the  Birds   lost   to  the  Seattle   Ramblers by just 27-2 5. U.B.C.   Thunderbirds   are   defeated   by   Whitworth   College 29-7.
Central    Washington   Wildcats   win    3 5-14
despite Thunderbirds' outstanding play.
Oregon College of Education Wolves lose
47-26 with Don Vassos scoring his eleventh
touchdown of the season.
\\JKJ      -
**?4$* Four without cox: J. Madden, D. McClure, M. Turnbull, and G. Smith   (stroke).
Tom Biln, cox, is dunked — an old tradition. ROWING
U.B.C. oarsmen under coach John
Warren made a clean sweep at the Canadian trials in St. Catherines. Later at
the British Empire & Commonwealth
Games in Wales, the eight-oared crew
brought Canada its only gold medal by
scoring a smashing victory over other
contestants. The Fours with Cox and
the Fours without Cox, after scoring
convincing wins in the preliminary
rounds, placed second in each of these
races and won silver medals.
Lome Loomer (captain) stroked the eight-oared crew in Wales.
The eight-oared crew: B. Wilson, D.
Helliwell, A. MacKinnon, B. McKer-
lich, W. d'Hondt, G. Mervyn, W.
Pretty, D. Arnold. Kneeling: J. Warren, and T. Biln (cox). U.B.C. was host to the Pacific Northwest Cross County Meet in November and
placed third in the final standings.
Jack   Burnett   and   Jim   Moore   outrun
Washington sprinter.
CROSS COUNTRY AND TRACK
Out-running  some  of  the  best   runners  in   the  Northwest,  Jim   Moore   (242)
placed first.
£*.**> *N p.
CRICKET
U.B.C.'s Cricket Team
GOLF
Each year golf becomes more
popular on the U.B.C. campus
and the Golf Team is chosen
from the top six competitors in
the 72-hole University Open
Tournament. This team, with
Gary Puder as manager, enjoyed
a most successful season in
Evergreen Conference tournaments. Next year it will entet
into competition with the
prairie universities.
During the past few years, standard
of play and interest in cricket have
both shown a marked improvement.
Last summer, the U.B.C. Cricket Team
entered a tournament with other British Columbia teams, and early in September, led by Captain Roland Bishop,
won the Fyfe-Smith Shield.
GOLF TEAM: Ron Barr, Bill Adamson, Art Pullman, Chan Buckland, Grieg Candlish, and Gary Puder. SOCCER TEAM-BACK ROW: F. Kuruc (coach), F. Harrop, B. Knagg, M. Lessey, J. Alexis, F. Assoon,
J. Morris (manager). MIDDLE ROW: H. Schyndell, F. Sealy (captain), B. Elliott. FRONT ROW:
B. Wedley, B. Dempsey, J. Isberg, T. Tutti, K. Watson.
SOCCER
Captain Frank Sealy ready to side kick ball to
team mate. Goalie John Isberg stops the ball in a
Saturday afternoon game at the University.
Soccer is another sport in which
U.B.C. competes against Vancouver
and District teams, and this year Varsity was most successful in having its
team win top position in the League.
In connection with the International
series started in 1956, the U.B.C. Soccer team travelled to California last
November to play and win exhibition
games against the University of California.
Page 197 RUGBY Rugby is one of the most popular and most successful
sports on the campus, and U.B.C. supports three teams
which play in the Vancouver and District rugby league.
The teams played well against such famed international
teams as the New Zealand All Blacks, the Australian Wallabies, and the British Barbarians, and in a home-and-home
series with the University of California, the Thunderbirds
won the World Cup.
U.B.C. RUGBY PLAYERS-STANDING: D. Milne, A. Laithw*ite (coach), M. Chambers. P. Willis,
G. McGavin, N. Henderson. J. Phillips, P. Rugg, A. Preston, J. Insley (mgr.); KNEELING: B. McKee,
C. Sam, D. Macintosh, B. Allardyce, T. Hunt, J. Hudak, J. McDonald.
Page 199 SWIMMING  TEAM-BACK  ROW:   T.  Morrison,  G.  Gilchrist, D.  Main,  D. Creed, B. Bagshaw, J. Hamilton, J: Rennie, C Campbell, D. Gillanders,
B. Cowie  (manager). MIDDLE ROW: E. Berno, M. Lemieux, L. Ashbaugh, P. Pellatt, A. Swanzey. FRONT ROW:  N. Tribe, K.  Roller.
SWIMMING
Page 200 Swimmers have their speed checked.
Swimming holds the unique position
of being the only sport in which U.B.C
completely outshines its Evergreen Conference Competition. Ken Doolan, Pete
Pellatt, Ernie Berno and Bob Bagshaw
were the nucleus of the Thunderbird
Swim Team, 1958 Evergreen Conference
champions, and coach Peter Luztig was
pleased with the number of newcomers
on this year's team.
Bob Bagshaw practices starts.
Thursday afternoon practice at Crystal Pool.
Page 201 FENCING
H. Grueninger, J. Wood row, and J. Shene at a practice in the Field House.
The Fencing Club is open to all men
and women who are interested in the
skillful and fascinating art of fencing,
and during the past three years the membership has almost doubled in size. Many
Pacific Northwest as well as B. C. champions are products of this group which
is so ably coached by Paul Burckhardt.
Page 202 BADMINTON
The U. B. C. Badminton team continued their high standard of play that
last year won them the B. C. championship. Besides finishing high in the Vancouver Badminton League, they provided
stiff competition for many of the top
players from Vancouver, Victoria, and
Seattle during the Rackets Club Centennial Tournament and came close to defeating the previous Canadian champions.
Art   Yeske plays  a  fast-moving,  hard-hitting  game
Bruce Forsyth reaches for a back-hand shot
Page 203 Joe   Marchand   specializes   in   rings,   free   calisthenics
and   tumbling.
Dieter  Weichert,  the  Team's  most  outstanding  all-
round point winner
GYMNASTICS
Opening another very promising season in gymnastics, the U.B.C. Gym Team attended the three-
way Washington State meet. Edged out of top score
by Washington State College, U.B.C. placed second.
This was the first of many competitions, the final
winners of the series being eligible to enter the Pan-
American games in Chicago.
Mike Grant  demonstrates a bent arm lever
Page 204 WEIGHTLIFTING
The Weightlifting Team has more
than held its own in any of the competitions it has entered with either
Evergreen Colleges or Vancouver
Clubs. Amongst its members who
have turned in outstanding performances are Wes Woo, present holder of
Canadian and B.C. records in his age
group, and Bruce Kinghorn and Don
Ward, two of the best weight-lifters
U.B.C. has ever had.
Two of U.B.C.'s strong men
Glynn Searl performs a difficult squat snatch
It takes plenty of strength to lift this—Bob Gayton and Rod
Hanson are the lifters.
Page 205 ICE HOCKEY
The Hockey set-up was different this
year from in the past. Twenty intramural
teams were formed in the fall, and the
Varsity team was not organized until the
second term. This team was coached by
Dick Mitchell and practised each week in
the Kerrisdale Arena in preparation for
the Hamber Cup series which was played
in Edmonton in March.
Fast skating Archie Gaber
Four outstanding varsity
players: A. Gaber, C. Singh,
B. Cherpeta, and D. Crane. Varsity Grasshockey Team — Kneeling: J. Young, K. Sandhu, L. Clarke, G. Forward (captain), E. Andrew. Standing: J. Davidson (coach), N. Forward, D. Huntley, V. Warren,
R.  Lees, S. Qadri, and Dr. M. F. McGregor   (coach).
GRASSHOCKEY
The three U.B.C. grass-hockey divisions played every Saturday afternoon
both fall and spring. Though inexperienced at first, under Dr. Malcolm
McGregor's coaching they proved
themselves both fast and capable by
the end of the season. The goal in
league competition was the O. B.
Allan cup which U.B.C. has twice won
as B. C. champions.
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Varsity practises for a Saturday game
Centres take a bully within the free circle
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Ray Ostby,  Harvey Abel, and Al Fisher (coach)  at Banff meet
Mt. Norquay chair lift, Banff
The UIB.C. team took second place
at Rossland and Wenatchee but dropped to third at Banff. At each meet
the Alpine team won the combined
downhill and slalom, and the Nordic
team came either first or second in
the cross country but was less successful in the jumping.
Page 208
Dick Thorpe in the downhill event CURLING
Members of the Pomeroy rink: C. Pomeroy, D. Stewart, I. Heslop, and A. Paul.
A rink skipped by Jack Arnet won the right
to represent U.B.C. at the Inter-Collegiate Bonspiel
held in Edmonton in March. Six teams entered the
play-down with the final game being played between
the rinks skipped by Jack Arnet and Cyril Pomeroy.
This is the first year that U.B.C. has entered in the
Collegiate Bonspiel.
Less  than  three  years on  the  campus,  curling  has  become  a
most popular sport
A Sunday practice at Pacific Curling Rink
Page 209 BASKETBALL
Page 210
Young and old tangled at the annual Homecoming game when the grads
returned to play the Varsity team. 1958-59 was the most successful season the U.B.C. Thunderbirds have had
for many years. The final score of their
most thrilling game showed that they had
lost by just two points to the squad representing Canada in the 1959 World Basketball Tournament. In Evergreen Conference exhibition games their record
was five won and five lost with the final
games to be played later in the South.
Ed Pedersen demonstrates guard position
BASKETBALL THUNDERBIRDS-FRONT: G. Jackson (trainer), A. Erasmus (manager), K. Wins-
lade, T. English, B. McDonald, D. McCallum, W. Knight (manager). BACK: D. Treleaven, E. Pedersen, B. Drummond, W. Osborne, E. Gushue, N. Martin, J. Pomfret (coach). Missing: D. Dumaresq, K.
Hartley.
Page 211 U.B.C. and the College of Puget Sound each won a game in their January
encounter.
The famed Harlem Globetrotters pleased capacity crowds—the score was as expected.
Page 212 Barry Drummond in game against Seattle Buchans
The Birds won the Homecoming game with Norris
Martin as their top scorer.
In November the Seattle Buchans defeated U.B.C. twice and proved to be
the year's toughest opposition.
Page 213 Four of U.B.C's tennis aces:  B. Schutz, G. Bentley, P. MacPherson, and W. Forster.
TENNIS
Tennis is another sport in which our university
excels, and in five out of the past six years, U.B.C.
has captured the Evergreen Conference men's doubles title. This year, under coach Jack Milledge and
manager Pete MacPherson, the team entered in two
indoor tournaments as well as those with Washington and Oregon colleges.
Pete MacPherson jumps for the ball
George Bentley plays the net after a served ball. Intramural  swimming  finals for  the individual events and for  the free   style and
medley relays were held at the Empire Pool.
INTRAMURALS
Men's   Intramurals   sponsored   mixed   as   well   as
men's bowling.
Doreen Evans and Bob Bagshaw check times and
plactngs during the swim
meet. Basketball is one of the most active Intramural sports on the campus. The
competitive schedule started early in January with noon hour games in the Memorial
Gym.
Intramural Cross Country—Varsity Outdoor Club, Forestry, and the Ramblers were the
top three teams in the meet held last November.
Page 216 INTRAMURALS
U.B.C. has one of the most comprehensive campus-
confined athletic programs in Canada. Fraternities,
Residences, Faculties, and the majority of clubs enter
teams in this intramural program and more than
3,000 men and 800 women participate annually in
twenty sports. These sports include swimming, volleyball, tennis, bowling, ping pong, cross country, golf,
touch football, badminton, basketball, soccer, boxing, wrestling, track and field, and skiing. Points
given for each win and each championship go to
form an aggregate team champion at the end of
the year.
Soccer
Volleyball
Ping Pong
Page 217 At a    weekly W.A.D. meeting are, seated: M. Peterson, L. Boyd,  S.  Simpson,  S.   Shakespeare, B.   Richardson,  I.  Ogle,  M.
McLachlan, T. Carroll, M. Baker, S. Scott, J. Waldie. Standing: P. Richardson, F. McLeod, A. Ede, P. Pollock, J. Burgett.
WOMENS ATHLETIC
DIRECTORATE
It is W.A.D.'s function to organize
and co-ordinate both intramural and
extramural womens' sports. It consists of the managers of all teams on
the campus, and this year the executive included of Theo Carroll, President; Marg McLachlan, Vice-President;
and Margaret Baker, Secretary.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
The Women's Big Block Club, unlike the Men's Society, is not a service
club. It is set up in the form of an
honorary club whose function is primarily social, and is made up of Big
Block and Small Block Award winners.
Page 218
J. Waldie, M. Peterson, S. Fenton, S. Shakespeare, P. Power, and H. Walker attend
a Big Block Club meeting. GYMNASTICS
Hard working gymnasts are Judy Bisson, Jean Burgett, Judy Gowing, Pam
Thomas, and Kay Baker.
The U.B.C. Women's Gymnastics
team spent many hours of patient
practice preparing for outside competition. During its second year on the
campus, this team competed mostly
with teams from Washington colleges.
Practising a post
Somebody slipped!
Page 219 Boys' Rules Basketball Team members: H. Walker, J. Symons, P. Power, A. Lindsay, M. Mac-
Vey, S. Crawford, G. Leitner, M. Peterson, L. Boyd, P. Dalzell, P. Richardson (manager)., and
Coach Mearnie Summers — plus Snoopie, the mascot.
Page 220
Marilyn  Peterson  watches  Sylvia  Crawford  score  a
basket. BOYS'   RULES
BASKETBALL
The U.B.C. Thunderettes, with Miss
Mearnie Summers as coach, practiced twice
weekly during the year and played their
games each Wednesday night. The Senior
A team competed against teams in the Vancouver Senior A and Senior B Leagues, and
early in February entered the B. C. championships from which the winner went to
Calgary to compete in the Canadian championships.
A tense moment as Heather Walker shoots the ball
A  jump ball   for   Pat  Power and
Sylvia Crawford.
Page 221 Action abounds during this game with Crofton House
GIRLS' RULES
BASKETBALL
The two teams of Girls' Rules Basketball, coached by Mrs. Penny, enjoyed a very successful 1958-59 season. In regular competition both
teams played a series of games against
York House and Crofton House
Schools.
Jean Shilvock sinks a shot over the head of her opponent
Page 222 VOLLEYBALL
Both girls' volleyball teams, under
the able coaching of Miss Helen Eckert, have participated in several
tournaments with the Washington
colleges, and the first team has won
all its games. As contending B. C.
champions, this team has a very good
chance of going to Montreal in April
to compete in the try-outs for the
Pan-American games.
Heather Muir executes a powerful back tip-off during a practice session.
Volleyball Team—Standing: Miss H. Eckert, coach, M. Koehn, J. Elderkin, D. Walsh, S. Weeks, R. Freudenstein, F. MacLeod, manager. Kneeling: D. Clements, D. Fraser, I. Oglesby, J. Waldie, M. Crowley, V. Clemens, H. Muir. Missing: J.
de Vette.
Page 223 VARSITY TEAM-S. Simpson, A. Gourlay, P. Pollock, D.  Lewis, H. Charlton, S.
Lewis, A.  Swan,  S. Clark, L. Shekury, M. Peterson, B. Lindberg.
U.B.C. TEAM — C. Greene, R. Statfeldt, V. Husband, D. Hunt, K. Boyd, K. Baker, G. Stott,
B. Hay, J. Wilson. Missing: M Buker, E Taylor.
Page 224 ,.
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A tense moment during an exciting game.
GRASSHOCKEY
Miss B. Schrodt coached two grasshockey teams
which entered the Vancouver Women's Grasshockey
League. "Varsity" was victorious at the Northwest
Hockey Conference in Seattle, and "U.B.C." defeated
teams from the University of Washington and Western Washington College of Education. Besides competitions, the girls staged a rummage sale and a
raffle in order to raise money to send the Canadian
grasshockey team to Holland.
Ann Swan, goalie, clears the ball
U.B.C. team at noon hour practice. BADMINTON
Three women's badminton teams,
coached by Miss Tilley, entered various Vancouver League matches. Successful in the B League tournament
were S. Shakespeare and M. McFarlane
and L. MacDougall and D. Semadeni,
while strong mixed combinations
made it possible to down last year's
league winners.
A difficult shot gracefully executed by Lynne MacDougall
The birdie takes a beating!
Sidney Shakespeare places a shot GOLF
For the third consecutive year, a
women's Golf Team was organized
at U.B.C, and during both terms the
girls met for weekly practice sessions
in the fieldhouse. During the spring
the team enjoyed many games on the
University course, and at the end of
March played against the ladies of local clubs.
Miss K. Duff-Stuart demonstrates correct form to V. Con, W. Bennett, S. Simpson,
E. Bailey, and J. McKee.
These three would-be "Robins" are E. Palmer, C Swain, and R. Matsushita.
ARCHERY
Organized late in the year,
the Archery Team had a
short but fun-filled season.
This small group of enthusiastic archers, with Miss A.
Tilley as coach and Mary
Fraser as manager, practised
in the field house or hockey
field regularly each week and
competed against a team of
Greenwood archers. SPEED SWIMMING
A variety of meets with American
and Canadian colleges provided lively
competition for team members this
year. In the Canadian Intercollegiate
Telegraphic Swim Meet held last November, U.B.C.'s team placed first followed by Queen's and then McGill.
Irene Service, , Carole Youn? and Linda
Shier won their events as did the Medley and Free-style Relay Teams.
Team Members — Standing:  I.  Service, M.  Peebles, J.  Bisson.
Sitting: L. Shier, V. Grant, M. Murray, L. Murray.
Mickey Murray, Lynn Murray, Linda Shier and Virginia Grant
race at the Crystal Pool.
Linda Shier heads for shore.
Page 228 Synchronized Swimming Team: A. Brown, E. Baynes, P. Rogers, P. Butting, J. Isberg, N. Van der Gast,
C. McGregor, J. Neily, H. Smith, P. Oldham, B. Stevens, P. Young, B. Campbell  (manager).
SYNCHRONIZED
SWIMMING
Under the direction of Coach Mrs.
Noel Morrow, the girls practised
synchronized swimming in time to appropriate musical selections. Single,
duet and team routines were perfected
in preparation for the B. C. championships.
Precision as well as top-notch swimming are required for these
difficult   routines. TENNIS
The six members and two spares
of the women's Tennis Team practised twice a week in the field house
under the supervision of manager Isabel Ogle and coach Jack Milledge.
Throughout the year matches were
held with city clubs and a trip to Eugene was planned for the end of the
season. The team expected to enter
the B.C. Junior Indoor Tournament
for the first time, and it was hoped
this would become an annual event.
Caroline Kerr ready for a back-hand stroke.
Coach Jack Milledge with A. Davies, C
Kerr, I. Ogle, C Stuhrman, and L.
Shearer.
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E. Woods, B. Bengough, S. Clift, D.
Chalmers, and D. Mackie round the
track on a wind sprint.
TRACK
Emphasis on track began after Christmas when
the girls began to concentrate on training for the
provincial championships to be held in May. In adT
dition the girls participated in time trials with V.
O. C, and met in competition with the Optimist
Club. Ten girls, under the coaching of Di Matheson,
took part in U.B.C. events.
E.   Woods   takes   a  hurdle   while   D.   Chalmers,   D.
Mackie and S. Clift practise starts.
B. Bengough throws the discus while S. Clift aims
a  shot-put.
Page 231 CURLING
Margo McQueen managed the two
women's Curling Teams for 1958-59,
and Zulette London and Ruthann
Senz were skips. Practices were held
on Saturday afternoons at the Pacific
Rink and, although the teams did not
enter any cup competitions, they
played several times against the Capi-
lano team.
J.  Steward  and M.  McQueen  watch Z.   London  and  R.  Senz check
distances.
FENCING
1958-59 marked the first year for
women's fencing on the U.B.C. campus. The girls practised twice each
week to train for provincial championships, and they were also members
of the mixed fencing club.
Coach  Paul Burckhardt  points  out fencing tactics.
Page 232 And away they go!   Education won the Intramural Swim Meet
*****
INTRAMURALS
*S2*
An extensive program of intramural activities provides an opportunity for all women students to participate in a wide variety of sports. Organized by W.A.D., this program arranges group and individual competition in an effort to create interest in
both team and single play.
■3
Intramural Ping-Pong with Janice Gibson and Patti-Ann Dunsmuir representing A.D.Pi.
Page 233 Phys. Ed. jumps for the ball
Intramural Volleyball was played
during noon hours throughout the fall
in the Women's Gym. When all playoffs had been completed, Physical Ed.
Team 2 emerged victorious over
A.DPi.
Sharon Durham of A.D.Pi returns a service
The Intramural Bowling tournament was held Tuesdays and Thursdays during November at the Varsity
Alleys. From the thirty teams entered, Phys. Ed. Team 1 and Acadia
Team 1 reached the finals with Phys.
Ed. emerging the victors.
Marilyn Taylor aims for a strike while Maureen Thompson watches. Many enthusiastic girls passed their
January lunch hours with lively games
of basketball. These intramural
teams represented clubs, faculties, and
sororities, and both the girls' rules and
boys' rules sections were entered.
Alpha Gamma Delta plays Phrateres
Badminton intramurals began in
January with more teams than ever
before entered in both singles and
doubles competitions.
Not quite high enough!
Delta Gammas, alert and ready!
Page 235  fine arts Franz Carius: Two Men And Storm
Page 238 The wide variety of programs
on this year's agenda of cultural events fostered an appreciation and enjoyment of art,
music and drama. Many of
Vancouver's visiting artists
gave freely of their talent at
noon hour lectures and concerts.
Page 239 SPECIAL EVENTS
Special Events Committee: Charles Lancaster, Edward Aho, Dave Sproule, and Mike
Jeffery, chairman.
Again this year the Special Events
Committee continued to bring noted
singers, musicians, and speakers to the
University campus. "Noon Hour" programs featured these famous artists, and
appreciative students crowded the Auditorium to hear many outstanding presentations. James Laver of the Victoria &
Albert Museum, the English humourist
Stephen Potter, the noted poet Langston
Hughes, and the Gateway Singers, as well
as those pictured in the following pages,
were a few of the entertainers who visited the university.
Eleanor Collins, Vancouver singing
star, sang the blues and negro spirituals
with an unusual depth of feeling. It is
her hope to further the understanding for
her people by taking the blues and putting them on a higher level.
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Page 240 "Music 201"—Dave Pepper and the Chris Gage Trio were broadcast over
U. B.  C.  Radio every Monday morning during the fall term.
Irwin  Hoffman   conducts   a   rehearsal   of
the Vancouver  Symphony  Orchestra.
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Page 241 Lloyd Powell, former professor of
pianoforte at the Royal College of
Music, London, was guest at one of
the Department of Music's regular
series of concerts devoted to concertos for various instruments.
Jose Iturbi played to an enthusiastic
audience one noon hour in the hope
that his performance would encourage
the appreciation of good music. Visiting the University with him was
Carraccucas, his Korean Palace hound.
Page 242 Pete Seeger sings "Wim-o-Way"
Equally at home on the concert
stage and in the night club, Pete
Seeger presented an interesting program of folk music from all parts of
the world.
Rod  Smith   and his guitar
Karheinz Stockhausen belongs to the
small but immensely important group
of continental composers who are exploring the possibilities of electronic
music.
Page 243 Madame Tore Segelcke, an outstanding member of the National
Theatre in Oslo, chose a brilliant program depicting scenes from "Peer
Gynt," "MacBeth" and "Media" —
performances for which she is justly
famous.
Marianne Moore, the distinguished
American poet, opened the year's program by giving an inspired reading of
her own works, selections from which
are included in every major anthology. "Is America Facing World Leadership?" was the topic chosen by Mrs.
Eleanor Roosevelt when she addressed
U. B. C. students. During her visit
to the campus, this internationally
known humanitarian officially opened
Canada's first International House.
PHOTO BY LOTTE JACOBI
Associate Curator of the American
Museum of Natural History and Professor at Columbia University, Dr.
Margaret Mead is a leading authority
on South Seas anthropology. Whether
technical or popular, her many books
on this subject have been both informative and persuasive.
Page 243 DRAMA
Five of the play's six characters meet in an English country garden.
MRS. WARRENS PROFESSION
Bernard Shaw's controversial play Mrs.
Warren's Profession was revived last fall
by the Freddy Wood Theatre. Joyce So-
bell played Mrs. Warren who refused to
earn her living by rag-picking or flower-
selling, while Shirley Broderick appeared
as the daughter who so strongly disapproved of her mother's chosen profession.
Page 246
Vivie's office Closing scene of "The Birds"
U.B.C.  PHOTO
THE BIRDS
Not only were the words of this classical Greek play transposed into modern
idiomatic English, so too were the setting, costumes, and style of acting translated into a modern theatrical idiom. Thus
the extravagance and exuberance of
Aristophanes' comic spirit were communicated to a twentieth century audience.
Natalie Veiner as Choragos
Page 247 Fine Arts Gallery in U. B. C. Library
ART
THE
HAMMER BROTHERS
COLLECTION
"Infant    Moses    Stepping    on    Pharaoh's
Crown" by Aert de Gelder.
Van Dyck's  "Charles  I of England" The Art Gallery exhibited paintings and sketches by Paul Kane
dene on his trip to the Pacific coast in the 1840's.
PAINTERS ELEVEN
This Ontario group includes Harold
Town, Tom Hodgson, Ray Mead, Oscar
Cahen, Hortense Gordon, Alexandra
Luke, Jack Bush, Kazus Nakamura, Jock
Macdonald and William Yarwood.
Paintings of various members have been
called "overpowering," "pleasing," and
"dynamic."
Tom Hodgson: "Autumn Leaves"
Jock MacDonald: "Primeval Fire
Page 249 -i
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ARTIST/TEACHERS
IN B. C.
"Waiting   Figures"—J.   A.   S.   MacDonald
"Marsh   Bird"—Charles  Stegeman
"The Gap"—Fred Amess
Page 250 Rounthwaite & Fairfield received
the Gold Medal for their design of the
Stratford Festival Theatre, Stratford,
Ont. This permanent building incorporated the existing circular amphitheatre and open stage which presented new problems in auditorium
design.
STRATFORD   FESTIVAL THEATRE
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ARCHITECTURE   -   MASSEY MEDALS
Rother, Bland & Trudeau were
awarded the Silver Medal for the Ottawa City Hall, Ottawa, Ont. This
building consists of an eight-story administrative block and a three-story
executive block; it is steel frame structure on a reinforced concrete base and
is clad in limestone,   aluminum   and
OTTAWA CITY HALL
Page 251 "Asiatic Head" by Otto Fischer-Credo
Page 232
SCULPTURE
An open air exhibition of sculpture
was held at the University during the
summer by members of the B. C. region of the Northwest Institute of
Sculpture. Since the formation of this
group in 1955, sculpture has become a
major art form in this province, with
emphasis being placed on a greater use
of sculpture in architecture.
"Madonna   of  the Cedars"
Carlsen.
by Alfred E Besides the organized displays and
exhibitions of painting, architecture,
and sculpture, there are many unexplored corners on the campus which
provide unexpected and interesting
works of art.
Lionel Thomas' emblem for St. Mark's College.
Construction pipes are seen from a different point of view in Norm Pearson's
unusual photograph which won second
prize  in  the   Ben-Hill Tout  competition.  organizations Clubs' Day: Eighty-Four Clubs To Choose From
Page 256 Education is not just the lecture room or laboratory, it is
also the campus organization
which encourages special interests and abilities. Through
such organizations we learn of
leadership and co - operation;
here friendships are gained, experiences broadened.
Page 257 UNIVERSITY
CLUBS'
COMMITTEE
University Clubs' Committee is
composed of members from each of
the eighty-four clubs on the campus
and is their representative on Students'
Council. Again this year U.C.C. sponsored a Student Training Program designed to help train future leaders.
Clubs' Day in the Armouries
U.C.C.  Executive—Standing:  H.  Smith,  D.  Edgar,  B.   Small,  T.  Head.  Seated:   P.   Ryan,  D.
Brown. Missing: R. Brink.
Page 258 CHINESE VARSITY SOCIETY
Makings of the float.
The promotion of social and cultural
activities among the Chinese students on
the campus is the purpose of the Chinese
Varsity Club. This year, with Alfred
Chan, as president, the Club reached a
membership of 140 and took part in
many college activities. The Tri-City
Basketball Game and the Tinpan Alley
party were two of its most outstanding
events.
The finished product.
L.  Chow and  J.  Lowe  undergo an  unusual frosh initiation.
Proud leaders CAMERA CLUB
Bill Barchard, President
Improvements to facilities, high quality equipment, and a large active membership have combined to make the Club
a success. With professional guidance,
prize-winning photographs have been
entered by members in both the Club
competition and the Ben Hill-Tout Salon.
Vancouver's 9 o'clock gun—a prize-winning photograph Make-up
MODELLING
This year a Modelling group, under
the sponsorship of the Camera Club, was
organized to give campus girls training
in make-up and fashion modelling.
Downtown establishments were always
ready to supply professional help.
Pat Kirstuik poses for the Camera Club
Adjusting lights
Page 261 Splicing, sound recording, and editing.
FILMSOC
With Carl Christiansen as president,
members of Filmsoc learned many of the
processes involved in producing a motion picture including splicing, sound
recording and editing. They also planned
advertising layouts for coming shows,
sponsored feature films twice a week,
and set up special class movies. Filmsoc
was always available to show any campus
organization how to run a projector.
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Bub Bennett, Don Barclay, and Don Malnii busy with
advertising layouts.
Page 262
Lights! Camera! Action! Reg Beck busy with Thursday's broadcast
HAMSOC
The purpose of the Amateur Radio
Society is to promote an interest in radio
communication. With ham radios the
Club has contacted radio operators in 68
countries and relayed messages to families and friends of students. The inter-
university network, consisting entirely of
Canadian university stations, has been
used in valuable ways by many campus
organizations.
Complications
Hamsoc Executive, Seated: C. Westphal,
J. Oades, R. Beck. Standing: President R.
Roadhouse, B. Irving, B. Hanson, J. Quail. Now to begin another!
Mamooks is the club responsible
for the multitude of signs advertising
campus activities. Anyone who has
the talent and the desire to participate
in this invaluable service is offered
professional instruction in the basic
art processes or in the more advanced
air brush technique and silk screen
printing.
Artistry in motion
A smiling victim for Mamooks
Page 264 U.B.C. RADIO SOCIETY
Al Simmons cues the next record for a broadcast.
This year Radsoc, or more formally
U.B.C. Radio Society, extended and improved their services to the campus. Special news features, visiting speakers, and
classical music were included in the
daily programs which lasted from nine
to four in Brock Hall. Once a week Radsoc broadcasted for thirteen stations
throughout British Columbia, and also
supplied music for many university
dances.
Byron   Fish,   Bill    Rodgers,   Ron   Reusch,   and
Daryl Dikenson use the teletype machine.
Radsoc's increasing collection of records.
Page 265 INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
An active club on campus, International House aims to promote friendship and understanding among the peoples of the world. Besides their grand
ball at the Commodore, International
House members held an international
fair emphasizing folk music and dancing
as well as fine art displays. With the
new club house completed this year, it is
hoped that more foreign students will
have the opportunity to meet those from
all parts of Canada.
President Peter St. John holds the I.H.A. motto.
The new International House situated on Marine Drive at the West Mall.
Page 266 An   informal   gathering  in   the  lunch   and
recreational room.
Elmer    Hara,    past    president,
moving into the new house.
supervises
The   modern   lounge   of   the   new   International
House. NISEI
VARSITY
CLUB
The Nisei Varsity Club does much to
promote inter-racial friendship on the
U.B.C. campus. Lectures provided a serious educational side to Club activities,
while many pleasant social events took
place between Nisei's Frosh Reception
and its Graduation Banquet.
Dorothy Maede, Hiroko Haya, and Yoneko Sakata cut the cake
for Nisei Varsity Frosh Reception.
INDIA
STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Membership in the India Students' Association increased again during the
1958-59 season. Under its president, B.
S. Jwanda, the Club served as the campus
centre for East Indian society and culture, and many lectures, films and debates were enjoyed during the year.
Page 268
Executive:     A.   S.   Gill,    L.   Boodoosingh,   A.
Berar, H. Singh, and Pres. B. S. Jwanda. EL CIRCULO
El Circulo, a Spanish-speaking club,
introduces Canadians to South American
ways. Twice a week students gathered
to brush up their Spanish conversation
and to learn more about the culture of
Latin America including the latest popular songs and dances. The "Mambo Masters" provided lively music for El Circulo
members at the monthly fiestas. President for 1958-59 was Bill Horswill.
The  annual   "Spanish   Week-end"   which   was   held   at   the   U.B.C.
Forestry Lodge, Loon Lake.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS*
ASSOCIATION
The Caribbean Students' Association
was formed in 1954 and since then has
grown rapidly in both membership and
activities. On Clubs' Day this group entertained the crowds with their Calypso
Steel Band which is one of their specialties. Charles Arthur served as C.S.A.
president this year.
The Calypso Steel Band
performs at Homecoming
pep meet. Thunderbird Cheerleaders—STANDING: Donne Yee, Jeri Wilson, Bonnie Engelbeen,
Bonnie Galloway. SEATED: Pat Kirstuik, Mary Ann Elliott, Doramy Hodson,
Judy Dale.
THUNDERBIRD BOOSTER CLUB
The Thunderbird Booster Club promotes spirit and loyalty on the campus
by supplying half-time entertainment for
U.B.C. games and by providing "on
campus' publicity. The T.B.C. includes
cheerleaders, majorettes and the Booster
Club band.
Boosters get together
T.B.C. majorettes
Page 270 AQUA
SOCIETY
During its second year Aquasoc's
main activity was the training of its
new members in both lung and
snorkel diving. Several weekend diving trips were made as well as a
couple of longer excursions.
U.B.C.*s Frogmen include D. Ward, C. Wills, B.  Ramsay, B.  Lessimore,
and President B. Strachan.
FIGURE
SKATING
CLUB
Since its formation in 1956, the
Figure Skating Club has served mainly
as a means of obtaining credit for
P.E., although to do this members
must also belong to an off-campus
skating club. The eighteen members
also provided skating entertainment
for many skating parties.
Lynn   Pcarcey   and   Ken  McKinnon   ready   to
practise   at   Kerrisdale   Arena. VARSITY
OUTDOOR
CLUB
The main objective of the V.O.C. is
to promote interest in mountain climbing and skiing, and under the leadership
of President Karl Ricker, the Club's
main events were based on these two
sports. Many enthusiastic week-end
parties took place at the St. Seymour
cabin, while Mt. Baker, Steven's Pass, Mt.
Garibaldi, and Sun Valley were a few
of the more distant spots visited.
Don Lyon   conquers Mt. Shuk-
sun.
Jack Boulding, Don Brown, Les
Ashbaugh, and Dennis Holden
on   a  rugged  climb. 4
Don  Brown  in  an  unofficial  slalom  on  Garibaldi's  slopes
On  top of the world
A V.O.C. outing to Mt.  Garibaldi
Page 273 U.N. CLUB
The United Nations Club conducts
regular discussion groups dealing with
topics on current affairs, publishes a
UN. Digest, and brings speakers to
the campus for special events. The
U.N. Model General Assembly and
U.N. Day celebrations were held in
October.
U.N.  Club Executive:  L.  Ostensoe,  S.  Harris,  L.  Douglas,  I.  Campbell,
M. James.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
Parliamentary Council co-ordinates
the five political clubs on the campus
by including the presidents of each.
Under the direction of Sandy Hood,
president of this year's Council, Mock
Parliament was held in October and
January.
Mock Parliament in session
Page 274
Parliamentary Council Executive Major General Burns reviews COTC cadets
UNIVERSITY ARMED FORCES
Each year several hundred university
men train with the campus units of the
Armed Forces. Under the ROTC or the
COTC, the students serve three hours a
week during the university year and three
or four months each summer. The training program includes lectures, discussions
and demonstrations as well as practical instruction, and upon its completion, the
men may be commissioned into the Reserve or Active Force.
Members of the Air Force at Fall Convocation
U.B.C. PHOTO
'Turning  of   the   Page'   by   naval   cadet
Page 275 A meeting of Social Credit members
President:   Ken Benson
POLITICAL CLUBS
Arthur Turner M.L.A.  addresses  CCF.  Club
President:   Lyle  Christiansen
Each of the five Canadian political
parties is represented by a club on the
campus. These groups are organized
to arouse student interest in politics,
to make known party policies, and to
arrange for distinguished speakers to
visit the university whenever possible.
Each political party has the opportunity to form a government in mock parliament once a year.
L.P.P. Club executive
President: Jim MacFarlan
Conservative  Club  meeting
President:   Chris   Maule Jazzsoc   Executive:     L.   Burr,   F.   Smith,   N.   Seney,   T.   Lazenby,   and   President   J.
Frederickson.
JAZZSOC
The Jazz Society's purpose is to promote jazz on the U.B.C. campus. The
Club attempts to give its members a
working knowledge of jazz as well as
to bring to them concerts by the better
Jazz musicians. The Club also sponsors its own band.
"Xft-iM^
Carse   Sneddons   and  Frazer   MacPherson
display their talents.
Jazz session
Page 277 Mussoc's Homecoming float
MUSICAL SOCIETY
Students have an opportunity to participate in musical productions and singing through membership in Mussoc. They
receive instruction and practice in stagecraft, costuming, make-up, and committee
work during the staging of campus shows
such as this year's success, "The Boyfriend."
Grace MacDonald creates the next step for the Mussoc Chorus. Linet  Blizzard  and  Rudolph  Richards,  winners   of  the  Dance  Club  marathon.
Barbara Dobson,  Al Warobetz, Fred Johann-
sen, and Evelyn Popoff.
DANCE CLUB
The Dance Club is one of the
largest and most active organizations
on the campus. Its main aim is to improve ballroom dancing, but there are
also groups interested in square, folk
and interpretative dancing. The Club
enjoys many social get-togethers
throughout the year.
The Club's Executive—Seated: Rob Warnick,
Lelia Joy, Pres. Jim Morgan, F. Johannsen,
Jim Gaskel. Standing: Les Dawson, Norm
Leggett.
Page 279 New members sign the sub-chapter records
Pam    Howe    leads    executive   at    the    Initiation
ceremony.
PHRATERES
With a growing and enthusiastic membership, Theta chapter of Phrateres expanded to include ten sub-chapter groups.
Able leadership was provided by Pam
Howe and her energetic executive, but
each sub-chapter had its own social, service and sports activties. The whole
Phrateres Club participated in such All-
Phi projects as initiation, formals, Christmas carolling, and Intramurals.
New   pledges   enjoy   refreshments
Page 280 Roaring Twenties chorus girls
On the outside looking in
Dancers at the Pink Champagne Formal The traditional "Her Scienceman Lover"
PLAYERS' CLUB
Maxine Gadd, Cecil Plotnikoff in "Blue
Duck's Feather and Eagle's Down."
"The Importance of Being Ernest" with Richard Irwin and Val Dowling.
Once again in its more than forty
years of existence the Players' Club had
a most successful season. "Her Science-
man Lover" introduced newcomers to
U.B.C. life, and later in the fall term
"Blue Duck's Feather and Eagle's Down"
was also produced. In January a delightful interpretation of "The Birds"
was presented in cooperation with the
Department of Theatre, and "Charley's
Aunt" concluded a year both entertaining and instructive.
Page 282 The Ramblers Executive: D. McMasters,
M. Zlotnik, N. Forshaw, Pres. R. Baker,
B. Lindner.
RAMBLERS
This year the Ramblers Athletic
Club attracted many sports enthusiasts,
and its membership grew from the 25
of the previous year to 110. The Club
won football and badminton games
and, with entries in 20 different
sports, scored particularly high in intramurals.
Keith Hayes sprinting
The football squad
Page 283 Competition at the Totem Rally—Dennis Maze checks Paddy Brown.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
The U.B.C. Sports Car Club participated well in their gymkhanas and rallies
this year. Affiliation with the International Conference of N°rtnwest Sports
Car Clubs enabled members to compete
in races, hill climbs and rallies.
An MGA sets out on night section of
Thunderbird Rally. Bruce Taylor and   Larry Brown check under the car hood.
Jim  Margellos  and   his  Austin  Healey  are  helped by   fellow  competitors. Christian   Science   Club   members   check   in   periodicals
President:  Lome Payne
Baptist Club Executive
President:  Milton Nelson
RELIGIOUS CLUBS
Religion is an integral part of life
and the various religious groups on
the campus have been formed in order
to give students an opportunity to
work for and learn more about the
Church of their choice.
The Newman Club lounge provides a quiet retreat
President: Archie McDonald
Attentive Lutheran Club members
President: Marvin Haave
Page 286 S.CM. members at a regular discussion group
President: Ian Dingwall
Hillel Club Executive
President: Saul Parker
V.CF. members attend a lecture
President: Bert Cameron Pyjama clad entertainers at the Christmas party at Fort Camp.
Residences on campus include Acadia
and Fort Camps, the women's dormitories
and the four theological colleges. Each
has recreational facilities as well as a
study room and thus provides the occupants with a place for all their activities. Some of the year's outstanding
events were the Christmas Party, the
Fall and Spring Dances, and the Fort-
Acadia mixers.
Suppressed desire costumes at the Dorm Dance.
Page 288 & 4
Li
jj
\
Sharon Drysdale and Pat Speers at their desks in
Anne Wesbrook Hall.
Elaine   Much,   Fort   Camp   Queen,   rides   in
Homecoming Parade:
RESIDENCES
Fort Camp's bed bug
Fort Camp residents view slides in Anne Wesbrook lounge.
Page 289 Mr. Darryl Roberts, President of
Acadia Camp, presents a bouquet to
newly elected Miss Acadia, Miss
Joan  Alexander.
The    "Barrack    Bounce" — Fort-
Acadia's mixer.
Page 290 Christmas dance at Acadia Camp.
DbH-Kuuy
Acadia Camp's own orchestra provides music for a dance:
Billiards in Acadia's
Rec room.
Page 291 PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
The aims of the Psychology Club are
essentially to promote interest in psychological problems and psychology as
a science, and to keep members abreast
of the various branches of the subject.
Scheduled activities included a program
of informative noon hour lectures and
films, evening seminars, and several social events. Lawrence Boulter was the
year's active president.
Speaker and students enjoy a discussion period.
The Physics Club gathers for a demonstration.
PHYSICS CLUB
This year the Physics Club, under its
president Elmer Hara, had a membership
of fifty-five. The object of the organization was to create an opportunity for
members to give, hear, and discuss papers
and topics of interest to physics students.
The Club also enabled students to acquaint themselves with graduate work
and to talk over their ideas with faculty
members. publications
Page 293 Grant McDonald, Co-ordinator
COORDINATOR
OF PUBLICATIONS
The newly created position of Co-ordinator of
Publications has been laid upon the shoulders of
Grant McDonald who also serves as chairman of
the Publications Board. He is responsible for allocating money for all campus publications, for deciding general policy, and in general, for untangling
all business complications arising from the printing,
publishing and distributing of the Ubyssey, Totem,
Raven and Handbook.
Page 294
Mrs.   Herman,   Secretary,   mails
copies of Ubyssey to advertisers. Desmond Fitzgerald, Editor of Raven
Don Hill, Editor of the Handbook
Raven is U.B.C.'s literary magazine
and this year appeared with not only
superior contents but with a very new
and novel typography. The Handbook, U.B.C.'s least literary effort, is
without a doubt the most read book
on the campus.
Students purchase their Raven
Page 295 THE UBYSSEY
Ubyssey staffers delve into every corner
of the campus in search of scandalous items
to fill their paper; on the serious side, they
report national university news and suggest
answers to campus problems. Student polls,
club notes, letters to the editor, sports and
special features all comprise the content
of each edition. A complete staff of photographers, copy writers and special editors
work faithfully in the North Brock basement office.
Dave  Robertson,  Editor-in-Chief
Rupert Buchanan,  Assistant Editor
Al Forrest, Managing Editor
Kerry Feltham, City Editor
Page 296 V>   V;
Bob Bush, Sports Editor
Barb Biely, Senior Editor
Judy Frain, CUP Editor
Elaine Bissett, Senior Editor
Rosemary Kent-Barber, Editor Special Editions
Bruce Taylor, Senior Editor
Page 297 TOTEM
STAFF
One of those lare Friday nights in the Totem office
Barbara Hay
Editor-in-Chief
Debbie Brown
Associate Editor
Diane Watson
Layout Editor
Nancy Paul
Copy Editor
Page 298
Carolyn Wright
Art Editor
David Vawter
Photography Editor
Carole Stuart
Rewrite Editor Pat Overhill
Clubs Editor
Staff: Dorice Joyce
Rosemary Coleman
Ann Blayney
Fine Arts  Editor
Joan Fitzpatrick
Campus Life Editor
Lorraine Rossiter
Photo Co-ordinator
Bev Daly
Awards Editor
Ann Gordon
Buildings Editor
The Totem staff presents this annual in an attempt to preserve the year's activities at U.B.C. in a
volume that is both personal and pleasing. Totem
brings to you a pictorial calendar of college events,
photographs of graduates, and write-ups describing
the functions and aims of all faculties, clubs, and
teams. For the first time in its history the yearbook
contains a campus life section in full colour. We
hope that in years to come the 1959 Totem will
remain a priceless album of university life.
Geoff Mott
Fraternity  Editor
Shirley  Louie,   Editor
Grads & Faculties
Staff: Eleanor Taylor
Carolyn Henderson
Madeline Bronsdon
Peggy Ebbs—Canavan
Cathy Nimmo
Carol Armstrong
Barbara Myers
Ellen Williscroft
Marie Lee
Lois Boulding, Editor
Grads Sc Faculties
Diane Bowman
Greeks Editor
Ray   McNabb
Sports Editor
Staff:
Bill Kurmey
John Auld
Linda Blair
Staff:   Glenda Mclnnes
Claire Willescroft
Women's Sports Editor
Staff: Carole Dougherty
Sheelah Wright & Administration
Editor, Janet Thomas Geoff Farmer
Hal Brochman
George Fraser
UBYSSEY
PHOTOGRAPHERS
This year, as a result of overcrowding, both Ubyssey and Totem photographers had their own separate dark
rooms with the new Ubyssey photo
studio situated behind Brock. Because
of constant deadlines this studio was
always a scene of great activity and
hundreds of pictures were produced
during the year.
Colin Landie, Chief Photographer
Brian Johnston
Cliff Hunt
Neil Burton
Page 300 Dave Redekop
Chris Ascher
Doug Symons
TOTEM
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Diane Whitehead
Thirteen photographers under Photo Editor Dave Vawter and dark room
manager Norm Pearson attended every campus event, printed approximately 1500 pictures and submitted
their assignments to section editors.
The standard of photography was
high — Fred Schrack and Norm Pearson won first and second prizes respectively in the Ben Hill-Tout Salon
which is contested by both U.B.C. faculty and students.
Paul Williams
George Draskoy
Al Groves
John Townsend
Alan Coode
Page 301  greeks Prize-Winning Float In Homecoming Parade
Page 304 Many and varied are the activities of U. B. C.'s Greek letter
societies. Through rushing,
pledging, serenading—through
exchanges, formals, Mardi Gras
— through Song Fest, philanthropy, scholarship — are
formed the close ties of fellowship.
Page 305 inter
fraternity
council
I.F.C   Executive   (L.   to   R.):   President   S.   Mader,   D.   Cook,   M.
O'Reilly, M. Ross, M. McKitrick.
pan
hellenic
association
Pan-Hell Executive—SEATED (L to R.): J. Thomas, President B.
Ellis, J. Hodgins, N. McCurdy, C. Stein. STANDING (L. to R.):
B. Scott, D. Long, J. Robertson. MISSING: M. De Wolfe.
Page 306 Faculty "wives" glee  club entertains harmoniously
For the price of one raffle ticket each,
two thousand students attended the Mardi
Gras Pep Meet where fraternity and sorority candidates for King and Queen of
the Mardi Gras were presented. Queen
contestants made a colorful procession as
they paraded around the Armories in
their elaborate national costumes, and
fraternities vied with each other in recommending their candidates. Highlighting the meet was the annual comedy
skit put on by faculty members.
mardi
gras
pep meet
A.  T. O.'s present their candidate George Jex
Fiji warriors persuade the crowds
Page 307 mardi
gras
Mardi Gras Committee — Front Row: M. Christie, S. Wright, D. Hodson, M. James.
Middle Row: S. Delbridge, R. Kidd, N. Ingledew, M. Warren. Back Row: J. But-
terfield, D. McGrath, B. Yuill, B. Henderson, L. Kavic, B. Armstrong, J. Hearst.
This year's International Mardi Gras, which
was co-chaired by Marlene James and Mike Warren,
attracted 1,700 guests and resulted in a $3,000 cheque
for the Children's Foundation. In charge of production were Brian Gunn and Jim Carney, while Doramy
Hodson was choreographer.
International spirit and Dave Horton, Beth Hobbs, Lois Miller,
and Bob Tulk.
Page 308 John Robertson, Phi Delta Theta, and Sharon Bernard, Kappa
Kappa Gamma—Mardi Gras King and Queen.
Short Girls' Chorus Line
Page 309 alpha
gamma
delta
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Confucious  says  .
In 1958 Alpha Gamma Delta was successful in capturing the Leeming Trophy
awarded to the most outstanding sorority
of the year. This active campus group
gave extra time and energy to aid their
charity, the Cerebral Palsy Association.
Special features for the Alpha Gams were
their Graduation Breakfast and Firesides
as well as the prospect of national convention to be held in southern Indiana in
late June.
Exchange  artists  at  work
Practising  for  intramurals Toys and books for the Children's Hospital
Throughout the year Alpha Delta Pi
members participated actively in sports,
scholarship, campus organizations, and
philanthropic work at the Children's Hospital. Traditionally, the girls held their
Black Diamond Tea in honour of their
mothers and a Friendship dinner for the
new initiates. After their convention
next June, A. D. Pi delegates are planning a trip to Europe.
alpha
delta
pi
Totem pole a la pledges
Entertainment spectators alpha
phi
An Alpha Phi dream man candidate
The Song Fest Trophy contributed to
the success of the Alpha Phis' eventful
year. In the fall they combined with
Alpha Tau Omega to produce an award-
winning Homecoming float, and to raise
funds for the Heart Foundation, they held
a Valentine's Tea. A Far East Pledge
Party and a formal at Glen Eagle's were
their outstanding social functions.
Indian princesses
A sorority skit Sweethearts of the Ball
alpha
omicron
Pi
Very domesticated,  too
The A. O. Pi's enjoyed a wide social
round including the pledge party, the
Night in Paris Ball, the Seattle Invasion,
and Camp in April. Their Figures in
Fashion Show gave its large proceeds to
the Cerebral Palsy Association and the
University Development Fund. This
summer, A. O. Pi's from U.B.C. will host
their International Convention at the
Empress Hotel in Victoria.
Excuse the reach delta
gamma
Horsing around
Pledge party pose
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Delta Gamma's international philanthropy is to help the blind; in Canada,
they support the C. N. I. B., aided by
the proceeds from their annual Blind
Craft Sale and Tea. The new D. G.
pledge class were hostesses at the nautical pledge party and they in turn were
later treated to an Italian dinner by the
actives. Culminating the year's activities
was the week spent at Yellow Point
Lodge.
Big-Little Sister  dinner D. Phi E. rhythm
Delta Phi Epsilon which was founded
in 1917, came to this campus in 1946.
In philanthropic work, the sorority contributes towards a foundation for children with rheumatic fever, research in
the field of Cystic Fibrosis, an orphanage,
and a U.B.C. bursary. The D. Phi E.'s
sponsor Pledges on Parade, an annual
event in the Greek calendar.
Alfred E. Neuman fans
delta
phi
epsilon
A casual sorority function gamma
phi
beta
A moment to remember
Gammi Phi Beta's philanthropic work
is to maintain two camps for underprivileged children, and in February they held
a Valentine's Party for those children
who had attended camp. Their annual
Hard Times Pledge Party and their Carnation Ball were two memorable events
in a busy year which included an enthusiastic participation in both intramurals and Song Fest. After the spring
finals, Gamma Phis sojourn for a week
at their Sechelt camp.
Pyjama Party Feast
Gamma Phi executive members Pledge meeting is full of activity
Kappa Alpha Theta's international
philanthropy is the maintenance of the
National Institute of Logeopedics in
Wichita, Kansas, and in addition to this
they held an orphans' Christmas party in
conjunction with the Fijis. The Thetas'
aim is high scholastic achievement coupled with participation and responsibility
in extra-curricular activities; socially, they
were ever active from their "Kiddies'
Kapers" pledge party to their annual
Spring Formal.
kappa
alpha
theta
Catching up on holiday news
Theta can-can kick kappa
kappa
gamma
Heap big pow-wow
Happy Birthday to U.B.C.
U.B.C.'s fiftieth birthday saw Kappas
and Zetes saluting the University with a
birthday cake in the Homecoming parade.
A highly successful and beneficial retreat
was held after pledging for both actives
and pledges alike. Philanthropy for the
Kappas meant making Christmas hampers and singing carols in pensioners' rest
homes, and after Christmas they entertained and helped a group of underprivileged children.
Pledge Party, 1958 alpha
delta
phi
Have you heard this one?
Alpha Delta Phi is the oldest fraternity represented at U.B.C, having been
founded in 1832 at Hamilton College in
Clinton, N. Y. Many of the campus'
capable leaders and organizers come from
the Alpha Delt house. Literary meetings, the Intramural sports program, a
bridge tournament, and the traditional exchange with the Washington chapter
rounded off the year's activities.
Pledges tuning up
Relaxing in the den alpha
tau
omega
A midnight raid
Alpha Tau Omega was founded in
1865 and now has 120 chapters and several thousand members throughout Canada and the United States. This Fraternity is especially noted for the initiation of Help Week into international
fraternity programs. The U.B.C. chapter,
installed in 1948, received the Grand
Prize and Cup for the best Greek entry
in the 1958 Homecoming float competition.
It must be a good story
Men of Harmony
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■ Founded in 1839, Beta Theta Pi enjoys
a large membership and participates in
all phases of university life both scholastic and extra-curricular. During the year
activities included a pledge party, Saturday nights at the house, and the Beta
Dairy. A popular Beta trade-mark is
their unique instrumental quartet which
enlivens serenading, and they are known
on the campus as the song-singing, milk-
drinking Betas.
Beta convention delegates
beta
theta
pi
Intramural  swim  meet
Have YOU a  reservation? delta
kappa
epsilon
Rear Guard?
Hot coffee after a work party
Delta Kappa Epsilon has long taken
an active interest in such philanthropic
activities as the Red Feather campaign
and Kinsmen Apple Day. During Homecoming festivities the Dekes and the
Thetas worked together and produced an
outstanding Vancouver publicity float.
This year a special contributional program was drawn up to commemorate the
100th anniversary of alumnus Theodore
Roosevelt's birth.
Heavy, heavy  hangs over thy head delta
upsilon
The U.B.C. chapter of Delta Upsilon
is one of six in Canada and seventy-eight
internationally, and has been active on
this campus for twenty years. The Fraternity is a non-secret organization, its
major purposes being to promote friendship, develop character, and advance culture. It has always taken an enthusiastic
part in intramural sports, campus activities, boys' work, and the Song Fest. Socially, the Apache Bash climaxed the
year.
Mugs and music at the D.U.  House
After-dinner conference
Song Team kappa
sigma
How 'formal' can you get?
Kappa Sigma, founded in 1869 and
now represented by a total of 150 chapters in the United States and Canada,
came to U.B.C. in 1941. This year began
with the pledging of thirteen exceptional
rushees and, along with regular activities,
Kappa Sigma was particularly well represented in intramural sports. A special
Fraternity tradition is the breakfast party
given for all sorority pledges on campus.
Kappa Sigma dream girl
Real Forestry men lambda
chi
alpha
Jam session
Lambda Chi Alpha was founded at
Boston University in 1909 and later
amalgamated with Theta Kappa Nu to
become the largest college fraternity with
152 chapters. An important social event
of Zeta Xi chapter, established at U.B.C.
in 1944, is the annual Lambda Chi Al-
phatraz and the Crescent Ball at which
a queen is chosen from sorority contestants.
Relaxation at Lambda Chi House
A chairful of Lambda Chis phi
gamma
delta
A toga exchange with the D. G.'s
Phi Gamma Delta believes in a full
calendar of activities with concentration
placed on scholastic and athletic achievement, participation in all intramural
sports, and in campus leadership. The
Fiji's also contribute actively to worthy
causes through their special Christmas
Party (complete with Santa) for orphaned
children. Social highlights of the year
were the Fiji Grass Skirt Party and the
Spring Formal
Cribbage solitaire?
Great minds ponder the next move phi
delta
theta
Football anyone?
Although the Phi Delts are famous for
their hospitality and amazing parties,
they take even greater pride in their
service work. Besides the I.F.C.'s Help
Week, they had their own Help Week,
adopted a Cub Pack, and did work with
orphans. Scholarship was also important
to the Phi Delts who emphasized this
aspect of university life by offering scholarships to their deserving members.
Mother's little helper
Where is the opposition? phi
kappa
pi
The  Centennial ends
Phi Kappa Pi, the only Canadian national fraternity, has maintained and
strongly emphasized the spirit of Cana-
dianism. The aim of the brotherhood is
indicated in the fraternity motto Phil-
uminoi Kanadioi Piuametha—"In brotherly love, as Canadians, we benefit one
another." On the social agenda last year
were exchanges, the Orphanage party, the
fifth annual active-alumni stag, and the
Spring Formal.
The  Fraternity  house
The piano  roll  blues Black and Gold Ball
U.B.C.S Phi Kappa Sigma is one of
more than hf ty chapters in North America. Its aims include the promotion of
good fellowship, the cultivation of the
social virtues, the encouragement of
scholarship, and good relations with the
university. Nor is the social life of the
fraternity neglected, for during the past
year Phi Kappa Sigma held its annual
formal, two pledge parties, and a Pirate
Party.
phi
kappa
sigma
A friendly circle at the Pledge Party
A practice for Song Fest
1 psi
upsilon
A lively card game
The Psi U's, though active in intramural
sports, also tried for high scholastic
standing and last year received recognition from their national headquarters for
their high mark average. All chapters of
this Fraternity strive to remain small in
order to promote a truer fraternal feeling, and the Psi U pledge is known by
the garnet and gold rock he carries.
Give a pledge a break
Float work party sigma
alpha
mu
A solemn ceremony
The smiling song  team
Led by Al Baker, the Sammies this
year marked the tenth anniversary of
their fraternity at U.B.C. High spots of
the year were the annual Hawaiian
Party, New Year's Party, Spring Formal,
and the successful basketball, volleyball,
and bowling teams. Besides their social
and campus activities, this fraternity always ranks among the top contestants in
the scholarship competition.
Experts in the culinary art sigma
chi
At the Sweetheart Ball
Christmas festivities
Delta Omicron, which this year celebrates its tenth anniversary, was established at U.B.C. as the 108th chapter of
Sigma Chi. Sigma Chi is an all-round
fraternity and encourages its members to
maintain high scholarship and to participate actively in campus affairs. Party life
was accented by the pledges' Toga Party,
the Miami Triad and the Sweetheart Ball.
Sigma Chis in toga styles Who rushed the film?
The motto Pro Bono Professionis—
"For the Good of the Profession"—
clearly emphasizes the aim of Sigma Phi
Delta. Its three Greek letters, standing
for Science, Friendship, and Duty, indicate the spirit with which Sigma Phi operates as a social-professional fraternity
of engineers. As an international fraternity, it encourages its members to attain excellence in scholarship while maintaining a complete social program.
,r   vWtKQME
ONLY
sigma
phi
delta
Convention delegates celebrate
Indian   maids and braves zeta
beta
tau
We just struck up an acquaintance
This year has been one of promise for
Zeta Beta Tau. Although small, with
only twenty-two actives, it attracted eighteen new members, the largest pledge
class in its history. Possession of the
Inter - Fraternity Scholarship Trophy did
not interfere with an active participation
in campus activities or with a varied social life which included a Masquerade, a
Bermuda Shorts Party, and the Spring
Formal. Plans were also announced for
a new house to be built on Fraternity
Row.
Is  it   really  a  masquerade?
Same old Saturday  night zeta
psi
Full Housel
The Zetes were prominent in radio,
political and debating circles; they provided members for the rowing, rugby,
and swimming teams; and their emphasis on academics won them high standing on the Inter-Fraternity scholarship
list. Off the campus Zeta Psi continued
to work for the Girls' Industrial School
and carolled for the old folks at Christmas. From time to time they relaxed—
usually with a rousing party.
Cross-country creepers
The voyageur of Zeta Psi  advertising Vancouver's Chinatown
Page 338 MX,!***™"
Situated on the tip of scenic
Point Grey and surrounded by
two thousand acres of endowment lands, U.B.C. often seems
a world apart. However, the
University owes much to Vancouver for the two are linked
in many ways. We are grateful to the city for its generous
advertising contributions.
Page 339 THE EVANS. COLEMAN &
EVANS  ORGANIZATION:
BRANCHES OF EVANS, COLEMAN & EVANS LIMITED
Vancouver, B.C.
North Vancouver, B.C.
Victoria, B. C.
Nanaimo, B.C.
DIVISIONS OF EVANS, COLEMAN & EVANS LIMITED
Alberta Clay Products Division Medicine Hat, Alta.
B.C. Concrete Division   Vancouver, B.C.
Diethers Division   Vancouver, B.C.
McCleery & Weston Division  Vancouver, B.C.
Marine Division   Vancouver, B.C.
Baker Brick & Tile Company, Limited Victoria, B.C.
Champion & White Limited Vancouver, B.C.
Clayburn-Harbison Ltd  Vaucouver, B.C.
Evans, Coleman Trading Company Limited .... Vancouver, B.C.
Evans, Coleman Wharf Co., Limited Vancouver, B.C.
Gilley Bros. Limited New Westminster, B.G
Hillside Sand & Gravel Limited  Vancouver, B.C.
Working Partner of those who build in Western Canada
Page 340 I mTTT it^
OUR BUSINESS IS PRIMARILY THE
MANUFACTURE AND DISTRIBUTION OF
QUALITY CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TO
THE BUILDING INDUSTRY
IN WESTERN CANADA
WE MANUFACTURE
Clay, face and common brick, vitrified pipe, flue lining and refractory products.
Concrete and pumice brick, blocks, partition tile and drain tile, etc.
WE PRODUCE
TRUE-MDC concrete to specification. Concrete aggregates, sand and gravel,
crushed and quarried stone, riprap.
WE DISTRIBUTE
Building supplies of all descriptions, also reinforcing steel and mesh, rails, cast iron
pipe, steel scaffolding, acrow props, etc. Domestic and industrial coals.
WE OPERATE
A fleet of tugs, scows, and derricks, deep sea and coast-wise wharves,
warehouses with trackage facilities, etc.
Page 341 Friden
THINKING MACHINES
OF CANADIAN BUSINESS
CALCULATORS
COMPUTYPERS
ADDERS
IDP EQUIPMENT
H. C. Haluss, Manager
1225 BURRARD STREET
MU 4-4481
Compliments of . . .
McCOLL-FRONTENAC OIL
COMPANY LIMITED
Texaco Petroleum Products
789 West Pender
MU 4-1335
"The House of Service"
The Vancouver Supply Company Ltd.
Wholesale Grocers and Janitors Supplies
25 ALEXANDER STREET
VANCOUVER 4, B. C.
Phone:  MU   1-8321
J
<ani2e*t
MAKERS OF THE WORLD-FAMOUS
Jantzen Swim Suits, Sweaters,
Knitted Suits
Sun Clothes and T- Shirts
JANTZEN OF CANADA LIMITED
10th Avenue and Kingsway
Phone TR 6-3344
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Page 342 ■
JCBBISH
SEES VOUR
Beware the Nebbish!
For Week-end Snapshots . . .
That you'll  be  proud  to say you  took  yourself
... treat yourself to our efficient developing, printing and enlarging services. How
about those pictures you took on vacation? Bring in the exposed rolls for our
careful treatment. You'll be delighted you
did! And for an extra thrill, let us "blow
up" a favorite negative or two. You'll
agree that our enlargements are beauties.
Prompt service on processing color films,
too, of course.
(°)
EASTMAN
Photographic I Tft
Materials    LIU.
610 Granville
Street
AT HOME ON THE CAMPUS
Dairyland products are delivered to
UBC every day; UBC-trained bacteriologists staff the Dairyland laboratory; UBC's Faculty of Agriculture has worked in close co-operation
with Dairyland for many years.
Dairyland is proud of this long association with the University of British
Columbia.
A Division of the Fraser Valley
Milk Producers' Association.
Page 343 <*
-/"
fljj^B
gg**** i sac, /*
Dining and Social Block
University of British Columbia
Thompson, Berwick and Pratt — Architects
Page 344 SERVICE
To Alumni, the University and the community.   This is the purpose
of the U.B.C. Alumni Association of which you are now a member.
OB JECTIVES
a. To bring about the unity of graduates or former students of the
University of British Columbia and to further among them the spirit
of friendship of undergraduate days.
b. To instill in all graduates of the University of B.C. a feeling of
loyalty to the University and a sense of responsibility for the continuance of the educational work of the University and for service
to the public of British Columbia.
c. To support suitable undertakings for the facilitation of the work of
the University or of education in general, and to cooperate with
organizations with similar aims and objects.
d. To educate public opinion regarding the needs, the use and benefit
of the University of B. C. and education in general.
e. To adopt a definite policy on questions directly or indirectly affecting the University of B. C, education in the Province of B. G,
or graduates of the University of B. G, or persons engaged in educational work in the Province of British Columbia.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
252 Brock Hall Alma 4200
Compliments
CANADIAN WOOD PIPE
& TANKS LTD.
550 Pacific Street Vancouver, B.C.
MU 5-7245
RE 1-4614
Niohfe-   /   KE- 4,44"Y
N.ghts.   { QL 2126_L
Murphy Excavating
CO. LTD.
G. MURPHY
J. HOWE
1466 W. SIXTH AVE.
VANCOUVER 9, B. C.
•lust between us men!
Do you knew that Birks, selection of Diamond Engagement Rings at $ 125.00 h
tha largest and matt attractive In town? Every diamond in this collection is a
Birks diamond and the name Birks is engraved en each ring. You may choose
any stylo you wish for only $12.50 down — the balance in ten equal
monthly payments. We win be happy to shew you these handsome rings
at any time for they are rings
that any girl would wear with
pride. Comparison will prove
metdollar-fer-dellar each is a
value that cant be matched.
B I \\ K S
Granville at Georgia MU   5-6211
THE NAME YOU KNOW YOU CAN TRUST IN DIAMONDS
Page 345 EATON'S
It's a new world, the one you're
entering, one of charts, slide
rules and dollar signs; sleek
business offices and the professional hum of industry.   You're
part of that hum now; you step
into it with assurance, confident
that the training you've received
will give you the poise you merit.
Stepping along with you, busy
day after busy day, will be the
clothes you wear. And, for the
latest styles in men's clothing,
for correct, meticulous business
wear, accessories, visit the
Men's Shops at EATON'S. Come
in often.   You'll find us
friendly, helpful and so precise
with men's wearing apparel.
EATON'S
31  OUTLETS TO SERVE YOU IN B. C.
Page 346 CROSSMAN
MACHINERY COMPANY
LIMITED
806 Beach Ave., Vancouver 1, B.C.
MU  1-5221
With the Compliments of .  . .
THE
ROYAL TRUST
COMPANY
Executors and Trustees
Vancouver:
626 WEST PENDER ST.
George 0. Vale, Manager
Victoria:
1205 GOVERNMENT ST.
R. W. Phipps, Manager
Peter Van Dyke's
campus
barber
shop
RESIDENTIAL „.„,,,. ,-,„.,„
* ?=LAL INSTALLATIONS
By
FLOOBCBAFT LIMITED
VANCOUVER'S  LEADERS  IN  FLOOR  COVERINGS
1964 W. Broadway REgent 1-4628
SYMBOLIC WITH THE NAME
Qjeslebter
STENCIL DUPLICATING WITH THE
PRINTED LOOK
Simplicity, Economy, Versatility and Efficiency
There is a Model for Every Business
PJREE SERVICE EVERYWHERE
Inquire Without Obligation
Gestetner (Canada) Limited
1169 Richards Street, Vancouver, B. C.
MU 5-6556
Page 347 you travel in good company
with
THE   ■BANK
Banking today requires young men who can
serve the Bank's interests in many parts of the
world. There are problems to be met and
decisions to be made on the spot... rather than
from behind a desk miles away. At Toronto-
Dominion we will, over the next few decades,
be vitally involved in Canada's great expansion.
If you are interested in a career that touches
every type of Canadian business . . . come
in and see us.
TORONTO-DOMINION
THI BANK THAT LOOKS AHIAD
BANK
paramount
CANNED SALMON
The choice of nutritionists
PARAMOUNT Canned Salmon is rich in
protein and mineral content, so vital for
maximum health and energy.
• Perfect for party snacks
• Satisfying  in sandwiches
• Superb in luncheon dishes
NELSON  BROS.   FISHERIES   Ltd.
Vancouver, B. C.
fllilllV   SEITICI
cmiiiciii net mm in.
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
GRADUATING CLASSES
May your future be
Happy
Wealthy
and
Healthy
Page 348 Acadia Camp cat studies too
"CHINESE CUISINE AT ITS BEST'
Internationally   known   and   acclaimed   tops   in
Chinese Cuisine, hospitable service and
exotic  Oriental  decor—truly a
Restaurant of Distinction
Reservations: MU 3-1935       155 E. Pender St.
THERE IS A BIG DIFFERENCE
in
. . STYLE
. . QUALITY
. . FIT
When your SUITS
ARE CUSTOM MADE By
To the Student Body    .    .    .
OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND
BEST WISHES
Bell & Mitchell Limited
641 Richards Street
INSURANCE
Vancouver, B. C.
MU 5-6441
REgent 8-7161
Allied Heat & Fuel Ltd.
2096 WEST 13TH AVE.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
IMPERIAL ESSO STOVE OIL
FURNACE OIL - BUNKER OIL
CLEAN COAL—All Grades and Sizes
FIR SAWDUST
Page 349 A noon-hour battle rages in front of Brock
COMPLIMENTS OF
B. BOE LIMITED
PLUMBING  &  HEATING
CONTRACTORS
3525 East llth Avenue,    Vancouver 12, B.C.
HE 4-7275
Page 330 DRAWING MATERIALS
OF ALL KINDS
BOARDS - SCALES - TEE SQUARES
INKS - PAPER - ANGLES
REPRODUCTION SERVICE
OZALID PRINTING
PHOTO COPY
BLUEPRINTING
THE
HUGHES-OWENS
COMPANY LIMITED
569 RICHARDS STREET, VANCOUVER
ALSO
EDMONTON    -   WINNIPEG   -   HAMILTON
TORONTO    -    OTTAWA    -    MONTREAL    -    HALIFAX
CZdctcJC
Office Machines
for
Adding - Calculating - Bookkeeping
• FASTER
• SMOOTHER
• SIMPLER
• RELIABLE
All the traditional operating conveniences and quality
construction of the ADDO-X, and now
AUTOMATIC MULTIPLICATION
AT ADDING MACHINE PRICES
Special models for many purposes:—
Tabulating & Shuttle Carriages,
Accumulating Grand Totals, etc.
B.C. Distributors
FRANK L.BOTT «ft CO.
418 ABBOTT STREET    VANCOUVER 4, B.C.    MUtual 1-2423
1812 COOK STREET      VICTORIA, B.C.       EVergreen 2-3812
Compliments of . . .
THE
COLLEGE
SHOP
* Faculty Sweaters
* Crests
* Gym Supplies
* Rings and Pins
* Beer Mugs
* Sundries
BROCK HALL EXTENSION
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE A. M. S.
Page 351 CONGRATULATIONS
and Best Wishes to the
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
for the importance of its
contribution to the development
of British Columbia
Murphy Stationery Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS   -    PRINTERS
LITHOGRAPHERS
DUPLICATING MACHINES & SUPPLIES
151 Wert 5th Ave. Vancouver 10, B.C.
TRinity 6-5591
Remember!
The
UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICES
offers a complete low cost catering service throughout the campus
For your convenience the locations are
FORT CAMP
ACADIA CAMP
BROCK HALL
(Snack Bar and Dining Room)
INFIRMARY KITCHEN
at Wesbrook
CAF
BUS STOP COFFEE BAR
FACULTY DINING ROOM GYM CAF
Arrangements may also be made for:
TEAS, BANQUETS and WEDDING RECEPTIONS
P»ge 352 CHOOSE A CHALLENGING CAREER!
as a
CHARTERED
ACCOUNTANT
(C.A.)
Do you like meeting people?
Do you like interesting work, that takes you into even
kind of office, and to mines, mills, factories, ranches,
shipyards, retail stores, banks and financial houses?
Would you like to have a thorough knowledge of
accounting, auditing, and taxation?
Would you like to combine practical and theoretical
training, leading to independent professional status, or
an executive position in industry or government service?
IF SO
WHY NOT ENQUIRE ABOUT BECOMING
A CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT?
There are several methods of obtaining the required
training:
• Combined B. Com. — C.A. Course
• University Degree followed by the C.A. Course
• The C.A. Course followed by the B. Com. Course
• The Chartered Accountants' Course alone
For Brochure or Further Details, Contact:
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
475 Howe Street
MUtual 1-3264
OR
The Faculty of Commerce
University of British Columbia
Page 353 1743-1749
[fhese Natives are   Very
Loving   and fond of their
Children, Never I think
seen any parent    or
Relation  strike a child    in
anger all  the time   I   have
been here ,or in these parts,
beleving  itt may be  the
Same all over America,
Observing    De1 la,sale  and Some   others
mentions thesame,&c -and as to heaving water
at them when angry,  I have seen done
frequent,the fondness  to their childn.is not
with them as in England, as itt's too frequent
the Entire Ruing to childn. and Greif to
parents,when itts too Late to correct them.
But it's to be Regarded  these son's or Daughters
never Leaves their parents,tell they gett married,
then the youngest son or son in  Law mentains their
parents as     Long  as they    Live.
BY
ISHHML
JAMES ISHAM, whose Observations on Hudson's Bay provide a fascinating account of life
during the mid-18th century at the two great
northern forts of the H B C, took over Prince of
Wales's Fort at the age of 25, and five years later,
was made chief at York Factory, where he served
on and off until his death there in 1761.
^ofcon^'Bftti (Eomjwng.
INCORPORATED    2~°   MAY   1670
Page 354 Everything and anything at the College Shop's lost and found rummage  sale.
FOR
TELEVISION
RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS
RECORDS
FINE FURNITURE
& ELECTRIC APPLIANCES
THOMSON & PAGE LTD.
2914 Granville Street
REgent 8-5144
and
PARK ROYAL
WA 2-1288
Whether   for   Home   or   Business   Office,   our
Stationery and Printing Department will
Serve You in Many Ways
Gehrke Stationery & Printing Co.
Limited
1035 Seymour St.
MU  1-0171
THE 711 SHOP LTD
natural clothes for men
783  GRANVILLE  ST.
VANCOUVER 2, B. C.
•        •        •
BEST WISHES
U.B.C GRADS /
THE KEYSTONE PRESS LTD.
Printers Lithographers
860 KINGSWAY, VANCOUVER        TRinity 9-1541
Page 355 Guaranteed
to give maximum satisfaction,
every Jenkins valve features these
performance-proven benefits:
• Expert design and engineering
• Finest quality material
• Unrivalled dependability,
efficiency and endurance
• Low maintenance cost
• Made by valve specialists
taring valves wmapassed hkf^w&mm
%
^
TRADE
JENKINS
MARK
Jenkins manufactures more
than 400 different types of
valves in Canada's most
modern valve plant
When specifications call
for valves, call Jenkins.
%S   Sold through leading industrial distributors
JENKINS  BROS. LIMITED
Sales Offices:
Toronto • Winnipeg • Edmonton • Vancouver
MAKING    VALVES    IS    OUR    BUSINESS -OUR    ONLY    BUSINESS
Page 356 V*
V.
GOLDEH
SYRUP
Active people of all ages need the
sustaining, satisfying food value of
Roger's Golden Syrup. It replenishes muscular energy in a matter
of minutes. It b delicious tasting,
wholesome and pure.
••nlO*!*'
THE B.C.SUGAR REFINING CD. LTD.
MAKE UP A PARTY
FOR SATURDAY NIGHT DANCING
AT THE
BEAUTIFUL
COMMODORE
CABARET
Reservations: MU 1-7838
872 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Marie Moreau and U.B.C. coeds battle over who wears what
Page 357 Cast your vote!
w Over 1000 High Purity
from a SINGLE SOURCE
•. everything you need in
laboratory chemicals
You're Sure of Quality—when you specify
Nichols "C.P." Acids and Baker & Adamson Laboratory Reagents. They are guaranteed to meet or
exceed the most exacting A.C.S. specifications!
And when you use these dependable laboratory
chemicals, you're sure of superior packaging, too
—offering every advantage ... better protection
. . . more convenience .. . and greater economy.
With Nichols as your source, you're also sure
of dependable supply, for we maintain full stocks
at all times in large modern warehouses in Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver.
ALLIED CHEMICAL CANADA, LTD.
NICHOLS CHEMICALS
Head  Office:   1450   City   Councillors   Street,   Montreal   2,   Que.
Box 65, Toronto  18 Vancouver  (Barnet,  B.  C.)
Page 358 BERNARD
Laundry Services Limited
(A. R. Bernard <—> Manager)
COMMERCIAL LAUNDERERS
Linen Supplies
TRinity 4-1155
130 West 5th Aye.
Vancouver, B.C.
Look you about — o'er your Campus ground,
Look you about, let your gaze wander 'round,
O'er the buildings, the students, and all those who
Have imparted so much, to create the new YOU.
Reflect but a moment — of all that it means;
Impress in your mind, indelible scenes,
Scenes to remember, throughout all your days,
For here has been molded the shape of your ways.
Methods and means — plus habits of doing
If wisely employed, are forever accruing,
Bringing to those who know their true worth,
A Life of Real Meaning while on this good earth.
BEST-PRINTER    CO.    LTD.
(Formerly Best Mimeograph Co. Ltd.)
151 WEST HASTINGS, Vancouver 3, B. C.
MUtual 4-3742
U.B.C. Law Case Books — Lab. Manuals —
Graphs — Forms — Maps, Etc.
Totem work goes on — rain or shine!
P««e 359 ';;-■•■;■
YOUR FAMILY ^OPPtN&CEN|"RES v
?&.:*(&&      ■■:
V".   rli"       ±m -       --   -
Page 360 College Printers Ltd.
Commercial and Social Printers
and Publishers
PRINTERS OF THE UBYSSEY
4430 W. 10th Ave.
ALma 3253
With the Compliments of
Boyles Bros. Drilling Company Ltd.
DIAMOND DRILL
CONTRACTORS & MANUFACTURERS
1291  Parker St.
Vancouver, B.C.
O. B. ALLAN
LIMITED
JEWELLERS SILVERSMITHS
DIAMONDS WATCHES
Granville at Pender
Vancouver, B. C.
Compliments of
LTD.
in the University District
4409 West 10th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
The University Book Store
The Book Store was established for the convenience of
students and has effected a considerable saving to the
students in time and money. It is prepared to supply
all text books required for the various courses offered
in the University, also such articles as note books,
loose-leaf sheets, fountain pens, drawing paper and
= instruments. ========
Page 361 Your Sign of
GUARANTEED
PROTECTION
in Paint Finishes
950 Raymur Avenue, Vancouver
For industrial finishes and specialty coatings to meet
your specific needs, call on GENERAL PAINTS,
Technical Service.
TELEPHONE MU 4-5311
for complete  information
Makers of Monamel and Monaseal
BURNABY    LUMBER
*    *    *
3779 Kingsway
HE 4-2696
COMPLIMENTS
OF     A
FRIEND
tHMtm
The Frosh idea of U.B.C.
Page 362 It happens every spring
Oak Tree
Sleeping
Not tomorrow, nor the day after, but
in time, a huge oak tree will have
emerged from this acorn. It's the same
with saving. With patience, persistence
and determination you'll soon find
your savings have grown big enough to
buy what you set out to save for.
The first thing to do is to start.
And the best place to start is at our
nearest branch.
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
750 branches across Canada ready to serve you
Page 363 ff
the glowing future lies unrolled"
FRANCIS BRET HARTB
January, 1870
Although no one knows what details the future
holds, the blueprints of the atomic age and the
space age are pretty clear.
Journeys to the moon? Without doubt. Atomic
energy for many peacetime purposes. There's every
assurance of it.
Making these - and much more - possible is a
familiar friend: electricity. For without this force,
the atom could never have been explored, the rocket
would be stock still on its launching pad.
While electricity has performed many miracles for
mankind in the past, its greatest roles are yet to be
played. In the years ahead, the new conveniences
and comforts this man-made servant will create
will give even greater meaning to:
"live better - electrically"
B.C.ELECTRIC
Page 364 A newly created position this year
was that of Advertising Manager for
all main campus publications. Bill
Miles ably carried on this work and
assisting him was Al Mar who took
charge of Totem's advertising.
Bill Miles
Al Mar
ADVERTISERS' INDEX
O. B. Allan 361
Allied Chemical  358
Allied Heat & Fuel 349
Alumni Association  345
Bamboo Terrace  349
Bell & Mitchell 349
Bernard Laundry 359
Best - Printer 359
Birks   345
B. Boe Limited 350
Frank L. Bott 351
Boyles Bros 361
B. C. Electric 364
B. C Sugar Refining 357
Burnaby Lumber  362
Canadian Bank of Commerce 363
Canadian Wood Pipe & Tanks 345
College Printers 361
College Shop 351
Commodore Cabaret  357
Grossman Machinery 347
Cunningham Drugs  348
Dairyland 343
Eastman  343
Eaton's of Canada 346
Evans, Coleman & Evans 340
Floorcraft  347
Friden   342
Gehrke Stationery  355
General Paint  362
Gestetner  347
Hudson's Bay Co 354
Hughes - Owen 351
Institute of Chartered Accountants 353
Jantzen of Canada 342
Jenkins Bros 356
Keystone Press  355
McColl - Frontenac  342
McDonald's Tobaccos  352
Marty's  361
Modernize Tailors  349
Murphy Excavating 345
Murphy Stationery  352
Nelson Bros. Fisheries  348
Royal Trust 347
Seven Eleven Shop - 355
Thompson, Berwick & Pratt  344
Thomson & Page 355
Toronto - Dominion Bank 348
University Book Store  361
University Food Services  352
Vancouver Supply Co.  342
Peter Van Dyke  347
Woodward's 360
Yearbook House  367
Page 365 SUBJECT INDEX
Advertising Staff   365
Agriculture Faculty      S6
Alma Mater Society      34
Alpha  Gamma .Delta    310
Alpha Delta Pi 2. ,.. ,.   311
Alpha Delta Phi  .'.....:..3.1?
Alphi  Phi      312
Alpha   Omicron   Pi         313
Alpha Tau Omega   320
Alumni   Association         31
Aquasoc 	
Archery,   Women's   	
Architecture  School   _„
Armed Forces —	
Arts & Science Faculty	
Associated Women Students	
Badminton   Men's   	
Badminton, Women's
Basketball, Boys' Rules .
Basketball, Girls'  Rules
Basketball,   Men's   	
271
227
60
275
62
35
203
226
220
222
210
Beta   Theta   Pi       321
Big   Block   Club,   Men's       187
Big Block Club, Women's   218
Blood   Drive       154
Boards of Governors      26
Buildings —.   166
Camera Club    260
Caribbean   Students     269
Chancellor Grauer   28
Chinese Varsity    - 259
Clubs  Day ,  _ 25 8
Commerce Faculty 	
Commerce-Law  Grads
Convocation „
  78
  83
„_ - 155
  32
  195
Cross Country   194
Curling, Men's    209
Curling, Women's    232
Dance Club  _  279
Council, Students'
Cricket	
Deans    —.
Delta Gamma
Delta Kappa Epsilon
Delta Phi Epsilon .....
29
314
522
515
Delta Sigma Pi ._  49
Delta  Upsilon     323
Directory,   Student    _  295
Education Faculty   84
El  Circulo  269
Engineering  Faculty     90
Exams . .——.  160
Faculty   Association     30
Faculty Awards    43
Fencing,   Men's     _ 202
Fencing, Women's   . .  232
Figure Skating Club . , _. _.- 271
Filmsoc   262
Fine Arts    236
Football   188
Football Queen   164
Forestry Faculty   102
Frosh   Council         37
Frosh Hazing    148
Frosh  Queen      163
Gamma  Phi Beta     316
Golf, Men's    195
Golf, Women's   227
Graduate Studies   140
Grasshockey,   Men's     207
Grasshockey, Women's   224
Greek   Activities        307
Gymnastics, Men's   204
Gymnastics,   Women's 219
Hamsoc   263
Handbook   295
High School Conference  —..      37
Homecoming 156
Homecoming  Queen      162
Home   Economics   Faculty   _..—. 108
Honorary   Activities   Awards          51
Hungarian Demonstration _. , 153
Ice  Hockey     206
India Students' Association    _, ....   268
Interfraternity Council 306
International   House   ...„    266
Intramurals,  Men's   215
Intramurals,   Women's   —.... -    233
Kappa  Alpha Theta 317
Kappa Kappa Gamma ._. „ 318
Kappa  Sigma   __....„ 324
Jazzsoc    _  277
Lambda   Chi   Alpha .     32 5
Law  Faculty    _    112
Leadership Conference      152
McGoun Cup Debate       23
Mamooks    264
March of Dimes    158
Mardi Gras    308
Mardi Gras Queen    165
Medical   Faculty        118
Men's  Athletic   Association  .._ „    187
Model Parliament  -_   274
Modelling Club    261
Musical Society  _.  278
NFCUS „      36
Nisei Varsity   268
Nursing  School      122
Panhellenic Association    306
Parliamentary  Council   „„ —  274
Pharmacy Faculty  „.._ _—   128
Phi Gamma Delta   —  326
Phi Delta Theta    327
Phi Kappa Pi   328
Phi  Kappa  Sigma     329
Photographers,  Publications    300
Phrateres   —- 280
Phrateres  Queen      164
Physical Education School   132
Physics Club    292
Players  Club    282
Political   Clubs       276
President MacKenzie       28
Psi Upsilon   330
Psychology   Club       292
Publications   Co-ordinator   294
Radio  Society      265
Ramblers       283
Raven  295
Registrar  *     30
Registration      146
Religious Clubs     286
Residences 288
Rhodes Scholar    42
Rowing       192
Rugger  198
Sigma Alpha Mu  331
Sigma  Chi      332
Sigma  Chi  Sweetheart      165
Sigma Phi Delta   33 3
Sigma Tau Chi      49
Skiing, Men's    208
Soccer    196
Social Work School     134
Sopron Faculty of Forestry    105
Special Congregation     151
Special   Events       240
Sports   Car   Club      284
Swimming, Men's   200
Swmiming, Women's Speed   „  228
Swimming, Women's Synchronized .... 229
Tennis, Men's   214
Tennis, Women's   230
Theology   138
Thunderbird  Booster Club      270
Track, Men's     194
Track, Women's   231
Totem   298
Ubyssey       296
Undergraduate Societies Committee —    3 5
United Nations Club  — 274
University Clubs Committee ....——— 25 8
University Clubs Committee Awards      50
V.   G.   H.   Grads       126
Varsity  Outdoor Club    272
Volleyball, Women's     223
Weightlifting    205
Women's Athletic Directorate .—  218
World University Service     36
Zeta  Beta  Tau   _.     334
Zeta  Psi       335 Designed
Quality
f.
or
yearbook house
EXECUTIVE   OFFICES  AND   FACTORY
BOD  LOCUST  BTRCCT
KANSAS   CITY  G,   MISSOURI
IN  CANADA:
7   KINO   STREET    WEST
TORONTO  1,  ONTARIO
Publishers of your "1959 TOTEM" yearbook And now Totem is ready for the printer.
We nave had a wonderful year despite tnose
long January nights and the dreadful moments when photographs vanished and there
just was no copy. The most rewarding part
has been working with other people —< people who accomplished more than seemed
humanly possible and did it in time to meet
deadlines.
Throughout the year we on Totem found
the University offices and campus organizations most co-operative, and we want to express our appreciation for their assistance.
Our thanks also go to those who helped us
identify the 'mysterious' individuals who
kept turning up on teams and executives.
lt would he difficult to name all those who
made the 1959 Totem possible, so I will just
thank everyone who contributed in any way.
A special word of gratitude goes to the
Totem Staff who devoted so much of their
lime, and thought to this publication. And
best luisries to next year's Totem <—> there's
a lot of fun mixed in with the hard work!
Barbara Hay
Page 368 KANSAS   CITY   6.   MISSOURI
TORONTO 1, ONTARIO
Lithographed  in  U. S. A-  by Yearbook  House ■tMffl
{J.CI-*""**'
■•■*■■ Mf

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