UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Totem 1948

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubcyearb-1.0119062.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubcyearb-1.0119062.json
JSON-LD: ubcyearb-1.0119062-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubcyearb-1.0119062-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubcyearb-1.0119062-rdf.json
Turtle: ubcyearb-1.0119062-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubcyearb-1.0119062-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubcyearb-1.0119062-source.json
Full Text
ubcyearb-1.0119062-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubcyearb-1.0119062.ris

Full Text

 S3
,C5
to.
6ut)
©
I
•
.
m
.©
m.
 ;	  CAMPUS
Co//eges and Residences
ADMINISTRATION
Faculty
Student
ACTIVITIES
Highlights
Major Clubs
Publications
ATHLETICS
ORGANIZATIONS
Greeks
Minor Clubs
CLASSES
ADVERTISING and MISCELLANY
h *    ♦
. i
7   * # Published annually by the students of The University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, Canada.
DONALD 0. STAINSBY  ._   Editor
DONALD S. ROBERTSON   Associate Editor
HOWARTH L. WOLFE Associate Editor
WILLIAM F-H. IDSARDI    Copy Editor
J. DAVID BARKER    Section Editor
EVA V. HOLM      Section Editor
ROBERT M. FYNN     Section Editor
ROBERT CAVE-BROWN-CAVE    Photography Director [ipTTi
*fc
$X'l !lwt
i
«*
~ *jcr -
*•*
mm-.   *       '^^
el^^ajF    g> -|»       -<•   ^J
,\
_-__L___.
^l*7JW_fr ♦■•N*
^-T
*R
#*,**
»_3r
ft ,   L/
•f.. Hi^
■*  r ~
'-,,*"'^.  — i
-    ****4_  <*
#-s*'4f
,-*\^—«K
Now there are lighted tapers in our souls,
A flame to light the pathway of the mind;
We touched the tapers here; and for the flame
Unknowing but all willing, traded youth.
If ages, like worn shrouds, we leave behind
Be glad we left youth here; no burial place
Is finer than these old beloved walls;
This happy land, Elysium of the young.
This book is but a record of that time
When, bound by common bond of student days
We pledged a lasting friendship with a laugh
And walked in comradeship upon our goal.
Our prayer is this    though paths of life diverge,
May we retain the concord of these days;
And lessons of this brotherhood recalled,
Please God, extend our hearts to all mankind. ■-.
m\
I
_E.*_L___   _*_____!
tm
■ J
[Th
&
**
■
«-*-£
w
• «vi4_Hj^^^ *
"*            .-.             "■   _        '       ■___
_____*_>__l
s
m
it
3S-
^
IK.
>  -.
r*_
*. *   _a
"*.  91 V_
W
,1*-iW_
_H         **_!__*_-~"_
%'-3_^_a
s
_E_^___v^_fc
^_^_r
■   •*,
■de                V
"__S__
*&■■
*«.-
'«IB£J£2-
£*
-a*
-
■   :1
■_
•:•"
_Fi
m
.-        _■
.^^
^
I
*■    ' _
1
A*
ft
r*                       j j£M~
.%^^^g$g#*&^ j^^T
■f    ~
N, _v
S5   ^
JSli___iW^f^ ^^-^
t> ^
1_9®BP_**
(i
F    J
k
To the casual observer, the UBC campus is much the same as others. It is
larger and more beautiful than many, perhaps, but it has the same quiet, studious
air at most times. When the weather permits, students lounge about the lawns,
on the banks of the ponds, or walk through the forest paths.
But beneath the veneer lies the real UBC, the campus of diverse clubs, of
politics and dances, of new buildings and old sports, of Canadians and Chinese,
Americans and Englishmen and Hindus, of engineers and artsmen, commercemen
and lawyers.
The very position of the campus lends to this diversity, this being of, and
interested in, many different things: situated on Point Grey, near polyglot
Vancouver and overlooking the Lions' Gate through which pass vessels of all
types, flying the colours of many nations.
All these things combined to make the campus UBC what it was during 1947-
1948 ... all of them contributed to the theme of TOTEM '48, the college's
tribal record . . . with that in mind, the editors humbly invite you to read,
in the following pages, some facets of the life of UBC—the Campus Cosmopolitan. Although it is at best a thin and
fragile shell, the campus is important
to any college, for it is the face whose
smile makes friends of strangers and
welcomes home old grads. Though the
geographical location may vary greatly,
there is something rightly similar
about all campuses; their staid buildings with their circling vines, their
quiet walks, their noisy Quads—all
spell Varsity in any language.
Some of this timeless similarity has
been captured in the photographs
reproduced on the following pages,
and it is hoped that these pictures will
help in future years to reconstruct
some of the highlights of life at the
campus UBC. For it was on this
campus that the year's history was
made. CAMPUS ARTS
The Library took on a new and lopsided appearance
during the year as workmen sped the construction of the new
wing. Designed to double the building's capacity, the new
wing will be matched in the future by a similar structure on
the south side. Until that time, students must bear with the
ungainly structure.
10 SCIENCE
One of the first permanent buildings on the campus, the
Science Building remains today the only permanent building
that is finished or unaltered. It is the home of aspiring
chemists, biologists and other delvers into the scheme of
things. Its traditionally noisy ventilating system continued
to amuse lower classmen.
11 PHYSICS
An 800 thousand dollar training ground for future
physicists was opened in the fall of 1947. The impressive
building embodies all the latest architectural advances in the
design of scientific structures. It is one of the most up-to-
date centres of scientific research on the continent.
12 '
ENGINEERING
Engineers lay claim, by right of possession, to the
Applied Science Building. To their indignation, some labs
and lecture halls in the building are used by Artsmen.
These "guests" are taught a full appreciation of the privilege
they have been granted.
13 BROCK HALL
Brock Memorial Hall—social centre of the UBC—is one
of the most popular spots on the campus. In it are housed
the modern Alma Mater offices, club rooms and a luxuriously-
appointed spacious lounge. Here students can put their
academic cares aside and pursue their social activities.
)« GYMNASIUM
The scene of many Conference and Intramural battles,
the Gymnasium rocks daily with exertions of steaming athletes. Containing the offices of the Physical Education staff
and the Graduate Manager of Athletics, the Gym is the
home of all P.E. majors.
15 ARMY   HUTS
UBC lecture huts claim the distinction of owning chairs
with the hardest seats in the world. Proof of the callouses
is in the sitting, and bustles came into vogue this year.
These huts are heated according to the  weather—just the
)6 NEW APPLIED SCIENCE  BUILDING GOT  UNDERWAY  DURING EARLY PART OF THE YEAR, SHOWED SIGNS OF FINAL SHAPE BEFORE END OF SESSION.
NEW CONSTRUCTION AT UBC
Face of UBC campus underwent many changes in 1947-48, some permanent and others not
Just as bombs and shells changed the face of the globe
during the war, bulldozers and shovels did the same thing
to  the surface of UBC's  campus  during   1947  and  1948.
The roar of motors and compressed air hammers distracted students studying and professors lecturing. Men in
work-shirts and denim trousers became as common a sight
on the campus as the well-dressed senior did.
No student escaped the changes that tortured the face of
the campus. At the beginning of the year even those who
knew the campus backwards had to be directed to a rash
of new huts that had sprung up over the summer months.
A new vocabulary sprang up among some students who
themselves had a hand in this new building. Some explained
with almost professional pride the intricacies of laying
cement, of putting up forms and taking jack hammers apar'
to see what made them tick.
LIBRARY WING shed its scaffolding during the year, but finishing had      UNSEEN by most students, workmen swealily work through heat to tar
to  wait the  summer. roof of the new Library wing.
17 CEMENT TRUCK RUNS UP FANCY RAMP TO DUMP ITS LOAD DURING BUILDING
OF NEW ENGINEERS' HOME.
Physics Building
Physics  Building  was  pride  of campus  when  it  opened
in   the   fall,   was   complemented   by   new   Library  wing
Most significant of the buildings that
was opened this year was the pride and
joy of the physics department, the
Physics Building. With much fanfare,
including a special edition of The
Daily Ubyssey, Premier John Hart
officially opened the building on
November 1, UBC's homecoming day.
Students returning to the campus saw
the addition to the library finally
taking on some tangible form. It was
almost as large as the original structure.
Although most students took no
notice of it and many hardly knew that
it had happened, a new addition was
put on the powerhouse to provide for
more adequate lighting and power.
Behind the bus stop the new permanent Applied Science building was taking
shape and at the south end of the Mall
the excavation had been dug for the
new bio-science building.
When they returned from their holidays it looked like the face of the
campus would have another fresh coat
of makeup.
FLAGPOLE, long listed on maps of the campus,
became reality during the year, flew Red Ensign
WORKMEN FUSS WITH LEVELS AND MEASUREMENTS IW APPLYING STONE FACING
TO NEW LIBRARY WING.
RE-INFORCING steel is cut into lengths as workmen prepare to pour concrete for Library wing
18 —^^^-^_M_I
Hi
Colleges- Residences MASS CAMPAIGN BY STUDENTS OF VIC COLLEGE RESULTED IN THEIR WINNING A NEW HOME IN NORMAL SCHOOL BUILDING HIGH ON WINDY HILL
VICTORIA COLLEGE
"The  Castle"  has  gone  but  the old  spirit  still prevails  among  the  Island  students
To the old timers Victoria College was a term synonymous with "the Castle." But times have changed. Not content
to be outdone by the students of UBC who trekked through
the city from Fairview to Point Grey twenty-five years ago,
the students at Vic College staged a trek of their own.
Following greatly overcrowed conditions at the Castle
and reports from the fire chief at Victoria that the building
was unsafe, the students banded together in 1946-47 to
demand a better deal. They set their sights on the building
that housed the Provincial Normal School an institution
that used about a third of the available space.
Talks with the appropriate officials got practically nowhere, so the students started a petition aimed at having the
College moved to the Normal School building. They turned
out one-hundred percent for a parade through downtown
Victoria; they climaxed their drive by an interview with
the then Premier of B.C., John Hart.
And they achieved their aim. Today, high atop a windy
hill in the windy city, the 450 students of Vic College share
the Normal School; one end is theirs, the other the Normal
School's, and everyone is happy.
There, directed by Principal J. M. Ewing and led by
Student President Jim Paterson, the students lead a full
scholastic life. And the coeds and men both agree that the
Tower, with its beautiful rolling lawns, quiet solitude, and
abundant space is a far superior seat of learning to the Castle,
quaint and steeped in tradition as it was. And when their
two years are up, they come to UBC already steeped in the
"do it now" tradition of the senior school.
?ll
«.
imk^m
m
jfH^^' ' "
PRINCIPAL J. M. Ewing is popular with students, helps to work out their
problems. Small enrollment allows him to know many students by name
STUDENT PRESIDENT Jim Paterson leads highly developed student activities;  presides  over   Student   Council,   which   controls  the   lesser   groups
20 COUNCILLORS   migrate   to   offices   on   second   floor   to   discuss   minor
matters and problems across tables littered with lunches, milk and cokes
MICROSCOPE   staff   works   hard   in   tiny   offices  to   publish   semi-weekly
paper    throughout    school    year.    College    annual    also    works    here
ENTRANCE   to  College   is   on   left   of   building,
College   occupies   about   two-thirds   of   space
Comradeship sums up in one word
the difference between the students at
Vic College and their cousins at UBC.
At the college, with its small enrollment, it is comparatively easy to get
to know and be known by one's fellow
students.
Generally, however, the set-up at the
two schools is much the same. Alma
Mater fees at the college show up a
major difference, however. The students across the water pay only eight
dollars yearly, as opposed to the 15
at UBC.
Returning to the similarities between
the two schools, one thing very much
CUTE  COED  Diane Sherwood   peers  into  microscope   in   bl   lab   in   College's   only   army   hut
Comrades
Small numbers make friends
in common on both sides of the water
is the abundance of clubs.
Vic College boasts a Players' Club, a
Hot Records Club, a Camera Club and
a Music Appreciation Club. The VCF
and the SCM are also represented, as
are the Literary Arts and the IRC.
Added to these a Science Club and a
Psychology Club gave the 450 students
plenty of outlets for their various
interests.
Sports took on great importance, too.
Soccer and rugby, as well as swimming, grass hockey, golf and basketball were carried on throughout the
year   under   the   care   of   men's   and
COUNCILLORS Taylor (left)  and Hay lounge  in
Council office while   Hay  tells   his  war  stories
women's   sports   representatives,   Marg
Richardson and Don Henderson.
Other councillors for 1947-48 were
President Jim Paterson, Treasurer
Lome Henry, President of the Literary
and Scientific Dorothy Wills, Women's
Undergraduate Society President Joan
Gonnason, Director of Publicity Rodney
Nixon and First Year Representatives
Aileen Smythe and Don Elliot.
Publications were important during
the year at Vic College. Small staffs
worked in smaller cubby holes to produce the semi-weekly Microscope and
the school's annual, The Tower.
CARD   PLAYING   in  adjacent   cafeteria   is  common pastime at College, is banned at Pt. Grey
SUNNY DAYS capitalized on by College coeds,
who   bask   in   autumn   sun   on   spacious   lawns
LIBRARY   is situated on   building's lower floor,
bears     sign      "College"      to     distinguish      it
21 GROUP OF STUDENTS GATHER NIGHTLY AROUND TABLES IN STUDY ROOMS AT COLLEGE TO POUR OVER DAY'S WORK; OTHERS LOUNGE IN DORMS
ANGLICAN COLLEGE
UBC  skyline  benefits  from  Tudor  lines  of school  for  province's  Anglican   ministers
Set well back from Chancellor Boulevard in the northeastern corner of the UBC campus are the Tudor lines of
the Anglican Theological College, training ground for future
ministers of the Anglican Church. Its medieval structure is
an impressive part of UBC skyline.
In charge of the college was Principal Kenneth E. Taylor,
who arrived at UBC at the beginning of 1947-48 session from
the University of Western Ontario, where he was professor
of church history and dean of residence at Huron Theological
College.
The college housed 31 permanent residents, 26 of whom
were students of theology. There were 14 veterans among the
ministerial aspirants, eight of whom were married.
The daily routine started at 7:10, when there were morning services in the small chapel. After this there was breakfast and then the morning classes began. Dinner at noon was
followed by more classes till 4:30. The day ended with evening chapel at 5 p.m.
The after-hours life of the college naturally centred
around the activity the students themselves created. There is
an air of relaxation about its shaded grounds and halls. At
night in the rooms there were quiet gatherings of students
who sought the companionship of others and relaxed in the
informality of their presence.
TROPHIES on altar are pride and joy of the Theologs. Rev. Watney often
spends hours talking to the students in quiet of his room in the College
COLLEGE ALTAR is scene of religious services,  symbolizes the centre of
Anglican learning in province of Brtish Columbia. College day starts here
22 STATELY LINES OF STONE-FACED COLLEGE HAVE BECOME WIDELY KNOWN  LANDMARK FOR THE  UNIVERSITY CAMPUS;  EASILY  SIGHTED  AT SEA
UNION COLLEGE
The   building   under   the   tower   is   a   self-contained   unit   for   study  and  relaxation
The tall, grey tower of Union College is not alone a
landmark to the students attending UBC, for fishermen and
sailors of the British Columbia coast can see it easily as they
sail the waters of Burrard Inlet. From the tower's peak opens
up a panorama of the university area, the city of Vancouver
and, across the waters of the Inlet, the dwellings of the North
Shore nestling at the foot of majestic Hollyburn and Grouse
mountains.
But the tower is not all of Union College. Inside the
buildings are situated the large library, a recreation room, a
chapel, offices and a complete kitchen, as well as the many
individual rooms for the resident students.
The college offers courses leading to B.D., D.D., and
diploma and degree courses in Religious Education. The
guiding hand of the college belonged to the principal, Dr.
J. G. Brown.
COLLEGE STUDENTS spend considerable time in the building's lounge. Also contained  under the
lower are a large library, a complete kitchen and private rooms for each of the numerous students
PRINCIPAL  of   Union   College   is   the   Reverend
J. G. Brown, shown here in his study at college
23 ACADIA'S  ACCOMMODATIONS  HOUSE EVEN THE PRESIDENT, SHOWN  HERE WITH HIS FAMILY IN THEIR HOUSE MADE OF CONVERTED ARMY HUTS
ACADIA CAMP
Famed first student residence on UBC campus houses even president, has younger set
COMMON SIGHT at Acadia   is  that of student
working   late  at   night,   seen  through   window
Acadia Camp, an easy 10-minute
walk from the lecture rooms, was a
working example during the year of
what the future holds for establishment
of permanent campus residences at
UBC. Housing nearly 400 single students, both male and female, Acadia
also catered to the needs of married
students and faculty, who occupied the
66 self-contained suites that are scattered throughout the camp.
Acadia's domain extends as far as
the two trailer camps where some 49
UBC husbands and fathers combine
studies, family life and homesteading.
The scene was picturesque with its lines
of washing above the rows of assorted
caravans.
The Acadia Council was composed
of President Bob Currie, Secretary
Moira Burns and Treasurer Barbara
Hoole. These students, aided by elected
council members, looked after camp
discipline and enginered many social
attractions that made Acadia a popular
"resort" away from the bustle of Vancouver streets.
The younger set at Acadia, the children, were organized into a supervised
nursery school, which is situated in a
hut specially outfitted for the purpose.
I
^llmmmm\   \ E*^^
fl
hit
■    ju---a
"■"I""
mmm^LmW       M
ill     1 '
YOUNGER SET gets its regular bath in the community washtubs, can often
be seen toddling around the camp with fathers' books and other material
TRAILER LIFE is the routine for more than forty residents of Acadia, often
dwelling houses family, complete with cat, but veteran must study there
24 »~VtT^- r-"T^Ef_ j-j-.-.-.
CUE-TEES OF FORT CAMP INDULGE IN A QUIET GAME OF EIGHT-BALL. THE CAMP LADS  ARE ADEPT AT  MOST  FORMS   OF  INDOOR  RECREATION
"STAG" FORT CAMP
Closer  to  campus  than Acadia,   the   Fort  houses  many  male  UBC  student-veterans
Fort Camp, overlooking Burrard Inlet, and a mere stone's
throw from the nearest lecture rooms, housed a total of 386
single male students. Although it is smaller than Acadia
Camp, Fort also has its own student government and is organized on much the same basis. Student Council at the camp
was headed by President A. N. Patterson, who was assisted
by A. L. Gourlay, secretary, and hut representatives.
Students at Fort Camp, though far from the city, found
that there was ample entertainment to be found at the camp
and nearby university evening functions. The UBC library
found many Fort Camp students to be regular patrons, as
the camp residents were renowned for studiousness.
Although Fort Camp is only a beginning in the drive
towards permanent student residences, it may be viewed,
along with Acadia, as the best and most efficient answer to
the present housing situation.
BIG   DATE   coming   up,   so   Fort   student  starts
with early shower as he makes ready for night
NEXT STEP  is   pants  pressing.   Facilities  at the
Fort   were   always   overtaxed   on   a   Saturday
FULL STOMACH  before leaving  was necessary,
here the camp cook prepares a succulent meal
25 TIME OUT FROM STUDIES IS THE ORDER OF THE NIGHT RIGHT AFTER SUPPER EVEN FOR HARD WORKING CO-OP STUDENTS, WHO DO HOUSEWORK
MENS CO-OPERATIVE
Working together,  the men of the Eighth Avenue house found a  way to beat costs
For students who had a yen to live cheaply, even at the furnace, washing the floors or dishes, or doing a general
expense of spending part of their spare time in doing house- clean-up job around the house. The only meal prepared by
hold chores   the University Students' Co-operative Associa- ^ housek wag din        and at othe_ timeg ^ residents
tion provided the necessary outlet. 1 he men s house was situ- • •        ,• '
ated on West Eighth Avenue, not far from the university, had to fend for themselves. But they took time off, too, during
and there each of the co-owners took his turn in fixing the the year, for spontaneous house parties, enjoyed by all.
REGULAR FEATURE of Co-op life is the exchange dinner between men's and women's houses. Casual
atmosphere of the house is indicated by writer's lack of concern over mis-spelling in exchange note
STUDY TIME in the Eighth Avenue house, and
Co-opper foregoes  pleasures  in   effort  to   pass
26 H1<rti-.-p»™   ^..A-*-;~:
CHORE GIRLS AT THE WOMEN'S HOUSE DISH UP SUPPER FOR THEIR LUCKIER MATES WHO  WILL DOUBTLESS BE LEFT WITH  THE DISHES TO  WASH
Like
THE WOMEN'S HOUSE
their male counterparts, the girls banded together to ease the pocketbook strain
The Women's Co-op House was also run by the University Students' Co-operative Association, and provided accommodation for a limited number of girls under similar conditions to the men's house. Each occupant purchased shares in
the association, and these, along with the savings made by
working for themselves, enabled the residents to live quite
cheaply for these inflated times.
The normal routine of the year was softened a bit by the
weekly exchange when men and women, in rotation, dined out
at the other co-op house. The association ran into a little
trouble at the end of the year, however, when it lost the
women's house. Consequently, those who had planned, as
many often do, to spend the summer in the co-operative way,
found that they had to double up in the men's house for a
short time in the spring, while another house was obtained
to house the women members of the association which, incidentally, was the first university group to provide housing
for UBC students.
BRIDGE GAME is popular feature in a Co-op. Enthusiasm for the  game
and degree of skill among players rate highly among stalwart players
USUAL CHORES of feminine living indulged in by coeds at the house in
spite of crowded faciltes caused by numbers stayng at the one abode
27 Administration of a university as
large and varied in its interests as UBC
is no small task. For there is not only
the job of controlling and correlating
the great diversity of courses in the
four main faculties and their many
departments, but tied in with it is the
never-ending task of looking after the
students themselves.
These students have the amazing
faculty of losing themselves in any one
of several dozen clubs, and many
students participate in several. It is,
then, the job of the Alma Mater
Society to watch over, through its dif-'
ferent branches, the needs and wishes
of each individual group.
The following pages are a pictorial
sketch of the doings of the two classes
of government at UBC—Faculty and
Student. ADMINISTRATION KNOWN  AS  "LARRY"  TO  THE   CREW,  "BLUENOSE"   DR.   N.    A.   M.   MACKENZIE   PILOTS    UBC'S   SHIP   OF   LEARNING.
THE MAN FROM PUGWASH
"Big Larry" came as a freshman with the Class of '48, but is destined to remain behind them
It's a long way from Pugwash, Nova Scotia, to Vancouver, B.C. . . . but one man bridges this gap; a man whose
name has become a byword from coast to coast.
He is Dr. Norman A. M. ("Larry") MacKenzie—soldier,
international lawyer and president of UBC.
Pugwash has every reason to be proud of "Larry." His
untiring efforts in the service of UBC have made his name
respected in university circles across the country. Faced
with the tremendous job of equipping this institution for its
influx of veterans President MacKenzie solved the myriad
of difficulties with a resourcefulness and ingenuity that is
characteristic of all his actions.
The president can write after his name (but seldom does)
the impressive string of initials B.A., LL.B., LL.M., LL.D.,
K.C, F.R.C.S., M.M. and Bar; he gets five and one-half
inches of Who's Who in Canada, the same as William Lyon
MacKenzie King, yet one of his associates has said, "He
probably would have been a playboy if he'd had the time."
His amazing faculty for making friends wherever he goes
has surrounded the president with a score of anecdotes concerning his ability to extract money for the university from
government officials with such charming grace that the process is almost painless. It is rumored that he persuaded
former Premier'Hart's government to part with $5,000,000
for university expansion during the course of a golf game
with "John."
President MacKenzie's charm and wit combined with his
organizational ability bid fair to make him the most popular
president the university ever had.
30 CONGREGATION   SPEAKER   ENLIVENS   ORATORY  TO   THE   AMUSEMENT   OF FORMER PREMIER  HART,  CHANCELLOR HAMBER,   PRESIDENT MacKENZIE
UBC's largest fall congregation saw three hundred and
five diplomas awarded as well as the presentation of five
honourary degrees.
Degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, was conferred upon former Premier John Hart. Four distinguished
scientists, two from the United States, received honorary
degrees of Doctor of Science, honoris causa. Recipients were:
Lee Alvin DuBridge, president of California Institute of
Technology; Ernest Orlando Lawrence, inventor of the
cyclotron used in atomic studies; Chalmers Jack MacKenzie,
president of the National Research Council, and Ormond
McKillop Solandt, Director of Defence Research.
Following the presentation of these degrees the three
hundred cap-and-gowned graduates marched in solemn procession to receive their diplomas before a capacity crowd of
friends and relations.
The assembly then moved over to the new Physics Building, where Premier Hart officiated in the opening of the
$800,000 structure. The four scientists also took part in the
ceremony.
Upon completion of this impressive ritual the premier,
his associates and the fledgling graduates were entertained
at tea in Brock Hall. This congregation was expected to be
the last one of this impressive size.
GIRL GRADUATE receives congratulatory handshake and her degree from
President N. A. M. MacKenzie. Fall ceremonies more personal than spring
BREATHER from lengthy graduation ceremonies was taken by Hon. John
Hart and President Emeritus L. S. Klinck, who chat amiably over cup of tea
31 DEANS OLD AND NEW
Retirements marked year's end among the seconders of president's efforts to find room for all
The Blue and Gold of the Arts faculty continued to provide cultural inspiration for hundreds of students who flocked
to its banner despite some doubts on the part of the
engineers.
Designed to provide a well rounded and practical background for the problems of every day living the faculty of
Arts includes courses ranging from courses in mathematics
and biology to studies of philosophy and social problems.
Students from all across the continent and even from India
and China came to British Columbia to take advantage of
its excellent curriculum and teaching staff.
As a tribute to its success stand an impressive throng
of businessmen, doctors, lawyers, teachers, ministers, professors and hundreds of other professional men who have
used their B.A. degree as a stepping stone to other more
detailed studies and pursuits.
Established last year, the Chair of Music, under the
direction of Harry Adaskin, has become firmly entrenched in
the hearts of music lovers not only at UBC but throughout
the city of Vancouver.
Working in close co-operation with the Arts faculty, the
Department of University Extension continues to offer
various courses to interested persons off the campus.
Dean Daniel Buchanan, who for twenty-seven years has
lems of war and peace, announced his retirement. With
Dean Buchanan will go Dr. G. G. Sedgewick, head of the
Department of English, one of the most popular and colorful
figures on the university campus. The faculty will also lose
Dr. Isobel Maclnnes, head of the German department; Dr.
W. L. MacDonald of the English department; Dr. R. H.
Clark, chemistry; Prof. F. E. Buck, horticulture, and Prof.
John Davidson of the biology and botany department.
These men and women have left a lasting impression on
the university and, more important, on the hundreds of students who have been privileged to receive instruction and
guidance at their hands.
Dean Buchanan came to UBC from Queen's University
in 1920 to head the Department of Mathematics and became
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science in 1929. To the
Dean and his amiable assistant Professor W. H. Gage fell
the tremendous job solving the problems peculiar to a campus
which was dedicated to receiving all the veterans who wished
to enroll. His success in solving these problems is evident
today with hundreds of classes flowing with a smooth efficiency that rivals that of the intimate pre-war days.
During his retirement the venerable Dean plans to devote
his time to writing and research. "While my hair has
turned grey my grey matter has not entirely disappeared,"
he said.
RETIRING  DEAN  DANIEL  BUCHANAN   COMPLETES  HIS   FINAL SEMESTER.      STUDENTS LEARN FIGURES FROM AMIABLE ASSISTANT DEAN W. H. GAGE
32 JOHN  N. FINLAYSON
Dean of Applied Science
GEORGE F. CURTIS
Dean  of Law
Sound Leadership
Capable leadership given to UBC students in various faculties by experienced executives
Capable leadership combined with administrative ability
characterize the work of the remaining deans of the UBC
faculty.
Her friendly smile and never failing helpfulness have
won for Dean of Women Dorothy Mawdsley the respect and
admiration of thousands of women who turn to her for advice
every term.
The faculty of agriculture under Dean F. M. Clement
has been expanding rapidly and now ranks among the finest
in Canada.
Both the veteran faculty of applied science under Dean
J. N. Finlayson and the lusty and thriving infant law faculty
under the leadership of Dean G. F. Curtis had a successful
year. The science class was a record, while the three-year-old
law faculty turned out its first lawyers.
F. M. CLEMENT
Dean of Agriculture
M. DOROTHY MAWDSLEY
Dean ot Women
33 DEPARTMENT HEADS
F.   M.   CLEMENT
Agricultural Economics
J. R. W. YOUNG
Agricultural  Engineering
G. G. MOE
Agronomy
MAXWELL A.   CAMERON
Education
G.   G.   SEDGEWICK
English
A.   B.   RECKNAGEL
Forestry
ROBERT  H.   CLARK
Chemistry
JOHN  N.  FINLAYSON
Civil Engineering
O. J.  TODD
Classics
34 DEPARTMENT HEADS—(Continued)
DAVID O. EVANS
French
M.  Y. WILLIAMS
Geology and Geography
ISABEL   MaclNNES
German
ELLIS  H.  MORROW
Commerce
CHARLOTTE   BLACK
Home Economics
HENRY F. ANGUS
Economics   and  Political  Science
F. H. SOWARD
International Studiot
A. F. BARSS
Horticulture
W. N. SAGE
History
35 DEPARTMENT HEADS—(Continued)
H. M. KING
Animal  Husbandry
FREDERIC   LASERRE
Architecture
ANDREW   H.   HUTCHINSON
Biology and Botany
DANIEL   BUCHANAN
Mathematics
H.   J.   MacLEOD
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
FRANK  A.   FORWARD
Mining and Metallurgy
HARRY ADASKIN
Mu-<-
C. E. DOLMAN
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
ESLI L. WOODS
Pharmacy
36 DEPARTMENT HEADS—(Continued)
S.   N.   F.  CHANT
Psychology and Philosophy
E. A. LLOYD
Poultry Husbandry
ROBERT OSBORNE
Physical Education
JAMES   O.   ST.   CLAIR-SOBELL
Slavonic Studies
GORDON  M.  SHRUM
Physics
C. VYNER BROOKE
Spanish
MARJORIE J. SMITH
Social Work
W. A.  CLEMENS
Zoology
GEOFFREY C. ANDREW
Assistant to the President
37 DEPARTMENT HEADS (Concluded)
CHARLES B. WOOD
Registrar
ANGUS  MacLUCAS
Bursar
Behind-the-scenes work of the university staff was eminently successful during the year in handling the administrative business of 9000 students.
Registrar C. B. Wood handled the problems of enrollment and examination results with his characteristic efficiency.
Moneyman Bursar A. MacLucas, saddled with the difficulties of fees, bursaries, scholarships and other monetary
problems, has done an exceptional job. Mr. MacLucas announced his retirement in the spring.
In his twofold task of veterans' adviser and employment
bureau head, Major MacLean was kept busy despite the decreased veteran enrollment.
In the over-crowded library, W. Kaye Lamb guarded his
hordes of books and dreamed of the day when the new wing
would be finished.
W.  KAYE  LAMB
Librarian
W. F. McLEAN
Veterans'   Counsellor
38 _... COUNCIL
Tat UK"'""1"       "       B  c
T»t
Student Administration NEWSPAPERS ACROSS  COUNTRY  FOLLOWED LIVINGSTONE'S AIR  CRASHES AS HE DID SPECTACULAR CONFERENCE-HOPPING BOTH SIDES OF "49"
STUDENT'S COUNCIL
Temperamental Council harried students and leaders alike with booze, election orders
Seldom in the lengthy history of its
existence has the student government
of UBC been fortunate enough to obtain the services of two such capable
officers as student-president Grant B.
Livingstone and Treasurer Bob Harwood.
Livingstone, because of his former
position on the Canadian Legion executive, had the firm grasp of governmental procedure so necessary to the
chairmanship of his temperamental but
enthusiastic council.
HARWOOD  GAINED  NATION-WIDE  RECOGNITION   IN  SPRING  WITH   ELECTION AS  NFCUS  HEAD
Dark, suave Bob Harwood, with a
year of council experience as Junior
Member behind him, handled the council pocketbook with a cool determination that won him the respect of everyone on the campus.
Unfortunately, Harwood's term ended in the spring of '48 when he resigned to accept the honour of presidency of the National Federation of
Canadian University Students—a posir
tion which made his name known on
every campus across Canada.
The conference-happy Livingstone
took UBC's name and fame to dozens
of universities across this country and
the United States. Moving by train,
boat and private plane, he hit the headlines more than once with spectacular
plane crackups from the wilds of northern B.C. to the southern states. Somehow he always managed to escape
unscathed.
Harwood, at times overshadowed by
the more flamboyant president, always
managed to carry out his assigned
duties with a quiet efficiency that distinguished all his actions.
40 PERT TADDY KNAPP BECAME FIRST COUNCIL  SECRETARY TO  HAVE   USE   OF   BRAND   NEW   BABY,   THE   PIERCE   WIRE   RECORDER
BIG MACHINE
Macdonald and Knapp proved important cogs in Council machine as year's business piled up
With clubs developing like mushrooms on the UBC campus, the offices of Literary and Scientific Executive president
became an increasingly difficult one. Despite its complexities
President Jerry Macdonald succeeded in making the club
program the most successful in the history of the university.
Macdonald's worth won for him the position of LSE
president for two consecutive years, the second year by acclamation. Further Council ambitions were wiped out in '48,
however, with his defeat in the treasural campaign.
On Macdonald's capable shoulders fell the task of organizing the Fall Ball, which for the first time was presented
on the university grounds. Considerable criticism was directed at Macdonald for his handling of the traditional
affair but veterans on the campus were extremely grateful
to him for providing an enjoyable evening within their
limited means.
Taddy Knapp, pert, efficient council secretary, probably
will go down in UBC history as the only recorder to have
a mechanical notebook. Miss Knapp's tangles with the Pierce
Wire Recorder never failed to provide amusement for the
wearisome Council meetings.
Despite her  difficulties with the robot-like  device, she
managed to complete a most successful term. Seldom losing
her temper, Miss Knapp's cheerful "will somebody please
repeat the  motion  a little  slower this  time,  please,"  was
guaranteed to shorten the determined oratory of more than
... J LSE PRESIDENT Jerry Macdonald served second term on Council in same
one councillor. position, brought experience to fob and many stars and events to campus
41 NORA   CLARKE   bossed  the  powerful  women's
group, finished year in big huff but made it up
STUART  PORTEUS  startled  Council  and campus
when   he   switched    from    Law   to   Theology
ROSY   HODGINS   headed   the   bumptious   USC
which suffered from considerable growing pains
JACKIE
women
SHEARMAN
for    second
looked     after     athletic
term,    few    complaints
The workers rounded out Council's good government team
And after the figureheads of responsibility came the seven Council members
who worked.
Effervescent 0. Nora J. Clarke (the 0 was for ornery according to the Livingstone) headed the Women's Undergraduate Societies and almost everything
else she could manage. A sour note near the term's end when she stamped out
of council was neatly patched up by the time the smoke cleared.
Christian on council, Stuart Porteus staggered everyone when he switched
his Law course for the ministry, still sandwiched duties of Junior Member between sermons.
Business-like Rosie Hodgins was chairman of USC which she discovered later stood for Undergraduate Societies Committee. She kept the following
people on their toes: Council, Engineers, The Daily Ubyssey, blood drivers, ISS.
Jackie Shearman and Dave Comparelli turned up at each Council meeting
with a shower-room air of running shoes and disinfectant. They were athletic
representatives.
Bob Bagnall, the burly, silent Engineer, coordinated social activities and
Gordon Baum member-ed for the sophomore class.
DAVE COMPARELLI bossed the MAD two successful years, developed varied  sports  programme
BOB    BAGNALL    struggled    with    claims   and
counter-claims    of    groups    to    plan    calendar
GORDON  BAUM held out for Interests of the
lower   classmen    from    his    Sophomore   chair
42 STUDENT   GOVERNMENT'S   GANGLING   PROBLEM   CHILD   ALMO ST CAME  OF AGE  UNDER  CONSTANT GOADING  OF  COUNCIL
THE USC
Problem child of the AMS struggles through difficult year, emerges with new purpose
Things had been tough for the idiot
child of student government, but before April, 1948, had rolled around it
almost looked as if the Undergraduate
Societies Committee was going to
struggle to its feet.
Formed as kind of combination
whipping boy, work battalion and advisory body by student council in
1945, there had always been considerable doubt (most notably on the part
of the chairmen) on just what the
function of the body should be.
It took Rosemary Hodgins a couple
of confused months in office and three
weeks in hospital, but towards the end
of the first term she was pretty sure
she had it all figured out.
Rosemary had a handful of keen
and efficient workers on her side (she
knew they were keen because they came
to meetings).
Quiet, dreamy-eyed Mary Leiterman
was secretary; Bob Currie, vice-president; John Craven, treasurer; Ralph
Huene, co-ordinator.
THE USC was set up as a sort of
sounding board to the council. It drew
popular representation from each of
the undergraduate societies, each sending representatives in proportion to
I heir enrollment.
The representatives from each faculty
were as follows:
ROSIE     HODGINS    coaxed,    cafolled,    goaded
fledgling      government      unit     thruogh     year
Arts, 18; Premed, 4; Applied
Science, 9; Agriculture, 4; Commerce,
5, and the minimum of three each for
Nursing, Teachers Training, Social
Work, Law and Physical Education.
Each member had one vote and
representatives were presidents and
vice-presidents of each faculty.
Chief projects carried out at the two-
weekly meetings were: Fall Ball committee, chaired by Ralph Huene; ISS
drive, lead by Bob Currie and Sue
Young; NFCUS dickering, handled by
Don Cunliffe, Roy North and Muriel
van der Valk; constitutional revisions,
Lloyd MacKenzie.
Students of 1948 were presumably
well behaved because the discipline
committee (some called them campus
c»ps) and the judiciary panel dealt
with only one case, handing out two
penalties for carding-playing in the caf.
Then, of course, there was the
annual probe into the mismanagement
of the Daily Ubyssey, but no one paid
much attention.
43 CLUBS TOOK THEIR ORDERS  FROM THIS  PANEL  OF  LSE  EXECUTIVES  WHO   PILOTED   A   RECORD   NUMBER   OF   CLUBS   THROUGH   A   BUSY   TERM
LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC
Biggest year in history of LSE saw club total soar to 72
More than three-quarters of all 9000
students who packed themselves into
UBC classrooms for the biggest session
on the books were members of clubs.
The selection of clubs was wide; the
boast, "a club for every taste," was no
idle prattle. Six major and 66 minor
clubs ran the entire gamut from microbiology to women's public speaking.
Whether the student was looking for
a fwe cozy hours with a microscope
and a group of friendly bacillus or an
inside look at the workings of Communism in Canada, the 1948 club program had just what the heart desired.
Organization of a program of this
scope (never before had UBC had so
many clubs) was no cinch, as a handful of eager workers found out. They
were the members of the Literary and
Scientific Executive. If they weren't
terribly literary and far from scientific,
they were certainly executives.
They had something of a head start
in being led through the bumper term
by a curly-headed, gimlet-eyed young
man who probably knew more about
campus clubs than any ten men in
Brock Hall.
He was dapper Jerry Macdonald. He
had  already  served   one  term   in  the
JERRY   MACDONALD,   made   second   term
as  LSE   head  even  better  than   the  first
office of LSE president when  elected
to his second term in 1948.
Jerry had had a busy year, but a
little girl with sparkling eyes actually
did all the work. She was Secretary
Nancy Davidson, whose even temper
and rapid efficiency startled even sober
micro-biologists.
Every two weeks representatives
from every one of the 72 clubs gathered for the LSE meetings. They had
passed constitutions, offered financial
edvice, organized "club-days," and
generally regulated club functions.
Two standing committees within LSE
shouldered a heavy burden during
1948. They were the special events
committee, which brough to UBC five
symphonies and 13 other attractions;
and the stag ecommittee, which worked
with the Players' Club and the Mussoc
to stage uaditorium shows. General
administration of the satge and properties was their big worry.
44 WOMAN PROBLEMS WERE WUS PROBLEMS.     INNER WUS EXECUTIVE MADE EVERY DAY LADIES' DAY AT UBC
WOMEN'S UNDERGRAD
WUS mix peanut butter sandwiches and hard boiled eggs with girl government
A dozen of the prettiest girls on the
UBC campus were also the busiest in
1948.
They were the members of the
Women's Undergraduate Society Committee.
Every Thursday was WUS-day for
them. ITiis meant they would bring
their peanut butter sandwiches and
hardboiled eggs to the Student Council
room and while President 0. Nora J.
Clarke munched her daily apple, they
settled the problems of UBC's Co-Ed
population.
Perhaps it was because three turned
out to be almost four males for every
girls on the campus; but somehow there
never seemed to be any problems.
Of course there had been the regular chores of the WUS; Hijinx, WUS
Co-Ed dance, a series of tea dances and
the annual banquet. There had been
plenty to keep the executive panel
occupied during the little Thursday
noon picnics.
They went on the warpath for WUS
Hijinx, turned up in Indian costumes,
whooping like savages. Congo Capers
was the title of the annual Co-Ed; a
little more polite savagery. The tea
dances in Brock Hall main lounge on
Friday afternoons were interesting  in
NORA   CLARKE,   WUS   prexy,   munched   apples
while   steering   Co-Ed   activities
one outstanding way.   There was never
any tea around.
The panel was constituted to rpere-
sent all girls on the campus and, therefore, drew representation from each
undergraduate society enrolling women,
from Phrateres, and from PanHell.
Arts had representatives from each
year out of deference to the overwhelming size of the faculty. The only married
girl on the executive was Mrs. Helen
Stewart, who took time off from her
housewifely duties to serve as first
year rep.
President, of course, was Nora
Clarke; vice-president, Rosemary Byrn;
secretary, Pat Tiedge; treasurer,
Daphne Black.
Four to one or not, the girls were
pretty sure that 1948 had been kind to
them however, and as they tore off the
April leaf from their office calendar
they had looked back on seven fun-
packed months.
45 PREMEDS
Premeds bunch muscles for last big leap that they hope will bring them UBC med school
In one of the white huts behind the
Brock members of UBC's Premedical
Undergraduate Society took a well-
earned rest.
The Senate approval given in December to construction of the proposed
medical school on the campus brought
to a successful conclusion a campaign
PREMED   EXECUTIVE   FOR   FIRST   TIME   IN   YEARS   COULD   SMILE   AFTER  GAINING   BIG   VICTORY
which the PMUS had fought for four
years. The Premeds had been battling
for establishment of a post-graduate
school of medicine since 1944. The
"big campaign year," 1947, had ended
with a government allocation of $1%
millions to the school.
Now Premeds are patiently awaiting
1949, at which date the school is scheduled to open its doors to budding doctors.
This year, sparked by an executive
headed by Jack Faghin, Premeds added
to their store of medical knowledge
by inviting prominent authorities in
various fields of medicine to lecture
at their noon-hour meetings. Under
student Jack Leggatt extra-curricular
courses in advanced first aid were also
given.
Crowning event of the year was the
annual Jejuna Jitters dance, given
jointly with Nurses Undergraduate Society.
ENGINEERS' UNDERGRAD
Redshirt cheiffains lead scarlet hordes to even greater triumphs in 1948
The redshirted legions were goaded
on in 1948 by as able an executive as
ever took slide rule in hand.
The  Engineers'   Undergraduate   So
ciety Committee fell into line under
Chieftain "Big Red" (his mother called
him Ronald)   Grantham.
Engineers had always held the name
BURLY  SQUAD  OF  EUS  MHIEFTAINS   PILOTED   ENGINEERS   THROUGH   RECORD-SMASHING   TERM
for spirit. Faculty brawls, ripsnorting
parties, el blotto, pep meets had been
the hallmarks of their distinction. But
in 1948 they outdid themselves. Besides
the customary carryings-on within the
faculty, they branched out to take an
important part in the student life of
the entire Alma Mater Society.
The Science ball had been a monster
success, as was the banquet and pep-
meets. Ttudent government's ailing
USC depended upon the Redmen representatives for the spark that drove the
bumbling body to act as if it might
almost last out the term.
Head men around the EUS bastions
for 1948 were vice-presidnet, Dave
Brousson; secretary-treasurer, Bob
Gray; first and second year representatives and members from each of
the professional clubs.
The term 1948 turned out to be a red
letter year for the Science men in more
ways than one. Almost every page
of this Totem attests to their activity.
46 RED CROSS EXECUTIVE
Unheralded trojans helped launch noble experiment in free plasma
The nurses were looking for blood.
In their crackling stiff uniforms they
patrolled the campus in the fall of '47
as the advance guard of a noble experiment.
The Canadian Red Cross Society,
front line friend to thousands of servicemen, had a peacetime project as
important as its wartime services. In
every hospital they would provide free
blood for transfusions to the sick whenever needed. British Columbia was the
first province to tackle the plan and
UBC was in the forefront of the attack.
The university's Red Cross Executive, five behind-the-scenes Trojans,
masterminded the program of collecting
blood from students to be sent throughout the province to "Blood Banks,"
where plasma would be always on hand
for all who needed it. The blood flowed
freely, and in the right direction, into
the pint bottles of nurses who staffed
the mobile clinics established on the
campus.
More  blood came  from UBC  than
from any other group of comparable
size, and British  Columbia knew that
UBC, as ever, was a good neighbor.
GOOD  NEIGHBORS TO  B.C.'s HOSPITAL-RIDDEN THOUSANDS  WERE THE  RED  CROSS  COMMITTEE
WORKERS, WHO PUSHED BLOOD DRIVE OVER THE TOP
ALMS OFFICE STAFF
Six smart young ladies bossed everyone including Council in order to get things done
Student council members thought
they ran the Alma Mater Society. But
six pretty girls on the campus knew
better. TTiey ran it.
Pert Bev Sheppard (whose name is
regularly misspelled as it probably is
here) whipped her staff of six over the
typing, stenographing and bookkeeping
hurdles with barely a bruised knuckle.
Whimsical Jane Lyle cracked wise on
the information desk as often as not
but the enquirers seldom went away
mad. Lois Webster cranked the mimeograph machine and rattled a mean typewriter. She and stenographer Nancy McGill looked fondly on life when the
fancy wire recorder absolved them
from Livingstone's spasmodic dictation.
The lass with the Lancaster lilt, saucy
Mavis Walton, doled out the cash, balanced the books, while Kay Dawe
wrestled with one of the most unusual
filing systems she had ever seen. ams office girls battled gamely with complaining students and ailing machines
47 Nowhere does the campus show its
cosmopolitan tendency more than it
does in the clubs and the activities carried on during the year. For there is
hardly a hobby, vocation or pursuit
that is not represented somewhere in
the lists of the LSE.
The activities are carried on by the
students as a whole, by individual
faculties, by the Greek letter societies
or by lesser groups. Of course, they
are not all just social in nature.
Groups like the Publications Board,
the Players' Club and the Musical
Society, the Radio Society and others
carry the word of UBC to the world
at large, and the world responds.
Be it dancing, debating, politics or
hobbies, it can be found somewhere
on the Campus Cosmopolitan—the
campus UBC. ACTIVITIES USUALLY QUIET WATERS OF THE LIBRARY LILY POND WERE DISTURBED ONCE AGAIN AS ENGINEERS AND FROSH FOUGHT IT OUT ON THE BANKS
FROSH WEEK
Frosh and Engineers mixed things up as usual during first week's orientation programme
A group of green, green freshmen
wandered casually across the Library
lawns in the fall of 1947, and as they
wandered they were followed by another
group of red-sweatered Engineers. The
group of green, green freshmen slowly
approached the Lily Pond and suddenly
found themselves set upon by the ferocious red-shirts. And so, as every fall,
the freshmen orientation program got
underway. The ensuing battle on the
lawns or in the Quad, however spectacu
lar they may have appeared, were only
part, and a minor part, of the overall
welcome extended to the year's batch of
Frosh. Tea dances, smokers for the
men and suppers for the women helped
to make them feel at home at UBC.
AT THE  TEA DANCES,   HOWEVER, THE   ENGINEERS TOOK A  DIFFERENT TRACK,   DID   THEIR   BEST   TO   MAKE   AN   IMPRESSION   WITH   FRESHETTES
50 p *_^^^
B'l       _-\_-f
Mr '      ^|                        _I_KW_I
1
|B>
■^p^   /
_■             ____________h_. ^^^^                  A fff
■          ■<■'■    "; 1
_      \       -__H
r^_H                    _^_i^_^_H_b   _^_^^^^t_i          -^-F■ v_E_
m
ME'.       ''"jiff    ]^^|
l_fl                                      ________ _____■
THE   FROSH   RECEPMON   SAW   THE   SHEDDING   OF   GREEN   REGALIA   IN    FRONT   OF  A   REPLICA   OF   THE   CAIRN.   FROSH   MET   PRESIDENT,   OTHERS
The Frosh Reception
After the battles Frosh were welcomed to university   at   traditional   reception   ceremony
The Engineers, and upperclassmen generally, might have
been a bit rough on the males, but they considered the
women in a different light. True, the new co-eds had to wear
the traditional goggles and hats, no make-up and so forth,
but nevertheless they were eyed with appreciation during
their initial days at UBC.
In spite of the terrors held out to all Frosh by the
orientation committee, they took it in good part. And after
the first week, they shed their regalia on a replica of the
Cairn at the Frosh Reception held in the Brock, where they
were welcomed by President MacKenzie and other faculty
and student representatives.
DEPANTING WAS  NOT UNCOMMON  DURING THE  FROSH-ENGINEERS  BATTLES.   DESPITE   HUGE   CROWDS   WATCHING,   FEW  TOOK   PART  IN   FIGHTS
51 THUNDERBIRDS GRIN  HAPPILY AS TEAM-MATE TOSSES  BALL  BACK  IN AFTER ONE  OF THE TOUCHDOWNS IN VICTORIOUS HOMECOMING GAME
HOMECOMING
Grads returned to campus in November to relive the old days, were amazed at changes
All the traditional college rah-rah
spirit was evident on November first
when alumni returned to the campus for
the annual Homecoming celebrations.
New sights for old grads included the
brand new Physics Building, the new
Library wing and the initial work on the
Applied Science Building. Many of the
grads had not been back to their Alma
Mater since before the army huts took
their place in every nook and cranny
across the campus, and to help these in
their efforts to find their way around,
Phrateres offered a guide service, and
_: -r*^
'     _**
__3__ •
m
"*' m
.   -.a i   '
>;
■
Vm
,'V
•    ?»
■ -. $
^&0
6£
' «#
W
,
4 '• r ■-r-
t V_L** *^W_i 1
GRADS GAZE AT VINE-COVERED CAIRN AS THEY RECALL DAYS OF CAMPAIGN AND GREAT TREK
conducted special tours of the campus.
There was the traditional Big Block
luncheon, following which the grads
watched the Thunderbirds win their
only football game of the season, defeating the Pioneers from Lewis and Clark
27 to 7. After the game came the
alumni tea and annual banquet.
Then, those who preferred to, went
to see once again the Toties of UBC
combine their eforts in the traditional
Potlatch, while others attended the annual basketball game between the
alumns and the Thunderbirds, in which
the grads were defeated 66 to 63 by
the university's first team.
Following all the day's activities two
dances were held to wind things up.
One, in Brock Hall, was strictly for the
alumni, where they danced the night
away to the tune of modern ditties
which were echoed across the campus
in the Armoury, where undergrads
shared the big building with the former
students. And no one minded at all that
a dog decided to run interference during the afternoon's football classic.
52 STUDENT   PRESIDENT   LIVINGSTONE   SPEAKS   TO   CROWD  FROM   PLATFORM IN  FRONT OF CAIRN AS  PART OF THE TRADITIONAL  CAIRN  CEREMONIES
Cairn Anniversary
Homecoming shares the limelight with the 25th anniversary of the trek to Point Grey site
Closely tied in with the Homecoming celebrations in 1947
was a second cause for a gathering of the alumni — the
twenty-fifth anniversary of the Great Treak and the founding
of the Cairn. Members of the Class of '23 gathered together
in the Hotel Vancouver to honour the 29th of October, where
they dined and remenisced of the old days in Fairview,
among the shacks. Student Council President Grant Livingstone represented the present student body at the gathering
and reminded them that UBC was once more partially housed
in shacks, this time called huts.
Preceding the banquet there was a short afternoon ceremony at the Cairn, at which J. V. Clyne, who took part in
the Trek, recalled the conditions as they had then existed.
Special tribute was paid by the 200 gathered on the Mall to
F. F. Wesbrook, the university's first president, and to
President Emeritus L. S. Klinck, his successor, for the part
they had played in developing UBC.
At the evening gathering, the former students relived for
a time the days of the Trek, and from deep down they recalled the old spirit that prevailed as they sang both popular
songs of the day and the more enduring college songs. Each
one received a silver pin—a replica of the Cairn that they
had built with the stones gathered on the Point Grey site
following their trek through the city in the eventful days of
1922.
Dr. A. E. "Ab" Richards sent a message of encouragement from Geneva where he was at the time with the Canadian delegation to a United Nations conference. Dr. Richards
was the president of the Alma Mater Society in 1922-23, and
chairman of the famous Student Campaign Committee which
engineered the whole drive to have the UBC moved to its
permanent site. He recalled the trials of the time, but noted
in his message that the whole campaign was also "a lot of
fun."
CAIRN PINS of silver were given to those who took part in the Trek of
'22.   Above   is   reproduction  of  design   of  small   lapel   ornaments   given
53 PROUD   WINNER   of   queen   contest,   Bev   Burley,   displays   heart-shaped
compact   won   with   title.   Miss   Burley   represented   Phys   Ed   in   contest
FALL BALL
Economy dictated move to hold ball in the
Armoury   for  first   time   in   dance's   history
Thursday, November 13, 1947, was the date of the Fall
Ball's first appearance in the Armoury. Formerly held downtown at the Commodore Cabaret, it was felt by those in
charge that the cost of the fall formal had become prohibitive
to many students. So, with economy in mind, the scene of
the function was changed.
Much publicity was given to the transformation of the
"Ugly Duckling Armoury" into a Latin-American setting for
a grand fiesta. And, indeed, it was hard to imagine that the
huge building was normally used as a drill-hall, once the
decorators had finished their job.
The Fall Ball was strictly a student affair. The dance orchestra under Frank Nightingale gave out with sweet and
hot and at intermission the University Radio Society produced the floor show.
Of course, the highlight of the evening was the crowning of the queen. The eight contestants were named by each
faculty. Students got a preview of the show at the pepmeet
held one noon hour in advance of the actual ball, where they
were also entertained by music and comedy acts. The winner
was Beverley Burley of Physical Ed, who defeated Betty
McKendry, Home Ec; Betty-Jean Goodale, Applied Science;
Marguerite Davies, Commerce; Mary Mare, Arts; Peggy
MacDonald, Agriculture, and Ruth Macdonald, Pharmacy,
for the honours. The winner received a heart-shaped compact
as a token of her charms.
Student reaction to the proposal to have the ball in the
Armoury was varied, but a poll by The Daily Ubssey showed
the overwhelming majority to be tentatively in favor of it.
Some writers to the paper felt that the dance, because of prohibition regulations in force on the campus, would be held
in the parking lot. However, the building was crowded, and
stayed that way till the end.
Honors came in bunches for the statuesque blonde who
captured the hearts of thousands at UBC's Fall Ball and
danced away with a Queenly crown. Beverley Burley was
celebrating her triumph a few nights after the ball with a
small group of friends who escorted her to dinner at a
romantic candle-lit restaurant near the campus. They sat
quietly in the dim half-light of the salon which had been
decorated with imaginative "left bank" trimmings, checkered
table cloths, Picasso-like murals and all. Suddenly photographer's flash bulbs flared in her face and a score of
grinning persons swarmed around her effusive as a Kiwanis
receiving line. With surprise, she accepted an orchid
corsage from a matronly woman. It may have been the
plot of a clever press agent but Beverley Burley got her
picture in the papers again, this time, the drum beaters
said, because she was the 100th guest at the new restaurant.
\Jff*L ^n
* ■__'     '
;
mf^mV'-^k.
HI
1 ^C
jj*"ff^
^____________JI
ffl^_H_
ml
WLmmm*
Jk^v
VOCALIST  gives out during one dance  number while  part  of orchestra
lakes   a   rest.   Music   was   provided   by   Frank   Nightingale's   orchestra
54 1
'                              *
■*,!f.
A                Sf                           i
\} '   •'*
<_#
i,
7     4    ^—^
^      _■           ^>
1
_M_L
L              ?
PUBSTERS  LIVED   UP TO THEIR  REPUTATION  FOR   HAVING  A  GOOD   TIME,  WERE   SEATED  30  AT  ONE   TABLE,  PROVIDED   SECOND  FLOOR  SHOW
Armoury Dressed Up
Extensive redecorating job had to be undertaken to provide proper atmosphere for formal
The details of the change in plans were announced by
Fall Ball committee head, Ralph Heune, in a special supplement of The Daily Ubyssey. There were outlined the changes
and benefits to be derived from this first attempt to hold a
formal dance on the campus. An artist's conception of the
Armoury was displayed, showing how the Armoury was to
be changed. One end was cut off on an angle to provide for
catering service, the bandstand was placed diagonally across
one corner, and in the northeast corner of the building a
raised lounge was installed for those who got tired with it all.
The Latin-American theme was borne out throughout the
hall, where decorations allowed no doubt as to the motif.
The queen candidates were escorted by two gaily dressed
caballeros and the floor show was also touched with bit of
Spanish.
Never before had university students furrowed their
brows more deeply over the problem of having a good time
than with 1947's gala Fall Ball. Weeks before the dance,
petitions were circulating in the cafeteria and through the
campus both protesting and lauding the choice of the huge
parade-square Armory as the scene of the "Spanish fiesta."
Jack Fraser, who began the anti-Armory crusade, said 90
percent of fraternity men would boycott the dance because
of "poor floor, expensive cab fare and the effect of the
floor on clothes." But the opposition who campaigned just
as tenaciously for the less costly party won out and the show
went on. Fraser's faction had the last laugh when the dance
lost money and angry couples spent hours stumbling through
the maze of tables and settings to find misplaced reservations. For the next year, Student Councillors decided, the
Fall Ball would be forgotten.
CABALLEROS   escorted   the   queen   candidates   as   they   paraded   before
whistling crowd just prior to vote taking. Contest close from start to finish
55 FAMOUS VISITING VOCAL TEAM, THE DEEP RIVER BOYS, WERE LURED TO   THE CAMPUS TO HELP PROVIDE PUBLICITY FOR GREEK GALA MARDI GRAS
AVERAGE COED, painted for the Fall Ball pepmeet by the Mamooks, was -
hit of Fall Ball show, where it was displayed prior to parade of queens
PEPMEETS
Free noon-hour entertainment popular with
students, who liked music and bawdy skits
Students of The University of British Columbia have a
mania for pepmeets. This was shown no better than during the
year 1947-1948, when students gathered in the Gymnasium,
the Auditorium or the Armoury to catch what was offered in
the way of noon-hour entertainment.
And a wide variety of tastes were satisfied by the entrepreneurs of these mid-day vaudeville shows. Name stars,
such as Mills Brothers and the Deep River Boys, came to add
sparkle to the peppy shows. At other times the students contented themselves with the musical makings of Frank Nightingale's orchestra and the sometimes original, often hackneyed,
quips and ad-libbing of the home-grown masters of ceremonies. But whatever the offering, there was always a good
response.
Pepmeets were held, usually free, for publicity for such
functions as the Fall Ball and Mardi Gras, or the opening of
the football season, or even for the hell of it. And they were
held to whip up enthusiasm for the first McKechnie Cup
games. Or they were staged just because somebody or other
thought it would be a good idea.
56 Big Shows
Queens paraded to delight at some, but at
others it was all music or "Meet the Team"
Although it was a doubtful point, at the year's end,
whether or not the pepmeets achieved their purpose, the pepmeet usually had a reason for its existence. At the Fall Ball
and Mardi Gras pepmeets, for instance, the candidates for
queen of the respective functions were lined up and paraded
across the platforms much in the manner of a horse-show,
but with much better audience participation.
The first pepmeet of the year was staged on the third of
October, in honor of the opening of the football season on
the campus. With the first home game (against CPS Loggers)
coming up on the week-end, Master of Ceremonies Herb
Capozzi, himself a member of the team, introduced the members of the team to the students. Music by Frank Nightingale
rounded out the noon hour performance in the Armoury.
The second show also featured footballers, but the main
event of the day was the scheduled fight between Ace Joker
Dick Ellis and Grant Livingstone, AMS president, concerning the Jokers' Club rooms (see page 180). Artsmen and
Jokers combined for the event, which occurred at noon
Thursday, October 23, in the Gym, which was also resplendent with Frank Nightingale's orchestra and luscious cheerleaders. The Jokers also put on another fine football show
in the Gym on the seventh of November, at which they
featured their frog race. Lome Glendinning mc'd and introduced the gridders just prior to their battle with Pacific
University.
On November 12, UBC's Toties gathered in the Gym
again to get a preview of th Fall Ball queens, where they
were shown a sketch (by Mamooks) of the average UBC
coed. Music by Nightingale. Capozzi mc. A skit by the
bubbling Jokers.
The Deep River Boys were present for the Mardi Gras
pepmeet, January 21, which was mc'd by Pat Kalensky. The
boys were helped out musically by a local jazz combo that
had the joint jumping while the queens paraded.
The Aggies put on a good show on
the fourth of February. Featuring negro
singer, Ken Spencer, the meet in the
Armoury heralded the coming Farmers'
Frolic, event of the year so far as
Aggies go.
Traditionally one of the hottest of the
noon hour gatherings, the Engineers'
pepmeet of 1948 did nothing to embarrass its perpetrators. Advertising the
Engineers' Ball, known in '48 as the
"Red Inferno," the meet was complete
with two bawdy skits and a raffle.
Throw in some music, and the 24th of
February, 1948, went down in Engineers' annals as a Big Day.
Audiences? Always capacity. Good
a place as any to eat a lunch.
SINGER SPENCER helped sell Farmers'  Frolic at Armoury meet, where he '\
sang to capacity crowd early in February. Later helicopter aided publicity
THE MAMOOKS sparked   many a  pepmeet,   provided  cheer leaders  for some,  posters  for others.
They even on occasion put on some shows of their own as well as supply other groups with publicity
57 SPIRIT OF MARDI  GRAS  IS ECHOED ADMIRABLY IN THE CLASSIC SHOT BY MICKY JONES SHOWING  UNDERGRAD  REACHING FOR CHORINE'S  LEG
MARDI GRAS
Popular second term formal ran to full house for two nights of gaiety 'under the Big Top'
The Commodore Cabaret has been, from time to time, the
scene of many of the parties thrown by UBC, and the staff
at that downtown institution has long come to accept the
madcap antics of exuberant undergrads as something more
or less routine. But exuberance hit an all time high at the
Commodore on the nights of January 22 and 23 in 1948, for
those were the nights of Mardi Gras, those were the nights
when the students of UBC atended the year's big formal,
and danced and sang the night away into the wee small hours,
and Chinatown.
Mardi Gras in 1948 was set "Under the Big Top," and
the motif served as well as any that could have been devised.
The traditional two chorus lines—the Tall Girls and the
Short Girls, were garbed in something filmy and revealing
that seemed to do its best to suggest the high spirits of a
carnival, and the cat-calls from the well-spirited crowd acclaimed the costumes, even if the well executed routines did
go unnoticed by many.
QUEEN   CANDIDATE  "COLLEEN   PEGGY"  CHATS  WITH  McKAY AND  FRIEND DURING  INTERVAL;  PART OF  CROWD (RIGHT)   LEERS  AT FLOOR SHOW
58 PUBSTERS REVELLED ON FIRST NIGHT OF THE BALL, HAD RINGSIDE SEAT;  (RIGHT)   FAMED   LEAVY TWINS   HAVE  TROUBLE   ESCORTING  THEIR   CAMEL
Lots of Fun
GPB's Mary Pat Crowe topped list of queens
for the honours, fashion show wowed crowd
Add to the hilarity a parade of so-called circus animals,
highlighted by the camel led by the famous Leavy twins, and
a fashion show, by the sorority girls, of everything from fur
coats through negligees to swimming suits, and Mardi Gras
had just about everything. But all the trappings to the
nonce, there was something about Mardi Gras '48, as there
has been about all Mardi Gras, that could not be developed—
it just was. That was the air of the students, that at all
times assured success of the venture to its sponsors, Pan-
Hell and IFC.
The charitable function had its queen parade, too, the
contestants, one from each sorority, being first introduced
to the student body at the pepmeet held on the 22nd and
again at each of the two nights of the actual show. When the
final ballot was counted, Gamma Phi Beta's Mary Pat Crowe
topped the list to be crowned queen of the Mardi Gras, 1948.
rr i ' TALL GIRL CHORUS relaxes for the cameraman between shows. The girls
came from each sorority to do their bit in aiding annual charitable dance
QUEEN MARY of Gamma Phi Beta dances with Chancellor Hamber after
crowning  ceremonies.  She  won out  over contestants   from each sorority
LEAVY TWINS grimace behind bathing suit models who are dwarfed by
giant proportions of the famous alumni, who returned to help Mardi Gras
59 CURIOUS CROWDS SPEND TIME LOOKING AT ARCHITECTURE'S DISPLAY OF   LOW-COST   SUBURBAN   DEVELOPMENT,   WHICH   WAS   ONE   OF   MANY
ENGINEERS' BALL
Engineers' night out was held over for two shows because of faculty's high enrollment
Kept from the alien eyes of Artsmen and other foreign
students of campus UBC lo! these many years, the classic
Engineers' Ball came out from behind its iron ring curtain
in February, 1948, with a plot to rake in the shekels. The
mammoth show, under title of "Red Inferno," was held, by
popular acclaim, for two nights for the first time in its history. Immediately, Artsmen and pubsters stole silently within
the familiar halls of the Commodore to see for themselves
just what Engineers do on their nights out. And they saw
plenty.
Heralded as usual by the special Engineers' edition of
The Daily Ubssey (printed in customary red ink) and by a
lively, bawdy pepmeet in the Armoury, the Red Inferno was
out of this world. Did not the publicity releases state that
the whole show originated in Satan's nether region headquarters? For sure it must have.
Displays were plenty, fun was plenty, and floor-show and
queen parades were pleasantly lacking. And there were not
enough Artsmen present to spoil the fun.
OSCULOMETER was popular stopping off place for swains with competitive spirit, but broke down due to pressure of business, annoying others
HUG-O-METER was almost as  popular, but failed to provide final thrill;
it, too, broke down a few times, but was rapidly repaired by Mechanicals
60 _i_
MECH   '50'S   mechanical   man   drew   many   onlookers   who   admired   its
flashing eyes and wiggling ears. The ogre didn't worry Mechs at table
NEW GLEE  CLUB  is  Engineer sortie into  culture,  performed  first time at
Red  Inferno,   where singers,   uniformly dressed,  gathered  on  bandstand
The Red Inferno
Ball was highlighted in '48 by novel displays and first offerings of newly formed Glee Club
A novel feature of the evening's festivities was the choral
offering of the newly-formed Engineers' Glee Club, on view
for the first time. Attired in dark pants and red ties, the boys
did their best by many old favorites.
Traditionally uninhibited, the students of Applied Science
gave their all to keep the whole affair in a gay and carefree
mood. Signs picturing camels and demanding in bold letters
that you "Forget Your Hump" and "Enjoy Yourself" were
tacked to posts throughout the building.
The traditional Osculometer and Hug-o-meter were there
and well attended by curious Don Juan's, although the press
of business threw them out of working order occasionally,
much to the annoyance of many would-be testers. Displays
were plenty, but perhaps the best, so far as drawing crowds,
was the mechanical man, whose slide-rule ears waved from
side to side as he talked to the audience.
So, once the big day was over, the Engineers retired
once more to the nether regions to plan the show for '49.
SECOND YEAR group who wined and dined at party feature Danny Wallace,   standing   left.   Formals   and   tuxes   blended   well.   Note  water  jug
FLOATING BRIDGE display of the first year Engineers drew many favorable comments. Each
department or year of the Applied Science
faculty designed and executed a display to
grace their tables at the Red Inferno. Keen
competition arises each year between groups
as to the relative merit of each display, which
range   from    intricate   models   to   osculometers
BIG  RED GRANTHAM,   1948
at ink stand presented to hir
EUS  prexy,   gazes
i from "the boys"
ONE OF MANY signs urging revellers, probably
needlessly, to forget troubles and enjoy themselves at the Engineers' big do of the year.
Previously the dance had been held one night
only and was reserved strictly for undergrads
of Applied Science faculty. In 1948, however,
the run was extended to two nights for the
first   time,   and   all   went   who  secured   tickets
61 ARTSMEN GATHER TOGETHER DURING THE EVENING TO SING A SONG AND DRINK A TOAST AS YEAR'S MOST UNCROWDED  PARTY CONTINUED
ARTS PROM
Artsmen from all years gathered informally at Commodore to find, for once, room to dance
MC APPLAUDS winner of drawing at intermission just prior to Prom's small-scale floor show
In an effort to bolster attendance at
the senior class party, the Junior-Senior
Prom in 1948 became the Arts Prom,
and probably the only informal university function to be held at the Commodore Cabaret.
On Thursday, February 19, Artsmen
gathered to pass a night in revelry, and
as their special guests they had the
English rugby team from the University
of California, who were at UBC playing the Thunderbirds in the first half
of the World Cup series, which was,
incidentally, captured by UBC.
Music by Calangis' Commodore Orchestra provided the backdrop for the
dancers who, at intermission, were
entertained by a vocalist and an acrobatic adagio team specially imported
for the occasion.
The Arts Prom was as usual open to
students of all faculties, and representatives of all were visible among the comfortably uncrowded tables and dance
floor of the traditional downtown fun-
spot. And it was a treat to see the males
in comfortable suits instead of the usual
tux "monkey suit."
ARTS PRESIDENT Huene forms nucleus of table group during supper time
of Prom's agenda. Artsmen's boss in '48, Heune was also Arts'  USC rep
HUENE AGAIN, this time at head table where he belongs. Patrons were
only group to have flowers and tulip decorations on tables, but none bare
62 CROWD OF WEARY AGRICULTURE STUDENTS PASSES TIME AT CARDS ON THE RETURN TRAIN  TRIP FROM  AGASSIZ  FIELD TRIP COMPETITION ET AL
AGGIE FIELD DAY
Annual spring trip to the Fraser Valley Experimental Farm was scene of close competition
The 27th of February, 1948, was a
big day in the calendar of the Agriculture Faculty, for that was the day the
student farmers took for their annual
junket up the Fraser Valley to the experimental station  at Agassiz.
There the budding farmers divided
into three classes for the judging contests for the two grand prizes, the
Freshman Cup, which is awarded annually to the freshman with the highest
score, and the Lady Jane Trophy, emblematic of judging supremacy.
The awards were made at the annual
spring banquet of the Aggie Under-
grads held in Brock Hall on March 10.
It was the 28th annual banquet, and
had as its speaker Ken Caple, MSA,
UBC grad of '25 and now regional
director of the CBC at Vancouver, Mr
Caple had been a guest of the AUS the
year before, and because of the big hit
he   made   with   the   crowd  there   as
sembled, he was called back for a
return engagement. Others at the head
table   included   President   N.   A.   M.
MacKenzie, Dean Clement, Dean of
Women Dorothy Mawdsley and Mr
and Mrs Jack Bell.
FOLLOWING THE  TRIP  CAME  MORE FUN AND   LESS  WORK AS   STUDENTS   DANCED  AND   SANG
63 DEAN CURTIS (second from left) smiles happily with other faculty members as the law students cavort the night away from their legal worries
COUNCIL PRESIDENT Livingstone joined gentlemen lawyers on their spree,
reclines  with   Pubster-lawyer   Les   Bewley   behind   candle-bedecked  table
LAW BALL
Law  students  take  night away from  their
studies to live like human beings for change
UBC's legal experts discarded their writs and torts in
favor of ritz and sports for a night at the Commodore, February 17, and carried on in a manner "beyond the long arm
of the law." Nobody was arrested.
Without spraining their dignity, they carried out what
appears to be a secret operation, Operation Law Ball, and
entertained themselves in a manner that has since been kept
under wraps, securely tied up in coils of red tape. Valerie
Manning headed the entertainment committee.
HOME EC GIRLS danced with their partners in cosy confines of Brock Hall
as they celebrated fourth anniversary of their small, glamourous faculty
SHIRLEY OLSEN and Pubster Pinchin talk things over with faculty representatives during course of evening. Friday,  13th, was no terror to men
HOME EC.
Girls of the Home Ec department celebrate
birthday of young faculty with huge cake
Glamorous cookery of the Home Economics department
coeds and the press of their own appetites outweighed a
double taboo that hung heavy over the heads of the men
"dates" who attended the Home Ec Ball, Friday, February 13.
In spite of the day, and the ever-present Leap Year threat,
the boys turned out in full flattering force for the fourth
birthday celebration of the Home Ec department. They left,
full, too.
Piece de resistance of the banquet was a huge icing bedecked cake with four flickering candles. Shirley Anderson
was in charge of arrangements.
64 FLOOR SHOW of sorts was provided at intermission as much bewildered
Aggie aped professor, tried to explain technical diagrams, got confused
BLONDE AND SOW got together in latter's wire and rail enclosure to talk
things over when dance really got tough, or boring, or hot, or something
FARMERS' FROLIC
Fun-loving Aggies put on good show with good publicity for their annual costume shindig
The Aggies' annual spring dance received one of the best advance publicity
coverages of any function at UBC in
1948.
At a gala pepmeet on the fourth of
February, the Aggies presented the
negro vocalist, Ken Spencer, to lunch-
munching students. Outside, the campus
was covered by Aggies selling apples on
their annual pilgrimage for money, and
out of the clear blue sky a helicopter
swooped onto the lawn in front of the
Arts Building—all part of the build up
for the Farmers' Frolic, in the Armoury,
where the crowd gathered in outlandish
garb to forget their studies.
Everything from dude cowboys to
t'baccy chewin' homesteaders were represented in the throng that milled on the
huge building's concrete floor. In the
centre of the dance floor a tree was
erected and fenced off by a split-rail
fence. And, reclining peacefully unaware
of   the   proceedings   in   the   southwest
corner of the Armoury, behind another
split-rail fence, was a fat contented pig
(see cut).
Bales of hay served many for seats in
the haphazard cabaret set-up. Soft
drinks were sold under the name of
applejack and apples were available
for everyone.
Truly an uninhibited affair, the dance
ranged on into the night, and nobody
minded a bit that some Artsmen had
sneaked in.
SO-CALLED COWBOY rests one out against rail
fence  In  centre of  floor with  his   peasant girl
CAF INVASION by orchestra of sorts was part
of publicity build-up by campaign-wise Aggies
PRIZE-WINNERS for their costumes lean proudly
against the central fence to pose for their pics
65 FUNSTERS  FROLIC THROUGH COMMODORE AT ANNUAL TEAR
SCANTILY   CLAD   kiddies   receive   prizes   at   Bawl,   as   Jokers  culminate
successful year.
Kiddies Bawl
Madcap Jokers' Club Presented Their Annual
Costume Classic, Budgeted for 17 Cents Profit
When official UBC pranksters, the Jokers' Club, decide
to "toss a hop" they leave no gag unturned to make it the
most remembered function of the year. More than 300 who
braved the wint'ry blasts in diapers, sailor suits and knee
pants to turn up at the Commodore on February 10 well
remember "The Kiddies' Bawl."
Budgeting to earn 17 cents, the campus zanies charged
$3.76 per couple for the annual laugh orgy, which got under
way with a gag-packed mad drive featuring soap box racing
on the Mall.
CHIEF  CLARKE LEADS  BUCKSKINNED  WUS   EEXCUTIVE   IN WAR  WHOOPS-
HI JINX
Coeds Gathered in Brock for Annual Party, Became Indians
COY SQUAW, alias Tennant, is watched closely.
Brock Hall was given back to the
Indians for one night in 1948—February 12. For that, was the night of
WUS's annual Hijinx party, and the
theme for the year was taken from
the folklore of the Haida's. And, true
to Ubyssey tradition, one of the male
reporters, Hal Tennant, crashed the
party. Also true to tradition, the inter
loper was discovered and ejected from
the hall. .,
"Now I know what women do at hen
parties,** Tennant wrote. "They torture
hefyW^rnen, that's what they do." He
described how he was discovered and
then paddled by each of the 141 women
(he said he counted them) there. The
women enjoyed it anyhow.
66 CANADIAN   PREMIERE  OF  AIRBORNE SYMPHONY  HIGHLIGHTS   CULTURE   PARADE   STAGED   BY   SPECIAL   EVENTS    COMMITTEE
STARS
Culture Brought to Point Grey
By Special Events Committee
Outstanding   stars were  brought  to
the campus UBC once again in 1947-
48 by the Special  Events  Committee,
under leadership of Jerry Macdonald.
Perhaps the highpoint of the year
was the Canadian premiere of the Airborne Symphony by Marc Blitzstein.
Taking part in the performance were
100 UBC singers who formed the
chorus of the "vocal" production. The
UBC singers were coached in their job
by the Vancouver Symphony's conductor, young, amiable Jacques Singer,
and John Avison and C. Haydn
Williams.
The Vancouver Symphony appeared
at other times, too, under Singer, John
Avison and the concert master, Albert
Steinberg. Other pass features of SEC
are discussed  overpage.
SPORT-COATED   Jacques   Singer  draws   beauty
out of Symphony orchestra.
STUDENT    CHORISTERS    carol    through    lilting
melody  passage  of Airborne   In   UBC  armory.
MUFFLED TYMPANNIS roll in dramatic passage
from    Vancouver    Symphony    student    show.
67 BARTON, FRANK, 'CELLIST, was one of more popular offerings to student
body  in the  course  of noon-hour concerts  by  Special  Events  Conmirtee
Students' compulsory season's ticket turned
out to be free pass to galaxy of famous stars
When registering students slid their fifteen dollar AMS
ante across the registrar's counter there was sometimes a little
behind-the-hand mumbling.
What they probably didn't realize then was that they
were buying, along with all the rest of the Alma Mater
privileges, a season ticket to what turned out to be one of
the best year-round floor shows in UBC's bustling young
history.
What the Special Events Committee loosely termed pass
features included, in 1948, five full-length Vancouver Symphony programs, a Canadian premiere of the Airborne
Symphony, a galaxy of top-billing dance teams, and more
singers and instrumentalists than you can shake a libretto at.
Beak-nosed Jerry Macdonald and his show-wise handful
of Special Events Committee workers poured long over
publicity releases, came up with the best selection in years
. . . and for prices minute alongside downtown scales.
Hundreds of culture-conscious who packed the Auditorium and the Armoury for the two-weekly treats liked it.
They must have. More than a few skipped l:30's when programmes ran over schedule.
KURT VON SCHUSSCHNIGG caused quite a stir when he was invited to
speak on campus, and after lengthy battle appeared as evening guest
TENOR FRANK ADAMS sang to a full house in the Auditorium, like the
others he did not seem to mind the lunch-chewing, late-arriving audience
6ft SUSAN JOY THORNEYCROFT CAPTURED UBC  HEARTS AND LED TO  CAMPUS LEGION  CHALLENGING  DOMINION  TO NATION-WIDE BABY  CONTEST
BUBBLING BABIES
Diaper Derby started at UBC grew into nation-wide effort; UBC ate dirt as U of A entry won
A Diaper Derby of nation-wide proportions grew out of a UBC beautiful
baby contest in the spring.
Competition was sponsored by
campus branch of the Canadian Legion.
Incensed by a UBC boast that "our
province has the tallest trees and most
beautiful babies in the Dominion,"
student-parents attending eleven universities across Canada threw their
bonnets in the ring, and swamped the
Legion office with pictures of their
gorgeous offspring (infant).
In the rattle duel with the best of 'em,
UBC confidently backed campus queen
Susan Joy Thorneycroft, glamorous
blue-eyed looker aged 23 months. The
tiny Little Mountain Camp charmer
was officially crowned by retiring
monarch Mary Pat Crowe, coed Mardi
Gras winner.
With such a pert 'n pretty champion,
UBC hopes ran high for the inter-
Varsity title. The dark-haired little miss
was the center of all the excitement
attendant to a nation-wide beauty contest. Apparently unmoved by the ac-
clamaitons of her charms, Susan Joy
maintained an air of composure and
self-confidence throughout the entire
contest.
Unfortunately, in the final round of
the Diaper Derby, the UBC queen lost
out to the University of Alberta's pride,
Peter Devine. Little King Peter, aged
18 months, is the son of a student
veteran.
The colossal task of selecting the one
beautiful baby as winner, from so many
appealing tots, was obviously not one
to be envied. Judge M. J. Coldwell,
CCF leader, admitted he fell for Peter's
curly hair. Other members of the
judging board included Progressive
Conservative leader John Bracken, and
Maj .-Gen. C. B. Price, head of the
Canadian Legion.
JUDGES AT   LOCAL CONTEST  HAD  HARD  JOB  TO   CHOOSE  FROM   ENTRIES   AT LEGION   DANCE
69 AWARD   WINNERS   DAVIDSON,   WILSON,   CREALE,   GREER   BECOME   MEMBERS   IN   1948
HONOURARY LSE
Awards handed out for superior service in LSE Clubs
Service "above and beyond the call of study" elected
these campus notables to the Literary and Scientific Honourary Society.
Membership in the society is awarded for outstanding
contributions to campus club activities. Major clubs may
nominate two for the award; minor clubs, one.
LSE president Jerry Macdonald, also president of the
Honourary Society, established something of a university
precedent,   in  heading  both  organizations  for  two   years.
Recipients for 1948 were: hardworking Nancy Davidson for her work as director and actress in many Players
Club productions and as secretary of LSE;
Whip-cracking Michael Creal for his contribution as
president of the Historical Society and vice-presdent of the
Parliamentary Forum;
Epic-making J. Wendall Forbes who sparkplugged
Mussoc hits as both business manager and chorister;
Speech-making Cliff Greer who headed the Parliamentary Forum;
Script-writing Ernie Perrault who established the
Radsoc in its new studio and formed an inter-university
Radsoc, in WURF;
Serious-eyed Mario Prizek who assisted most major
clubs with his literary and artistic efforts;
Pace-setting Cal Whitehead who caromed through
Mamooks, Radsoc and Players Club activities with equal
abilities;
Quick-changing Beverly Wilson who was star, director
and 1946-1947 president of the Players Club, won drama
scholarship as UBC thespian.
HONORARY  LSE  INDUCTEES  ALSO INCLUDE  FORBES,   PRIZEK,   PERRAULT,   AND  WHITEHEAD
70 Minor Clubs HIGH ABOVE ACTORS, STAGE CREW WORKS IN SOUND EFFECTS BOOTH FOR THE PRODUCTION OF PERRAULT'S ORIGINAL "LET SLEEPING GODS LIE"
PLAYER'S CLUB
In their little cubby-hole in the Auditorium Green Roomers worked hard to produce five plays
A small green room upstairs in the Auditorium has as its
furniture two or three beaten-up old chesterfields, several
odd chairs, lunch papers, three or four decks of cards, each
with a card or two missing, and 75 people. The walls are
decorated with group pictures of "Pygmalion," "Berkley
Square," "Taming of the Shrew," "Pride and Prejudice,"
'What Every Woman Knows" and countless others.
For this small green room is the home of the UBC Players'
Club, which in 1947-48 was 33 years old—the same age as
the University itself.
President Jerry Williamson piloted the club through the
trials of the bigest postwar year the Players have yet tackled.
The local production of five plays as well as a junket to
Winnipeg for Western Universities' Drama Festival, and a
tour in the spring of the interior of B.C. with stopovers at
Kelowana, Vernon and other points, proved once again that
the Players' Club was not only the oldest student group on
the campus, but one of the liveliest.
The year began for the Players' Club early in the fall,
when old hands looked over the crop of aspirants to choose
those most fitted to fill up the club's membership. Fifteen
of the group's roll were, as usual, made up of stagehands,
the crew that provided the scenery and lighting, that handled .
the curtains and the sound effects. The other sixty acted in
the atmosphere created from them by the hidden fifteen.
On highlight of the year was the production of a new one-
act play—'Let Sleeping Gods Lie"—writen by UBC Student
Ernie Perrault. The home-grown production was presented
with three others in the club's annual fall play offerings.
The spring play—"The School for Scandal"—met with
student aclaim on the campus, and was heralded well in the
course of its tour through the province.
"WOMEN IN COUNCIL," according to Ubyssey critic, was saved by acting of  Ned Larsen,  who turned  otherwise dull  comedy  into  god farce
MAKING-UP BACK STAGE, cast of "Aria da Capo" prepare to face audience on first night of fall productions, "da Capo" was entered in Festival
72 LOIS SHAW PLAYED  COLUMBINE  IN COMEDY SEQUENCE OF
CAPO," A PLAY ON WAR
"ARIA DA
PIERROT WAS PHIL KEATLEY'S BABY AS HE CO-STARED WITH SHAW IN
DRAMA FESTIVAL ENTRY
Fall Plays
'Aria da Capo" represented UBC at Drama Festival in Winnipeg; Perrault original played
The fall plays in 1947-48 featured "Aria de Capo," a
sympolic play of comedy and tragedy by Edna Saint Vincent
Millay. Joy Coghill directed, and starred Lois Shaw as Columbine and Phil Keatley as Pierrot in the comedy sequences. In
the ensuing tragedy scenes, Cal Whitehead and Jack Cairns
played Thyhsis and Corydon respectively and Ron Walmsley
the figure of tragedy, Cothurnus. "Aria da Capo" represented UBC at the Western Universities' Drama Festival
at Winnipeg.
Ernie Perrault's "Let Sleeping Gods Lie" featured Bill Vel-
lutini as Jupiter and Betty Peyman as Juno. Joan Powell
played Venus, Bernie Reid was Terpsichore and Dick Goss,
Mars. It was under the direction of Frank Vyvyan.
"The Miracle of St. Anthony" brought to light a new star
in the club's circles—Daphne Hutcheson—who played the
bewildered but believing maid, Virginia. Cyril Groves played
the blessed saint and Wally Marsh portrayed Gustavus. John
Wickham Barnes directed, assisted by Ray Bates, who also
took a minor role.
"Women in Council," from a Greek original by Aristophanes, was, in the words of a Ubyssey critic, turned "from
a light and somewhat dull comedy into a hilarious farce by
the vaudevillian antics of Ned Larsen," who acted Blepyrus.
Norma Bloom was his wife, Praxaga.
DIRECTOR   COGHILL  makes  last  adjustment ta
Ron  Walmsley's costume  as  figure of  tragedy
JOAN POWELL hams for the photographer during rehearsals foi "Let Sleplng Gods Lie," in which
she  played  part of  a  very very sultry Venus  in the original  play  by  Emie Perrault,  Arts  '48
73 PART OF ELABORATE SET AND COSTUMES OF "SCANDAL" ARE SHOWN BYCLOTHIER, KEATLEY, GOULD AND SHAW DURING LAST-MINUTE REHEARSAL
"School For Scandal
IJ
Extravagant foppery of 18th Century portrayed
ambitious Green Roomers' spring production
The Players' Club's traditionally near-professional spring
performances received a shot in the arm in 1948 as the
Green Roomers banded together once again and churned
out the 18th Century comedy of manners, "School for
Scandal."
The extravagant foppery of the period was realistically portrayed in the acting, costumes and sets used in the play.
The sets and costumes were designed by student Mario Prizek,
and the clothing alone cost the club some $600. Shimmering
satin characterized the dress of the women, and most of the
men appeared in rich velvet and gold braid. It took the stage
crew three months to build the sets as designed by Prizek.
Student interest in the production was high from the outset, and all tickets for the student nights were distributed
long before the first performance, going to the student body
in the short period of two hours.
COSTUMES designed by Mario Prizek, Arts '48, provided much of splendor
of  '48   presentation,   "School  for Scandall."  Ex-student  Coghill   directed
GEORGE BARNES, as Charles Surface, was scalped from the ranks of the
University Radio Society to take part; long hair became famous on campus
74 VETERAN MUMMER JAMES ARGUE TOOK MALE LEAD AS SIR JOSEPH, WOUND   UP   HIS  LONG   CAREER   IN  THE   PLAYERS'   CLUB   IN  THAT   BIGPART
"Scandal" On Tour
Argue and Forrester led scintillating cast of "Scandal" through many perfomances in province
Jim Argue took the male lead of Joseph Surface. He was
supported by Anne Forrester as Lady Teazle. And Players'
Club alumnus Joy Coghill returned to the Green Room to
direct the play with the assistance of Nancy Davidson.
Other major parts were taken by Dave Massy as Sir Peter
Teazle, Lois Shaw as Lady Sneerwell, George Barnes as
Charles Surface, Earl Bowen as Sir Oliver Surface and Isobel
Gold as Mrs. Candour. In the minor roles were Ned Larsen,
Phillip Keatley, Robert Clothier, Nanagh Richardson, Walter Marsh, Jack Cairns, Tino Genis, Cyril Groves, Stuart
Campbell, Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Bill Vellutini, Jim Shaw,
Hilda Thomas and Gordon Sick.
An innovation in '48 was the holding of a matinee of the
year's big production. The 4 p.m. showing was staged specially for high school students, in order to familiarize them
with the play before they had to read it as part of the course
in English 100.
Following the end of exams, the Players' Club took "The
School" on tour throughout the interior of B.C., re-establishing an old pre-war custom. Final performance was in downtown Vancouver, to the general public, at the International
Cinema Theatre.
And, in the spring, the Players' Club of Victoria College
came to the mother campus with their production of "To-
varich," which ran in the University Theatre in conjunction
with the downtown presentation of "The School for Scandal"
DIRECTOR  COGHILL  fixes  a   wig  |ust  prior to   "on stage'   call.   Coghill
directed Drama Festival entry in fall, "Aria de Capo",-former Green Roomer
ROUTINE STRUGGLE into their coats was part of task for male members
of "Scandal" cast, who found it hard to get used to extravagant styles
75 Cf
Robin Hood
i.
ROBIN SERVICE sings booming approval of roistering Sherwood bandits
in Mussoc hit.
MAID   MARIAN,   Doris   Dain,   looks   askance,   dreams   of   swashbuckling
lover Robin Hood.
The old, old story of Sherwood Forest was told
once again in music and song by Mussocers
John Fish had his hands full in 1947-48. He was president
of the UBC Musical Society, that sparkling group of vocalists and musicians who each year give out with a high-class
operetta for the entertainment of their fellow students. Not
only that, Mr. Fish was also boss of the subsidiary Glee Club,
which revitalized in the previous year from a long war-
induced coma.
High in the Glee Club's agenda in 1947-48 was its participation in the Canadian premiere of Marc Bitzstein's "Airborne Symphony," under the direction of Jacques Singer,
resident conductor of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.
C. Haydn Williams, the director of the Musical Society, took
part in their training, along with John Avison and Mr. Singer.
The major production of the year for the Mussoc was the
annual spring presentation, in '48, a repeat of "Robin Hood,"
an operetta of Sherwod Forest by Reginald de Koven. The
show was first produced by Musoc in 1937.
Altogether, some 125 persons tok part in getting "Robin
Rood" behind the footlights for UBC's music lovers. There
were 10 principals, a chorus of 30, 30 minor parts, a 24-
piece orchestra and 31 behind-the-scenes workers doing
make-up, working on costumes and preparing sets.
Kelvin Service, a Mussoc stalwart, took the title roll of
wooing Maid Marian, played by Doris Dain. John Fish as
the sheriff did his best to break up the love affair, but in
the end was outwitted, partially through the help of Marjorie
Johnson as Alan-a-Dale. Douglas Wetmore handled Little
John, Art Palmer added a touch of comedy as Sir Guy, Dorothy McPhillips played Dame Durden, Walter Hunsaker was
Friar Tuck and Sheila Rayner played Annabelle.
Scenes at rehearsals were of great informality. The men
rehearsed their parts minus their coats and ties; the women
were in skirts and sweaters. The musical director, C. Haydn
Williams, likewise was in his shirt sleeves, perpetually chewing a cigar. Assistant dramatic director Walter H. Gage
had his persistent pipe in his mouth on all occasions. Perhaps the most informal of the group was the dramatic director, E. V. Young of Theatre Under the Stars and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, who kept the crew in laughter as he pantomimed the parts of actions for the various
actors.
A review of the operetta, which ran for four nights on
the campus, was written for The Daily Ubyssey by visiting
journalist Al Kullman of the University of Washington
Daily. Kullman gave John Fish the orchids for best performance, claiming that Fish "carried out his combination villian-
comedian role with excellent stage presence. His resonant and
expressive voice made his performance and singing the best
in the show." Others singled out by Kullman included Doris
Dain (Lady Marian), Douglas Wetmore (Little John), Art
Palmer (Sir Guy) and Walter Hunsaker (Friar Tuck). He
also praised the orchestral direction of C. Haydn Williams.
Following their sucessful run on the home campus, the
Musical Society took the story of Sherwood Forest south
to the University of Washington, as part of an annual musical exchange with that university. The club was enthusiastically received and entertained by the Americans, along with
their presentation, which received high praise.
76 JUST TO  SPOIL THE  EVIL SHERIFF'S FUN,  KELVIN  SERVICE  IN TITLE  ROLE OF "ROBIN HOOD" BREAKS FREE AT LAST MINUTE TO CLAIM HIS OWN
77 SPOTLIGHT   focuses   on   solo   singer   in   Mussoc   "Robin/'
singers backed up Mussocers to make "Robin" smash hit.
Glee   club
ORCHESTRA REHEARSES under direction of Music Director C. Haydn Williams, who at all times demonstrated the informal atmosphere of Musoc
ROISTERING BANDITS  of  Sherwood  forest  clown after curtain drops on
opening night of Mussoc hit "Robin."
GLEE CLUB
Musical Society subsidiary took part in Airborne, gave shows of its own; a little highbrow
Returning to the Glee Club, that little publicized branch of
Mussoc, it is Worthy to note the numbers that participated
in the premiere of the "Airborne."
Some 75 haritones and bases, 50 tenors and 25 contraltos
joined the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra for the performance, along with the narrator, Juan Root. The event was
one of the highlights of the University's cultural year.
Following close on the heels of the long and exacting
rehearsals under Jacques Singer, Mr. Williams and John
Avison, the club banded together for its annual song concert,
which also was held in November. The emphasis in Choice
of songs for the Glee Club shifted in 1947-48 from the lighter
variety to light classical and classical songs. The more diffi-
cul program was once more guided by the club's musical
director, Mr. Williams.
Friendly rivalry between the occupants of Room 207,
Auditorium, and the Green Roomers upstairs continued at a
high pace, but efforts were made to keep the stage crews
happy by providing some sort of unified control.
Glee Club choristers won popular acclaim with their choral
background work at the spring graduation ceremonies as
well as at the Airborne.
Banks of upturned faces, each with a mortar board
perched jauntily, stood behind the faculty on a raised platform. They filled the armory with the" ceremonial strains
of the Alma Mater Hymn -as"graduates filed into position
with academic gowns flowing and eyes shining.
78 FLUTES, WINDS, AND STRINGS TAKE A RUN AT THE MELODY OF THE UN FINISHED.    INFANT STUDENT ORCHESTRA WORKED HARD, DID GOOD JOB
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY
New group of the LSE proved to be prize baby of campus culture lovers in first year of life
Swaddling-clothed baby of the Literary and Scientific family line-up was
the University Symphonic Orchestra
Society, whose function was to give
students opportunity to perform as a
part of a symphonic group.
Born as the long-cherished hope of
a persevering, music-minded group on
the campus, the infant really came to
life just before exams, in December.
By the end of the academic year, the
club had grown into a husky youngster, with four public appearances to
its credit.
Its parents were the Symphonic Club,
which acted as a patron organization,
and the University Concert Orchestra.
The latter, through the encouragement of Professor Harry Adaskin and
the music department, expanded to
make room for the new-born group.
The infant club orchestra was made
up of string, woodwind and brass instrumentalists, about 50 students in all.
Mr. Albert Steinberg was musical
director. Club president was Dave
Morton.
Aspiring musicians juggled two
gruelling weekly rehearsals with regular curricular schedules, and on the
whole made commendable turnouts for
practice. Their enthusiasm was only
slightly dampened by fall of '47's street
car   strike.   Usually   the   "full   squad"
turned out for the late evening rehearsals every Thursday.
Originally formed during the late
1946-47 academic year, the student
Symphonic Society's orchestra was the
first success to greet several attempts
to form such a group in past years.
Formerly, although the moving spirits
behind the inception were enthusiastic,
the young orchestral group died from
lack of support.
Real impetus to its eventual birth
was given by establishment of a Faculty of Music on the campus under Professor Adaskin, during 1947. Since
then the group has been progressing
satisfactorily and is "growing into" it-
proper role, that a fine student symphonic orchestra should fulfil in campus cultural life.
MAESTRO ADASKIN CHECKS THE SCORE WITH 'CELLISTS OF STUDENT ORCHESTRA
79, OFTHEINITED
PARLIAMENTARY FORUMITES AT HOME, OBVIOUSLY POSING FOR THEIR PICTURE;    FORUM    SHARED    CLUB    ROOM    SPACE    WITH    U.N.    SOCIETY
PARLIAMENTARY FORUM
Busy, varied, even zany year kept Forumites busy pounding their desks, pleading the case
Members of the Parliamentary Forum were busy as usual
during 1947-48, what with their noon-hour debates and talks
and their special events, such as the McGoun Cup, Frosh
and other debates, even against American colleges.
President Cliff Greer kept the club busy right from the
start. One sample of the kind of things that went on in the
University's debating circles during the year was the debate
in October, when veteran desk-pounders Les Canty and Ian
Cowan not only upheld the  affirmative of the subject in
FORUM
guiding
LEADERS,  Joan
the activities of
Fraser and  Cliff Greer,   had  much  to do with
the large group. Greer also on executive CCF club
question, but turned on themselves and argued the negative.
No decision was passed as to which side won the debate.
The big event of the year, of course, was the annual fight
for the McGoun Cup, emblematic of debating supremacy
among Western Canadian universities. Friday, January 16,
was the date of the meet, and UBC played host in Brock
Hall to the University of Manitoba team. Ben McConnel and
Stewart Chambers were the home team for UBC, while the
contestants who travelled to Edmonton to meet the University
■ of Alberta were Art Hiller and Bob Keenan. The topic in '48
was "Resolved That the Canadian Government Take Immediate Steps to Curb the Power of Organized Labor." At home,
UBC lost a split decision and won on the same basis at the
U. of A. The upshot of it all was that the cup was eventually
captured by the University of Saskatchewan.
Of course, a local high point of the Forum's year is always
the Mock Parliament in the spring session. In '48 a mock
party—the Whig Union of Socialist Tories, excepting Stalin-
ist-Trotskyites, WUSTEST for short — swept to any easy
plurality on their platform to put the "mock" back into the
Mock Parliament. Among other things, they advocated turning postal and penal services over to private enterprise. The
WUSTEST did not contest the election without protest from
the other parties, however, and the LPP finally withdrew
from what it called "a farce." The student body as a whole
semed to like it well enough. Another gag party, the Fascist
Union, withdrew before, the elections as a concession to the
regular political clubs.
80 McGOUN DEBATERS STU CHAMBERS, MIKE CREAL OF HOME TEAM AND ART HILLER OF TRAVELLING TEAM BROUGHT UBC CLOSEST TO CUP IN YEARS
FINAL McGOUN   DEBATER  Bob   Keenan  formed  second  half  of visiting
team  which won split  devision of  University of  Alberta  at  Edmonton
Mockery
In effort liven Mock Parliament, WUSTEST
group campaigned, won on trumped platform
Nothing loath, the Progressive-Conservatives entered
into the spirit of the "Mock" Mock Parliament, and were
soon followed by the remainder of the political parties—
excepting the LPP, of course. The Progressive-Conservatives
threw out their original preliminary programme, and backed
up with umbrellas and faked British accents, substituted one
stumping for more beer and unity.
Other parties followed the WUSTEST and Conservatives' lead, and the parliament provided the student body
with some highly-entertaining debates. The LPP maintained their "won't play" attitude throughout, and as a
consequence, much vital information on Communist principles and doctrines was missed by the students.
Final standings at the polls gave the WUSTEST party
a clear majority, the zany party gathering 19 seats, while
the CCF carried 12, the Liberals 10, and the Progressive-
Conservatives 7. WUSTEST leader, Hugh Legge, led the
government as "Prime Minister," and the party lived, up to
the reputation earned by its name.
On the more serious side, other formal debates at home
and at American colleges dealt with Palestine, atomic energy,
price controls, racial discrimination, and all the regular debating topics. Many new topics were introduced during the
course of the year, and the Parliamentary Forum provided
the campus with a living example of the legislative functioning
of a democracy.
81 WITH  KAY  LADD  IN  CENTRE,   MAJORETTES  PRACTICE  ONE   OF THEIR  MANY INTRICATE ROUTINES WHICH PROVIDED COLOR, SPIRIT ON GRIDIRON
The HUSTLING MAMOOKS
Nearly fifty members of service club worked behind the scenes to create atmosphere at UBC
Nearly fifty pseudo-Picasso's bent
brushes to dabble in every hue of a
technicolor rainbow—and enough paint
to float Brock Hall—and produced
more than half a city block of posters
—well over 200 of them.
Yes, 1947-48 was a busy year for
quiet, self-effacing Frank Heard,
Mamook president, and his throng of
tireless   and   seldom   thanked  workers
of the Rainbow Room.
Vice-president Joe Stewart, head
point brush rinser and manager of
poster productions, led a staff of student palette wielders through the successive onslaughts of Mardi Gras,
queen contests, AMS elections, club
membership drives,   and more  dances
than he would care to shake a Reeves
No. 9 at.
"See Us First for Atmosphere" was
the slogan for the dance decoration department, which figured high for the
easel-time rating. Tulip time, Casbah
capers, Spanish-American, and the
strings of paper diapers for the baby
contest finals were a few of the
triumphs racked up in this branch.
PRESIDENT HEARD had colossal task  in '48  of
organizing his painters and peppers for action
JOE  SEWART,  Mamook  vice-president,  assisted
Heard    in   handling   things,   controlled   posters
PERT   SECRETARY,   Maureen   Auterson,   rounded
out    the    executive,     handled    correspondence
82 PRIDE AND JOY of the Rainbow Room was their giant poster easel which
was signed  by  members,   past and  present,  who  ate  lunches  In club
CONSTANT BRIDGE GAME went on throughout year as  painters waited
their turn at air gun or easel, or just skipped a lecture or two for cards
ON THE GRIDIRON
Cheerleaders and majorettes added zest and colour to many sport attractions throughout year
The pigment-pixie squad included
Dick Chong, Chris Couchlan, Francis
Ruda, Birthe Johnson, Ann Saunders
and a paint-smeared host of others.
On the other side of the Mamook
picture is the group of cheerleaders
and majorettes, who for the last time
in 1948 operated under the banner of
the Rainbow Room. According to plans
laid during the year, the scintillating
squads of pep-rousers were to be
transferred to the Joint Pep Board,
leaving the Mamooks strictly a poster
and decoration unit.
But in 1948 the glamour was all
Mamooks; the girls who twirled their
batons as they strutted across the gridiron or the hockey sheet were, as
formerly, Mamooks; the gals and guys
who leaped to their feet and off them
into the air as they chanted "Kitsilano,
Capilano, Siwash squaw . . ." hung
their uniforms in Mamooks' lockers
and ate their lunches in the Rainbow
Room in the South Basement of Brock
Hall.
The majorettes became the darlings
of the University with their cartwheels
and provocative routines, and on the
trip to Salem or the junket to Nanaimo
they added that extra splash of color
that meant so much.
The blondes were far outnumbered
in the line-up of baton weilders for
UBC in 1948. There were only two of
the fair-haired girls, Gloria Newell and
Sarah Lee Tidball. But the brunettes,
Billy Wadds, June Little, Lois Whimster, Phyllis Johnson and Kay Ladd
had keen competition in capturing the
whistles from the grandstand. That
little thing the girls wore was, inciden
tally, a white uniform trimmed with
gold braid.
But the godsend to UBC males, who
were overwhelmed by the new look,
came in the cheerleaders, the little
dears, whose white, blue and gold
sweaters with the big gold "BC" topped
a swirling white skirt that was very
definitely and provocatively "old lok."
In the band were Diane Walsh, Denyse
Pierce, Ruth Genis and Shirley Harvey.
The cheer-fetching men included
John Hall, Bill Dalgleish, Dave Aird
and Don McConkey.
As was noted earlier, the cheerleaders, majorettes and also the University
band were to switch allegiance in '49
to the newly formed ('48) Joint Pep
Board, which, the founders claimed,
would be better able to co-ordinate the
tasks involved in raising student spirit
at football and hockey time.
BRUNETTE
practiced   one
KAY   caught   by   camera
of   her   swivel-hipped
as   she
routines
PSEUDO-TOTEM POLE built by male cherleaders
in   one  of  their payer  moments  of  practicing
DENY PIERCE waves gaily from crossbar of goal
posts toward which she so often cheered teams
83 CHIEF ENGINEER AL GOLDSMITH FONDLES HIS BABY, THE BRAND NEW CONSOLE  IN  BRAND NEW STUDIOS  OF RADSOC—UNEQUALLED ANYWHERE
THE VOICE OF UBC
Brand-new studios of the URS opened up new fields to budding campus broadcasters to enter
One of the huskiest youngsters of the LSE is the University Radio Society, which in January of 1948 opened its new
ultra-modern studios in the South Basement of Brock Hall.
These new studios, built at the cost of $3,750, are the most
advanced radio centre in any North American university, so
claims Ernie Perrault, president of URS.
The studios were officially opened by Dr. G. M. Shrum,
head of the physics department, who is the honorary president of the URS. The studios consist of a central control
room, which is the equal of man commercial stations. On
each side, separated by glass walls, are the two studios, one
of them large enough for orchestral and vocal groups. Beyond the "heart" of the URS is the large office space, where
record files, scripts and other office paraphenalia are stored
and the general work of the society is carried on.
During the dormant fall period, the directors of the various departments kept their charges busy in trade schools
dealing with continuity writing, dramatic technique, preparation of musical shows and other technical radio tasks.
All scripts were student written, acted and produced. The
150 members of URS were broken down into several departments, each under its individual head.
PRESIDENT PERRAULT has been called Orson Welles of UBC; has written
produced, directed radio shows, legit plays; also writes prose and poetry
PART OF EXECUTIVE of URS, showing Cal Whitehead, PRO, and George
Barnes, program director, in centre back with Al Goldsmith, front
84 NEW CONSOLE took much time on part of engineering staff before it was
ready to be installed  in new control  room, turntables take 16"  records
Varied Shows
Drama, news, music and comment view for top
honours as full broadcast sked got underway
Campus broadcasting in 1947-48 did not begin till the
second term because of the difficulties of construction in the
new studios. Once it started, however, the regular dramatic
show, "Thunderbird Theatre," went back on the air, along
with another old regular, "Music from Varsity." The campus
system carried music and world news, as well as weekly reports on snow conditions up the mountains on the North
Shore. George Barnes, as programme director, handled all
these shows at one stage or another.
Representative directors were: Drama, Don Cunliffe;
news, Frank Dartnell; continuity, Cecelia Merrett; chief engineer, Al Goldsmith, and campus broadcasting, Bill Nickels.
Much of the broadcasting done in '48 was in connection
with the Western Universities Radio Federation, which UBC
headed as president. The first of these shows was a historical
sketch, using choral groups and musical montage, depicting
the story of UBC. Round Table Discussions were another
regular feature of the WURF shows, which were broadcast
through the facilities of the CBC.
CAST—Meet Mr. Climax during rehearsal prior to airing on radio station
CKWX;   left   to   right,   Ashton,   Duval,   Merrett,   Cowan   and   MacDonald
HONORARY PRESIDENT,  G.   M. SHRUM,  pressed burton  in Brock Lounge
lo officially open new studios on January 9, 1948.    Standing, E. Perrault
SOUND EFFECTS are always Important to a radio show; here pert Secretary Marilyn Shaver lends hand operating the home-built thunder machine
RADSOC EQUIPMENT is used by many organizations; here it is used to
help  put over one  of  many  noon-hour  pepmeets   produced  each  year
85 t  now.
■I
Pin KB
( »•
■ M
■   -f
(•-'J;
la  . |
["•     l i'J
■1
' _^_L -Jg-^-i
7ml
>S          ___ it_l
ij
Willi
_______________ T>^3fK*__;
aHffife-
^
fit
BB^
■ ■ |                    7-ft,"
.* **~
THE   OFFICERS   OF   BRANCH   72   HAD   BUSY   YEAR   GUIDING   LARGE   BODY   THROUGH   DIVERSE   ACTIVITIES   FROM   WEST   MALL   HEADQUARTERS
UNIVERSITY LEGION
Commies, baby contests and drives for higher grants occupied most of Legion's time in '48
UBC Branch 72, Canadian Legion, British Empire Service
League, continued to serve the student veterans at UBC
through the hectic 1947-48 session, as it had served them in
the two previous years of its renewed existence. While not in
any way a part of the Alma Mater Society, the Legion branch
PRESIDENT  MILLER,  sparkplug   behind  ever-active  group,  which  served
about  half total  UBC   population,   although   not  all  veterans   belonged
did its best to co-operate with the student body and pulled its
weight in many student affairs.
Perhaps the most spectacular event that occurred in the
Legion hut on the West Mall was the battle in the spring
term over the Communist question. Cross-Canada charges
were laid at the Uiversity of Manitoba, and were answered
here by former Legion president (1946^47) Grant B. Livingstone (Arts '48). Nothing much happened beyond a lot of
smoke and some hot news copy for The Daily Ubssey.
More concrete, however, was the branch's part in the successful drive for increased grants for student veterans across
Canada. As a result of the campaign, many veterans were
enabled to continue their studies.
Along with tea dances and informal meetings, the Legion
managed to fill up its year under the presidency of Perry
Miller. For a time it was thought that the campus branch
might acquire the Dolphin tearoom on Marine Drive near
the campus for a wet canteen. But, money talked, and the
Legion was perforce quite quiet.
In co-operation with The Daily Ubssy, the student veterans
at Little Mountain Camp sponsored a Diaper Derby and dance
to raise funds for a kindergarten at their centre. Children of
student veterans were entered in a "Most Beautiful Baby" con-
tst, which was eventually won by pert little Susan Joy Thor-
neycroft.
The Legion Canteen, in their office building, open to all
students, was a welcome spot to many Toties with the exam
bug who, studying late, found it the only campus eatery open
in the late evening for the traditional cup of coffee. The Legion
was blessed many times over by study-wearied students.
86 SCM AT TEA was common occurence for local group which mixed study of
Christ with many social functions, including week-end camps, conferences
SCM
Local portion of world-wide organization
study with fun, sent delegation to Kansas
The local branch of the Student Christian Movement enabled
students at UBC to study Christian ways of life in conjunction with other students across Canada. Through exchanges
and periodicals members were kept in contact with others
throughout the world.
Perhaps more important locally, however, were the regular
meetings, the firesides, social events and week-end camps and
conferences. Here the UBC SCM was allowed ample fellowship in a group that cut right across the normal student
lines and included some from all faculties and other divisions. _
A highlight of the year was the trip of 24 students to the
North American Conference on Christian Frontiers, held at
the University of Kansas in December, 1947. Stuart Porteus
led the group, which joined two thousand other students at
the city of Lawrence in Kansas.
LEADER AT MIXER in Brock Hall was big task because of large number
of members in non-sectarian religious group, headed by Pres. R. Andrews
LEADERS OF THE CAMPUS BRANCH OF SCM LINED UP IN BROCK HALL FOR  THEIR   PICTURES.    PRESIDENT  ANDREWS   IS   TO   RIGHT   OF   FIREPLACE
87 PACKED POLITICAL MEETINGS FROM ALL PARTIES    HEARD   RECORD   NUMBER    SPEECHES
POLITICS
Campus politicians win fight for official
recognition under AMS constitution
Serious politics had become an issue on the Point Grey
campus in the 1948 session.
By April the scene was calm and unruffled, but much
had gone before.
Every political party in British Columbia was represented in a student group, some of which contained memberships of more than 300.
More than twenty "big-name" politicians (the sponsoring clubs had called them statesmen) addressed audiences
ranging upwards of 1500 at two week intervals during the
fall and winter sessions.
But for the political clubs, 1948 was the year of their
great victory. They were battling for their existence and
they won.
When the session opened there were no political clubs
as such. There were political forums; the socialist forum,
the communist forum, the democratic forum . . . and so on.
They had to call themselves forums rather than clubs because of the constitution of the Alma Mater Society. The
constitution forbade the formation of any club which might
be thought of as political. Discussion groups were all right,
however.
TOP   COMMUNIST  on   campus  was   second   year   law  student  Norman
Littlewood who headed  UBC student LPP club.
88
\ In addition to these so-called discussion groups, there
were several clubs not bearing the name of any political
faith but none-the-less serving the function of political clubs.
Some accused these groups of acting under false pretences,
and of duping students into their meetings under a phoney
label.
Grant Livingstone, politically conscious president of the
Alma Mater Society, smelled a rat. He decided to do something about it.
His position had been an extremely vulnerable one.
Everyone, especialy the leaders of the opposing political
factions, had known that Livingstone was the fair-haired boy
of the local Progressive Conservative party and that he
nursed a smoldering hatred for the Communists and only
a bare tolerance for the socialists.
No one thought that Livingstone would be able to keep
all the various factions happy.
But at the opening of the fall session he summoned his
student council about him and they prepared a resolution.
' The resolution proposed an amendment to the Alma
Mater Society code which would free the formation of political clubs. The clubs would become regularly constituted
entities under the Literary and Scientific Executive. They
would receive grants from student funds and would be
responsible to the student council for their actions. (If
they didn't behave they would have their grants cut off.)
Some of the things they were forbidden to do were:
(1) Have any direct link with the mother party.
(2) Campaign   openly   for   election   purposes   on   the
campus.
(3) Nor could they run candidates or express support
for candidates in any student election.
Livingstone had thought of all the answers, he had left
no loopholes unblocked.
When the first general meeting of the Alma Mater
Society rolled around in the first week of October, he was
ready to try out his baby on the student body.
It went smoothly . . . more smoothly than even Livingstone had'hoped.
There were voices raised against specific points. The
Communists resented the innuendoes against them. They
did not run other clubs under phoney names, they charged
hotly.
But that passed.   So did the resolution.
Political clubs became lawfully constituted, law-abiding
clubs just the same as the basket weaving club and the
junior girls' folk dancing club.
There was a flurry the following day in the AMS
office. Leaders assembled the faithful about them and
hastily filed application for charters.    They all got them.
Then later came the fight over the question of affiliation
with inter-university federations of campus political clubs.
Councl haggled the question over for several weeks, came
up with an approval resolution and received the nod from
the next general meeting of the Alma Mater Society.
When Grant Livingstone tore off the April page on the
AMS office calendar, he looked back on a year which had
seen the growth to maturity of political thought on the UBC
campus.
SMOOTH-TALKING   Dave   Tupper   carried   the
standard at UBC, headed P-C student club.
Progressive   Conservative
SHORT   SOFT-SPOKEN   Frank   Lewis   argued   for   the   liberalism   of   the
Liberals,  set up Liberal  Party  club on campus.
GAUNT, DESK-POUNDING Murray Bryce set out to preach the gospel of
socialism through the land,  remade socialist forum into CCF club.
89 L   _■    *■_!
__ ^___L ______ _____
mW*mmmm.^mM
HmmW
H v '         V_F *>--&.-J)fj|
i   bm&. f
&m<   «3________-
i__i_____B_l
_E_p^t
tm  *  ■•v
_T—#•    ^
v
II-       C_ii)     mi
V l
. --iii
W_r_»'     —i
A
MOVIE ADVERTISING hod big year at UBC as energetic Film Society made
determined bid to show wares ot full houses in spite of student apathy
FILM SOC
Decade-old group used smart promotion to get
full houses for their evening, noon showings
Diminutive, energetic Ray Speers, president of the Film
Society ,spent his spare time in the Brock Snack Bar cursing
the fact that as a projectionist he had to watch the same
movie unfold before his eyes anywhere from ten to a hundred
times. But nevertheless, he kept righ on projcting, and his
organization in 1947-48 showed many hit movies and revivals to campus-bound residents of the UBC camps. His
prices were cheap, too.
It wasn't all gravy for the Film Society, however. They
had the heartbreak at first of watching the celluloid unfold
before a near-empty theatre. Then, after a series of smart
promotion stunts (see cut) the gang began to get its reward
in full houss. Such shows as "Lost Horizon" and "Madonna
of the Seven Moons" were presented by the active but little
publicized group.
In addition, they supplied equipment and projectionists
fo rvirtually every motion picture showing on the campus,
and at many off-campus events.
Their successful entry into the entertainment field came
at an appropriate time, for the club celebrated its tenth anni-
vrsary in 1948, having started just prior to World War II
as a strictly educational group. Once the entertainment at
noon hour and evening shows were successful, the members
began thinking ahead to the production of some movies of
their own.
HAM OPERATORS repair some of their delicate equipment in Hurt L-22;
they had trouble in fall term as their radios interfered with nearby labs
CALL LETERS became known to many parts of the world as,  in second
year of existence, UBC's hame expanded activities and powerful radios
HAM OPERATORS
AROA made contacts throughout the world, made news, supplied news for The Daily Ubyssey
UBC's hams continued to operate station V27ACS during
the year, in spite of some difficulty they had with delicate
equipment in nearby physics laboratories. And they made
contacts with other amateur ops around the world as they
completed their second year.
Known officially as the Amateur Radio Operators' Association, the hams helped The Daily Ubyssey score a first in
college news-gathering when they relayed info from the
University of New Brunswick to the Ubyssey.
90 Flying Club
Student flyers form new club to teach each
other how to fly the cheap way
Flying on a shoe string sounded pretty tough to half a
hundred airminded students in 1948 but they found a way.
They had always dreamed of flying but the cost of
commercial flying schools was far beyond the student pocket-
book. Their solution was to form a cooperative flying club,
most unusual and ambitious organization to come into existence in the 1947-48 term.
They chartered a club, bought two aircraft, and spent
their 'tween lecture afternoons and sunny Sundays dodging
clouds while they taught each other to fly . . . the cheap way.
Initiation fee was twenty-five dollars, monthly dues were
$16.75. The monthly levy entitled members to two hours
flying time each month. Additional airtime could be obtained at a reasonable charge.
When the session ended the flying club had been zooming into their second month of existence and already boasted
almost 50 members.
Organizer Jimmy Harty, an applied science student
who would rather fly than eat, figured that when the club
took-off next fall the membership would be nudging 100.
"The more the merrier," he chirped. "As more members come along with their initiation fee we will buy more
aircraft."
The initiation fee can be redeemed when a member
withdraws from the club because it is in the nature of an
ownership share in the capital assets of the two aircraft.
Number one on the infant club's dream parade was a
landing strip right on the campus and a huge inter-university
air show at Vancouver airport in the fall of 1949.
-91
7$
_^.   J           ^k
WW J^L\
\ w
"^2?"    ■* i
tP^**--!^ 1      \
4r «_^H
___.              ' ~~~~ '
HARTY,  MRS. AND DAUGHTER GRAB  CLOUDS  IN  CLUB SHIP
Teachers
Social Problems Club mulled
over evils of present day
Armchair social and political theorists had their innings in the Social
Problems Club.
Though many behind-the-hand whispers early in the fall term branded the
club as a political front organization,
the council amendment to the Alma
Mater Society code freeing the institution under LSE of honest political
clubs, removed this smear, if it had
ever actually existed.
The club gathered at noon meetings
to eat lunch and mull over what they
considered were the major defects of
our social mores and political structures.
They sponsored expert speakers in
both politics and sociology and in this
sense served the valuable purpose of
bringing authoritative opinions to the
campus.
SOCIAL PROBLEMS WERE THE MEAT OF SPC WHO MET AT NOONS TO PROBE EVILS OF THE DAY
91 OBSTACLE COURSE was no obstacle to steel-hard COTC corpsmen after
summer training.
BREN-MAN Robertson draws a steady bead during COTC summer battle
scheme.
COTC
It had been an eventful year for the university's part-
time soldiers. In addition to accepting a large batch of new
recruits, training of the one-year veterans had proceeded at
a brisk pace.
At the conclusion of the winter's training, student officer
cadets departed for their summer camps strewn across Canada. These had lasted for a minimum of four months, and
training received had been valuable.
&,**.& Go*
SHIP'S   COMPANY   quick   march   order   rings   through   UBC   Armory   as
UNTO sailors walk the deck.
LECTURING   UNTD  sailors   in  fine   points   of   seamanship,   not   a   carpet
parade.
UNTD
A university that has to its credit all sorts of firsts
would not be complete without its own navy. So UBC had
its own navy.
Under the command of Lieut. Cmdr. Frank J. E.
Turner the campus navy turned out weekly to learn what to
expect from life at sea. All year they tied knots and took
compass readings in anticipation of the summer when they
would join the regular navy for a cruise to Mexico and
points. Some were scheduled to spend the summer on the
frigate Antigonish while others, more fortunate, were lined
up to spend the vacation aboard the cruiser Ontario.
92 Publications SMILING  EVEN IN  THE THICK OF  BATTLES, FERGUSON LED REJUVENATED PUBSTERS THROUGH NOTABLE YEAR
THE "PUB" BIG YEAR
"The Pub' took a new lease on life when it acquired its new editor and all campus knew it
When Donald Ferguson took the reins as editor-in-chief
of Publications in mid-1947, there was more than a change
of staff in the ranks of the "illegitimate children of the
Publications Board." With the coming of the new editor-in-
chief, The Ubyssey, student newspaper, was able to prefix
"Daily" to its name. From the weekly campus sheet back in
the days of World War I to the snappy four-times-weekly
paper of 1947-48, The Daily Ubyssey had come a long way.
The arrival of the paper to daily status had wrought a
great change for the students who staffed it. It meant that
the pace of publishing was quickened; there was little time
for the leisurely loafing enjoyed by former pubsters on off-
press days.
But the change to daily status did not mean Pubsters
would not be too busy to keep their ferret-noses out of
campus affairs. Early in the year the Undergraduate Societies asked Council to pass a resolution charging The
Daily Ubyssey with "an editorial policy of considerable
destructive criticism," inadequate publication of club and
society notices, and the fostering of faculty discord. Rolling
up its sleeves, the Editorial Board met with USC  in   a
seven-and-one-half-hour session and took up the charges
point-by-point. The result was a vote of complete confidence
in the discretion of the Editorial Board.
Under Ferguson's whip-hand as editor-in-chief were the
Publications Board's five prize babies: The Daily Ubyssey,
The Totem, The Thunderbird, The Student Directory, and
The Tillicum Handbook. Staffed by approximately seventy-
five students, the five publications acted as news services,
notice boards, telephone directories, freshmen's guide to
UBC, and medium of literary writing.
Whatever they worked at, Ferguson's Pubsters could always be heard on off-hours solemnly voicing the Pub chant:
"There's a thriving kindergarten in the depths of old
Brock Hall;
They feed the kids on bottles from the time that they
are small.
They sleep on gin-soaked Ubysseys and Fergy is the
lord
Of  the   illegitimate   children   of   the   Publications
Board."
94 Managing
Editor
New position on trial during Pub's expansion
in an attempt to gain better news organization
The growth of The Ubyssey to a daily brought one
revolutionary change in Publications Board government: a
new position, that of Managing Editor, was cheated. The
new position called for someone to supervise technical details of The Daily Ubyssey to see that pictures were duly
dispatched to the engravers, that copy and cuts were duly
dispatched to press, and to oversee the affairs of The Daily
Ubyssey generally.
To fill this position in its initial year, the editors called
upon Laurie Dyer, who had risen through the sports department to become its editor in 1946-47. Dyer faced a
number of serious problems as he stepped into the new
post; among them was a serious fire at the plant of the
Standard Publishing Company, where The Daily Ubyssey is
produced, which destroyed large numbers of cuts.
Perhaps a more serious issue to face was a marked
shortage of reporters at the beginning. Realizing the importance of junior staffers, not only as reporters, but as
prospective associates and editors, Dyer helped conduct a
successful advertising campaign to wheedle away journalistic-minded students from the paths of righteousness.
DYER   HANDLED   THE   TECHNICAL   WORRIES   OF   SMART   DAILY   PAPER
Totem Boss
Stainsby's appointment led to vast revolution
in 'broom closet' offices of revised yearbook
Unkempt, usually unshaven, Donald Orval Stainsby had
a dream during the summer of 1947.
He was the editor of Totem '48, and he planned a yearbook which would leave no paste-pot unturned to be different, brighter, more sparkling than any Totem on the six-foot
bookshelf which traces UBC history back to the Fairview
Shacks.
Totem '48, Chief Stainsby decided, would follow magazine style layout: Life-style copy would be run on whizzing
breezily from picture to picture.
Somewhat later than usual because of the scope of the
changes and labour problems, Stainsby's dream bore fruit
during the summer of 1948.
As 3600 students who bet $3.50 on Stainby's dream
cracked the paint-smelling bindings on their yearbooks, the
handful of trusties who had laboured with Stainsby were
agreed that Totem '48 was all the bumptious young Artsman
had planned.
The long hours which frequently stretched into days and
nights of typewriter-pounding, picture-sorting, and dummy-
pasting in the messy and poorly-ventilated Brock basement
broom closet had paid-off.
STAINSBY'S   TOTEM   IS   THE   LATEST
HISTORY   DUE   TO   CHANGES
95 COPY  EDITOR HAGGART HANDLED   REWRITE,  LARSSEN  ASSIGNED  STORIES,  ASHTON   WIRED  THEM ACROSS   CANADA,   ROBERTSON   ON  FEATURES
UBYSSEY'S EDITORS
The Daily Ubyssey's editors survived hectic year with an all-time record of notes to ed
Publishing   a   daily
more work than fun.
newspaper    is
That at least is the conclusion of ten
Daily Ubyssey Editorial Board members who were left wistfully surveying
an average of two supplemental examinations each after winding up the year
with the eightieth regular edition.
But the daily chore was also fun.
Of an all-time record number of letters to the editor (nearly 500) comfortably 30 percent were "mad."
Three commended The Daily Ubyssey
on doing a good job. The balance
complained of rain, exams, politics, caf
coffee.
The trusty ten who laboured long beneath the floor of Brock Hall will nonetheless count the year well spent.
They were satisfied with their product and so apparently were the 8500
who jostled in the Quad every morning
for their copies.
For the first time in the blustering
young history of UBC the student body
published a daily newspaper, bringing
8500 four-page, six-column copies out
to the West Point Grey campus every
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday, eighty times during the session.
Also for the first time in many a
year, The Daily Ubyssey sported an
ample picture budget which fancied
each edition with an average of five
cuts.
Don Ferguson, upon whose office
door "Editor-in-Chief" was neatly lettered, toted up the year's schedule with
this comment:  "Whew!"
Laurie Dyer, sincere-faced young
Commerceman, served his sentence as
Managing Editor in wrestling with labour relation problems of a waning
staff of between five and 50 reporters
depending upon the weather, the proximity of exams, and the moods of the
city editors.
News Editors Tore Larssen, early in
the year, and later Black Jack Wasserman thought up story ideas and assigned them to reporters.
Labouring over a steaming typewriter on the rewrite desk was Copy
Editor Ron Haggart. Cubs learned
much by sadly watching their tender
messages to the world butchered and
flayed as Haggart injected a shot of
drama into the news with his lustrous
touch.
CITY  EDITORS  WASSERMAN,   SEARS,  GRIMMET,   PINCHIN  TOOK  REGULAR  DAY ON  DESK  WHILE  BLOCKBERGER  HANDLED   INDEPENDENT SPORTS
96 CITY EDITOR GRIMMET GETS A BIT OP ADVICE FROM MANAGING EDITOR   DYER   AS   THE   DAILY   SHEET   GOES  THROUGH   THE   EDITORIAL  ROOM
Ei
SWEAT IT OUT!
IS
King-sized city desk was hub of Daily Ubyssey production line, handled daily stream of copy
Around the U-desk city editors Jack
Wasserman (and later Hal Tennant),
Joan Grimmett, Val Sears and Hal
Pinchin laid into their head-writing,
copy-reading and make-up staffs; often
as not wound up by doing it themselves . . . sometimes until 3 a.m. in
the print shop.
Dreamy-eyed Phil Ashton kept news-
conscious UBC in touch with 17 other
Canadian universities through the wires
of Canadian University Press.
Then there were the boys in Sport.
Pudgy little Dick Blockberger called
the step for a crack team of sports
writers listing Fred Moonen, Al Hunter,
Bruce Saunders, Hal Murphy and
Johnny Melville.
They watched and listened to meaty
athletes, drank coke, wrote fantastic
stories  in  a  more  fantastic  language,
and complained about the advertising
space.
Regular columnists Les "Uncle" Bewley, Don Stainsby, Hal Tennant, Jack
Wasserman alternately joshed, menaced
the news-reading public.
But when the staff gathered around
the U-desk to :post mortemize issue
number eighty they were glad the year
was over.
There had been lighter moments.
HONEYHAIRED LONI was popular with the
boys at the shop, could get copy reset nearly
any time; male staffers always had trouble
getting late copy and corrections cast by the
lino operators, who for some strange reason
claimed they wanted to go home. Ubyssey
staff sometimes got home in the wee small hours
BIG RED GRANTHAM, following USC fight, took
over as Classified  editor, tried a  new system
ASSOCIATE EDITORS' Robertson and Marshall
lake time out to dream of future as burly City
Eds; in off hours favourite pastime of Pubsters
was to recline on huge U-desk to talk and
smoke and tear each other's papers apart for
style and makeup blunders. Sessions seldom
got anywhere but were lots of fun regardless
97 ASSOCIATE  EDITORS ROBERTSON AND WOLFE GLARE AT CAMERAMAN  FROM ROGUES'  GALLERY  POSE—REALLY WORKED  HARD OCCASSIONALLY
TOTEM '48 "ALL NEW"
Nebulous staff gathered around Editor Stainsby to produce most revised yearbook in years
Just like one of Mr. Ford's newer offspring, Totem '48
is "all new." Editor Stainsby and his nebulous staff decided
on change and the book you are even now reading is the
end product.
The new-style end sheets set the pace, where for the first
time in years the "wallpaper" type of design has gone by
the board to be replaced with the new single-unit endpaper.
The title page and section pages also show a chfnge—
for the first time the duotone process was used in the
Totem. And, of course, most striking of all is the new
makeup, styled after that of leading pictorial magazines
although adapted to UBC needs. The copy too has been
smartened up considerably.
SPORTS ED BARKER had his days turned into nights struggling with recalcitrant  athletes  and   managers  as   he  battled  to   complete  the   job
SECTION  EDITOR HOLM looked  gracious about the  office,  did big  job
recruiting   Minor Clubs  into  her 20-page  section  of  smarter  yearbook
98 COPY  EDITOR  IDSARDI  was  always   busy at editor's  side  to  work or
play,  and when  he  worked  his  vicious  pencil   ripped  apart  offerings
SECTION EDITOR FYNN spent days and nights, mostly nights, stripping,
sorting, labelling, checking and double checking numerous class portraits
THE WEE STAFF
What staff there was did magnificent back-breaking job to turn out the "all new" Totem of '48
Staffers were always short in supply in '47-'48, and the
book holds the latest publication date in the history of
UBC'S Totems.
Leading the staff were associate editors Don Robertson
and Howie Wolfe, who handled activities and administration
sections respectively as well as aiding in the more plebian
parts of the job. Sports editor Dave Barker beat photographers and recalcitrant athletes to turn out the smartest
"Athletics" section seen for a long, long time.
Eva Holm handled the minor clubs, aided with the Publications section. Mickey Fynn worked extensively with the
classes, sorting, listing and hunting faces from among the
3000 included in that section.
Bill Idsardi as copy editor checked the stories for style
after Novia Hebert, Laura Haahti, Don Ferguson, Val
Sears, Pat Henderson, Marg MacDonald, George Robertson, Bruce Saunders, Jack Wasserman, Ron Haggart, Fred
Moonen, Pete Foy and Bruce Bewell struggled with the
creative end of the job.
Following this Editor Stainsby and many of his cohorts
wrote captions, heads, subheads, pasted up the dummies
and sat back and waited. The result you now read.
PIXIE BOSS  CAVE often conferred with editor,
their opinions could be heard throughout Brock
McDOUGALL showed up midway through year,
proved asset to overworked photography staff
WEIRD   PIX   seemed   to   be   pixies'   motto   as
Idsardi and Hartt gathered on dance assignment
99 DIRECTOR   CAVE   WATCHES   AS   JONES   POINTS   OUT   MERITS   OF   FIX
THE PIXIES
Variety of "machines" responsible for turning
out the year's great quantity of news pictures
After seven months of groping in the murk of The
Daily Ubyssey darkrooms, a handful of Contax-conscious
fensmen turned on the lights to find they had toted up an
all-time record of more than 3500 published pictures.
Using cameras, which they professionally call
"machines," ranging from ten dollar Brownies to $600
Graflexes, they had popped three packing cases full of flashbulbs at everything from traffic accidents to the neatly
grouped Women's Public Speaking Club.
Bob Cave, director of photography, had clubbed,
caj oiled, humoured the staff of ten photographers into successfully completing the giant Totem '48 task as well as
keeping The Daily Ubyssey supplied with news pix for each
deadline.
Micky Jones, star on-the-spot news cameraman for The
Ubyssey, filled in the idle moments between his engineering
lab periods by serving as technical director.
Danny Wallace, Larry Ades, Bill Wallace, Bob Stiener,
Jack Law, Yale Joffe and others squinted through the range-
finders and clicked the shutters.
As the pixies packed up their cameras in April they
looked back on a year crammed with the blue-white pop of
flash guns and the vinegar smell of darkrooms and were
sure they would be back in September.
■ADJUSTMENTS  WERE  ALWAYS   IN   ORDER   FOR   PIXIES.   STEINER,   A   SKIRT, BLATCHFORD AN ENLARGER AND LAW HIS CAMERA AS WORK BEGINS
THREE MORE  OF FAITHFUL BAND OF SHUTTER-SNAPPERS  INCLUDES NORM. ROSS, YALE JOFFEE AND BILL WALLACE, ALL BEGAN AS NEOPHYTES
100 IC
Thunderbird"
Big year for campus writers recorded in pages
of smart literary mag, 'The UBC Thunderbird'
Campus writers had their best year in 1947-48.
The Thunderbird, three-year-old literary quarterly, continuing its expansion, published a total of 96 pages of short
stories, articles, humour, poems and cartoons in November,
January and March issues, and it sold more copies than ever
before.
Well-known campus authors continued to appear in it.
and many new names were discovered.
News was made by the first issue of the year. It was a
sellout—something unprecedented in the magazine's history
—and at least two short stories in it brought wrathful letters to The Daily Ubyssey. The stories were Dean Bonney's
"Borkum," which dealt with three soldiers in the occupation
army in Germany; and C. K. Toren's "Posting," a story
about some none-too-happy airmen.
Continuing a policy adopted the previous year, each issue
published a faculty contribution—Earle Birney's "Montreal,"
a preview of a poem from the Trans-Canada sequence in his
new book, Strait of Anion. The January issue followed up
with a review by wry-witted Professor Louis MacKay of
his own book of poems, The Ill-Tempered Lover. In March,
Dr. William Robbins reviewed the now-famed Canadian
satire, Sarah Binks.
Another faculty contributor whom the magazine's stafl
couldn't help regarding as still one of the boys was Eric
"Jabez" Nicol, who had a lot of fun writing about the
ominous rise of physical education and the misfortunes ol
Hornet Quincey at the Mardi Gras.
Short-story writers published for the first time during
the year indued James Jackson, Robert Harlow, C. K.
Toren, Paul Wright. Ernie Perrault, A. H. Burt, Rolf Loeh-
EDITOR JOHN  WARDROPER ponders  over makeup of the snappy quarterly which in 1947-48 set a new record for its three-year life, 96 pages
hich, John Norris, John North, Arthur Alexander, Mary
Mackenzie and M. 0. P. Morrison. At least two others were
men who have sold a considerable amount of material—
William McConnell and G. E. Mortimore.
Campus poets continued to be prolific—nearly 40 poems
appeared in the three issues.
Staff was: John Wardroper, editor; D. K. Paul and Dean
Bonney, associates, and Hilda Thomas, poetry editor.
HARDWORKING THUNDERBIRD STAFF consisted of Wardroper, Don Paul and Dean Bonney, associates, and Hilda Thomas, poetry editor.    They managed to make best selection in quarterly's history
CONSTANT   CONTRIBUTOR  was   Ernie   Perrault,
who turned   in   prose  and  poetry,  wrote   plays
101 EDITOR     WALDEN     PONDERED     AND
CHECKED LENGTHY PROOF SHEETS
WEIGHED     PHONE     NUMBERS
DIRECTORY
Popular guide to dating fun biggest in history
as campus population became larger again
Most popular "little black book" on the campus turned
out to be blue in 1948.
For the 4000 students who paid 25 cents for it, the
student telephone directory was the final authority for telephone numbers.
Dateless at the last minute, hundreds thumbed pages of
the tiny blue-covered volume before every major party of
the year.
No one thumbed directory pages more or better than
burly Artsman Frank Walden. And he wasn't interested in
a date.
Editor of the book, he was working against time to bring
the directory out before deadline . . . and in the face of a
bigger student enrolment thap ever before.
He made it only slightly behind deadline.
Said Walden and his little knot of weary-eyed proofreaders: "Never again."
Typing, then proofreading for errors and re-reading the
corrections is not much of a game when you are playing
with lists 200 feet long numbering 9000 students.
But subscribers warmly replied: "The biggest two-Bits
worth on the campus."
CAPABLE   DARLING   OF  THE   PUB  TURNED  OUT  BOOK   NEARLY   ALONE
TILLICUM
Blonde Loni Francis spent summer turning out
Freshmen's bible which was popular with all
Bible-like for the 1500 freshmen who wandered on to the
West Point Grey campus in September, The Tillicum was
old stuff for honey-haired Loni Francis.
She edited the compendious little handbook, says she can
now recite the AMS code and constitution complete with
footnotes.
It was an unsual summer holiday for the pretty little
Pubster but she brought The Tillicum out in time to greet
the freshmen on the campus without a hitch.
Working almost single-handed, she rapped out coverage
on all campus clubs and organizations—monosyllabic explanations offered on a freshman level for freshman consumption.
a
The pocket-sized volume turned out to be a minor bestseller when it went on sale to upper classmen later in the
term.
Some seniors felt there were a few of the secrets of the
AMS that they had missed in first year.
Smiled Miss Francis: "One four-bits is as good as another."
102 BIG SHOTS AT STONE supervise and actually engage In making-up the
dally quota of four pages. Often good natured fight between sports, city
FIRST  PARTY   of  Publications   year  took  place   in   Stanley  Park   Sports
Pavilion early in October, new cubs become initiated into final routine
TRIP TO SOUTH by many staff members of The Dally Ubyssey saw them      BEVY OF BEAUTY at Publications table during Fall Ball  in the Armoury,
publish one issue of University of Washington daily. Ubyssey host at UBC      Pub   had   consistent   high   attendance   record   at   all   Varsity   functions
STAFF   ADVISER    (ex-officio)    Graduate   Bewell      FANCY   WALLPAPER   In   Editor-in-Chief's   office       "UNCLE  B" — alias Columnist Les Bewley —
consults    standard    reference    before    advising      was applied by energetic Pubsters as publicity       looks   knowing   during  junket   south  of   border
103 Jfi'*
Athletics are important at any college,
and UBC is no exception. But perhaps Varsity does excel in the great
variety of sports and athletic pursuits
offered to its students.
At any rate UBC has gone truly international in its athletic ambitions,
playing in most cases teams from the
United States. But the standby games
of rugger, grass hockey, ice hockey
and soccer are not forgotten and they
share an important part of the limelight.
The degree of participation in sports
varies greatly among the students.
Phys Ed students, intramural players,
first-team stalwarts and mere spectators all abound. Some of their doings
in the chase after thrills and excitement are shown as Totem '48 tries to
recapture the diversity of "the game." ATHLETICS OSBORNE,     LAITHEWAITE,     WHITTLE,    WYNNE    AND    POMFRET    GUIDED    PHYSICAL    EDUCATION    MUSCLEMEN    TO    EVEN    GREATER    EFFORTS
^^H__B_H
MARION HENDERSON, women's sports czarina, lights up for the camera.       SLEEPY-EYED  Luke  Moyls,  graduate manager of athletics,  was  joe-boy
Miss   Henderson   teaches!  Arthur  Murray  routines   to   UBC   wallflowers.       for Men's  Athletic  Directorate.     Hard   work   forced   Moyls'   resignation.
106 MEN'S ATHLETIC DIRECTORATE  CONTROLS CAMPUS  ATHLETICS, ALLOTS  FUNDS   FOR  TRAVELLING   TEAMS   AND   DECIDES   EXTRAMURAL   ACTIVITIES
MAD KNEW THE SCORE
Student-Faculty panel whips UBC athletes through record year sport card
Controlling body of all athletics and
all athletic funds on the campus is the
Men's Athletic Directorate. With them,
also, is the Women's Athletic Directorate which, while meeting as a separate
body, works under the MAD and is
dependent upon them for funds.
UBC athletics continued to show a
post-war increase with the addition of
many new clubs, more teams and
greater turnouts of aspiring athletes.
The trend of competition in the university athletics is definitely toward intercollegiate    meets.    Whereas    formerly
UBC teams played teams from the city
leagues and teams from other Canadian
colleges, the latter were rather hard to
manage, due to the distance separating
them. Now, with many UBC teams entered in American Conference leagues,
the scene has changed considerably.
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC DIRECTORATE FUNCTIONS IN A SIMILAR MANNER TO   MEN'S,   BUT   IS   DEPENDENT   UPON   MAD   FOR   FUNDS   AND   POLICY
107 THE SEVEN MULES OF THE UBC THUNDERBIRDS' LINE, WHO FORMED A STRONG DEFENSE AND GOOD OFFENSIVE UNIT  IN THE PAST CAMPAIGN
CONFERENCE FOOTBALL
Birds' only victory comes at opportune time—Homecoming, as Pioneers bow, 27-7
Enjoying a mediocre season as far as wins and losses
were concerned, the senior American football entry in the
PNWCC played before a packed house at each of its four
home games.
On only one occasion did the 'Birds send the crowd
home in a victorious mood. That was at the Homecoming
game against Lewis and Clarke, and the convincing way in
which the 'Birds defeated the Pioneers gave promise of more
victories to come.
Lead by Dougie Reid and Freddie French, who accounted for three of the 5 Birds touchdowns, and Herb
Capozzi, who formed a one-man line at times, the 'Birds
outrushed, outpassed and outscored the Pioneers for a 27-7
win. The only other game in which the Varsity men c_.ne
close was against Whitman College Missionaries, blowing a
6-0 lead late in the game, and losing by a margin of the
extra point, -6. "Goat" of this game was Freddie French,
who missed the convert after UBC's early-game touchdown.
In three tilts, the 'Birds failed to score a single point.
These were College of Puget Sound-UBC (14-0), Willamette-
UBC (33-0) and Linfield College-UBC (23-0). The other two
games resulted in a close 20-19 loss to Pacific University
and a not-so-close beating from College of Idaho Coyotes.
Coaching duties were capably handled by Gregory
"Hardrock" KaMt, well known in football circles throughout Canada and the States. An ail-American at Wisconsin in
the early thirties, Kabat moved to the Coast to take over
the Vancouver College club. He arrived on the UBC campus
in time to coach the 'Birds to a Hardy Cup Canadian championship in his first year, 1945.
Captained by Doug Reid, the 'Birds personalities were
ranged between 145-pound Freddie French to 235-pound
Herb Capozzi. Average weight of the club was a light 175,
and the American teams had a decided advantage in the
matter of heft.
Herb Capozzi and Alec Lamb balanced the line at the
respective tackle positions, with Bill Pearson anchoring the
wall at centre, Goulebef and Sainas flanked the ends with
Brewer, Lord and Murphy rounding out the backfield.
In matters of total points the 'Birds were seriously outdone, scoring only 65 points as against 151 by the opposition. Twenty-seven of the 'Birds points were scored in the
Homecoming game against Lewis and Clarke Pioneers.
Coach Greg Kabat makes the Thunderbirds bend over backward in
training for a strenuous 1948 campaign—two weeks of this put the boys
in top shape, but . . .
108 LUCKY WISHBONE ceremony Is performed before
'Birds meet rivals by Nora Clarke and star,
Doug Reid.
CLOWNING 'BIRDS in the "powder room" help each other into straps, buckles, pads and  brass
knuckles in last minute rush before whistle brings team jogging onto field.
BIRDS TRAMPLE
<*?_;
Knute Rockne's famous wishbone, being tasted by fullback Dougie Reid and Nora Clarke (upper left), may have
put Notre. Dame on top but it did practically nothing for the
'Birds.
Walt Pumphries' (upper right) shoulders don't seem to
fit his uniform. He's given a helping hand for team mates.
Dr. Allerdyce (lower left) fires the opening gun in the
Homecoming game Against Lewis and Clarke College.
Sainus breaks away with the leather in the Pioneers vs.
UBC tiff (lower right). In lower shot beautiful blocking by
UBC enables a Birdman to gain valuable yards. Sparkling
aerial work put UBC on top 27-7.
GOING THROUGH—hard and fast. 'Bird ball carrier stacks damnyankee
bodies   behind   him.     Number  40   moved   in   before  blocks   caught   up.
GRIM-FACED Doc Allardyce bunches muscles for kick-off in 'Birds opener.
Patron saint of MAD sneaked out of fly-filled lab to catch most of
season's tilts.
BULL-DOZING flying  blocks clear path for high-stepping 'Bird  ballman
pulling a sneak around right end.    Gridmen packed stands every game.
109 BALLET DANCER'S LEAP GIVES UBC COMPLETED PASS AS BLUE AND GOLD  SQUAD, ATUNED TO AMERICAN GAME AT LAST, SNATCHED ONLY VICTORY
REID GOES OVER.     REFEREE SIGNALS AS UBC SCORES ANOTHER AGAINST PIONEERS.
SCORER'S   POOR   MATHEMATICS   ROBBED   UBC   OF   HARD-WON   POINT      COACH   "HARDROCK"   KABAT   ACCEPTS   VICTORY   CONGRATULATIONS
110 OVER 100 RUNNERS LEAVE THE STARTING LINE IN THE  INTRAMURAL CROSS-COUNTRY.     PIERCY   COVERED   THE   COURSE   IN   NEAR-RECORD   TIME
UP IN THE AIR Is Forsythe In one of the many volleyball games played in
the Field House. Over thirty teams participated in the popular lunch-hour
sport.
FIGHTING it out, two members of opposing intramural teams reach for
the ball.    Contests produced surprisingly good brand of ball.
113 NO STANDS ROARED  for this three-bagger deep into  left field  but the
intramural batsmen figgers it's a lot of fun anyway
BITING   CANVAS   for   a   fast  throw,   this   intramural   matman   likes
spare-time exercise in a little more rugged style than most.
_________■__■
his
HE   SWINGS—misses,   it's   strike   three   and   back   to   the   peanut  butter
sandwiches for this intramural baseballer.
INTRAMURAL
Although the bigger sports on any university campus may
always make good news and draw large crowds out to watch
them, they are not always the most important part of the
university's Physical Education program. The number of
students who are able or qualified to play on the first teams,
be they basketball, football, rugby, soccer or almost anything
one can think of, is very small. A team has a limited number
of players and naturally the best men are picked to play on
the team. However, it is in the Intramural set-up at any university that the largest number of students get the chance to
participate in athletic contests. Through a well run Intramural
program, any group of students can be banded together and
enter one or more teams, according to the sige of their organization and compete with other groups of students.
This year at UBC the Intramural program under the capable direction of Ivor Wynne of the Physical Education department, ran along very smoothly, to the satisfaction of all
the participants. A total of 1976 students took part in all
phases of athletic activity. This group broken down shows
that those students composed a total of 38 different teams.
These were made up of fraternity teams, numbering 15;
faculty teams, 9; living centre teams (Acadia and Fort
camps), 3; other clubs (these including ex-high school
groups ,etc.), 11. In this way, then, almost 2000 students who
would otherwise be unable to take part in any organized
athletic program, are amply taken care of.
The year started off with volleyball, a large number of
the games being played outside while the weather permitted.
Phi Delta Theta fraternity won the volleyball league by defeating Beta Theta Pi in the finals. Next on the list of main
Intramural events was the cross-country race. The course is
charted around the environs of the university and covers
a distance of two and six-tenths miles. First in with the most
men, and consequently winners of the event, was the Legion
entry.
The main events, that is those requiring definitely set up
playing schedules, such as basketball, Softball and touch football, were played at different times; the small events, those
requiring smaller participation, such as golf, skiing and
badminton, were fitted in among the other events. One of
the major events during the year was the swimming meet.
This was held at the Vancouver Crystal Pool and took two
nights and one afternoon to run off. Final results in this
event gave the seaweed crown to the Physical Education entry;
The golf playoffs went to Delta Upsilon fraternity, while the
badminton trophy went to Alpha Delta Phi. The two events
which drew the largest number of participants, probably by
the nature of the games, were volleyball and basketball. A
total of 926 students participated in both these games.
The final tally of all points indicated that Beta Theta Pi
fraternity lead the field with a total of 3471/^ points to their
credit and Phi Delta Theta fraternity a close second with
345 points. These two were both far ahead of the third place
group, Physical Education, who had a total of 302 periods.
114 Tennis Club
This is the first year that the campus
has every had a fuly organized Tennis
Club within its boundaries. Tennis always has been a popular sport with the
students at UBC, but it was not until
last year that the club actually functioned. The club was fortunate that
there were so many top notch tennis
stars to pick from on the campus. In the
first membership drive, 125 people signified their desire to weild a racquet
under UBC colors.
The addition of the new Field House
to the sports facilities at UBC has been
a great help to the Tennis Club. The
Field House contains the only indoor
tennis courts in the city, so that the
members had lots of opportunity for
play, even though the elements were
not in their favor.
This year, for the first time at UBC,
a girls' team was formed. The girls
fared well under the expert tutelage
of Miss Marjorie Leeming. The men's
team has been prepping all year for the
intercollegiate tournaments, to be held
after the Universitly closes.
THE TENNIS CLUB at UBC this year was one of the most powerful teams that has played here.
Here are Thomas, Stockstad, Jinks, Anderson and Jack Volkovitch
TWO OF THE STRONGMEN showing what they can do in the way of tossing  a few  pounds  around.   Emphasis is  on  health and  body  building
LOOKS LIKE AN AD, but it is the same two, lined up in order to show
the  bodily  benefits   than  can   be   derived   from  this  form   of  exercise
Weight Tossing
First   in   Western   Canada,   the   newly-founded   Barbell   Club   was   highly   successful
One of the newest clubs to be formed on the campus, the
Varsity Barbell Club, breathed its first breath this year,
under the active organization of Peter Gook, now president
of the club, and Bud Grondahl, secretary-treasurer. The main
purpose of this club, as the name denotes, is to encourage
weight training (body building through the use of weights),
and to develop among its members an interest in competitive
weight lifting. Although this a relatively new thing at UBC,
in the form of an organized club, it is far from new in many
American universities. The sport is relatively new in Canada,
at any rate, our university being at present the only one in
Western Canada to have such a club on the campus. Because
of its rather late organization on the campus this year, the
activities of the club have been largely physical contests.
115 THRILL OF THE OUTDOORS AND GRANDEUR OF B.C. SCENERY  IS TYPIFIED IN THIS PICTURE OF NORM CARLSON AND ED MORRISSEY AT GARIBALDI
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Club  fights   weather,   stiff climb.    Mount  Brunswick  proves   tough  opponent
VOC activities got underway during
the 1947-48 season with an enjoyable
if rather long and wet hike to Mount
Brunswick, situated behind Hollyburn
Ridge. Brunswick is the sesond peak
behind Holyburn, and the approach to
it involves a lot of hard hiking and
climbing. Of the approximately 160
eager outdoor clubbers commencing the
trip, only five of these managed to
make the peak  of the mountain.  The
weather was the one biggest headache
of the trip, and it is extremely doubtful if even one member returned without having at least half of their clothing completely soaked.
BRIDGE,  normaly an indoor game  ,is  here being  played  in the snowy
outdoors by VOC MEMBERS Heft to right), Lee, Dudley, Laidman, Schon
CAMPING   OUT,   another  VOC   standby.   Here  we   have   (left   to   right).
Buzz Beesley, Kay Aps (back to camera) D. Campbell, R. Rogers and others
116 SHEILA CAMPBELL, a typical  Outdoor Club girl,
loaded  down  with  equipment  for  outdoor  life
LOG  ROLLING—Not the old  lumberman's  style,  but probably  much  more  practical. Three  VOC
members, Maury Cote, Gwen Avery and Bob Dudley help push around during a  club work hike
Work hikes completed, new members
were given their first glimpse of the
social side of the club at the fall roller
skating party. Later on in the year, as
a sort of grand finale, a spring costume
party was held in the Brock Lounge.
This party, described by all members
as excellent, presented the wildest array
of costumes yet seen in the Brock Hall.
Snow fell late on Grouse Mountain
this year and many of the members had
their first day of skiing on a late
November trip to Mount Baker. Several
much smaller parties made private trips
into Sky Pilot, situated about two miles
behind Britannia, and to Garibaldi
Park.
The greater body of the club vacationed up at the club cabin on Grouse
Mountain. During this stay they were
rewarded with a seven foot snow fall,
but the New Year's Eve party made
some members unable to appreciate it
for a few days.
January  was  marked  by  a  skating
party and the annual steeplechase ski
meet. This classic follows a course
from Thunderbird Ridge to the peak
of Dam Mountain, down Whistler's
Pass, pass Grouse Mountain Chalet, and
thence down to the cabin. Winners of
this even and also of the Dam Downhill
were Harry Smith and Anne Hatton.
On the books for the new year is the
new club cabin. Plans for this lodge
are already drawn up (see picture of
executive group), and members hope
to work on it this summer.
EXECUTIVE OF THE CLUB—A. Adams, A. Ede, S. Hicks, J. Handel, K.
Montgomery, Jim Aitken, J. Lintott, W. Ewing, W. Roots, Harry Smith,
George Coats and A. Leslie
TENTING TONIGHT AT GARIBALDI—All part of VOC activities. Outdoor
life is being sampled by Shirl Goodman, Kathie Anderson, Marie Kendall,
J. Rennie and M. Hodgson
117 PAT McGEER LETS GO A ONE-HANDED PUSH SHOT, WHILE HARRY KERMODE WAITS FOR REBOUND
118 UBC THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL TEAM—BACK, BELL, FORSYTH, MUNRO, CAMPBELL,   SELMAN.   MIDDLE,   MITCHELL,   STEVENSON,   McGEER,   McLEAN,
SCARR.   SEATED, MANAGER PENN, HAAS, COACH OSBORNE, KERMODE, MANAGER   PLANT.   THEY   PLACED   SECOND   IN   THEIR   LEAGUE   THIS   YEAR
STARRY HOOPSTERS
Hoopsters happy despite runner-up slot in PNWAC casaba loop
University of British Columbia's top
basketball, team, the Thunderbirds
have since their entry into the Pacific
Northwest Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, consistently proved themselves to be top calibre in the backet-
ball field in this loop. They have not
managed to top or even equal the record
of the 1945 team (first UBC team in
Conference play) but nevertheless,
though they have not won the league,
they have proved tough competition,
and have ended up for the last two
years in runner-up position. The 1945
aggregation won the league easily, but
since that year the competition in the
league has improved immeasurably.
At the beginning of this season just
past, Coach Bob Osborne, dubbed "The
Wizard of Oz' by his 1945 champions,
had an almost green team, from which
he has constructed, during the season,
a basketball squad of sufficient skill to
place second in a hard fought league.
Only two new players were added to
the team this year, but a number of
those who were already members of
the team had not seen much action in
the '46-'47 season. With the newcomers, Reid Mitchell and Bill Bell, these
• boys got into the game much more this
year, and have gained a lot of floor
experience that should stand the team
in good stead next year. Coach Osborne built his new team around his
more experienced player., namely Pat
McGeer, Harry Kermode and Bob
Haas. These three together accounted
for over 55 percent of all the points
scored by the team last season.
Before entering the Pacific Northwest Athletic Conference, the Birds
used to play in the Men's Senior "A"
League, and from thence on three
occasions they managed to win the
Canadian basketball crown. Once in
1931, again in 1936 and in 1941, for
the last time, before becoming intercollegiate champions in 1945.
Coach Bob Osborne took over the
reins of the Physical Education Department from Maury van Vilet in the
summer of 1945. He has lots of experience with winning teams, having
played on the Varsity 1931 championship team, and later with the Canadian
basketball entry, to compete in the
Olympics.
Once again Bob Osborne will play
basketball at the Olympics, but this
time he will be sitting on the bench
coaching his team, instead of playing.
The Thunderbirds, on May 10 and 11,
in Toronto's Maple Leaf Gardens,
definitely put themselves in the favored position for Olympic possibilities
by defeating al their opposition. Bob
Osborne journeyed to London in a dual
capacity, as B.C. Olympic representative
and as coach of the Canadian basketball entry.
119 OFFICIAL FINAL STANDINGS
31!
w
CPS      12
Willamette   9
B.  C   9
Lewis & Clarke     8
Idaho       6
Linfield     5
Pacific U   4
L PF PA Pet.
2 910 692 .857
5 807 722 .643
5 799 745 .643
6 851 814 .571
8 809 832 .429
9 747 824 .357
10 637 723 .286
Next year, the Birds basketball team
should be a real threat, as they have
now definitely proved themselves to be
one of the outstanding hoop squads in
Canada. Bill Bell, playing in centre
position, and John Forsyth, also playing centre, should present quite a scoring threat to an opposing team in the
PNWAC.
Next year, however, the team will be
without the benefit of some of its better scoring players. Pat McGeer, who
was one of the main cogs in the Birds
scoring machine, will not be playing
next year. Bob Haas and Harry Kermode, who also made up the better half
of the scoring this year, will also be
leaving. The scoring duties will fall on
the remaining members of the team
and any new players who may join the
team next year. However, with some
Olympic experience under their belts,
the Birds should stand well up in next
year's Conference race.
FREDDIE BOSSONS, starry Bird hoopster, poised
to net the leather, tallying another marker for
the rampaging Birds.
LEWIS AND CLARK PLAYERS LOOK ON HELPLESSLY WHILE McGEER SINKS ANOTHER ONE FOR UBC
120 LES BULLEN AT WICKETS has just driven the ball, while Wills, Hobson and
Pudney converge on It from the pitch. Cricketers hampered by lack of pitch
CRICKET
Varsity Cricket Club again entered two teams in the B.C.
Mainland Cricket League last summer. These two were Varsity in the first division and UBC in the second. A very successful season was enjoyed by both clubs, but they did not
manage to annex any silverware for the University. Varsity
played a total of 14 games, while UBC played 18 games. A
combined team of Varsity and UBC played 4 games while on
tour in the Okanagan. Two members of the team, Pete Hob
son and Art Hill, were chosen to play for the B.C. team, in
the inter-provincial champinship at Toronto.
THE FIRST ELEVEN—Back row
standing, Joplin,
Griffin, La
■sen, Scott, Cod-
ville,   Pudney,   Pauker.   Kneli
ng,   Willis,   Pearce,   Hobson,
Bullen,   Martin
„-.
Its
j__ij
mmm
__■? f    1 w^S
K Jf— *9
Wr^
*^_B
v*4$M
l___L_     _______
■ ■                           J •;
"- *              _tf *
^-_^«ffl_H_________i
■_■ 1
*&**3*
^^(
TOM PEARCE bowls  one down, while Joe  Pauker acts as umpire,  and
Art Griffin  prepares to field the ball  in case unknown batter connects
GOLF
OUT   ON   THE   GREEN—Doug   Bajus   putts   a   long   one.   It   looks   pretty
straight from  where we're  standing.  Bajus  travelled   south  this spring
The golfing fraternity at UBC got well underway before
Christmas, when it held its Annual Match Play Championship. The qualifying rounds were played on the University
Golf Course, and after the contestants had paired off, they
played their matches around the same course. Outstanding
in this event was Doug Bajus, who got his head well above
the others in the qualifying rounds, and consequently went
on to win the tournament.
Bob Esplen, who led the parade in the qualifying round,
unfortunately for him, lost out to Doug in the finals. It was
a touch-and-go match, with Esplen leading all the way in the
morning. However, Bajus tightened up in the afternoon and
shot a very fine sub par, to walk away with the championship.
After Christmas, the club had its hands full, organizing
a representative golf team to complete in the newly organized Conference Championships. A system was worked out
which took into consideration both the pre-Christmas scores
and the after-Christmas scores of all the members. Later on,
in February, the club held the outing at Peace Portal Golf
Club. Unfortunately, the course was not in very good condition and consequently neither were the scores. This first
round constituted one of the four medal rounds in the spring
season. The other three were played around Fraser, University and Point Grey, respectively.
121 CHIEF BOB  BOYES  ATTEMPTS VAINLY  TO  CHECK  A  LUCKY   PLAYER AS HE LAYS ONE UP FOR TWO POINTS AFTER BREAKING
CHIEFS DROP FINALS
Power house Senior A opposition just too much for valiant Chiefs
The UBC Chiefs are the university basketball entry,
playing in the Men's Senior A City League. A total of four
teams were playing in the city league this year, and among
these were the Dominion champions, the Vancouver Clover
Leafs. Playing against such powerful opposition, the student's
put forth their best efforts, but after defeating New Westminster Luckies in the semi-finals, they dropped the city title
in the finals to the powerful Leaf squad. The semi-finals
with the Luckies was a thrilling series in itself. The first
game was played in New Westminster, and at this game the
Chieftains managed to drop the game by one point. All
through the season the two teams had alternately defeated
each other by narrow margins, in the vicinity of two or three
points. The next game was played in the UBC Gym, and was
contested by the students. The final ruling tipped the scales
in their favor and gave them the game by two points. The
third and final game of the series, played at the Luckies'
home floor was taken by the Chiefs by a one-point margin,
during an overtime period. The final playoffs against the
Clover Leafs  followed  almost  immediately after the semi-
122 UBC CHIEF BASKETBALL TEAM. THEY DIDN'T QUITE MANAGE TO DEFEAT POWERFUL    DOMINION    CHAMPIONS,    THE   VANCOUVER    CLOVER    LEAFS
finals. The games were played in rapid succession and the
rather tired Chiefs dropped three straight games to the
Dominion champions, without getting a look in.
The UBC Chiefs were first organized in about 1944, but
in that year did not play in any organized basketball league.
When the Thunderbirds pulled out of the Men's Senior A
League in the city and started to play Conference basketball
with American colleges, the Chieftains stepped into the Senior
A League in place of the Birds. In their first year of league
play, that is during the season of 1945-46, they led the
league the whole year, only to be defeated by the Lauries in
the finals. The next season, 1946-47, the Chiefs once again
made the semi-final playoffs, but this time they came in
third in the league, losing in the semis to Leckies of New
Westminster.
This year, however, the situation was reversed, as the
Chiefs defeated the Luckies in the semis, to earn a place to
meet the powerful Clover Leafs. During the semi-final and
final playoffs, the schedule of games was rather gruelling.
The whole thing called for seven games to be played in
seven consecutive nights. The Chiefs this year were rather
WHICH ONE will get the ball? Two Chiefs and two Arrows caught by the
photographer as they fight for rebound. UBC's Bob Boyes in foreground
123 STAR CLOVERLEAF SANDY ROBERTSON GRABS FOR A PASS FROM TEAM MATE BOBBY BURTWELL AS JACK  POMFRET HITS  THE  GYMNASIUM  DECK
unfortunately plagued with injuries. Two of their best men,
Fred Bossons and Art Phillips, had troubles in the final
games. Phillips sprained an ankle early in the series and this
kept his game down very much. Bossons had trouble all year
round with a bad knee, but in the final game the hard grind
of so many games was just enough to slow him down
considerably.
CLOVERLEAF  TRIO   converge   on  Chief  star,   as   the  Varsity   hoopsters
scramble for another victory over city league opponents.
TENSE MOMENT of  game as casaba opponents leap for basket score.
Cloverleaf strength proved too great for Chiefs in finals.
124 A *lnil»Ue...
to the sweetheart of the 1948 Olympic Games, UBC's own
Irene Strong. In April Irene was packing up her swim
suits and checking her tickets for* Wembley stadium.
She would swim for Canada and UBC, in the 12th
Olympiad.
125 WATER POLO, a tiring sport, which requires all participants to be in top
condition.  Here  we see three  players bearing down  on  George Knight
SWIMING TEAM—Standing, Morrison (mgd.l. Whittle (coach), Stangroon
leapt.). In water, Brodie, Tolehurst, Bakony, Creedon, Hawthorne, Stob-
bart, Knight, Tarleton, Wilson, Thistle
STUDENTS ENJOY AQUATICS
Pool lack slows conference-crashing swimmers
Swimming was given a further impetus on the campus this year by having it established on a Conference
basis. Hampered by the lack of a pool
on the campus, the team has to practice
in the city at the public Crystal Pool.
The men's team, coached by  Doug
Whittle, felt themselves a little limited
by budget difficulties, but managed to
surmount these troubles. The team
concentrated on the Conference meet in
Portland on February 28, and succeeded
in annexing another Conference win
for the University.
The girls' team formed a water ballet
team under the direction of Hazel
Smith. This group gave several displays
during tre year, and in addition to these
did their full share of competitive
swimming for the University.
GIRLS TEAM (left to right)—
son,   E.   Hall,   P.   Gartside,
B. Schrout, J. Avery, A. Spencer, J. Mache-
K.   Wilson,   K.   Woodside   and   A.   Suiker
READ TO GO—Five members of swimming team paused momentarily on
edge of pool, waiting for final gun to send them plunging into the water
126 THUNDERETTES   D  FOWLER,  M.  SUMMERS,  G.   SCHWARTZ,  N.  McDERMOTT, J. PENDLETON, J. WEEDON, Y. FRENCH, R. WILSON, CAMPBELL, CROOKS i
CASABETTES GAIN TITLE
In the Women's Basketball League, only one university
team was entered for competition, in the Senior B Girls'
League. Due to the fact that there was no competition in the
Senior B League for the Thunderettes, the girls played in
the Senior A League during the year. There were only two
teams in the Senior B League this year, so both of them,
Tracy's and Thunderettes, played in the Senior A League.
The Thunderetes won the city championship and then went
on to defeat Chilliwack two straight games out of three for
the Lower Mainland title. However, in the provincial playoffs,
the girls were defeated by the Hudson's Bay team
DOREEN CAMPBELL make good check n a game at King Edward gym.
The shooter, No. 4 of the opposition, didn't reckon with Doreen's jump
MORE ACTION down at King Ed  gym.  Here  the situation  is  reversed.
Doreen Campbell does the shooting for the Thunderettes as she is checked
127 A LINE OUT DURING ONE OF THE CALIFORNIA BEARS-UBC THUNDERBIRD   GAMES  AT VARSITY STADIUM—ONE  OF THE  FEW CALIFORNIA GAINED.
RUGGERMEN TRIUMPH
UBC 15 edge Aussies for world acclaim
Winners of the World Cup this year, UBC Thunderbirds
completed a very successful season about two months ago.
The main league which the Birds participated in, commenced
before Christmas, with six teams entered. Competition in
this league is for the Millar Cup, which Varsity won without
a single loss. Also entered in the competition, with the
Thunderbirds, was the second university team, UBC.    UBC
managed to finish third in the Cup round-robin series.
Next logical move, was for the Thunderbird eleven to
defend their possession of the Tisdale Cup, but due to the
pressure of a heavy outside playing schedule, the first team
dropped out and left UBC to defend the cup. With North
Shore "All Blacks" only one point behind them, UBC had a
tough fight to keep possession, but in the final count, they
RUGGER was never a soft game, as the above picture  proves,
the scramble, anything can happen, and usually does.
During
SOMETIMES it's not a problem of what to do with the ball, but rather,
where is the ball or who's hiding it?
128 THUNDERBIRD scrum half grabs the ball and breaks away, throwing it
on its way to the three line preparing to close the remaining distance
for a try.
ACTION features California game. Reid, Dunbar close in on hapless player
SCRUMS mix it up in hard-fought tilt.   Dunbar stands ready in background
came through with flying colours to win the series without a
loss and return the Tisdale Cup to the University for another
year.
It was during February that the first games of the World
Cup Series against the California Golden Bears, were played
at the University. The Thunderbirds won the first 13 to 3,
dropping the second game by a tight 3-0. Later, in March
the Birds travelled to California for the last two games of the
series. In California, Varsity found their proper place and
took both games 15-8 and 11-3, thereby retaining possession
of the World Cup. This is the second season that Varsity
has retained the Cup since they first put it up for competition
in 1945.
March 3, the Thunderbirds met the famous Australian
rugby team "The Wallabies," in the UBC Stadium. Of three
games played in Vancouver by the Wallabies, the university
team provided them with the stiffest competition, holding
the score to 20-6. The next day, student players were honoured
by the Wallabies at a lunch given by the Vancouver Rugby
Union. Vancouver "Reps" were also honoured in the same
way, when the Australian manager presented all players with
miniature rugby balls in sterling silver.
In the second division, the "Sophs" and the "Engineers"
were unable to finish play for the Carmichael Trophy because
of proximity of exams.
THUNDERBIRD  full-back
Dunbar grabs the leather from  the Golden Bears possibly saving a try and aiding the team on to victory.
129 In the past two years, the university had produced what
had been undoubtedly one of the finest English Rugger aggregations ever witnessed on local grounds. The Varsity squad,
except in moments of overconfidence, had dominated the
play throughout the full game, and the situation had reached
such a point that the newspapers wanted to know only the
score—it was taken for granted that the campus squad had
won the game.
Fans of the English game had been openly thrilled with
the fight the Blue and Gold had put up against the Wallabies,
an Australian International team. The Daily Ubyssey quoted
the Wallaby captain as admitting the Thunderbirds had
provided the men from "Down Under" with the stiffest
opposition the Australians had met in Canada. Many experts
rated the student squad as on a par with many International
teams found overseas, and it was hard to find a fan who
would disagree with them.
Although handicapped by studies and exams, the Thunderbirds became consistently known as the "Thundering
Thunderbirds" and when an opposing team took to the field
against them, it was usually a do-or-die gesture; the score
bordered on the inevitable.
DUNBAR playing the ball  while  unidentified  enemy   player gets  ready
to make a tackle.    Play was rough, in most cases.
to        I
$k  J5l-*j&^ &
'MS*. JVsl
rSSjfei? *
\sm
Jl            j
1   .         *£
tt£5t     jfft'      lS5l^
**^vL f v&R ft     >65
1   -    JL%
pjl     ^kH M~*fy
tfjHl (t_iu_fil
V __■_■___  1      Btf      ~\   -~a\
___■ :5__P!______z,      ' ■ 1
WPPIH
■ wm   *"'V_i_3_H
__J    ' ...         2        I
i VJt*
WflPfc^j^p^^^^
'^^h!
UBS'S    REPRESENTATIVE   SENIOR    RUGBY   TEAM—WINNERS   OF   THE    WORLD   CUP   AND   THE   McKECHNIE   TROPHY   FOR   THE    1947-1948   SEASON
130 'f5      •§'        A-       _V     »             m
Ba           __*_.            Mi          '»        'W       *■*       '__
§
fUg.                               \    -X.                                                                               __                                                 Jb
L
|            »Jbc               ,'RC'   .,.*V
?    _l                       ■
■-_       \      '            .       \—       .r p
Lir.
ft if.-'yii_Hf_Ti    V        * «     <__"___. 4k *    __:.          _^1 ^__%l >____L 1l_____. «_i
B^TjdfJ _■___ V.    «. •_a_H_Ki «_■_. > ___?>■___ i     -^_____ %______ -Jb|___ _____u___
B;-. ^fc____ <■    Efe w_l ■  ■ __n___!_^^___ _b_^9p> ■_
|^9H^K^BMflKj^HH«|fiK
PUCKMEN AND HANDLERS GANG UP FOR CAMERAMAN.    PUCKSTERS  MISSED  LEAGUE,  BATTLED
HARD FOR FOURTH.
UBC CARRIES THE  PUCK,  AS  THREE MEMBERS  OF OPPOSITION SWEEP  IN  TO  TAKE POSSESSION
Pucksters
The 1947-48 edition of the hockey
team, while not finishing up first,
nevertheless managed to come fourth
in the tough Pacific Coast Senior "B"
League. Handicapping factor for the
team was the fact that they had but
one hour a week practice time, and had
to rely on game time for many of their
practice sessions.
In a two-game total point series
against Vancouver Indians, the Birds
came from behind to win 6-4. However
in the semi-final against the Nanaimo
Clippers, the students did not fare so
well, bowing out by dropping two
games to one.
The highlight of the year was a trip
to California and Colorado, at which
time the team played against the Golden
Bears of the University of California
and against the San Francisco Olympics. Downed by the Bears 6-2, the
Birds managed to hold their own
against the Olympics team, tying the
game at 2-2.
No weak spots were to be found in
the Birds, from the goalkeeper out.
Both offensively and defensively the
team clicked smoothly, all the players
co-ordinating nicely for the strength
of the team. Bill House in the networked like a Trojan keeping them clear
and was admirably assisted by defense-
men Terry Nelford, Bob Saunders, Jim
Peebles and Jim Rowledge. On the forward line Fred Andrew, Has Young
and Hugh Berry made up one aggregation, and Bill Wagner, Bobby Kock and
Lloyd Torfasonon the other group.
A WHITE SPOT PLAYER RUSHES DOWN THE ICE IN AN ATTEMPTED BREAKAWAY AS TWO UBC BLADEMEN CONVERGE FROM SIDES TO STOP RUSH
131 AFTER A LITTLE  BIT  OF ACTION,  PLAYERS   PICK THEMSELVES  OFF THE GROUND IN A WALK-AWAY. BILL THOMAS LOOKS DEJECTED AS HE TURNS
SOCCER HAS BOOM YEAR
Coached by  St.   Saviour  Star Millar McGill,  UBC's soccer teams play  sparkling  ball
Two soccer teams carried the Blue and Gold colors into
the Vancouver and District Soccer League this season, Varsity in the first division and UBC in the second division.
Varsity, the first eleven, was coached again this year by
Millar McGill, one-time star performer with St. Saviours in
the Coast League. The team was under the capable management of CUS president, Bob Wilson, and captain of the team
was centre-forward Gus McSween.
The team, showing great playing ability, was in top position for most of the season, ending up with 12 wins and 2 ties
against 6 loses. Varsity now holds a three point lead over
their closest rivals, Empire Hotel, but the hotelmen have three
games to play and have a chance of passing the student eleven.
Presently Varsity holds the Vancouver and District League
Shield, having won it last year.
Varsity, unfortunately, fell by the wayside in the Imperial
Cup race, being nosed out in the finals by an upset loss to
Powell River, who had been at the bottom of the league all
year. The Varsity squad this year was particularly strong defensively, with fullback Jack Cowan being chosen as the
league's best when the all-star team was chosen. Combined
with right fullback Stew Wilson and centre-half Gus McSween,
the team provided a rough ride for any attacking opposition.
Jimmy Gold and Dave Thompson held down the other two
halfback positions. The forward line was led by veteran
centre Ilvan Carr, with Howie Osborne and High Ross as in-
sides, and Bobby Moulds and Stu Todd on the wings. Gordy
Shepherd, another strong forward, was unfortunately bothered by a bad knee most of he season. Fred Morrow in goal
guarded his nets excellently and was seldom beaten, save on
one or two occasions.
132 MAINSTAYS  OF VARSITY  SOCCER TEAM: DAVE THOMPSON,  BILL THOMAS, STU TODD AND CAPT.  GUS McSWEEN.     THESE BOYS TOPPED LEAGUE
LEFT TO  RIGHT,  FULLBACK STEW WILSON, HUGH ROSS,  JIMMY GOLD, GORDY  SHEPHERD,   JACK  COWAN.  JACK   CHOSEN YEAR'S  TOP   FULLBACK
IT MAY LOK LIKE RUGBY OR FOOTBALL, BUT IT'S ONLY SOCCER. CHARGING  IN TO  BLOCK THE  KICK,  PLAYER STUMBLES AND  FALLS ON KICKER
133 FIRST TEAM—LES BULLEN, BILL PEARSON, NED LARSEN, GUS DECOCQ, NORM BARR, C. WILLS,  CLEMENT,  D.  PUDNEY, JOPLIN,  HARRICK, BENHAM
VARSITY, UBC TAKE HOCKEY
Campus teams come 1-2 in first division but lose Challenge O. B. Allan Cup in  finals
The past season has seen Varsity enter and maintain four
undergraduate teams in the first and second divisions of the
B.C. Mainland League. Two of these have been playing in the
first division, while the other two were entered in the second
division. At present the club has an outstanding membership
of approximately 60, and plans are underway for the doubling of the membership next year. Standings in the first division were very close, with Varsity leading the throng by 3
points, and UBC a close second, being only one point behind
Varsity. Vancouver was third with the East Indian team filling the bottom position in the standings. After Christmas,
both University teams maintained their leads for many
months, only to be ousted from top place by a greatly improved Vancouver team. Both cups, the Challenge Cup and
the 0. B. Allan Knockout Cup, won last year by Varsity,
changed hands this year, and now repose in the inner sanctums of the Vancouver squad.
The student teams in the second division played good
hockey all year, but finally got beaten by a new entry into
the league, the Faculty team, composed of members of the
staff of the University.
It was found impossible this year to send a picked Varsity
team to Vancouver Island to play exhibition games with some
Island teams. This had been done in previous years, but this
year, it was felt, that there was a lack of sufficient competition on the Island to warrant the expense of sending a team
from Varsity.
SECOND UNIVERSITY TEAM—B. Ross, A. Grenius, J. Piercy, D. Hanson, M.
MacDonald.   Kneeling,   H.   Buckley,   E.   Grenius,   S.   Arneson,  B.   Bibace
LES BULLEN RUSHES  IN to tangle with  Bob Ross.  In background can be
seen  Gus  Decocq   standing   by   for  a   pass   should   Bullen   be   successful
134 UBC GRASS HOCKEY: Coltman, Taylor, Schrodt, Lang, Merritt, Richardson,
Stephens,     Rice,    Thompson.     Seated,    Dobson,    MacKinnon,    Fitzjames
FEMMES
The university fielded two women's grass hockey teams
this year, Varsity, the senior team, and UBC, the second
team. The Varsity team were the holders of the Spalding
Trophy, emblematic of city supremacy in the Women's Grass
Hockey League, but throughout the year they had been tied
with the Ex-Kitsilano women's team, and in the final game
they lost both the title and the trophy by dropping the game
by a count of 4-2.
The UBC team reached the semi-finals, after holding
third place in a league of seven teams. After playing the semifinal matches the team finally ended up in third place standing. In a play day, held in the fall at Portland, with twelve
American college teams, Varsity managed to end up sharing
top honors with Oregon State College. Later, in the spring
when the university staged the Invasion of Victoria College,
Varsity defeated the Vic College team by 3-0.
A PRACTICE SESSION, during which we see Anne Munro in hot pursuit
of the  small  ball.     Girls  practice on field   behind   Brock   Hall   building
SENIOR WOMEN'S GRASS HOCKEY, VARSITY. THEY SHARED TOP HONOU RS WITH OREGON STATE. OUTSTANDING MUNRO, TURNER (middle, seated)
135 AND THEY'RE IN CLOSE folks, as we near the end of round five.    UBC
boxers trade fast-flying leather in pre-toumey workout.
TOURNEY
Campus maulers bunch muscles
Second annual intra-mural boxing and wrestling tourna-
men gave the groan and grunt boys a chance to fill each
other's face with leather and canvas.
The mat men are shaping up for inter-collegiate competition and it is possible tourneys may be arranged for next
term.
Elbow-in-the-ear tactics seem to be winning the match for
A LONG LEFT smashing home to the jaw in a lightning cross. UBC the blond Sampson in the lower picture but its legality is
fighter in the spotted shorts hit the canvas seconds later. questionable.
ONE LARGE CAULIFLOWER EAR GETS A FLYING START IN LIFE AS UBC MAT MEN WORKOUT DURING 'TWEEN LECTURE WRESTLING BOUTS—ALL IN FUN
136 FISHERMAN    DAVE    McNAIR    STANDS    ON    THE    BANKS    OF    A   TURBULENT   STREAM   AS   HE  TRIES   HIS   LUCK   AT  THE   OLD   PISCATORIAL   ART
FROG AND MINNOW
Club permitted to exercise voice in provincial fish and game legislation
In its second year on the campus, the Fish and Game Club
has fostered the best interests of the student sportsmen.
Through its membership in the Lower Mainland zone, the
club was able to voice its opinion with regards to influencing
the fish and game legislation of the province.
The club's many and varied activities were supplemented
this year by some extremely interesting talks given by a few
local sportsmen.
One of the most outstanding of these was that one given by
G. L. Pop. His movies of B.C. game were aclaimed by all
members.
These talks were usually given at the weekly meetings
of the club. When not on hunting or fishing trips, the meb-
bers have a rifle range on the campus, where they may spend
many enjoyable hours sharpening their aims.
This range is located in the Arts Building basement and
will probably stay there, despite the plans for a full time
hunting and fishing lodge, a skeet range and beter and larger
trips for all members next season.
The club hopes to enlarge its membership very substantially with these added inducements over the coming years.
The executive for 1947-48 were: President, B. Frguson;
vice-president, E. Samann; secretary, J. Lewis.
PRESIDENT Bob  Ferguson and Rifleman Bill Cook,  seen outside the club
rifle range. In basement of Arts Building, members spend noon hours here
TWO SHARPSHOOTERS, Margaret Smith and Bill  Cook, seen here in the
range situated in the Arts basement, are rated best gun handlers in club
FLY TYING, an old art,  is here being practiced  by Marion  Lawis, one
of the deft tyers in the club. In charge of fly tying this year was D. McNair
137 MEMBERS  OF  UBC  SKI  TEAM LEAVING SUN VALLEY. LEFT TO   RIGHT ARE   D.   FRASER.   J.   LEGATT   (MANAGER),   D.   ANDERSON,   GAR   ROBINSON
A SKIER'S SILHOUETTE  is outlined  against the evening sky at Mt. Garibaldi,  where  University of   B.C.   ski   team  spent weeks  making   movies
UBC SKIERS
U of W plankmen too good
Possibly it was just a coincidence, but at nearly every
intercollegiate ski meet the Thunderbird ski team entered,
they were beaten by th high flying Univrsity of Washington
squad.
It crtainly wasn't through the lack of trying that the team
failed to take a first in open intercollegiate skiing. A total of
five college meets, including Sun Valley Intercollegiate Championships, North Western meet at Martin Pass, Canadian
Intercollegiate at Banff, a UBC host meet at Rossland and an
exchange meet at Baker gave the campus skiers every chance
for a showing, which they took advantage of, placing in the
first thre every time.
Although lacking the opportunities of the men, the girls
team took part in the Sun Valley Mary Cornelia Trophy
event. Mary Ewart placed fifth in the combined, followed by
Jo Costillou, Bev Robertson, Cecelia Burt and Shirley Welsh.
Individually, however, the boys did exceptionaly well.
John Frazee took second place in the men's slalom in the
Dominion championships at Banff, with Doug Fraser schus-
sing the downhill course for a top rate second. One of the
team members, Gar Robinson, was even regarded as an
Olympic hope contestant and took part in the Olympic trials
at Montreal last spring. (He hit a tree and got off the course
not to finish.)
138 ABOVE is Cecelia Burt, member of girls' ski team, which participated in
6th Anual Intercollegiate meet at Sun Valley. On right is Don Anderson,
four-way skier, who has participated in almost every tournament this year
r^J
W 2.
A        ■**_■
t"**TlS__/»-"- ,Z,U
L            ?T^ft__.W
. \    m
' mM^' -^^^^^*3r *
*
-Xt-
NEW PEP FOR PLANKSTERS
Revived Thunderbird ski team holds their own across the country
A new departure from the VOC was the revival of the
Thunderbird Ski Club, which sponsored the competitive
skiers. Don Johnson was elected president with Al Bluechel,
treasurer. Jack Leggatt acompanied the team as team manager and part-time publicity agent.
It was again luck for the MAD and the campus skiers that
Peter Vajda took over the ski coaching chores for the past
season. It's not every coach who hikes up mountains Sunday
mornings or drops his work for a week or more to show his
lads the "finer art of skiing."
Two of the most popular and consistent skiers of the team
graduate in 1948. Doug Fraser and Don Anderson are the
losses to the Alma Mater.
JOHN FRAZZE,  a  powerhouse  skier, who puts skiing before schoolwork.
This year he captured second  place in Dominion Slalom Championships
TOP MAN is Doug Fraser, classic downhill and slalom skier, Doug was
high scorer in Western Canadian Intercollegiate four-way ski championships this year. Lower, Gus Robinson, former Western Canada champion
139 EXECUTIVE OF THE GYM CLUB, DAVE ROXBROUGH (MANAGER), GEOFF HEAL   (PRES.),   AL   McMARTIN,   COACH   DOUG   WHITTLE,   SEATED   IN   GYM
CAMPUS ACROBATS
Daring young men fly with greatest of ease to make '48 gymnasts' most active session
Varsity's Gymnastic Club completed a very successful
season during 1947-48. First and foremost on their list of
achievements was the acquisition of a new rampoline. This
rather strange device consists of canvas mounted on springs.
The idea of the trampoline is that it gives the performer
springs in his feet, after a fashion. Bouncing up and down
on the trampoline, the gymnast gains momentum and when
he feels he is bouncing sufficiently, he attempts some feat,
such as a back flip or a double somersault. The machine was
used during the year mostly for teaching tumbling. For this
purpose it is invaluable, as it is an excellent method of de1
veloping timing. At present the UBC trampoline is the only
one in Vancouver, and has been used extensively by the club
for displays both at the university and down in Vancouver
proper at the Forum and the Y.M.C.A.
The fall Canadian Gymnastic Championships were
held at Montreal and one of UBC's prominent matmen, Bill
Boyd, journeyed to Montreal to compete. Bill did not manage to place first in the contest, but out of a total of 26 of
Canada's best gymnasts, Boyd took tenth place.
BILL BOYD WORKS OUT in the gym. Bill  represented the university at
Montreal last fall in Canadian Gymnastic Championships; he placed tenth
OVER THE HIGH  BOX  goes Wally  Roots.  Two ardent admirers look on
from   background.   Boxing  ring   used  in  intramural   meet  may  be seen
140 Foil-Men
Simpson Cops Dominion Championship
UBC Fencing Club has finished a year which, in the
opinion of the members and the executive, has been a very
successful one. The end of the term saw the club completing
its third year as an organized group on the campus. During
this time great strides have been made in acquisition of material, better coaching instruction, and a larger membership.
This year the club was combosed of 22 members, 17 men
and 5 women. In the line of better equipment, th club r-
ceived $90 worth of secondhand fencing equipment. This is
the first real equipment grant that the club has had in the
three years since its inception.
Another- reason why the club flourished so well this
year was the brilliant instruction which they were able to
obtain. For a coach they had Major George Braund, holder
of city, provincial and Dominion fencing titles. Club President Dan Lambert maintains that it was due in large part to
Braund's untiring efforts and expert coaching that the club
functioned so well.
A further step forward for the club was the origin of a
new club crest.
In addition to the crest, a distinctive costume was also designed. Both of these things will add to the smartness and
morale of the club during competition. The club entered
in the provincial and city championships, to take place April
30 and May 1.
CLUB  INSTRUCTOR George Braund (Dominion Foil Champion) gives Dave
Morton instruction  concerning finer points in art of fencing with a  foil
MEMBERS   (left  to   right),   Connor,   McTaggart,   Camus,   Shuster,   Belt-   S
impson,   Braund,   Lambert,   Trusdell,   Morton,   Park,   MacDonald,   Stastny
NUCLEUS OF THE CLUB (left to right), H. Laurldsen-Hough, O. Scudamore,
N. Harvey, D. Chant, S. Germanluk, D. Morton in front of target after
shoot.
A PERFECT SCORE registered in the bull'seye by two of the sharpshooters,
Steve Germaniuk and Dave Morton. Looks like other shots were good also
Archers Win
Nottingham had notting on UBC
During February and March the club held several tournaments with the University of Alberta archers. For the first
time in the history of tournament play amateur radio set-
were used as a means of holding a tournament when the
two teams could not shoot in the presence of each other. All
of these were won by the UBC team.
The winning team consisted of four club members, namely,
Dave Morton, Steve Germaniuk, Owen Scudamore and Donald Chant. The high scorer in tournament play for the year
was Dave Morton.
The club is now installed in the Field House, where the
club has great plans for expanding their activities. Plans have
been under way to hold tournaments with clubs from universities all across Canada and as well a few in the United States.
Also on the agenda for 1948-49 is the formation of a
women's team for competitive shooting.
The club is now installed in the Field House, whr the
members had a chance to not only hold tournaments with
other clubs, but also the members could have shoots amongst
themselves.
In addition to the shoots held with Alberta, there were
two held with a local team. One of these UBC won, the first,
but lost the second.
The executive for 1947-48 was as follows: President,
Don Chant; vice-president, 0. Scudamore; secretary, Nancy
Harvey; manager, E. Lauridsen-Hoegh; consultant, S.
Germaniuk.
141 The Minor Clubs form the backbone
of the extra-curricular life at UBC.
They provide outlets for the particular
hobbies of each student and give him
training in "running the show." And,
in a college as large as UBC, they provide that sense of social security that
is nearly impossible to attain in the
large classes and crowded cafeterias.
Another large group that helps,
among other things, to provide the
necessary social outlet to the students
are the Greek letter societies. But they
also work, as do all students at UBC;
they provide a nucleus without which
many a campaign would be defunct
before it was under way.
In necessarily limited space, Totem
'48 now points up the highlights of
these small but important groups. ORGANIZATIONS PAN-HELL   KEPT   EIGHTEEN   CAMPUS  SORORITIS   IN   LINE  DU RING BUSY TERM,  RAPPED A FEW KNUCKLES BUT HAD  FUN
PAN-HELLENIC SOCIETY
Nursemaiding nine sororities through the term was the
tough row hoed by Pan-Hellenic Society.
PERT   KAY   LOUTIT    held   reigns   of   Pan-Hell    society,   guided   Greek
controlling  body through  "smooth-sailing"  year.
Chief nursemaid was Kay Loutit, pert little Alpha Gam,
who served an action-packed term as president of Pan-Hell.
Regulation of competitive sorority rushing rated high
on the priority list for the agendas at the weekly meetings
of the controlling panel.
Two representatives from each sorority brought the total
membership of the group to 18. Dean of women, Dorothy
Mawdsley served as faculty adviser and unofficial sponsor.
Arrangements for the Mardi Gras fell as a heavy load
on the soft, sweater-clad shoulders of the Pan-Hell society.
There were committees to organize, decorations to see to,
tickets to sell, and of course, the beauteous chorus to whip
into shape.
But when the last teacup from the last spring rushing
tea was washed and hung up for another year, the girls of
Pan-Hell decided it had been a year of smooth sailing for
the campus greeks.
Left to Right, Back: Joan Charters, Joan Feast, Molly
Reed, Ruth Becker, Trudy Price, Kay Cook, Marigold Mackenzie, Jean Woodward, Peggy Aveling, Elaine Leiterman;
Seated: Peggy Fullerton, Mary Pat Crowe, Polly Lane, Kay
Loutit, Tina Howard, Nora McGarry, Shirley Chisholm.
144 Left to Right: D. Black, N. Clarke, J. Collison, N. Davidson, J. Fraser, J. Grimmett, N. Guilhamoulie.
Left to Right: R. Hodgins, S. Ketchen, K. Knapp, E. Leiterman, J. Shearman, B. Wilson. (Not shown)  M. van der Valk.
t9sJL*z~S\
IM^U
<j&
Delta Sigma Pi, University of British Columbia's
honorary women's sorority, is a group set up to bring together women leaders from many different phases of campus
activity.
At twice monthly meetings the "inner high council" of
campus women drank tea and discussed important phases
of student affairs, offering constructive criticism and hints
to the various leaders.
Ground work for petitioning the U.S. women's honorary
sorority, Mortar Board", was laid during the term of 1947-48.
Beverley Wilson was president; Nora Clarke, vice-president; and Daphne Black, secretary.
Faculty advisers and unofficial sponsors were Dean of
Women Dorothy Mawdsley, Dr. Isabel Maclnnes, and Dr.
Joyce Hallamore.
Membership to the group is by appointment only and
ten girls were taken in during the term of 1947-48.
145 * UPPER—Blundell, J.; Breadon, M.; Brithour, H; Brett, J.; Campbell, J.; Charters, J.; Clyne, E.; Dalrymple, J.;
Eyres, J. * LOWER Feast, J.; Fisher, J.; Fitzpatrick, P.; Graham, B.; Harrison, B.; Latsoudes, V.; Little, J.;
Lomow, D.; Malcolmson, A.
* UPPER—MacKenzie, S.; McEachen, B.; McKinley, E.; Mc Turk, H.; Montgomery, M.; Moore, J.; Norman, M.;
Purvis, B.; Reid, R. * LOWER—Robinson, K.; Ross, M.; Shaw, B.; Watts, L.; Webster, P.; Willoughby, L.; White, E. J.;
Campbell, M. A.
GLfc*-, <J?_«te.(J&
146 * UPPER—Bishop, D.; Bone, M.; Burbridge, E.; Burns, H.; Cameron, D.; Carnsew, M.; Castillou, J.; Chisholm, A.;
Coady, M. * MIDDLE—Cotterall, G.; Cunningham, C; Davies, M.; Emmonds; Forrester, S.; Gamey, P.; Hazlewood, J.; Hopkins, I.; Irwin, L. * LOWER—Irwin, T.; Jarvis, J.; Johnson, L.; Ketcheson, R.; Lindsay, H., Livington,
R.; Loutit, K.; Mare, M.; Mayo, L.
■
* UPPER—McDonald, F.; McDonald, F.; McKendry, B.; Robertson, B.; Rowllings, M.; Smith, E.; Smithson, B.;
Stockstad, D.; Thomson, M. * LOWER—Turnbull, M.; Wolfe, I.; Wolstencroft, S.; Seaman, H. L.; Kerr, J. L;
Stewart, K. A.
OJ^H«~^V*l*z~
147 * UPPER—Barraclough, L.;  Bassett, B.;   Chisholm, S.;  Craig, M.;   Dougan, C;  Durham, N.;   Fawsitt, J.;  Finlay, G.
* LOWER—Glover, M.;  Guilhamoulie, A.;  Gunn, S.;  Hallsor, J.; Howard, M.; Johnson, S.; Johnston, W.; Kerr, M.
%   \   %-
% K <
* UPPER—Laird, J.; Larkin, D.; Mouatt, M.; Macdonald, R.; Parker, F.; Proud, A.; Rogers, M.; Sibley, M. * LOWER
—Smith, L.; Stuart, E.; Terrace, I.; Tonning, E.; Turner,  B.
QHJL-®
>**VYian\ lT/v
6k
148 rv
A
r%
££.
lWw
_^_^_^_f^^_I **
*UPPER—Auld, J. Aveling, P.; Eell, L.; Bennet, L.; Bowkett, M.; Brandt, B.; Carson, M.; Ewart, M.; Forbes, A.
*LOWER—Gibson, M.; Hatfield, H; Lang, L.; Lynch, S.; MacFarlane, J.; McLoughlin, K.; McDonnell, G.; Marshall, L.;
Mills, R.
•UPPER—Mowatt, J.; Murray, I.; Orchard, A.; Parker, M.;   Patterson, M. J.; Sinclair, E.    *LOWER—Tiedge, P.; Vigiir,
S.; Wilcox, J.; Woodman, M.; Woodworth, J.; Worrall, G.
Qi*t*-(?L.
149 * UPPER—Argyle, C; Baird, J.; Bayne, J.; Brown, J.; Bulman, L.; Burke, R.; Clarke, E.; Clarke, 0. * MIDDLE—
Corsier, D.; Coulter, M.; Cowan, P.; Cummings, M.; Davidson, N.; Forrester, A.; Fraser, J. G.; Giegerick, P. * LOWER
—Greer, B.; Griffiths, G.; Hardie, N.; Hill, G.; Hodgins,  R.; Hopkins, J.; Hudson, G.; Johnson, P.
* UPPER—Kincade, M.; Leiterman, E.; Lewis, N.; Mathers, G.; McAlpine, M.; McDonald, E.; McGarry, N.; McKenzie, J.
* MIDDLE—McLean, J.; McLeod, C; McTavish, S.; Meilicke, J.; Orr, R.; Pike, M.; Richards, B.; Seyman, B. * LOWER—
Stewart, S.; Wakely, D.; Wallick, N.; Williams, M.; Wilson, C; Wood, S.
4?jJl*Z*fy««m*m-
150 Baker, R. Bookman, S. Diamond, R. Levison, M. Sier, H.
Becker, R. Chernov, E. Fox S. Nagler, F. Waldman, S.
VsJte*(?JL Z\^SU^
151 * UPPER—Bamiord, G.; Beamer, M.; Byrn, R.; Carman,  H.;  Clarke, J.;  Coleman, M.;  Coultard, R.;  Crowe, M.  P.
* MIDDLE—Dunfee, E.;  Fairweather, P.;  Finning, J.;  Hamilton,   J.;   Hill,   C;   Johnson,   P.;   Knapp,   T.;   Long,   C.
* LOWER—MacKinnon, W.; Manning, V.; McLung, M.; McCorkell,   P.;   McLeod,   T.;   McWilliams,   B.;   Mitchell,   J.;
Mowbray, M.
* UPPER—Norris, N.;  O'Flaherty, J.; Palmer, J.; Parke,  P.;   Parkinson,   M.;    Pendelton,   J.;    Price,   T.;   Pye,   E.
* MIDDLE—Rennie, N.; Ritchie, J.; Roberts, B.; Ross, M.;  Russell, N.; Scott, N.; Scott, P.; Somers, M.   * LOWER—
Stewart, P.; Symonds, P.; Teasdale, D.; Tremaine, M.; Wells, N.; White, E. J.; Woodward, S.; White, D. L.
U«.~*-QL3iaz.
152 * UPPER—Bakony, S.; Baldwin, B.; Burt, C; Burt-Smith, K.;   Clark,   C;   Fullerton,  P.;   Galbraith,   J.;   Hartree,  B.;
Hartree, S.   * MIDDLE—Hill, S.; Kenny, E.; Laidler, D.;   Lipsey,   B.;   McSachran,   J.;   Mckenzie,   M.;   Michas,   V.;
i
Peyman, B.;  Reid, B.   * LOWER—Seyer, R.;  Stedman, S-R.;   Stokkland,   M.;   Stuart,   D.;   Vosper,   J.;   Wallace,   A..;
Weir, S.; Stafford, C. M.
M<4^0J^*fafc
153 * UPPER—Abbott, S.; Angus, A.; Black, D.; Bowell, J.; Bowell, N.; Chew, B.; Cook, K.; Desbrisay, D.; de Wolfe,
* LOWER—Groll, S.; Hall, B.; Hamliton, P.; Laird, E. A.; Lane, P.; Lewis, C; Martin, J.; McConville, S.
@_^-§A-K
* UPPER—McLennan, C; Milson, D.; Newcomb, D.; Painter, B.; Pearson, E.; Powell, J.; Reitchel, H.; Richards, V.;
Rose, J. H. * LOWER—Russell, B.; Shaw, J.; Snow, D.; Turner, P.; Vivian, J.; Wilson, B.
I\   ^SSkmtU^lmmmamm,
154 INTER FRATERNITY COUNCIL DREW DELEGATES FROM  EACH  FRATER NITY, COOPERATED TO GUIDE GREEK ACTIVITIES DURING THE TERM
INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
Pulling the strings that controlled fourteen Universities
of British Columbia fraternities was no cinche for the Inter
Fraternty Council.
Fraternities had had an obstreperous year. There had
been tiffs with the Daily Ubyssey, with Student Council, but
nursemaiding IFC carried them all off with suitable aplomb.
Organization of greeks for the blood drive staged by the
Undergraduate Societies Committee turned out to be biggest
feather in the IFC cap. Under careful goading from the
executive, the greeks turned out resoundingly to push their
quotas of blood donations into the clear.
Big burly president Hank (his mother calls him Henry)
Sweatman ruled the IFC roost with an iron hand. He had
to.
Male greeks' part in the annual greek letter society
ball had been a big hurdle which Hank coached his lads over.
Then there had been the customary regulation of rushing
practices in the fall and in the spring, and the administration of rapped knuckles for dirty rushing.
But IFC was a gentle master in 1948. The greeks had
been happy and big Henry figured the year had gone
"pretty smoothly."
BIG HANK (his mother called him Henry) Sweatman held reigns of Inter
Fraternity Council, turned in smooth administration.
155 *UPPER:   Bewell, B. E.; Cunningham, J.; Dewar, R.;  Duff us,  J.;   Ferguson,  D.  C;   Grantham,  R.;   Harwood,  R.   S.
*LOWER: Hayward, D.; Fennimore, K. L.; Livingstone, G.; Macdonald, J.; Miller, P.; Perrault, E.
Sigma Tau Chi is a men's honorary fraternity constituted to bring together leaders from various different campus
activities for the purpose of discussion and mutual criticism
and assistance.
The group met during the term at two week intervals,
took off their shoes and slouched down in easy chairs in the
Men's Committee Room, upstairs in Brock Hall.
Then it started. Everybody and everything was raked
over the coals. And after three or four hours and several
packages of cigarettes per member later, the campus bigwigs
emerged with solutions to all the knotty problems facing
student government.
President Jack Cunningham (no one knew his first name
was Jack, they called him Cut) tried to keep order and
usually did.
After the term had ended the group figured they had
enjoyed a useful existence. Despite the fact that they have
no official status, the behind-the-scenes high council found
they had had their collective finger in almost every contentious issue.
156 • UPPER—Alderdyce, T. E.; Baldwin, G. R.; Bayfield, J. T.; Beebe, B. W.; Blair, D. C; Burke, S.; Cameron, D.
Clement, E. H.; Duffus, J.; Ellis, H. N. * MIDDLE—Eckman, H. H.; Field, R. B.; Frazee, J. D.; Freeze, G. A.
Fry, H. C; Gerrard, W. G.; Gray, E. J.; Hackett, R.; Jeffery, A. W.; Keller, J. R. • LOWER—Kenny, S. B.; Ker, J. R.
King, M. G.; Larsen, N.; McAlpine, J. D.; McLorg, T. F.; McNab, W. S.; McTavish, W. B.; Melvin, R.; Milligan, G.
© © QQ ©
m&dmmhm&Um\mih
* UPPER- Milligan, J.; Milroy, J.; Murray, J. L.; Panton, J. A.; Pearson, W. M.; Pudney, D.; Rhodes, H. W.;
Robson, W. M.; Ross, R.; Sears, V. C. • LOWER—Smitten, F. A.; Standfield, B. M.; St. Louis, A. L.; Whittal, P. L.;
Whittal, H. V.; Wilkinson, F. C; Whitney, R. B.
OJ^^te_.(BL
157 IB
mWBEBLWi
• UPPER—Avis, S. F.; Bell, D. N.; Bell, F.; Bluechel, A. J.; Borthwick, J. W.; Burns, T. K. R.; Burch, W. G.; Burnett, D.
H.; Campbell, K.; Chatwin, B. M.; Cliff, R. L. • CENTRE—Collins, F. K. S.; Cote, P. T.; Cunningham, J. R.; Farry,
G. F.; Flavelle, C. G.; Forsyth, J. A.; Franklin, D. B.; Granger, H. M.; Grantham, R. D.; Guest, C. R.; Gustavson, S. E.
• LOWER—Hirtle, J. G. S.; Hirtle, W. H.; Johnston, D. R.; Joplin, A. F.; Kerr, R. R.; Latham, A. R.; Lister, W. G.;
Lyons, E. H.; Maxwell, N. R.; MacGregor, F. C; McMartin, A. B.
• UPPER—Noel, J. G.; Olson, G.; Penn, W. R.; Rea, D. T.; Richardson, D. W.; Robinson, M. C; Ross, H. F.; Sherlock,
D. G.; Sievenpiper, P. B.; Stevenson, G. H.; Turner, J. N. • LOWER—Wallace, W. H.; Warner, W. L.; Watt, N. S.;
Webster, R. J.; White,. A. T.; Whitehead, F. E.; Wilde, W. H.; Williams, D. R.
^j^-Tte.(3&
158 * UPPER—Abercrombie, E.; Arthur, D.; Bakony, C; Bart Lett, L.; Brown, N.; Carter, Don; Carter, Doug; Collum, J.;
Crofton, J.; Cuthill, L. * LOWER—De Vito, B.; Dyer, L.; Fawcus, G.; Field, R.; Ford, B.; Gait, D.; Gosbee, A.;
Hamilton, B.; Henderson, C; Hyde, R.
* UPPER—MacGowan, J.; McConachie, E.; McKay, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mitten, D.; Nisbett, W.; Pettigrew, S.; Plant, G.;
Ruck, J.; Smith, T. * LOWER—Sutherland, L.; Sweatman, H.; Tindle, P.; Welsh, D.; Wetmore, D.; Wetmore, M.;
White, J.; Winter, W.; Varcoe, J.
«
159 * UPPER—Adkin, E. Y.; Armour, J. D. H.; Bancroft, G. L.; Butterworth, E. M.; Campbell, C; Castillou, H. G.;
Cawley, N. B.; Cowan, J. C; Crompton, R. G.; Darby, G. H.; Elsey, C. L. * LOWER—Gear, W. I.; Gerrity, E.;
Glover, C. J.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnston, J. C; Knight. R. G.; Leeming, L. B.; Lees, J. C; Moore, R. J.; MacDonald,
D. H.; Pierce, A. F.
* UPPER—Pinchin, H. R.; Porteus, S. W.; Preston, T. B.; Selman, G. R.; Shepherd, G. W.; Shortreed, W. R. A.;
Sinclair, K. I.; Sissons, W. J.; Slark, G. A.; South, D. L.; Stockstad, P. L. * LOWER—Sweeney, W. A.; Todd, S.;
Toynbee, R. M.; Turland, D. J.; Woodman, R   H.; Wotherspoon, A. H. B.; Dunsmoro  F. G.; Kelly, J.
m>
^c44**-^
x"&""m~
160 Burgess, A. N.; Black, P.; Bergklint, L. R.; Beguin, A. C; Barker, D.; Baum, G.; Colcleugh, M.; Comparelli, D.; Dewdney,
E.; Docksteader, A.; Eagle, M.
*UPPER—Gilmour, G.; Hogan, J. F.; Hughes, W. J.; James, D. A.; James, R. C; Johnson, E. M.; Johnstone, J. S.;
Lawson, R. D.; Long, C. F.; MacFadden, J.; McGuirk, J. 0. *LOWER—Olmstead, L. D.; Parker, J. N.; Peques, J.; Smith,
R. C; Stewart, G. C; Stroud, R. C; Tomlinson, K.; Thomson, I. G.; Thomson, J. G.; Wellburn, V.; Wensink, R.
Qk^O^Qk
161 * UPPER—Abbott, S.; Angus, A.; Black, D.; Bowell, J.; Bowell, N.; Chew, B.; Cook, K.; Desbrisay, D.; de Wolf, G.
* LOWER—Groll, S.; Hall, B.; Hamilton, P.; Laird, E. A.; Lane, P.; Lewis, C; Martin, J.; McConville, S.
* UPPER—McLennan, C; Milson, D.; Newcomb, D.; Painter, B.; Pearson, E.; Powell, J.; Reitchel, H.; Richards, V.;
Rose, J. H.  * LOWER—Russell, B.; Shaw, L.; Snow, D.; Turner, N.; Turner, P.; Vivian, J.; Wilson, B.
_f V
<£.ea.
▼
<BfeG£«~-ft_- <$>_«__.
162 * UPPER—King, D.; Lamb, D.; Lindsay, R.; Lockhart, A.; McColl, D.; McKay, D.; MacDonald, B.; MacLeod, D.;
MacPherson, C. * MIDDLE—MacPherson, J.; Manning, R.; Moulds, J.; Nairne, R.; Peacock, J.; Plommer, B.; O'Brien, J.;
Rigby-Jones, R.; Roberts, H. * LOWER—Rosene, B.; Rudolph, J.; Shier, P.; Smith, D.; Smith, G.; Todd, P.; Tomalty,
L.; Weldon, R.; Wills, C; Clark, F. B.
<?fo^*»»«J^&jJl**Lm
163 * UPPER—Alexander, D.; Anderson, D. McL.; Bodie, D.; Bossoms, F. H.; Campbell, D. H.; Carson, T.; Crosby,
H. R.; Cumberbirch, P. R. * MIDDLE—Dickson, S. C. V.; Downs, K. W.; Elworthy, A. B.; England, L. L.; Fraser, J. D.;
Gardom, G. B.; Garner, D. A. C; Gardiner, J. * LOWER—Gorman, D. G.; Grimson, V. J.; Haas, R. L.; Hogarth, G. L.;
Hoover, G. L.; Johnson, F. J.; Jones, A.; Jones, S. C,
^JU^jJ^^VUSm
164 * UPPER—Knudsen, A. M.; Leckie, D. F.; Lipsett, F. R.; Long, J. H.; MacKenzie, D. M.; McBride, M.; McKim, D. S.;
McLeod, D. C. * MIDDLE—McLeod, J.; McLean, J. C. T.; Nichol, J. L.; Nicholson, D. A.; Nightingale, F. H.; Olson,
K. B.; Ostrosser, R. H.; Pratt, E. A. * LOWER—Reid, R. R.; Richards, M. D.; Russel, C. H.; Sauder, W. L.; Smith,
R. P.; Town, D'A. A.; Walker, P. 0.
,*
(P^^fel^te
-.-,;'
165 * UPPER—Alton, H.; Bain, Alistair; Bain, Arthur; Barras,    Cyril;   Blockberger,   Dick;   Eedy,   Gerald;   Gillespie,   G.
* CENTRE—Graham, F.; Kelsberg, R.; McBride, R.; McCulloch, T.;  McLaughlan, H.; McRae, J.;    *    LOWER —
Madill, M.; Morgan, J.; Moloney, P.; Munham, M.; Potts, D.; Previs, K.; Soltaire, L.
*   UPPER—Turner, R.; Velay, C; Walls, J.; Ward, D.; Warner, R.; West, W.; Forrest, H.;    *   LOWER—Young, V.;
Hertz, 0.; Warne, B.; Hoffenfeffer, D. Q.; Hart, M. V.; Kellner, B.; Physick, M.
<?JU •&*— £1
,■:
166 • UPPER—Beattie, G.; Bertram, D.; Bryant, C; Burgess, H.; Curtiss, M.; Dennis, D.; Downing, M.; Duff, B.; Forrest, I.
• LOWER—Greenwood, S.; Gummow, J.; Haggart, R.; Hope, K.; Klimovich, A.; Hummel, B.; Mark, H.; Merck, G.;
Morris, B.:
Owen, R.; Payne, D.; Storey, D.; Tate, D.; Tennant, J.; Thompson, K.; White, N.; Williams, R.
(RU Akp*&«^
167 Bridges, R.       Dayton, M.        Greig, H.        Harbell, J.       Hughes, L.     Lightbody, A.     Nemetz, A.        Piercy, J.
Pride, H.     Shopland, H.      Smith, K.       Thorson, A.      Thorson, E.      Wallace, B.       Warner, K.
S
<?4»47-£fcc
168 * UPPER—Chercover, M.; Cohen, K.; Diamond, X.; Epstein; Gelmon, A.; Goldberg, A.; Groberman, L.; Gurevich, B.;
Kline, C; Kolberg, J.; Lederman, J. *LOWER—Leshgold, J.; Narod, L.; Newman, R.; Potters, B.; Shore, M.; Trade-
man, E.; Wasserman, J.; Soifer, J. R.; Raphael, R. P.; Jampolsky, M.
T«
169 • UPPER—Atherton, D.; Bell-Irving, H.; Boak, J.; Bourne, H.; Boyd, B.; Brown, J.; Burgess, F.; Burnside, W.;
Carrothers, F.; Cherniavsky, P.; Cooper, D. • Centre—Darling, G.; Davies, G.; Donelly, B.; Hamilton-Gorges, D. P.;
Gourley, J.; Hamilton, R.; Hanna, R.; Hanna, J.; Houghton, K.; Laudrum, B.; Lee, G. •LOWER—Lewis, C. A.;
Longley, D.; Martin, J.; Martin, R.; Margach, J.; Mills, R.;  McCarvill, H.; McCallum, K.; McDougall, B.; McDougall, D.
• UPPER—McFadyen, H.; McFeely, C; McDonald, M.; McNally, E.; Mcintosh, E.; McGavin, B.; Nixon, P.; O'Brien, T.;
Purvis, H.; Reeves, P.; Rice, R. • CENTRE—Rogers, P.; Russell, D.; Swinton, H.; Tailing, G.; Tiernan, P.; Tynan, W.;
Watson, B.; Wilson, A.; Worth, P.; Urquhart, M.; Wark, B. • LOWER—Whitelaw, G.; Wheatley, G.; Wells, J.; Dewar, C.;
Puckering, B.; Sperling, B.; Seddon, J.; Dsiher, W. H.; Young, N.; McKenzie, L. G.
LmtitoWW (RU.
170 * UPPER—Bergstrom, J. A.; Carmichael, D. W.; Carrigon, B.; Cochrane, H. C; Coulson, G. A.; Craig, G. L.; Culos, P.;
Foot, T.; Gennis, E. H.; Grant, F.J.; Greene, J. * LOWER—Gregg, H. M.; Halpin, R. D.; Huene, R. B.; Huestis, R.;
Irwin, A. A.; Isaacson, C. T.; LeBlanc, R.; Long, G. R.; Mason, F. B.; McGuire, C; Milne, L. A.
\ ■%. \   1 %.   K
*. %   K S
%.   K
* UPPER—MacKenzie, R.; McLeod, M.; Mulligan, M.; Rowse, D. J.; Scott, B.; Scott, G.; Severidge, N.; Sims, N. C;
Slipper, W. G.; Thackeray, P. A.; Trip, 0. H. * LOWER—Turney, H.; Weaver, K. F.; Wilks, E. J.
QM^'lv* Omeq*
171 • UPPER—Thompson,  F.;   Umbach,  G.;   Addeson,  H.;   B aum, G.; Donaldson, R.; Gray, T.   • LOWER—Hammersley,
M.; Hardy, L.; Murphy, F.; Richards, G.; Tanner, B.; Whyte, D.
• UPPER—Fleming, J.; Francis, A.; Fraser, J.; Graham, J.; Hopin,  C;   McDonald, H.   • LOWER—McLauchlin,  D.;
MacLeod, K.; Muir, T.; Scott, M.; Strang, H.; Tepoorten, B.
Qlti Stoma Glti
172 • UPPER—Bird, R.; Carrol, M.; Dodman, G.; Fonseca, A.; Hicks, H.; Johnson, P.   • LOWER—Jordan, A.; Logie, D.;
Niblock, P.; Robertson, D.; Perry, T.; Tynan, H.; Walley, W.
Atkinson, H.; Barnet, J.; Gilmour, A.; Gordon, R.; Marshall, C; Robertson, D.; Tompkins, N.
jUamiMHacki
173 • UPPER—John Anderson,   Art Botham,   Jack Brown,   Lee Corbett,  John Dawson,   Warren Ferguson,  John Gardiner.
• LOWER—Ralph  Goodmurphy,  Tom  Griffiths,  Drummond Hamliton, Gordon Halcrow, Bob Keenan, Ted Lawrence,
Dale Longmore.
• UPPER—Peter Myers, Don Moore, Douglas Morgan,l Allan Milner, Frank Mylrea, Jack Neelands, Bob Ohs.   • LOWER
—Art Patterson, Stew Robertson, Thor Stamnes, Stan Towers, Sheridan Worley, Ben Wyatt, Dan Wyatt, Cyril White.
(letaGlu
174 PHRATERES  EXECUTIVE,  COMPOSED  OF OVERALL PRESIDENT  AND  HEADS  OF  SUB-CHAPTERS,   HAD   THEIR   HANDS  FULL   PLANING   PROGRAMME
PHRATERES
Largest women's group in campus expands activities, stages camp, formal and big initiation
Phrateres, largest women's organization on the campus, in '47-'48 upheld
its reputation as one of the most active
clubs at UBC.
The session was started off in a
merry fashion by the annual fall dance,
this time entitled "Autumn Nocturne."
Brock Hall was decorated in a fashion
unique for the occasion—an autumn
motif was carried out as fully and as
successfully as was humanly possible,
thus displaying another of the numerous talents of the various chapter members.
Although the social work programme
of Phrateres was not carried out in a
manner similar to that of other years,
it was highly successful. Chapters of
the organization, who work under the
point system, carried out numerous
duties, such as selling poppies, "tagging" for the student ISS week, and
donating blood for the UBC campaign.
In addition to this, the chapters did
individual work. Lambda, one of the
largest chapters, sent crates of books
and magazines to libraries overseas.
Kappa girls turned domestic for a day,
and, putting on their little aprons and
grasping their mixing spoons eagerly,
made quantities of fudge which they
sold on the campus.
Because of the friendly spirit which
pervades the Phrateres clubroom, and
the initiative of the girls themselves as
individual friendly spirits, the increase
in membership was more than noticeable. This being the case, the club was
able to carry on and function as one
of the more predominant forces on the
campus.
The increased membership was apparent at group functions, such as the
PHRATERES  PRESIDENT headed one of campus'
most active groups through expanded calendar
annual elections. Marg Scott, who was
elected president of Phrateres for the
next year, also handled the camp activities in the spring at the end of the
term in May. Held at Camp Artaban
in Howe Sound, the summer siesta was
so popular that the camp was unable
to close down on the day predicted.
The annual camp was the first of two
major projects which Phrateres carried
out successfully in the latter part of the
term. The second was the installation
of new officers held in Brock Hall.
Dressed in evening gowns, all of
which were very swish, the 300 members, both old and new, sat in a reverent and awesome silence while the new
executive was being installed according
to the tradition upheld ever since the
time the chapter was started at UBC.
Several speeches were given by older
members who had long since graduated, and whose words of wisdom
were more than appreciated by the
new members.
The meeting was accented by the
presence of two Seattle girls, both
members of Phrateres, who came to
Vancouver especially for the installation. They were conducted on a limited
tour through the Brock Building, and
were impressed particularly with the
new studios of the University Radio
Society.
175 LONG AND SHORT AND TALL, SUB-CHAPTER PRESIDENTS  HEARD  CAMPUS  SING  THEIR  PRAISES
FRIENDLY PHRATERIANS HELP OUT
Service club of effervescent coeds spreads cheer from Brock Hall
Phraterians were seen around the campus washing car
windows ni the parking lot, shoe shining in the Caf, selling
candy in the Quad as chapters competed for the activity cup.
Led by President Isabelle MacKinnon, Phi chapter garnered
the coveter award.
Les vigourous, but more enjoyable perhaps, were the
many social functions. Various chapters joined forces during the year to hold a barn dance, Halloween and Valentine
parties. The biggest event of all, the Phrateres formal, enlivened the November social calendar.
But all was not play for Phraterians.
Each sub-chapter was busy with some type of philanthropic work.
Chapters collected food, clothing and books for the ill
and needy. Other chapters entertained infirmary patients
at Christmas parties.
Phrateres helped the needy on the campus, too. Their
willingness to help out piled up requests for their services,
and they always came through.
All activities of the 400-strong legions were chanelled
through the hard-working executive. President Shwila
Ketchen and vice-presidents Marion Dow and Noni McGregor had able assistants in secretaries Ruth Irish and
Betty Philpott and in treasurer Evaline Walling and publicity
director Betty Lowes.
Presidents of the 17 sub-chapters were as follows:
Alpha _
Bet 	
Gama _
Delta _
Epsilon
Zeta
_ Lois Whimster
— Betty   Sayce
— Joan Christian
  Nancy Russel
— Nancy Harvey
— Gene McMinn
Eta   Eileen Moyls
Iota   Shirley Manning
Kappa   Maureen Johnson
Lamba   Edith Klusindorf
Mu .     Pat Christian
Xi Joan McDonald
Omicron   Joan Taylor
Rho   Margaret Scott
Sigma   Jane Boulton
Phi .a  Isabelle MacKinnon
Chi   Mary Sainas
176 HONORARY ACTIVITY AWARD WINNERS ROBIN ANDREWS, JACK DUFFUS AND LAURIE DYER
Labour Rewarded
Council   acknowledges  service  beyond   duty;
hands out fourteen honourary activity awards
Joan   Fraser,   Ian   Greenwood   received   pins,
scrolls  along  with   14  HAA winners  In  1948.
Activity of student enterprise during
the term of 1947-48 was well attested
to on the day of the final meeting of
the Alma Mater Society.
A record-smashing fifteen students
strolled nervously up to the council
microphone to receive Honorary
Activity Awards, the highest award
open to competition within the structure of student government.
The awards are made on a basis of
the candidate's contribution to student
affairs in his own club, and to the overall program of the AMS. His academic
standing is also considered.
Winners of the award for 1947-48
were:
ROBIN ANDREWS: for outstanding
work as campus leader of Student
Christian Movement and as SCMC
National President. He was a theology student.
HERB CAPOZZI: for a long and significant role in campus athletics,
which covered nearly every sport
played, for MAD, and for a consistently high academic average.
JACK DUFFUS: for outstanding leadership in the Players' Club extending
over four undergraduate years and
for an academic record high in the
first class range despite a course
considered the most difficult at the
University, Engineering Physics.
LAURIE DYER: for diligent servcie
rendered to promotion of campus
athletics as member of Men's Athletic
Directorate and Sport Editor of The
Daily Ubyssey.
JOAN FRASER: for long-term and
outstanding behindthe-scenes work
with the Parliamentary Forum and
for a consistently high average in a
difficult course.
RON GRANTHAM: for an undergraduate career in student affairs beginning with presidency of his frosh
class and of Mamooks, and ending
with his presidency of the Engineers
Undergraduate Society.
IAN GREENWOOD: for outstanding
contribution to student government
as president of the Agriculture Undergraduate Society and for attaining outstanding high academic results
177 BEV  WILSON
CAL  WHITEHEAD
NED   LARSEN
despite guiding his executive
through the most active term in its
history.
NED LARSEN: for notable contributions to the Players' Club, to the
Special Evnets Committee and to
campus athletics, together with a first
class academic record.
ERNEST PERRAULT: for capable
leadership of the Radio Society
through difficult formative years
and for his literary contributions to
the various campus publications and
to the Players' Club.
BILL SMITH: for his quiet efficiency
within the Undergraduate Societies
Committee and as Mamook president
1946-47, and for his notably high
academic average during his undergraduate years.
HARRY SMITH: for his able leadership of the Varsity Outdoor Club,
which guided the club through a
growth which ended with it becoming
the largest club on the campus.
MURIEL VAN DER VALK: for her
tireless work with the Legion, the
United Nations Society, the International Relations Club, and more
notably the Undergraduate Societies
Committee.
CALVIN WHITEHEAD: for a wide and
varied series of contributions to most
campus organizations, including the
Publications Board the Mamooks,
Student Council, the Players' Club,
and the Special Events Committee
and the Radio Society.
BEVERLY WILSON: for her diligent
and efficient service as president of
the Players' Club 1946-47, and of
Delta Sigma Pi 1947-48, her outstanding acting abilities, and for her
distinctive academic record.
BOB WILSON: for his outstanding
work in campus athletics as executive member of Men's Athletic Directorate, and for his able and efficient
presidency of the Commerce Undergraduate Society.
BOB   WILSON
BILL  SMITH
ERNIE  PERRAULT
178 Minor Clubs OUSTED BY COUNCIL ORDER FROM THEIR CLUBROOM, THE JOKERS SHOWED  THEIR  OLD  SPIRIT BY CAMPING  ON  LAWN  IN   FRONT   OF  BROCK
THE JOKERS CLUB
After slow start. Jokers named new Ace and began to get their old vigour back at term's end
The joke was almost on the Jokers in 1948.
Suffering a double-death blow, the irrepressible Jokers
had all but succumbed when stocky, second-year law student
Dick Ellis breathed the glint of the old fire into the failing
campus zanies.
A skimpy handful of the old core turned up on the
campus in September to find their president and founder,
madcap Dave Hayward, firmly entwined with a diligent
study of the law. He was going to pass his examination and
decided that he would not be able to pilot his boys through
their third year of activity.
Then when the club was scrambling to its feet, fraternity
rushing broke out in a rash of smokers, stag parties, and
hand-clasping. Result: key members fled the ranks for the
more socially acceptable greeks.
It was getting on past Christmas exam time before UBC
students were sur~ the Jokers Club, born in the wake of the
war, was not going to pass in the wake of the post-war.
But Ellis, 22-year-old ex-navy man, and a knot of madcap trusties remembered Hayward's plan for the club. It
was to be a kind of Greek letter society without the barriers
of formal membership, dues, formal meetings, and Greek
letters.
It was to be peopled chiefly by ex-servicemen who
wanted something cheap to do with their spare campus time.
Its aim: to laugh at the serious-eyed business of going to
college and to recapture the old days of 1930 (which many
of the founders remembered) when it used to be fun to go
to college.
He did it.
After a long crawling start the Jokers Club had hit their
stride, wound up the year with as many and frequent stunts
as ever.
180 WAR   WITH    COUNCIL   resulted   when   Jokers
were evicted from  clubroom, they raise a tent
JOKERS' FROG DERBY NEARLY  ENDED  IN  DISASTER WHEN  LOST  ENTRY  BUT GOT A  NEW  ONE
BACK TO OLD ROUTINE
War against New Look was just one of weekly series of noon-hour stunts in packed 'caf'
Skirts had been getting longer and the Jokers didn't
like it.
Ace Joker Dick Ellis dressed his boys in skirts, sweaters,
dresses; paraded them atop a cafeteria table. Armed with a
pair of giant scissors, he then snipped the bagging material
until the hemlines had risen to display boney hair-covered
knees.
This was just one of an almost once-weekly schedule of
stunts pulled off by the campus crazymen in, around, over,
and under their table in the northeast corner of the noon-
packed cafeteria.
In early spring, AMS president Grant Livingstone was
faced with a housing shortage for his 70-odd campus clubs.
He thought the Jokers were declining, so assigned the Outdoor Club to the Joker clubroom in the extension hut behind Brock Hall.
The following day Livingstone shambled into his office
to open the daily heap of mail, staggered back three steps
and wondered.
His usually neat office was littered with tattered chesterfields, wicker chairs and camp cots; each containing a
capacity load of grinning Jokers.
They wanted their home back and that was no joke.
The next day culture-hungry students rushing to their
8:30's missed a step and their 8:30's as they whizzed past
the lawn in front of Brock Hall.
Overnight a community of burlap tents had sprung up.
The Jokers were taking the housing lack into their own
hands.
They erot their clubroom back.
Then there was the Kiddies' Bawl, budgeted to net a
profit of 17 cents. Admission was 83.76; cheaper for anyone wearing diapers.
At vear's end the Jokers figured 1948  ha.d been  kind to       BARBER'S SUPPORT was given when Jokers lost their clubroom; he moved
thsm after all. <■ chair out on to Block lawn with them, joined seige against Council
181 What About
Clubs?
Effervescent Jerry Macdonald probably knew
more about clubs than any other student on
the campus. For two years he guided the 90
myriad organixations at UBC through their
fattest years. At the beginning of his second
term he drew freshmen aside to explain in this
special editorial from The Daily Ubyssey why
extra-curricular activities could add to a
student's university life almost as rich a treasure
as his lectures.
"When we think of the clubs on our campus, we like to think of a passage
by Stephen Leacock in which he tells us that if he were to start a university, he
would start with a Common Room rather than with lecture rooms or anything
else that is normally associated with a university. For, he believes, people can
learn more from discussions in a Common Room than they can from other
channels of learning.
"During the war, we at UBC lost our Common Rooms due to the fact that
all the available space was needed to take care of the growing populace. But the
gatherings of people in groups of their own interest continued on in the clubs
of our campus, an outlet for your extra-curricular interests.
"The average freshman who enters UBC is confronted with a mass of names
and initials in his Tillicum, denoting campus organizations. The majority of these
names and initials foretell just what a freshman can expect from the clubs when
he joins them, but there is more behind the names. That is why clubs are holding
meetings all over the campus this week.
"Freshmen will have the opportunity to listen first-hand to club members
telling of the activities of their favorite clubs, after which Joe Frosh can make up
his mind. This is the freshman's chance to get acquainted with the many clubs
on the campus and to become a member of one or more of those clubs.
"We can offer nothing but pity to the undergraduate who goes through four
years of university life with no extra-curricular activity. This is the individual
who received his $720 worth of education from the administration but missed
three times that much of a different kind of education."
182 BUSY  EXECUTIVE   KEPT   JAZZ   GROUP   BE-POPPING
THE GREAT  MUSIC   BROUGHT   DEEP  THOUGHT,   JOY,   CLENCHED  FISTS
JAZZ SOCIETY
be-bop vs. kansas city styles kept jazzists at loggerheads
While other groups spent ponderous noon hours in discussing the Partition of Palestine, The Atom Bomb and The
Great Menace, a select artistic "group of fifty" had a more
delicate problem: Jazz, should it be Chicago, New Orleans,
Kansas City or Be-bop.
They wore down a peck of phonograph needles in
attempting to reach a decision, finally concluded that Jazz
is The Thing and the long hairs can go blow their flutes.
Jazz club jockey Bill Hill led the group through a cope-
setic season jam and jive-packed with Dizzy Gilespie, Meade
Lux Lewis and others who mid-wifed America's Great Jazz
Age.
Club members took to the air with two Vancouver radio
shows, a half hour stew of the best in rhythms over CKMO
and a weeklv "Selection of the Week" on CKWX.
Ivory-tapper Al McMillan held the purse strings for the
energetic group, spent most of his time deciding whether
club funds should go for Ellington or Basie records.
Pubster Jim Banham was secretary, Ruth Mills, librarian
of the extensive record and book collection; Eric Gee, publicity director; and Carl Johnson, program director.
A 13-program series produced in co-operation with the
Radio Society brought the good word of jazz to students over
the campus network.
Disk jockeys from Vancouver city stations came to
twirl platters for members at several meetings and explain
the inner significance of the music from the Golden Age of
Noise. The professional jazzist were made honorary members: Jack Kyle and Reo Thompson of CKWX, Bob Smith of
CBR, and Jack Cullen and Al Reusch of CKMO.
PRESIDENT BILL SMITH LED
STUDY in expressions as |a_z club members drink in rhapsody of noise
183 NEWMANITES ALTERNATED  EXPERT SPEAKERS WITH SOCIAL FUNCTIONS
Newman
Campus   Catholics   turn   in
biggest session in past five
years
Under the executive of Phil Brocking,
president; Anita Chisholm, vice-president; Eileen Heaton, corresponding
secretary; Maureen Auterson, Recording secretary; and Dick Hanley, treasurer, the Newman Club carried out its
most successful season in the past five
years.
An impressive list of speakers and
discussion functions was lightened with
a generous sprinkling of parties, including the smash success "Kismet Capers."
El Circulo
FIESTA   PARTY  HIGHLIGHTED  BIG  YEAR FOR SPANIARDS
RECORD MEMBERSHIP OF THIRTY PLACED ECONOMICS CLUB IN FIRST RANK
Latino-Americanos reel off best Spanish at
series of social functions al la espanol
All the social graces were conned "en espanol" by the
1948 Circulo Latino-americano. Conversation, singing and
dancing made up a large part of their latin-american activ-
ties. These were interspersed by speakers in Spanish and
films on Spanish-American subjects.
Bi-monthly meetings were carried on with "mucho
gusto" under the executive of: Margaret Gamey, president;
Dr. A. R. Mattos, Hon. Pres.; Jim McDonald, Vice-Pres.;
and Bert Mansfield, Sec.-Treas.
Highlight of their social year was the Spring Fiesta
where rhumbas and sambas were under the able tutelage of
German Guevara, student from Mexico City.
Economics
Economics   club   members
probe current social problems
The Economics Club stimulated keen
interest in the study and discussion of
economic problems by their thirty
members last year.
Excellent papers presented on a wide
field of subjects characterized the individual research which the club encouraged.
The executive were: Dr. Stuart Jamei-
son, Honorary President; David Braide,
President; Evelyn Fawcett, Secretary;
John West, Treasurer; and Bill McKay,
Vice-President.
184 Forestry
Many papers of interest given by members
during year
The Forestry Club interests itself with a problem that
should concern every citizen in British Columbia. It is the
problem of the practising forester and logger. British Columbia depends so much on its forests as a source of wealth
that this problem is a very real one to the club members.
During the academic year members are called upon to give
papers treating of some aspect of forestry or forest products.
This year the students undertook and produced a smart handbook of forestry entitled "The UBC Forester." Pictured
members of the executive are—left to right: Vic Heath, Dick
Clifford, Jerry Burch, Jack Roff and Ben Gibson.
THE   FORESTRY   CLUB   CONCERNS   ITSELF  WITH  THE  PROBLEMS   FACING
THE PRACTISING FORESTER AND LOGGER
Architecture
Try to promote healthy interest in architecture on campus
The Architecture Club first made its
appearance on the campus in 1948 and
it has been investigating everything
from Gothic to Functional architecture
ever since. Its purpose, however, is not
only academic but promotional as they
endeavour to spread the gospel of sensible architecture to every student at
UBC. Pictured executives are, left to
right: J. Woodwarth, R. L. Toby, E.
Middleton, J. Elberton, C. Tiers, G.
Stubbs and P. Skrimshire.
ARCHITECTURE  CLUB CONCERNS ITSELF WITH THE STUDYY AND PROMOTION OF  ARCHITECTURE
ON CAMPUS
Engineering
Institute  is composed of students from all
branches of engineering world
The Engineering Institute of Canada, student branch,
is composed of students from every branch of Engineering.
Speakers on various aspects of the engineers' work are asked
to give lectures every year. Members of the student chapter are asked to give papers at the student night of the Vancouver Chapter of the EIC. The Institute, like all societies
concerned with engineering, tends to the practical side with
the technical side coming out in the presentation of practcal
papers. Pictured executives are, left to right: R. M. Cook,
A. G. Fletcher, R. A. Pillman and R. Merritt.
CLUB SPONSORS MANY SPEAKERS ON VARIOUS  ASPECTS OF
ENGINEERING  DURING  THE  YEAR
185 PLACING STUDENTS AT SCARCE OPTOMETRY SCHOOLS WAS BIG TASK FOR 1948
Pre-Opt
Pre-Optometry clubmen
search for schools, pressed for
UBC faculty
Under the executiveship of Elmer
Roeder, pres.; Norman Fox, vice-pres.;
Edward Beck, Sec.-Treas.; and Ken
Morrow, Rec. Sec, the Pre-Aptometry
Club carried out a successful year.
They helped place Pre-Optom students by contacting all colleges possible.
They also had speakers from among
practising optometrists of Vancouver
talk to their club and tours of Vancouver optical plants were conducted.
Contact was kept with the Vancouver
Optometric Ass'n.
LE  CERCLE  FRANCAIS'  MEMBERS ARE  CHOSEN   FROM  THE   UPPER YEAR
AT   UBC
RUSSIAN   CIRCLE   MEMBERS   SHARE   MUTUAL   INTEREST   IN   SLAVIC   CULTURE
Le Cercle Francais
Bi-monthly meeting devoted to every aspect
of French cultural and social life
Le Cercle Francais has a special interest at UBC because
of the national character of the French culture and social
customs that pervade Canada. At meetings which take place
every other week members gather for informal discussions
of French music and literature, games, songs and playlets
which give them a greater understanding of the French way
of life and its heritage of culture. Because of the advanced
nature of the work which must be covered Le Cercle Francais opens its membership only to those students in upper
years whose academic standards are sufficiently high for
them to be able to hold their own when the conversation
turns to a complicated nature.
Russian
Circle
Russian Circle concerns itself
with understanding the culture of the Slavic people
Russia and the Slavic peoples have
gained such an important place in the
modern world and since students are
always keenly interested in trends in
modern society it is inevitable that there
should be an organization such as the
Russian Circle at UBC. This group
concerns itself with acquiring a greater
understanding of the cultural background and the cnotributions that the
Slavic peoples and the Russians are
making to modern society.
186 Women's Public
Speaking
Club's purpose is to train themselves in the
art of self-expression
The art of self-expression is not an easy one and the
girls in the Women's Public Speaking Club are out to overcome stage fright and the myriad other little fears that
plague the speaker facing a sea of faces. The job is not an
easy one and the girls indulge in long hours of diction practice and the other essentials that must be cultivated before
one can even sit on the speakers' platform. Noon hour meetings of the club are held twice each month at which speeches
and debates are given by the members. In all cases they
have been prepared by the members themselves. Outside
critics including Dean Mawdsley lend their criticism.
Chemicals
Latest developments in
Chemical   Engineering    discussed by this group
The role of chemistry in modern
society is a very great one and it is
with this modern gargantua in mind
that the Chemical Institute of Canada
was formed in 1947. The Institute
meets regularly to inform and discuss
with its members the trends and discoveries that modern day chemical
engineering is making to enrich the
world about us. Pictured executive is,
left to right: J. Williams, Ruth Nish,
J. Thomas, M. Muirhead, and Pat
Worthington.
EXECUTIVE  IS MARY MOORE, VIRGINIA   RICHARDS, AND JOAN  BOYLE
CHEMICAL   ENGINEERING   STUDENTS  REVIEW  NEW  WORLD   OF  CHEMICAL   DISCOVERY
Physics
Physics fascinates forty in atom smashers club
The field of physics held fascination for forty members
of the Physics Society who met every two weeks last year
to discuss topics of interest in physics.
Both students and staff were numbered among the members of this illustrious club. Their executive consisted of:
Morton Mitchner, pres.; Bill Howard, vice-pres.; and Helen
Urquhart, treas.
The main part fo their meetings consisted of a full sixty
minute talk delivered by a senior student or a member of
the staff. A particularly clever device was instituted by the
Physics Society this year to increase the stamina of its members.   Refreshments were served at the beginning of the hour.
PHYSICISTS   PROBED   ATOMS   AND   PEANUT   BUTTER   SANDWICHES   AT
CLUB MEETINGS
187 NEW   READING   ROOM   ATTRACTED   STUDIOUS   CHRIST   SCIENTISTS
c. s. o.
Christian    Scientists   build
reading room and hold
testimonies
The Christian Science Organization,
a branch of The Mother Church, The
First Church of Christ, Scientist, in
Boston, Mass., held weekly testimonial
meetings and maintained a Study Room
on the campus.
The officers were: Ben Gibson,
Reader; Vivienne Allen, John Barltop,
Fred Francis, Doug Leiterman and
Murray Mackintosh, Board of Directors; John Thygeson, President; Mary
Cassie, Secretary, and George Clark,
Treasurer.
Gliders
AIRCREW CHIEFS OF GLIDING CLUB TRAINED STUDENT PILOTS
Thunderbird gliding and soaring club proves
motorless flight fine sport
The wild blue yonder was the club room of one minor
club at the University of B.C. in 1948.
The Thunderbird Gliding and Soaring Club swooped
over the Lulu Island flats in their two primary gliders on
Sunday afternoons sniffing out the warm drafts of rising air
that keep their motorless craft aloft.
On the ground the club sponsored a series of classes in
aerodynamics, meteorology, and other studies that would
come in handy when the student flyers found themselves a
thousand feet up with no motor to depend on.
Pet project during the term was the proposed construction of a utility sailplane.
TURNING   WHEELS   AND   LEVERING   LEVERS   FASCINATE   MECHANICALS
Mechanicals
American Institute of Mechanical Engineers prepares  for
careers in industry
Watching the wheels go 'round in
the mechanical labs was fun for the
hardy engineers of the American Institute of Mechanical Engineers, U.B.C.
branch.
Industrial tours, student papers and
guest speakers formed the major part
of the program of the group, comprised
of third and fourth year mechanicals.
Executive members were (see cut)
left to right: J. L. Horbell, secretary;
Prof. W. R. Richmond, honorary chair-,
man; W. Bannon, president; I. C. Paterson, vice-president; (standing) J. F.
MacBride, third year rep; D. N. Welch,
'athletics.
188 Historical
Antiquity was the playground of the "Hysterical" society student historians
The fascination of something old and the effects of past
trends on current and future affairs of the world brought
upper year history honors students together in the student
Historical Society.
Good naturedly dubbed the "hysterical society," the
group's meetings were far from, hysterical. Third year
students prepared papers on the facets from history to be
presented to the mmbeers at their regular firesides.
Executive members were (see cut) Ronald Shepherd,
left, and Michael Creal, right.
RON SHEPARD AND MIKE CREAL GUIDE HISTORICAL CLUB
Lensmen
Student pixies rack up  two
major salons and build darkroom
Two photographic salons and the
completion of a new darkroom kept the
Camera Club lensmen busy.
The first, held during the fall, attracted entries from all other Canadian
universities—about 30 prints in all.
Campus pixies turned in more than
25 prints in the campus salon later in
the term.
1948 officers were: Slmi Greenwood,
president; Phil Tourner, vice-president;
Eric Holmgren, secretary; John Collins,
darkroom manager.
PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOGRAPHS PHOTOGRAPHERS; CAMERA CLUB EXECUTIVE
Civils
Campus branch of American Institute of Civil
Engineers proves valuable to redmen
Civil questions brought civil answers at the meeting of
the American Institute of Civil Engineers, U.B.C. campus
branch.
Thrd and fourth year engineers of the civil class met
at regular sessions to listen to student papers, professional
engineers, and professors discoursing on the marvels of
civil engineering.
The redmen were convinced that A.l.C.E. affiliation was
an important step toward building their careers of building.
BRIDGES   AND   SKYSCRAPERS   WERE   CONCRETE   REALITIES   FOR   CIVILS
189 Maths
EXTRACURRICULAR  FIGURES  AND  CURVES WERE  FUN  FOR MATH   CLUB
Secrets of universe easy as
tic-tac-toe for mathematicians
Pure mathematics, which they knowingly reassured each other was the
"purest form in which philosophy can
be smoked," was something of a parlour
game for 25 of the most elite number-
jugglers on the campus.
They were the Mathematics Club.
Mathematics majors to a man, they
gathered once every two weeks to probe
the secrets of the order of the universe.
Refreshments wre usually served.
Harry Cannon (see cut) left, was
president, Paul Gilmore, right, was vice-
president, and Peter Thomas, centre,
secretary-treasurer. (His books
balanced.)
_r\. 1. Jti. -ti.
FUN   AND   GAMES  WITH  HIGH  VOLTAGE  WAS   SPORT  OF  AIEE   GANG
American Institute of Electrical Engineers has
hardy band at UBC
The boys who knew that electricity was more than what
burns the toast and costs four cents a kilowatt hour while
it's doing it, were the members of the American Institute of
Electrical Engineers, campus branch.
"Busman's holidays" to electrical industry plants and
hydro electric plants added spice and fresh air to an intensive
program of speakers and technical papers sponsored by the
engineer group at their two-weekly meetings.
Membership is limited to third and fourth year electricals, who, anyone of them could tell you, were the best
damned engineers since Faraday.
BIBLE STUDY AND  PRAYER MEETINGS  FILLED  BUSY  ECF PROGRAM
E. C. F.
Engineers  Christian  Fellowship worked to make Christ
known
Best argument against the popular
belief that all engineers are descended,
directly or indirectly, from the devil
and the red regions is the Engineers
Christian Fellowship.
The ECF, an affiliate of the VCF,
makes only one stipulation in welcoming all engineers to their ranks; they
must "wish to know Christ and to make
Him known."
Prayer meetings and Bible study
classes filled in 'tween lab periods for
the 100-strong club.
190 Phsychology
Field trips, talks, weekly films keep psych
majors busy
Discussions, field trips, speakers and weekly film showings were some of the outstanding activities and entertainment of the Psychology Club.
Among the prominent psychologists and psychiatrists
who presented talks to the club were Professor Chant, Professor Belyea, and Mr. Edmund Macdonald.
A program of summer work was planned by grads as
a cooperative project of research in psychology.
The executive for the 66-member club was: Gregory
Belkov, President; Helen Best, Vice-President; Margaret
Wright, Secretary; Mike Downing, Treasurer; Jack Wells,
Social Convener; and Professor S. N. F. Chant as Honorary
President.
PSYCHOLOGISTS   HERE   PROMINENT   EXPERTS   IN  TALK   SERIES
Science
Songsters
Engineers choir brings tears
to redmen's eyes at faculty
banquets
No discredit to the handful of
throaty-voiced engineers from other
class, the Engineers Music Club turned
out to be a feathe rin the Big 50 cap.
Big 50 singers formed the nucleus of
the choir and it was Big 50 choirmasters
who whipped the infant club into form,
and built the repertory from a meagre
chorus of faculty songs to an impressive
list including many semi-classical folk
songs.
REACHING FOR A LOW ONE   ARE  THRUSH-VOICED   MEN  OF   ENGINEERS'   CHOIR
B. C. T. F.
Student teachers' irganizatiin prepares neophytes to enter "most important profession"
Schoolmarming   is
battle it used to be.
not   the   old   knock-down-drag-out
Teachers in B.C. are little by little winning their long
running fight for recognition, for reasonable wage scales,
for smaller classes, for higher standards, and for all the
hundreds of other factors which make an education system a
good one.
The B.C. Teachers Federation has lead the fight for this
goal and the U.B.C. campus branch of the parent body was
in at the front during the 1948 session.
EXECUTIVE
BCTF    PILOTED    CLUB    THROUGH    HOT    SESSION
191 LETTERS   CLUB  HEARD   LEARNED   PAPERS   ON   LITERARY   TRENDS   AT  FIRESIDE
Letters
These lettermen weren't athletes, they worked out on a
typewriter
For that exclusive set which "planned
to write, you know" there was the
Letters Club.
The experts at word joinery, all English honors students, gathered around
the fireside at regular meetings to entreat the muses and listen to each
others' "aesthetic naterings."
John Baxter was president.
Radio
GLOBE-GIRDLING HAM RADIO OPERATORS TALKED WITH REST OF WORLD
Ham operators operate around the world on
the short waves
"Home of the Hams" at University of B.C. was a re-re-
re-converted army hut crammed full of dials, tubes and radio
geegaws.
This little hut behind the Science building was U.B.C.'s
contact with the outside world. From there members of the
infant campus branch of the Amateur Radio Operators'
Association kept up a running conversation around the world
over the shortwaves.
Formed in 1947, the campus hams had already taken
over a council position on the B.C. Association.
CHINESE STUDENTS CLUB SHARED COMMON PROBLEMS; ORGANIZED PARTIES
Chinese
Chinese  students form their
own club to promote personal
contact
Organized to promote personal contact among Chinese students on the
campus, the Chinese Students' Club
put in a busy social year.
Under the executive of President,
Robert Wong; Secretary, Ruby Joe;'
Treasurer, Edward Fung; Social Convener, Herman Wong; and LSE Member, Harry Lee, this active club
sponsored a Frosh reception, a Hallowe'en party, a Graduation party and a
Spring dance.
The Club's purposes also to promote
friendly relations with other campus
organizations.
192 OUMt
48
_L , A
#/
A&me
xettu   y^sJvcU
Some students will remember the 1948 term for their
classes, their labs, or their examinations. They will remember
a scholarship won or just missed. Others will remember the
part they played in student government, in clubs, or Greek
letter societies.
The year 1948 will summon for many happy visions of
parties, dances and, perhaps, a special date or two.
But the editorial staff of TOTEM '48 had a pretty good
hunch that there was one thing that very few students would
forget in a hurry.  Pretty girls!
Unbiased observers like faculty members and bus drivers
had said that 1948 had brought with it the prettiest girls
that the University had ever seen.
That might have been an exaggeration, but the crop did
look pretty good.
TOTEM '48 rounded up pictures of some of the prettiest
girls on the campus, and in this section gives you a peek at
them. They were winners in various queen contests, and
we'll bet you an old dance program that the faces will be
familiar.
193 ■5*h-
Matof Pat
It was a melting smile that won third
year Arts beauty, Mary Pat Crow, the
crown in the annual Mardi Gras Queen
contest. Shiny dark eyes and a trim
five foot six also contributed. li&j&dey
Blondes had their innings when Bev
Burley copped the queen's crown at the
Fall Ball. Burnished gold locks and a
laughing personality clinched Bev's
candidacy for the throne. V
*_ss
Blueia
That sultry, long-lashed look was
enough to earn for freshette Shiela
Macaulay the title "Freshette We
Would Most Like to Be Orientated
With" during freshman orientation
week. BuAjG+K McAf
Sweetheart of UBC was two-year-old
Susan May Thornycroft. That demure
gaze melted judges' hearts, made her
prettiest student's baby on campus. Of course the students make the university. It is they who do the work
behind the scenes, and it is students
that the old grad mostly remembers—
his fellow students and memories of
their life together at college.
The students at UBC are rather a
special lot, however. For they not only
make the university of today, but they
made it what it is today. The great
trek of 1923 is a matter of history, but
its tradition has carried on through
the years.
They come from everywhere, do the
Toties at UBC. British Columbia, yes,
B.C. supplies the bulk of them, but
English, Americans, Chinese and East
Indians are here. And so are Canadians too, that do not call B.C. their
home. They all help to create the
international spirit that prevails at
UBC. CLASSES VERY   BUSY   EXECUTIVE   OF   ARTS   UNDERGRAD   HAD   DESTI NY OF CAMPUS' LARGEST UNIT UNDER WlNG AT ALL TIMES
ARTS '48
Though tired and weary, Arts '48 still journeyed on, most managed to collect the sheepskin
Hundreds of reluctant Artsmen plodded their way
through the final eight months of academic torture as they
neared the end of their endurance tests—all eyes on the
sheepskin.
Surprising thing was that most of them succeeded, all
but a few Pubsters and a couple of hangovers from Students'
Council.
Arts '48, once again a record class, was the group that
staggered to the campus in the fall of '44 to be greeted by
a president who was also in his freshman fog—Norman
Archibald McLeish MacKenzie.
Prominent on the roster of fellow-classmates, Arts '48
will remember beetle-browed Grant Booth Livingstone, Council prexy, who spent much of his time wrangling with fel-
low-Artsman, 0. Nora J. Clarke, WUS head.  In  their off
moments they put down the waste baskets and made up.
Pubsters' pedal-pusher and "most handsome man" on
campus (that's what they said) Don Ferguson whiled his
days away beating Arts senior Totem boss and Ubyssey
Columnist Stainsby. Stainsby just snarled, didn't bite.
Long, dark, laconic Jack Baxter headed the Letters Club,
Joan Fraser was prominent in Parliamentary Forum circles,
Jack Duffus bubbled away over the ISS, and Tish McLeod
legged her way across the dance floor into many a male
heart.
Arts '48 executive for the year was: Ralph Huene, president; Nan Guilhamoulie, vice-president; Joan Fraser, secretary.
200 * UPPER—Adams, Ann Elden; Addy, Albert C; Aish, Jane Anita, Matsqui—Honours chemistry; Phrateres, VOC, Jazz
Society, Chemical Institute; Aitchison, Kenneth M., New Westminster—English and history; Alderdice, Ernest T.,
Vancouver—Honours psychology; Psychology Club; Alexander, Arthur W., North Vancouver—Honours English; Players'
Club, Letters Club; Alldritt, Marjorie A., Victoria—Honours English and French; Allen, Vivienne, Victoria—Economics
and English. * LOWER—Anderson, W. Ian, Vancouver; Andrews, William R., Shawnigan Lake—President SCM; Angus,
Ann S.; Argyle, Catherine M., Nelson—Delta Gamma; Argyle, Perce E., Vancouver—Honours mathematics and physics;
Argyle, Sidney C., Vancouver; Arthur, Charles D., Vancouver—Delta Upsilon; Auld, Jean T., Vancouver—English and
psychology; Alpha Phi.
* UPPER—Avery, E. Gwendolyn, Princeton—Zoology and bacteriology; VCF, VOC, VSC; Aveling, Madeline B., New
Westminster—Alpha Phi; Baker, Frank, West Fernie—French and English; Baker, Rowena M., Lady smith—Delta Phi
Epsilon; Bakony, Stella C, Vancouver—Kappa Alpha Theta; Baldwin, George R., Vancouver—Honours English; Alpha
Delta Phi; Players' Club, Letters Club; Ball, Charles E., Vancouver; Bamford, Gwendolyn J., Vancouver—Zoology and
Psychology; Gamma Phi Beta. * LOWER—Bargen, Peter F.; Bartlett, J. Geoffrey, Vancouver; Bartlett, Leslie H., Vancouver
—Zoology and psychology; Delta Upsilon; Premedical Club; Bassett, Beverley A., Vancouver—English and mathematics;
Alpha Omicron Pi; Public Speaking Club; Baxter, John S., Vancouver—Honours English; Beaton, Alexander J.,
Vancouver—Zoology; Becker, Ruth R., Vancouver—Psychology and English; Delta Phi Epsilon; Hillel; Benson, Edith J.,
Victoria—Zoology and bacteriology;  VCF, Premedical Club.
CAMPUS FLYING CLUB WOULD MAKE SCENES LIKE THIS COMMON AT UBC,  BUT POOL-PLAYERS AT FORT SEEMED OBLIVIOUS EVEN TO 'COPTER VISIT
201 ARTS '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Berisford, Robert, Vancouver; Best, Helen L., Vancouver — Psychology and sociology; Blair, David C.
Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Boes, Lillian F., Brighton, Ont.; Bogas, Kenneth P., Vancouver—History and economics;
Parliamentary Forum; Braide, David I. W., Victoria—Honours economics and political science; President Economics
Club;   Brown,   Helen   E.,   Nelson—English   and   history;    Mussoc;   Brown, Jack M.,  Vancouver—Honours psychology.
* LOWER—Brown, Richard M., Penticton—Psychology and English; Brummit, William M., Nelson — Premedical,
Symphonic Clubs; Bryant, Charles W., Lethbridge, Alta.—Psi Upsilon; Burd, Helen D., Victoria—Phrateres, VOC;
Burke, William Thomas, Vancouver—VCF; Burke, Ruth Elaine, Vancouver—Delta Gamma; Burnell, Joan C, West Vancouver—Philosophy and psychology;   Phrateres;  Burns, Helen M.
* UPPER—Burnside, A. Deane M., Penticton; Burtsmith, Kathleen F., Victoria; Bustead, Frank F.; Butler, Alfred J.,
Vancouver—Psychology and biology; Psychology Club, SPC; Bygrave, Cecil J., Vancouver; Cameron, D. I.; Campbell,
Frances C, Nelson—English and history; Radsoc and Symphony Club; Campbell Mary, Chilliwack. * LOWER—Cannon,
G. Harry, Vancouver—Honours physics; President Mathematics Club; Capstick, Edward A., Prince Rupert—History and
English; Carter, Donald G., Vancouver—Delta Upsilon; Carter, W. B. Douglas, Vancouver—Phychology and chemistry;
Chadwick, Helena B., Vancouver—English and French; Phrateres; Chalmers, Alan B., Victoria; Chambers, J. Earl,
Vancouver; Charnley, Elizabeth M.,  Vancouver—Honours Chemistry; CIC, Women's Public Speaking Club.
STUDENTS, MOSTLY ARTSMEN, WANDERED IN AND OUT OF THE LIBRARY   AND   PHYSICS  BUILDING ALL YEAR;  SOME   LIVED AT MALE  FORT CAMP
202 * UPPER—Chernov, Eva T., Vancouver—Delta Phi Epsilon; Hillel; Chisholm, Anita G., Vancouver—Psychology and
French; Alpha Gamma Delta; Newman Club; Christian, C. Joan, Vancouver—English and psychology; Phrateres, SPC;
Christian, Patricia M., Vancouver—English and psychology; Phrateres; Christie, Donald A., Vancouver—Honours biology;
Clark, Douglas H., Vancouver—Honours economics; Economics Society; Clark, George W. P., West Grand Forks—English
and history; SCM, Glee Club; Clark, John S., Quesnel. * LOWER—Clarke, John W., Ocean Falls Economics and German;
Clarke, 0. Nora J., Vancouver—History and English; Delta Sigma Pi; President WUS; Clerkson, Gladys, Vancouver—■
Phrateres; Clerkson, John D., Vancouver—Zoology and chemistry; Premedical Club; Coady, M. Margaret, Vancouver—
Bacteriology and zoology; Alpha Gamma Delta; Bacteriology, Newman Clubs; Coffey, Doris M., Vancouver- SCM,
Symphonic Club; Cole, Dacre P., Mayne—IRC, President UNS.
* UPPER—Comparelli, E. Dave, Vancouver—President MAD; Connal, Ross G., White Rock—SCM; Conner, Orville G.,
Vancouver; Connolly, Muriel A., Vancouver—Honours French; IRC, French, Letters Clubs; Cook, Katherine, Vancouver—
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Coope, Felicity M., Victoria—Spanish and French; Players' Club; Cooper, William E. H.,
Vancouver. * LOWER—Corry, Geoffrey D., Vancouver—History and government; Phi Gamma Delta; Court, James, E. 0.,
Vancouver; Cowie, Lillian M., Nanaimo—Honours biology and botany; VCF, VOC, Legion; Cowley, Elizabeth M., Victoria; Cox, Albert E., Vancouver—Honours psychology; Psychology Club; Cox, Stanley J., Vancouver; Creal, K. H. Michael,
Victoria; Crerar, Alistair D., Vancouver; Crompton, R. G.
STUDENTS, TENSED UP FROM LONG DAYS OF LOOKING AT ATHLETIC LECTURERS,   OFTEN  TOOK  NIGHT   OFF  TO   REVEL,  OFTEN  FREQUENTED   WK
203 ARTS '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Cumming, Marion S., Penticton—Bacteriology, chemistry and zoology; Delta Gamma; Curtis, J. S.; Day,
Alsion E., Kelowna—Honours chemistry; VOC, CIC; Denholm, Mary P., Calgary, Alta.—Psychology and sociology;
Derrick, Jack B. C, Vancouver —Honours biology; Desautels, Odille M., New Westminster—Honours chemistry;
Destrube, Francette M., Victoria—Players' Club; Dewdney, E. * LOWER—Dixon, Mary M., Vancouver—Phrateres;
; Dore, Burnell V., Victoria — Honours mathematics and physics; Dow, Harry G., Penticton; Dundas, 0. Judith, Victo
ria; Efford, Robert J., Vancouver—Honours bacteriology; Society of Microbiologists; Egilson, A. Konrad, Vancouver—
Honours English; Elart, Alice J., New Westminster—Psychology and English; Phrateres, Psychology Club.
* UPPER—Elliott, Frederick G., Chemainus; Embleton, Charles R. A. W., Victoria—VOC; Evans, Arthur M., Vancouver—
Chemistry and psychology; Ewart, Elizabeth M., Princeton—Bacteriology; Alpha Phi; VSC, VOC; Eyers, R. Joy, Victoria—
Alpha Delta Pi; Faghin, Jack, Vancouver -Honours bacteriology; Fahlman, Gregory A., Cloverdale—Honours chemistry;
Fairfax, E. Mercedes, Vancouver—Physics and zoology; Phrateres. * LOWER—Falconer, Dickson M., Vancouver—Newman Club; Farley, Albert L., Vancouver—Photography Club ; Fawcett, Evelyn Anne, Duncan—Honours economics; Secretary Economics Club; Feast, Joan E. C, Vancouver—President Alpha Delta Pi; Phrateres, VOC; Federoff, Ludmilla, Lulu
Island—English and philosophy; Fell, Ralph C, Victoria—English and history; Ferguson, Donald C, Vancouver—English
and philosophy;  Beta Theta Pi;  Editor-in-Chief Publications; Faimengo, Marya E., Vancouver—Philosophy and English.
FIRST FORMAL HELD  IN ARMOURY WAS THE FALL BALL.   BROTHERS  OF   BETA THETA PI WATCH AS CABELLEROS ESCORT BALL QUEEN CANDIDATES -
204 * UPPER—Finlayson, Douglas G., Vancouver; Finley, Russell H., Medicine Hat, Alta.; Ford, Kathleen P., Vancouver;
Forrest, Hugh L., Vancouver—Honours economics; Forsyth, Beatrice E., Vancouver; Fraser, G. Joan, White Rock—Delta
Gamma; Parliamentary Forum; Fraser, Alan W.; Freeze, George A., Vancouver—Zoology and psychology; Alpha Delta
Phi. * LOWER—French, Yvonne L., Vancouver—English andmathematics; Phrateres, Senior Manager Grass Hockey; Freu-
diger, Ronald, Vancouver -Economics and government; Fry, Howard C, Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Golf Club; Funk,
Henry J., Chilliwack; Galbraith, A. E.; Galbraith, Joan, Vancouver -History; Gall, Elizabeth, Vancouver; Gamey, Margaret D., Vancouver- —Spanish and French; Phrateres, Secretary El Circulo Latino Americano.
* UPPER—Garner, J. J., Vancouver—Kappa Sigma; Gear, W. Irving, Vancouver; Gerrie, E. A., Vancouver; Gerrity, E.,
Vancouver; Giegerich, Margaret A., YeUowknife, N.W.T.—Economics and geography; Delta Gamma; IRC, Phrateres;
Giesbrecht, Herbert; Gillespie, John T., Vancouver—English and history; Goostrey, Alex D., Burnaby—English and
history. *LOWER—Goulson, Carlyn F., Lochdale—Honours history and English; Badminton Club; Govier, Oren W.,
Vancouver; Graham, John A., Vancouver—Economics and philosophy; SPC; Graham, Thomas A., Vancouver—History
and English; Grant, John W. R., New Westminster; Grant, Douglas R., Vancouver; Gray, Edward J., Vancouver—Alpha
Delta Phi; Green, Joanna E., Vancouver    History and English; SCM.
'_. *
\j
> M **_"
h y>w..   i
1  * -j 2_s% * _
** ^V\      ' '"^^_!j  _                                     I mmmW' * * *
M___-__J
i
/I
STUDENTS HAD A TREAT WHEN AIRBORNE SYMPHONY WAS PLAYED ON   THE CAMPUS; 100 STUDENT SINGERS TOOK PART IN CANADIAN PREMIERE
205 ARTS '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER- Green, Mary C, Vancouver—Psychology and English; Greenius, Eric 0., Vancouver—English and geography;
Greer, Clifford A., Vancouver—President Parliamentary Forum, Socialist Forum; Griffith, Gwynneth M., Victoria—Economics and sociology; Delta Gamma; Grimson, Victor J., Vancouver—English; Phi Delta Theta; Groll, Shirlie N.,
Vancouver—Psychology and sociology; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Grunlund, Barbro E., Port Alberni—Honours English;
Phrateres; Grunland, Jean M., Port Alberni—Honours chemistry; Phrateres. * LOWER—Gubbins, Patricia M., Vancouver
—VOC; Guilhamoulie, Anne M., Ladysmith—Honours French; Delta Sigma Pi, Alpha Omicron Pi; Legion, Le Cercle
Francais, Newman Club, Vice-President Arts; Gunn, Shirley A. M., Victoria—Alpha Omicron Pi; Mussoc; Gushue, Wilfred G., Vancouver—Chemistry and mathematics; Hadley, Arthur J., Vancouver—History and philosophy; VCF; Hall,
Beverley E., Vancouver—Psychology; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Hall, Ross H., Aggasiz—Honours chemistry; VOC; Hallsor,
June C, Victoria—English and French.
* UPPER—Hamilton, S. Brian, Nelson—Geology and geography; Delta Upsilon; Dawson Club; Handling, William D.,
Vancouver—History and geography; Hanley, Richard W., Vancouver—Golf, Newman Clubs; Harrick, Nick, Lang Bay—
Honours physics and mathematics; Physics Club; Harris, Gordon S., Nelson—Premed Club; Harris, L. Harold, Vancouver
—Physics and mathematics; Mussoc; Harris, Shirley M., Trail; Hart, Suzanne M. * LOWER—Hartree, Beverley M.,
West Vancouver—Philosophy and English; Kappa Alpha Theta; Harvey, Joan, Ardrossan, Alta.—History and English;
Mussoc; Hatton, Gwladys N., Kamloops—Zoology and bacteriology; VOC; Haughn, Howard J., Prince Rupert; Heaps,
Phillip A., Vancouver; Helders, John, Vancouver; Henderson, Clifford B., Vancouver—Zoology and chemistry; Delta
Upsilon; Hennenfent, Earl H., Vancouver—Chemistry and physics.
SCENE OF MANY SMASHING PARTIES WAS COMMODORE; HERE ARTS PROM REVELLERS  SHARE  FLASHBULB WITH  GENTLEMEN  LAWYERS ON SPREE
?06 * UPPER—Heslop, Marporie, Parksville—Legion; Hinchliffe, Marjorie, Lulu Island—Slavonic studies and psychology;
Women's Rifle Club; Hobbs, Barbara J., Victoria—History and English; Phrateres; Hopen, Clarence E., Vancouver—Chi
Sigma Chi; Mussoc; Horsmield, Anne M. H.; Horton, John H. M., Vancouver—English and mathematics; Hoskins, Mar-
cella R., Vancouver; Howell, Ruth M., Victoria—Psychology; Phrateres. * LOWER—Hudson, Grace B. C, Vancouver—
French and English; Delta Gamma; Hummel, Brian C. W., Vancouver—Honours chemistry; Psi Upsilon; CIC; Tunt, Edward G., Vancouver Biology and history; Archery, Photography Clubs; Hunter, John M., Powell River—Mathematics
and physics; Hurford, James R., Courtenay —Geography and history; Vice-President Badminton Club; Huba. G.: Irish,
Ruth I., Vancouver—Honours chemistry; Phrateres, SCM, CIC; Irwin, L. Beatrice, Kamloops—Alpha Gamma Delta.
* UPPER—Jackson, R. F.; Jampolsky, Michael, Vancouver; Jarvis, Nancy Joan, Vancouver—Alpha Gamma Delta;
Jeffery, Mary Lou E., West Vancouver—VOC, Biological Discussions Group; Jenkins, Leonard C, Vancouver—Honours
bacteriology and preventative medicine; Bacteriology Discussions Group; Joe, Ruby, Victoria—Secretary Chinese Students'
Club; Johnson, Arthur L.; Johnson, Frederick J., North Bend—Economics and history; Phi Delta Theta. * LOWER—
Johnson, Joan L., New Westminster—English and French; Johnston, Helen May, Chilliwack; Jones, Allan Ernest, Vancouver; Jones, Neville C, Kelowna—Chemistry and zoology; Kaario, Edsel A., Vancouver — Economics and history;
SPC; Kabush, Harry; Karen, Walter, Vancouver; Kayll, Dyne  A.,   Vancouver—Chemistry   and   physics;   Rowing   Club.
YOUTH TRAINING SCHOOL AT ACADIA BROUGHT HIGHSCHOOLERS TO CAMPUS WHICH THEY TOURED IN AWE.    THEY USED OLD INSIGNIA (CENTRE)
207 ARTS '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER--Kelly, James, Kimberley—Kappa Sigma; Kenney, J. Harold, Prince George—Geography and economics;
Kenny, Edith W., Vancouver—Psychology and English; Kappa Alpha Theta; Kerley, Donald R., Vancouver—Psychology
and zoology; Mamooks; Ketcheson, Helen R., Vancouver—Alpha Gamma Delta; Publications; Ketchen, Sheila, Vancouver
—President Phraters; King, Ralph F. B., Vancouver—Honours English; Kinnear, James K., Vancouver. * LOWER—Klapp,
T. A.; Knapp, Katherine, Vancouver—Psychology and sociology; Gamma Phi Beta; Big Block, Secretary AMS; Knight,
Harold A., Vancouver; Kouches, Mary, Vancouver—French and English; Le Cercle Francais; Kraminsky, Ralph A., Regina,
Sask.—Economics and English; Hillel; Kristianson, S.; Laidler, Dorothy M., Victoria—Honours mathematics; Kappa
Alpha Theta; Laird, Elizabeth A., Vancouver—Kappa Kappa Gamma.
* UPPER—Lake, K.; Lang, Lorna; Lang, Elizabeth J., Vancouver—Honours political science; Mussoc, Phraters; Lees,
William; Legg, Peter G., Vancouver—Mathematics and physics; Leshgold, Jack B., Vancouver—Zeta Beta Tau; Leuillier,
Robert A., Vancouver—French and English; Lewis, Carol Ann, New Westminster -Chemistry and bacteriology; Kappa
Kappa Gamma; Arts executive. * LOWER -Lewis, R. Nancy, Vancouver Honours philosophy; Delta Gamma; Lewis,
Marion, Vancouver; Lipsey, Barbara Mae, Victoria—History; Kappa Alpha Theta; Lisicka, Iva M., Vancouver—Honours
economics and mathematics; Le Cercle Francais; Lockhart, Alan D., Vancouver—Zoology; Phi Gamma Delta; Lomas,
Nancy B., New Westminster—Bacteriology and zoology; Phrateres; Lomow, Donna L., Vancouver; Longley, J. Donald,
West Vancouver—Zoology and psychology; Zeta Psi.
PUBSTERS TRIPPED TO WASHINGTON TO EDIT "DAILY", BANQUETED AFTER   SPENDING BUSY DAY AROUND THE U-DESK IN THE LARGE CITY ROOM
?08 * UPPER—Lorimer, John D., Vancouver; Lott, Gordon G., Victoria; Louie, Alice K. C, Moose Jaw, Sask.; Lowes, Betty
D.; Malensek, Clementine, Vancouver—French and German; Malcolmson, Susana, Vancouver History and English; Alpha
Marshall, Robert E., Vancouver—Zoology and chemistry. * LOWER—Martens, Fred L., Vancouver; Matheson, L. Lenore,
Kelowna—-VCF; Mayo, Warren C, North Vancouver—Physics and mathematics; McAlpine, Mary, Vancouver — Delta
Gamma; McAllister, John B., Victoria—Honours psychology; Legion; McConnell, Catherine, Vancouver—English and
French; Mussoc; McConnell, J. A.; McCulloch, Thomas A., Vancouver—Honours physics; Phi Kappa Sigma.
* UPPER—McDaniel, Francis J., Vancouver; MacDonald, Eileen, Vancouver; McDonald, Francis S., New Westminster-
Alpha Gamma Delta; McDonald, James K., West Vancouver—Spanish; Vice-President El circulo latino americano;
MacDonald, Madeline, Thorold, Ont.; McGarry, Nora, Vancouver—Psychology and English; Delta Gamma; WUS; McGill,
Allan S., Vancouver—Honours economics; President IRC; McGill, Trudabeth Ann, Victoria — Phraters. * LOWER —
McGregor, Iona M., Vancouver—English and sociology; Second Vice-President Phrateres; McGrasson, I. G.; Mclssac, J.
Frank, Vancouver; McKay, Donald; MacKay, Bruce S., West Vancouver—Honours mathematics and physics; MacKay,
Ronald H., Vancouver—Honours zoology; MacKenzie, Archie C, Revelstoke — Psychology and zoology; AROA;
McKenzie, K.
EARLY  DAYS  OF NEW  SESSION  STARTED  WiTH   USUAL CAIRN   CEREMONY, A RUSH  AT THE  BOOK STORE AND  SPRAWLING  IN BROCK BALCONY
209 ARTS '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER—McKeown, Robert, J. E., Vancouver; MacKinnon, Jean B., Vancouver—Phrateres; MacKinnon, Isabel F.;
McLaren, Henry M., Vancouver; MacLean, Eian D., New Westminster; MacLennan, Catherine, Vancouver—Kappa Kappa
Gamma; McLellan, Luella M., Vancouver— History and English; VCF; McLeod, Constance D., Vancouver—Zoology;
Delta Gamma; Golf Club. * LOWER—MacLeod, Kenneth I., Vancouver; McLeod, Marilyn J., Vancouver—English and
psychology; Gamma Phi Beta; MacLeod, Malcolm G.; McLeod, John F., Penticton—English and economics; Phi Delta
Theta; McLoughlin, Kathleen, Vancouver—Honours French ; Alpha Phi; McMechan, Melville Y., Vancouver—Chemistry
and mathematics; MacMillan, Lois A., West Vancouver—Newman Club, VOC; McMillan, V. Dyke, Vancouver—Radsoc.
* UPPER—McMynn, Robert G., Vancouver—Honours zoology; McNab, William S., Vancouver; McNeill, Dennis N.,
Vancouver—English and political science; VOC; McTurk, Helen G., Kamloops—History and English; Alpha Delta Pi;
Meldrum, Ronald M., Vancouver; Mertz, James G., Penticton—Zoology and psychology; Miles, Elwood R., Vancouver—
Psychology and chemistry; Mussoc; Mill, M. M. * LOWER - Minnig, Louis, Vancouver; Mock, Leslie L., Vancouver;
Moloney, Patrick J., Vancouver Phi Kappa Sigma; Montpellier, Alfred L., Vancouver; Moore, Joan, Vancouver—History
and government; Alpha Delta Pi; Morrison, S. Roy, Vancouver—Honours mathematics and physics; Chess Club; Morrow,
Frederick C, Vancouver- -Honours mathematics; Morse, I. Una.
CONSTRUCTION   CREWS   AT   WORK   BECAME   A   NORMAL   SIGHT   IN   THE DAY OF THE UBC STUDENT; NOT SO USUAL WAS CLUB DAY IN THE FALL
210 * UPPER—Moskovitz, Israel, Vancouver; Mouat, Margaret M., Ganges- -Zoology and psychology; Alpha Omicron Pi;
Premed Club; Muir, Irene S., Duncan- -Bacteriology and biology; Society of Microbiologists, Glee Club; Naish, Francis T.;
Nash, Clarence W., Armstrong—Socialist Forum; Nation, Beryl A. 0., Victoria—French and government; Mussoc;
Newport, Violet G., Vancouver; Nickerson, Norman D. L., Vancouver — English. * LOWER - Nightingale, Frank H.,
Vancouver—Psychology and zoology; Dance Band; Noel, Helen R., Okanagan Falls—Second Vice-President Legion; Oliver,
Jean E., Victoria—Psychology; Phraters; Olson, Doris, Vancouver—English and zoology; Phraters; Ord, Alexander H.,
C. Eric, Victoria—History, English and psychology; Oughton,Vancouver—Honours mathematics; Symphonic Club; Orme,
John M., Vancouver—Honours chemistry; CIC; Big Block; Outram, Donald N., Vancouver—Badminton Club.
* UPPR—Owens, Noel S., Vancouver-—Honours history; IRC, Historical Society; Parliamentary Forum; Oxley, Mary
H., Vancouver English and History; Parker, Fay V., Victoria; Paterson, Hubert M., Lulu Island—Physics and mathematics; Mussoc; Payne, Doris D., Vancouver—Mathematics and English; SCM; Pearkins, Jon, Vancouver—Chemistry
and physics; Fencing Club; Pearson, Emma S., Vancouver—Kappa Kappa Gamma; Pearson, Gwendolyn M., Vancouver—
English and history; Pi Beta Phi; Phrateres, Gee, Rifle Clubs. * LOWER—Perrault, Ernest G., Vancouver—Sociology;
President Radsoc; Phillips, Paul V., Vancouver—VCF; Phil pott, Elizabeth J., Vancouver—Phrateres; Pike, Gordon Ches-
ley, Vancouver—Zoology and biology; Pike, Margaret U. M., Victoria—Zoology and chemistry; VOC; Pincott, Clifford E.,
Vancouver—Biology and mathematics; Pitcairn, E. Margaret, Vancouver — English and history; Plater, Leonard J.,
Vancouver.
WELL-KNOWN    LANES    AND    BAYS    SURROUNDING   THE    CAMPUS    DRAW  NATURE LOVERS;  CAMPUS  LASSES  DO  BIG  JOB  IN   HELPING NATURE
211 ARTS '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Pluym, Henry A., Vancouver; Pochin, Helen R., West Vancouver—Chemistry and mathematics; Phrateres;
Potter, Gilbert D., Vancouver; Powell, Marguerite J., West Vancouver—English and French; Price, Trudie, New Westminster—Sociology and psychology; Gamma Phi Beta; Prizek, Mario H. D., Vancouver—Honours English; UBC Thunderbird ; Purdie, Margaret I.; Purse, Dorothy A. S., Vancouver—Psychology Club. * LOWER—Pye, Eleanor, M. A.,
Duncan—Bacteriology and zoology; Gamma Phi Beta; Phrateres; Quinn, James W., Vancouver—Mathematics and physics;
Rally, Charles R., Vancouver- Zoology and psychology; Newman Club; Redlich, Aline Berta, Vancouver; Reed, Beryl C,
Vancouver- English and history; Phrateres; Reesor, M. Jean, North Vancouver—English and history; Phrateres; Reid,
James Gordon, Vancouver; Reid, L. V.
* UPPER—Reid, Mary R., Vancouver—Honours English; Reitlo, Eunice M., Moose Jaw, Sask.; Reynolds, I. Mary, Victoria; Richards, Allan E., Vancouver; Richards, Eileen E., Vancouver—Government and economics; Richards, Virginia J.,
West Vancouver—President Women's Public Speaking Club, VOC; Rideout, Chester F., Vancouver; Rietchel, Helen E.,
Vancouver—Psychology and English; Kappa Kappa Gamma. * LOWER—Rivers, William A., Vancouver —Zoology and
biology; Legion Pipe Band; Robinson, M. Kathleen, Vancouver—Bacteriology and chemistry; Alpha Delta Pi; Rochfort,
Cdnstance A., White Rock—English and sociology; Rocher, Allan, Vancouver—Parliamentary Forum; Rogers, Mary E.
M., Ladysmith—Alpha Omicron Pi; Mussoc; Ross, R. D.; Ross, William L., New Westminster; Rowe, Jack F., Victoria.
FAMILIAR OUTLINES  OF THE LIBRARY  UNDERWENT CONSIDERABLE CHANGE; BONFIRES AND STACKS OF REINFORCING IRON WERE FAMILIAR SIGHTS
212 * UPPER—Rowse, Denis J.; Rowley, Charles E., Vancouver—History and English; Sample, John T., New Westminster—.
Honours mathematics and physics; Scutt, Alan G., New Westminster—English and history; Searle, Marion E., Vancouver
—English and German; Phrateres; Selfe, Conrad A., Vancouver; Service, Peter K. W., Vancouver—Honours chemistry;
Mussoc; Shand, Donald, Vancouver—Honours physics. *LOWER—Shepherd, Gordon W., Vancouver—English, history
and psychology; Kappa Sigma; Varsity Soccer; Shirley, Frederick S., Vancouver—Mathematics and physics; President
BCTF; Sibley, Philippa A.; Sibley, Isobel Mary, Victoria—Symphonic Club, IRC; Simpson, Marguerite G., Vancouver—
English and French; Phraters, Mussoc; Slark, Gordon A., Vancouver- Physics and mathematics; Kappa Sigma; Physics
Society; Slader, David J., Nelson; Smith, Helen A.,    Vancouver—English history.
_■____■
* UPPER—Smith, Helen Mary, Vancouver—Psychology and sociology; Smith, Thomas T., New Westminster—Premed
Club; Snape, M. Anne J., Victoria—French and English; Phrateres; South, Donald L., Vancouver—Geography and history; Kappa Sigma( Spencer, Herbert W., Nanaimo—Zoology and chemistry; Premed Club; Stainsby, Donald 0.,
Ladner—English and history; Editor Totem '48; Stedman, Shirley R., Vancouver—Kappa Alpha Theta; Stewart, Catherine
A., Port Alice—History, economics and English; Phrateres. * LOWER—Stewart, Kathleen A., Vancouver—English and
history; Alpha Gamma Delta; Stewart, Sheila F., Vancouver—Zoology and chemistry; Premed Club; Stiles, John G.,
Vancouver—Mussoc; Stokes, John W., Cobble Hill Zoology, biology and botany; Stone, David R., Vancouver; Stone,
James S., Vancouver—Physics and English; Stone, Lome Murray, Vancouver—Mathematics and physics; Sutherland, H.
Lloyd, Chilliwack—Mathematics  and physics.
MORE   SCENES   OF   LIBRARY   CONSTRUCTION   CLASH   WITH   TRADITIONAL PICTURES OF STUDENTS IN FOREST RESERVE AND ALONG THE BEACHES
.213 ARTS '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Suttie, Alexander, Vancouver—History and English; IRC, UNS, USC; Taylor, Joan R., Vancouver—Sociology
and psychology; Phrateres; Temoin, Maurice D., Vancouver;Tener, John S., Vancouver—Honours zoology; Biological Discussions Group; Thiessen, Victor F., Abbotsford; Thom, M. H.; Thomas, John A., Vancouver—Honours chemistry;
Thomas, Raymond B., Lulu Island. *LOWER—Thompson, B asil H. M., Vancouver—Society of Microbiologists, Archery
Club; Thomson, Marguerite, Vancouver—Alpha Gamma Delta; Thomson, Anna J., Vancouver —■ Honours English and
French; Secretary Letters Club, Symphonic Club; Thomson, Ian G., Vancouver—History and English; Phi Kappa Pi;
Tiedje, Patricia A., Trail—Bacteriology and zoology; Alpha Phi; Secretary WUS; Outdoor Club; Tkach, John S., Smoky
Lake, Alta.—IRC, UNS; Tomlinson, Kenneth Y., Prince Albert, Sask.—English and history; Phi Kabba Pi; Tubbs, Dorothy
M., Victoria.
* UPPER—Tully, Ralph W., Vancouver—Mathematics and physics; Turner, Patricia A., Vancouver—Economics and psy-
UPPER—Tully, Ralph W., Vancouver—Mathematics and physics; Turner, Patricia A., Vancouver—Economics and psychology; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Underwood, Peter J.; Urquhart, Helen M. A., Port Moody -Honors physics; Mathematics Club, Physics Society; Verrier, John B., Calgary, Alta.; Vrublevski, Diane G., Vancouver—French and English;
Phrateres; Waldichuk, Michael, Kabaigon, Ont.—Honours chemistry; Legion, CIC; Warden, Geoffrey, Quesnel—English
and history. * LOWER—Wardroper, John E., Vancouver- English and history; Editor UBC Thunderbird; Warkentyne,
Henry J.; Webster, Harry R., Lillooet—VOC; Weir, K. Marguerite, Vancouver—English and music; Phrateres, Premed
Club; White, Douglas A., Vancouver- -Physics, English and mathematics; White, Doreen L., Vancouver—Treasurer,
Gamma Phi Beta; White, Massie L., Vancouver -Zoology and chemistry; Wilkinson, E. Joyce, Victoria—Psychology;
Phrateres, Psychology Club.
PUBSTERS AS  USUAL WERE A WEIRD LOT; THEY WORKED ON THE  U-DESK,   CELEBRATED   BIRTHDAYS,   OR  POSED   FOR   SO-CALLED   PORTRAIT  JOBS
214 * UPPER—William, Ian H., Victoria—Honours chemistry; Wilson, Beverley, Nanaimo—Delta Sigma Pi; Players', Letters
Clubs; Wilson, Catherine A., Vancouver—Delta Gamma; Wilson, William G., Vancouver; Witter, Patricia A., Vancouver;
Wolverton, Harold G., Vancouver -Mamooks; Wong, Elsie, Vancouver- Bacteriology and zoology; Wong, Wah, Vancouver—Honours political science; UNS, IRC, Parliamenta ry Forum. * LOWER—Wong, Robert, Victoria—Honours
chemistry; Woodward, Shirley A., Vancouver—French and English; Gamma Phi Beta; Wormsbecher, John H., Vancouver
—English and history; Jazz Society; Wunderlick, Raymond, J., Vancouver—Wylie, Joseph, Vancouver; Yeardye, Mary
A., Vancouver—Bacteriology and zoology; Yorkston, Doreen M., New Westminster—Mussoc; Young, Edith B., Vancouver
—Premed Club.
*■ UPPER—Young, John J., Vancouver—Honours history; Yule, David L. G., North Vancouver—Honours psychology;
Legion; Zivot, Aaron, Vancouver; Zoellner, William J., New Westminster—English and history; Mussoc; Austin, Shirley
H., Vancouver—Newman Club; Beesley, J. F. B., Kamloops—VOC, Newman, Premed Clubs; Bayne, M. Joan, Vancouver
—Zoology and English; Delta Gamma. * LOWER—Erskine, H., Vancouver; Hill, A. G., Victoria Honours economics;
Economics Club; Hirtle, William A., Oliver—History and English; Beta Theta Pi; Parliamentary Forum; Kenny, I. B.,
Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Livingstone, Grant B., Vancouver—History and economics; Sigma Tau Chi; UNS; President AMS; Plaskett, M. V., New Westminster—Honours Latin and English; Thomas, P. D., North Vancouver; Wall, W. B.
THE WIDE-OPEN  ELECTION  CAMPAIGN SAY MANY  STRANGE TWISTS, INCLUDING BROUSSON SIDE-SHOW; LEGION BABY CONTEST WAS NEW TOO
215 BULLDOZERS WERE AS COMMON AS STUDENTS ON THE CAMPUS  UBC DURING   L'AFFAIRE  '48   AS THEY  DUG  BASEMENTS   AND  GRADED   ROADS
FALL SCENE LOOKING DOWN MAIN MALL FROM CAIRN; FLAGPOLE IN DISTANCE HAS LONG BEEN ON  CAMPUS MAPS,  NOT BUILT TILL  1947-48
216 WITH THREE-QUARTERS  OF THEIR  UNIVERSITY  CAREER BEHIND  THEM,   ARTS '49  LOOKED   FORWARD TO  LAST SESSION
ARTS '49
Junior class lost sight of unnecessary academic troubles ... worried about*their bridge game
Back stretch 49'ers moved into the inside track this year
with two laps behind them and the finish line in sight. The
juniors had acquired a little of the superior cockiness of a
senior and rubbed off most of the dampness behind the ears
that distinguishes a sophomore.
Lectures and exams began to take the subordinate position they deserve in relation to the more important social
aspects of university life. Naturally the juniors became experts at bridge, the most important single interest of a third
year student.
Club activities, Radsoc, Players', Musical Society, The
Daily Ubyssey, and chess absorbed hundreds of juniors.
Val Sears, Eva Holm and Ron Haggart contributed their
talents to The Ubyssey.  The next year's Radsoc president,
George Barnes, one of the year's outstanding juniors, headed
the programme department of the Radio Society. Voluptious
Joan Powell played an eye-stopping Venus for the student-
written "Let Sleeping Gods Lie."
Minor clubs absorbed dozens more of the record-breaking class, grooming them for executive positions in their
final year.
The juniors boasted a varied assortment of luscious
coeds numbering among them Joan Grimmett, city editor of
The Daily Ubyssey, and Esme Macdonald, Radsoc's Jill-of-
all-trades.
The senior class of the next year could look forward to
a live-wire group of boys and girls if the year's junior class
was an indication.
217 ARTS '49 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Abbey, N. Douglas; Adam, Frank C; Adamovich, Claudette; Adrian, John; Alexander, Donald L.; Allder,
Frank H.; Amm, John J.; Andron, Lily Alvina; Arlidge, Bruce K.; Aro, Kosta V.; Atkinson, William A. * MIDDLE—
Baldwin, George W.; Bandura, Albert; Banks, George N.; Bargus, John W.; Barker, Thomas W.; Baycroft, Bernice W.;
Beck, James M.; Becker, Wilfred H.; Beduz, Louis B.; Bell, John M.; Bell, John N.; Bell, Kenneth E. * LOWER—Bell,
Lois Jean; Bell, William J.; Bell-Irving, Rosemary; Beltz, William G.; Benson, Leslie B.; Bergstrome, Brant E.; Berry,
Susan; Biro, Louis; Black, Margaret M.; Blackhall, John A.  G.; Blanchard, Jack D.
* UPPER -Bloom, Norma E.; Blundell, June Rose; Bodie, Donald 0.; Bolton, Jane E.; Bonney, Gordon E.; Bowell,
Joanne E.; Bowkett, Mary F.; Breen, John Kendall; Brett, A. June; Broderick, Eric L.; Browning, John R.; Bruce,
Marian D. * Bryce, John R. G.; Bryenton, Gordon A. M.; Burns, Robert L.; Burroughs, Gloria B.; Byrn, M. Rosemary;
Byrnes, Margaret J.; Calder, Thomas L.;  Cameron, Patricia A.; Cameron, Kathelene; Cameron, L. Diane.
ALTHOUGH   COEDS   WALKED   THE   UBC   BEACH   IN  SPRINGTIME, -THE   LIGHT SNOW OF WINTER DAMPENED SPIRITS, NOT TO MENTION MANY FEET
218 tiwmm.
SMSM
* UPPER—Campbell, Doreen E.; Carney, Anne; Carson, Patrick J.; Castillou, Josephine; Charters, Joan C; Chell,
Richard A.; Chisholm, Shirley M.; Christie, B. Joan M.; Clark, Dennis M.; Clark, Earl; Clark, Nigel H. * MIDDLE—
Clarke, Calista; Clement, Earl Herbert; Clements, Gordon G.; Cocking, Raymond E.; Colcleugh, Murray; Coleman,
Mavis E.; Collison, Anne P.; Coops, Parzival; Corker, Barbara D.; Corsan, Grahame D. * LOWER—Coulson, G. Allan;
Courtice, Gordon L.; Cowan, Everette, L. K.; Crabb, John J.; Crawford, Ronald; Creery, Leslie J.; Cross, David A.; Crowe,
Mary Patricia; Cumming, George S.; Curran, Joy M. R.; Cutcher, Allen C.
* UPPER—Dain, Kate Doreen R.; Davies, John L.; Dempster, J. R. Hugh; Dennett, Thomas T.; DesBrisay, Diana E.;
DeVito, Robert V.; DeWolf, Susan G.; Dick, Norma M. M.; Dickson, Ronald G.; Dobbin, Nancy C. * LOWER—Downing,
Michael E.; Dunfee, Evelyn M.; Dundas, I. Ann A.; Dunlop, Ruby Doreen; Dunn, Frederick, G. C. C; Dunn, William
D. F.; Duxbury, James H.;  Eckersley, E. Phyllis; Edgar Maureen; Edwards, Glyn M.; Edwards, John G.
STUDENTS ACROSS THE  CAMPUS,  IN THE GYM OR AT FORT CAMP, WERE TOLD OF COMING EVENTS BY MAMOOKS' POSTERS, PAINTED IN BROCK
219 ARTS '40 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Edwards, Martin H.; Elliott, Barbara J.; Etchell, Charles T.; Evans, B. H. Philip; Fahlman, Patricia; Fawsitt,
Joyce C; Fearn, D. Rodney; Ferguson, Robert G.; Fergusson, Eleanor J.; Fetherston, William H. * MIDDLE—Field,
Ross B.; Finning, Joanne E.; Fisher, Eleanor J.; Fitzpatrick, Margaret; Flood, Joyce; Forrester, Anne L.; Forward, Charles
N.; Francis Mary Grace; Freer, John T.; Furk, Dorothy Mary; Fyffe, Gordon J.; Gamache, Luce. * LOWER—Gardner,
Robert R.; Garvie, Leslie A.; Gellatly, Peter; Genschorek, Herman W.; Geoffrey, Barbara M. V.; Gibson, Garnet M. A.;
Gilmour, Hugh S. A.; Glennie, Douglas W.; Goode, Eric S.; Gosbee, Allan W.
* UPPER—Go wans, Helen Mary; Grant, Gordon G.; Grant, Denis C.; Gray, M. Betty Anne; Greenwood, Lionel S.;
Greer, Betsy Ann; Gregg, Harold M.; Groves, Cyril; Guttormsson, Peter T.; Haas, Jane M.; Haahti, Laura K. * LOWER—
Hage, Keith Donald; Haggart, Ronald B.; Halton, Cora Evelyn; Hamilton, Christina A.; Hamilton, Eleanor J.; Hamilton,
John D.; Harold, Douglas W.; Harper, Barbara R.; Harris, Marion B.; Hartree, Shirley A.; Harvey, Nancy F.
THE YEAR SAW SEX IN MANY FORMS ON THE  CAMPUS; GALS AND GAMS IN THE CAF, BABIES IN CONTESTS, GALS IN SNOW, WITH ICE-CREAM
220 * Hassell, Rose L.; Hawthorn, James W.; Hempsall, Jean; Henley, Ian George T.; Herrmann, George G.; Heslop, Lorna
M.; Hess, Forest G.; Hicks, Gerald F.; Hill, Catherine L.; Hodson, Margaret P.; Holm, Thelma M. * MIDDLE—Hopgood,
Douglas A.; Hopkins, Jean Emily; Huene, Ralph B.; Hughes, Patricia M.; Hunt, Rodney E.; Hunter, William R.; Hurst,
Maud Hazel; Irwin, Andrew A.; Isaac, Jacob; Iverson, Brian J.; Janzen, Edwald. * LOWER—Jenvey, George E.;
Johnson, Alice S.; Johnson, E. Sharon E.; Johnson, Lily Annie; Johnson, Maureen L.; Johnson, Violet; Johnston, James
C;  Johnston, Winifred E.; Johnstone, Margaret M.;  Johnstone, Delmar D.; Jones, Arnold R.
* UPPER—Jones, John C; Jordan, Laurance T.; Katz, Isadore Charles; Kay, Donald W.; Kellett, Ruth E.; Kemp, Reta
L.; Kennett, Patricia M. L.; Kent, Chan E.; Kidd, Margaret I.; Kilvert, James L.; Kincade, Marjorie M. * LOWER—
King, David Joseph; Kiss, Frank M.; Kitchen, Joan K.; Kocher, Paul E.; Kyle, George B.; Laidley, Albert E.; Laird,
Joan W.; Lane, Polly; Lane, Robert F.;  Langford, Albert  E.
STUDENTS TURNED OUT EN MASSE TO CHEER ON THE THUNDERING GRID DERS. EARNEST GLADIATORS WORK OUT, GET ADVICE FROM GREG KABAT
221 ARTS '49 (Continued)—
___"■■
mm
_r ' _ _•!•_■ W™_m     J-* *• ___
sm&
* UPPER—Latsoudes, Vivian; Laundy, Patrick W. M.; Lazareff, Elsie A.; Leblanc, Raymond L.; Leiterman, Elaine H.;
Lenardon, J. Robert; Lenett, Norman H.; Levison, Mollie; Lindsay, Ellis George; Littlewood, Charles A. * MIDDLE—
Livingston, Ruth D.; Lougheed, Henry V.; Lyne, Lillian Louise; Lytton, B. Joyce; Madill, Mervyn F.; Manson, Helen E.;
Markham, William G.; Marshall, Elmo M.; Martin, Stewart W.; Martin, Wilma June; Mayon, June 0. * LOWER—
Macauley, Ronald A.; McCannel, John Arthur; McConnell, W. J. C; McConville, M. Shirley; McCorquodale, D. James;
McCosham, Beverley J.; McCoy, Arthur G. L.; McCreight, Charles T.; McDonnell, Geraldine; McEachern, Alexander;
McGladery, Kathleen M.
* UPPER—Mcllvride, M. Ruth; Mclntyre, Peter R.; Mackay, F. Douglas S.; McKellar, Robert Geo.; Mackenzie, Hubert N.;
McKenzie, Donna M.; Mackenzie, Fergus E.; Mackenzie, Marigold A.; McKenzie, Robert H.; Mackenzie, Shirley M.;
Mackinnon, Dixon * LOWER—Maclean, Jackie M.; McLean, Margaret E.; McLellan, Peter D.; McLeod, D. Cameron;
McLeod, Mary Jean; Macleod, Mary S.; McMartin, Peter J.; McMartin, Alan B.; McNair, David L.; McOuat, W. Gordon;
McWilliams, V. Bernice.
CARDS AND DANCING TOOK THE SPOTLIGHT WITH  MANY STUDENTS,  BUT  SOME   LIKE  LIVINGSTONE  WORRIED  ABOUT  STUDENT  GOVERNMENT
222 * UPPER—Miller, Olive May; Morrison, John S.; Morton, David C; Mowbray, Mary E.; Muirhead, Mary L.; Muirhead",
Kenneth; Mullins, Norman D.; Munday, John D.; Nagle, Beverley; Newby, Jack Dean; Nickel, William J. * MIDDLE—
Nyholm, Marion H.; Oates, John L.; Paddon, Betty Laird; Palmer, Joan E.; Parke, Margaret I. E.; Parkinson, M. H.;
Patterson, William P.; Pattison, James P.; Pearson, Harry L.; Pelter, George Albert; Peyman, Elizabeth S. * LOWER—
Pierce, Alan F.; Poole, John K.; Powell, Dorothea U.; Pringle, Wm. Alan H.; Purvis, Dorothy B.; Reid, Birnie E.;
Rennie, Nancy Jean; Reynolds, Warren L.; Rheumer, George A.; Roberts, Beverly A.; Robertson, Stewart D.
* UPPER—Rosene, William A.; Ross, Shirley J.; Sacuta, Norman C: Sandback, Eric S.; Sanford, Donald M.; Scanlon,
Vivian D.; Scott, Gordon 0.; Scott, G. Patricia; Scott, Priscilla R.; Scott, William M.; Sears, Vallance C. * LOWER—
Seibold, Ervin A.; Selman, Gordon R.; Seyer, Rose Marie; Shaw, Millo R. T.; Shepp, Robert J.; Shore, Marvyn A.;
Shuley, Margaret E.; Skipp, Herbert L.; Smith, Aubrey D.;   Smith, Dorothy 0.; Smith, Marion E.
SOME SCENES SNAPPED AT RANDOM PICTURED EVER-PRESENT HUTS, A BUS DRIVER, AND DR. COWAN'S PRIDE AND JOY, A VERY LIVE  FALCON
223 ARTS '49 (Continued)—
K£9&
* UPPER—Smithson, Beverly J.; Snape, Joan; Sortome, David R.; Sowerby, Raymond; Spencer, Ann M.; Spicer, L.
Josephine; Steel, Doreen; Steen, William R.; Stemland, Martha; Stewart, James W.; Stewart, James A. * MIDDLE—
Stockstad, Dolores E.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Stuart, James D.; Sulymka, William; Sutherland, Jean; Tanner, Benjamin F.;
Taplin, Arthur C; Tener, Gordon M.; Thompson, Francis W.; Thomson, Margaret A.; Thurston, K. June A. * LOWER—
Tiffin, M. Madeline; Tognotti, Lome A.; Tomalty, G. Lome; Tomlinson, Raymond; Tompkins, Neville C; Tower,
Stanley C;  Tremaine, Mary C; Tull, Thomas J.; Turnbull, Margaret L.; Turner, John N.; Varty, Thomas N.
* UPPER—Volkovich, John; Wallace, Maud Vena; Walton,   Howard W. G.;  Warner, Donald L.;  Wartnow, Floyd C;
Watkins, Richard W.; Webb, May; Webb, Phyllis Jean; Webster, Patricia; Weekes, William Henry; Wensink, Raymond A.
* LOWER—Whitehead, Frank E.; Whitney, Joan Elian; Whyte,  Donald R.;  Wilkinson, Thomas D.;  Wilson,  John R.;
Wilson, Lawrence L.; Winton, John L.; Wolfe, Harry B.; Wolfe, Leslie H.; Wright, Margaret Jean; Wyllie, Peter John E.
,-t~^_i
CAREFREE  STUDENTS TOOK  EVERY  OPPORTUNITY  TO  TAKE  LIFE  EASY,  PLAYED, DANCED AND  EMP.IED THE  COFFEE POTS WITH  EQUAL FACILITY
224 SLIGHTLY LESS BEWILDERED THAN   IN  PREVIOUS YEAR—ARTS '50 TREATED THE FROSH IN MUCH THE SAME WAY A6 THEY  HAD BEEN TREATED
ARTS '50
Class of '50 came to campus in fall determined to look and act like sophomores and did so
The green tinge worn off, several thousand students came
to Point Grey in September, 1947, somewhat less bewildered
than they were the year before. They were second year Arts-
men.
Through with required subjects (with the exception of
baneful French 2), they began to pick and choose a little
bit, and to think that by the year's end they would be halfway through their university career.
When the year ended, most of them were.
Prominent in the class were Norma Bloom, star in her
freshman year of the Players' Club production of "Berkley
Square" and active in her second year as well; Gordon
Baum, fiery red-headed Sophomore member of Council and
latter-day refugee from the COTC.
Jim Banham became a Ubyssey stalwart, and Hal Tennant continued on his starry-eyed career as associate and
later city editor of The Daily Ubyssey, as well as turning
out his popular "Once Over Hardly" each and every Friday
during the year. He was also adept at platter chatter.
Another illustrious sophomore was Bob Cave, madcap,
shaggy-headed Photography Director of the Publications
Board. Diane Walsh kept up her end of Mamooks' cheering
crew.
Too many to list starred on the university sports programmes and others, just scads of them, fanned out as Arts-
men do, to join some or many of the minor clubs.
In the early spring they once more banded with the
Frosh class for the annual "Froph" dance, class party for
both years.
All in all, Arts '50 came determined to make a good year
of it and judging from the smiles on their faces when they
were not frowning they must have succeeded.
225 ARTS '50 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Abbott, Shirley E.;  Adams, Alvin M.; Adams, Raymond S.; Aitken, William J.; Albers, Muriel E.; Alexander,
David W.; Allan, Gifford A.; Allan, John Ross; Anderson,   Norma   P.;   Auterson,   Maureen   C;   Avery,   Richard   Hi
* MIDDLE—Baker, Diane C; Barnett, Norah G.; Barr, Donald D.; Barraud, A. Marguerite; Battershill, David S.; Baum,
Gordon, V. C; Beattie, George M.;  Bell, Inglis F.; Bengough,  Diana Joy;  Bentley, Peter, J. G.;  Blake,  Osmo Harry.
* LOWER—Boggie, Alexander; Boldt, Theodore; Bolton, Franklin B.; Bongie, Lawrence L.; Bonney, I. Dean; Bookman,
Shirley E.; Bousquet, Albert E. J.; Bowering, Richard H.; Braams, John Herman; Briggs, Thomas I.; Briggeman, Ray Wm.
*^^   i_. ■
* UPPER—Brookbank, Alan H.; Brooks, Leslie C; Brooks, Shirley J.; Brown, Chester S.; Bull, Colin, Anthony; Burgess,
Thomas A.; Burt, M. Cecelia; Byrne, Garrett R.; Campbell, Joan M.; Campbell, Robert L.; Carson, John T. * LOWER—
Caspersen, Donald D.; Cassie, Mary Irene; Cave-Browne-Cave, R.; Chilton, Robert B.; Christensen, Ralph M.; Christie,
Joyce M.; Clyne, Elspeth A.; Coatsworth, Ronald; Cock, Eleanor F.; Colwell, Elizabeth M.; Cooper, Gordon H.
Hg§
_^_B
B_B
^^^^i2
[__S
w
'  ..:     ■                        '
.1   ....
w
w
tti
raw^H
*r •
»*«, i*nt\ p«rfcM^i»>^H_.w.-.w.T*
_^
11
■
WOP**
FULL  BLEACHERS   WERE   COMMON  ON   AMERICAN   FOOTBALL SATURDAYS,  BUT  DESERTED   MALL  AND  STADIUM   USUALLY  A  SUNDAY SPECTACLE
226 <X_K_S
mow
* UPPER—Cornish, Norman C; Coulthard, Rosemary M.; Crabb, Margaret S.; Crawford, Jeanann D.; Creech, Robert E.;
Cummins, Shirley P.; Currie, Robert S.; Curry, Muriel Gene; Davidson, Francis A. * MIDDLE"—Demarcos, Earl C;
Des Brisay, Geoffrey; Diamond, Pauline E.; Disbrow, Harry Lee; Dolman, Frank; Donaldson, Roy G.; Donnelly, William E.;
Dougan, Constance R.; Dowding, Robert W.; Do well, Eric G. * LOWER—Dowling, Robert W.; Drinnan, Rona H.;
Duckitt, Louis S.; Duke, Daryl J.; Elder, Helen G.; Elgaard, Knud; Ellis, Jack A. N.; Ewing, Walter M.; Fetherstonhaugh,
A. D.; Flaggs, George L.; Foolkes, Richard G. ,
* UPPER—Forsyth, Norma; Fox, Sharon M.; Fraser, Nancy E.; Fraser, Pamela L.; Fynn, Robert; Galbraith, S. Stuart;
Gale, Henry Hamon; Gallagher, Dorothy; Gardner, Rachael Mae; Gill, William B.; Gilmour, Lila Ann. * LOWER—
Glover, John Brooks; Goldsmith, Allan; Goodwill, Joyce M.; Govier, Grace M.; Grant, Michael A.; Gray, Gilbert C. P.;
Gray, Thomas G. H.; Greene, Justin W.; Grimmett, Richard H.; Gurevitch, Esta; Haakonsen, Rosalie.
THE BROCK UNDERWENT MANY CHANGES OF FACE DURING THE YEAR, FROM SCENE OF FORMALS TO RADSOC AND BLOOD DRIVE HEADQUARTERS
227 ARTS '56 (Continued)
■^■MM-HHM-H
* UPPER—Hamilton, Sine A.; Hamiltongorges, D. P.; Hartt, Jacqueline V.; Heard, Dorothy B.; Hendricks, John R.;
Hewson, Roy Thomas; Heywood, William W.; Hicks, Henry A.; Hill, Elizabeth Fern; Hill, Iris Elaine; Hill, James Stanley;
* MIDDLE—Hilton, E. John; Holman, Russell C; Holmes, Betty Mae L.; Holmes, Mary Pauline; Hopkins, Edward S.;
Home, Eleanor J. Y.; Howarth, Lionel D.; Hughes-Games, Harold; Hummel, David M. W.; Husoy, Foster P.; Hyde,
Alan W. * LOWER—Ibbott, John William; Ikeda, Ronnie M.; Imayoshi, Katsumi; Irwin, Harold Gifford; Johnson,
Doreen P.; Johnson, Ross A.; Johnson, William M.; Johnston, Everett H.; Johnston, Pamela D.; Jokisch, Alfred; Jones,
David E.
* UPPER—Kallquist, Andrew W.; Kelsberg, Roy P.; King, Henry Maitland; Kirker, R. James; Kirshfelt, Irene L.; Knight,
John F.; Knight, George M.; Knudsen, Albert M.; Kringhaug, Olaf; Lyle, Lesley J.; Lach, Bernard * LOWER—Larssen,
Tore; Lauritsen, Mildred E.; Lee, Bruce Alexander; Legg, Hugh P.; Levey, Gerald S.; Lewis, John Frederick; Lewis,
Juliette; Liaskas, M. Agorita L.; Light, Margaret, I. S.; Lindholm, Louis F.; Liverant, Robert B.
COED LINE-UPS WERE COMMON, WHETHER FOR QUEEN OF THE FALL BALL IN THE DECORATED ARMOURY OR  PRACTICING FOR  FASHION SHOWS
226 * UPPER—Lockwood, Alfred R.; Lotzkar, Joseph; Lowbeer, Margaret P.; Lundeen, Marvin A.; Mackoff, Albert A.;
Maland, John Robert; Manning, Lawrence W.; Manning, Shirley P.; Manning, Walter L.; Manson, Peter Arthur;
Marcotte, Raymond 0. * MIDDLE—Mathers, Gretchen C; Matheson, Joan A.; Matheson, M. C. Murray; Mayrs, J.
Colleen; McAlpine, John D.; Macaskill, Joan I.; McCallum, Kenneth K.; MacCarthy, Alexandra; McCreery, Paula Mae;
Macdonald, Esme A. F.; Macdonald, James R. * LOWER—Macdonald, M. Kay; McEachen, Elizabeth H.; McGee,
Francis G.; MacGowan, John; McGuire, Cyril J.; Mackinnon, Willa C; McLachlan, Donald C; Maclean, Mary;
McLean, Hugh John; McLennan, M. Elizabeth; McLelland,  M. Sharen G.
______!
* UPPER—Macleod, Elizabeth I.; McNicholas, Joyce; McPhee, Malcolm D.; MacPherson, E. M.; Meilicke, Joyce; Melton,
Joanne A.; Milson, Diana W.; Mintak, John; Moilliet, Antony. * Morrison, Melba M.; Moscovitz, William; Moslin,
Ralph S.; Mowatt, Jean G.; Moyls, Eileen M.; Mulholland, Helen B.; Munro, Kathleen Ruth; Nagler, Fay Ethel; Nastich,
Mileva; Naylor. Glenn I.; Nelson, Earl W.
RELAXATION TOOK MANY FORMS, FROM FORMAL DANCES TO LOUNGING IN BROCK HALL, BUT MOUNTED QUEEN CANDIDATE SEEMED  UNEASY
229 ARTS '50 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Nelson, William C; Nichols, Joan P.; Nisbet, Walter L.; Norris, Nancy J.; Northcote, Thomas G.; O'Brien,
Robert Wm,; Ogg, Sheila M.; Oldaker, Vincent G.; Oldfield, F. Arthur; Oliver, Daniel M.; Orr, Robin J. * MIDDLE—
Oughton, Donna Y.; Owen, Dennis B.; Patterson, David G.; Paul, Arthur T.; Peebles, Robert D. L.; Pendleton, June;
Perry, Raymond; Petrowsky, Victor M.; Phare, D. Rowina; Piggott, Irene; Powell, Joan A. * LOWER—Prescesky,
Peter; Preston, Doris Irene; Price, Manly; Price, Marguerite E.; Prokopchuk, William; Proud, Alona; Pugh, Gerald
H. C; Purcell, Patricia M. A.; Purvis, Hugh G.; Rayner, Katheryn B.; Reo, Douglas G.
i£ii?3
* UPPER—Ready, Charles B.; Reid, Harriet E. V.; Ritchie, Joan B.; Robertson, Catherine; Robertson, Betty L.; Robertson,
George C; Robson, Wallace M; Roedde, William A.; Rogers, David T.; Rose, Barbara Ann; Ross, Hugh F. * LOWER—
Rosse, Jack D.; Russell, Nancy R.; Ryan, Fred C; Sager, Margie; Sayce, Elizabeth C.; Sandison, James M.; Scott, A. Nini;
Scott, John A. A.; Scott, M. Pauline; Scott, Margaret J.; Senay, George W.
GRADS AT HOMECOMING SAW NOTHING DIFFERENT ABOUT GYMNA OR STADIUM AND  GRADUALLY BECAME  INURED TO   UGLY  LECTURE HUTS
230 * UPPER—Senini, James T.; Seymour, Barbara A.; Sharp, David R. P.; Shaver, Marilyn A.; Sheriff, Gladys A.;
Simonson, Murriel; Sinclair, D. Enid R.; Skaling, Thomas R.;  Skene, Olive; Slipper, William Geo.; Smart, Walton W.
* MIDDLE—Smith, Angus; Smith, Alvin W. G.; Smith, Elsie Kate; Smith, Margaret Ethel; Smithson, Beverley; Smyth,
William H.; Snider, Ruth; Snyder, John L.; Somers, D. Marie; Sones, William A. P.; Sparkes, Shirley E. * LOWER—
Steuart, Velma J.; Stewart, E. Ruth; Strong, Irene E. G.; Sunga, Preetom Singh; Tabata, Susumu; Tait, Ralph H.; Tait,
Robert M.; Taylor, Gordon D.; Taylor, Joan E.; Taylor, J. Carolyn; Taylor, M. Doreen.
* UPPER—-Tench, Stanley E. G.; Tepoorten, Leonard B.; Thibaudeau, Denis U.; Thomas, William D; Thorsen, Randi;
Tocher, James D.; Topping, William E.; Tough, Norman J.; Trewin, Henry E.; Trip, Ove Hansen; Truesdell, Donald E.
* Tuddenham, Stanley F.; Turner, Raymond B.; Vivian, B. Joan; Vogt, Gordon Wm.; Wadds, Ethel A.; Wakely, Doreen L.;
Waldman, Shirley J.; Walker, Joanne; Ward, Alfred G.; Warne, Douglas F.; Wassick, Robert H.
BROCK HALL WAS SCENE OF ALMOST CONTINUOUS PARTY; ALTHOUGH NOT ALWAYS  UNDER SAME  SPONSORSHIP THE  SAME GAIETY  PREVAILED
231 ARTS '50 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Watt, Calvin L.; Watt, J. Earl; Watts, Leona; Webster, Alex. D.; West, Godfrey A.; West, William R.;
Whimster, Lois Ann; Whitmore, Janet M.; Wilcox, L. Joan; Wilks, Everitt John; Williams, Mary J. * MIDDLE—
Windebank, Christine; Winter, Margaret, G. B.; Wolff, John Hammond; Wood, Shelagh T.; Woodhead, Kathleen M.;
Woollam, Anne Mary; Worrall, Ernest A.; Wyatt, Benjamin D.; Wyatt, Daniel James; Annable, Robert G. * LOWER—
Baile, Blake; Benwell, A. P.; Buckingham, Robert R.; Button, D.; Calvert, T.; Campbell, Thomas J.; Chew, Barbara K.;
Coulter, Thelma T.; Cowen, Stanley C; Epp, Henry; Frampton, Walter R.
* UPPER—Friesen, Julius R.; Gigliotti, A. J.; Greer, Sinton B.; Hughes, Phyllis M.; Ibbott, John William; Kelley,
M. C; Kerr, Robert B.; Kittleson, Morris E.; Koop, Jacob F.; Koss, Michael J.; Lacy, Joseph W. * LOWER—Langille,
Alexander R.; Marshall, Jocelyn S.; Martinson, Verna I.; Mayoh, Lorraine A.; MacDonald, Frances L.; McLachlan, D. A.;
Miazga, Frank; Moffat, Norah Jean; Montador, Peter A.; Nimmons, Arlene A.; O'Connor, Gerald F.
* UPPER—O'Flaherty, B. Joanne; Olson, Edsel Norman; Richards,   John   L.;   Rothstein,   Rosalie;   Russell,   Nancy   R.;
Scholefield, Arthur J.; Seddon, John W.; Seibold, Mary G.; Sigurdson, Albert L.; Smith, James H.; Tait, Winifred G. M.;
* LOWER—Thompson, P. J.; Thomson, R. Bruce; Tunis, Joseph; Vigar, Sydnie C; Weldon, Richard C.
232 V
_ '
 -„^ _.
,;__  --»■''-*«_-. ^„_  j
r'-iJui__,,'"<«i
l"*J.    ".!             ^        V
1 >   _»■'-:   1
_* ar
■* ^-**«i.. _ __^  ^  .
hu MkuiP
%a:?         t*
^ "* i j   '
■—— _-
f*                  t *__,       ^>f :
i-.Ai,^| ■UJLLT
■^c    •            v™.
"*. »   J '          ■.!__■  »>
JL> -
ill
11
■   llu_ 1    til
L           ^^      ___________£ _•_____■_____
.- all
.1
,.   .  » l»li         -.£i
1  1
m4
IB      ^S
inlii 41!     -     ?_
i'iW^ i
r j   S
>„ v
. J. \
^7^7
^   -J&*
'   5 '  ?.i
_  -«      ■ I
p          " V              \         *                 a
■•■/■■*"     f
-
I
* *
v   *_
■^1>
V  v
k
:.«_.J
-
M
^      y
1
> *
•
\
^
k -
x
-^S
1
*
A*
fjK
>      x#'
V
,
V-C-x
7
*
■ ^^-     *■
-i                                                               ;-  __ ' _  i
■ ■	
-v ■;                   ;
* ■ ■.»-
"""-'          /             ■
i        J
- ■
■-
"' " - "
■^jg/f^f-'-
■r       .^^
s__i: r:
MUCH   SURPRISED   UPPERCLASSMEN   FOUND   THE   NEW  CROP OF FROSH  NO  PUSHOVER AT LILY POND  OR  ELSEWHERE
ARTS '51
Campus' youngsters came through just as smartly as any of their predecessors had ever done
For the first time in their sweet young lives, 1500 youngsters toddled out to the campus on West Point Grey in the
fall of 1947. Displaced high school students covered the
lawns, they filled all the chairs in the Caf, the chesterfields
in Brock Lounge, the very sidewalks. They were the annual
crop of Frosh.
The Saturday before the first day of lectures saw them
lined up for blocks, their twisted serpent stretching. from
Brock Hall to the Main Mall. In the Brock the AMS girls
and volunteer help handed them their regalia—green ribbons, large buttons, name-bearing placards for their, backs,
the Tillicum.
For a week freshettes blushed for the lack of make-up,
freshmen stumbled lecture-ward under the indignity of miss-
matched socks and rolled-up pants legs.   '
With the week's end they first attended the Frosh Smoker
or the WUS Supper, where lawbreakers were punished in
various idiotic, collegiate ways. Then the next night regalia
was abandoned at the foot of a Cairn in replica, and the
Frosh became undergrads.
They elected their executive and settled down to the routine. Among those who became famous were crew-cut Peter
Murphy who was elected their president, who played basketball, later ran successfully for Sophomore member of Council; Pubsters Pat Henderson and Bruce Saunders.
233 ARTS '51 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Adam Miles Douglas; Alexander, Joan E.; Arrowsmith, Rosemary; Atamanenko, George; Atkinson, Kenneth G.;
Bahr, Kathryn M. S.; Baillie, Elaine E.; Baker, Ronald James; Baker, Stuart R.; Bronger, John T.; Brotherton, Donna M.
* MIDDLE—Brown, B. A.; Brown, Marion E.; Buckerfield, Mary M.; Butterworth, Lyla M.; Caldwell, George E.; Calvert,
Joyce H.; Campbell, Diane M.; Charters, William B.; Barr, Norman K.; Barrett, H. Bernard; Barton, Joan D. * LOWER—
Basted, Joan K.; Beaton, James D.; Beaubier, J. Dean; Bishop, Richard J.; Black, R. F.; Blagg, Michael 0. B.; Boivin,
J. A.; Bone, Brenda Marilyn; Booth, Arnold Robt.; Bowell, Beverly Jean; Cherry, Douglas H.
* UPPER—Chin, Q. H. William; Cho, James; Clarke, K. Mary; Clarke, Stanley T., Clearwater, Garth D.; Clerkson,
Jean E.; Clerihue, M. M. Muriel; Cliffe, Valerie; Clowes, Emily Myra; Cochrane, Jean M.; Collett, A. C. * LOWER—
Collier, C. Leonard; Collins, David L.; Comely, Combe Verity; Connor, Roger George; Cook, Joseph; Cooper, Gordon Wm.;
Cooper, Rhea Doris; Cowden, Eric S. B.; Crawford, F. William; Cue, D. Victor; Cumming, Beverley C.
FRESHMEN  SPENT  FIRST  HECTIC  WEEKS  AT CAMPUS   FEELING   OUT THEIR NEW ENVIRONMENT. AT RECEPTION, MET DEAN MAWDSLEY, DANCED
534 ft££M
T r«TM
IrTfl
* UPPER—Cumming, Alexander A.; David, Victoria; Davies, Patricia J.; Davis, Judith Frances; Davis, Maureen E.;
Dawe, Arthur G.; Dean, Kenneth Harry; DeGuefe, Taffara; De Twornicka, J. Ann T.; Dodek, Morton; Douglass,
Diane M. * MIDDLE—Dowzard, Patricia A.; Dyer, Louis McLeod; Edgar, John Charles; Effinger, Barbara J.; Elliott,
Delsa Grace; Elworthy, B. J. Diane; Eng, Betty; English, Roderick A.; Erickson, Ruth Edith; Evans, Charles W.; Ewing,
Anne McColl. * LOWER—Ewing, Esther Mary; Fairey, Leonard F. T.; Faulkner, Donald A.; Fiddes, Melville J.; Field,
Jacqueline M.; Fisher, Shirley A.; Fitz, James Carmel T.; Flett, Norma Pauline; Fletcher, Dorothy A. Forbes, Elizabeth J.;
Ford, Lyman Douglas.
* UPPER—Foster, William R.; Fraser, Meryl Arline; Fraser, William L.; Fripps, Douglas T.; Frith, M. A.; Fry,
Patricia Ann; Garbutt, Frederick G.; Gardner, Dorothy S.; Gee, Margaret Jean; Genest, Marilyn June; Gibbard, Ida
Mary; Gillis, Donalda M. * LOWER—Glennie Lome Wm.; Goddard, George Husby; Grant, Elizabeth H.; Grantham,
Richard F.; Gray, Ishbel Jean; Greaves, David Rio; Gregory Patricia Ann; Grondahl, Bryan John; Gunn, Margaret Jean;
Gunn, Lois Ann;  Guttormsson, Kristjan.
UNIVERSITY PANORAMA SWEEPS THROUGH THE DOMESTIC SCENES AT ACADIA TRAILER CAMP, ANTICS OF JOKERS AND COKE IN THE ARMOURY
235 ARTS'51 (Continued)—
* Haahti, Eila T.; Halksworth, Alice; Hales, Edith Diane; Hamilton, Orphir W.; Hanson, Kenneth M.; Harrington,
David H.;   Harris, Beverly Jean;   Harvey, John  Herbert;   Harvey,   Shirley   P.;   Hatfield,   John   B.;   Heath,   Dianne.
* MIDDLE—Henninger, James R.; Hey wood, Albert H.; Hickey, Barbara Joy; Hill, Christopher J.; Hodgson, Dorothy M.;
Hodson,   P.;   Hollands,   Keith   G.;   Hollick, Kenyon   T.   H.   Hopkins,   Shirley   W.;   Hrysio,   Juliana;   Huang,   Phoebe.
* LOWER—Hubbard, Richard K.; Hughes, Malvern James; Hulse, Joseph Hugh; Inglis, Ernest D.; Iredale, Wm. Randle;
James, Patricia K. R.; Johnston, Jeanine A.; Johnston, J. Lorraine; Johnston, Lyle Henry; Johnstone, Myrell L.; Judd,
Philip H.
_S1S
* UPPER—Kahn, Henry; Katznelson, Gordon; Killick, Donna Ruth; Kong, Glen Paul;  Kosaka, Kikuye Karen;  Ladd,
Kathleen M.; Laird, Bernice D.; Laird, Robert H.; Laite, H.   A.   Grayson;   Lakie,   Margaret  Lois;   Lamarre,  Roland  J.
* LOWER—Lambert, Douglas; Lawrence, Richard H.; Lawrie,   David   Murray;   Leathley,  Leonard A.;   Lee,   Edward;
Leonard, D. M.; Lee, Jean; Lepper, Catherine E.; Leslie Ronald M.; Leuchte, Nicholas F.; Lewis, William F.
STUDENT JOURNALISTS REALLY GET AROUND; THE WWCOLLEGIAN VISITED  THE DAILY UBYSSEY WHO IN TURN INVADED WASHINGTON DAILY SHACK
236 ift&a
* UPPER—Lietze, Arthur Carl; Lillos, Norman Malvin; Lil
Lipsin, Edmund D. S.; Lister, Marion P.; Lister, Varna Je
* MIDDLE—Loring, Kay Phyllis; Lort, Williams Ross; Lot
Luetkehoelter,   Henry;   Lundy,   F.   Deane;    Mandeville,   A.
* LOWER—Maska, Rose; Matheson, Alastair T.; Matheson,
McCaskell, Norman; McDonald, Marjorie R.; McEwen, K. L
Bernice M.
ly, Edward Blake; Lilly, Marion Jessie; Lim Walter W.;
an; Locke, Harry; Logan, Robert M.; Long, Jean Elizabeth,
zkar, Brana; Louie, Beatrice; Lowe, Toy; Luckner, R. J.;
Frank; Markland, Beverley M.; Martin, Vivian Grace.
Eleanor A.; Maxwell-Smith, J. Ian; McArthur, Lois B.;
enore, McFarlane, William J.; MacGillivray, P. E.; Mackay,
* Mackenzie, Mary V.; Mackenzie, Robert M.; Mackeracher, M. Joan; McLachlan, Ron 0.; MacLean, Dimples L. J.;
MacLean, Estella B.; MacLean, Rae Margaret; McLefin, M. H. I.; McMachan, Gerald A. * LOWER—McNames, Joan;
McPhee, Wallace Bruce; MacQueen, John Robt.; Meek, Malcolm D.; Meneely, Janet D.; Michas, Alexander T.; Millar,
Winifred M. V.; Miller, Dirk Kerr; Millham, Herbert C; Millikin, Ronald D.; Milne, Kathleen M.; Mitchell, Geraldine A.
SPECIAL   CEREMONIES   WERE   HELD   FOR   25TH   ANNIVERSARY   OF   GREAT TREK. PARTICIPANTS WERE HONORED AMID MUCH ACADEMIC DISPLAY
237 ARTS '51 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Mitchell, Thelma June; Montemurro, Joseph; Moodie, Margaret M.; Morrison, M. Allan; Mothersill, Oliver J.;
Moul, George Edward; Muckle, Norman P.; Munnis, Marjorie A.; Murphy, Eileen M.; Murphy, Peter D.; Murray-
Allan, P. D. * MIDDLE—Myers, Ronald Robert; Nakamoto, Amy; Nolan, Patrick M.; O'Brien, Dorothy Ruth; Olley,
Peter P.; Ord, Caroline H. H.; Papove, Nicolai N.; Paterson, Blair R. B.; Pattison, James A.; Pauline, Murray A.;
Pedersen, Signe Ruth. * LOWER—Pedrini, Harry; Perry, Marjorie P.; Peterson, Ernest A.; Philion, Alma Loretta;
Phillips, Diane M. C; Poffenroth, Gordon; Pop, Alice; Potter, Constance H.; Pritchard, Margaret A.; Purdon, James
Herbert; Purdon, Arthur Donald.
* UPPER—Purvis, David G. S.; Quan, G. C; Raitt, Charles K.; Ramage, Edwin Steven; Ramage, Stephen A.; Reecke,
Robert H.; Reed, George Aubrey; Rendall, Patricia M.; Rennie, Shirley N.; Reynolds, Eva Marion; Rice, Jacqueline Joan.
* LOWER—Richards, Norman R.; Richardson, R. J.; Ridley, Robert Mumey; Riley, Pamela Helen; Ritchie, Mary B.;
Robinson, Anthony B.; Rogers, Douglas A.;  Rogers, Rosemary J.; Rolfe, Basil John L.; Ropas, Ella Mary; Roscoe, June B.
PROF GAGE HELPED WELCOME THE FROSH WHO HAD SPENT FIRST WHILE STUMBLING AMONG HUTS. HARDENED POOL PLAYER STUCK TO PRACTICE
238 £££&
_Mi&9&€_ £&___'
_flJi_rf_i&r_ iKin^^HkBBirfnk
* UPPER—Rushford, Gwen Yvonne; Rutter, Jane Page; Sahaydak, Edward S.; Sansum, Victor H.; Saunders, Bruce C;
Schmidt, Evelyn Rose; Schmidt, Margaret L.; Scoby, Joan Margaret; Segall, Irene Sylvia; Shallard, Barbara J.; Shearer,
David Wm. E. * MIDDLE—Sick, Gordon Robt.; Sigurdson, Gordon R.; Simpson, Robert S.; Sinclair, M. J.; Sinclair,
Walter D.; Skeeles, Betty Irene; Skelding, Marion L.; Smith, W.; Snyder, Aldeane F.; Stanton, Russell V.; Steacy, Newton C.
* LOWER—Steiner, Leonore E.; Stevenson, Robert V.; Stewart, Gordon W.; Stokes, Rosemary; Strutt, Jo Anne; Sutton,
P. J.; Symons, Dnolad Albert; Tanner, Florence; Taylor, Laurence A.; Taylor, Shirley Jean; Thompson, Ann P.
£-S_&A
* Thompson, Harold Wm.; Thomson, James Harvey; Thorne, H. Marilyn; Timberlake, J.; Toban, Arliss June; Toban,
Phyllis Marion; Toporchak, Frank J.; Townsend, Colin E.; Turner, William John; Upham, Margaret E. P.; Vannatter,
M. Jean. * LOWER—Vanderleur, John V.; Vines, Roberta M.; Voysey, Adrian C; Walker, David Roy; Walker, G.
William; Wall, David E.; Ward, John Carting; Warren, John M.; Watts, John L.; Weeden, Joan Fraser; Welch,
Bruce Ernest.
FRESHMEN,  AFTER FIRST TIMID LOOKS AT  INLET,  GATHERED  FOR  FIRST   CAIRN   CEREMONY   AND   TREMBLED   AT   WUS   SUPPER   SMOKER   (ABOVE)
239 ARTS'51 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Welch, Margaret Anne; Whiffin, Edward L.; Whitaker, Beverley F.; White, Denis R. T.; Whiteley,
William H.; Whitty, Joy Francis; Wigmore, Lois I.; Wilson, Thelma F.; Winquist, David R.; Wolrige, Joan; Woo,
Leonard Sing. * LOWER—Wood, S. David; Woodcock, Lillian J.; Wride, Marjorie K.; Wright, Arlene M.; Wunderlick,
Joseph;  Wynne, William E.; Young, Walter M.; Zokol, Joseph F.; Baird, T. S.; Cameron, 0. B.; Campbell, M. J.
EARLY  IN  YEAR SNOW  MOVED  IN   FROM  NORTH  SHORE   PEAKS  TO  COVER CAMPUS THOROUGHLY; HOWEVER THE KNOWLEDGE CAME THROUGH
■ ■ __. 3 i. ___
____.      _V_il1_r    % _   I    ,J_b_m
~
,'       . *i
-      -a-    mw— -»    "-m.-n^ii-»-
$
<
"7I"»               - '1—
i B   1
HOMECOMING CROWD  WATCHED  AS  THUNDERBIRDS  WON  ONLY  GAME OF YEAR BY LOP-SIDED SCORE. DESERTED MALL, STADIUM WERE RARITY
240 I               19 b i!?k
1
^_dw9_L_.                  Wk ~'   " P
________■   A  ■■■Jr ff                       •                ______________p"
-P^
^^__   K|
_fl        ^***^_&*,    *4^X
*   ^fJm\
,^         ^^
__F                      -fll
^ V
//.
.
SENIOR  COMMERCE   EXECUTIVE  SMILED  GLEEFULLY   ALL  YEAR OVER THEIR  NEW ACCOMMODATIONS   ON   EAST  MALL
COMMERCE
Four years of campus life ended for Commerce seniors who were glad to say goodbye to stat
Four years of stat labs, reports, graphs, economics, labour
relations and marketing came to an end in the spring of
1948 for the Commerce seniors. They had slept through
more lectures than their precedessors, according to many,
but others countered they had absorbed more good from
their UBC career.
Be that as it may, they were happy in their final spell
on the campus for at last they had their department housed,
if not in one building, at least in one group of huts on the
north end of the East Mall. There they frolicked the year
away, smugly thinking of past years when they and their
forebears had trudged the sodden half-mile to the Aggie
barns for their stat labs. As a matter of fact, they did not
even seem to mind bunking so near the Law huts.
Commercemen were famous in all fields of campus activity—academic, athletic, extra-curricular and even social. By
all odds the most famous of the year's crop was Robert S.
Harwood, who in his third year served as Junior Merpber
on Council and in his final term as treasurer. It was in the
Christmas vacation that the debonair, smooth-talking Com-
merceman captured the hearts of the other delegates to the
NFCUS conference at Winnipeg and got himself elected to
the presidency of that dominion-wide organization. Promptly
after the holiday he took a couple of months off to tour the
nation's colleges, having first resigned his major council
seat.
Pubsters Laurie Dyer, Dave Barker and Hal Pinchin as
well as queen-candidate Marg Davies added lustre of the
Commerce crown.
Executive for the year was: Bob Wilson, president; Al
Bergstrom, treasurer; Margaret Ross, secretary, and executive member Al Lamb.
241 COMMERCE '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Addison, Hugh P. F., West Vancouver—AROA; Anderson, Donald M., Vancouver—Phi Delta Theta; Ballard,
Harold R., Vancouver; Barker, John D., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Pi; Publications; Barraclough, Lila P., Nanaimo—Alpha
Omicron Pi; VOC; Barrigan, Donald B., Vancouver—Beebe, Bruce W., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Bergman, Elmer
0. E., SUverton. * LOWER—Bergstrom, E.; Bergstrom, Johan A., New Westminster—Alpha Tau Omega; Fish and Game;
Treasurer CUS; Blake, F. Gordon, Deseronto, Ont.; Bossons, Frederick, Vancouver—Phi Delta Theta; Botham, Arthur D.,
Vancouver; Bourns, Stewart A., Vancouver; Bramley, James H., Vancouver; Brewster, Donald A., Vancouver.
* UPPER—Brigham, William J. H., Vancouver; Brolly, Peter G., Vancouver—Newman Club, Socialist Forum; Bromley
Gordon F., Vancouver; Broman, Kurt I., Trail; Brown, John V., Vancouver; Brown, Robert D., Vancouver; Brown,
Thomas Lee, Vancouxer; Bryce, Allan A. W., Vancouver. * LOWER—Buerge, Ivar M., Nakusp; Burch, Ivan D., Victoria
—Badminton; Burdett, Raymond, Vancouver—Jokers; Burgess, Fred 0., Los Angeles, Calif.—Zeta Psi; Cameron, Cecil H.,
Chilliwack; Cameron, James M., Regina, Sask.; Campbell, Douglas E., Vancouver; Carter, K. Bruce, Trail—Economics S
ociety.
COMMERCEMEN WERE OUT IN FORCE FOR THEIR ANNUAL BANQUET AT   COMMODORE WHERE  THEY MET THEIR FUTURE  EMPLOYERS  INFORMALLY
242 -
* UPPER—Christie, Lynn A., Vancouver, Clark, Lionel D.. New Westminster; Clarke, Thomas G., Victoria; Clerihue,
Clarence J., Vancouver; Cohen, Jack I., Vancouver—Zeta Beta Tau; Jazz; Cooper, George W., Vancouver; Cote, Robert
F., Victoria; Cousins, Frederick T., Calgary, Alta. * LOWER—Cowan, Douglas V.; Cowan, Patricia, Duncan — Delta
Gamma; Tennis Club Treasurer; Craig, John R., Vancouver; Cumberbirch, Peter R., Vancouver—Phi Delta Theta;
Cumming, David G., Vancouver; Cuthbert, Betty Jean, Cecil Lake—Badminton; Davies, Marguerite E., Vancouver—
Alpha Gamma Delta; Day, G. Robert, Vancouver.
* UPPER—Duncan, Mary L., Victoria; Dyer, Lawrence N., Vancouver—Delta Upsilon; Managing Editor Ubyssey; Elliot,
Thomas S., Vancouver; Elliott, S. Robert, Salmon Arm—Legion; Elworthy, Arthur B., Vancouver—Phi Delta Theta;
Epstein, Hirsch, Vancouver; Evans, Lionel D., Kimberley; Feldman, Solomon, Vancouver. * LOWER—Fielding, Greeson,
C, Vancouver; Fish, John H.—President Mussoc; Forbes, J. Wendell, Drumheller, Alta. — Treasurer Mussoc; Forrester,
Shirley, Vancouver—Alpha Gamma Delta; WUS; Foster, Winston M., Calgary, Alta.; Fox, David P., Vancouver—Legion;
Gait, T. Douglas, Vancouver—Delta Upsilon; Gardiner, John G., Flintoft, Sask.—Beta Chi.
COKES AND DOUGHNUTS AT DANCES IN BROCK HALL, BUT DURING THE   DAY  STUDENTS   HIKED  TO  CAF,   FACULTY   GUESTS  DINED   IN  NEW  CLUB
243 COMMERCE >48 (Continued)
* UPPER—Gardiner, Jack H., Victoria; Gardiner, Howard J. W., Victoria; Garrard, Richard Al, Vancouver; Gee, John
W., New Westminster; Gennis, Emerson H., Vancouver—Alpha Tau Omega; Gerrard, W. Grant, Hollyburn—Alpha Delta
Phi; Gibb, Henry D., Kamloops; Gillespie, Gray A., Regina, Sask.—Fish and Game. * LOWER—Gillespie, G. H; Good-
murphy, Ralph M., Regina, Sask.—Delta Kappa Epsilon; Men's Public Speaking; Gourlay, Robert A., Calgary, Alta.;
Graham, John M., Vancouver—Chi Sigma Chi; Grant, Francis J., Winnipeg, Man.—Alpha Tau Omega; Green, Gordon A.,
Victoria; Greenaway, Jean E., Vancouver -Phrateres; Hadwen, Colleen V., Dawson Creek.
* UPPER—Hall, Jean E., Vancouver; Halpin, Roger D., Vancouver; Hamilton, Drummond G., Vancouver; Hantke, Allan
P. R., Victoria; Hardy, Stafford L., Vancouver; Hardy, Lyle E., Vancouver; Harwood, Robert S., Vancouver -Treassurer
AMS, Economics Society; Harwood, Gordon L., Victoria. * LOWER—Henderson, Merrill R., HoUaday, Utah; Herring,
Stephen, H. E., New Westminster; Heywood, Joyce, Cowichan Station; Hickenbotham, Harold, New Westminster; Hicks,
E. S.; Hogg, David M., Vancouver—Jazz Society; Hooker, Harvey F., Milner—Golf; Howard, Malvina M., Vancouver—
Alpha Omicron Pi, Treasurer Panhell.
EVERYTHING HAD TO START SOMETIME, AS THE CLOTH IN THE LOOM, OR THE WINDOWS IN THE LIBRARY WING, OR CO-OPPERS GOING ON A DATE
244 * UPPER—Howat, Joseph D. W., Vancouver—Beta Theta Pi; Hudec, T.; Hundleby, D. Rex, Vancouver; Hurst, R. C;
Iannacone, Ernest M., Vancouver; Isaacson, Clarence T., Vancouver—Alpha Tau Omega; Islava, S. K.; Johnstone, Robert,
Vancouver. * LOWER—Johnstone, James S.; Jones, Elin Kay, Sidney; Jones, Stanley C, Vancouver; Kaye, Francis D.,
Vancouver; Keenan, Robert G., Moose Jaw, Sask.—Radio Society; Kelly, Michael J., Vancouver; King, Donald N., Port
Alberni—Phi Gamma Delta;  Kirkland, James W., Vancouver,; Knight, G. Roland, Victoria. - ,..
* UPPER—Lade, Gordon W., Vancouver; Lammers, Rodney G., Victoria; Laudrum, William A., Vancouver; Lister,
William G., Vancouver Beta Theta Pi; Livingstsone, K. M.; Lord, Bruce S., Vancouver; Maltby, Richard G., Vancouver
—COTC; Manuel, Lloyd W., Vancouver. * LOWER—Marak, Peter; Mark, Harry J., North Vancouver—Psi Upsilon;
Marshall, F. L.; Mason, Frank B., Port Coquitlam—Alpha Tau Omega; COTC; Treasurer, Legion; McBride, R. H.; McCurdy, D. Kenneth, Vancouver; MacDonald, A. Donald, Preston; MacDonald, Henry A., Vancouver.
THE CAMPUS  IN THE SPRING WAS TYPICALLY BEAUTIFUL ESPECIALLY IN THE BOTANICAL GARDENS, WHERE THE POND AND LAWNS LURED MANY
245 COMMERCE '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER—MacDonald, H. William, Vancouver; MacDonald, W. H.; McFarlane, Harold E., Vancouver; MacGregor,
Hector C, Port Alberni; McKay, William T., Vancouver—Delta Upsilon; Parliamentary Forum, Economics Society; McKeachie, James G., Victoria; MacKinnon, Robert R., Victoria; McLaughlin, Robert G., Vancouver. * LOWER—Maclean,
M. Bruce C, Victoria; MacPherson, J. S.; Merrick, Richard T.; Moore, Frank H., Fort Steele; Moore, Roy John, Prince
Rupert—Kappa Sigma; Morfey, R. D.; Murray, John Walter; Neelands, D. Jack, Vancouver.
* UPPER—Nichol, John L., Vancouver—Phi Delta Theta; Nobbs, Graham W., Victoria; O'Keefe, Charles J., Portage la
Prairie, Man.; Olmstead, L. Dennis, Sceptre, Sask.—Phi Kappa Pi; Palmer, John H., Vancouver; Panton, John A., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Paulin, William P., Vancouver—Delta Upssilon; Radio Society, Physical Society; Peacock, J. R.
LOWER—Peart, Arthur E., New Westminster—Jazz Society; Peck, Douglas C, Sidney; Pinchin, Harold R., Vancouver—
Kappa Sigma; Senior Editor Ubyssey; UNTD; Pudney, J. W. David, Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Presisdent Field
Hockey, Cricket; Richards, George C, Victoria; Richards, H. J.; Rigby-Jones, Roy J., Vancouver—Phi Gamma Delta;
Roberts, Harry A., Hollyburn.
THE CAMPUS OF UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, SITUATED ON BEAU TIFUL POINT GREY OVERLOOKING SPARKLING WATERS OF HOWE SOUND
246 * UPPER—Robertson, James M., Vancouver; Ross, MargareJ., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Pi; Rottluff, Robert G., Vancouver; Sabiston, Colin A., Vancouver; Sainas, Mary, Vancouver—Phrateres; Sandersson, James W., Prince Albert, Sask.—
Jokers; Saturley, Michael J., Victoria; Sauder, William L., Vancouver—Phi Delta Theta. * LOWER—Scott, Bruce, Victoria; Shaffer, Marion A., Vancouver—Phrateres; Shaw, Barbarbara P., Victoria—Alpha Delta Pi; Shelley, Raymond,
Vancouver—Legion; Shugg, Harold F., Kelowna; Sims, Norman C, Vancouver—Alpha Tau Omega; Smith, Kenneth O.,
Vancouver—President VCF; Smith, Leslie F., Vancouver.
* UPPER—Smith, Otto B., Abbotsford; Smith, William H., Vancouver; Stevenson, Gerald H., Vancouver—Bete Theta Pi;
Stewart, George C, North Battleford, Sask.—Phi Kappa Pi; St. Louis, Archie L., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Strachan,
N. H.; Taylor, R. H. Trevor, Victoria; Thorne, Alice G., Ladner. :   \. \
LOWER—Walls, Lewis J., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Sigma; White A. T., Vancouver—Beta Theta Pi; Whittall, H. V., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Whittall, Patrick L., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Wilcox, Eddie A., Dawson Creek; Wilkinson^. Cameron,  Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Wilks, Roderick J., Vancouver—Secretary Fencing Club; Williams, Elmer.
THE STADIUM, BARREN WHEN  EMPTY,  SOON LIVENED UP WITH STRUGG LES OF THE TEAM AND THE CHEERS OF THE CROWD DURING GRID GAMES
247 COMMERCE '48 (Continued)
m              rf
mkWBt9^]&
__HBB_H__BI
Wilson, Alan J.; Wilson, Robert M., Vancouver—President CUS, Manager Varsity Soccer; Wood, James A., Langford—
VOC;  Woodman, Mabel E.,  Vancouver—Alpha Phi; Yearwood, Douglas N., Vancouver; Young, W. Maurice, Vancouver.
COMMERCE '49—
2319.
* UPPER—Adams, Clifford L.; Adams, J. Raymond; Aitken,  Bruce S.; Alton, Howard S.; Archer, Elmer R.; Atkinson,
Charles M.; Barraclough, Henry N.; Berts, William E.; Billingsley,   Harry   G.;   Black,   Daphne   J.;   Blaine,   John   J..
* MIDDLE—Blockberger, R. J.; Boykowich, Leon S.; Bray, Ronald  C;  Brown, John B.;  Brown, James A.;  Burbidge,
Eileen M.; Burgess, William H.;  Bushfield, E. Doreen; Butler,  Charles F.;  Campbell, D. Duncan;  Capozzi, Joseph  J..
* LOWER—Casey, James J.; Castle, Robert G.; Chapman, F. Lome; Chatterson, Harvey R.;  Clerk, George E.; Clarke,
June E.; Cliff, Ronald L.; Cook, Florence A.; Cossack, William; Cote, Maurice N.; Cowan, Barbara S.
* UPPER—Cowper, I. Howard; Crofton, John E.; Crowther, F. W. P.; Cruickshank, J. M.; Crump, Richard 0.; Dakin,
John K.; Dale, David W.; Dalgleish, William H; Dempsey, William S.; Dewar, Raymond P.; Dobney, Millicent E.;
Downs, Kenneth W. * LOWER—Emmons, Margaret J.; Fairbairn, J. Kenneth; Fairweather, David M.; Fawcus,
Geoffrey C; Fleming, John R.; Forrest, Ian M.; Fullerton, Donald R.; Fulton, Norman A.; Garner, Donald; Gibbs,
Victor E.; Gillespie, George H.
248 * UPPER—Godefroid, John J.; Gook, Peter R.; Gordon, Ralph M.; Gosling, David E. L.; Gourlay, James L.; Goulet,
Lawrence S.; Graham, Barbara Ann; Gravelle, Henri 0.; Green,   Harold  M.;   Greene,   George   A.;   Greig,   James   W.
* MIDDLE—Hamilton, Ronald W.; Harris, Thomas F.; Henniger, Ezra C; Hermon, Richard B.; Hoel, Leslie C;
Holman, Neville C; Huestis, Robert W.; Johnson, Robert; Kellman, John D.;   Kelsberg,  William;   King,  H.   Stephen.
* LOWER—Langdale, Glyn H.; Livingstone, Kathleen; Longmore, Dale S.; Luback, Peter; Maglio, Eugene A.; Hasson,
J. N. Gerard; McBride, Gerald P.; McCallum, Robert C; McCulloch, William; MacDonald, C. Gordon S.; MacEwen,
Paul R.
* UPPER—MacKinnon, Richard G.; McLennan, Robert P; McRae, John J. S.; Melvin, Ronald M.; Melville, Jack A.;
Menzies, Charles N.; Mercer, George E.; Miller, H. F. Herbert; Milne» Lamond A.; Moe, Kenneth G.; Montgomery,
Margery K. * LOWER—Morfey, Montegue H.; Morrish, Frank A.; Moynes, James H.; Murdoch, George; Nelson,
Robert E.; Nicholson, Donald A.; Oberg, Stanley M.; O'Brien, Thomas L.; Olds, W. W. Glen; Olson, Keith Bernard;
Peacock, James R.
FREQUENT GATHERINGS OCCURRED; IN THE FALL, CONGREGATION; ALL YEAR,  TEA DANCES  IN BROCK  HALL;  AND  THE RADSOC STUDIO  PARTY
249 COMMERCE '49 (Concluded)
■
* UPPER—Pearson, William M.; Peters, Kenneth R.; Pettigrew, Stuart J.; Potter, Byron Alan; Potts, David B.; Randall,
Robert  M.;   Reid,  William  J.;   Reid,  Robert  R.;   Richardson,   Gordon   A.;   Robertson,   Donald   S.;   Roddick,   Mary.
* MIDDLE—Ross, John; Rothery, Thomas F.; Rowllings,   Marjorie; Rumford, Vernon J.; Russell, Donald C; Sampson,
Hubert; Seale, Reginald C; Shaw, J. Edward F.; Skilling, Samuel   W.;   Smart,   Arthur   D.;   Smallacombe,   L.   Gordon.
* LOWER—Standfield, Barry;  Stevens, Shirley A.;  Strachan, Norma H.; Sugars, Edmund G. K.; Sundberg, Lyall M.;
Taylor, Jack Keith; Thodos, Constantine N.; Thompson, Norman A.; Todd, Paterson A.; Topelka, Carl; Town, Dalbert A.
* UPPER—Turner, Norma Grace; Vik, Norman; Wallace, William P.; Warner, E. Ronald J.; Watson, Bruce W.; Watt,
Terrence R.; Watts, Kenneth H.; Weaver, Kenneth F.; Webster, Ronald J.; Westmore, Thomas; Wetmore, Michael S.
* LOWER—Wishart, T. Alan; Woodman, Ralph H.; Wort on, Leonard W.; Wotherspoon, Arthur H.; Wylie, T. Milton;
Zezula, Joseph F.
THE  SECTION  NEAR THE   SCIENCE   BUILDING  WAS  ALWAYS  BUSY;   IN   FRONT THE CAIRN CEREMONY, AND BEHIND, THE HOME FOOTBALL GAMES.
250 COMMERCE '50—
* UPPER—Anderson, John M.; Armstrong, Robert B.; Blakley, Herbert A.;   Brewis,  Fredrick L.;   Brown,  June   D.;
Campbell, Douglas G.; Chadwick, Charles A.; Chattey, Robert B.; Clark, Peter N.; Cook, George; Coomber, Harvey S.
* MIDDLE—Cropper, Ronald J.;  Dawson, John Harley; Denisiuk, Mary A.; Dewar, Douglas A.; Disher, Wayne H. T.;
Eckman, Howard W.; Fedyk, John Joseph; Fong, Dexter; Gemmell, Robert H.; Gibson, John Wm.; Gilmour, Allan M.
* LOWER—Glass, John Gordon; Gordon, William J.; Grant, William Robt.;  Griffiths, Joan; Hack, H. Walter;  Hanton,
A. Martin B.; Hardy, S. Maureen; Hay, George D. E.; Hinchcliffe, Arthur;  Hollett, Rennie H.; Howard, Robert W.
* UPPER—Howell, Edward M.; Hutton, John M.; Johnson,John S.; Johnston, Donald R.; Jones, Kenneth A.; Kita,
Alfred; Knowlton, C. Gordon; Lamport, George; Lee, Paul; Linington, Grant W.; Lynch, Sherle. * LOWER—Manuel,
Joyce; Martin, Alison M.; McCarvill, Norman R.; McFadyen, W. Neil; McKay, Robert James; McLean, James C. T.;
MacLean, Mary C; Mills, James Donald M.; Mitchell, Norman; Mitten, Douglas S.; Newell, Gloria L.
STUDENTS GAVE BROCK HALL BACK TO THE INDIANS EARLY IN FEBRUARY WHEN FEMALE PSEUDO-REDSKINS WENT ON THE WAR PATH AT HIJINX.
251 COMMERCE '50 (Concluded)—
_mIIJ»-A J_L_tlk-_Kt_k•_•_._£ kii   fen.
* UPPER—Painter, Elizabeth R.; Palmer, George A.; Peters, Mary; Prince, William W.; Pringle, John B.; Pruner,
Jeffrey;  Pyke, Robert Arthur;  Robertson, Gordon A.;  Rogers, James Wallace; Rogers, John David; Root, Lawrence P.
* MIDDLE—Sager, Melvin Allan; Samuels, Hershel; Sanford, Travers D.; Saunders, Jack E.; Stambuski, Velma J.;
Swan, Harold F.; Tidball, Sara Lee; Toolson, Adrian R.; Turney, Harry Dean; Umbach, Gordon T.; Wadsworth, Robert M.;
Walker, Peter 0.   * LOWER—Wall, Nancy Elizabeth; Wright, Richard J. W.; Wright, William J.; Young, Raymond A.
THE  LIBRARY  HIDING AS  MUCH AS  POSSIBLE  OF  ITS   UNFINISHED ADDITION   STRIVES   TO   RECALL   ITS   FORMER   SYMMETRICAL   GOOD   LOOKS
252 BIG  RED SHOWS THE WAY AS EUS-SPONSOR  DIME  MARCH   GROWS
ENGINEERING  '48
Biggest to date was the boast of the graduating class of
applied science students of 1948.
But the burly men of science were certain that quality
had not been sacrificed for quantity. Engineering '48 collected a near record number of prizes, scholarships, and
fellowships, attesting to their academic ability.
Extra curricularly, the 300-odd members of the bumper
class set the pace for the entire faculty. Their year wound
up to a flying start with the budget fight at the fall general
meeting of the Alma Mater Society. "Big Red" Ron Grantham rallied the boys in first days of the term for the
onslaught, argued hotly against AMS Treasurer Bob Har-
wood's slash of engineering social budgets.
Then it was the Daily Ubyssey. The student newsmen
were misquoting engineers, blackening the fair name of
Applied Science and sowing the seeds of inter-faculty discord, they charged. Probe followed probe until the March
of Dimes campaign rolled around.
The redmen hopped on the March of Dimes bandwagon
and before the whirlwind campaign ended they had counted
up more than $1200 all in nickles, dimes and quarters for
the Crippled Children's Hospital.
Then, of course, the annual Science Ball, kept the boys
occupied for a long time. There were table decorations to
plan and build, tickets to sell, programs to arrange.
Bleary-eyed engineers, who began straggling into labs
and drafting rooms late in the afternoon following the session at the Commodore seemed to agree that their efforts
had not been wasted.
Dante was made an honorary engineer for the night
and the redshirt frolic was dubbed "The Inferno." A huge
poster hung above the door carried the ominous note:
"Abandon hope all ye who enter here." Along with hope
most of the merry-making engineers also abondoned a lot
of inhibitions.
But when the fumes had cleared away after four years
of labs, surveys, and hard work, the 300-odd "builders of
civilization" shrugged into their graduation gowns and filed
past the president clutching Bachelor of Applied Science
Degrees.
It had been worth it and they were sure they were going
to have no trouble in applying their applied science.
253 ENGINEERING '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER—CHEMICAL—Anderson, Reginald S.; Archibald, Roy W., Vancouver—Swimming Club; Babb, A. Leslie,
Vancouver—President ECF, VCF; Beggs, Adrian E., Vancouver—VCF; Bridges, Russell B., Hollyburn—Sigma Phi
Delta; Bruce, James R. D., Vancouver; Butters, Robert G., New Westminster; Dallalana, Ivo John.   * LOWER—Darling,
Peter A.,; Johnson, Robert; Johnson, Robert, Vancouver Peter A.; Johnson, Robert, Vancouver—Sigma Phi Delta; J
oily, Roy D., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Pi; Kolberg, Joseph,Vancouver—President Zeta Beta Tau; Hillel; Lloyd, Don Br
uce, New Westminster; Marshall James, Vancouver; McLellan,Gordon N., loco—AIChE; Publicity EUS.
* UPPER—McLellan, John W., Vancouver—VSF, ECF; Secretary AIChE; Munro, Robert C; Phare, G. Rowland, Vancouver—VCF, EIC, AIChE; Powley, Maurice B.; Rose, William E., Vancouver—AIChE; Schoening, M. Allan, Penticton
—AIChE; Shadwell, Howard J., Vancouver—Kappa Sigma; AIChE; Big Block; Shore, Albert G., Vancouver—Sigma
Phi Delta; President AIChE; Parliamentary Forum; Executive EUS. * LOWER—Speers, Edward A., Vancouver—AIChE;
Stokkeland, Margaret, Albion—Phraters, VOC; Stroud, Ross C, Vancouver—Phi Kappa Pi; Jazz Society; Timmons,
Anthony, Vancouver; Young, William H., Chilliwack. CIVIL—Barras, Cyril W., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Sigma; Civil
Club; Burnham, G. Allan, Vancouver—Civil Club.
STAGES IN AN ENGINEER'S LIFE: THE  LECTURE  ROOM, SUPPOSED STUDYING   TIME,   AND   THE   CLIMATIC   AWARD   PRESENTATION   AT   INFERNO.
254 * UPPER—Cote, Paul T., Vancouver—Beta Theta Pi; Civil Club; Denluck, Robert N., Ranger, Sask.; Fletcher, Alan G.;
Gordon, Robert N., Vancouver—Sigma Phi Delta; Grantham, Ronald D., Vancouver—Beta Theta Pi; Mamooks, Civil
Club, EIC; President EUS; Gray, Robert V., Vancouver—Phi Gamma Delta; Civil Club, EIC; Secretary-treasurer EUS;
Hirtle, James G., Oliver—Beta Theta Pi; Civil Club; Employment Rep EUS; Illington, John, Rosthern, Sask.—Civil Club.
* LOWER—Jackson, Roy I., New Westminster; Jackson, William S., Vancouver; Jones, Cyril P., Vancouver—President
Civil Club; Jones, J. Eric; Joplin, A. Frederick, Vancouver—Beta Theta Pi; Lessard, J. Irenee, New Westminster; Matson,
Herbert M., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Sigma; Milligan, George B., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Civil Club.
* UPPER—Narod, Leonard K., Victoria—Zeta Beta Tau; Peterson, Earl R., Chilliwack—Civil Club, EIC; Pillman, Raymond A., Sointula—EIC, VOC, Civil Club; Read, Anthony M., Vancouver; Robertson, James D., Ladner; Smith, Thomas
F., North Vancouver—Delta Upsilon; Stewart, Mervin J., Victoria; Thompson, Mavor S., Vancouver. * LOWER—Thorson,
Emil, Vancouver—Sigma Phi Delta; Underwood, Clyde E. F., Vancouver; Wannop, Robert C, Vancouver; Wolfram, Gordon, Lulu Island—Treasurer VCF. ELECTRICAL—Atherton, Don L., Vancouver—Zeta Psi; Bain, William A., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Sigma; Bartlett, A. William, Victoria.
ENVIOUS REDSHIRTS LOOK ON WHILE VICTORIOUS PETE HOBSON IS BORNE  FORWARD  TO   COLLECT   THE   PRIZE   FOR   BEST  TABLE   DECORATION.
255 ENGINEERING '48 (Continued)—
* UPPER—Bluechel, Alan J., Vancouver—Beta Theta Pi; AIEE, Ski Club; Brodie, Malcolm N., Vancouver; Burgess,
Harold N., Trail—Phi Kappa Pi; Outdoor Club; Craig, R. Alex, New Westminster; Davis, Evan Thomas, Vancouver;
Dundas, Robert M., Victoria—President AIEE; Eagle, Malcolm, Vancouver—Phi Kappa Pi; AIEE; Gray, Walter J.,
Vancouver. * LOWER—Harrison, Roland S., Grand Forks; Hudak, Nicholas; Humble, W. H.; Kaliski, Tadeusz, Vancouver—AIEE; Kerr, J. S. Stevenson, Vancouver—AIEE; Kervin, Ronald H., Marysville; Korlie, William, Vancouver;
Krmpotich, Michael E.
* UPPER—Lebedovich, Stephen; McGregor, Frederick C, Vancouver—Beta Theta Pi; McLennan, John R. B., Vancouver;
Morrison, R. John, Vancouver—Sigma Phi Delta; AIEE; Nastich, Milan, Richmond; Pellicano, Joseph, Penticton—Newman Club; Prior, Charles A., New Westminster; Robertson, Phillip, W., Nanaimo. * LOWER—Sumpton, Murray G., North
Vancouver; Taylor, Chester C, Vancouver—Players' Club, AIEE; Wheatley, Gordon H., Vancouver—Zeta Psi; Secretary
AIEE; Winter, Wallace H., Port Alberni—Sigma Phi Delta. GEOLOGY—Billingsley, James R., Saskatoon, Sask.—Dawson
Club; Burns, Al; Campbell, Richard B., Vancouver—Dawson Club.
Jk _ a
EXHIBITS WERE PLENTIFUL AT RED INFERNO.   HERE ARE PICTURED THE CHEMICALS', AGGIE ENGINEERS' AND  DAWSON CLUB ENTRIES  IN  CONTEST
256 * UPPER—Davies, Raymond D.; Ellard, Howard R., Regina, Sask.—Zeta Psi; Manager Zeta Psi House; Gabrielse,
Hubert, Cloverdale; Nelson, Samuel J.; Nicholson, Henry D., Vancouver—Film Society, VOC; Pollock, William 0.,'
Duncan—Dawson Club; Roberts, Arthur K., Vancouver. * LOWER — Robinson, Malcolm C, New Westminster—Beta
Theta Pi; Dawson Club; Roddick, James A., White Rock; Rudolph, John C, Calgary, Alta.—-Phi Gamma Delta; Sheldon,
Robert F., Vancouver—Sigma Phi Delta; Tait, David H., New Westminster — Dawson Club. MECHANICAL — Ard,
Thomas R., West Vancouver; Barron, William A., Vancouver—President ASME.
* UPPER—Bauder, Edward M., Vancouver—VOC, Glider Club; Bene, Joseph, Eburne; Borisuk, Michael, Fernie; Brown,
Robert S., Calgary, Alta.—Kappa Sigma; Burton, William A.; Campbell, Colin G., Calgary, Alta.—Kappa Sigma; Carlyle,
Allan M., Calgary, Alta.—Delta Upsilon; ASME; Badminton Club; Cherniavsky, Peter, Vancouver—Zeta Psi. * LOWER—
Choate, Deryck C, Red Deer, Alta.—ASME; Dennys, Ronald G., Vernon—VOC; Dobie, Thomas T., Britannia Beach;
Elia, Nick, Vancouver; Fulton, Andrew W., Vancouver; Forbes, Robert N., Waskatenau, Alta.; Golding, John W.; Harbell,
Joseph L., Salmon Arm—EIS; Secretary ASME.
NEW BUILDINGS LOOMED EVERYWHERE AND STUDENTS BECAME USED TO   CRATED TRANSFORMERS,  CONCRETE TRUCKS AND  BUILDING MATERIALS
257 ENGINEERING '48 (Concluded)—
* UPPER- Harrison, John H., North Vancouver; Harrison, Gerald E. G., Nanaimo; Hobson, George W., Victoria—
Gym Club; Hogan, Lewis F., Vancouver; Keller, John R., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Leith, William C, Kimberley—
VCF; Lightbody, Alexander, New Westminster—Sigma Phi Delta; ASME; Lindsay, J. Roderick A., Vancouver—Phi
Gamma Delta; ASME. * LOWER—McDill, William A., Vancouver—Iota Lamda Sigma; Adjutant COTC; MacDonnell,
Alexander, Victoria—VOC, COTC; McLeod, Donald F., Vancouver—Sigma Phi Delta; Newall, Norman, Vancouver—
ASME; Paterson, Ian C, Vancouver—Vice-President ASME; Rice, James, A., Edmonton, Alta.; Scott, William L., Medicine Hat, Alta.; Simonton, P. Grant, Calgary, Alta.—Delta Epsilon; ASME.
* UPPER—Sissons, William J., Medicine Hat, Alta.—Kappa Sigma; ASME, EIC; Stokes, H. Aldred C; Thomson,
James G., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Pi; Watts, Bernard G., Vancouver; Williams, Nicholas T., Port Hammond—Glider
Club. MINING—Charles, Richard J., Vancouver; Durham, George C, Vancouver. * LOWER—Hagen, John C, Kimberley—Phi Kappa Sigma; Dawson Club, Film Society; Hunter, Stanley, J., Vancouver; James, Donald H., Vancouver—
Phi Kappa Pi; VOC, Dawson Club; McKenzie, Harold A., Sooke— Phi Kappa Pi; Parker, John M., North Vancouver—
Phi Kappa Pi. PHYSICS—Duffus, Henry J., Vancouver—Sigma Tau Chi, Alpha Delta Phi; Players', Fencing Clubs;
Secretary EPS; Jeffery, Charles B., North Vancouver—Glider Club, VOC, Treasurer ECF.
ALWAYS EAGER TO LEAP INTO  FRAY THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL TEAM FOUGHT FOR GLORY OF ALMA MATER IN SHADOWS OF NEW LIBRARY WING
258 * UPPER—Lambe, Edward B. C, Vancouver—Letters Club; Lawrie, William E., Vancouver; Lawson, Robert D., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Pi; Big Block; Lipsett, Frederick R., Vancouver—Phi Delta Theta; President EPS; Morgan, David
W., Vancouver-—Big Block; Piercy, Joseph E., Vancouver—Sigma Phi Delta; EPS, VOC; Woodward, Frank A., Victoria.
* LOWER—FORESTRY—Brown, G. Stuart, Vancouver; Burch, P. Thomas, Vancouver—Forestry Club; Castillou, Harry
G., Vancouver Kappa Sigma; Fish and Game Club, Parliamentary Forum, Forestry Club; Burch, W. Gerald, Trail—Beta
Theta Pi; Vice-President Forestry Club; English, John J. C, Vancouver—Newman Club; Holmes, David C, Victoria—Forestry Club; Kermode, Harry D., Vancouver—Kappa Sigma; Vaughan, Victor H. D., Hollyburn.
* UPPER—Clifford, Richard L. T., Vancouver; Harris, Kingsley F., North Vancouver—VOC, Economics Society; Johnston, George R., Vancouver—Honors botany; Noble, David A.,Vancouver—Forestry Club; Robinson, Grant T., Vancouver;
Roff, Jack W., Vancouver—President Forestry Club; Selkirk, Daryl R., Victoria—Mussoc; Thomas, George P., Vancouver—Forestry Club. * LOWER—Young, Victor M., New Westminster—Phi Kappa Sigma; Velay, Charles, Maillardville-—
Phi Kappa Sigma; Wellburn, Gerald V., Duncan—Phi Kappa Pi. METALLURGY—Adams, William S., Vancouver; Be-
guin, Andre C, Argenta—Phi Kappa Pi; President Dawson Club; Bradley, Ralph K., Winnipeg, Man.; Carter, Ralph,
Vancouver.
* UPPER—Cawley, Nevil B., Victoria—Kappa Sigma; Coulter, Roy F., Winnipeg Man.—Dawson Club; Crowley, Paul B.,
Winnipeg, Man.—Newman Club; Douglas, W. Scott; Johnson, Robert, Vancouver; Morton, Raymond L., Vancouver—
Sigma Phi Delta; Tait, Robert J. C, Vancouver- -Alpha Delta Phi; Warner, Kenneth M., Vancouver—Sigma Phi Delta;
Dawson Club.
259 ROAST   BEEF   OVER,   BANQUETTING   REDMEN PREPARE FOR SHOP TALK
ENGINEERING   '49
The Third Year boys had always figured they were the
backbone of the redshirted legions. And they were probably
right.
They figure it this way: by the time an engineer reaches
Fourth Year he is all wrapped up in his career and has become a crotchety old man who looks upon student hankey-
pankies as kid stuff; first and second year engineers on the
other hand are still involved in faculty brawls. They haven't
selected their courses and really don't know what it is all
about.
For the third year boys, "good ole Scince '49," school
was a lot of fun.
They were just getting their teeth into their courses
having specialized at the end of second year and declared
their intention of becoming electricals, civils, mechanicals
and so on.
Wth knowing behind-the-hand whispers they assured
each other that they "ran Engineers' Undergraduate Society."
President Ron Grantham, who happened to be a fourth year
man, had an able henchman in forty-niner Vice-President
Dave Brousson.
Brousson rallied his eager forty-niners about him to
lead them through verbal brawls with the Student Council,
The Daily Ubyssey, the Undergraduate Society Committee,
the Administration, and finally in the not so verbal brawl
staged at the Red Inferno sometimes known as the Engineers'
Ball.
EUS, the governing body of the engineers (governed
by '49, they said) was comprised of President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Professional Relations Chief (who kept the
downtown engineering profession convinced that UBC '49
was going to be the best damned bunch of engineers they
had ever or would ever see), First and Second year representatives and representatives from each specialized department within the faculty.
These were notably: American Institute of Electrical
Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers,
American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Dawson Club
(mining, geology, metallurgy) forestry club, architecture
club, Society of Automotive Engineers, Engineering Physics
club, Aggie Engineers' club, and several smaller groups.
Despite the ponderous-sounding membership, EUS got a
lot done in 1948 and were proud of it.
For Engineering '49 the year had been an eventful one
but it had had enough lighter moments to break the term
up and make it fun.
They left the third year classrooms and labs with a firm
conviction that it would be a long time before Dean Finlayson would have a better third year class.
260 * UPPER—-Adam, James C; Aho, Aaro Emil; Ahrens, Robert H.; Anderson, Dan E.; Anderson, Lloyd H.; Bagnall,
Robert F.; Bailey, James M. M.; Baker, David J.; Beaumont, Evan A.; Berry, Hugh E.; Bigsby, Floyd W. * MIDDLE —
Blakely, W. John; Bourns, William T.; Brawn, Richard E.; Bredt, Malcolm D.; Brotherton, Lome W.; Brown, William M.;
Browne, John E.; Burmeister, Russell M.; Burwell, James D.; Butterfield, Floyd N.; Cameron, Donald I. * LOWER—
Campbell, Malcolm H.; Carrigan, Brian J.; Charles, Trevor A.; Cook, Richard M.; Craven, John Harold; Dayton,
Martin J. J.;  Dow, Walter H.; Dunlop, Robert D.; Dunsmore, F. Grant Edwards, Inglis W.; Edwards, John S.
* UPPER—Elliot, Charles W.; Eng, Thomas S.; Fisher, Donald C. M.; Fox, Charles R.; Frankovitch, Jerrold; Fraser,
Frank S.; Frey, John D.; Gardner, John S.; Gattenmeyer, John L.; Germaniuk, Stephen; Good, Russell J. * LOWER—
Gordon, James S.; Gordon, Merritt E.; Gray, Kenneth P.; Greig, Henry J.; Hamilton, Stuart F.; Handel, Robert D.;
Hartman, George F.; Hatch, William R.; Headrick, Stanley D.; Heath, Victor; Hewlett, Cecil G.
THE AGGIES STAGED THEIR ANNUAL FIELD DAY; STOCK JUDGING WASN'T   ALL  PLACID,   FOR  EVEN  LIVESTOCK  MUST  EAT  WHEN   IT  GETS  HUNGRY
261 ENGINEERING '49 (Concluded)—
* UPPER—Hoover, George L.; Hopkins, Charles N.; Jackson, Brian C; Jackson, Charles; Jackson, Laurence E.;
Jamieson, Robert D.; Johnson, Eugene M.;  Johnson, I. Erling; Kanwisher, William; Kayll, S. John; Knappett, Alan H.
* MIDDLE—Lawrence, James E.; Lerbekmo, John F.; Lindgaard, Harold C; Low, John; Low, Norman R.; Lum,
Mun G.; Maidment, Howard; Malcolm, Robert A.; Mason, Roy   B.;    McAdam,    John    R.    G.;    MacBride,   John    F.
* LOWER—McColl, H. Stuart; McConachie, C. Eric B.; McCorquodale, William; MacDonald, Robert G.; MacFadden,
Jack H.; McGuirk, John 0.; McLennan, Donald J.; Mehling, Frank R.; Merritt, Rex D. V.; Merrifield, Glen Shaw;
Merrifield, Samuel S.
* UPPER—Milburn, James V.; Milligan, Jack W.; Mills, Robert M.; Montegani, Anthony L.; Montgomery, Roy W.;
Morison, J. Douglas; Morrill, G. Lloyd P.; Morton, David Stewart; Moul, Albert Alfred; Moulds, James H.; Moulson,
Donald Chas. * LOWER -Mracek, Albert U.; Mungall, Allan G.; Owen, David R.; Ozol, Nelda; Parker, Eric G.;
Patterson, Arthur M.;  Pearson,  Hans L.;   Peetz, Anthony   G.; Peters, Ernest; Poole, William H.; Pope, Stephen H.
IRREPRESSIBLE  AGGIES  CONTINUALLY MADE MERRY DURING THE YEAR   AT BARN   DANCES,   FARMERS'  FROLIC;  FACULTY  EVEN  JOINED   IN   FUN
262 * UPPER—Potts, Ian; Pratt, Edward A.; Redel, Walters R.; Reid, John D.; Richardson, Donald W.; Robertson,
James D.; Rokosh, John P.; Roper, Gordon J.; Sandrin, Joseph   0.;   Saunders,   Robert   H.;    Schjelderup,   Hassel   C.
* MIDDLE Scott, Samuel A.; Smith, James A.; Smith, James E.; Smith, Kenneth W.; Smith, Neville; Smith, Robert R.;
Snowling, Richard G.; Soros, Knute; Sprung, Douglas L.; Stachon, Joseph A.; Steele, Robert G.; Stemshorn, William G.;
Stenhouse, James F.; Stevens, Hugh G. * LOWER—Stiell, William M.; Story, David M.; Street, Albert V.; Street,
George T.; Stuckey, Lester R.; Sutherland, James G.; Sweeney, W. Alan; Talbot, Brian F.; Taylor, John D.; Taylor,
Ralph E.; Thicke, Ronald B.; Thomas, Stanley L.; Tindle,  Phillip A.; Tufts, Richard C; Turland, Douglas J.
* UPPER—Uhthoff, John C; Underhill, C. David; Vallee, Lloyd H.; Venutti, David L. B.; Villiersfisher, John; Wallace,
Robert; Webb, Leslie E.; Welsh, Daynard M.; Welsh, Douglas A.; White, Alan M.; Wight, William; Willcox, J. Allan;
Williams, Gaynor P.;   Williamson,  Daniel F.;   Willox, George J.; Young, Nelson K.; Ziller, Wolf G.; Zitko, Henry.
STUDENTS' INTEREST RAN GAMUT FROM GAY LYRICS OF ROBIN HOOD THROUGH PRECISION OF COTC TO SNOWY SLOPES OF GROUSE MOUNTAIN
263 REDSHIRT   ARCHITECTS   PLAN   COMMUNITY,   BUILD   SCALE   MODEL
ENGINEERING   '50
Big Fifty was big in more ways than one.
Applied Science '50 was the biggest class of engineers
ever to assemble under the tables of the Commodore. It was
comprised of the biggest and toughest engineers ever to
batter an artsman's noggin. They finished the term with a
bigger record of achievements than any other red-blooded
and red-shirted class before or since.
They also picked the biggest fight with the biggest
authority on the campus.
It was Engineering '50, (Big Fifty, as the class was
affectionately dubbed because of its record size), that started
the battle with the administration to put a stop to the fancy
Christmas examination program which the faculty sprung
on the students in 1948.
The administration had said first that there would be no
regular exams. What exams there would be, they had explained, would be held by the individual professors in ordinary lecture time and would not be handled from the registrar's office.
This had sounded all right at first. But when Christmas
had rolled around, all the professors had decided that they
wanted exams and all within two or three days.
The result was that students wrote Christmas exams;
only instead of having them on a regularly spaced out
schedule they had them bunched into a short period and they
had only one hour instead of the customary three or two
hours in which to write the tests.
The engineers didn't like this. Nor did anyone else.
But Big Fifty figured they were big enough to do something
about it so they passed a resolution and canvassed opinion.
At term's end, after most of the faculty had thrown in with
the boys, it appeared likely they had not worked in vain.
The registrar announced that Christmas exams would be held
in the usual fashion in 1948-49.
But 1948 wasn't all lobbying and resolutions for Big
Fifty's twelve divisions totalling more than 750 students.
A brisk capable executive goaded, edged, manoeuvred
the giant class through a record-smashing year.
The Engineers' Song Club, a '50 idea to start with,
turned out to be a solid '50 enterprise. The Science Ball,
the Banquet, the pep meets, mixed in with a bumper number
of division and class functions provided needed breathers
from the nightly slide rule drill.
When Big Fifty packed up ther lab manuals and test
tubes and began the hunt for summer employment, they
were looking back on a mark, as big as the class, that they
had left in the Applied Science department.
264 © S Q
* TOP—Abercrombie, E.; Abrahamson, M. P.; Aitken, J.; Amm, W. S.; Apps, C. E.; Apps, J. C; Bain, A. S.; Bancroft,
G. L.; Barager, W. R.; Baylis, A.; Bean, J. M.; * CENTRE —Bellrose, J. S.; Bennett, E. G.; Bergklint, R.; Bertram, D.
M.; Biddle, G. R.; Billings, J.; Bitcon, R. K.; Blackey, J. H.; Boyes, R. C; Boyko, P.; Braybrook, I.; * BOTTOM—
Broster, J. D.; Brown, M. M.; Brown, N. G.; Brown, R.; Burden, H. P.; Burns, B.; Campbell, I.; Cant, J. C; Carey, D.
A.; Caison, J. A.; Caulfied, R.
* UPPER—Cheng, E.; Chercover, M.; Clark, K.; Cochrane, H. C; Codville, D. C; Collicut, J.; Cook, W. C; Coomes,
H. D.; Corbett, L. V.; Colton, G. N.; Cowan, J.; * LOWER—Creber, M.; Crouser, E. E.; Currey, H. D.; Dahl, G. M.;
Danard, D. C; Davies, G. B.; De Beck, H. D.; Diamond, J.;  Dinsmore, E. R.; Dixon, D.; onatt, N. L.
DESERTED DAMSEL STOPS TO PASS THE TIME OF NIGHT WITH THE MECHANICAL MAN WHILE COME  DISCUSS AERODYNAMICS,  OTHERS  FLUID FLOW
265 ENGINEERING '50 (Continued)—
* TOP—Donaldson, H.; Doran, W.; Daughty-Davies, J.; Douglas, P. W.; Dudley, R. S.; Dybhavn, T. S.; Eaton, G. H.
Elliott, H. V.; Esplen, R. W.; Ford, J. G.; Forrester, J. H. A.; * CENTRE—Fowler, P. L.; Friesen, 0.; Froud, J. L.
Gardiner, S. G.; Gibney, W. H. R.; Goold, A. C; Gordon, N. F.; Gouge, J. W.; Grant, G. A.; Grantham, J.; Greer, J. H.
* BOTTOM—Griffiths, P. G.; Hall, K. W.; Hall, W. H.; Hastings, H. 0.; Hatherly, A. L.; Heeney, R. B.; Hermann, R. C.
R. C; Hird, E. V.; Holdsworth, J.; Holkestad, H.; Holland, H. E.
5.     H     %      ~
K •% ^   K
Hope, K. G.; Horcroft, J.; Horner, H. C; Horsley, I. L.; Hoskins, D.
CO-OPERATION OCCURRED AT MANY POINTS.   THE CO-OPPERS IN BOTH   HOUSES RELAXED AFTER WORK; EVEN ZANY JOKERS HELPED BLOOD DRIVE
266 * TOP—Holbrook, D.; Howard, J.; Hubbard, I.; Hughes, L. R.; Hughes, P. G.; Hutcheson, J. G. R.; Ines, F. E.; James,
R. C; Johnson, W.; Jokisch, C; Kerby, C. L.; * CENTRE—Kolbiens, W.; Lamb, J.; Lambert, D. C; Lamperton,
C. H.; Lanchester, F.; Landers, W. B.; Lang, M. R.; Lockwood, E.; Long, E.; Lund, J.; Mannel, E.; * BOTTOM—
Martin, S.; McAllister, G.; McBride, R. W.; McBride, R.; McCaskill.K. A.; McColl, D. J.; MacDonald, G.M.; MacDougall,
N.; McEwan, W. D.; McGregor, C. A.; Mclntyre, D. J.
_ir-fe___.a-R_i___L'i__f_w
IS'JlSml
* UPPER—MacKay, D. L.; MacKenzie, A.; MacKenzie, D. R.; McLaughlin, D.; MacLeod, I.; MacNicol, W. J.; McQuillan, D.; McTavish, W.; Milroy, R. J.; Morley, W.; Mullen,F.; * LOWER—Naylor, J.; Nesbitt, C; Newton, C. G.;
Nicklom, J.; North, P. H.; O'Brien, R.; Olsen, M. T.; Oslund, G.; Otte, F. J.; Painter, M.; Paskusky, J.
NOT ALL THE ACTION OCCURRED ON THE GRIDIRON, AS TEAMS DONNED   AND TESTED PADS AND TAPING BEFORE EMERGING TO MEET THEIR FOES
267 ENGINEERING '50 (Concluded)—
TMM
• TOP—Patterson, F. J.; Peele, H. R.; Pike, C. R.; Pike, F. A.; Pinskey, G. A.; Plant, G. E.; Polos, J.; orter, K. H;
Preston, J. F.; Preston, R. T.; Pyne, M.; * CENTRE—Quinlan, B. A.; Rashleigh, T.; Redpath, .; Rennie, C; Rhodes,
H. W.; Riley, J. P.; Roberts, J. S.; Robertson, L. D.; Russell, C. H.; Russel, D.; Rywak, J.; * BOTTOM—Scudamore,
0.; Schon, H. A.; Shaw, G. C; Shopland, H. T.; Shrumm, A. R.; Shugg, A. G.; Shumka, J. H.; Simmons, G. E.; Sinclair, K. I.; Slee, F. C; Smith, K. C.
* UPPER—Smyth, H. E.; Snowball, J.; Southwell, P.; Stoney, C. P.; Story, J. W.; Summers, R.; Sutherland-Brown, A.;
Toffdahl, K.; 8aggart, N.; Tait, B.; Tailing, G. T.; * LOWER—Tassie, P.; Taylor, F.; Taylor, S. K.; Thomas, R. D.;
Thompson, D.;  Thompson,  F.;   Thompson,  F.  D.;   Thompson, G. M.; Tibitt, H. R.; Todd, I. R.; Townsend, W.
SPADE WORK WAS A FAMILIAR SIGHT AS THE BUILDINGS TOOK FORM; BUT THE JOKERS WERE NOT OUTDONE AS THEY BURIED EX-ACE HAYWARD
268 * UPPER—Tearcy, L.; Urquhart, D. J.; Urquhart, R. D.; Wadey, R. H.; Walker, R. I.; Wallace, D.; Ward, R. J.; Watt,
L. J.; Webber, E. D.; Weber, R.; West, D. R.; * LOWER —Westberg, R.; Whistler, A. H.; White, W.; Wiggins, W. F.;
Williams, N. L.; Wingert, F. A.; Wood, H.; Woodcock, J. R. ; Young, R. H.; English, A. J. M.; Dilworth, L.
ENGINEERING '51
It's tough to be a freshman but you get over it fast.
Green tinges hanging over from their first year vanished rapidly for Engineering '51 when the newcomers to
the applied science game found themselves rubbing shoulders
with the boys in the sombre stucco building at the top side
of UBC's campus.
Of course they had had to fight off the taint of their arts-
man year, but at just about the time they were crowding
into their first science pepmeet they had become engineers in
the full and glorious sense of the term.
Unofficial estimates attributed more artsman scalps to
the first year apsci boys than to any other tribe of the red-
men.
Artsman pelts stretched drying in the hot sun along the
walls of the First Year drafting room atttested to their rapid
acclimatization.
And more than one fledgling arts freshie had the
ominous letters "Ap. Sc. 51" seared into his meagre brain
as he clambered dripping and slathered with oozy mud from
the bottom of the lily pond.
The Red Inferno had been a new experience for the
lads in '51 but they had liked it.   Painstaking hours of plan
ning and construction had gone into the impressive model
of Lake Washington pontoon bridge which graced their
table at the Commodore holocaust. The upper-year Mechanicals might have copped the prize but the '51's were pretty
sure there was something rotten in the judging.
More than a few of the boys had been disappointed,
however, when the executive ruled out an eager suggestion
to float the bridge in a table-top tank of rye rather than the
more conventional hydrogen oxide.
Little '51 had placed a solid shoulder behind EUS
campaigns to collect blood for the Red Cross, dimes for
Crippled Children's Hospital, dollars for ISS and at the
term's end '51 figured it had done pretty well.
The ordeal of weathering a second freshman-hood successfully over, with only minor casualties, Science '51 were
looking forward to sinking their fangs into a juicy program
for second year in the forthcoming term.
Sure the labs would be tougher to cook, the civil problems less uncivil, the survey projects more impossible but
with a trusty slide rule and a good cookbook "we'll come
through.    We did it this year" they encouraged each other.
269 ENGINEERING '51 (Concluded)—
* UPPER—Anderson, Allan' H.; Archibald W. R.; Ashley, E. W.; Atamanchuk, Wilfred E.; Austrom, Clarence J.;
Ayers, M. J.; Ayers, Walter R.; Baillies, John A.; Bean, JohnS.; Binns, Allan S.; Bosdet, George H.; Bowers, George W.;
Broster, David Edward. * MIDDLE—Brown, John Wilber E.; Brown, M. Donald; Cake, Douglas Donald; Cameron,
Alexander W.; Cavers, John K.; Chizik, Nicholas T.; Cianfaglione, Anthony; Clark, Lester R.; Clements, Barrington H.;
Cooper, Donald R. * LOWER—Cripps, W. Dale; Delane, Gerry Dennis; Dickinson, John Racey; Dobbie, John Wright;
Duerksen, Walter D.; Dufton, William C; Duguid, Donald A.; Duncan, Donald R.; Ellerton, J.; Englehardt, Norman T.;
Findlay, Robert G. K.
* UPPER—Finlayson, Malcolm J.; Forward, Peter C; French, Donald A.; Friedel, Frederick; Gardner, Robert J. D.;
Gilchrist, Harry A.; Hackwood, Robert J.; Hamilton, William G.; Hardy, John E.; Harrison, William F.; Hebert,
Raymond 0. * LOWER—Henn, Howard H.; Henry, William; Hjorth, C. Erik; Hogarth, Gordon L.; Holmes, Arthur T.;
Hooker, Arthur L.; Isfeld, Victor L.; Jamieson, Donald H.; Jasper, C. Monty; Jenkins, David L.; Jensen, John Eric;
Johnson, Byron 0. S.
THUNDERBIRD   GRID   STARS  WON   A  GAME,  LOST  SEVERAL  HEARTBREAK ERS  BY   NEAR-MISSES;   MOGULS   FELT   CONFIDENT   FOR   THE   NEXT  YEAR
270 * UPPER—Johnson, Kenneth H.; Jones, Arthur E.; Jones, Michael 0.; Jones, Ronald T.; Kenny, Alan C.; Kerr, K. E. R.;
King, A. E.; King, Donald A.; Knappett, Herbert L.; Kneale, Charles W.; Kolodychuk, John; Krupa, John E.; Laign,
David A. * MIDDLED—Landau, S. Nathan; Langmuir, Allan; Lucas, Kenneth C; Manning, Luard J. McConnell,
Stallard W.; McLellan, Daniel F.; MacLeod, Richard A.; McLorg, Anthony F.; McMaster, Donald; MacRitchie,
Norman D.; Mills, Alan W. * LOWER—Montgomery, Fen ton H.; Moran, Frank P.; Morrison, Clark A.; Murray,
John L.; Murray, W.; Naylor, Henry F.; Nemetz, Alvin S.;Norlund, Raymond L.; North, Roy A.; O'Brien, James M.;
Orlowski, Paul L. P.
* UPPER—Oxland, Thomas Hugh; Patterson, T. J.; Phillips, Frederick; Quail, Douglas E.; Ramsey, D. J.; Ross,
Robert Wm.; Savage, Frederick L.; Sawden, Francis H.; Schofield, Leo J.; Scott, Angus M.; Scott, H. M.; Scott,
James E. * LOWER—Scott, Kenneth N.; Searcy, Edwin M.; Semper, Robert 0.; Seraphim, Donald P.; Shapiro,
Lionel M. I.; Siddall, Arthur C; Slater, Alan W.; Slight, Gordon Peter; Stamnes, Trior; Swanson, William J.; Sweica,
J. Carmer.
__^___
* UPPER—Tanner, Giles C; Tassie, W.; Thackeray, Paul A.;  Trembath, William J.;  Unwin,  Alexander M.;  Walker,
Charles S.; Williams, Cymryd P.; Williams, Robert S.
271 IT TOOK A  HARD-WORKING EXECUTIVE TO PUT ACROSS THEIR MANY PUBLICITY STUNTS, FUND-RAISING CAMPAIGNS
AGRICULTURE
Oft - maligned Aggies filled the year with a lot of sparkle, ingenuity and more hard work
The ploughmen homeward plodded their weary way in
the spring, grasping their milk-stained BSA's in hickory-
hardened hands.
The much-maligned yellowsweaters could well be proud
of an academic accomplishment that included more road-
work than any other 15 courses on the campus. Morning
and evening, fair weather or foul, the Aggies could be seen
trudging between the mist-shrouded barns and their lecture
building.
An enterprising Aggie executive brought everything from
apple-laden helicopters to squealing sows onto the campus
in a series of very successful publicity stunts advertising the
Aggie Ball. They were seldom outdone in either the variety
or ingenuity of their gags.
Not content with out-joking the Jokers in publicity, the
farmhands brought everything from the barnyard but the
smell to the Armoury for the Farmers' Frolic. Dancers fled
from the squeal of pigs and the packle of chickens but
managed to pack four hours' fun into the evening.
Drinkers amongst the Aggie students will be able to step
up for a slug or two at Frank E. Buck Drinking Fountain
next year. The fountain, equipped with running water, was
subscribed to by Aggie students in honour of UBC's landscape artist.
Executives of the Agriculture class were: President
Ian Greenwood; vice-president, Stanley Burke; secretary,
Pat McDonald; treasurer, Pete Guiry, and sports representative, Doug Knott.
272 _JT-OTfe_i__JM_il
* UPPER—Arnason, Stefan B., Vancouver; Burke, Stanley L., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Vice-President AUS; Campbell, Robert H., Vancouver; Caplette, John F., Lynnmour; Coulter, Maureen A., Vancouver—Delta Gamma; Craig, Robert
G., Vancouver; Davidson, George A., Vancouver; Davis, F. Russell, Vancouver. * LOWER—Devlin, Lloyd, North Vancouver; Devlin, Douglas G.; Devlin, Edward L., Vancouver; Doell, Jacob C, Vancouver; Drewry, Neil T., Victoria;
Ewaniuk, Peter, New Westminster; Faryna, Gene W.; Ferris, Clarke H., Vancouver.
* UPPER—Gibb, Orson, Vancouver; Gibson, David L., Vancouver; Gibson, Margaret P., Neiv Westminster—Alpha Phi;
Gilchrist, M. M.; Gummow, John B., Peachland—Psi Upsilon; Mamilton, John C; Harms, Harold F., Vancouver.
LOWER—Heal, Geoffrey H. G., Armstrong—President Gym Club; Henderson, Arthur D. H.; Hennell, Paul Victor, New
Westminster; Hicks, E. Sheila, Vancouver—President Ag WUS, Vice-Pres. VOC; Horsfield, Eleanor M., Duncan—Biological Discusssions Club; Hutchings, Frederick R., Lulu Island—Legion; Hyde, Ronald B.; Irwin, E. Louise, Vancouver
—Alpha Gamma Delta; VOC.
STUDENTS REALLY MIRED THINGS UP DURING THE YEAR FROM PINT-SIZED   BULL   SESSIONS   THROUGH   SCHOTTISCHES   AND   BIG   BLOCK   CHEERS
273 AGRICULTURE '48 (Concluded)—
IB
* UPPER—Irwin, Robert, E. T., Sardis; Jones, George A.; Kendall, C. Jill, North Vancouver — Biological Discussions
Club; King, Joyce V., Vancouver—Society of Microbiologists; Secretary Aggie '48; Kline, Cecil M., Calgary, Alta.—
Zeta Beta Tau; Kneale, John, Vancouver; Knott, Douglas R., New Westminster—AIC; Laughton, David B., Vancouver.
LOWER—Longfield, Howard F.; Maddin, Cameron A., Vancouver; MacDonald, Donald H., Vancouver—Kappa Sigma;
Milan, Betty E., Port Alberni—Film Society; Miltimore, James E., Salmon Arm; Murray, Gordon A., Vancouver; Nelson,
Clarence H., Vancouver; Norris, Flora C.
*UPPER—Peterson, Sigurd B., Cloverdale; PickleS, Norman R., Victoria—VOC; Pringle, Rodney; Reynolds, Robert T.,
Ladner; Riehl, Herbert, Vancouver; Senay, Charles M., New Westminster—SPC, JAI, Society of Microbiologists; Smith,
Eric S., Vancouver; Spicer, Vivien A. M., Victoria—Phrateres; Rifle Club. * LOWER—Stockstad, Paul L., Vancouver—
Kappa Sigma, VOC, AIC; Senior Manager American Football; Talbot, Mary Kathleen, Vancouver; Todd, Stuart, Vancouver
LOWER—Stockstad, Paul L., Vancouver—Kappa Sigma; VOC, AIC; Senior Manager American Football; Talbot, Mary
Kathleen, Vancouver; Todd, Stuart, Vancouver—Mussoc; Triggs, Rosalie E., Nelson—Film Society; Tupper, Norman E.,
New Westminster; Vincent, Ronald J. A., Kitchener, Ont.; Wallick, Nancy, Winnipeg, Man.—Delta Gamma; Wiggins,
Murray M., Vancouver.
Wilkinson, Robert L., Vancouver; Wilson, Donald D., Vancouver—President Aggie '4#; "^icharias, John V-» Chilliwack.
274 SING  FESTS  CHARACTERIZED  SPIRIT  THAT  KEPT  AGGIES   IN   CAMPUS   SPOTLIGHT
UNDERGRADUATE AGGIES
Rotten eggs and over-ripe tomatoes had been the stock
in trade of the agriculture graduates.
For the Aggies, 1948 had been a busy year, but on several occasions they had made time for the traditional faculty
riots. Two or three times redshirted, and comparably red-
faced, Sciencemen had crept Lack to their labs wiping the
evidences of the Aggies' marksmanship from their red
sweaters and red faces.
But it wasn't all beer, skittles and her shirt battles for
the Aggies.
They had walked away with the title as the most active
faculty group on the campus in an action-packed term.
A long-laboring executive had piloted the yellow-
sweatered hordes through party after party, barn dance after
barn dance, and drive after drive.
They had raised money for worthy causes (Buck Memorial fountain) with such novel devices as the annual apple
sale.   They had gone so far as to have a helicopter loaded
with rosy red apples coast in for a smooth landing on the
Arts lawn. It was just a publicity stunt, but the Aggies
thought of it first.
Aggies were the only faculty to get their recruits straight
out of September's crop of eager freshmen. The green of
the frosh soon turned to the yellow and purple of the Aggies
after the fresh crop of inductees were worked over in the
Aggie common rooms. First year representative on the
executive panel was fresh-faced Tom Whitehead.
In agriculture the usual is always reversed. So by second
year the city slcikers of first year were well on the road to
becoming rubes. Second year rep on AUS was Vic James,
as good an Aggie as ever sat down to a cow.
By third year they were real honest-to-goodness farmers
with straw in their hair. George Gould called the tune for
the third year square dance.
But at harvest time in April, the Aggies were sure they
had sown well.  It had been a good year.
275 AGRICULTURE (Concluded)—
* UPPER—Armstrong, F. Allan; Barker, Arthur J.; Berry, Gordon H.; Blair, Gilbert J.; Coles, Barbara M. Cooper,
Ronald W.; Crosby, Richard H.; Crow, William 0.; Davidson,   A.   John;   Ellison,   Kenneth   V.;   Elsey,   Coleman   L.
* MIDDLE—Esler, John A.; Faryna, Gene W.; Fletcher, Harry F.; Foot, Edward J.; Fraser, David S.; Fulton,
Wallace G.; Gross, Alfred; Hazlewood, Joan I.; Hazlette, J. Desmond; Hill, Guida E.; Isfeld, Albert N. * LOWER—
Jones, Philip A.; Knight, Ursula H.; Kyle, William S.; Larkin, Doris Edith; Leckie, David F.; Littler, Alan E.; Lockard,
Raymond G.; McDonald, I. Margaret; McDonald, Patricia;  Moloney, James V.; Motherwell, Andrew F.
\ K <
l2__*SS_S£_2
\ \ s.
\ K <
* UPPER—Newton, Isobel Jean; Norris, Margaret E.; Owen Richard R.; Patterson, Eugene B.; Pelter, John A.;
Sieburth, Louise R.; Southcott, Burnett A.; Starrak, H. I. Lloyd; Stuart, H. Daphne; Tate, Douglas U.; Townsley,
David S. * LOWER—Underwood, Eric J. E.; Wakefield, Philip D.; Warburton, Roger H.; White, Doreen Ann;
Wilkinson, Alfred T.; Williams, Ronald S.; Wilton, Arthur C.
LAWYERS HAD MERRY TIME AT FORMAL COMMODORE GATHERING, WERE  JOINED BY FACULTY AND REPRESENTATIVES OF RCN AND LATIN AMERICA
276 * UPPER—Berry, Richard S.; Bissett, Helen M.; Campbell, William D.; Eedy, Gerald T.; Fitzgerald, John D.; Gilmour,
Robert F.; Gitelman, Percy; Gray, Alastair A.; Hardie, Nena C; Holding, Frank R. * MIDDLE—Jenks, Reita Mary;
Kelly, Friede M.; Laddy, M. Sophie; Law, G. R. John; Llo yd, John A.; Lockhart, Shirley R.; Main, Geoffrey E.; Marsh,
Howard Wm.; McCorkell, Pamela; MacDonald, Joan E.; McLaughlin, Ross. * LOWER—MacNeill, Allan C; Minchin,
Elspeth Mary; Morton, Jack E.; Neufeld, John H.; Richards, Melbowrne D.; Shortreed, William R.; Stace-Smith,
Richard; Unwin, Robert V.
^ f^ r>
V-       \mt
JfkJSm*
* UPPER—Chancey, Harold W. R.; Course, Kenneth J.; Cuthbert, Joan M.; Dawson, Frederick R.; Deverell, David A.;
Gabriel, Effriede; Higgins, Wilfred Robert; Horie, Joseph K.; McConkey, Gordon E.; Paton, Ian David; Ryder, James C.
* LOWER—Steele, William Thomas; Tipple, Patricia E.; Wilkinson,  Kenneth H.     OCCUPATIONAL—Johnston,   L.   G.;
Tamboline, Lloyd; Rasmusson, B. K.; Robinson, W. E.
AGGIES HAD TRADITIONALLY GAY TIME AT BARN DANCE IN FALL TERM;   DANCED TO MODERN MUSIC WITH CIGARETTES, WHISKY & WILD WOMEN.
277 LAW   UNDERGRADUATE   SOCIETY   HEADED   BY   GENIAL   SENIOR  LLOYD McKENZIE, WAS  RESPONSIBLE  FOR LAW BALL
LAWYERS
First lawyers in history graduate from UBC's fledgling faculty as bumper classes near goal
This was a milestone year for the Law faculty.
Fifty-two graduates of the UBC Law school were scheduled for admission to the B.C. Law Society after successfully
trying their third-year examinations. They were members of
the first graduating class in the history of the school.
It was a millstone year for Dean George F. Curtis and
his three permanent staff associates. They grappled with the
problem of finding seats and texts for more than 100 prospective legal minds in the first-year class.
The fledgling legal eagles had a chance for practical
experience by taking part in the trials of students charged
by the discipline committee. The law students presided at
the trials and also acted for the prosecution and defense.
Another feature of the students' practical training included the Moot Courts. Students in first and second year
classes each had to take part in a case. Procedure involved
preparing the prosecution and defense for cases that had
already been decided in English and Canadian courts.
The men and women who practically lived in the rambling green buildings at the far north end of the campus
were able to contribute substantially to campus affairs. They
were well represented in all campus political groups and a
law student was elected to fill the office of Undergraduate
Societies Committee chairman, incidentally succeeding another law student.
Only social activity completely supported by Dean Curtis' 300 hermits was the annual Law Ball at the Commodore,
February 17. The affair was so notably successful that all
lectures in the faculty had to be cancelled the following day.
Presiding over the affairs of the Law undergraduates for
the year was genial Senior Lloyd McKenzie.
278 UPPER—Alexander, Ernest A., Vancouver—Phi Delta Theta; Beaven, Rodney, Vancouver; Blewett, John C, White
Rock; Bonner, Robert W., Vancouver—Delta Upsilon; Botterell, Hugh E., Vancouver—Kappa Alpha Theta; Brown, Eric,
Vancouver—SAE;  Campbell, William E., Sherman—Phi Kappa Sigma; Cantell, Edward T.
LOWER—Carmichael, Herbert A., Vancouver—Phi Gamma Delta; Carmichael, Andrew J.; Carrothers, Alfred W., Vancouver—Zeta Psi; Chambers, Stewart L., Vancouver—Legion, Parliamentary Forum; Clark, Frank B., New Westminster—
Phi Gamma Delta; Cobus, Anthony E., Vancouver; Cross, Gerald H., Esquimalt; Cunningham, John R., Vancouver—
President Sigma Tau Chi, Beta Theta Pi.
UPPER—Dent, L. Ronald G.; Ellis, Hugh M., West Vancouver—Alpha Delta Phi; Fisher, Thomas K., New Westminster
—Phi Gamma Delta; Fleishman, Neil M.; Forrest, Stewart R.; Gourlay, John L., Vancouver—Zeta Psi; Gray, Leslie T.,
Vancouver; Hall, Arthur H.
LOWER—Hall, Ormonde J., Vancouver -Phi Gamma Delta; Hannesson, Richard S. M., Burnaby; Hayward, David F.,
Vancouver—Jokers; Hunter, Douglas L.; Irvine C, Vancouver; Johnson, Gordon H., Vancouver; Lane, William T.,
Vancouver—Zeta Psi;  Lane, William G.,  Vancouver-   Zeta  Psi.
279 LAW (Continued) —
* UPPER—Lawrie, Frank D., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Sigma ; Lewis, Cecil J., Vancouver—Zeta Psi; Long, Charles F.,
Vancouver—Phi Kappa Pi; Mann, Donald E.; Margach, John A., Vancouver— Zeta Psi; Marshall, Thomas C, Vancouver
—Phi Kappa Sigma; Martin, William J. G., Vancouver—SPC; Parliamentary Forum; McDonald, Leslie M. * LOWER-
Mclllree, John M., Victoria; Mcintosh, George B., Vancouver—Zeta Psi; McKenzie, Lloyd G.; McKenzie, Helen
G., Vancouver—Phi Delta Delta; McKinlay, John A., Vancouver —Phi Delta Theta; Mead, William R., Vancouver; Millar,
Perry S., Vancouver—-Sigma Tau Chi, Phi Delta Theta; President Legion; Moresby, William J., Victoria.
* UPPER—Perry, Frank S., Prince George—Phi Kappa Sigma; Picard, Horace L., Vancouver; Pilkington, Roderick;
Plommer, Robert D., Vancouver—Phi Gamma Delta; golf; Quinn, Ivan B., Vancouver Delta Upsilon; Ritchie, Hugh J.,
Hollyburn—Phi Delta Theta; Spry, F. Russell; Strongithar m, Edward D., Vancouver—Phi Kappa Pi. * LOWER—
Stubbs, William R., Vancouver; Sutherland, Alexander K., Vancouver; Swinton, A. Hans, Vancouver -Zeta Psi; Thompson, William J., Vancouver; Tupper, W. H, Vancouver; Vanalstine, William F.; Vaughan, David L., Vancouver; Walsh,
John W.
UBC SOCIAL CALENDAR SAW MANY AND VARIED DANCES, FROM FORMA LS TO THE LUDICROUS JOKERS' BAWL AND GREEKS' WILD WEST EFFORTS
280 Wark, Bruce E., Vancouver—Zeta Psi; Warner, William L.,   Vancouver   Beta   Theta   Pi;   White,   E.   Jean;   Whitelaw,
Glenn R., Vancouver—Zeta Psi.
* UPPER—Abbott, Arnold T.; Anderson, John J.; Anderson, John; Anderson, Richard B.; Bell-Irving, Duncan H.; Blake,
Francis H.; Boyd, Bruce L.; Campbell, David H; Carmichael,   Duncan   W.   Comparelli,   David   E.;    Cowan,   John   C.
* MIDDLE- Dewdney, Edgar; Ellis, Richard C; Ferguson, Warren N.; Gardom, Grady B.; Gilmour, Gordon H.; Goldberg,
Arthur H.; Griffin, James A.; Griffiths, Thomas; Halcrow,Gordon C; Harvey, Robert J.; Johnson, Roland W. *LOW
ER—Ker, J. Ross; King, Malcolm G.; Long, George R.; Lorimer, James G.; Manning, Valerie J.; McCulloch, Ross G.
; MacFarlane, Alan B.; MacLeod, Kenneth R.; McLoughlin, Harold; Milne, Dennis D. G.; Morgan, Douglas S.
THE   USUAL SOLITUDE  OF BLUFFS  OVERLOOKING THE  INLET  AND THE STATELY QUIET OF THE BROCK WERE OFTEN SHATTERED BY JOKER ANTICS
281 LAW (Concluded)—
* UPPER—Murray, Richard D.; Ohs, Robert J.; Smitton, Frank A.; Taggart, John D.; White, Cyril; Williams, David R.;
Wills, Charles H. LAW '50—Bakony, Charles E.; Bianco, Paul R.; Bray, Marshall P. * LOWER—Broatch, George K.;
Broderick, John C; Calder, Rachel E.; Cowpersmith, David; Ellis, David N.; Forbes, Alix Mary; Gurevich, B. Sydney;
Halcrow, William T.; Hinds, David B.; Hodgins, Rosemary E.; Hogarth, Douglas A.
* UPPER—Hughes, William J.; Islaub, S. Kenneth; Jenkins, James Rees; Leeming, Lloyd B.; MacDonald, Malcolm A.;
Milner, Allan Ralph; Mulligan, Maurice W.; Munro, G. Neville; Myers, Cecil D. P.; Ostrosser, Richard H.; Severide,
Norman. SLOWER—Slater, David C; Smith, ilbert J.; Topham, Ernest A.; Ward, Donald K.; Wasserman, Jack Whitney, Raymond B.; Williamson, Donald A.; Winchester, Donald R.; Worley, Lome S.
OUTDOOR CLUB PUT ON THE DOG ONE NIGHT IN THE SPRING AND HELD THEMSELVES A COSTUME PARTY WHERE NEARLY ANYTHING COULD GO
282 HOUSEWIFERY  RAN  POOR SECOND  IN CHOICE  OF CAREERS   FOR   SWEET   GIRL   GRADS   OF   HOME   EC   DEPARTMENT
HOME ECONOMICS
Cakes, puddings, sewing were over for the Home Ec gals as they wandered off with degrees
They had perspired over hot stoves for four years but
1948 saw the final serving of degrees for the graduating
class of Home Economics, and it had been worth it.
But plain pure homebuilding was not numbered among
the ambitions of many of the lovelies as they stepped up
to receive their neatly bound and cellophane-fresh graduation diplomas.
The lustre of high-price careers held them fascinated.
Housewifery was running second best to textile and food
purchasing agentry, dietetics, textile and interior design,
fashions, and a host of other niches where the demand for
Home Ec graduates was felt.
Homebuilding, they decided, would be nice, but perhaps
later.
College had been fun, though. There were the experi
mental cakes that turned out to be just that. There had
been leaky pressure cookers and spilt jam. And then, of
course, the precious pranksters who had considered it sport
to switch the labels on the salt and sugar.
Big kitchen project for the year was the monster birthday cake, decked with a candle for each year of the infant
faculty's life.
There were probably few more scientifically baked or
rapidly eaten cakes hustled out of the Home Ec ovens.
The occasion was the annual Home Ec class party which
kept Brock Hall rafters ringing until well on toward the
inevitable 8:30's.
Diminutive, efficient Dorothy Pearson headed the Home
Economics Undergraduate Society. Secretary was bright-
eyed Shirley Anderson and Peggy Bowe was vice-president.
283 * UPPER—Baldwin, Marjorie B., Vancouver—Kappa Alpha Theta; Bennett, Mavis G., Enderby; Berry, Frances E., New
Westminster—Phrateres; Bigsby, E. Jean, Armstrong—SCM; Bishop, Doris M., Vancouver—Alpha Gamma Delta; Blair,
Ruth M., Hollyburn—VOC; Bone, Margaret M., Vancouver—Alpha Gamma Delta; Bowe, Marguerite W., Vancouver—
Phrateres, Vice-President Home Ec. * LOWER—Breadon, Mary L., Vancouver—Alpha Delta Pi; VOC; Campbell, Marion E.,
West Summerland; Christie, Eileen A., Vancouver; Collinson, Eileen M. A., Vancouver; Cotterall, Gertrude, Vancouver
Alpha Gamma Delta; Diamond, Rita, Vancouver Delta Phi Epsilon; Hillel; Franklin, Mary E., Vancouver; Gee, E.
Roberta, Kamloops—Phraters, Mussoc.
* UPPER—Harris, Dorothy M., Penticton- SCM; Harriso n, M. Bernice, Vancouver- -Alpha Delta Pi; Haskins, Wendy
Lois J., Vancouver—Badminton Club; Hepburn, Phyllis R., New Westminster—Phrateres; Hill, Shirley, J. E.; Hopkins,
M. Isabel, Vancouver—Alpha Gamma Delta; Jackson, Eilee n L., Vancouver; Kincaide, Georgia May. * LOWER—Kirk,
Eva Winifred, Vancouver; Klusendorf, Edith M., Vancouver—Phrateres; VOC; Lake, Yvonne, Vancouver; Layton, Mary,
Victoria; Loutit, Kathleen A., Vancouver—Alpha Gamma Delta; President Panhell; McCarter, Jean L., Vancouver—Mussoc; McKinley, F. Eva J., Vancouver- -Alpha Delta Pi; MacNair, Esther F., Chilliwack—Phrateres.
k*, j»*>
i __.-___
i
I,
1                 \   i
_M           1 J
*
DANCES   IN   BROCK  WERE   COMMON  THING  TO   MARY  JANE   PATTERSON (EXTREME RIGHT) BUT NEVERTHELESS PROVIDED AMUSEMENT OFFTIMES
284 UPPER —MacQueen, Margaret J., Eagle Harbour; Montgomery, Mary M., Cultus Lake—Alpha Delta Pi; Home Ec Club;
Morris, Leila K., Jasper, Alta.; Pyrndahl, L. C; Smillie, Elsie R., Vancouver - Phrateres; Smith, Edna A., Vancouver—
Alpha Gamma Delta; Home Ec Athletic Rep; Soon, Isabel  Q. Y., Vancouver; Tredaway, Edna P., Victoria—SCM.
LOWER—Turner,   Blanche  M.,   Vancouver—Alpha  Omicron   Pi;   Mussoc,  Public   Speaking;   Walling,   Evelyn   J.,   New
Westminster—Treasurer Phrateres.
HOME EC '49
STRANGE   LAB,   BUT  A   FAMILIAR   ONE  TO   HOME   EC   STUDENTS,   FOR   WHOM   TABLE   DRILL
WAS  ALL   PART  OF  THE   GAME
While fourth year students were
traipsing about in black graduation
gowns preparing for the big step, third
year Home Economics girls were still
laboring over the hot stoves in white
aprons.
But the big day was no so far off
now.
One year doesn't sound so much,
they thought. But then why hurry
graduation? They were having fun,
wern't they? Third year had been a big
picnic. Sure they had been the dirty
dishes to wash; exams, essays, lab reports. But then there were parties,
dances and the good old Home
Economics Undergraduate Society
student government.
The cozy atmosphere of everyone
knowing everyone else had always been
the charm of UBC's young Home Ec
faculty.
Combined with the busiest term on
record, Forty-niner executive members
decided that this was the secret that
made Home Ec more fun than any other
course on the campus.
285 HOME ECONOMICS (Continued)—
fit j ?
* UPPER—Bean, Louise A.; Bown, Elizabeth M. Q.; Brethour, Helen S.; |Burr, M. Eleanor; Carman, Helen A.;
Carnsew, H. Muriel; Cunningham, Constance; Dalrymple, Jean W.; Dow, Marion Ellison; Doyle, G. Annetta;
Fairweather, Pauline; Finlay, Gladys M. * MIDDLE—Finlay, Gladys M.; Harvey, Mary L.; Hatfield, Helen |E.;
Hindmarsh, L. May; Kechik, Sasha A.; Kerr, Mildred E.; Kerr, Joan I.; Long, Catherine B.; Mayrs, Irene May; McColl,
Daphne J.; McMahon, Dorothy E. * LOWER—McManus, Helen; McMynn, Audrey G.; McTavish, Shirley A.; Murray,
Iris E. E.; Neilans, Mary N.; Norman, Mary T.; Olsen, Shirley W.; Paterson, Mary Jane; Pearson, Dorothy B. H.;
Richards, Barbara J.; Rose, Joan F.
* UPPER—Sortome, Eleanor Emma; Terrace, Ivy A. J.; Willoughby,   Lorene   E.;   Anderson,   Shirley   E.;   Ashworth,
Evelyn M.; Atkinson, Kathryn D.; Atrill, Phyllis Marie; Baird,   Moira   June;   Beamer,   Margaret   J.;   Bray,   Orma   E.
* LOWER—Carson, Muriel J.; Coursier, E. Doreen; Edgar, Eleanor R.; Gamey, Patricia M.; Hall, Ellanor A.; Heffernan,
wenyth T.; Hopkins, Nancy J.; Johnston, Phyllis M.; Jones, Evelyn Julia; Little, June M.; McKendry, Elizabeth M.
YOUTH TRAINING SCHOOL MEMBERS WERE SHOWN THE CAMPUS DURING  THE  WINTER WHEN THEY MET AT ACADIA  FROM B.C.   RURAL AREAS
286 * UPPER—McLean, Joan D.; McLeod, Jean H.; Mehmel, Lucille C; Morgan, Edith L.; Newcomb, Diane L.; Reid,
Doreen Marie; Robertson, Beverley M.; Rogers, Mary Isobel; Ross, Madeleine L.; Russell, Bette Ann; Scratchley,
Lila M.; Taylor, Margaret E. * MIDDLE—Warren, Barba ra Jean; Wells, Ann Nancy; Wilson, Patricia A.; Wolstencroft,
Sheila; Wong, Helen; Ashley, Joan E.; Atkinson, M. J.; Bigsby, Marianne L.; Blatchford, Averil G.; Bone, Genevieve G.;
Borthwick, Barbara J. * LOWER—Braim, Margaret Joan; Clarke, Doreen N.; Clarke, Edith M.; Cox, Marjorie;
Cruickshank, E. Dawn; Dench, Geraldine M.; Gibson, S. Anne; Grant, Isabelle; Hopkins, Iris Elaine; Joe, Hazel Audrey;
Johnston, Joanna J.
* UPPER—Keogh,  Geraldine M.;  Lim,  Lily;  MacCorkindale M.; Massinger, Mary M.; Pineo, F. Jacqueline; Tomsett,
Jean Emilie; Uurquhart, Beverley J.
MAMOOKS  WERE BEHIND THE  SCENES IN  MANY  UNIVERSITY  FUNCTIONS,   PROVIDED   MAJORETTES,  SIGNS AND  CHEERLEADERS   FOR  ALL  GAMES
287 GIRLS THOUGHT IT A LOT OF FUN WHEN IT CAME TO PLAYING  AROUND   WITH   GORY   MESSES   OR   STEALING   BLOOD
NURSING
The girls in the stiff white aprons took over Vancouver General, kept in touch with campus
Just under a hundred pretty girls in stiff white middies
figured they were better friends to man than any cocker
spaniel.
And they were  probably right. They were the nurses.
Nursing was a rough proposition if done the college
way. First year on the campus is followed by three slow-
moving hard-working trainee years at Vancouver General
Hospital. Then back to UBC for two or one year, depend
ing on the degree desired.
Carrot-topped and freckled, Cora May Stafford was just
a small-town girl but as president of Nursing Undergraduate Society, keeping the girls in the campus spotlight was
as easy as jabbing a penicillin needle.
Blood drives, X-ray drives, ISS drives, were sprinkled
with moonlight drives for the most action-packed year on
record.
* UPPER—Clark, Mary I.; Earnshaw, E. Mary; Greenhorn, D oreen; Ingram, Eileen; Joh, Anita D.; Montgomery, Nancy J.;
Stafford, Cora May; White, Eleanor J. * LOWER—Wilson, M ae; Barber, Bernice E.; Campbell, Margaret, A.; Mercer,
Gabrielle P.; Vincent, Marguerite V.; Donald, Conagh Jean; D oree, Joan F.; Gore, Joan Marian.
288 * UPPER—Hodgert, Dorothy A.; Kennedy, Ruth Mary; Leighton, Margaret E.; McCrory, Verna Mabel; Neilson, Isabella
C; Scott, Muriel Ruth; Buckler, Mildred A.; Chamberlayne, E. Jean. *LOWER—Longmore, W. Mary; Saunders, Gwendolyn, J.; Siddons, Pauline Joy; Thompson, Cleta.
* UPPER—Angus, Isobel E.; Godwin, Elizabeth, J. H.; Gould, Clara Emily; Kergin, Dorothy Jean; Knowlton, Gwynneth J.;
Mclntyre, Keitha G.; Messenger, Joaneta D.; Murray, E. Claire. * LOWER—Rut, Gloria W.; Smith, Amy Gertrude; Stewart,
Patricia J.; Thompson, Dorothy M.; Upham, Betty Ann; Wade, Mary Kathleen, Willis, Marjorie E.; Coleman, M. E.
COSTUME PARTIES RAN THE GAMUT FROM MEDIEVAL VOC GATHERING (1 AND 3) THROUGH FARMERS' FROLIC (2 AND 4) TO ANNUAL HIJINX 151
289 NURSING (Concluded) —
I
* STANDING Boyle, Marion; Reid, Dorothy; McNair, Mary; Riddell, Hilda; Wheeler, Shelagh; Fraser, Elaine; Taylor,
Shirley; Fullerton, Margaret. * SEATED—Butler, Jean; McCarthy, Jessie; Caplette, Betty; McDermid, Mary; Cope, Doreen;
Byers, Dorothy.
*BACK ROW—Jones, Estelle; McLellan, Marny; Jackson,
Vivian; Crane, Vin. * THIRD ROW—Ward, Greta; Twil-
ley, Elaine; DeLisle, Elaine; Creamer, Ruth. ^SECOND
ROW—Graham, Joan; Bullen, Betty; Mitchell, Beverley;
Harvey, Caroline. * FRONT ROW—McCarthy, Noreen;
Stewart, Grace; Parfait, Dot; Calvert, Jean.
STIFF WHITE uniforms look formal here but nurses' executive proved they
could be informal too.
NURSES
Blood  Drive  and  smash-hit
Socials Mark 1948 for NUS
UBC's lost battalion found itself in 1948.
Lost because they spend at least three of their five or
six undergraduate years at VGH off the campus, the nurses
turned up in force on the Point Grey promontory in 1948.
Success of the Blood Drive had been the biggest feather
in their stiff starched caps. Then there had been the Nurses
Ball and the Pre-Med Ball.
Executive of the Nurses Undergraduate Society in 1948
was: president, Cora-May Stafford; vice-president, Mary
Reston; secretary, Dorothy Gallagher; treasurer, Betty Ann
Upham; social convener, Eleana White; athletic rep., Margaret Stevens.
290 PHYS EU
Musclemen Box Wrestle Pant
Their Way Through
Final Exams
UBC's muscle men turned out in
"full strength" this year to kick, jump
and stretch their way toward the coveted BPE (Bachelor of Physical Education) in one of the most strenuous
courses the  university  offers.
Not lacking in brains, the brawny
teachers sweated as hard in their classrooms as on the gym floor, alternating
between books and basketballs, pens
and pyramids.
Under the capable direction of Bob
Osborne, the boys and girls should be
able to compete with any feats of
strength their pupils offer.
President of the Physical Education
Undergraduate Society was Al Thies-
sen; secretary-treasurer, Peter Greer,
and vice-president, Joan Robinson.
GROANERS play like matmen for Phys-Ed  homework; Exams were tougher,
all sports, turn out first rate gym teachers, instructors.
Infant faculty cover
* UPPER—PHYSICAL ED '49—Andrew, Frederic G.; Attwell, Lewis S.; Blake, Roy; Gould, Isabel M.; Home, Gerald T.;
Laing, Margaret A.; Nelford, Terry E.; Pavelich, John I.; Shearman, Jacqueline; Skubay, Michael; Thompson, Gordon.
* MIDDLE—PHYSICAL ED '50—Askew, Stuart Wm.; Hansen, Ivan E.;  Husband, Joan M. W.; Merritt, Shirley Mae;
Moore, Donald E.; Munro, K. Anne; Nelson, Jack Taylor; Pendleton, Jane F.;   Pride,  A. Harry;  Stephens,  J. Marcelle.
* LOWER—Taylor, Belinda D.; Taylor, Cecil J.; Titus, A. Grace; Weber, Catherine Jean; Wilson, Kathleen M.; Wilson,
Katherine; Young, Harrison S.   PHYSICAL ED '51—MacKinnon, Carol P.; Schrodt, Phyllis B.
291 ALTHOUGH  SMALL THE  "OTHER  CLASSES"  HAD  MANY  ADVANTAGES   SOCIALLY,   ABLE   TO   HAVE   FANCIER   FUNCTIONS
OTHER CLASSES
Lesser groups on campus helped to round out academic atmosphere of cosmospolitan college
Social Work went big-time in '48, finding a new home
for its 103 students. There were 73 students proceedings
to their BSW's and 15 taking course for the MSW degree.
The executive consisted of Ken Weaver, president; Dorothy
Farley, vice-president; Evelyn Roberts, secretary-treasurer,
and Alice Grace and John Pollock, MSW and BSW representatives respectively.
There were 70 Teacher training students in '47-'48, 50
of them male. Half the time was spent off the campus practising the classroom theories, they took a junket to Essondale Mental Health Clinic to study educational methods as
applied to mental cases. Executive for the year: Frank
Wright, president; Les Canty, vice-president; Yvette Morris,
secretary-treasurer;   conveners,   Lorna   Wilson   and   Lome
Barclay.
The post-graduates attending during the session were
taking courses varying from advanced physics to special
history studies. Unorganized and only optionally paying
AMS fees, they formed just a small portion of the UBC
population.
Pharmacy students, though small in number, had their
own undergraduate society, headed by Hugh McCue, president, and Ross Sinclare, vice-president. Because of their
small numbers, social functions of their own were limited,
but they partook of the general student activities.
292 * UPPER—Calnan, Wilfrid M.; Heckels, Enid Mabel; Ley dier, Bernice R.; Mathewson, Eleanor W.; Roberts, Evelyn
Marie; Evans, Maureen E.; Janssen, M. Elizabeth; Khun, Gottfried John; Moore, C. Jean. * MIDDLE—Seaman,
Helen L.; Wilson, Barbara Ruth; Wood, Russel B. Conchie, Bruce E.; Hack, Otto H.; McKeague, Justin; Nightingale,
Jacob A.; Phare, Stewart; Tamblyn, John P. * LOWER—Woodrow, Alexander; Brown, Harry; Carter, David S.; Jones,
Robert H.; Ozeroff, Michael J.; Rogers, Lloyd P.; Wood, George Alan; Clarke, Joyce G.
* UPPER—Glover, Rose Marie A.; MacDonald, Ruth E.; Smith, June L.; Auchinvole, H. Joan; Cline, John Donald;
Daniel, Marjorie C; Durham, Nanette Rose; Jacobs, V. Marjorie; LeHuquet, J. Raymond. | * LOWER- McAllister,
Margaret; McEachran, M. Joan;  O'Grady, Doreen M.; Wood, Hilda May.
CLARKE AND FRIEND AT HI  JINX,  SWISS MISS, AGGIE BASIE-BELL,   FLOOR   SHOW,  AND   DYKE   BEATEN   AT   HIS   OWN   GAME
293 X£*5>
^3^;
«__•>".. "*»&._*_ ?'kj?<
*!r*.j   of  chhrge   AH
!Mu members of tlte
^L'KitunKtbillly  lor accuracy
nTh>HH^otl tin any *po_ftc (tot*.
(PUP
<V VOJUgJCCU^
In this final section of the book, the
editors have tried' to find space to
record the little things that happened';
the events and sidelights that formerly
could not be included in the year book.
However, these little thinks mean
something, even though they cannot be
carved on the main trunk of the
Totem—the Tribal Record of UBC.
Seemingly unimportant many of them
may seem, but altogether they help
fill out the record of the year. There is
something in the following pages for
every student, although little is for all.
So when page 336 is turned, the tale
is told: One more year in the growing
history of UBC; one more page in the
expanding diary of an international
campus. _fT- *OJ
mm-      ~^J ^   .    -A. '^
jjfc^^^^I
_*c.
-v2___-f_& 5g__^^_^ __^
5__SSS
ADS * MISCELLANY For over twenty-five years .. .
For over 25 years the name of Ward & Phillips Limited has
been synonymous with "dependability" in the field of printing
production. The ability of producing fine printing and
lithography within the delivery dates mutually agreed upon
has been the cornerstone of our business. Should you have
a problem in the production of your printed requirements,
whether it be the planning of folders, booklets, catalogues
or printed stationery, we would greatly appreciate your
enquiry. Our response will be immediate and we hope, helpful.
WARD    &    PHILLIPS    LIMITED
Csroaucers  of   cTine  Cyrinhng  ana   oLtil-iografiny
382  WEST  BROADWAY  -   TELEPHONE:   FAirmont  7605  -  VANCOUVER, B.C.
296 YOUTH GROUP BEGINS STROLL OVER CAMPUS IN TYPICAL GARB
YOUTH
Young people from many B.C. points
received training here as rural leaders
The south side of Acadia Camp reverberated) once
again in the spring of 1948 to the yells and catcalls
of youths from throughout the province of British
Columbia. From daily lectures, meals in the Acadia
kitchens and forays across the large, green campus,
the province's youth were trained to take their place
in the fast-moving pace of a modern province.
They were attending the latest in the university's
series of Youth Training Camps, which name has
been adopted to that assemblage of huts to the south
of Acadia Camp proper—the Youth Training Centre.
In '48, for the first time, the school was known
as the Youth Training Course. Previously it had
been called the Rural Leadership School, but authority took exception, or feared the people might take
exception, to the term leadership, causing the change
in title. The change, however, was not complete, for
in their final dance in Brock Hall's main lounge, part
of the decorations consisted of the old insignia—a
large circular cardboard crest on which was emblazoned the insignia—RLS.
Students at UBC at first, as every year, were
somewhat startled at the sight of the Centre's
"youngsters" trooping across the campus clad in
jeans, cords, sloppy sweaters and even bright red
plaid shirts. In the course of their few weeks' stay,
however, the staid undergrads got used to them.
SLACKS WERE  ORDER  OF THE  DAY  FOR  THE  GALS AT BROCK
COMPLIMENTS
EMPIRE MOTORS
Limited
BURRARD AND DUNSMUIR
AUTHORIZED FORD AND MONARCH
DEALERS
SMART
DRESSERS
APPRECIATE
BETTER
CLOTHES
Quality with Style
ALWAYS A SAFE INVESTMENT
YOU WILL LIKE OUR
PERSONAL SERVICE
Zddie k. 2>eem
534 Seymour Street   -   Opp. Yorkshire Bldg.
;■. \
297 CONGRATULATIONS TO CLASS OF '48
tfja»*
JiUaW
UNIVERSITY SMART SHOP
4353 W.  10th Avenue
DISTINCTIVE  HAIR STYLING
tJavvW-auAe  <Jje.auiu  Q)aian
Proprietrist
EDITH M. WALL
Opposite   Hotel  Vancouver
4450 West 10th Avenue ALma 0045
VANCOUVER, B.C.
"Meet Me At"
ffiftiftifflffiffij^
CURRIE    AND    PRESIDENT   TALK   OVER    DIFFICULT    CAMPAIGN
DRIVE
Fund drive short of objective despite
great   efforts   of   labouring   directors
Campus International Student Service relief,
whose prime function is to buy books and necessities for destitute students in wartorn countries, suf-
fere a discouraging set-back in 1947-48.
UBC's campaign for 1SS netted only $500 of its
$9000 objective, in spite of the efforts of a hardworking committee headed by Bob Currie.
Four UBC students, chosen for scholastic ability
and service to the student body, attended a six-weeks
international affairs session in Germany, sponsored
by ISS.
UBC representatives were Cliff Greer, Muriel van
der Valk, Dacre Cole and Gregory Belkov. Dr. Gordon M. Shrum, head of the physics department,
represented the faculty.
298 TWO   OF   THE   WILD   KITTENS   CAPTURED   AFTER   LONG   CHASE
SIN
in
Cat's   family   unruly,   delinquent
depths of musty Brock Hall basement
Campus life, apparently, is not always the best
training for motherhood.
UBC has its own delinquent family in the person
of Queenie, the Brock Hall's famous black mouser,
and her many offspring. Last year, while hotly pursuing her duty, this cat-mother shamefully neglected
her children.
Result was that the kittens bceame anti-social, and
could only be enticed from their musty cellar retreat
around meal-times.
EMPIRE SHIPPING
COMPANY LIMITED
WORLD-WIDE
FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
PAcific 7121
966 W. Hastings St    Vancouver, B.C.
UNPREPAREDNESS
■ - - FAILURE
A bank account is an assistant in character building. It establishes the confidence, independence and pride which increases
effort and paves the way to success.
Open an account today and be prepared!
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
UNIVERSITY DISTRICT BRANCH—H. M. CORWALL, Mgr.
4473 West  10th Ave.   (near Sasamat)
21 BRANCHES  IN GREATER VANCOUVER
63 BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
299 Your Campus Service Station
Students'   Car   Repairs   Our
Specialty
U. B. (1 Service Station
(Just off University Boulevard)
ROY HAND,   Prop.
2180 Allison Road ALma 0524
Compliments of
MR. GORDON FARRELL
Challenger Watches
are known throughout
Canada for
dependability and
long service
SELECT YOUR CHALLENGER
at
Jewelers
BIRKS
Vancouver,  B. C.
Silversmiths
SEDGEWICK   UNVEILS   HUMORIST'S   PLAQUE   IN   BROCK   HALL
JABEZ
Funnyman  becomes  only  a  memory
to thousands of mourning undergrads
In the Cavalcade of Events of 1948, the saddest
was without doubt the "passing on" of UBC's Prince
of Humorists, Eric P. "Jabez" Nicol, now a successful Canadian author.
The writer who as boy and man armed with an
acid pen had probed the student idiosyncracies and
made his students laugh at themselves for ten years
was immortalized by erection of a bronze plaque
during a full-dress ceremony in Brock Hall, February 16.
Memorial was unveiled by Dr. G. G. Sedgewick,
and inscription read in part: "To Jabez . . . who
gave to his fellow men . . . the priceless gift of
laughter."
Funds for the dedication—which just missed its
pre-arranged Valentine's Day deadline—were raised
by a student Nickels for Nicol campaign, sponsored
by Ubyssey idea man and columnist Les Bewley.
Campaign was carried to a successful conclusion over
the gentle protests of the unassuming Jabez.
Bewley's only regret was that rising transportation costs forced him to abandon in the quarry his
original memorial idea, rumored to be a campus
"kissing rock."
300 MORE and MORE,
it's
II
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
\\
1948 is big with promise for British Columbia. Never in its history
was there a keener interest than there is today in its opportunities and
attractions. In all parts of the world there is an eagerness to know
what it has to offer to the capitalist, industrialist, and homeseeker.
It is safe to say that British Columbia was never in healthier or more
robust condition, that never has a keener or more soundly-based
optismism prevailed.
We are entering a new era, in which new demands will be made upon
us all. We face a future of splendid promise to the young men and
women of today.
Business and industrial leaders are of one mind—that this is the day and
age of specialized knowledge, that the key positions, the worth-while
posts in the business and industrial world will go to those whose minds
are trained and disciplined, whose perceptions have been quickened to
grasp the intricacies of the new techniques.
The tide of settlement is definitely flowing to the West. With its
many advantages, British Columbia has become the Mecca for settlers
from every part, the chosen field for industrial and commercial
enterprise.
MORE AND MORE, IT'S "BRITISH COLUMBIA," to industrialists,
investors,  home-, and  pleasure-seekers.
THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND  INDUSTRY
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B. C.
G. ROWEBOTTOM
Deputy Minister
HON. LESLIE H. EYRES
Minister
301 E.
A.
LEE LTD.
THE
FINEST
IN WEARING APPAREL
623 Howe St.
•
Vancouver, B. C.
MArine 2457
MILLER   SENIOR   SHOULD    GRADUATE    BEFORE   HIS   SON    DOES
VANCOUVER'S FIRST
DEPARTMENT STORE
Georgia at Granville Streets
Vancouver's   Key   Corner
fytfclM*j*%.
INCORPORATED-
302 FATHER, SON
Family   pair   both   attending   college
but   father   hopes   to   graduate   first
College student Craig Miller has no fear that his
father will misunderstand any of his campus problems. His father, Ernest Miller, is also enrolled at
UBC, The situation of both father and son at the
same university does not seem the least unusual to
the Millers.
Ernest Miller, having served twenty-one years in
the army, is studying law and will complete his
course two years before his son, who is in At\s.
With two members of the family as full-time
students the Millers were forced to recognize the
housing problem. After a lengthy search with what
seemed like too many dead-end leads for comfort,
the Millers discovered a vacant three-room trailer at
Wesbrook camp.
Being a talented father, Miller senior took to
carpentering and enlarged the cupboard space, thus
simplifying the housekeeping problems for his wife.
The trailer system has proved both convenient
and inexpensive, and Mrs. Miller, with a built-in
refrigerator and an electric rangette, is able to carry
on just as if she had a real kitchen.
Both Mr. Miller and Craig are doubly delighted
with their present housing arrangements, since it has
solved for them the transportation problem—they are
able to get an extra forty winks in the morning and
arrive on the campus within ten minutes.
'SOMETHING NICE  INSIDE FOR YOU"
iJaint  tLireu <Jia\dex G)i}op
"YOUR CAMPUS FLORIST"
4429 West 10th Ave. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone ALma 0660
^t^danU limited
CREATORS  OF  FINE JEWELLERY AND WATCHES
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Seymour at Dunsmuir
PAcific 4364-5
"NOPE, /'M ON
THE GOLD SEAL
STANDARD!"
You don', wonder that Sylvester is too satisfied with
"Gold Seal" to want any substitute. You wouldn't either.
This superior brand of fancy red sockeye salmon is so
delicious . . so rich in tangy sea-food flavor. Now that
supplies are more plentiful, you'll be able to get "Gold
Seal" Salmon more often at your grocer's. Look for it
today.
GOLD SEAL—Fancy Sockeye; deep red
color.    Finest salmon for every use.
RED SEAL—Fancy Cohoe Salmon; medium red color.   A salmon of many uses.
PINK  SEAL —  Fancy    Pink    Salmon;
lighter in color.     Ideal for fish  loaves,
cakes, etc.
GOLD SEAL
SALMON
A Product1 of
THE   CANADIAN   FISHING   CO.
LIMITED
Vancouver, B. C.
303 304 CONDUCTOR JACQUES SINGER IN A TYPICAL POSE, CONDUCTS
SINGER
Popular Vancouver   Symphony leader
led his orchestra to many full houses
Delighted undergraduates were able to enjoy more
than their fair share of "Singerisms" through the
immensely popular campus concerts given by the
Singer-conducted Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.
The dapper, dynamic maestro and his orchestra
won the hearts of students completely with their quips
and music.
Whenever the symphony under Mr. Singer or
some guest conductor was scheduled, arrangements
were made for a full house. Jerry Macdonald and
the Special Events Committee, arrangers, were never
disappointed.
ASSAY, INDUSTRIAL AND EDUCATIONAL
LABORATORY SUPPLIES   —   CHEMICALS
CAVE & COMPANY
Ltd.
567  Hornby St. - Vancouver,  B.C.
SINGER CONGRATULATES ONE OF THE "AIRBORNE" CHORISTERS
SPEED     WRITI NG
HARRADINE
COMMERCIAL COLLEGE
41st at Granville                                KE. 1944
OFFERS A SHORT COURSE IN . . .
•     speed writing
•     shorthand
•     typing,  bookkeeping
Day and Night Classes, Open All Year
There's   Always
Another Winter
And
that means furnaces to stoke and fires
to keep burning. To make sure of
next winter's fuel supply, place your
order now. You stand a better chance
of getting the size and grade you
require.
INQUIRE  ABOUT  SUMMER
ICE CONTRACT
Save up to 25% with guaranteed ice-delivery all
summer!
GARVIN ICE & FUEL
COMPANY LIMITED
305 SEE THE  NEW  POST-WAR MODEL
of the
ROYAL    PORTABLE
TYPEWRITER
with
• FINGER FORM KEYS—to follow the con
tour of your fingers.
• SPEED SPACER—cuts down spacing errors.
• RAPID  RIBBON  CHANGE — new ribbon
with no fuss or muss.
• MAGIC MARGIN — position the carriage
then flick your fingers.
BYRNES TYPEWRITERS
LTD.
592 Seymour Street — PA. 7942 - PA. 2752
B. A. PRODUCTS
CONVENIENT FOR THE
STUDENT
TENTH AVENUE
SERVICE STATION
10th & Imperial
AL. 0250
ADASKIN AND MARR PERFORMED FOR STUDENTS AND FACULTY
ADASKIN
Students   and   faculty   both   applaud
Adaskin   and  Marr's  evening  recitals
Throughout the last winter "overtime" musical
enjoyment has been provided for UBC students and
staff in a series of recitals by violinist Harry Adaskin and pianist Frances Marr.
These free concerts were held in the Brock Hall
on Sunday evenings, and it is proof of their enthusiastic reception that students from all over the
city trekked as far as ten miles to hear the performance of the Varsity music professor and his accompanist wife.
Music heard at the Adaskin-Marr recitals was
carefully selected with variations of length and mood
and contrast of classical works with modern.
Some of the Beethoven sonatas studied in Mr.
Adaskin's classes were repeated at the concert with
the enlightening comments of the violinist, who is
also widely experienced as a lecturer and critic.
Selections from the recitals given by the Adaskins
on their eastern tour were included in the later programmes.
Another stimulating feature of the Sunday evening entertainment was the perceptive and brilliant
presentation of the works of more modern composers. The tempestuous violin concerto of Sibelius was
well-performed and equally well-received.
The Adaskins rendition of the work of Delius
were especially notable for their sensitivity of performance and fidelity to atmosphere.
30$ A WORD OF
GREETING
TO THE
GRADUATING
CLASS OF '48
In bidding "good-bye" to the corridors of the University, the graduating
classes will have mixed feelings.
Looking backward over your University experience, you will cherish
the friendships made and the knowledge gained in the past four years. Those
years have been epoch-making at U. B. C. and have been challenging to
the ingenuity and the loyalty of Faculty and Students alike. You have
pioneered in a formative period of this provincial institution.
Looking forward, you will require to do some pioneering in this great
undeveloped province of ours. The young industries of British Columbia
await your skills, your knowledge, your ingenuity and your genius; and the
loyal application of your youth and enthusiasm will yield dividends to you
in richness of living and usefulness of service.
I wish for you all a full measure of happiness and success in your
careers.
WM. T. STRAITH,
Minister of Education.
307 YOU  MAY  DO  BETTER WITH
KEYSTONE
BRAND
Loose leaf Sheets
and Binders
Choose   Keystone   Brand  for  all
your Class and Study Work
Smith Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
VANCOUVER - VICTORIA - EDMONTON - CALGARY
LOSER    WILLIAMS     (LEFT)     CONGRATULATES     BIG     BROUSSON
ELECTION
First wide-open campaign in history
as   election   restrictions   are   dropped
"Dumping" of restrictions against campaigners
for student office cleared the way for an uproarious
elections week.
Stumping in the presidential race resembled a
lusty,   colorful,   three-ring   circus.   Student   voters,
Armstrong & _fon.ei.ti Construction Company
LIMITED
ENGINEERS AND  GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
1449 HORNBY ST. VANCOUVER, B.C.
308 MGLO ClUIIilV
Shipping Company
STEAMSHIP AND CHARTERING AGENTS
Marine Building
Vancouver, B.C.
ready for anything, weren't surprised when Applied
Science candidate Dave Brousson introduced a
"Brousson Shows," complete with freaks and cheesecake, on the campus. His opponent in the close battle, Law student Dave Williams, was loudly supported by a tribe of wild, war-painted natives.
Post-elections drama occurred on Brock Hall stage
when Don Ferguson, Publications editor-in-chief,
pushed a peanut with his nose, as punishment for
betting on the wrong "horse."
C. P. FOSTER
_ CO. LTD.
ENGINEERS' AND SURVEYORS'
INSTRUMENTS
DRAWING AND TRACING PAPERS
COMMERCIAL STATIONERS
BLUE-PRINT AND OZALID
PAPERS AND CLOTH
569 RICHARDS
TAtlow 2245
BROUSSON  SIDE-SHOW  WAS ONE HIGH  POINT OF THE WEEK
B.C. Distributors for
DODGE
DESOTO
Passenger  Cars
DODGE
"Job-Rated" Trucks
Begg Brothers
LTD.
1190 W. GEORGIA
PA. 5181
309 END RESULT OF ROSY'S BLOOD-LETTING DRIVE WAS HARD BED
WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
SHARP and THOMPSON
ARCHITECTS
626 W. Pender St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Engineers . . .
When you graduate to problems involving high grade sand
and gravel, True-Mix concrete
and other building materials,
consult
DIETHERS LTD.
Granville Island
MA 6231
Vancouver, B.C.
m%W* ^_l                                                    _L
■■_■        B'Hw     _____H
__ES__V Ii-* ___Ki_ w
_T"-'- ___* *■
1 v^^J[              KM
__^_. v_B P-.^-^^X m
■ a^W-i_lr-^CvV :   V_B
H                   —^mmm%mm\tT/.    ^—mm^^^H
TL '                                     *                    1 V VT
_£. «%'■                 fl J    '      'I to no     1
mpR  _ ti • '___MALPl
_H_& L __________■>, mui
JUST   A   PART   OF  EXTENSIVE   CAMPAIGN   TO
COLLECT   DIMES
DIMES
Rosy and Big Red at different times
led private campaigns to public good
That "Maid of All Work," Law faculty's gift to
the UBC campus, came through once again in the
1947-48 term by piloting the campus through one
of the most extensive campaigns for blood donations
yet witnessed by hordes of students long inured to
campaigns of all varieties.
Rosemary Hodgins, USC president, took on her
shoulders the task of making students at the University of British Columbia blood conscious. Soon the
stumbling Toties were faced at every turn by posters
showing suppliant (and beautiful) Red Cross nurses
telling them that their, yes, their blood was needed
—now. The students followed through.
One of Rosie's cohorts on the USC—Big Red
Grantham, president of Engineering Undergraduate
Society—was responsible for another of the campus's
odd campaigns for good causes—this time the March
of Dimes.
The Engineers organized and won a race of dimes
—a race designed to see which faculty could produce
I he longest lines of dimes on the Quad's concrete
surface. They followed their successful defense of
their own challenge by claiming that The Ubyssey
had failed to give them sufficient coverage—a complaint so old and so common to Pubsters that it
raised scarcely any dust in the mouldy basement
quarters of the Publications Board.
Best Wishes to the Student Body ot U.B.C.
For Success in 1948
British  Columbia's  Pioneer  Hardware Supply House
VANCOUVER, VICTORIA
NEW  WESTMINSTER
310 Bank of Montreal
West Point Grey Branch, 4502 Tenth Ave. W.
A.  E. WALTERS, Manager
YOUR CAIDPUS BARBER SHOP
Union Sbop (A.F.L)
Save  yourself   valuable   time   by   dropping   in   a.   your
convenience.   Minimum waiting time with
FOUR chairs to serve you.
PETER DYKE
Proprietor
Formerly win Hotel Vancouver Barber Shop
South Basement Brock Hall
PREXY LIVINGSTONE GOT HOOKED ON WEIRD LIQUOR BATTLE
BOOZE
Mystery  beer bottle  found  complete
with   straws   on    Livingstone's   desk
Dodging slyly behind a sheaf of Students' Council
minutes, student president Grant Livingstone was
caught in a light moment by a quick Totem shutter.
On the table before him is a light-bodied "long
one," equipped with seven straws. The student official
and six other councillors were about to drown their
legislative worries. Question: what was in the bottle?
311 Gestetner
(Canada) Limited
Manufacturers ot the
World's Premier Duplicator
Fine Papers, Stencils
and Ink
660 Seymour St. Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 9644
HEAD OFFICE FOR CANADA—TORONTO, ONT.
FACTORY—LONDON,   ENGLAND
UBYSSEY   REPORTER   DEBUNKED   THE   WHOLE   ISSUE   IN   SURVEY
0.11LLM
LIMITED
Jewellers         Silversmiths
Diamond Watches
•
GRANVILLE at PENDER, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Your
"TOTEM" Photographer
J. C. WALBERER
IF YOUR PICTURE ....
. . . appears in this issue of The Totem you may obtain
additional prints in any size, rapidly and at a reasonable
price by telephoning .  . .
J. C. WALBERER
Residence:
5 West 7th Ave.
Phone:
FAir.  1157
312 SEX WAR
Vacilating   coeds   first   spurn   males,
but   flock   back   quickly   at   protests
There's bound to be mild furore when university
men, renowned for their versatility, are spurned by
their own coeds. Such is the conceit of many college
men that they adopt the it-can't-happen-here attitude.
But it did.
Two female university seniors, "tired of university men," advertised in a Vancouver newspaper for
a couple of naval or air force officers to take them
out. The advertisement had unusual results.
Most of the males accepted the challenge quite
casually—they still have their old uniforms, and if
the prize merits it, could easily have them pressed.
Several attractive coeds, when asked by a Ubyssey
reporter for their opinion on the matter, replied in
what was, for the males, a satisfactory manner. Most
of them were fond of campus men. They thought the
girls who advertised were suffering, not from a
weariness of UBC men, but from a lack of ability to
catch any.
But the innocent little seven-line ad did more
than that. It knocked the props from under the founders of the Commerce Date Bureau.
The original aim of the Bureau was "to find a
man for every woman and a woman for every man."
They agreed that the experiment was a failure.
And what became of the girls? They were turned
over to a sympathetic newspaper columnist, who
solved their problem satisfactorily.
For All Your Activities
Courteous, Prompt Service
STAR CABS
MArine 2121
BEST WISHES TO THE
STUDENT BODY AND GRADUATING
CLASS OF 1948
KER 8 KER LTD.
Real Estate and Insurance
475 Howe Street
PAcific 3241
the m...
Still   Boasts  the  same   Informality
although  the   Brock
Memorial Building Lunch Room is getting some of its business.
Eat in either place, depending on the mood you're in . . . but
don't forget to patronize Campus Merchants. Your undergrad
idiosyncrasies will be understood and overlooked.
313 Wm>3wm$$ targe variety ami complete
s^mmm of quality mmimmMm m evtr y
E^aitii^at will help Was yoiir bu%et*
Consistent Bvery-day ' Low Pimm.
VAM&&.& VI» »S    I-ARGBST     D6 P A ft T... 8 £f T   :Sf»i|
i':o:.^.;.>;^::s:::^.;::.v.>:.:A:.:r..0.: •.-•.-.....: y:^^;^;?;^:^:^;^:^-::^::?:^:^^
314 CROWDED    ARMOURY    LISTENED    TO    "AIRBORNE"    PREMIERE
AIRBORNE
Campus groups banded once again in
annual  tribute  to  dead of two wars
UBC students' extra-curricular activities truly went
"sky-high" both in the artistic and in the zany advertising fields.
A commendable performance was turned in by
one hundred UBC students who volunteered as chorus
members for Vancouver presentation of the novel
"Airborne Symphony."
Garbed in Air Force blue, the untrained, "raw"
recruits won the praise of music critics with their
combined vocal harmony.
The Aggie faculty was "airborne" a different
fashion when they brought a helicopter to the campus to spark their annual spring apple day.
The buzzing, mechanical "humming-bird" landed
on the Arts lawn, under the noses of hundreds of
cheering students. Out stepped vivacious, denim-clad
coed Guida Hill, pretty Aggie student. The apple-day
sales and proceeds of a hoe-down in a carefully-made
haymow in the Armoury were put into a fund to
buy a memorial fountain for Professor Frank Buck,
retired member of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Although he wasn't equipped with wings like
Pegasus, a horse managed to get into the Aggie flying
circus act. He was content to stay on solid ground,
munching the campus greensward.
To the Student Body . . .
OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND
BEST WISHES
BELL & MITCHELL LTD.
541 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY
LOOSE LEAF BOOKS, SLIDE RULES
FOUNTAIN PENS, SCALES
DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
CLARKE  b STUART
CO. LTD.
Stationers, Printers, Bookbinders
550 Seymour - Vancouver, B.C.
FANCY  AGGIE   PUBLICITY  STUNT BROUGHT HELICOPTER,  SOWS
COLUMBIA
PAPER CO. LIMITED
Wholesale
Paper Merchants
Manufacturers of "Columbia" Quality
Scribblers and Exercise Books
Vancouver, B.C.
Victoria, B.C.
315 NELSONS GUARANTEE
YOU
The Finest Quality Laundry
and Dry Cleaning Service
in Canada
jBP
rAiimonl 6611
Practice makes perfect ... in sport
. . . and in money management too.
Good practice in money management
is to spend less than you earn, and
bank whatever you can . . . regularly,
till it becomes a habit. Remember:
what you save is the most important
part of what you earn.
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
EDITOR    FERGUSON    RECEIVES    TRADITIONAL    "HONORARIUM"
EDITORS
Clachan   Hall   scene   of  final   revelry
as the merry Pubsters held their wake
Traditionally exuberant Pubsters capped off another year in the spring of '48 with a gay and liquid
party in West Vancouver's Clachan Hall—a building
situated over the equally liquid waters of Burrard
Inlet.
It was the bang-up event of the year, at which
Pubsters were honoured for past service and informed
of their stations for the coming session. High point
of the night was presentation of the traditional rum-
filled silver flask which custom requires all retiring
editors receive. (See cut.)
As the evening aged Pubsters gathered in groups
large and small in any and all corners of the cosy
party-quarters. They talked of the future, the past,
sang songs (favourites: Glenwhorple, The Whiffen-
poof, Pub "Lullaby"), and upstairs in some peasant's
room they listened as publisher Morris Belkin whiled
away the evening with small talk on big subjects. He
was later joined by his wife but the party did not
break up.
Retiring staffers made their parting speeches, the
Totem boss uttering a now infamous one-sentence
farewell, and before the evening was gone the antics
of Pubsters were many and varied.
Many were the tears shed in cups as the gathered
clan recalled the battles with USC, the brawl with
the Mardi Gras, struggles with the EUS, with Council, with individual students.
All in all, Pubsters as a whole figured it was a
pretty good year.
316 THE   LEGION   BABY   CONTEST   SOON  SPREAD   ACROSS   NATION
BABES
THE   KIDDIES'   BAWL   HAD   ITS   OWN   WEE   BRATS   FOR   1948
Legion and Jokers combine to make
diapers popular across campus in '48
In spring term, UBC students showed an abnormal, extra-curricular preoccupation with babies.
A campus Diaper Derby was staged, in which
beautiful 23-month-old Susan Joy Thorneycroft
romped home a winner. And the zany Jokers' Club,
happy over its success last year, decided to hold the
Kiddie Bawl again.
THE UMERffl BOOK STORE
The Book Store was established for the convenience of the Students and has effected a considerable saving to the Students in time and
money. It is prepared to supply all Text
Books required for the various courses offered
in the University, also such articles as Note
Books, Loose-Leaf Sheets, Fountain Pens,
Drawing Paper and Instruments.
317 Whether  for  Home or  Business Office,  our
Stationery and Printing Department will
serve you in many ways.
GEHRKE'S LTD.
566 Seymour
PAcific 0171
JELLY
POWDERS
e
SPICES
FLAVORING
EXTRACTS
The Vancouver Supply Company Ltd.
A
a/itze/i
THE BIGGEST NAME IN
SWIM SUITS
Sun Clothes    •    Sweaters
Wherever you find the Jantzen label—you
have found the best design, in tailoring and
fit. Look for the Red Diving Girl, your assurance of quality.
J11TZ1I PITTING MILLS
of Canada Limited
CANADA'S BEST KNOWN APPAREL NAME
Vancouver, B.C.
CHAMPION   HELMAN   PLAYED   TEN   BOARDS   SIMULTANEOUSLY
CHESS
B.C.   chess  champion  visits  campus;
awes students with ten-at-once game
The UBC chess team was one of the most active
minor clubs on the cumpus during the year.
The team entered the Vancouver Inter-Club B
tournament, won five matches and drew one, to annex the B trophy. A second team made a fair showing in the same tournament.
Besides the extra-campus activity, there was much
excitement on the campus due to the Helman match.
A. Helman is the B.C. chess champion, and is considered the best player in the province. He is also
the one-time Manitoba champion.
He has showed an active interest in promoting
chess on the campus, and has given valuable help to
the university club. He donated the Helman trophy
as a visual award for the club championship.
The trophy was won this year by Peter Wyllie,
who will be president of the Chess Club next term.
The Chess Club has also invited demonstrations
from top-ranking players in Vancouver this year.
They had the opportunity to observe Helman playing
ten boards simultaneously.
"The promising players of next year are, in my
opinion, Hans Fisher, an Aggie student, and H.
Mitchner, Arts," states last year's president, Andy
Malysheff.
318 HELD IN HIGHEST
ESTEEM THE
WORLD OVER
A fine reputation is above price! The diamond trade
mark cast on the body of every Jenkins valve carries
a reputation of over eighty years of unparalleled
service ... it means integrity, reliability, and, most
of all, dependable performance.
In all parts of the world, the famous diamond trade
mark is known and respected as signifying top
quality.
SOLD THROUGH  RELIABLE DISTRIBUTORS
EVERYWHERE
JENKINS  BROS.   LIMITED
617  St.  Remi  Street,  Montreal
Sales Offices:
1       TORONTO            WINNIPEG            VANCOUVER
'     V.^r^fe^^^
JENKINS VALVES
For    industrial,    engineering,    marine    and    power
plant   service    .  .  .   in   Bronze,   Iron,   Cast    Steel
and     Corrosion-Resisting     Alloys.
31'
» W. & J. WILSON
IMPORTERS OF FINE BRITISH WOOLLENS
Hotel Vancouver
•
SWEATERS from Braemar of Scotland.    New
line COATS and SUITS from Jaeger and
Chester Barrie of London.
SHIRTS, SOCKS, TIES, etc., from well-known
Old Country Makers.
feimg ^xlbtxtb
VANCOUVER, B.C.
(MlXXMZ
(guaranty (fualtig
BOGARDUS WICKENS
LTD.
1000 Homer St. MA 3248-9
Vancouver, B. C.
ilfe;.
IF
1 __■*
I
I
-_
1
. *:-fft.-.__'1«.
i    1               Y%
k\       _.        "K
'i_           f   r~       l
1
■l
V
—>i   v^
■ <■'*
X  '
FULL   LECTURE   ROOM   WAS   COMPLETE   WITH   TRACTOR,   PIGS
PSYCHOLOGY
Who says you can't indulge in the whimsical'and
the practical at the same time? Professor J. E.
Morsh's course in the psychology of adjustment allowed his students to do just that with great success.
After the first lecture in the Agricultural Pavilion,
one mile south of the Bus Stop, the students were
practising their texts faithfully.
The opening incident began with Oscar. Oscar
was one of the Agriculture faculty's prize hogs. He
meandered slowly into the lecture hall, took rapid
note of the situation, and decided to drop the course.
Oscar was a bright boy—he wouldn't have been
able to find a seat anyhow. Due to the large number
of students taking the course, the business of finding
a seat was pretty much a free-for-all. Some students
adjusted to this aspect of the course by sitting on one
of the many tractors housed in the Pavilion.
The many ploughs, tractors, cow and horse skeletons, and other miscellaneous farm implements, used
for Aggie class instruction, caused less non-adjustive
reaction than a 20-foot blackboard. The blackboard,
because it hid the students from Professor Morsh's
view, had to be rolled outside by several husky
students before each lecture.
The classroom, equipped with a built-in twelve-
foot-high refrigerator, built-in "bull" rings on the
wall, and concrete ramps up to the stage, is almost
perfect for its intended purpose. However, many of
the psychology students found it a trifle disconcerting to switch their minds from contemplation of
Freud to that of farm implements.
During most of the term it rained heavily. On
those days one would have thought that, because of
the long trek to the buildings, the attendance would
have been small. It was exactly the opposite. Students
would arrive on time and en masse, dripping wet,
thus proving that the popularity of any course cannot be lessened by inconvenience.
320 Grads of '48 ...
Congratulations and Welcome to the Alumni Group
1/aui
U. B. C. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
A Member of the American Alumni Council
publishes the
Graduate Chronicle
A 36-Page Quarterly Containing News by and About Your Fellow Alumni and U.B.C.
sponsors the
U. B. C. ALUMNI FUND
An Annual-giving Program Designed to Help U.B.C. and Her Students
Donors of $3.00 or more (Active Members) Receive Each Issue of fhe Chronicle
Farm. Secretary-Manager
Please remember to send your
queries, suggestions and criticisms
to our genial and energetic full-time
Secretary-Manager, Frank J. E.
Turner in your Alumni Office, Brock
Hall, (/.B.C., and send your Chronicle
news-items, personal and class
notes, and feature articles to our
brilliant Lawyer-Editor, Ormy Hall.
Chronicle Editor
-  ___■ I ■_■_■
FRANK j. E. TURNER
ORMONDE j. HALL
Branches:
LONDON, ENGLAND — NORTHERN CALIFORNIA — SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
SUMMERLAND — SOUTH OKANAGAN — WEST KOOTENAY — VICTORIA
WELLS    —    KELOWNA    —    VERNON    —   KIMBERLEY   —   TORONTO   —   OTTAWA
MONTREAL   —    CRESTON VALLEY
321 UBYSSEY   SPORTS   SCRIBES   SHOWED   OFF   IN   U   OF   W   OFFICE
PUBSTERS
Travelling Pubsters welcomed chance
at   trips   to   flee   hectic   UBC   routine
Pubsters of The University of British Columbia
really got around in the season 1947-48. Not only
did they cover the campus more thoroughly than in
the past, but they made two official forays south of
the border. A trip was made to Seattle to publish
the University of Washington Daily, and in return
they were visited by the journalism students of that
college.
Another side-trip by the Pub took in the
WWCollegian—Western Washington State Teachers'
College sheet—where, more in a social than official
capacity, the Canadian students livened up the town
for 24 hours or so.
Other side-trips fell almost completely to sports
scribes, who took frequent jaunts to Nanaimo, New
Westminster, Victoria and even Los Angeles, following the teams as they fought for honour on the hockey
ice or the English rugger fields.
The Totem too came in for its share of travels.
Early in the year photographer Micky Jones and
Editor Stainsby spent a day in Victoria to give, for
the first time in years, coverage of the UBC sidekick, Victoria College, in the college's big yearbook.
Another unique venture by Totem pixies were the
aerial trips of Danny Wallace and Bob Steiner which
resulted finally in Steiner's aerial shot of the campus
viewed on the title page.
--7S^_-.
STONE-WORK   PROVED   MUCH   THE   SAME   IN   BOTH   NATIONS
322 and Some More
Gate-crashing  pic-takers  lead   merry
life,   envied  by  most  other  Pubsters
Photographers, said many a Pubster during the
year, lead interesting lives.
Witnesses to that fact were the tribe that snapped
their shutters in the Student Publications Board's
photography department. Dances, football, basketball,
hockey and roller skate marathons; lily pond battles,
beauty horse-shows and famous stars lecture rooms,
campus scenes and automobile accidents.
They wandered back-stage at Mardi Gras, taking
interesting posterior shots of chorus girls; or blackmail material of ardent swains kissing their unreluct-
ant dates at Phrateres formals.
But it wasn't all a life of ease for the pixies.
When at a dance, pixies were beaten into parking
their dates and not their cameras, though the end-
product in a few instances showed little evidence of
that procedure. The dates were not available at press
time for comment.
Guarding several hundred dollars' worth of equipment—cameras, flashbulbs, range-finders—was not an
easy task in the crowded Commodore, or even in
the sonctity of the Pub's darkroom, where one photographer reported the loss and assumed theft of her
camera during the year.
PIXIE   WITH   FINGER   IN  MOUTH   PONDERS   RANGES,   SUBJECTS
YOU press the button ... IT does the rest
Kodak Verichrome Film
A Great Film—because you know it will do a top-notch
job, so simply and so dependably—without worry or
uncertainty. Come in today for a roll or two and start
your picture taking next weekend.
EASTMAN
PHOTOCRAPHIC
MATERIALS
610 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
LTD.
MACAULAY,   NICOLLS,
MAITLAND 8 CO. LTD.
INSURANCE, FINANCIAL AND ESTATE
AGENTS
435 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:
PAcific 4111
■*3S_
FURS OF UNQUESTIONABLE
QUALITY
R. J. POP
Limited
FURRIERS
Granville  at  Fifteenth
B Ay view  1771
LARGEST  FIREPROOF   REFRIGERATED   FUR  STORAGE
VAULTS
323 POLITICS
Commie Tim Buck received varied welcome at UBC, presented with dead cat
Boos, jeers and a dead cat greeted Canadian
communist leader Tim Buck when he appeared at
The University of British Columbia last spring to
addr.ess the LPP students club. More than 3500
students, commies and otherwise, crowded into the
Auditorium either to hear his speech or to make fun
of him.
Barely had Buck started to speak over the noise
of the crowd when a very dead cat sailed on-stage
from somewhere in the audience. The red leader ignored the sally, however, and continued his speech
to a restive hall.
When he stepped down John Hladun, Canadian
Club sponsored anti-communist, mounted the platform and accused Buck of being Lenin-educated and
a spy for the communist party of Russia.
The crowd became unmanageable at this point,
alternately cheering and screaming at Hladun. Various impromptu speakers from the howling spectators
grabbed the mike to defend Buck, among them Bruce
Ewan (see cut), son of the editor of Pacific Tribune.
His defence of the right of free speech brought affirmative nods from the saner elements of the
audience.
SPORTSMAN
Daily Ubyssey held poll to offer new
'Sportsman of Year' honours at UBC
Things became very quiet in The Daily Ubyssey's
Sports Department toward the end of the final term
in 1948, so quiet, in fact, that chubby Dickie Block-
berger decided to liven them up.
He planned a campus-wide poll to choose the
most popular Sportsman of the Year.
The Daily Ubyssey's ailing budget was dunned
for a smart silver cup; ballots were printed on the
sports page; a ballot box was erected in the Pub;
the ballots came in.
The end result of the stunt was announced in issue number 80 of The Daily Ubyssey—Dougie Reid.
Pictures were taken of smiling Dickie handing smiling Dougie the big silver cup (see cut), and everyone
was presumably happy.
But ugly rumours circulated that the ballot boxes
had been packed. Dickie spent much time maintaining that such could not be for there was no limit
placed on the number of individual votes—all a
would-be elector had to do was to clip his chit from
as many Daily Ubysseys as he wanted. Simple as that.
The Pub was quite happy over the whole affair,
despite the ugly rumours, for it had gone over well
in sporting circles and had proved to be one more
service of the Student Publications Board.
324 Opportunity
MADE IN B.C.
The development of British Columbia's natural
resources brings industries here . . . with accompanying
payrolls  to  provide  opportunities  for  our
young people.
Through  its  Industrial  Development  Department
and its advertising campaign "Business is Moving
to B. C", the B. C. Electric is helping to
establish  Industries  here.     Through  projects  such
as Bridge River Hydro the B. C. Electric
is ensuring an ample supply of low-cost power .  .  .
one good reason why "Business is Moving to B. C."
325 SvtM/icnUtfeaM t&e 4ui
326 PRESIDENT   MACKENZIE   TAKES   PART   IN   SIMILAR   CEREMONY
WAR GYMN
Hesitant   Council   stepped   as   far   as
turning  sod  on  Armistice  Day,   1947
Students at The University of British Columbia
had waited patiently for three years for some statement of building date for the War Memorial Gymnasium to which so many had given both time and
money. And their anxious ears were matched by
countless thousands throughout the province of British Columbia who also had shared in the gigantic
student campaign for funds for this "living memorial" to the province's war dead.
Council had met the queries evasively for two
and a half years; they had talked of further campaigns, of bigger grants from the provincial government, even of bond issues. But nothing was done.
On Armistice Day, 1947, however, a change in
policy was made. Council announced the first sod of
the building would be turned on that fitting date.
Supporters of the campaign were heartened; they
would, they hoped, soon see the fruit of their labours.
Accordingly, November 11 saw the Provincial
Minister of Public Works, the Honourable E. C. Carson, ceremoniously take spade in hand, turn the
celebrated first sod.
But at year's end nothing further had been done;
all that came was further talk of bond issues, and
possibly a new site for the contentious structure.
CAMPUS  SERVICE   GROUPS  HELD   ANNUAL  SERVICE   AT  BROCK
ARMISTICE
Campus becomes distinctly air-minded
both in music and advertising stunts
November 11, 1947, was hallowed once against
at UBC as representatives of the Canadian Officers'
Training Corps, the University Naval Training Detachment and Branch 2, Canadian Legion, BESL
(University Legion), paraded in front of Brock Hall
to honour the dead of two wars. Following the ceremonies they paraded to the proposed site of the War
Memorial Gymnasium where Public Works Minister
E. C. Carson turned the first sod in preparation for
construction long promised by Students' Council.
THE INSIGNIA OF
CANADA'S FINEST
ENTERTAINMENT
FAMOUS      PLAYERS      THEATRES
CAPITOL
STRAND
ORPHEUM
DOMINION
Lenses must accurately interpret the findings of your optical prescription. The frames
and mountings must position these lenses
to hold them in the proper alignment to
secure the fullest seeing comfort possible.
Each step, fr_m the lenses to the finished
eyewear, must be taken with no tolerance for what is
commonly known as a safe margin for error—Optically
speaking there is none. Remember for your convenience^—our two offices.
•  Plastic Contact Lenses •  Plastic Artificial Eyes
PRESCRIPTION OPTICAL
CO. LTD.
424 Vancouver Block      -      413 Medical Dental Bldg.
Exclusive Opticians to  the Eye  Physician  for Over 20
Years.
327 13
PRINTED   BY  WARD   &   PHILLIPS   LIMITED
3B2   WEST   BROADWAY
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
OF
MBIA
UNIVERSITY
BRITISH COLLI
JUL 12 1949
THE LIBRARY

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubcyearb.1-0119062/manifest

Comment

Related Items