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UBC Publications

The Totem Nineteen Hundred and Forty Six 1946

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Array   PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA.  VANCOUVER, CANADA
WILLIAM D. STEWART
NANCY MACDONALD
JEAN MacFARLANE
Editor
Associate Editor
Associate Editor
\n        III
J)
Ii! Ml mfi DEDICATION
Six days before the atomic bomb put an end to war in the Pacific, Lieut.
R. Hampton Gray, D.S.C., sacrificed his life, sank a Jap destroyer, and was
awarded the Victoria Cross.
He took part in attacks on the German battleship Tirpitz, for which he
was awarded the bronze oak leaf.
In the Pacific zone, Gray won a Distinguished Service Cross for a series
of air attacks on the Jap mainland.
On August 9, 1945, he valiantly gave his life to sink a Japanese destroyer,
an action which has emblazoned his name on the pages of war's history.
To the memory of Hammy Gray, Victoria Cross winner and university
student, we gratefully dedicate this Year Book.
.PAGE     FIVE * 0 K B S
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*   - ADMINISTRATION  President
N. A. MacKenzie
I am glad to have the opportunity to write
a short statement for the Totem, for in a sense
it will be my farewell to those who graduate
this year.   But I would also like to include in
it those who have come back to the University
from the Armed Forces in such large numbers
and those, too, who have come to us direct
from school.  This year has been a difficult but
thrilling one for all of us, and the next few
years promise to be equally interesting.   My
own belief is that in years to come we will
agree  that  those who were students  in  the
immediate post-war years were unusually fortunate in having as classmates the most interesting group of young people that have ever
attended this or any other university.   I hope
all of us will realize this now and make the
most of it.   Those who graduate, too, will not
lack interest and challenge in the world around
them.  It will not be an easy world nor a simple one, but it will be one of unlimited opportunity.   I say this because of the many things
that must be done in it, the problems that must
be solved and the difficulties that must be overcome.   Think only of our capacity for production, the possibilities that await us in the field
of atomic energy, and the new world that has
been opened up to us because of the ease and
speed  of  transportation  and  communication.
Or, putting it in other forms: Can we achieve
peace  and  prosperity and  employment  and
the "good life" that all of us want and need,
in our day and generation?   Or do we face
a future of strife and depression and ultimate
war and possible destruction?  Either, or if you
like, both of these possibilities lie ahead and
we, and more particularly you, will have a
hand in deciding the way we go and the fate
we achieve.   I believe and hope that it will
be the first of these alternatives, namely peace
and plenty that is in store for us.   I believe,
too, that all of you will, in your own way, do
your best to make sure that these hopes and
beliefs are realized.
PAGE    TWENTY-SIX Chancellor Hamber officiates in the presenting oi the degrees.
Air Vice Marshal Plant receives an LLJ>.    "and as you go forth from these halls-
PHGE     TWENTY-SEVEN Left to right:    E. H.  Barton. W.  G. Murrin. Hon. Denis  Murphy. Chancellor E. W. Hamber. chairman; President N. £t. M.
Mackenzie, CL E. Lord. Miss Winifred Johnston, secretary to President; J. B. Clerihue and G. T. Cunningham.
Board of Governors
The Board of Governors, a group of men and
women selected in the light of their success and
leadership in their respective professions, and
their interest in those things appertaining to the
university, supply the shoulders upon which rest
the responsibility for the furthering of the standards and reputation of the university.
Theirs is the task of establishing bursaries,
approving scholarships, and accepting gifts in
the name of the university.
The erection of the long-awaited permanent
buildings must be sanctioned by the Board, as
must plans for the improvement and maintenance
of the present temporary structures.
Upon this group of eleven prominent citizens
devolve what are perhaps the most important
duties in connection with the University, namely,
the' appointment of the president, deans, and
faculty members, as well as the decisions as to
the size of the student attendance.
Of the members composing the board, two of
the eleven are  ex-officio,  three are elected  as
representatives of the Senate, and the remaining
six are appointed for six-year terms by the Lieutenant Governor-in-Council.
The chairman of the Board of Governors, the
Hon. Eric R. Hamber, first took office in 1945,
after the unfortunate death of his predecessor,
Chancellor R. E. MacKechnie, in 1944. The chairman is elected to office every three years. President N. A. M. MacKenzie is the other ex-officio
member of the Board.
The representatives from the Senate to the
Board are: Arthur E. Lord, B.A., Vancouver; H. T.
Logan, M.C, M.A., Duncan; and J. F. Walker,
B.A.Sc, Ph.D., F.R.C.S., Victoria.
The remaining six members of the Board appointed by the Lieut.-Governor-in-Council include:
William G. Murrin, Vancouver; Edward H. Barton,
Chilliwack; The Honorable Mr. Justice Denis
Murphy, B.A., LL.D., Vancouver; Joseph Badenoch
aearihue, M.C, M.A., B.C.L., K.C., Victoria; R.
H. Neelands, Vancouver; and George T. Cunningham, Vancouver.
PAGE    TWENTY-EIGHT FACULTY
LEADERS
Despite- the traditional disparaging remarks
from the engineers and aggies, the imperturbable
Arts faculty continues to add over two hundred
names to its list of graduates as each successive
term expires.
In refutation to the arguments of the red-sweat-
ered throng concerning the value of an arts
education, stands the impressive list of successful
doctors, lawyers, business men, ministers, professors and teachers, and even engineers, who
based their more advanced work or study upon
the solid foundation of a BA degree.
Designed to give the students a well balanced
education, the Arts faculty offers courses ranging
from the study of the humanities to the latest
developments in electronics and nuclear physics.
The study of the earth, its structure, the history of
its people and their tongues, are only a few of the
many fields open for research. Working in close
co-operation with the Arts faculty is the Department of University Extension which offers courses
to interested persons unable to attend UBC.
This term, with the completion of his twenty-
fifth year at UBC, the Dean of Arts, Dr. Daniel
Buchanan, also sees the end of the most hectic
session that the faculty has experienced. With
the sudden appearance on the campus of more
than two thousand ex-service men last September, and then fifteen hundred more in January,
the dean and his assistant, Prof. W. H. Gage,
were working long hours interviewing and advising the prospective students, preparing timetables that would not clash among six thousand
students, in an institution built for fifteen hundred,
as well as performing their professional duties,
which normally are a full time job.
. However, in living up to their promise of accepting any and all servicemen who can fill the
requirements of the university, and who desire a
college education, no matter how many applied,
the officers and staff of UBC have achieved a
task worthy of the highest commendation. The
results of such a magnificent effort cannot but
show great beneficial results to our country in
future years.
Top: Dean D. Buchanan.
Lower: flsst. Dean W. H. Gage.
PAGE    TWENTY-NINE Agriculture, under Dean F. M. Clement, is becoming more and more popular with the students,
and with the returning servicemen. Many returned men who have invested in a small farm or who
don't wish to spend four years at university, find
the short winter course or the year-long occupational course of great practical value in coping
with the maintenance and production' problems
connected with a small holding. There are also
extension courses in agriculture offered at different
points in the province, under the auspices of the
University Extension Department.
The cultivation and treatment of the soil, the
scientific study of plant nutrition, the care and
breeding of domestic animals, and all the associated subjects dealing with the satisfaction of
man's basic need for food, have always been
important above all else. Now, however, with
the world's food supply depending to the extent
it does upon Canada's natural resources, the
agriculture faculty of UBC faces a new responsibility to Canada and to the world for the increase
and betterment, where possible, of our already
high standards of food production and exportation. Looking back, however, upon the previous
achievements of the faculty and the successes
of its graduates, we feel certain that it will be-
more than equal to its present and future re-
sponsibiliies.
Dorothy Mawdsley, Dean of Women, advisor
and friend. To the thousands of grateful co-eds
who have experienced the benefit of her advice
and generous help, she is always remembered
first in the latter category. Over the five-year
period she has held the position for which she is
so ideally suited, Dr. Mawdsley has become
generally known among the women on the
campus for her kind understanding and cordial
willingness to help any troubled or perplexed
co-ed.
Miss Mawdsley accepted the position of Dean
. of  Women  at  UBC  in   1941,   succeeding  Dean
Mary L. Bollert.
The problems that are brought to her for solving are many and varied. They may concern
any phase of a bewildered co-ed's life, from her
lecture timetable to her troubles with a hostile
•landlady, or perhaps the vicissitudes of a college
social life.
She also takes an active interest in the
sororities on the campus. She acts as chairman
of the procedures during bidding, and supervises
rushing in the fall and spring.
Top: Dean F. M. Clement
Lower: Dean D. Mawdsley.
PAGE    THIRTY Of all the memorable innovations introduced
at the commencement of the fall term in 1945,
perhaps the most noteworthy was the establishment of the lang-awaited Law faculty at UBC.
This new faculty, for so many years a serious
deficiency in our curriculum, represents the first
step by the Board of Governors in their long
range plan of future expansion for the University.
Dean G. F. Curtis, capable and kindly head of
the faculty, administers advice and instruction to
his eighty-five budding young attorneys from his
office in the south end of the ex-army hut that
temporarily houses the faculty offices as well as
the hundreds of dusty law documents and statute
books making up the law library.
The lectures for the most part are taken by city
men of the legal profession who leave their businesses to come to the campus in order to pass on
the knowledge they have used so successfully
in the correct employment and interpretation of
those latinized legal phrases and statutes, that
are so full of mystery to the uninitiated.
Though the need for more trained lawyers in
B.C. has long been a subject of anxiety to the
inhabitants of this province, there is no doubt
that with such a capable staff, the new faculty
will more than justify the confidence placed in it
by these far seeing men who made its existence
possible.
The men of the engineering department, under
the leadership of Dean J. N. Finlayson, are justly
proud of the part they played in the service of
their country during the war years. Graduate
engineers, now needed just as desperately in
peace as in war, have been pouring out of the
lecture rooms and laboratories of UBC in an
ever-increasing stream for the past five years.
The major task of the engineers, however, upon
the completion of which the progress of the whole
world depends, did not begin until after hostilities ceased. This is the reconstruction of the
regions of the earth ravaged by war, and the
reconversion of those factories which, although
built for peaceful production, were converted to
serve the purposes of total war.
The majority of the discoveries arising out of
war research can be, and many are being, turned
to the use of a world at peace. Great unexplored
vistas lie ahead to challenge the courage and
ability of the young engineer, and the world is
. waiting to make use of his trained mind and
hands. May future science graduates of UBC
continue to uphold the high standards set by
their predecessors in the realms of engineering!
Top: Dean G. F. Curtis.
Lower: Dean J. N. Finlayson.
PAGE    THIRTY-ONE Heads of Departments
F. M. CLEMENT, B.S.A. (Toronto),
Agricultural Economics
G. G. MOE, B.S.A., M.Sc. (McGill),
Agronomy
H. M. KING, B.S.A. (Toronto),
Animal Husbandry
C. E. DOLMAN, M.R.C.S. (England),
Bacteriology and Preventi-e Medicine
A. H. HUTCHINSON, M.A. (McMaster),
Biology and Botany
R. H. CLARK, M.A. (Toronto),
Chemistry
I. N. FINLAYSON, M.Sc. (McGill), LL.D.
Civil Engineering
0.  J. TODD,  A.B., Ph.D.  (Harvard)
Department of Classics
ELLIS H. MORROW, B.A. (Queen's)
Department of Commerce
PAGE    THIRTY-TWO Heads of Departments
BLYTHE EAGLES
Department of Dairying
G. G. SEDGEWICK
Department of English
HENRY F. ANGUS
Department of Economics, Political
Science, and Sociology
JOHN E. LEIRSCH
Department of Forestry
MAXWELL CAMERON
Education
M. Y. WILLIAMS
Geology and Geography
W. N.  SAGE
History
D. P. LEFEBVRE
Home Economics
A. F. BARSS
Horticulture
PAGE    THIRTY-THREE Heads of Departments
D. BUCHANAN
Mathematics
D. O. EVANS
Modern Languages
H. T. MacLEOD, O.B.E.
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
J. M. TURNBULL
Mining and Metallurgy
S. N. F. CHANT
Philosophy and Psychology
G.  M.  SHRUM
Department of University Extension
*
E. A. LLOYD
Department of Poultry Husbandry
MISS MARJORIE I. SMITH
Department  of  Social   Work
W. A. CLEMENS
Department  of  Zoo.ogy
PAGE    THIRTY-FOUR   . Heads of Departments
C. B. WOOD-
Registrar
A. MacLUCAS
Bursar
W. K. LAMBE
Librarian
MAJOR MacLEAN
Veterans' Counsellor
To all the members of the University staff must
go a great deal of credit for their patience and
efficiency in dealing with the problems incurred
by the tremendous increase in enrolment this
year.
Keeping detailed records of each student,
giving information on U.B.C. courses, tabulating
and distributing exam results, answering entrance requirement questions; all these duties
have kept the Registrar's Department, under C.
B. Wood, busily occupied from nine to four each
day.
The problems of the Bursar, A. MacLucas,
have also jumped with the attendance this year.
The handling of the fees of 7000 students, many
government-financed,   the  annual  bursary  and
scholarship problems, and the rounding up of recalcitrant students for last-minute fee payment, is
no easy job.
Major MacLean, the veterans' counsellor, in
his first year on the campus has done an excellent job of advising and giving information to
the veterans, many of whom have been out of
school for eight or nine years.
In the overcrowded Library the ever friendly
W. Kaye Lamb has managed through the year
to keep a watchful eye on the Library's 250,000
volumes, pamphlets, and serial publications, as
well as to maintain an organization with a vast
fund of information for the satisfaction of the
student seekers after knowledge.
FAGE    THIRTY-FIVE President Emeritus
L. S. Klinck, B.S.fl., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D.,
Officier de le-Instruction Publique,
F.R.S.C.
Professors Emeriti
lames Henderson, M.A., Professor Emeritus
of Philosophy.
P. A. Boving, Cand. Ph., Cand. Agr., LL.D.,
Professor Emeritus  of Agronomy.
C-    McLean   Fraser,   M.A.,    LL.D.,   Ph.D.,
F.R.C.S., Professor Emeritus of Zoology.
Lemuel   Robertson,   M.A.,   LL.D.,   Professor
Emeritus   of   Classics.
E. H. Archibald, B.Sc, A.M., Ph.D., F.R.S.E.
_ C, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry.
H. T. I. Coleman, B.A., Ph.D., Professor
Emeritus of Philosophy and Psychology.
S. I. Schofield, M.A., B.Sc., Ph.D., F.G.S.A.,
F.R.C.S., Professor Emeritus of Geology.
Department  of  Agricultural  Economics
F. M. Clement, B.S.A., M.A., Professor and
Head of  the  Department.
Department of Agronomy
G. G. Moe, B.S.A., M.Sc, Ph.D., Professor
and Head of the Department.
D.  G. Laird, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., Professor
of Soils.
Vernon C.   Brink,  M.S.A.,  Ph.D.,  Assistant
Professor.
Department of Animal Husbandry
H. M. King, B.S.A., M.S., Head.
S. N. Wood, B.S.A., D.V.M.
I.  C.  Berry, M.S.A., Ph.D.
Department   of Bacteriology
and Preventive Medicine
C. E. Dolman, M.R.C.S., M.B., B.S.,
M.R.C.P,. D.P.H., Ph.D., F.A.P.H.A.,
Head.
D. C. B. Duff, M.A., Ph.D.
L. E. Ranta, M.D., D.P.H.
Miss Marjorie Todd, M.A.
Department oi Biology and Botany
A.   H.   Hutchinson,  M.A.,   Ph.D.,  F.R.S.C,
Head,
Department oi Chemistry
R. H. Clark, M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C,  Head.
W. F. Seyer,  B.A.,  M.Sc,  Ph.D.,  M.A.I.
Ch.E.
M. J. Marshall, M.Sc, Ph.D , F.R.S.C.
W.   Ure,  M.A.Sc,  Ph.D.,  F.R.S.C.
I. A. Harris, M.A., Ph.D.
J. G. Hooley, M.A., Ph.D.
M.   Stusiak,  M.A.Sc.
R. A. MacLeod, M.A.
P.  Mundell, .M.A.
Department of Civil Engineering
I.  N. Finlayson, M.Sc, LL.D., M.E.I.C,
M.  Am.  Soc.  C.E., Head.
I. F. Muir, B.Sc.
A.  H.  Finlay, M.C,  B.A.Sc,  M.S.  in C.E.,
Ass. M. Am. Soc. CE.
A. Lighthall, B.Sc.
E. S. Pretious, B.A.Sc, M.Sc, M. Am. Soc.
CE.
A.  Peebles,   B.A.  Sc,  M.Sc,  Ass. M.  Am.
Soc. CE.
A. Hrennikoff, Grad. Inst, of Comunication
Eng.,   Moscow,  M.A.Sc,   Sc.D.,   Ass.   M.
Am. Soc. CE.
].  B.  Alexander, M.Sc.
Department of Classics
O. I. Todd, A.B., Ph.D., F.R.S.C, Head.
L. A. MacKay, M.A., B.A.
G. B. Riddehough, B.A., M.A.
P. C. F. Guthrie, B.A., M.A.
W. L. Grant, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Department of Commerce
E. H. Morrow, B.A., M.B.A., Head.
A.   W.   Currie,   B.A.,   B.Com.,   M.B.A.,
Dr. Com. S.C
F. Field, CA.
I. C. Taylor, B.A., C.A.
D.  K. Bell, B.Com., M.A.
Department of Dairying
Blythe Eagles, B.A ,  Ph.D., Head.
Miss  N.   Neilson,  M.S.A.
Department of Economics, Political
Science, and Sociology
H.  F.  Angus,  B.A.,  B.C.L.,  M.A.,  F.R.S.C
Head.
G. F. Drummond, M.A., M.Sc.
C W. Topping, B.A., S.T.D., M.A., Ph.D.
I.  A.  Crumb, B.B.A.,  M.S.,  Ph.D.
N.   A.   M.   MacKenzie,   B.A.,   LL.B.,   LL.M.,
LL.D,  K.C, F.R.S.C.
Department of Education
Maxwell A.   Cameron, M.A.,   Ph.D.,  Head.
F. T. Tyler, B.Sc, M.A., B.Ed., Ph.D.
Department  of  English
G. G. Sedgewick, B.A., Ph.D., Head.
W. L. MacDonald, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
F. G. C. Wood, B.A., M.A.
T. Larson, M.A,, B.A., F.R.S.C.
H. C. Lewis, M.A.
Miss D.  M.  Mawdsley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Mrs.  D. B. Smith, M.A., B.A., Ph.D.
E. Morrison, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
I. H.  Creighton, M.A.
W.  Robbins,  M.A., Ph.D.
G. P.  V.  Akrigg, M.A.,  Ph.D.
H. O. V. Nygaard, B.A.
Department of Forestry
I.  E.  Liersch,  B.A.,  B.A.Sc,  M.F.,
M.C.S.F.E.,   M.S.A.F.,   Head.
F. M. Knapp, B.S.F., M.S.F., M.CS.F.E.,
M.S.A.F.
B. G. Griffith, M.A., M.F., Ph.D., M.CS.F.E.
T.   G.   Wright,  B.F.,  M.F.,   M.CS.F.E.,
M.S.A.F.
J. L. Alexander, B.ScF.
R. M. Brown, B.Sc.F., M.C S.F.E.
E. R. Sprott, B.A., B.Com. B.S.F.
L. B. Dixon.
W.  Byers,  M.CS.F.E.
Department oi Geology and Geography
M.   Y.   Williams,   B.Sc,   Ph.D.,  F.G.S.A.,
F.R.S.C, Head.
C  O.  Swanson, M.A Sc, Ph.D.,  F.G.S.A.,
F R S C
H.   C   Gunning,  B.A.Sc,   M.S.,   Ph.D.,
F.G.S.C, F.R.S.C
H. V. Warren, B.A., B.A.Sc, B.Sc, D.Phil.,
A.I.M.M.,   F.G.S.A.
V.   J.   Okulitch, M.A.Sc,   Ph.D.,  F.G.S.A.
Department of History
W. N. Sage, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., F.R. Hist. S.,
F.R.S.C, Head.
F. H. Soward, B.A., B.Litt.
A. C. Cooke, B.A., M.A.
Miss S. Thrupp, M.A., Ph.D., F.R. Hist. S.
Miss M. A. Ormsby, M.A., Ph.D.
T. I. Oleson, M.A.
Faculty of Law
G. F. Curtis, LL.B.,  B.A., B.C.L., Dean.
F.   Reid,  LL.B.,   Prof.
Lecturers in Law
H.  R.  Bray,  K.C,   B.A.,  B.A.
C. W. Brazier, B.A.
The Hon. Mr.  lustice J. M. Coady, B.A.
Sen. J. W. deB. Farris, K.C, B.A.,
L.L.B.B.C.L.,  LL.D.
A. W. Fisher, B.A., B.Com.
I.  S.  McGuire,  B.Com.
N.  A. M. MacKenzie, M M. & Bar, K.C,
B.A.,  LL.B.,   LL.M.,   LL.D.,   F.R.S.C.
S.  I.  Remnant.
F. A. Sheppard, B.A., LL.B.
The Hon. Mr. Justice Sidney Smith.
The Hon. Mr. Justice J. O. Wilson.
A. Watts, B.Com.
Department of Home Economics
Miss   Dorothy   P.   Lefebvre,   B.H.Sc,   M.S.,
Acting Head.
Miss Stella Beil, B.S., M.S.
Miss Charlotte S. Black, B.Sc. (H.Ec), M.A.
Miss Nina H. Morley, M.A.
Miss Mary Holder.
Department  of Horticulture
A. G. Barss, B.A., B.S. in Agr., M.S., Ph.D.,
Head.
G. H. Harris, B.S.A., MS., Ph.D.
Frank E. Buck, B.S.A.
G Howell Harris, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D.
Department of Mathematics
Daniel  Buchanan,  M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.,
F.R.S.C, Head.
F. S. Nowlan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
R.  D.   James,   M.A.,  Ph.D.,  F.R.S.C.
Walter H. Gage, M.A.
S. A. Jennings, M.A., PhD.
D. C.  Murdoch, M.A.,  Ph.D.
Miss May L. Barclay   M.A-
Department  of Mechanical
and  Electrical  Engineering
Hector John MacLeod, O.B.E., B.Sc, M.A.,
Ph.D., Mem. A.I.E.E., M.E.I.C, Mem.
I.R.E.,  Head.
F. W.   Vernon,   B.Sc.Eng.,  Wh.Sch.,
A.M.I.   Mech.   E„   A.F.R.A.S.
S. C. Morgan, B.Sc, M.Sc, M.S., Assoc
A.I.E.E., Assoc M.I E.S.
W.   B.  Coulthard,  B.Sc,  Mem.  A.I.E.E,
AM.I.E.E.
W. O.  Richmond, B.A.Sc, M.S., Mem.
A.S.M.E.
H. M. Mcllroy, M.Sc.
D. W. Thomson, B.A.Sc, M.Sc.
Lome A. Kersey, B.A.Sc.
William A.  Wolfe, B.A.Sc, M.Sc.
Department of Mining and Metallurgy
J. M.  Turnbull,  B.A.Sc, M.C.I.M., M.  Inst.
Met.,  Head.
George  A.   Gillies,  M.Sc, M.C.I.M.,
M.A.I.M.E.
Frank   A.   Forward,   B.A.Sc.,   M.C.I.M.,
Mem. A.I.ME.,  M.  Aust.  I.M.M.
C  S.  Samis,  B.Sc,  M.Sc, Ph.D
L G. R. Crouch, M.Sc.
Department of Modern Languages
David Owen Evans, M.A., D.Phil., D.Lett.,
Head.
A. F. B. Clark, B.A., Ph.D., Officier
d'Academie,   F.R.S.C.
Miss  Isabel Maclnnes,  M.A.,  Ph.D.
Miss Dorothy Dallas, M.A., D.Lett.
Miss Deborah K. Aish, M.A., D.Lett.
Miss loyce Hallamore,  M.A.,  Ph.D.
Charles  Ernest   Borden,   M.A.,   Ph.D.
Charles Vyner Brooke, B.A., M.A.,  Ph.D.
Jack Horace Parker,  M.A., Ph.D.
Madame Y. Darlington.
Miss  Ethel  Harris, B.A.,  M.A ,  D.Lett.,
Officier  de  l'Instruction  Publique.
Department of Nursing and Health
C   E.   Dolman,   M.R.C.S.,   M.B.,   B.S.,
M.R.C.P.,   D.P.H.,   Ph.D.,   F.A.P.H.A.,
Head.
Miss Evelyn Hallory, R.N.,' B.Sc.
Miss   Pauline  Capelle,   R.N.,   B.A.,   B.A.Sc.
Lawrence E.   Ranta,   M.D.,  D.P.H.
Department of Philosophy and Psychology
S. N. F. Chant, M.A., Head.
Thomas G.  Henderson,  M.A., Ph.D.
Alexander P. Maslow, B.A., M A., Ph.D.
Department of Physics
Gordon M.   Shrum, M.M.,  M.A.,  Ph.D.,
F.R.S.C, Head.
A. E.  Hennings, M.A., Ph.D.
Harold D. Smith,  M.A., Ph.D.
Kenneth C. Mann,  B.A.,  Ph.D.
George M. Volkoff, M.A., Ph.D., LL D.
William Petrie, B.A., MA., Ph.D.
R.  Keith  Brown,   B.A.
J. H. L. Watson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
H.  R. Milley,  M.A.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
E. A. Lloyd, B.S.A., M.S.A., Head.
I. Biely,  M.S.A., M.S.
Department  of Social  Work
Miss M. Smith, B.A., M.A., Head.
Miss K. Reebel, B.A., MA., M.S.S.
Miss M. C. Johnston, B.A., M.S.W.
Department  of Zoology
W.   A.  Clemens,  M.A.,  Ph.D., F.R.S.C,
Head.
G. J.  Spencer, B.S.A.,  M.S.
I.  McT.  Cowan,  B.A.,  Ph.D.
Department  of University Extension
G  M. Shrum, M.M., M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C,
Director.
R. T.  McKenzie, B A.
Miss D. Somerset, B.A.
N.  Barten,  M.A.
Miss  M.   V.   Smith,   B.A.
A.  Sager, B.A.
University  Health Service
Stewart   Murray,   M.D.,  D.P.H.,   University
Health Officer.
J. S. Kitching, B.A., M.D., D.P.H., Director,
University Health Service.
Miss   Muriel  Upshall,   R.N.,  B.A.Sc.
Public Health Nurse.
Department of Physical Education
R.  F.  Osborne, B.A.
H.  D. Whittle, B.Ph.Ed.
Mrs.   J.   Sleightholme,   B.A.,  M.A.
Miss I Clay, Ph. Ed. Dip.
PAGE    THIRTY-SIX  Students Council
T_J
The Students'  Council
Every Monday night at seven o'clock during
the past term, these 11 black-robed council members have solemnly marched into the austere
council chambers in Brock Hall, and at one
o'clock the next morning they have filed sleepily
out of the smoke-filled chambers after fighting
their way through red tape and the inevitable
battles of student government. Increase in student enrolment has doubled the complexity of
council problems this year, but with the help of
much midnight oil the machinery of student government has run smoothly.
Staunchest supporters of the U.B.C. War Memorial Gymnasium drive, were Ole Bakken and
Mary Ann Norton, Presidents of the Men's Athletic Directorate and the Women's Athletic Association respectively. Bakken, a busy man,
periodically sauntered onto the basketball courts
for the Varsity Thunderbirds, and Mary Ann!s
constant theme during council meetings was "I
want a swimming pool."
Unhappy father of council's newest baby this
year, the Undergraduate Societies Committee,
was Hugh McLeod, who had the task of telling
council what its right hand group was doing.
Another unhappy father with 45 children was
Fred Lipsett, President of the Literary and Scientific Executive.   Chortling fondly over his charges
PJNSWORTH
PAGE    THIRTY-EIGHT Lipsett rode on the wave of the "Let's all form a
club" mania.
President of the Alma Mater Society this year
was Rhodes Scholar Allan Harrison Ainsworth,
a dogged, strenuous worker, who took the solution
of every campus difficulty, minute or mammoth,
seriously, and was perhaps the most conscientious taskmaster council members have ever had.
He has done an admirable job.
Easy going, pipe-smoking Treasurer Garry
Miller, retained a firm hand on the cash box, but
was sympathetic to the financial demands of
rapidly multiplying clubs which emptied their
piggy banks before the end of the year.
"Girl Mondays" of council were, tall, attractive
Sidney Flavelle, keeper of the minute books, who
has had her hands full with the extraordinary
average of 35 minutes each council meeting, and
the official voice of the women, "personality kid"
Nancy Pitman.
Most diligent surveyors of the A.M.S. rule
books this year were Jack Cunningham, Coordinator of Social Activities, and Sophomore Member
Cal  Whitehead.    The  two  council   "freshmen"
Whitehead busied himself with Special Events
features and sub-committees of sub-committees.
Cunningham, whirlwind type of worker, unknotted
snarls in the booking system.
MILLER
LIPSETT
KIRKPflTHICK
FiaVELLE
PAGE    THIRTY-NINE These 13 members of the often abused, and
always over-worked Council held the reins of
student government this hectic post-war year. To
their lot fell many unpleasant duties and many
thankless jobs, but they executed them all with
finesse, leaving behind them a memory of a year
capably and executively handled for the Alma
Mater Society.
BAKKEN
PAGE    FORTY Undergraduate   Societies   Committee
When the 1944-45 Council decided to increase
the number of council members, they also deemed
it wise to unite all the undergraduate societies
into one committee and to make the chairmanship of that committee one of the responsibilities
of the Men's Undergraduate Society President.
Thus the Undegraduate Societies Committee was
born.
The two original objects of this committee were
set down as follows: 1. To promote the direct
control of, and to co-ordinate, the activities of
the Undergraduate Societies. 2. To act as a
medium for the expression of their ideas on important matters.
The actual activities of the committee, however,
have become more comprehensive and varied
than these two brief sentences would indicate.
This year, with all the changes in the status of
some of the faculties, the USC has drawn up a
new constitution, and incorporated the Education
and Law Societies. The USC functions as the
Discipline Committee, and, at the other extreme,
presents the Honorary Activities Award for extracurricular activity. The committee also sponsored the Fall Ball in November, and carried on
with the work of the Employment Bureau. This
years under the able chairmanship of Hugh
MacLeod, the USC has experienced a difficult
year of organization, in preparation for its future
years at UBC.
McLEOD
WELTON
DONEGANI
LISTER
PAGE    FORTY-ONE Literary and Scientific Executive
Jack  Dufhis,  Winnie  Irwin, Kay Halpin,  Mary  Fagan,  Fred
Lipsett, Bill Stewart. Peter Lindenield.
Upper:   Fred Lipsett
Lower:    Mary Fagan
Under the guidance of President Fred Lipsett
the major and minor organizations of the University in the Literary and Scientific Executive
shared with the rest of the University in a very
successful year.
Commencing in the Fall with the annual club
week drive for membership, the L.S.E. drew up
a new election schedule, and admitted four new
clubs: the irrepressible Jokers, El Circulo Latino
Americano, Amateur Radio Operators' Association, and the Pre-Optometry Club.
The newly organized Special Events Committee was constituted this year in time to justify its
existence by sponsoring several very worth-while
pass features on the campus.
The Glider Club, with its first glider nearing
completion, has been supplied with a new workshop; the Musical Society and Players' Qub provided with extra student nights for their produc- .
tion.
The energetic executive of the L.S.E. included:
President, Fred Lipsett; Secretary, Mary Fagan,
and Vice-Chairman of the Stage Committee,
Lome Butterfield.
PAGE    FORTY-TWO Womens Undergraduate Society
Beginning the year with the establishment of
a precedent, the WUS executive broke all previous records by issuing fresh regalia to more
than four hundred freshettes. In order to ensure
complete subservience of the green clad novitiates
WUS organized as STUFF (society to undermine
freshette foolishness) and, donning green armbands and serious expression, and carrying
green lipsticks, set out to green the lips of cmy
freshettes found breaking the rules of conduct
laid down for them. The big-little sister supper
ended an unusually gay frosh week, filled to
capacity with activities.
The biggest of WUS-sponsored events came
with the Sadie Hawkins week in January, when
all co-eds were sent out with explicit instructions
on how to "get their man".
The traditional all-female Hi-Jinx was held in
the fall, with each of those attending dressed as
some comic strip character. Many were the weird
and fantastic costumes seen around the campus
that night.
PAGE    FORTY-THREE Pre-Medical Undergraduate Society
The establishment of a Medical
Faculty on the campus this Fall
and the instillation of a spirit into
the students that will start it off
with a bang—these have been the
aims of the Pre-Med Club this year.
The usual activities of the Pre-
Meds have included weekly meetings for business, lectures or films,
along with group visits to the hospitals on Saturday mornings to observe operations and autopsies.
The latter of their objectives,
concerning the spirit of the students,
has been accomplished in a manner that looks well for the successful achievement of the first of their
aims. The Pre-Med Ball, held late
in November, the Stag Party, and
the snake parade, complete with
skulls and skeletons, accomplished
a great deal towards the success
of the Pre-Med campaign on the
campus.
Special Events Committee
A varied and imposing series of
noon-hour entertainments was sponsored during the year by the Special Events Committee.
Violinist Adolph Koldofsky headed
the list, followed by soprano Anna-
bell Edwards. William Steinberg
conducted the fall concert of the
Vancouver Symphony in the Armoury.
Pianist Egon Petri provided entertainment for the students one noon-
hour, as did ten members of the
B.C. Institute of Music and Drama.
Still another noon-hour was filled
with a jam session by local jazz
musicians.
The spring concert in the Armoury
saw Antol Dorati conducting the
Vancouver Symphony.
PAGE    FORTY-FOUR Alma Mater Society
I. "Mitch" in conference;    2. Lynn;    3. Marg. relaxes while Lynn works;    4. The three musketeers;    5. Bev.
6.  Student  gets  service.
For meritorious service beyond the line of
duty .... this phrase is especially fitting for the
activities of the office staff of the A.M.S.
"Mitch" Mitchell, officially procter of Brock
Hall, arranges for the upkeep of the building, and
for commissionaires and check room staffs. He
also handles the catering tasks, with Frank Un
derhill, whenever food is to be served at social
functions.
Lynn Pearson, office manager, allots the routine office work to her two assistants, Bev. Shep-
pard and Marg. Patrick. She handles the petty
cash for the A.M.S., and assists the new student
Treasurer each year to fit smoothly into his job.
PAGE    FORTY-FIVE ACTIVITIES @ 1.   Freshmen's first lecture;    2.  Learning to act nonchalent in
the quad.
Fifteen hundred eager-eyed frosh were heckled,
laughed at, and made thoroughly welcome by
upperclassmen in a gala post-war Frosh Week
last September. Many of the newcomers were
ex-servicemen fresh from the forces. Although
the committee in charge decreed that those just
returned from the services would be exempt from
the usual indignities incident to a welcome to
PAGE    FORTY-EIGHT 1. Where is the nearest army hut?; 2. What size ; 3. Which
way is the car?; 4. Swell day to relax; 5. This, children, is
an artsman;    6.   Carry me back;    7. I fain would lay doon.
UBC, most of the boys insisted on donning regalia
and taking part in all frosh activities. Probably
most of them welcomed the opportunity to festoon
their uniforms in a manner frowned upon by officers of His Majesty's Services.
However the Frosh were not the only ones bewildered by the magnitude of the welcome.
Staid upperclassmen, used to the ersatz wartime
PAGE    FORTY-NINE 1.  Now where?;  2. A scienceman;  3.  Learn about the library
the easy way;   4.  What'll we do now?;   5.  Let's talk it over,
fellows.
To watch Freshettes, W.U.S. roamed the campus noting unruly novices who dared to wear
make-up, or speak to Freshmen. Retribution for
these sinners came at the Big and Little Sister
Banquet.
PAGE    FIFTY
I. The boys were punished at the traditional Frosh
Smoker. At the end of th.? week, with the Frosh
thoroughly initiated, Freshmen and undergraduate
went to work together, not as separate groups
but as one, as members of the Alma Mater
Society.
PAGE    FIFTY-ONE The Fall Ball, successor to the once famous
Junior Prom, entered its Sophomore Year at
University on November 19, at the Commodore.
Sponsored by the Undergraduate Societies Committee, the ball this year departed from the
ordinary routine of college social affairs by
featuring a King, to be elected at the event
by   those  attending.    Keith   MacDonald,   repre-
PAGE    FIFTY-TWO 1.   Cut. Helti and Stoo scare  customer;   2.   Pardon me. but
your strap is broken;   3.   Gayely galore;   4.  Majestic line-up;
5.   After the ball is over.
senting the Pre-Meds, won out over his five
opponents and was honored by being crowned
by the Queen of 1944-45, lovely Peggy Holt.
The committee in charge of the ball included
Cut Cunningham and Hugh MacLeod, Co-Chair-
men, Sidney Flavelle, George Baldwin, T. K.
Fisher, and Maxine Johnston, who arranged for
the very excellent decorations.
PAGE    FIFTY-THREE 1. Scienceman's nightmare;    2. Bottoms up;    3. Camera shy
Welton gets cup for Chem. Engineers:   4. Breaking the record;
5.  Harris inspects  Chem.  '47 display;    6.  We  told  you so;
7. Smile for the birdie;    8. Touche.
Secence
Climaxing weeks of intensive preparations,
500 Engineers forsook their slide-rules and logbooks the night of Thursday, February 21, to
descend on the Commodore for the annual Science
Ball. Known this year as the Red Riot. All celebrants agreed that "this was it."
PAGE    FIFTY-FOUR Getting more and more elaborate each year,
the table decorations at the Riot hit an all-time
high. Red as their ribbons were the faces of the
Civils and the Mechanicals who produced almost
identical displays.
PAGE    FIFTY-FIVE Other displays included the Dawson Club's
gold dredge and the Electricals' perpetual favorite, the Kissometer. The "Mystery Prize" went to
the Chemicals' working nylon plant.
Providing atmosphere was a huge mural by
PAGE    FIFTY-SIX 1. Who turned that light on ;    2. Cam Layard and friend;
3. Johnny Allen and  Sandy Haye. Mech.  47;    4. Pass the
loving cup around;    5. Big joke;   6. Hello!;   7. It goes through
here . . . .;    8. Chemicals exhibit prize winning display.
Harry Gordon and Lewis Lewis depicting an
Engineer's nightmare, pieces of which went to
adorn uncounted rooms. Cartoons of the other
great riots of history were drawn by Doug Campbell.
PAGE    FIFTY-SEVEN The Commodore this year was the scene of a
scintillating carnival of beautiful girls, dancing,
music, masks, and all the traditional color of the
New Orleans Mardi Gras festival that has become
so famous for its merriment and brilliance throughout the ages.
PAGE    FIFTY-EIGHT Succeeding the Greek Letter Societies Red
Cross Ball, the Mardi Gras ran for two nights
successively, with over a thousand people
attending.
From the ten lovely co-eds sponsored by the
sororities on the campus, Ruby Dunlop, Freshette,
.   PAGE    FIFTY-NINE was elected to reign over the merry festival of
fun.
The profits arising from the Mardi Gras,
amounting to over six thousand dollars, were
donated partially to the Red Cross, and partially
PAGE    SIXTY to the I.S.S. Fund on the campus.
Sponsored by the Greek Letter Societies, the
committee in charge of the ball included: Audrey
Buchanan and Don Newson, co-chairmen; "Booty"
Hebb, Don Mann, and Buzz Walker.
PAGE    SIXTY-ONE Heralding the eagerly anticipated Science
Ball the Engineers held their infamous annual
Pep Meet in the auditorium. Featuring typical
redshirt humor M.C. Doug Campbell and the rest
of the cast laid them in the aisles.
PAGE    SIXTY-TWO In the middle of February the Aggies gathered
at the White Rose Ballroom for their annual Barn
Dance, featuring old clothes and the Leavy
brothers. As usual the scientific farmers brought
the house down, almost literally.
.   PAGE    SIXTY-THREE 1. Gathering of the clan:    2. Big Block luncheon;    3. Ready
for a hula;    4. Splash party. ,
WometCL
The Women's Undergraduate Society, elected
democratically by the women of the campus, has
spared no pains to make this year the most active
and interesting year for the feminine branch of
the Student Body that the University has ever
experienced. From the gala Freshette initiation in
PAGE    SIXTY-FOUR 1.  Women's   Big   Block   luncheon;     2.   W.A.D.   make   plans;
3.  Preparations  for Sadie Hawkins  week;     4.   5.  6.  Scenes
from  the  annual  nefarious all female  Hi Jinx.
September, through the Big and Little Sister
Supper, the uproarious Hi-Jinx, the two Fashion
Shows, to the unprecedented Sadie Hawkins
Week in January, the teas for the ex-service
students' wives, and finally the big W.U.S.-W.A.A.
Banquet, it has been a noteworthy year.
PAGE    SIXTY-FIVE 1. Honorary A.M.S. member Steinburg and President Mackenzie; 2. A capacity audience enjoys Vancouver Symphony;
3. String section; 4. A hot drummer; 5. Bert Niosi and band;
6. The Deep River boys; 7. Another view of the boys;
8. Vancouver Symphony drummer beats it out; 9. Bert Niosi
himself.
The Special Events Committee, under the
capable Chairmanship of Cal Whitehead, sponsored a very excellent series of musical concerts this year, held for the most part at noon
hours, and featuring some of the foremost musicians of our time.
PAGE    SIXTY-SIX   .   . Included among the artists performing for
the students were such notables as Adolph
Koldofsky, violinist; W. Steinberg and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra; Egon Petri, pianist;
Antol Dorati, conductor; Paul Russel, pianist;
The B.C. Institute of Music and Drama, and interpretive dancers from Oregon State College.
PAGE    SIXTY-SEVEN 1. The campaign starts at the library; 2. Legion sponsors
"Operation Dollar"; 3. Some supporters; 4. Joker marathon;
S. UBS horse derby; 6. Some on, Seabiscuit; 7. Ready lo go:
8. "Operation Dollar" pays off:    9. Another marathon view.
Heralded by a special edition of the Ubyssey,
the Memorial Gymnasium Campaign hit the
campus and province early in February. With an
objective of $500,000 this drive was the most ambitious campaign ever attempted by the students
of U.B.C.
PAGE    SIXTY-EIGHT 1. Howie McPhee Memorial Trophy; 2. Mardi Gras Queen
and guests; 3. The last lap; 4. Just watch him go;
5. Spectators; 6. Our favorite jockey; 7. And the band
played on; 8. Ruby kicks off: 9. Bets "on the nose";
10. The winnah!
Quickly leaping to the support of the drive
the Jokers' Qub organized highly successful auctions, a roller-skating marathon and a carnival.
The Legion organized "Operation Dollar" and all
campus organizations gave their full support.
PAGE    SIXTY-NINE 1.  Best formula they've given me yet;   2.  Sturgeon, Sturgeon.
very fine fish;   3.   The Lighthouse-Keepers Daughter;   4.   Dr.
Smith, Jokster;   5.   Now we'll all get through;   6.   Fine, but
who are the others?;   7.   'We are. we are . . .'.
Sccencedcmauet
Red shirts blazing, 1000 Sciencemen and four
Science gals ate, sang and told jokes at the
always gala traditional Science Banquet at the
Commodore on October 25. Featured at the affair
were the "Lighthouse Keeper's Daughter," Dr.
Smith's jokes, and "Caviar."
PAGE    SEVENTY   .   , 1. 2, 4. 5. 6, 7—Formal opening oi Law Faculty;    3. We can  see through you;    8. Library before and 9. After the atomic
bomb.
PAGE    SEVENTY-ONE 1. Part of   record registration;    2. Cairn ceremony;    3. Pass;     4. Take that!;    5. Arguing?;    6. Seeing double;    7. Are there
any opponents;    8. Peek-a-boo;    9. Fordyce, Perris and Knock meter;    10. Betty Gray and friend;   11. Ainsworth and Wilkinson
ignore   warning.
PAGE    SEVENTY-TWO  Rhodes Scholar
The distinction of being the first post-war
Rhodes Scholar fell to U.B.C's prominent citizen,
Allan Ainsworth.
Now in his fourth year, Allan has proved
himself scholastically in his honors course in
English and Economics. He has, in fact, maintained a consistently high average sice his high
school days at Lord Byng.
His sound administration, as current A.M.S.
President, as well as past record with the Little
Theatre and the Players' Club, of which he has
been made a life member, indicate amply his
qualities as a leader. Also, in this connection,
he was, during his undergrad years, active in the
Parliamentary Forum and in various debating
teams.
Allan is affiliated with Beta Theta Pi and with
Sigma Tau Chi.
At Oxford, he will enter the Final Honours
School in "Modern Greats", so fitting himself for
the future he hopes to find in governmental
service.
Research Work
Dr. K. C. Mann, widely acclaimed physicist,
has been selected as the outstanding U.B.C. research worker of the year in consideration of his
work with the National Research Council during
the war.
Dr. Mann, who now holds an Associate Professorship, worked with the Navy Group of the
Radio Branch of the Council from 1941 to 1945.
His efforts were directed toward the design and
development of a compact radar set to meet specifications of the British Admiralty.
Upon completion, the set was enthusiastically
received by the authorities and was put into immediate use in the British coastal fleet. The same
set is now being used extensively by B.C. coast
shipping. Based on the principle of electronic
screen projection, it will reproduce surrounding
objects, ranging from driftwood to mountains.
Previous to joining the Research Council, Dr.
Mann lectured here in Physics from 1938 to 1941,
when he held as Assistant Professorship.
He is a charter member of Kappa Sigma
fraternity.
PAGE    SEVENTY-FOUR Red Cross Ball Queen
The happy combination of a five foot six inch,
by 125 pound stature—golden blonde hair—gay
blue eyes—and a twinkling, ready smile, fully
explain why Ruby Dunlop was elected and
crowned the first Freshette Queen of the Mardi
Gras, the annual greek letter societies ball, held
early this Spring.
For her coronation ceremony Ruby wore a
misty turquoise blue net evening gown with black
lace elbow-length gloves.
Superficialities of surface beauty do not stand
alone as Ruby's regal qualifications.
At Magee, her high scnool Alma Mater, from
which she graduated last year, she was active
in the Hi-Y organization. She served the 1944-45
term as President of the Vancouver Inter-Club
Hi-Y and was, in this position, responsible for the
direction of the Hi-Y Spring Conference.
Reconsidering her original intention to enter
Nursing, Ruby will direct her above-average
scholastic ability toward the study of Social
Service when she returns next fall for her sophomore year.
Extra-Curricular Work
Pat Fowler, third year Pre-med, has been
chosen as the student who has contributed most
to campus affairs this year. Pat, born in Riondel,
first attended U.B.C. in 1937. At that time he was
active in the Players' Club and other campus
organizations. Returning in 1944 after a six year
absence, he entered Pre-med.
This year, Pat was elected President of the
Pre-Medical Undegraduate Society, where he was
the organizer of a successful campaign to bring
about the establishment of a Medical Faculty at
UBC in 1946. Through this position he became
a member of the Undergraduate Societies Committee and the Discipline Committee, where he
has worked towards a recognition and understanding of these bodies by the University as a
whole.
Recognition of his wide interests and hard
work has been made by Sigma Tau Chi, UBC's
honorary fraternity.
.   PAGE    SEVENTY-FIVE Athletics
Leading athlete of the year was Sandy Robertson, who graduates this year in Civil Engineering. Robertson has starred in sports at UBC
during his four years on the campus, gaining
special recognition in basketball as captain and
leading scorer of the Thunderbird team.
During summer months, he made the grade
as Vancouver's leading baseball pitcher, and last
year was signed by the Boston Red Sox of the
American League.
A member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, he
has also helped the intramural team in other
sports. Kappa Sigma has captured the intramural
title twice in the past three seasons.
Robertson has also played occasionally with
Barsity soccer, cricket, and rugger teams. An all-
round athlete, he expects to try his hand at baseball for a few years before turning to a life job
in civil engineering.
Totie
As final candidate for the Hall of Fame, and
in full recognition of his efforts in furthering the
interests of the University, the editorial board of
the Totem are proud to present Totie, representative of student spirit, ambition, and success, in
connection with University activities.
Totie in this manner has become a symbol of
U.B.C. life, and in this capacity we present him
to the readers of this book. In the light of Totie's
achievements during the past year, with the increase of the members of his family from 3000
to 7000, the second largest University enrollment
in the Dominion, with the plans for the establishment of five new faculties and the actual opening
of one of them, with his mentions in Time magazine, with his huts and new buildings, with his
pies and goldfish, and in general, for the complete
competence with which he has overcome the
obstacles of the past year, the most trying of our
history, we are proud to honour him with mention
in this section of his Yearbook.
PAGE    SEVENTY-SIX ... c\*
to* UNIVERSITY  PLAYERS'  CLUB
1. COGHILL
2. JOHNSON
3. MacDOUGALL
4. JOHNSON
Drama, society, study, noon hours in the
Green Room, rehearsals, play readings—this
forms a composite picture of U.B.C.'s thespians.
the mad, gay and terribly busy members of the
Players' Club.
Barely had the term started when the hardworking student actors presented their first
dramatic effort of the year, in conjunction with
Frosh Week, for the edification of U.B.C.'s 1500
new students. This dramatic epic was entitled
"The Cavalcade of Woo."
PAGE    SEVENTY-EIGHT 1. TAYLOR
2. ARGUE and SHAW
3. WILSON
4. 5. SCENES FROM "THE ALTAR
PIECE"
Shortly afterwards, the club began rehearsing for the Christmas plays. They chose for this
year: "Orange Blossoms," a light farcical
comedy by Phillip Johnson; "The Rainmaker," a
dramatic experiment by Gwen Pharis; and Emmanuel Levi's "Altar Piece."
"The Altar Piece," an excellent picture of the
cruelties of racial prejudice, was so well received
that the club chose it as their presentation for the
Western Universities Drama Festival held this
year at Edmonton.
This festival, inaugurated this year at the
suggestion of the University of Alberta, as a noncompetitive meet, aims to stimulate interest in
University drama. U.B.C. will sponsor it next
year, with the Players' Club as host.
While the "Altar Piece" cast was performing
at this festival, the rest of the Green Roomers
began their biggest undertaking of the year, the
annual   Spring  play.    Selected  this  year  was
John Balderston's fourth dimensional romance,
"Berkeley Square."
A play of this type was a complete innovation to the club. Its great success can be attributed to the skill and versatility of both the
director, Mrs. Elsie Graham, and the excellent
character portrayals of the actors. The role of
John Standish, immortalized by the late Leslie
Howard, was played by Arthur Hill. Norma
Bloom interpreted the feminine lead.
Heading these active Green Roomers this
year was Jack Duffus, hard-working and long-
suffering President. Assisting him were Treasurers Ron Heale and Don MacDougall, along
with Joy Coghill, Secretary. Jim Argue, Don
Wilson and Chester Taylor headed the club
committees. The Advisory Board consisted of
Professor Walter Gage, Professor and Mrs. F. G. C.
Wood, Mrs. Elsie Graham and Miss Dorothy
Somerset.
PAGE    SEVENTY-NINE SCENES  FROM  THE  SPRING PLAY.
"BERKELEY  SQUARE"
1. Norma  Bloom,  freshette,  as  Helen Pettigrew.
2. Art  Hill, who played Peter Standish.
3. Three charming  17th century ladies.
4. Mr. Throstle  charms  companions.
5. Kate rejects Peter Standish.
6. Lady  Anne  and  Kate Pettigrew  read  Peter's
letter, while Tom expresses  disapproval.
PAGE    EIGHTY MUSICAL  SOCIETY
Celebrating its twenty-first anniversary, the
University Musical Society reached the peak of
success during 1945-46. Edward German's "Mer-
rie England", directed by C. Haydn Williams,
was presented as the Club's Seventeenth Annual
production.
This colorful operetta portrayed the life al
Queen Elizabeth's court in Shakespearean days.
A new cast, with a few old-timers as leading players comprised the personnae.
Erika Nalos,  Czecho-Slovakian dramatic  so-
PAGE    EIGHTY-ONE prano, played the May Queen. Alice Stonhouse,
lyric soprano, who first appeared in "The Pirates
of Penzance", was Bessie Throckmorton, Raleigh's
sweetheart. Kathleen Cole, mezzo-soprano, who
began in the "Pirates" also, played Queen Elizabeth's role.
Jill, the witch, was sung by Geraldine Foote,
Freshette mezzo-soprano. David Holman, well-
known tenor, who began in "Iolanthe", starred as
Sir Walter Raleigh, while Richard Brawn, a newcomer, sang the tenor role, Earl of Essex. Another newcomer, Boris John Melnyk, baritone,
was Silas Simkins. Edward Hulford, bass-baritone, took the part of Wiikins, first player in
Shakespeare's company.
Dramatic direction was under the guidance
of E. V. Young and Professor W. Gage, for the
twelfth consecutive year.
This year's officers included M. Dorothy
Mawdsley, Honorary President; W. Gage, Honorary Vice-President; Winnifred Irwin, President;
-Lucille Hawkens, Vice-President; Kelvin Service,
Secretary; Dorothy McLeod, Treasurer; Jerry Mc
Donald,   Advertising   Manager;   David   Holman,
Glee Club; Edward Hulford, Production Manager.
Glee Club activities were curtailed this year,
but it is hoped that provision for a permanent
conductor will be made next year. Under the
direction of Henning Jensen, Jeff Corry, David
Holman, and the supervision of Ted Kirkpatrick,
the Glee Club presented the Minstrel Show at
the Homecoming Potlatch.
"Music from Varsity", broadcast each Thursday evening over CJOR, featured the artists of the
Society with classical numbers and a preview of
the production.   Erika Nalos headed this project.
The Society is indebted to Robert G. Fiddes,
President of St. Andrew's and Caledonian Society
for his donation to the University to be used for
the future establishment of a Chair of Music, and
1. HULFORD
2. MacDONALD
3. MacLEOD
4. HULFORD and
HAWKENS
the purchase of a baby grand piano. It is to be
hoped that these innovations will be available to
students in the Fall of 1946.
Two changes in policy were made this year;
a departure from Gilbert and Sullivan, and an
additional performance, totalling five nights, to
meet 7000 students' demands. The Society has
come a long way from its 1916 nucleus of musicians to the present high standard of production.
PAGE     EIGHTY-TWO    . SCENES FROM THE MUSICAL   SOCIETY
PRODUCTION, "MERRIE ENGLAND"
1. Gallants   from   the   days   of   Queen   Elizabeth;
2. The entire  cast  assemble  for the  grand  finale;
3. The May Queen, Erika Nalos, enthralls her court;
4. The leads, David Holman and Alice Stonhouse.
perform a duet; 5. Who is this character. Sir Walter
Raleigh; 6. Chorus is spellbound by witches tale;
7.   Armouries   taken  over   for  an  early   rehearsal;
8. Witch Gerry Foote, centre front.
.   .    .   PAGE    EIGHTY-THREE Parliamentary Forum
Members of the Parliametary Forum experienced an energetic year under the leadership of
their hard-working President, Hal Daykin.
The activities of the society show a much more
marked resemblance to those of pre-war years
than have any since 1940.
With the first year of peace, the Forum
launched a program of symposiums before downtown clubs, such as the Y.M.C.A., the Wisemen's
Club and the Women's School  for Citizenship.
1. Joan Fraser
2. Dave Williams
3. Phyllis Webb
4. Doug Leiterman
BOB HARWOOD
PAGE    EIGHTY-FOUR   .
Usually two students would attend the meeting
for the evening as guest speakers.
Despite a lack of success, the 1946 McGoun
Cup debaters gained a great deal of experience
from the debates for that coveted trophy. Supporting the negative of the resolution that "the
Dominion Government should undertake to guarantee the provision of suitable employment at all
times for all persons able and willing to work,
Stewart Chambers and Tony Scott travelled to
Saskatoon only to be defeated by the Saskatchewan University team. The home affirmative duo
of Morris Berson and Dave Williams also lost to
the Winnipeg team.
B.C. liquoi laws received a thorough going-
over during the Frosh Debates between U.B.C. and Victoria College with Vic College coming out
over the Varsity team. Bud Gurevitch and Man-
son Toynbee stayed home while Marshall Bray
and Fergus McKenzie debated in Victoria.
Linfield College, McMinnville, Oregon, was
the only American college U.B.C. debated against
this semester. Harriet Hochman and Rosemary
Hodgins upheld the British colonial policy in India
against the Americans and won.
The question of political clubs on the campus,
one of the biggest issues of the year, arose as a
result of the blood and fire of electioneering for
.the Fall Mock Parliament. A minority Conservative Government led to a second election which
gave them a bare majority. Grant Livingstone,
their leader, became Prime Minister with Bob
Harwood, C.C.F. leader cs Opposition Leader.
Gordon Martin led the L.-P.P., Harry Castillou the
Liberals and Dave Williams the Retrogressive
Progressives.
1945-46 Executive was headed by Hal Daykin
until February when Bob Harwood, First Vice-
President took over the oficial gavel. Joan Fraser,
Second Vice, was followed by Dave Williams as
Third Vice. Alan Roeher served as Secretary in
charge of the Frosh Debates. Doug Leitermann,
as Treasurer, arranged the Spring Mock Parliament while Program Manager Rosemary Hodgins
looked after the weekly debates. With all the
activities, Harry Castillou and Phyllis Webb, the
Publicity agents, helped out immensely. Prof.
W. N. Sage as Honorary President rounded out
this year's Executive.
In 1946-47, the Forum promises to launch out
on some big plans comparable to pre-war schemes
now that the post-war period has arrived.
PAGE    EIGHTY-FIVE University Concert Orchestra
_■
i
mTtl
K
^__M^_________T___F
_1
IHHPV***'^'
l        -
NALOS
1. Hard at work;    2. Ferguson;
3. Court;    4. Bartlett
Chopin, Bach, Beethoven—these, and many
other great names in music—were presented to
student music-lovers by the members of the University Concert Orchestra. The thirty-piece aggregation, conducted by Henning Jenson, gave
five presentations during the past season.
Like all other campus organizations, the Concert Orchestra could not find enough room on
this overcrowded post-war campus to house all
those who wished to hear their recitals.
Active interest was given the society by the
patroness, Mrs. N. A. N. MacKenzie and Dr. G. G.
Sedgewick, Honorary President, and Howard Bartlett, Business Manager.
PAGE    EIGHTY-SIX University Radio Society
"Tuum Est", the motto of U.B.C, is personified
amongst the student body by the dynamic and
active members of the University Radio Society.
In spite of cramped and outdated studio facilities, and the lack of a regular broadcasting
station on the U.B.C. campus, the Society has
expanded its activities to such an extent that
this year has seen it become the leading university's radio society in Canada.
Last term's expansion in the organization culminated  with  the  official  opening   of  the  new
1. Loyd Buhner
2. George  Broatch
3. Pat Ottewell
4. Ray Perrault
studio in October, after months of concentrated
effort on the part of the members in putting the
new equipment in working order. On this occasion Dr. G. M. Shrum, Honourary President, congratulated the group on its progress.
These increased facilities necessitated a
change in location, from the closet in the Agriculture building to the present location in the
south basement of Brock Hall. In these still somewhat cramped quarters a fully modern, soundproof studio was constructed and fitted with an
eight channel standard broadcast mixer control
consol.
To Bill Watts, the President and the enthusiastic promoter of radio on the campus, the Club
BILL WATTS
PAGE    EIGHTY-SEVEN 1. Basketball broadcast
2. Bill MacKinnon
3. Jim Beard
Perrault directs
5. Phil Ashton
6. Dr. Shrum
and the students owe much of this achievement.
Under his able guidance, both series programmes,
special events, and sports broadcasts have been
given throughout the year over local stations
and the western network of the Canadian Broadcasting Company.
"Music from Varsity", "Microphone Goes to
College" and "Campus Theatre", as well as daily
presentations to the students in the Brock and the
Caf fill up the club's agenda. Special arrangements were made with local studios and many
or the Thunderbird basketball games, the final of
the McKechnie cup game, and the turning of the
sod for the new Physics Building were broadcast.
A news service was conducted regularly from the
Brock each noon hour, with notices and announcements of interest to U.B.C. students comprising the
main portion of the broadcast. Scriptwriting for
the dramatical productions was done by Ernest
Perrault, Jim Beard, Peter Duval, Loyd Bulman,
and some by President Watts himself.
Comprehensive future plans of the group em
brace the establishment of a transmitting station
right on the campus, so as to eliminate the necessity of airing programs through downtown stations. Further enlargement of the studio and
control facilities is also seen as a future development. In general, it is the contention of the Radio
Society that to increase the broadcast facilities is
the most efficient way to put the needs of the
University before the public, which is, after all,
the onyl way to alleviate these needs.
The Executive for this year has included Bill
Watts, President; George Broatch, Assistant Director; Pat Ottewell, Secretary; Loyd Bulmer, Chief
Programme Engineer; Ray Perrault, Chief Announcer; Jim Beard, Chief of Dramatics; Phil Ashton, News Editor; Bill MacKinnon, Sports Broadcaster, and Roy Ruddell, Chief Technician.
PAGE    EIGHTY-EIGHT Jazz Society
STROUD
STEWART
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
COWIE
HARRIS
Jazz as an art is the cause to which the enthusiasts of the Jazz Society pledge themselves.
To further this aim, record sessions are held each
week, at which the various aspects of Jazz as a
serious music form are studied.
Presenting this music to the student body at
large, a live improvised jam session is given
annually by leading student and city jazz groups.
The executive this year consisted of Ross
Stroud, President; Gordon Harris, Vice-President;
Alex Cowie, Secretary; Ross Stewart, Treasurer;
Betty Thompson, Librarian, and Ross Thompson,
Publicity Director.
PAGE    EIGHTY-NINE Mamooks
AARO AHO
1. The Executive seem happy
2. Bill Stewart
3. Charlotte Corbltt
Varsity, Rah, Rah, Rahl—With that yell, the
Mamooks, campus spark plugs and joe boys,
swing into action. The scene? A pepmeet, a
Thunderbird basketball game, a rally or an ISS
drive. Anywhere where there is work to be done,
and enthusiasm is needed, the Mamooks will be
there in a body.
Under their jurisdiction come not only cheer-
leading, but also pepmeets,  dance decorations,
PAGE    NINETY 1. Cheer leaders
2. Joe b.oy
3. Another poster
4. Dance coming up
5. Major Mamooks
ticket sales, ushering, Totem and Thunderbird
sales, and poster painting. Add to this the supervision of all the campus notice bords, and students begin to appreciate the effort and work of
the Mamooks in campus life.
Probably the biggest sigle order came with
this spring's Visitors' Day. The hundreds of
posters, all demanded on short notice, were done
well and punctually. To meet this particular
need, and to generally speed production, an air
brush set, complete with electrically operated air
compressor, was added to the myriads of brushes,
pots, jars, and bottles which comprise the equip:
ment of the poster section. It was this intriguing
device that made possible the wondrous subtlety
of shadow and tone quality, so outstanding in
this year's Mamook art work.
The gay Irish colleens and green shamrocks
which comprised the motif for the decorations al
the Junior-Senior class party, held this spring,
demonstrated further the capabilities of this busy
section of the Mamooks.
President Aaro Aho was ably assisted this year
by Vice-President Bill Stewart and Secretary
Charlotte Corbitt. Professor J. A. Harris acted as
Honorary Eresident. Mary McMillar supervised
all the ticket sales, while George Bloor worked
as the head cheerleader. Among the many talented signpainters of which the Mamooks boast
are Malchia Sanford, Bob Nickells, Bob Armstrong and many others.
Working with little praise and many criticisms,
the Mamooks have done a marvellous job of
pulling the campus together. More power to
them!
.   .   .   PAGE    NINETY-ONE Student Christian Movement
The Student Christian Movement attempts to
discover the truth about man, about life, and
about the universe. The program is designed
to enable interested students to discover real
religious principles which will provide them
with a basis for action in the present world.
The   study  program  is  made  up  of  seven
r m l
is*    if_^______L    M WW
1. The Executive of S.C.M
2. Marni. Tunbridge, Secretary
3. The bunch relenc
groups studying records of the life of Christ. In
addition to a psychology group, there is a weekly
social-political-economic series in which members analyse international problems. Russia'-s
foreign policy, and the Japanese-Canadian situation, were the two main subjects studied. The
general meeting, which all the members attend
once a week, is chiefly concerned with the role
of the University in society today.
The firesides and the out-of-town camps held
during the year are planned to bring the students
together in a friendly discussion of religion and
the present day world.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Kay Halpin; Vice-President, Don Brown: Secretary, Marnie Tunbridge; Treasurer, Duncan
Gray; Study Program Director, Pam Mitchell.
KAY HALPIN
PAGE    NINETY-TWO Social Problems Club
Problems of society are idealistically solved
by the members of the non-partisan Social Problems Club. To further the discussions of these
troubles of mankind, the club sponsors many
and varied meetings.
Officers for this year include Peter Linden-
feld, President; Ruth Irish, Vice-President; Jean
MacKinnon, Secretary; Gordon Martin, Program
Director; Jack Varcoe, Social Convenor, and
Gordon  Sandborn,  Publicity Director.
PAGE    NINETY-THREE Canadian Officers Training Corps
1. Lieutenant-Colonel G. M. Shrum. M.M.
2. Major Allen
3. Lieutenant McCllloch
Marching into the post-war world, the two
service corps on the campus reconverted to their
previous policy of voluntary enlistments with an
encouraging number of returned men and previous enthusiasts.
One company of two platoons comprised the
Canadian Officers Training Corps. The Corps
carried on with the syllabus established during
the war years.
Lieut.-Colonel Shrum continued in his capacity
PAGE    NINETY-FOUR 1. Relaxing in the officers' lounge.
2. N.C.O's at an instructors' parade.
3. Lecturing on marksmanship.
4. Nichols  end Idsardi,  signalmen.
5. Captain Field.
6. Sergeant-Major receives his instructions.
7. Line-up for pay parade.
8. Genial C.S.M. Irving.
PAGE    NINETY-FIVE as commanding officer, assisted in executive
duties by Major Topping. Returned service personnel comprised the student officers.
An executive and training staff, much reduced
from that of previous years, efficiently handled
the affairs o the Corps. Lieutenant McCilloch,
C.S.M. Irving and Sgt. Piper managed the paper
work and quarter's stores, while C.S.M. Green
instructed training.
The University Naval Training Division on the
campus was but half the size of the Army Corps.
Training consisted of signalling, boat work,
navigation and seamanship in the trend of previous years. Those who completed the training
schedule satisfactorily were required to go before
a selection board that chose the eligible candiates
for officers.
Leadership of the Division was continued
under Lieutenant-Commander (S.B.) Macllroy,
R.C.N.V.R. Lieutenant Nash of H.M.C.S. Discovery.
Lieutenant-Commander  (S.  B.)  Macllroy
1. U.N.T.D. officers.
2. Officers inspect cadets.
3. Lectures in the sunshine
H.M.OS. Vensldor.
4. Swabbing the deck.
5. On duty?
PAGE    NINETY-SIX   .  UBYSSEY
1.   Mardee   Dundas,  Editor-in-chief;
Editor;    3. Jack Ferry. Senior Editor;
Editor.
2.  Marion   Ball,   Senior
4. Bruce Bewell, Senior
Emanating from the northeast corner of the
basement of the Brock Hall, where the editorial
policy is determined, the influence and opinions
of the Ubyssey, campus newspaper, make themselves heard and felt in every phase of student
life of the university. Every debate, every controversial part of campus politics, has the Ubyssey
PAGE    NINETY-EIGHT   . taking its stand, setting forth its arguments, and
welcoming constructive criticism.
Setting the policy this year as Editor-in-Chief
of Publications, was diminutive, dark, Mardee
Dundas, the fourth female to hold this stormy
position. Mixing fingernail polish and printers'
ink for four years in succession, Mardee rose
from a Associate Editor in her first year to the
exalted position of Senior Editor by her third
session at University.
Taking the editorial reins from John Tom Scott,
she guided a temperatmental and diminishing
staff through a hectic post-war year of Jokers,
veteran and Greek Letter controversies and goldfish swallowing students, to produce 60 editions
of the campus tri-weekly paper.
Student interest in the Publications Board was
concretely indicated by the overwhelming number of letters to the editor received this year.
Ploughing through this melee of student opinions
to present their individual papers once a week
were the three hard working and much abused
Senior Editors, Marion Ball, Bruce Bewell and
Jack Ferry.
Scienceman Bewell, complete with oversized
pipe, calmly waded through the deluge of first
of the week news to pioduce the Tuesday issue,
sometimes with his inimitable "Stresses and
Strains" column. Assisting him with editing and
head writing were Associate Editors John Green,
Luke Moyls, Sports Editor
Ron Haggart, News Manager
Don Stainsby, Cup Editor
Don Ferguson, Associate Editor
.   .    .   PAGE    NINETY-NINE John Wardroper, Associate Editor
Nancy  MacDonald.  Van Perry
Don MacLean,  Associate Sports Editor
Jean MacFarlane and Helen Worth, and Assistant
Editors Audrey Garrard and Helen-Mary Gowans.
Wise-cracking Marian Ball condescended to
appear in the Pub every Wednesday to browbeat
cub reporters into writing the Thursday issue of
the paper. Occasionally Marian herself did a
little writing to convulse the campus with her
unique "Home Thoughts From a Broad". Associates John Wardroper and Van Perry and Assistants JohnGummow and Graeme Scott supplied
Marian with her male harem of a staff.
More or less Senior Editor of the Saturday
edition was Jack Ferry, who gave up the menial
job of editing a paper early in the spring to take
up the work of Features Editor, leaving the Saturday paper to his Associates Harry Castillou
and Don Ferguson. These two divided the work,
and alternated press nights until they barely saw
each other.
Associate on the Saturday paper was Rosemary Hodgins, with Assistant Editors Betty Motherwell,  Joan Grimmett, Howie Wolf,  Val Sears
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED   .   .   . 1. Van Perry poses;    2.  What price passion, Helen?
and Bob Mungall helping with the proofreading.
News Editor for the three papers, Ron Haggart
compiled the campus news into assignments for
the Senior Editors, as well as arranging for pictures for the Ubyssey with Photography Editor
Pat Worthington. Assisting Haggart in the news
gathering department, was Harry Allen, third
year Commerce student, who handled the News
Editor's job alone after the beginning of March.
Don Stainsby was responsible, as Canadian
University Press Editor, for receiving and sending
all C.U.P. telegrams ad dispatches between U.B.C.
and the eastern university papers.
Often seen trotting around the campus with
bundles of Ubysseys under his arm was hardworking Phil Ashton, circulation manager, who
also performed as a reporter when deadlines
were to be met and the regular staff was scarce.
Besides turning out three sport pages a week
for the major part of the term, Luke Moyls found
time to edit the sport page of the Totem, as well
as act as manager for a basketball team.
Assisting Moyls on the Ubyssey were Don Mac-
Lean, and Laurie Dyer.
Bill Gait. Features  Editor
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    ONE TOTEM
Bill Stewart,  Editor
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    TWO
Jean MacFarlane. Associate Editor
Nancy Macdonald. Associate Editor
The 1946 Totem, from the new red totem on
its leather bound cover, to the distinctive end
sheets which complete the expert job of binding,
has undergone a complete renovation from the
form in which the yearbook last appeared on the
campus. After four volumes of the Totem had
been published along a similar style of makeup,
the 1946 editorial staff decided in favour of a
modification of the format The result—a more
informal, streamlined continuity linking together
the many student activities, we place before the
reader with the hope that it may afford him
pleasure, now in the perusal of it, and in future,
in retrospection of these eventful college days.
Our diminutive, very hard working staff, under
-Editor Bill Stewart, divided up the work to be
done, then bravely rolled up their sleeves and
set to it, just finishing in time for the book to
be printed and bound before the Easter exams.
The copy on the Class Executives, and the
writeups of the Graduates, iell to the lot of Nancy
Macdonald, who spent long hours over a typewriter and on the phone gleaning information
that uncooperative students" omitted to write on
their course cards. Nacy also found time to write
the Phrateres copy, as well as time to do proofreading and captions.
Jean MacFarlane, our other Associate, took
time out from a busy Pre-Med course to write up
all the major and minor campus organizations,
as well as to arrange for the accompanying pic- tures. In spite of these duties, she earned the
undying friendship of the printers and engravers
by turning in these assigments before the deadline.
Assisting her were, John Green, Bob Fitzpatrick, Fred Grover, Rosemary Hodgins, Betty
Motherwell, Don Stainsby, Jane Seymour, Beverly
Ann Widman, and Doug. Yates..
The Fraternity and Sorority pages, always a
big headache, were well handled by Don Ferguson, who by now has a great antipathy for
Greek letter groups. Bruce Bewell was depended
upon for anything vaguely connected with engineering, as well as for much caption and proofreading work. Bob Fitzpatrick covered the Theology and Aggie copy, and also helped Jean with
the clubs.
Deane Sherman pushed the Totem sales to a
new high with his "Got $3? Well, devote 'em to
the Totem," while Luke Moyls, in his second
year with the sports section, somehow managed
to get his portion of the book to press, but at this
time of writing we don't yet know how.
We wish to extend our warmest thanks to Al
Black of Cleland Kent, and Charlie Philips of
Ward & Philips, for all those evenings and overtime hours spent on this publication, and also to
the men at both establishments whose workmanship kept the book to its high standards.
Bruce Bewell. Bob Fitzpatrick, Don Ferguson
Deane Sherman, Sales Manager
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THREE THE  THUNDERBIRD
A long cherished dream of the Publications
Board was realized this year with the first edition
of a literary quarterly on the U.B.C. campus.
The Thunderbird, with its twenty-four pages of
glossy paper, headline type, serious, comic, and
poetic articles, was enthusiastically received by
a small fraction of the student body, while the
remainder expressed only indifferent reactions to
the infant publication.
Ex Totem Editor John Green was chosen in the
Fall to edit the quarterly, with Don Stainsby,
C.U.P. Editor, as his Assistant.
After a great deal of pleading with the indolent literati of the campus, Green managed to
extract enough copy from them to fill the first
issue of the magazine, only to find that, due to
unforeseen difficulties with the advertising, it
was impossible to publish the Thunderbird until
the Spring term. Thus the "quarterly" was cut
down to two issues in its Freshman year at the
University.
Because of the work entiled in the job of
C.U.P. Editor, Stainsby was forced to give up the
Thunderbird, so that the Green editorial staff consisted of Alan Dawe, Don Scott Evison, and Strow-
an Robertson, Assistant Editors; Doug. Campbell,
Lewis Allen Lewis, Cartoonist.
John Green
Alan Dawe
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FOUR
Strowan Robertson PRE-MED JOURNAL
As part of its campaign to put U.B.C.'s new
Medical Faculty on the map, both locally and
nationally, the first issue of the Pre-Med Journal
has been published by the Pre-Meds. Lack of
technical knowledge limits the scope of the magazine, but it is the ultimate hope of the present
staff to publish a technical quarterly, similar to
those published by other universities.
At present the journal is concerned with
acquainting the embryo M.D.'s with a broad view
of the medical profession, and giving them a
chance to express their views on pertinent questions relating to their future profession.
To achieve these aims the first issue contained discussions on general practice, preventive
medicine, social medicine, and medical school
education as practised in other colleges. The
publication also included some articles on special
branches of medicine.
The Journal was established as a precedent,
but in its present form it is providing a needed
source of information to the students at U.B.C.
who are planning to make a career out of medicine, as well as the university-conscious public.
Mike Shepherd. Editor
Pat Fowler, Jean MacFarlane, Murray Sager and Phil Heaps watch Mike Shepherd lay down the law to Jack Faghin.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIVE DIRECTORY
The Student Directory, that indispensable little
booklet containing the name, address and phone
number of every student registered at U.B.C, remains the only offering of the Publications Board
whose contents are faithfully read and implicitly
believed. The Editor is never called a "radical"
or a "hide-bound Conservative," nor does he take
sides in dispute, prod council into doing their
duty, and see that each event in the year receives
its proper coverage and advertisement.   Despite
The book this year, edited by Bruce Lowther,
far surpassed in size any previous issues, and
sported a modern two-tone beige and brown
cover. Innovations also included a Business
Directory listing the names of the advertisers,
lists of the presidents of all the major and minor
clubs, along with their addresses and telephone
numbers, and the same information in connection
with all student representatives on undergraduate
societies.
Bruce Lowther was assisted at his job by Bob
Berggren, Jean Jamieson, Betty Kemo, Alex Leslie,
Helen Smith, Don Stainsby, Howie Wolfe, and
Lyle Woodley.
TILLICUM
Helen Worth and Jean MacFarlane
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SIX
The Tillicum, published annually at the beginning of the term by upper year members of
the Publications Board for the purpose of breaking
the facts of University life to the wide eyed
Freshman class, this year appeared in a different form, with different material, and under a
different cover.
The editorial staff, consisting of co-editors Jean
MacFarlane and Helen Worth, with last year's
editor Bruce Bewell giving the invaluable aid of
his hoary-headed experience, discarded the time
honoured custom of methodically copying the
preceding year's publication. At the beginning
of the summer they began to rewrite copy that
needed changing, bringing old copy up to date,
and throwing out old Totie cuts. This feverish
activity, along with the A.M.S. and M.A.D. revision of their Constitutions, resulted in the Tillicum emerging from its housecleaning a modern,
more extensive, and more readable publication,
which continued to serve the needs of the first
year class in their difficult orientation period. PHOTOGRAPHY
The Photography Department of the Publications Board was just one more of the large number of innovations around U.B.C. during this hectic
year.
Although the first few weeks of the Fall term
were spent among a overwhelming conglomeration of carpenters, lumber, planes, saws and cub
reporters, the photographers managed to get organized in time to keep the Ubyssey well supplied
with pictures.
With the coming of the New Year, the head of
the department, Gus Worthington, discovered the
tremendous number of pictures a Year Book requires, counted up the extremely small fraction
of that number we had, and began to crack the
whip accordingly. The cameramen co-operated
to the extent that several of them found, oddly
enough, that spending eight hours in the darkroom was not compatible with passing their
exams. They did turn out the pictures with a
vengeance, however, with the result that Al Black,
from Cleland Kent's, spent many of his January
and February evenings and Sundays laying out
and sorting large mountains of glossy prints.
Tom Hatcher
Bob Steiner Hal Harris
.   .    .   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND     SEVEN Gus Worthington, the energentic and capable
head of the photographers, spent his noon hours
sorting out prints, and handing out assignments
as well as trying to co-ordinate the rush deadline
work of the Ubyssey with the slower, more time-
devouring work of the Totem. Among the shutter-
bugs themselves, Tom Hatcher turned out the bas-
relief section pages and a large percentage of the
prints making up the book. Hal Harris, despite
the encumbrance of a tripod and flash extension,
always managed to turn his assignments in on
time. Bob Steiner, although rarely seen outside
the darkroom, found time to cover the co-ops as
well as several of the pass features and major
events. Roy Dougans remained true to his faculty
by using up thirty flashbulbs for as many good
pictures at the Science Ball and Pep Meet. While
Alf Evans and Fred Maurer co-operated on the
class executives, and several major clubs; Dick
Oulton and Van Perry handled the beauties on
the spot and others of the more interesting
photographic tasks. Gordie Young and Freddie
Grover covered a wide diversity of subjects, both
with flashguns and without, while Ron Bruce
and Cece Yip turned in all the remainder of the
photos.
Cecil Yip. Roy Dougans
Alf Evans
Fred Maurer
Gordon Young Dick  Oulton
Fred Grover
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHT I. Pre-Med Journal staff:    2. Ready to shoot:    3. Bill and Jean;    4. Now we call him Baldy;    5. Tillicum ed. Helen Worth;
6. Mardee goes mad;    7. Gus and the  pin-ups;    8. Can't you read?;     9.  Perry  and Ferry;     10.  Dougans  looks  pleased;
II. Are you Mr. Dollar?;    12. Freddie explains to Bill;    13. News Manager at work;    14. A dollar down.
.    .   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    NINE CLASSES *vt
lG
46
Br, Arts '46
Shouldering most of the responsibility of running an expanded post-war campus, are the
Seniors, the class of Arts '46. But the class of '46
.has come out smiling.
Heading the Student's Council was capable,
hard-working Allan Ainsworth. Under his leadership, the A.M.S. helped the many functions to run
more smoothly, in the transition period from war
to peace. The tremendous task of organizing the
War Memorial Gym campaign, the most ambitious project yet attempted by U.B.C. students,
fell to a committee of Student Council members.
Senior Nancy Pitman headed all women's activities, as President of the Women's Undergraduate
Society, while Maryanne Norton looked after
women's athletics.
On the Publications Board, Senior Mardee
Dundas became the fourth feminine Editor-in-Chief
in the history of the University. She was ably
assisted by Thursday Editor Marion Ball and
Sports Editor Luke Moyls. Helen Worth was the
right-man "man" of Tuesday Editor Bruce Bewell.
Keeping in step with the progressive campus
was the University Radio Society, headed by Bill
Watts. A newly-equipped radio station was constructed in the Brock and direct broadcasting lines
were maintained with local studios.
Hal Daykin had the busy job of holding the
active Parliamentary Forum in check . . . keen
interest was apparent on the campus from the
Mock Parliament debates, and two of the parties
made application to the Board of Governors for
permission to found campus political clubs. The
final decision was finally laid in the laps of the
student body, who voted on a plebiscite and
refused consent.
In the Players' Qub, Murray Sager upheld
the Senior Class with a lead in Altar-Piece, the
play which was chosen to go to Edmonton to the
Drama Festival of the four Western Universities.
The Executive of Arts '46 was elected late in
the year, as there was some hope that two
definite groups, Pure Arts and Pure Science,
would be formed. All arrangements could not be
made soon enough, however, and a composite
executive of Arts and Science was chosen at an
unusually well attended meeting in January.
Charlie Bullen was elected President and was
assisted by Juniors Joy Donegani and Jean MacFarlane, as Vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer. Dr. W. Sage was chosen as Honorary
President.
Above:    Charlie Bullen
Lower:  Jean MacFarlane, Joy Donegani
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    TWELVE AINSWORTH, ALLAN H.—Vancouver
Honors in Economics and English, Beta Theta Pi, Players' Club,
Parliamentary Forum, Economics Society, President of the
A.M.S.
AJELLO, PETER A.—Vancouver
Honors in Philosophy and Psychology, Players' Club,
Letters Club, Psychology Club, President of the Letters
Club.
ALDERDICE, DON F.—Vancouver
Honors in Zoology,  Biological Discussions Club.
ANDERSON, K. JOYCE—Vancouver
Maj. Chemistry, Min., Bacteriology; Alpha
Phi President.
ANGOVE, EDITH—Chapman Camp, B.C.
Maj., Bacteriology and Chemistry; - Student Christian Movement,
Badminton.
BAKER, WALLACE—Vancouver
BALL, MARION—Victoria
Maj.,   English and  Philosophy;   Kappa Alpha
Theta, Thursday Editor of the Ubyssey.
BARTON,  GEORGE M.—Vancouver
Honors  in  Chemistry;   Chemical  Society.
BEECH, EMMA L.—Vancouver
Maj., English  and Psychology;   Alpha  Delta Pi,  Letters  Club,
Psychology Club.
BELTON, NANCY K.—loco
Maj., Economics and English;  Gamma Phi Beta,
Badminton.
BENNETT, OWEN K.—Abbotsford
Maj., Biology and English;  French Club.
BISHOP, FRANK L—Vancouver
Maj., English and Psychology; Psychology
Club,  Symphonic Society.
BORDEN, JANE L.—Vernon
Maj., English; Min., Philosophy.
BRINE,  RALPH H.—Vancouver
Maj., Zoology and Chemistry;  Alpha Delta Phi.
BROCKMAN, ARTHUR  M.—Kindersley,  Sask.
Maj., English and Psychology.
BROWN,  ANNE—Vancouver
Maj., Zoology;    Delta Gamma, Players'
Club.
BROWN,  HELEN M.—Vancouver
Maj., English and Psychology.
BROWN, MARTIN L.—Vancouver
Honors   in   Philosophy.
BUCHANAN, AUDREY J.—Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta, Secretary of W.U.S.,
Co-chairman of Mardi Gras.
BULLEN, CHARLES F.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Chemistry   and   Mathematics;   Delta
Upsilon, President of Arts.
BUNKER, JAQUELINE L.—Vancouver
Maj., French and German,
BURNEY, ROSS H.—New Westminster
Phi  Delta  Theta.
CALDER, SHEILA H.—New Westminster
Maj., History and English; Alpha Delta Pi.
CANTY, LES J.—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi, Parliamentary Forum.
On to Medical School, comrades.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTEEN CARTER, DAVID S — Vancouver
Honors  in Physics;   Physics  Club,  Mathematics Club,  Golf.
CAULDERWOOD, JOAN M.—Abbotsford
Maj., Mathematics  and English;   Min.,  Physics.
CHARTERS, JOHN A.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Biology  and  History;   Symphonic Society.
CHENOWETH, PATRICIA M.—Vancouver
Kappa   Kappa   Gamma.
CLARKE, JOAN L.--Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma.
CLAYTON, BLANCHE P.—
CODRINGTON, ROBERT S.—Vancouver
Honors in Physics;  Physics Club.
COLQUHOUN, LENORE  J.—Penticton
Maj., English;   Min., Sociology and
Psychology;   Alpha Delta  Pi,  Badminton.
COPP, MARION E— New Westminster
Maj.,   English   and  Psychology;   Kappa  Kappa   Gamma;   Golf,
Tennis.
COULING, PHYLLIS M.—Vancouver
Maj., Bacteriology and Chemistry;  S.C.M., Chemical
Society,  Skiing.
COYLE, PATRICIA F—Vancouver
Maj.,   English;   Alpha   Phi.
CULTER, BARBARA A.—New Westminster
Maj.,   English and  Psychology;   Alpha
Gamma Delta, Tennis, Badminton.
DAHLQUIST, H. E.—White Rock
Maj.,  Political  Science  and  Economics.
DARLING, JOHN G.—Victoria
Letters  Club,  Economics  Qub, Golf, Badminton.
DAVY, SHEILA I.—New Westminster
Maj.,  English and Psychology;   Alpha  Delta Pi,
Letters   Club,   Psychology.
DAYKIN, HAROLD C—Vancouver
Honors   in   History  and  French;   Parliamentary   Forum,   Soccer,   President  of  the
Forum.
DEBECK, MYLEEN—Vernon
Delta Gamma.
DEPENCIER, EDITH MARY—Vancouver
Maj., English; Min., Psychology; Alpha Phi, Secretary of
Pan  Hellenic.
DEWDNEY, PAMELA—Nelson
Maj., English and Philosophy; Delta Gamma.
DONE, DOROTHY M.—New Westminster
Maj., Chemistry and Bacteirology; Musical
Society,  Chemical Club,   Swimming.
DUNDAS, MARDEE I.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English;  Min.,  Psychology;   Alpha Gamma  Delta;
Editor-in-Chief of Publications.
EDMONDS, MILDRED—
ELLINGHAM,  JOAN C—Vancouver
Maj.,   English   and   Sociology.
EWING, FRANCES M.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Economics;   Kappa Kappa Gamma.
I use Jergens.
Gimme a bite.
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTEEN FERGUSON, MARION A.—Chilliwack
Phrateres.
FLAVELLE, SIDNEY S.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Chemistry and Bacteriology;   Gamma Phi  Beta,
Secretary of the Alma Mater Society.
FLEETWOOD, CECILIA C—Cowichan Station
Maj.,   Zoology   and   Bacteriology;   V.C.F.,
Munro  Pre-Med.   Club,   Intramurals.
FLESHER, MARY F, -New Westminster
Maj.,   Psychology   and   Sociology;
Gamma, Badminton.
FOWLER, EVELYN M.—Vancouver
Maj., Chemistry and Bacteriology.
FOWLER, R.—North Vancouver
Maj.,   Economics   and   Government.
Delta
FRANCIS, MARION D.—Redonda Bay
Maj., Chemistry and Psysics;
Tennis.
Newman Club,
GARRARD,  AUDREY—Vancouver
Maj.,   English  and  Philosophy;
Alpha Delta Pi.
GIBSON, JANET—Vancouver
GOODERHAM, ELFANOR M.—Gleichen, Alta.
Maj., Chemistry;  Min., English;  Kappa Alpha Theta,
Basketball, Badminton.
GRANT, PHYLLIS F.—Vancouver
Delta  Gamma,  President of Panhellenic.
HARDY,  RUTH  E.—Vancouver
Maj.,   English   and   Music;   Phrateres,
Psychology,  Corresponding Secretary
of   Phrateres.
HARRIS, BETTY H.—Vancouver
Maj., English and Psychology;  Delta Gamma.
HARRIS, GORDON R.—Vancouver
Honors in Chemistry;  Jazz Society, Vice-President of the
lazz Society.
HARRIS, JULIENNE M.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English  and Philosophy;   Delta Gamma.
HAWORTH,  GERALD  N.—Vancouver
HENDERSON, BARBARA M.—Victoria
Maj., French and English.
HENDERSON, CLARENCE R—Falkland
Honors   in   Chemistry;   Film   Society.
HICKEY, GORDON R.—Saskatoon, Sask.
HICKS, ROGER B.—Vancouver
Pre-Med.   Club.
HOLE, LEONARD W.—Vancouver
HUGHES, RICHARD D.—Vancouver
Honors in  Geology;   G.M.  Dawson Club.
HULFORD,  EDWARD J.—Victoria
Maj., Philosophy and Psychology; Musical Society.
JARDINE,   JUDITH—Vancouver
Maj.,  English and French;  Players' Club.
The Brock converts to study hall.
.   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTEEN JOHNSON, CAROLINE L.—Vancouver
Players' Club.
JOHNSTON, ROSEMARY E.—Vancouver
Honors  in Chemistry.
JONES, E. G.—Victoria
Maj., History and Education.
KATZNELSON, EDITH—Vancouver
Honors in Biology and Botany; Delta Phi
Epsilon, Players' Club, Biological Dis-cus-
sion   Club.
KING, ILENE N—Vancouver
Maj., English and Economics;  V.C.F.
KLOPP, THOMAS A.—Vancouver
LANG, FRANK A.—Vancouver
Honors in Maths  and Physics.
LAZAREFF, ANNE E.—Shore Acres
Maj.,  Zoology and Chemistry.
LEE, DART L — Vancouver
Maj., Zoology and Psychology;  Tennis.
LINDOW, MAXINE L.—Salmo
Maj.,  French  and   History;   Phrateres,   Vice-President   oi
Fourth Year Women, Rifle Club, Bowling.
MANZER, NOBEL R.—Vancouver
Maj., Botany and Zoology;   Zeta  Psi.
MARTIN, MURIEL E.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English  and  Economics;
Gamma   Phi   Beta.
MARTINSON, MURIEL E.—North Vancouver
Alpha Gamma Delta, Badminton.
MILLER, CON D.—
Maj.,  Shemistry and Physics;   Soccer.
MITCHELL,  PAM—Victoria
Honors in History;   S.C M., Historical Society,
Archery.
MOLL, JOYCE E—Vancouver
Mcsical   Society.
MOORE, EILEEN D.    Vancouver
Maj.,  English  and  French.
MORRIS, PHILIP A.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English and History.
MORTON, KENNETH S'.—New Westminster
Maj.,   Zoology;   Min.,  Chemistry;
Beta   Theta  Pi.
MOYLS, LUKE—Vancouver
Maj.,  Maths   and  Physics;   Publications
Board, Sports  Editor of the  Ubyssey.
McCONNELL,  JOHN A.—Vancouver
Honors in Zoology.
McDONALD, ISABEL—Ocean Falls
Maj., English and Psychology;  Alpha Delta Pi,
Outdoor Club.
McINTOSH, PHYLLIS J.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Psychology;   Min.,   English   and   Government;   Kappa   Alpha  Theta.
McKIM, AUDREY E.—Vancouver
Maj.,  German and  English;   Basketball.
Banners and bands induce students to buy bonds.
'a \- HtAoouAtire«3
1
PAGE ONE HU NDRED AND SIXTEEN MACLAREN, NANCY A.—Oyama
Maj.,  Sociology and Economics;  Phrateres,  Rifle Club,
Sub-Chapter Chairman of Phrateres.
McLENNAN, ANN H.—Vancouver
Social  Service, Kappa Kappa  Gamma.
McLEOD,  DONALD C—Victoria
Honors in Economics; Swimming.
McLEOD, HUGH N—Victoria
Chairman  of the Undergraduate Societies
Committees.
McPHERSON, CHARLES J.—Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta, Badminton,  Track.
NICHOLS,  DOROTHY—Vancouver
Alpha Gamma Delta, Psychology Club.
NICKELLS, ROBERT G.—Victqrjg J' '
Maj., Chemistry dfyi Maths;  Musical  Society,
Mamooks, Chemical Society, Beta  Theta  Pi.
NIELSON, ALFREDA  M.-^Vancouver
NORDIN, JOHN V.—Vancouver
Honors  in Botany;   Forestry Club,  Biological  Discussion  Club.
NORTON, MARY ANNE- Vancouver
Maj., Maths and History; Min., English; V.O.C. President
of Women's  Athletic  Association,  Grass Hockey.
NUTCHEY, HENRY—Powell River
OBEN, JEAN D.—New Westminster
Maj., English and French; V.C.F., V.O.C,
Treasurer of the Varsity Christian Fellowship;
OLSON, BETTY E.—Westview
Honors in Chemistry.
OZEROFF, MICHAEL J.—Vancouver
Honors in Physics, and Maths; Physics Club, Maths Club,
President  of the  Maths Club.
PALLAS, ETHEL—Vancouver
Maj., English and French;  Musical Society.
PARKER, MARGARET J.—Vancouver
Honors in Chemistry; Delta Gamma.
PEELE, ROHAN F.—Vancouver
Honors in French;  Le Cercle Francais, Alpha Omicron Pi,
Badminton.
PEPPER, PEGGY E.—Victoria        -
Maj.,  English  and Frenca;   Phrateres,  S.C.M.
PETERSON,   NANCY F.—Burnaby
Maj., English and Latin; V.C.F., French Club.
■PLTITT, W. A.—Vancouver
Honors in Chemistry;   Delta  Upsilon.
PHILLIPS, JACKIE N—Vancouver
Maj., English and History;  Alpha Omicron Pi, Badminton.
PITMAN, NANCY M. A.—Sherman
Alpha Phi, President of the Women's Undegraduate
Society.
POJE, TONY—Nanaimo
POLSON, ROBERT C—Milner
Maj.,   History.
Goldfish Swallors?
Acadia Camp.
W
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i-
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PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN POORE, DOROTHY E.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Latin,  Maths  and Psychology.
PUDNEY, PETER H.—Vancouver
Honors  in  Maths;   Phi  Kappa  Sigma,   Golf,   Badminton.
REID, JUNE C—Vancouver
Alpha   Gamma   Delta,   Musical   Society,   Players'
Club,   Badminton,   Tennis.
REINER, DAVID P.—Vancouver
RICHARDS, JOAN A.—New Westminster
Honors in Chemistry.
RICKABY, JOHN D.—Vancouver
Maj., Sociology and Psychology;  Soccer.
RIPLEY, MARY E— New Westminster
Maj., Sociology;  Min., Psychology;  Kappa Alpha
Theta.
ROBERTS', EVELYN M.—Edmonton
Maj.,   Sociology   and  Economics.
ROBSON, MARITA H.—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology and Sociology; Gamma Phi Beta, Psychology
Club, Phrateres.
ROSE,  MARGARET A.—Vancouver
ROSS,  WINN—Victoria
Maj.,   Bacteriology;   Alpha   Gamma   Delta.
ROTHSTEIN,  MORTON—Vancouver
Honors  in  Chemistry;   Zeta  Beta  Tau,
Chess  Club.
ROULSTON, ALINE M.—Vancouver
Honors in French; Newman Club, Le Cercle Francais.
RUMSEY, JANE S—Vancouver
Maj., English and Latin.
SAGER,  MURRAY S.—Crescent Beach
Maj., Zoology and Chemistry;  Beta Theta Pi,
Players'  Club.
SALT,   LIONEL—Vancouver
Maj.,   English  and  Philosophy;
Phi Kappa Pi.
SANFORD,  MALCHIA—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology and Sociology;  Mamooks, Radio Society,
Phrateres.
SAUNDERS,  MARYBETH—North  Vancouver
Maj., Chemistry and Bacteriology;  Alpha Gamma Delta.
SCOTT, ANITA J.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Bacteriology;   Alpha Delta  Pi.
SHIELDS, LORNA M.—New Westminster
Maj.  Economics;   Min., Philosophy;
Gamma Phi Beta.
SILVER, LORNA M.—Port Alberni
Maj. in Maths and Physics;  Swimming Club, Intramurals.
SINCLAIR, JEAN G.—White Rock
Honors in Maths.
SMART, CATHERINE J.—Nanaimo
Maj.  in  Sociology  and  Psychology;
Alpha Delta Pi.
SMITH, DOROTHY B.—Vancouver
Maj. in Psychology and Sociology;
Kappa Kappa Gamma.
The mall, during the eclipse of the moon, 1946
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTEEN   . SMITH, MARJORIE C—Vancouver
Honors in Economics;   Alpha  Omicron Pi,  Letters Club,
Economic Society,  Parliamentary Forum,  Badminton.
SOLLERS,  THOMAS  H.—Spokane
Maj. in Government and Philosophy;  Kappa Sigma.
STANDEVEN,  RITA  D.—Vancouver
Maj., English; Min., French; Alpha Gamma Delta,
Players Club, Vice-President of Panhellenic, Assistant  to  Social Co-ordinator.
STEVENSON, KYLE B—Vancouver
Maj.   in  Psychology  and Sociology.
STEWART,  ROSS—Vancouver
Honors in Chemistry;
Swimming.
lazz Society, Chemistry Society, Golf,
STONE,  DOROTHY L—Vancouver
Maj. in Maths and Chemistry; Chemistry Society,
Outdoor  Club,   V.C.F.
STRACHAN,  JESSIE—Vancouver
Maj.  in Maths  and English;  V.C.F.
SYRETT, JOHN H.—Victoria
Honors  in  History;
Historical  Society.
TENER,  NORMA M.—Vancouver
Honors in Psychology and Philosophy;  Musical Society,
Psychology Club.
THOMAS, BLODWEN—Vancouver
Honors in Physics and Maths;  Swimming.
THOMPSON, BETTY S.—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology;  Delta Gamma, Jazz Society,
Librarian of lazz Society.
TRYON, MURIEL J.—Port Coquitlam
Honors in Bacteriology; Phrateres.
TUNBRIDGE, MARNIE A.—Vancouver
Maj. in English,  Sociology and Psychology;   S.C.M.,
Letters Club, Secretary of the S.C.M.
VANTREIGHT, ELSIE E—Victoria
Maj. in Economics and Sociology; Kappa Kappa Gamma.
VEEBERG,  RUTH E.—Cranbrook
Maj.,  Sociology;   Alpha Delta Pi.
WALSH, HELEN—Vancouver
Maj.   in  History  and  Philosophy;
Chess Cluo, S.P.C.
WARREN, MARJORIE J.—Regina
Maj. in Geology and Geography.
WATT, NANCY W.—Vancouver
Maj. in English and Psychology;  Musical Society.
WATTS, WILLIAM B.—Vancouver
Maj. in Economics and Geography; Radio Society,
Golf,  President  of  the  University Radio  Society.
WELSH, DOROTHY A.—Vancouver
Maj.  in  English and Psychology;'
Alpha Phi.
WESTLAKE, AL. C—Victoria
Maj. in History and Economics.
WHITE, BIDDY P.—Chilliwack
Honors  in Bacteriology;   Alpha  Gamma Delta,
Badminton,  Ping  Pong.
WHITE,  PATRICK C—Vancouver
Honors in History; Beta Theta Pi, Historical
Society.
WILSON, DONALD—Vancouver
Players' Club.
WOODWARD, FAITH M.—Victoria
Honors in History;  Historical Society, International Relations
Club,
WORTH, HELEN—Vancouver
Psychology and Sociology, Ubyssey.
YEO,  SHIRLEY—Vancouver
Maj., English;   Players Club.
YOUNG,  DIANA  B.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Economics  and  English;   Kappa
Alpha Theta, Economics Society.
ARTS '46
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND     NINETEEN Arts '47
Always a pace-setter, the Class of '47 led the
way again this year. In the early Spring elections, Earl Hysler, a returned serviceman, was
chosen as class President. His executive was
made up of Mary Dolmage as Vice-President,
and Heather Blundell as Secretary-treasurer. Barbara Kelsburg acted as Vice-President on W.U.S.
The new arrival in the publishing field, the
quarterly, "The Thunderbird," was edited by a
third year man, John Green.
This new edition was begun to furnish space
for more serious literary efforts of the students.
It was issued twice in the current year, and will
take up its position as a quarterly next term.
This Year Book claimed the efforts of three
Pubsters. Bill Stewart did a very capable job of
editing our All-Americal Annual, assisted by Jean
MacFarlane and Nancy Macdonald. Jean produced the club write-ups, and Nancy furnished
faculty and Graduation Class copy. Gus Worthington filled the position of manager of the
photographers and did his thankless task with
little fuss.
Again this year, Jim Argue played one of
the leads in the Players' Club production of
"Bereley Square," and Joy Coghill was responsible for the club's extended tour of the Interior
this Spring, acting as tour manager. In the Musical Society, Dave Holman sang the leading baritone role in Edward German's "Merrie England."
McGoun Cup debates saw Dave Williams, returned serviceman, coupled with Scienceman
Morris Berson, go down to defeat at the hands
of the debaters from Manitoba here at U.B.C.
Winnipeg later won the cup, with perfect points.
Fame came to the Junior Class when Hettie
Outerbridge was chosen as "the U.B.C. Co-ed
with the loveliest legs" by the King candidates
of the Fall Ball, and it put its magic touch on
Arts '47 again when Keith McDonald was
crowned King of the Fall Ball at the Commodore
in November.
Pat Fowler worked well as the first President
of the newly formed Pre-Medical Undergraduate
Society. Jean MacFarlane served as Publicity
Chairman on the same committee.
On the sports side of the ledger, Herb Capozzi
helped lead the Varsity Chiefs to victory, while
Ron Weber and Reg Clarkson worked with the
U.B.C. Thunderbirds as they played the leading
roles in the Pacific Conference.
Above:    Earl Heisler
Lower:    Mary Dolmage and Heather Blundell
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY ABBOTT, ARNOLD T.
ALLEN, ELLA K.
ALLEN, HARRY J.
ANDERSON, GEORGE C."
ARMSTRONG, ROBERT J.
BAILLIE, CHRISTINE M."
BAMPTON, DIANA L.
BAMPTON, VIRGINIA F.
BARCLAY-ROSS, L. MIGNON
BAXTER, ANNE H.
BELL, GERTRUDE M."
BELL-IRVING, ELIZABETH
BERTO,  IRENE M.
BLACK, FRANCIS L.
BLAIS, M. ANDREE
BLUNDELL, HEATHER
BOOTH, ELIZABETH A.
BOULTBEE, H. PATRICIA
BOYD, JOHN R.*
BOYLE, FREDERICK A.
BROUGH, ROSEMARY J.
BROWN, BETTY B.
BUCKNALL, M. A. JOY
BUNTING, I. JOAN G.
BURNS, MARGARET M.
BUTLER, EUGENIA R.*
BYRNES, L. MARGUERITE
CLARK, MARY E.
CLEARIHUE, JOYCE G."
COLLINS, JUNE V. V.
COMPARELLI, DAVID E.
COOLS, ADRIENNE E.*
CORMIER, BEVERLEY M.
CRAIG, MARGARET H.
CRAPKO, ONYSIA
CRIBB, REGINALD S.
CURTIS, BERTRAM E.
DAIN, DORIS M. R.
DeBECK, BETSY A.
DOBBIN, M. MARY
DOLMAGE, MARY E.
DONEGANI, JOYCE A. P.
DOWNMAN, LORNA M. S.
DRIVER, MARGARET W. J.
DROPE, PATRICIA J.
EDWARDS, T. HARVEY
ELLIS, D. CATHERINE
EPSTEIN, ROCHELLE
FAGAN, MARY S.
FARR, ROBIN M.
FERNE, HARRY C.
FOERSTER, DARRYL K.
FORD, MARGARET J.
FOWLER, S. PAT.*
FREWING, JOAN M.
FULLERTON, M. A.
" Pre-Medical Students.
. PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-ONE ■_* ,__ \i? ._. v__#:
FUOCO, JOHN R.
GILBERT, SHIRLEY E.
GILLIES, MARY LOUISE
GOODWIN, GWENDOLINE F.
GRANHOLD, ELLA M.
GRAY, DUNCAN S.
GREEN, JOANNA E.
GREEN, JOHN W.
GREENWOOD, HAZEL
GRITTEN, RICHARD A.
GUMMOW, JOHN B.
HAWKENS, LUCILLE
HENDERSON, J. NEIL
HENDERSON, ROBERT G.
HILLIER, FRANCES C.
HO, ARTHUR
HODGINS, BARRIE L.*
HOLMAN, T. DAVID
HOLMGREN, ERIC J.
HOVELAOUE, JOSEPHNE
HUDSON, JESSIE M.
JAMES, FRANCES E.
JEFFERY, MARY-LOU E.
JOHNSON, GLADYS M.
JOHNSTON, MAY S.
JONES, BARBARA M.
JUTTE, AUDREY D.
KELSBERG, BARBARA J.
KITOS, HELEN A.
LAIRD, DAPHNE E.
LANE, MARY E.
LAUBACH, ANNA L.
LECKIE, JEAN F.
LEE, HENRY W. C
LEE, SYBIL*
LEITERMAN, DOUGLAS S.
LIDDELL, CONSTANCE A.
LIPSON, PEGGY
LISICKA, IVA M.
LOCK, G: MARIE
LUNDELL, FREDERICK W.*
MARTIN, DEIRDRE
MARTIN, RUTH E.
MATHESON, BETTY J.
MATHESON, JOAN I.
MEHLING, AGNES E.
MENZIES, DORA K.
MITCHELL, IAN A.*
MORRIS, YVETTE M.
McDONALD, MARY F.
MacDONALD, NANCY K.
McDONALD, ROMA F.
McDOUGALL, EDNA M.
MacFARLANE, V. JEAN*
MacINTOSH, MARGARET J.
McLELLAN, LUELLA M.
• Pre-Medical Students.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-TWO McNaughton, mary m.
newman, russell g.
nicholson, katherine m.
nordan, harold c.
ourom, lorraine i.
outerbridge, henriette"
parker, mary e.
paul, yvonne l.
paulin, william p.
perrault, raymond j.
phelan, mary e.
radcliffe, roland w."
reid, dianne e.
rennie, jean m.
rice ernest t.*
roberts, gwendolyn e.
rogers, i. patricia
rosen, linda
salter, patricia m.
sanderson, joy e.
scott, margaret c.
segur, delphine c.
seymour, jane d.
shaw, e. june
shaw, gwendolyn m.
shepherd, ethel b.
smith, donald a.
smith, malcolm b."
sortome, e. eleanor m.
stewart, william d."
thomas, ethel b.
thomson, w. audrey
trefry, ethfl l.
vesterback, carl g.
vlag, ann m. a.*
vosper, catharine e.
white, robert d.
whittaker, william g.
wilkinson, margaret c.
williams, david r.
williams, dorothy e. d.
wilson, david a.
wilson, neil l.
winter, walter e.
wong, vivian m.
wood, william s.
woodman, ila r.
woodward, mary t.
worthington, a. e.
yates, maureen s.
yorkston, doreen m.
young, archibald d."
young, edith b.
young, margaret m.
young, victor m.
4 Pre-Medical Students.
Move it a blonde to the
■J
left, Joe.
J^H
A.   ■
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....         _
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PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-THREE Arts '48
Campus strangers one year and superior
Sophomores the next . . . that is the Class of '48.
Proud of their new-found maturity, Arts '48 has
moved into the hallowed ranks of U.B.C. under-
grads and have done their share in making the
name of U.B.C. famous throughout Canada.
In the Publications Board, Ron Haggart held
down the all-important position of News Manager,
while Don Stainsby managed C.U.P. Bruce
Lowther worked against almost insurmountable
difficulties to produce a Directory to rival the
Vancouver City phone book. Sheelagh Wheeler
acted as feminine sports scribe for Luke.
Lois Shaw and Art Alexander, both Sophomores, played the leads in the Fall presentation
of "Altar-Piece," which the Players' Club chose
to send to Alberta in February to compete in the
first Drama Festival held between the Western
Universities. Gerry Foote won a coveted part in
the Mussoc production of "Merrie England."
An Arts yell contest, sponsored by the Mamooks, was won by Soph Bill Hughes, who got
a ticket to the Fall Ball for his efforts.
In the sports field, Bob Haas and Jerry Stevenson distinguished themselves with the Varsity
Chiefs, as did Freddy Bossons. In Intermurals,
the Sophs did very well, with Taddy Knapp acting as Intermural Chairman on W.A.D.
Cal Whitehead acted as Sophomore Member
on Student's Council, and in that capacity headed
the Special Events Committee and the International Students' Service Committee.
Pubster Don Ferguson, fresh from the R.C.A.F.,
acted as Publicity Chairman for the Homecoming
Day in October, as well as serving as Associate
Editor of the Saturday Ubyssey.
In the thriving Parliamentary Forum, Soph.
Bob Harwood was chosen as leader of the C.C.F.
party, and as such, precipitated many of the
Mock Parliament debates.
Sophs Rosemary Hodgins and Harriet Hoch-
man followed up their activities of first year, and
were chosen for the second time as an all-
femine debating team to uphold the honor of
U.B.C. against Linfield College, McMinnville,
Oregon.
The Executive of Arts '48 was not chosen until
the Spring term, when Nora Clarke was elected
President of the class. Joan Mitchell acted as
Vice-President, and Paul Delaney was Secretary-
Treasurer.
Above:    Nora Clarke
Lower:    Joan Mitchell and Paul Delaney
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOUR . ABRAHAMSON, MICHAEL R.
ABRAMSON, JACK J.
AITCHISON, KENNETH McB.
ANDERSON, RICHARD P.
ANGUS, ANNE S.
ARCHECK, LILLIAN D.
ARLIDGE, J. WINSTON C.
ARMYTAGE, MARGARET E.
AULD, JEAN T.
AVERY, E. GWENDOLYN
AYERS, J. DOUGLAS L.
BAKER, ROWENA M.
BAKONY, STELLA C.
BAMFORD, GWEN J. E.
BARRITT, DOROTHY E.
BARTLETT, LESLIE H.*
BASSETT, BEVERLEY A.
BATTY, RUTH A.
BAYLES, THEODORE M.
BAYNE, M. JOAN*
BECK, FRIDELLA
BECKER, RUTH R.
BEESLEY, J. F. BERNARD*
BENTLEY, WILLIAM F.
BERISFORD,  ROBERT
BEST, HELEN L.
BIRKINSHAW, ADELE G.
BLEUCHEL, JUNE E.
BOGAS, KENNETH P.
BORTHWICK, JOHN W.*
BOURNS, T. K. R.*
BROOKS, DIANA E.
BROWN, FRANK A.
BROWN, DAVID H.
BROWN, T. L.
BRUMMITT, WILLIAM*
BRYANT, CHARLES W.
BULMAN, LOLA M.
BURD, HELEN D.*
BURKE, RUTH E.
BURNELL, JOAN C.
BURNS, HELEN M.
BUTLER, WILLIAM A. N.
BYRNES, JOHN L.
CAMERON, DONALD G.
CAMPBELL, DAVID H.
CAMPBELL, GRAHAM G.
CAMPBELL, IAN J.
CAMPBELL, JEANNETTE B.
CARMICHAEL, KATHLEEN D.
CARTER, DONALD G.
CAWLEY, MARGERY M.
CHALLIS, THOMAS W.
CHAMBERS, J. EARL*
CHAMBERS, MARY L.
CHERNOV, EVA T.
* Pre-Medical Students.
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE CHISHOLM, ANITA G.
CHRISTIAN, C. JOAN
CHRISTIAN, PATRICIA M.
CLARK, GEORGE W. P.
CLARKE, O. NORA J.
CLEMENT, EARL J.*
CLERKSON, GLADYS
COADY, M. MARGARET
COATES, JACK
COLE, DACRE P.
COLLINS, F. KAY S.
CONNOLLY, MURIEL A.
COOK, CECIL W.
COOK,  KATHERINE
CORBITT, CHARLOTTE W.
COTTER, BARBARA J.
COWAN, JOHN C.
COWIE, LILLIAN M.
CRAIG, JOHN S.
CUMMING, MARION S.
DAMER, WARREN R.
DARBY, GEORGE H.*
DAVIDSON, E. MERLE
DAY, ALISON E.
DENHOLM, ISABELLA M.
DENHOLM, M. PATRICIA
DENTON, ROBIN McC.
DESAULETS, ODILLE M.
DUNCAN, DOROTHY A.
EAKINS, JAMES J.
EFFORD, ROBERT J.*
EGAN, THOMAS J.*
ELART, ALICE J.
ENG, HARRY*
EVANS, ALFRED E.
EWART, E. MAYSIE
EYRES, R. JOY
FAIRFAX, E. MERCEDES'
FEAST, JOAN E. C.
FEDOROFF, LUDMILLA
FERGUSON, JOANNE S.
FINLEY, RUSSELL H.
FITZPATRICK, ROBERT C*
FOOTE, GERALDINE
FORBES, PATRICIA I.
FORRESTER, JAMES H. A.
FORSYTH, BEATRICE E.'
FOXCROFT, J. DRAYSON
FRASER, GERALDINE J.
FREEMAN, CHARLES B.
FULLERTON, PEGGY-ANNE
GAMEY, MARGARET D.
GAVA, JUNE P. E.
GEAR, W. IRVINE
GERRITY, ERNEST
GIEGERICH,  M.  A.
* Pre-Medicol Students.
Lectures, labs?—we got 'em.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-SIX GLOVER, CLIFFORD J.
GRANT, JACK R.*
GRATTON-SMITH, DOROTHY
GREEN, MARY C.
GREENIUS, ERIC O.
GREYELL, VELMA F.
GRIFFITH, GWYNNETH M
GRUNLUND, BARBRO E.
GRUNLUND, JEAN M.
GUBBINS, PATRICIA M.
GUILHAMOULIE, ANNE M.
HALL, BEVERLEY E.
HALL, ROSS H.
HANEN, J. M.
HARRIS, LEWIS H.
HART, SUZANNE M '
HARTRICK, WALTER J.
HAZELDINE, LORRAINE M.
HEAPS, PHILIP A.*
HEARD, SUSAN
HERN, M. JANE
HERTIG, LUCIENNE B.
HILL, SHIRLEY J.
HINDS, DAVID B.
HIRTLE, WALTER H.
HOCHMAN, HARRIET
HODGINS, ROSEMARY E.
HOGAN, JOHN F.
HOGG, DAVID M.
HORNE, BETTY-JEAN
HORWOOD, BERTRAM I.*
HOSKINS, ALFRED D.
HOSKINS, MARCELLA R.
HOUGHTON, KENNETH D.
HUDSON, GRACE B.
HUNT, EDWARD G.
HUNTER, ALLAN J.
hyman; LENARD N.
IRISH, RUTH I.
IRWIN, L. BEATRICE
JAFFARY, PAUL A.
JARVIS, N. JOAN
JEFFERY, A. W.
JENKINS,  JAMES R.
JOE, EDWARD D.
JOHNSON, JOAN L.
KABUSH, HARRY
KAYLL, DYNE A.
KENNY, EDITH W.
KETCHESON, H. RUTH
KING, P. JOSEPH'
KLENMAN, NORMAN H.
KNAPP, KATHERINE
KOERNER, NICHOLAS T.
KOUCHES, MARY
LAIRD, ELIZABETH A.
0 Pre-Medical Students.
.   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-SEVEN LANGFORD, JUNE V.
LARSEN, EDWARD R.
LAUDRUM, W.
LAVAN, MARY K.
LEE, DOUGLAS H. T.
LEES, HELEN M.
LEGGATT, JOHN N.*
LEHN, SARA
LESHGOLD, JACK B.*
LESLIE, ALEXANDER A.
LEVEY, DONALD H.
LEWIS, CAROL A.
LEWIS, F. NANCY
LIMBRICK, PATRICIA J.
LINZEY, D. JOSEPHINE
LOGAN, JUNE R.*
LOMAS, NANCY B.
LONGLEY, J. DONALD*
LORT, PHYLLIS M.
LYONS, E. HUGH
MALENSEK, C. TINA
MARTIN, RUSSELL G.
MASSON, RENE N.*
MATTHEW, FRANCES L.
MERCER, MARGARET E.
MESSUM, ROY P.
MILAN, BETTY E.
MILLS, RUTH C*
MINCHIN, PHARIC W.
MITCHELL, J. REID*
MITCHELL,  JOAN B.
MOFFAT, PETER J.
MOORE, DOROTHY P.
MOORE, JOAN I.
MORRISON, R. FRANK
MORSE, HUGH F.
MOSKOVTTZ, ISRAEL
MOTHERWELL, ELIZABETH L.
MOUAT, MARGARET M.*
MULLIGAN, MAURICE W.
McALPINE,  MARY
McCALLUM, JOAN M.
McCLUNG, P. MAXINE
McCONNELL, CATHERINE
McCONNELL, STALLARD W.
McDONALD, FRANCES S.
MacFARLANE, THOMAS G.
McGAVIN, WILLIAM A.
McGregor, iona m.
MacKAY, BRUCE S.
MacKAY, RONALD  H.
McKIMM, DENNIS S.*
MacKINNON, JEAN B.
MacLEAN. ALISTAIR J.
McLELLAN, MARNEY J.*
McLEOD, CONSTANCE D.'
" Pre-Medical Students.
On the Campus
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT . MacLEOD, MALCOLM G.
McLEOD, MARILYN J.
McLOUGHLIN, KATHLEEN
McMYNN, ROBERT G.
MacPHERSON, JOHN S.
McTURK, HELEN G.
NELSON, C. DONALD
NIGHTINGALE, FRANK H.
NOEL, HELEN R.
O'CONNOR, GERALD T.*
ORME, C. ERIC
OXLEY, MARY H.
PADDON, BETTY L.
PATRICK, WILLIAM N.
PATTERSON, WILLIAM J.
PAUL, NEDRA J.
PAYNE, DORIS D.
PEARSON, EMMA S.
PENDLETON, SUSANNE K.
PERKS, RONALD L.
PHILPOTT, ELIZABETH J.
PRESCOTT, PAULINE M. A.
PREVOST, EDWARD C*
PRICE, TRUDIE
PYE, M. A. ELEANOR
QUAIL, WILLIAM D.
RAINE, NANCY I.
REDLICH, ALINE B.*
REED, BERYL C.
REED, THOMAS G.
REID, MARY R.
RIETCHEL, HELEN E.
ROACH, MARK*
ROBINSON, JOAN E.
ROBINSON, M. KATHLEEN
ROGERS, MARY E. MacL.
RYAN, JAMES E.*
RYAN, RUTH C.
SAINAS,  MARY
SALTER, JAMES M.*
SAMCHUK, GEORGE G.*
SAMPLE, JOHN T.
SANBORN, GORDON W.
SANFORD, ROBERT M.
SCHINBEIN, JOHN E.*
SCHMID, MANFRED C.
SEARLE, MARION E.
SEGALL,  ANNETTE
SELKIRK, DARYL R.
SELKIRK, ROBERT B.
SHEARMAN, JACQUELINE
SHERLOCK, AUDREE J.
SHIER, R. PHILIP
SHOTT, GRAHAME B.
SIMPSON, MARGUERITE G.
SMITH, HELEN A.
* Pre-Medical Students.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-NINE SMITTON, FRANK A.
SPENCER, HERBERT W.
STAF, BERNICE G.
STAINSBY, DONALD O.
STEDMAN, SHIRLEY-RUTH
STERLING, DOREEN M.
STONE, DAVID R.
SUMMERS, G. ERNESTINE
SWENSON, PAUL A.
SZENDE. PETER P.
TALBOT, COLLEEN A.
TALLING, GORDON T.
TANNAR, NORMAN E.
TASSIE, PETER
TAYLOR, WILLIAM R.
TEMOIN, MAURICE D.
THOM, MARGARET H.*
THOMSON, A. JEAN
THOMSON, MARGUERITE
THOMSON. ROBERT
TTEDJE, PATRICIA A.
TOMLINSON, KENNETH Y.
TRAVIS, PHYLLIS T.
TRIGGS, ROSALIE E.
TURNER, JOHN J.
TURNER, LEONARD J.
TURNER, PATRICIA' A.
WALDICHUK, MICHAEL
WALLACE, ARDATH S.
WARDEN.  GEOFFREY
WARDEN, STELLA P.
WARDROPER, JOHN E.
WATSON, ARNOLD  W.
WEIR, C. SHEILA*
WEIR, K. MARGUERITE*
WELCH, HERBERT C*
WEST, DONALD R.
WESTINGHOUSE, MARGARET
WHITE, DOREEN L.
WHITE, DOUGLAS A.
WHITE, MASSIE L.
WHITEHEAD, CALVIN J.'
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY Arts '49
Words cannot describe the invasion of the
Freshman class to UBC this year. Over 1400
students, half of whom were returned servicemen,
invaded our peaceful campus this past September
with their green goggles, placards and rolled-up
pants .... battled with their traditional rivals,
the Sciencemen .... and quickly and overwhelmingly took their place among the under-
grads of UBC.
Shortly after Freshman Week, the class of '49
held the usual poorly attended but hectic elections, and chose ex-serviceman Phillip Evans for
president; Daphne Black for vice-president; Paul
Delaney for secretary-treasurer; and Gordon
Selman for athletic representative.
Ruby Dunlop made university history when she
was chosen as Queen of the Mardi Gras in January. She is the first freshette to win this coveted
position.
Norma Bloom was successful in winning the
feminine lead in the Players' Qub spring production of "Berkeley Square".
In the newly formed Jokers Club, freshman Alan
Beesley was elected to the position of Noise
Joker, and cheerfully lived up to his title. Another freshman to hold down a responsible position was Mary MacMillan, who handles all the
ticket sales for the Mamooks.
On the Ubyssey, Helen-Mary Gowans, Val
Sears and Howie Wolfe attained prominence as
assistant editors on their respective issues, while
Laura Haahti cooked up some of the best features
seen in a long time around UBC. Don McClean
filled the position of assistant sports scribe. Directory assistant editors included Jean Jamison,
Betty Kemp, Helen Smith and Bob Berggren.
On the sports sheet are the names of Al Ban,
who paced the UBC cross-country team on to its
third straight victory in the track meet in Spokane,
Wash. Lennie Letham rounded out UBC's basketball team.
The class of '49 has already proved itself a
real asset to the university. With the maturity of
its returned "vets", and the push of its high school
grads, this class has nothing to fear about living
up to standard. If first performances are any
indication of things to come, 1949 will be an
outstanding year at UBC.
Above:    Phil Evans
Lower:    Gordon Selman, Daphne Black, Phil Evans
Standing:    Paul Delaney
.   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-ONE ABBOTT, CLIFFORD R.
ABERCROMBIE, EVAN W.
ADAM, FRANK C.
ADAMOVICH, CLAUDETTE
AGNER, PHYLLIS
AITKEN, JAMES D.
ALARIC, PERLE W.
ALLDER, FRANK H.
ALLEN, JAMES
ANDERSON, JOHN J.
ANDERSON, MATHEA E. G.
ANDREWS, D. JAQUELINE
ANGEL, DONALD M.
APPS, GEORGE E.
ARMSTRONG, CHARLES F.
ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM N.
ASKEW, STUART W.
ATKINSON, DONALD J.
AUBREY, ROLAND G.
AUBREY, RALPH H.
BAALIM,  BARBARA
BAKONY, CHARLES E.
BALDWIN, GEORGE W.
BANCROFT, GILBERT L.
BARGUS, JOHN W.
BARKER, THOMAS W.
BATEMAN, ELLEN L.
BAYLIS, GREGORY F.
BEAN, JACK M.
BECK, JAMES McC.
BECKER, WILFRED H.
BEDUZ, LOUIS B.
BEHARRELL, ALICE M.
BEHNSEN, KENNETH C.
BELL, JAMES L.
BELL, JOHN M.
BELL, JOHN N.
BELL, KENNETH   E.
BELL, LOIS J.
BELL, MARGERY I.
BELL-IRVING, ROSEMARY H.
BELROSE, JOHN S.
BERTRAM,  DONALD W.
BIDDLE, GEOFFREY R.
BIGGS, FLORENCE E.
BILLINGS, JOHN
BISHOP, HERBERT P.
BISS, FRANK A.
BISSELL, G. EDWARD
BLACK, DAPHNE J.
BLAKELY, R. KENNETH
BLOOM, NORMA E.
BLOOR, GEORGE A.
BLUNDELL, JUNE R.
BODIE, DONALD O.
BOLTON, JANE E.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-TWO BOWELL, JOANNE E.
BOWKETT, MARY-FREW
BOYES, ROBERT C.
BOYLE, JAMES C.
BRADBURY, THELMA M.
BRAULT, MADELEINE R.
BRAY, MARSHALL P.
BRAY, RONALD C.
BRETT, A. JUNE
BRIGGS, BEVERLEY H. F.
BROATCH, GEORGE K.
BROOKS, GRETA ANN
BROWN, BEVERLY M.
BROWN, FRANK A.
BROWN, JOHN J.
BRUCE, MARIAN D.
BRYCE, JOHN R. G.
BUNKER, ALAN P. S.
BURBIDGE, EILEEN M.
BURGESS, RICHARD A.
BURNETT, WILLIAM F.
BURNS, JEAN A.
BURNS, ROBERT L.
BUSS, JAMES T.
BUTLER, CHARLES F.
BYRN, M. ROSEMARY
CAMERON, PATRICIA A.
CAMPBELL, M. McG.
CAMPBELL, THOMAS C.
CANIC, ANTHONY J.
CANNON, LOURENE
CANT, JAMES C.
CARMAN; HELEN A.
CARMICHAEL, CAMERON
CARMICHAEL, DAVID J.
CARNEY, ANNE
CARNSEW, HILDA M.
CARR, M. JOYCE
CARSON, PATRICK J.
CASTILLOU, JOSEPHINA M.
CHELL, RICHARD A.
CHENG, ELMER M.
CHERCOVER, MERWIN
CHEW, BARBARA K.
CHISHOLM, SHIRLEY M.
CHRISTIE, B. JOAN M.
CHURGIN, ARNOLD
CLARK, FRANCES M.
CLARK, H.
CLARK,   P.   KAY
CLARKE, KENNETH I.
CLIMIE, ROBERT C.
COAN,  JOSEPH
COATES,   GEORGE   D.
COCKE, KENNETH R.
COCKING,   RAYMOND   E
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-THREE COLEMAN, RICHARD S.
COLINS,  JAMES  R.
COOK, WILLIAM C
COOPER, DONALD R.
COOPER, EVERARD L.
CORDONI,   PETER   G.
CORNETT, LLOYD E.
CORY, ALLAN M.
COSTIGAN, JOHN P.
COTTLE, WALTER H.
COTTON,   PETER   N.
COURTICE, GORDON L.
COWEN.  STANLEY  C.
CREBER, ERNEST B.
CREERY, L. JOHN
CROSS,  JUNE  K.
CROSSLEY, E. TREVOR
CROWE, MARY P.
CRUICKSHANK,    J.    MELROSE
CULOS,  R.  PETER
CUMBERBIRCH,  PETER R.
CURRAN,  JOY, M. R.
CURRIE,  HUGH  G.
CUTCHER, C. ALLEN
DALE, DAVID W.
DANARD,   DOUGLAS  C
DAVIDSON,   NANCY  M.
DAVIES,  DAVID  W.
DAWSON,   E.  TREVOR
DEAN,  VERNAN
DeLISLE, ELAINE M.
DEMPSTER,  J.  R.  HUGH
DERRICK, JACK B. D.
DES BRISAY,  DIANA  E.
de VOOGHT, PETER J.
DIAMOND, ISADORE P.
DICKSON,  G.  RONALD
DIXON, T. DAVID
DMYTRYSHYN,   STANLEY R.
DOBBIN,  LILLIAN  C.
DOBNEY, MILLICENT E.   ■
DODD, ROBERT R.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-FOUR ELLIS, RICHARD C.
EMMONS, D. EDWARD
EMMONS,  M.
ESPLEN, ROBERT W.
ETCHELL, CHARLES T.
EVANS, B. H. PHILIP
EWART, ROBERT A.
EWING,   SHEILA   McG.
EXEL, FREDERICK L.
FADDEN, PATRICIA K. E.
FAIRWEATHER, DAVID  McL.
FAWKES, NORMAN
FAWSITT,  JOYCE G.
FELL, GLENN M.
FERGUSSON,   ELEANOR   J.
FIELD,  ROSS   B.
FINNING, JOANNE E.
FISHER,  DONALD M.
FISHER, E. JANE
FLANN, BEVERLEY
FORREST, HUGH L.
FORRESTER, ANNIE L.
FORWARD,  CHARLES N.
FOSTER, LOIS C.
FYFFE, GORDON J.
GALBRAITH,   ARNOLD   V.
GALE,  ARTHUR L.
GALARDO,   ROBERTO
GALLICANO,  WARREN B.
GARBUTT,   M.   JEAN
GARDINER, PATRICIA A.
GARDINER,  STEPHEN  G.
GARDNER,  LOIS  M.
GARDNER,   ROBERT   R.
GARGRAVE, ANTHONY J
GELFARB, SAM
GERNREY, SHIRLEY M.
GIBSON,  WILLIAM  G.
GILGAN,  WILLIAM W.
GILLIES,   DONALD   M.
GLENNIE,   DOUGLAS   W.
GLOVER,   DONALD
GOLDBERG,  AUDREY  D.
GOLDBERG,  MYER  A.
GORDON,   AUDREY   J.
GORDON,   D.   KENNETH
GORDON, NORMAN F.
GORDON,   RALPH   M.
GOROSH,  RUTH-CLARE
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-FIVE GRANT,   NORMA   M.
GRANTHAM, JOHN L.
GREEN,  ROBERT  J.
GREENWOOD,   LIONEL
GREER,  BETSY  A.
GREGG,   HAROLD
GREIG,   AME   W.
GRIEVE, DONALD McE.
GRIMMETT,  JOAN  A.
GUEHO,   VICTOR  N.
GUREVICH, BALFOUR S.
GURVTTZ, D.  CYNTHIA
GUTHMAN,   MICHAEL   G.
GUTTORMSSON, P. THOR
HAAHTI, LAURA K.
HAEBER,  JOHN
HAGE,  KEITH  D.
HALL.  DAPHNE  M.
HALL,  KENNETH  W.
HALL, WILLIAM H.
HAMILTON,    BETTY
HAMILTON, CHRISTINE A.
HAMILTON,  DRUMMOND  G.
HAMILTON,  E.  JOAN
HAMILTON, JOHN D.
HARRIS, DONALD G.
HARSTONE,   JOAN
HARTREE,   BEVERLEY   M.
HARTREE, SHIRLEY A.
HARVEY,  D.  LAYNE
HARVIE,  CAROLYN  F.
HATCHER, THOMAS G.
HATTON,  W.  LEWIS
HAWTHORN,  JAMES W.
HEARD,   SUSAN
HEATH,   ROBERTA
HEENEY, ALICE JANE
HENDERSON,   ALEXANDER   L.
HENLEY, IAN G. T.
HENNIGER, EZRA C.
HENSCHEL( ISOBEL E.
HERMANN,   RICHARD   C.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-SIX HOGARTH, LLOYD H.
HOLLAND, HAROLD E.
HOLLIDAY,   JOHN   R.
HOOKER,   HARVEY  F.
HOPE,,   KEITH   G.
HORCOFF, JOHN
HORNIBROOK,  JACK L.
HORSLEY,   TREVOR  L.
HOWE,  DAPHNE  D.
HUGHES, PATRICIA M.
HUGHES,   WILLIAM  J.
HUNTER,  DALE  S.
HUNTER,  JOHN L.
HURST,  MAUD  H.
HUTCHINGS, PATRICIA I. M.
HUTCHISON, COLIN C.
HUTT,   RITA   M.
HUWYLER, FRANK R.
INKIN,  GEOFFRY  L.
JACKSON,   RUTH   B.
JAMES,   ROBERT  C.
JAMES, WILLIAM C
JENVEY,   GEORGE   E.
JOHNSON,  ALICE S.
JOHNSON,  LILY A.
JOHNSON, MAE L.
JOHNSON, VIOLET
JOHNSTON,   JOYCE   R.
JOHNSTON,   WINIFRED   E.
JOKISCH, CARL R.
JONES,   ARNOLD   R.
JONES,   ESTELLE   P.
JONES,   LUCILE  L.
KACHUK,  WILLIS  T.
KATAJA,  MAY
KECHIK,   SASHA   A.
KEEN, C. HARRY
KEEVES, JOYCE M.
KEIS,  NICK
KELSBERG,   ROY  P.
KEMP, BETTY
KER,   M.   ALDRED
KERMODE,  RUTH  L.
KESSEL,  WILLLIAM
KIBLER,  N.  SHIRLEY
KINCAID,   MARJORIE  M.
KING, ARNOLD E.
KING,  ROBERT A.
KIRK,  JOHN W.
KNOWLES,  BARBARA  L.
KOCH,, IRMA Z.
LAING,  DAVID  A.
LAING,  MARGARET A.
LAKIOTIS, JOHN W.
LAMBERTON,   CONRAD   H.
LANE,   DONALD   F.
It's cold.
Freshette, that is.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-SEVEN LANE,  PAULINE H.
LANE,   ROBERT F.
LANG,  MARVIN  R.
LANGDALE,  GLYN H.
LANGLEY,   BRENT  A.
LATSOUDES,   VIVIAN
LAURJE,   GEORGE   A.
LAWRENCE,   GLENN   G.
LAWRENCE,   JUNE   L.
LAZAREFF,   ELSIE  A.
LEAK,  NORMAN  A.  J.
LEBLANC, RAYMOND L.
LEDERMAN, JACK
LEES,   JOHN  C.
LENARDON,  J. ROBERT
LEVISON,   MOLLIE
LINDSAY,  HELEN  M.
LISTER, EVELYN P.
LITTLEWOOD, CHARLES A.
LIVINGSTONE,   K.   M.
LIVINGSTONE,   M.   A.
LIVINGSTONE, MURIEL B.
LOCKWOOD, ERNEST J.
LOISELLE, HAROLD A.
LOMOW, WILLIAM L.
LONGSTAFF,   F.   ARTHUR
LOOMER, EVA L.
LOUGHEED, HENRY V.
LUCAS, APRIL J.
LUND, JOHN A. H.
MACAULEY, RONALD A.
MACEY,  JOHN  K.
MACOR,   DONNA  J.
MALCOLMSON,   S,   M.   B.
MALLETT,   DOROTHY   M.
MANNING, LUARD J.
MANSON,  HELEN E.
MARE,  MARY E.
MARKHAM,   WILLIAM   G.
MARTIN,   ALEXANDER   M.
MARTIN,   STEWART  W.
MASSY,  DAVID H.
MASSY.   RICHARD  O.
MATHESON, ALLAN H.
MATTHEWS,   HERBERT  L.
MAWER,   CAROLINE   B.
MEGAW,  ROBERT E.
MELLISH,   DONALD
MELVIN,  RONALD  McK.
MENZIES, BERTRAM R.
MENZIES, C. NELSON
MERCER, GEORGE E.
MILLER, JOHN G.
MILLER, OLIVE M.
MILLS,   ALAN  W.
MILROY, RODERICK J.
Looking for gold-fish?
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-EIGHT MITCHELL,   BEVERLY   J.
MOE,  KENNETH G.
MOFFATT,   NORAH   J.
MOFFATT,   WILMA   A.
MOISEY,  JOHN  A.
MONTGOMERY,   C.
MORRIS, MURIEL
G.
mort, beverley m.
mortimer, dortothy e.
moyls, f. james
muir, thomas w.
muirhead, mary l.
mullen, albert c.
mulroney, john a.
munro, g. neville
munro, kathleen r.
murphy, c. francis
murray, richard d.
McAllister, john b.
McBRIDE,  GERALD  P.
McBRIDE, ROBERT W.
McBRIDE, ROY D.
McCAIG,  G.  FREDERICK
McCARLEY,  DEAN R. '
McCarthy, noreen a.
McCLEMENT, F.  PATRICIA
McCONNELL, WILLIAM J. C.
McCONVILLE, M. SHIRLEY
MacDONALD,   D.   KEITH
MACDONALD, FRANCES L.
MacDONALD, GORDON M.
McDONALD,   LILLIAN  A.
macdonald, roy a.
McDonnell, geraldine e.
MacEWEN, PAUL R.
McGILL,   ALLAN  S.
McGILL,  GORDON W.
McINTYRE,   HELEN   E.
McKAY,   GLORIA   B.
McKAY, M. RUTH
MacKENZIE,  FERGUS  E.
MacKENZIE, M.  A.
McKENZIE,  ROBERT  H.
MacKENZIE,   SHIRLEY-MAE
•   McKEOWN,  WILLIAM  J.
McKINLEY, DOREEN E.
MacKINNON,   ISABEL F.
McKINNON,  J.   DONALD
MACKITOSH,  ALEX F.
MacLEAN,   FAIRBANKS  C.
MacLEAN,  JACKIE M.
McLEAN,  SINCLAIR  N.
McLEISH, JOHN A.
McLELLAND, DAVID G.
McLELLAND, M. SHAREN G.
McLENNAN, M. E.
Got a match
S5!£I
.    .   .   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-NINE McLENNAN,   ROBERT P.
McLEOD,  DOROTHY J.
MacLEOD, I. MURDO
McLEOD,  JEAN M.
McLEOD,   MARY   J.
McLORG, ANTHONY  F.
McMAHON,  DOROTHY E.
McMAHON,   EUGENE  B.
MacMILLAN,  MARY K.
McMYNN,  A.   GENE
MACNAB,   PHILLIP   I.
McNAIR,   BEVERLY  A.
McNAIR,   MARJORIE   H.
McNICOL,   WILLIAM   J.
McOUAT, W.  GORDON
McPHERSON,  W. STANLEY
McRAE, LOIS  M.
McWilliams, vera b.
nagle, joan b.
nanson, w. lyall
nascou, shirley l.
naylor, joseph y.
nemetz, milton m.
newby, jack d.
newton, clifford g.
ney, mary e.
nickel, william j.
nimmons, arlene a.
nisbet, patrick p.
noel, gerald a.
north, mary b.
nutt, william g.
o'brien, james m.
o'flaherty, b. joanne
o'grady, robert h.
o'hara, richard n.
oldenburg, dorothy m.
oulton, richard g.
owens, nancy e.
page, barbara  v.
paine, norah m.
painter, ann m.
palmer, joan e.
parke, margaret l. e.
parkinson, marguerite h.
paterson, herbert f.
patterson, frederick j.
pattison, james p.
peacock, james r.
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY PINSKY,  GEORGE A.
PIPER, RENEE E. S.
POLOS, JAMES
POOLE, JOHN K.
PORTEOUS,  JOHN  W.
POZER, JOHN H. N.
PRATT, LORNE A.
PRIDE,  A.  HARRY
PRIEST, ROBERT T.
PRITCHARD,   CATHERINE   L.
PRITCHARD, MARY G.
PUDNEY, J. W. DAVID
PULLEN, BETTY P.
PURVIS, DOROTHY B. A.
RADCLIFFE,   KATHLEEN M.
RAY, NAOMI H.
RHYMUR, BEVERLEY E. D.
REDPATH, DONALD C.
REID,  AUDREY  J.
REID, BIRNIE E.
REID,  PHYLLIS M.
REID, ROBERT R.
REID, STANLEY  L.
RENNIE, NANCY J.
RICHARDS,  JOHN  L.
RICHARDSON,  HENRY  G.
RICHARDSON, MAYNARD L.
RIDDELL,   ROBERT  H.
RITCHIE,  E. ANABEL
ROBERTS, BEVERLY A.
ROBSON, WILMA C.
ROCHESTER, JANET B.
ROEDER,   ELMER WM.
ROLLS, WALLACE E.
RONALD, EVA M.
ROSE, ANDREW H.
ROSENTHAL,   MARTA
ROSS,  AILEEN P.
ROSS, MADELEINE L.
ROSS,  SHIRLEY  J.
ROWLINGS, M. E. M.
RUNNELS,   DAVID   E.
RUSSELL,  BERNICE J.
RUSSELL,  BETTE  A.
RUSELL,   NEIL   G.
RUSSELL, PATRICIA D.
RUTT, BYRON R.
RYAN,  ARTHUR B
RYWAK,  JOHN
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-ONE SCHON,  HERBERT A.
SCHULBAUM,   ALLEN
SCOTT, PRISCILLA R.
SCOTT,   RUBY   V.
SCOTT,   W.   MAURICE
SCOW,  ALFRED J.
SCUDAMORE, R. J.
SEALE, REGINALD C.
SEARS, VALLANCE C.
SEATON, JOHANN B.
SEIBOLD, ERVIN A.
SEVERIDE,   NORMAN
SEYER, ROSE MARIE Y.
SHANKLAND, DAVID H.
SHARMAN,  BEVERLEY J.
SHAW,  GEORGE  C.
SHAW,  MARY W.
SHEFFIELD,   EDWARD   A.
SHOCKLEY, HELEN M.
SHOPLAND,  HAROLD  J.
SHORE,   MARVYN   A.
SHUGG, HAROLD F.
SHUM,  G. ALFRED
SIDDALL, ARTHUR C.
SIHOTA,   DEDAR   S.
SINCLAIR,   J.   CLIFFORD
SKELDING,   ELIZABETH   E.
SKILLING,   CAROLINE   D.
SKIPSEY, ARTHUR N.
SMALLWOOD,  EFFIE  I.  C.  A.
SMEE, DONALD A.
SMITH, DOROTHY O.
SMITH, JAMES H.
SMITH,   JESSIE  A.
SMITH,   WILMA   A.
SMUIN,   DONALD   E.
SNOW, DOROTHY C. H.
SOLLOWAY, RUTH
SOWERBY,  RAYMOND
SPENCER,   ANN   M.
STAMBUSKI,   VELMA   J.
STANDFIELD, BARRY M.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-TWO   , STRACHAN,   NORMA   H.
STRANG,   HARVEY  A.
STUART, ELIZABETH
SUME, RAINO R.
SUTHERLAND,  JEAN   .
SUTHERLAND-BROWN,   A.
SUTTON, GWENDA R.
SWAIN, THELMA J.
TAIT,  BRUCE
TAIT, MARGARET M. M.
TAIT, WINNIFRED G.  M.
TALBOT, EDITH A.
TALBOT, EDMUND H.
TAPP, MALCOLM G. A.
TEMOIN, ARMAND C.
TENER,  GORDON  M.
TENNANT,  JOHN M.
THODOS,  CONSTANTINE N.
THOMAS, JAMES W.
THOMPSON, DOUGLAS G.
THOMPSON, GORDON M.
THOMPSON,  JOY  E.   M.
THORSON,   STEPHEN C.
TTDMARSH, MALCOLM
TOBIASEN, JEROME B.
TODD, PATERSON A.
TOMLINSON,  NEIL
TOMLINSON,    RAYMOND
TONKS, CATHERINE E. M.
TOPHAM,   ERNEST  A.
TOWN, D'ALBERT A.
TOWNSEND, PETER C.
TOYNBEE,  RICHARD  M.
TOYNBEE, W. MANSON
TREMAINE,   MARY  C.
TUCK, TERENCE N.
TULL, THOMAS J.
TURNBULL, MARGARET L.
TURNER, BARRIE J.
TURNER, JOHN N.
TWILLEY, M. ELAINE
UPSON, MAGARET P.
URQUHART,  ROBERT D.
USHER, AUDREY K.
VARTY,  THOMAS  N.
VENABLES, WILLIAM
VERNON,  VICTORIA M.
VIERHELLER,   J.
VIGAR, SYDNIE C.
VOGEL,  HENRY  B.   A.
VOSPER, JANET M.
WAKEFIELD, PHILIP D.
WALDROP,   CLAYBOURNE
WALMSLEY, LAWRIE S.
WARD,  DONALD  K
WARD, GRETA L.
Sing louderl 1 1
,    .   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-THREE WARD,   RICHARD   J.
WARNER. DONALD L.
WARREN, ROY A.
WARTNOW, FLOYD C.
WATSON,   BRUCE   W.
WATSON, DONNA J.
WEBB, GERALD K.
WEBB,  PHYLLIS  J.
WEBSTER, PATRICIA F.
WEBSTER,   RONALD   J.
WEETMAN,    PHILIP   H.
WEINSTEIN, RETA R.
WESTAWAY,  ARTHUR G.
WESTMAN. H. JAMES
WHITE,   CYRIL   S.
WHITE,   NEIL   R.
WHITELEY,  FRANK G.
WHITESIDE,   F.   RICHARD
WHITNEY, NANCY A.
WHITTAKER, W. V.
WHITTALL, HUBERT V.
WICKSON,  R.  ROGER J.
WIDMAN, BEVERLEY A.
WILKINSON, J. WELLS
WILKINSON,   THOMAS
WILLAN,   AUDREY   M.   V.
WILLIS.  NANCY  E,
WILSON, DONALD J.
WILSON, EDWARD  P.
WILSON,   JOHN   R.
WILSON, LAWRENCE L.
WILSON, PHYLLIS M.
WILSON, P. JOAN
WINGERT,   FRANK   A.
WOLFE, HARRY B.
WONG,  JOHN
WOODLEY, J. LYLE
WOODWORTH, M. JEANE
WORSFOLD,  CATHERINE  E.
WORSOE,   JOHANNE-
WORTH, EDWARD J.
WORTHEN, LEONARD P.
WOTHERSPOON,   ARTHUR
WRIGHT, DONALD S.
WRIGHT,  JACK  C
WRIGHT,   PETER   L.
YOUNG,  ROBERT A.
YUSKOW,   WALTER
ZIMMERMAN, HAROLD W.
Woterlilies.
^^-^^Pft
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FOUR Commerce '46
After the successful campaign in 1945-46 for
the evolution of the Commerce Club into a full-
fledged undergraduate society, the Commerce
Department continued their campaign for conversion into a established faculty. No opportunity
was lost by the more than 700 Com students to
put in a boost for the department to be part of
the $5,000,000 expansion plan of the University.
First big event of the year was the Commerce
Dance at the Commodore in the middle of January. The Commerce students went on an uproarious post-Christmas fling that night before
settling down to an arduous second term of statistics, commercial law and business finance.
The major occurrence in the term for John
Commerce, however, is the semi-annual banquet
held downtown each session. Although last year
the affair was held in the Hotel Vancouver's
Banquet Room, the increased enrollment in 1946
made it necessary for the committee, to reserve
th main ballroom of the big hotel. Among the 700
students and guests present, such prominent men
as Lieutenant-Governor Woodward, Chancellor
Hamber, Premier Hart and Mayor Cornett were
in attendance. The banquet is usually considered
a "must" on the Commerce social calendar because of the invaluable contacts with the prominent business men during the course of an evening, made while mixing informally around the
banqueting  table.
All Commerce activity is not confined to the
Com department alone; these men of statistics
also seem to find time to become successful in
other fields as well. The society this year boasted
such men as Ole Bakken basketball star and
President of the Men's Athletic Directorate1 Ralph
"Hunk" Henderson, also a hoop star with the
Thunderbirds; Garry Miller, Treasurer of the
A.M.S.; Gordon Kersey, Secretary of the U. Branch
of the Legion Housing Committee.
The C.U.S. executive for 1945-46 was composed
entirely of fourth year students, with George
Pierson as President; Hugh Gordon, Vice-President; Barbara Campbell, Secretary, and Bob
Morris as Treasurer.
Above:    George Pierson
Below:    Bob  Morris.  Barbara Campbell, Hugh Gordon
. PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIVE ADAMS, DONALD KNAPP—Vancouver
Letters  Club,   Psychology  Club.
BAAKEN, OLE—Vancouver
Kappa Sigma,  Sigma Tau Chi,  Men's Athletic
Directorate,  Thunderbirds.
BEGERT, HENRY KENDELL—Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta.
BENNET, MARGARET KATHRYN-Vancouver
Kappa   Kappa  Gamma.
BLACK, RUNA ALLISON—Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma.
BLAIR, OLIVE MONICA—Vancouver
Alpha Phi.
BONEL, WILLIAM ELSMORE-Prince Rupert
Psi Upsilon.
BRUCE, CHARLES DAVIDSON—Vancouver
CAMPBELL, BARBARA—Victoria
Pi Beta Phi,  Swimming.
CLARKE, JOYCE M.—Victoria
Phrateres, Musical Society, Archery, Swimming.
CREIGHTON, KENNETH DAVID—Vancouver
Psi Upsilon.
DAY, JUNE M.—Vancouver
DENNIS, MELVIN WILLIAM—Vancouver
DUNCAN, HELEN JEAN—Vancouver
Alpha Gamma Delta, Commerce Club,
Employment Bureau.
FERRY,   JACK  ARNOLD—Vancouver
Zeta  Psi,  Ubyssey Saturday  Editor.
FORBES, JACK ANDREW—Revelstoke
Delta   Upsilon,   Skiing.
FOWLER, RICHARD WALTER--New Westminster
Psi Upsilon.
GILLEY, GORDON ROSS—Vancouver
Alpha   Delta Phi.
GORDON,  HUGH WARWICK--Vancouver
Zeta Psi.
GRAHAME, RICHARD WALLBANK-   Port Alberni
Winter Scene.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-SIX GRANT, PATRICIA MILLS—Vancouver
Delta Gamma
HAMMERSLEY, DONALD WILLIAM—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma.
HILL,  CLIFFORD  JACKSON—West  Vancouver
Phi  Gamma  Delta,  Golf, Badminton.
INMAN,  WILLIAM VAN  NORMAN—Caulfield
Psi  Upsilon.
KING,  WILLIAM  NORMAN—Vancouver
Soccer,  Tennis.
MEREDITH, THOMAS WATSON—Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta.
MILLER, ROBERTSON STEPHAN GARRY—Vancouver
Delta Upsilon, Treasurer of the Alma Mater
Society.
MORRIS,  BOB ARNOLD—Vancouver
Manager of the Book Exchange.
MACDONALD, DONALD JOHN—West Summerland
Commerce Club.
McFARLANE, ALEXANDER W.—Gibson's Landing
MacGOWAN, KENNETH OWEN  -New Westminster
Delta Upsilon
McMASTER, WILLIAM JOHN—Ottawa
Psi Upsilon.
O'BRIEN, WILLIAM JAMES—Seattle
Phi Kappa Sigma, Newman Club, Golf.
PUNTER, WILLIAM FRANK G.—Vancouver
SMITH, ARTHUR BUD—Calgary
Delta Upsilon, Commerce Club, Forestry Club.
THOMPSON,  ROSS  SETON—Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta, Jazz Society, Skiing.
VERNON-JACKSON, HUGH OWEN—Victoria
Players' Club, Employment Bureau, Badminton.
WILSON, NANCY M.—Victoria
Phrateres.
ZAHAR, EDWARD LOUIS—Vancouver
Newman  Club,   Radio  Society.
You Don't Say.
.   .   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-SEVEN ABBOTT, R. WILFRED
AIRD, W. JACKSON
ANDERS, BENJAMIN
ANDREWS, .ERNEST H.
BARNWELL,   JOHN  A.
BELL,  DOREEN  C.
BELL-IRVING,  DUNCAN   H.
BIRMINGHAM,   WILLIAM
BISHOP, L. GEORGE
BLAKE, IAN S.
BODIE, ROBERT T.
BOOTH,    R.   DOUGLAS
BRADNER,   GILBERT  G.
BURCH,   P.  THOMAS
BUSHELL,  NORMAN F.
CAREY, LEO P.
CHEW, V.  BRIAN
CHU, JENNIE
COWAN,   P.   ROBERT
CRIBB, JOHN  M.
CROMIE,  PETER  E.
DEAN,  ROLAND  R.
DEANE, KENNETH H.
FLEMING,  THOMAS  K.
FREUDIGER, RONALD
FROLIC,   GORDON  E.
GILBERT, JOHN A.
GOLDIE,   D.   MICHAEL   M.
GOODMAN,  JUANITA  V.
GREER, FREDERICK J..
GRIGG, NAOMI L.
HARRIS, RICHARD C.
HARRISON,   PAUL  H.
HILL,   WILLIAM   McC.
HODGSON, ELIZABETH J.
HOWSAM,  PETER  S.
JOHNSTONE,  ALAN D.
KENDALL, GLORIA E.
KNUTSON, ALVIN L.
LANGDALE,   LESLIE
LECHTZIER, M.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-EIGHT McGregor, duncan w.
McKENDRICK,   BRUCE  J.
ORTON,  ANTHONY  C.
PIERSON,   GEORGE F.
PERCIVAL,   J.  KENNETH
PERRY,  FRANCIS A.
PRATT,   F.   JOAN
QUICK,  BEVERLEY C.
RALFS, ROY B. H.
RIDDLE, ROBERT W.
SCOTT,  ANTHONY
SIGALET,   HAROLD   J.
SWiSTOON,   JOSEPH   B
VARCOE, JOHN B.
VAUGHAN,   MARGARET E.
WALLACE,  CHARLES H.
WILKINSON,  HUGH C.
WILSON, DAVID R.
WILSON, ERIC P.
WILSON,   JOSEPH   W.
WILSON,   LAIRD
ADAMS,   ANN-ELLEN
ARCHER, E. RAYMOND
ARCHER,  JOHN
ARNESON,   G.   BRUCE
BANNING,  STANLEY  E.
BARKER,  J. DAVID
BARRACLOUGH, LILA P.
BATES', ELMER W.
BEAMER,   GORDON  H.
BERGMAN,   ELMER  O.   E.
BERGSTROM, JOHAN A.
BOSSONS,   FREDERICK   H.
BROMAN, KURT I.
BROWN,  W.   ALLAN
BROWN,  T.  LEE
BURNSIDE, A. DEANE M.
BURROWS,  IVOR  R.
CARTER, K. BRUCE
CARTER,   S.   MacMORDIE
CHORLTON, RONALD W
CHRYSLER, CAMERON K.
COHEN,   JACK I.
COWAN,  PATRICIA
CRAIG,  GEORGE  L.
CREELMAN,   CLAUDE   W.
CUTHBERT,   BETTY   J.
CUTHILL, LEONARD D. J
.   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-NINE DAVIES, MARGUERITE E.
DAWES,   SYDNEY  T.
DINES,  R.  ALAN
DRYER,   L.
DUFF,   WILLIAM   T.
DULLER, JACK A.
DUNFEE,  DONALD  R.   •
DYER, LAWRENCE N.
ERICKSON, EVERETT R.
EVANS, DAN S.
FIELD, WILBUR L.
FORBES,   J.   WENDELL
FORREST,   J.  M.
FORRESTER, BARBARA S.
FUNDY, WALTE
GALT, THOMAS  D.
GENNIS,  EMERSON H.
GOODMURPHY,   RALPH   M.
GORMAN,   DAVID   G.
GOURLAY,  COLIN C.
GRAHAM, GEORGE R.
GRANT,  THOMAS C.
GREENAWAY, JEAN E.
GROBERMAN,  LIONEL
HAAS, ROBERT L.
■HACKETT,  THOMAS L.
HADWEN,   COLLEEN  V.
HALL, JEAN E.
HARDY, STAFFORD L.
HARFORD,  IAN  M.
HERRING, STEPHEN H. E.
HILL, JOSEPH R.
HRIGOREW,  ANDRO
IANNACONE, ERNEST M.
ISAACSON, C. THEODORE
JOHNSTONE, ROBERT
JONES, STANLEY C.
KASK,  A.  CHARLES
KEENAN, ROBERT G.
KING, DONALD N.
KIRK,   ANDREW   P.
LADE,   GORDON   W.
LAWRENCE,  H.  BROOKS
LAZZARIN, JOHN A.
LISTER,   WILLIAM   G.
LONG, JOHN H.
MEREDITH, K. E.
MILLAR,   THOMAS   P.
MILLER, DONOVAN F.
*_
t\
:rV_?i> ^y_-3£r«r"-y_C_-> is4 ■____£
Photo by Bowell
'Jh »_Wsx__t »W5C^__m_Wn3->!__1 «S. V/-
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY   . MILNER, ALLAN R.
MILNER,.  RONALD S.
MOORE,   R.  JOHN
MUIR, E.  WILLIAM A.
MACAULAY,  ARCHIBALD   R.
McCULLOCH, ROSS G.
MacDONALD,   HAROLD   M.
McKAY,  WILLIAM  T.
McRAE, DONALD A.
McRAE, N. HARRY
NAFTEL, C.  OAKLEY
NEELANDS, D.  JACK
NEKRASSOFF, MARGUERITE
PASTINSKY,   R.   RAE
PEGUES, JOSIAH J.
PEK,  MICHAEL
PHILLIPS, FRANK A.
PRATT, EDWARD A.
RANDALL,   ROBERT   McG.
REDPATH,   W.   ERNEST
RITCHIE, GORDON J.
ROBINSON, DONALD A.
ROBINSON,   JACQUELYN  R.
ROSS. MARGARET J.
SAUDER,   WILLIAM  L.
SCHMIDT,  RALPH L.
SHORT, PETER W.
SIMS,   NORMAN   C.
SMITH, J. HARRY G.
SMITH, KENNETH O.
SMITH,  WILLIAM H.
SOLLOWAY, JACK
SOMERVTLLE, WILLIAM R.
STEVENSON,  GERALD  H.
STIMPSON,   WILLIAM   A.
THOM, H. GILBERT
THORNE, ALICE G.
TODD,  HAROLD  B.
WALLS, LEWIS J.
WATSON,  G.   MARGARET
WEBB,   WILLIAM  E.
WEST, C. JOHN
WILCOX, EDIE A.
WILKINSON,  F. CAMERON
WILKS,   RODERICK   J.
WILLIAMSON, HUGH J.
WOODLAND,   VICTOR   C.
ZACKS,   WILLIAM
ZAHAR, FRANKLIN A.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND     FIFTY-ONE Bob Lister
Gordy Genge
lack Beveridge
Gordon Ellis
John Welton
Gordie Heal
Bob Seraphim
Tom Scott
Ken Broe
Science '46
Coming down the home stretch of their five-
year grind the men of Science '46 are eagerly
anticipating the day when they will take their
place in the industries of Canada to work with
the other U.B.C. grads who have gone before.
Once again the Graduating Class will go into
the production of the articles of peace for the
first time in six years.
Always making their voice heard on the
campus, the Engineers, through E.U.S. President
Jack Beveridge, took an active role in the development of the newly-formed Undergraduate Societies Committee.
Also notable in the ranks of the senior men
in red sweaters was Tom Scott who, in addition
to being President of the Mechanical Engineers
and President of the Graduating Class, also found
time to attend a mid-February conference of
student engineers in Montreal, from which he
returned with many valuable suggestions.
Science '46 was also active in fields other
than those which have to do solely with engineering. Bob McLellan, remembered chiefly for his
baritone roles with the Mussoc, was President of
the Camera Club. Showing that science is involved in no small degree in the game, Chuck
Dowding was President of the Chess Club.
Steve Howlett held the Presidency of the
Symphonic Club, proving that the men of science
are also men of culture. Peter Lindenfeld was
President of the Social Problems Qub.
Somehow managing to sandwich in a course
in metallurgical engineering between press days,
Bruce Bewell collected grey hairs editing the
Tusday Ubyssey. Doug Campbell's cartoons
brightened many editorial pages.
In the athletic field Thunderbird Captain Sandy
Robertson is the pride and joy of the engineers.
In addition to his activities on the maple courts,
wnere his scoring record of 40 points in a single
game will probably stand for some time, Sandy
is also a baseball player of no little ability, having been signed up by the Boston Red Sox.
Executive of Science '46 this year was: President, Jack Beveridge; Dawson Club, Bob Seraphim; Engineering Institute of Canada, Gordie
Heal; American Institute of Chemical Engineering,
John Welton; American Institute of Electrical
Engineering, Ken Broe; American Society of
Representative, Gordon Ellis.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-TWO AITKEN,  THOMAS-  Vancouver
A.I.Ch.E.
ALLEN,  GEORGE—West  Vancouver
Phi.  Kappa   Sigma;   fl.I.Ch.E.
ANDERSON, ALBERT A.—Power River
S.C.M.,   Glider   Club,   R.A.S.C.,   fl.I.Ch.E.
BANMAN, JOHN—Yarrow
fl.I.Ch E.
BARROW, GORDON M.—Vancouver
Tennis, Table Tennis, fl.I.Ch.E.
BEVAN, RHYS D.—Lower Nichola
Glider   Club,   fl.I.Ch.E.
BEVERIDGE, JOHN W—Vancouver
President   of   the   Engineers'   Undergraduate
Society,   Boxing,   fl.I.Ch.E.
BOWELL,   STEVE—Vancouver
Camera Club, Sigma Phi Delta, Golf.
BRAMHALL,
GEORGE—Vancouver
fl.I.Ch.E.
BURROWS,  MICHAEL—Rossland
Phi   Kappa  Sigma,   fl.I.Ch.E.
DOWDING,  CHARLES W.—Vancouver
Chess  Club,   V.O.C,   President of  the   University
Chess Club,  fl.I.Ch.E.
EVANS, WILFRED M— New Westminster
Musical Society, fl.I.Ch.E.
FORDYCE, DAVID B— Vancouver
Delta Upsilon,  Football,  fl.I.Ch.E.
GEE, ROY—Vancouver
Chinest   Student   Club,  fl.I.Ch.E.
JORGENSON, HARRY D.—Vancouver
Kappa Sigma, fl.I.Ch.E.
JOSEPHSON,  GILBERT M.—Merritt
Delta   Upsilon,   Golf,   Fastball,  fl.I.Ch.E.
LEWIS, ROBERT A.—Vancouver
Zeta Psi,  Golf, fl.I.Ch.E.
MARTIN,   AMES  P.—Vancouver
V.C F., American Institute of Chem. Engineering, Skiing,
President of  the Varsity Christian Fellowship.
MEARNS, ALAN N.
Sigma Phi Delta, fl.I.Ch.E.
MINIATO, OSWALD K—Vancouver
fl.I.Ch.E.
MOORE,   CHARLES—Vancouver
Sigma   Phi   Delta,   fl.I.Ch.E.
PERRIS, GEORGE- Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta, American Institute of Chem.
Engineering.
STEWART, DONALD L. -North Vancouver
American   Institute   of   Chem.   Engineering.
UNDERWOOD,   ELDIN  S.—Vancouver
Zeta   Psi;    A.I.Ch.E.
We're so happy here, behind these bars!
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-THREE WATE, KENNETH G.—Vancouvpr
Beta Theta Pi, A.I.Ch.E.
WATERS, H. BRYCE—New Westminster
American Institute of  Chem.   Engineering,  Tennis.
WELTON, R. JOHN—Trail
Vice-Chairman  of U.S.C.,   President  of  A.I.Ch.E.,
E.U.S., Vice-Chairman Discipline Committee.
WOOD,  NORMAN M.—Vancouver
Psi  Epsilon,  A.I.Ch.E.
BAYLEY, L.  JAMES—ChilHwack
Badminton,   E.I.C.
CURRIE, ROBERT H—Vancouver
E.I.C.
DIMOCK, ARTHUR C—Smithers
Badminton, E.I.C.
ELLIS, GORDON M.—
E.U S.,   Intramurals,   Athletic   Representative   of   E.U.S.,
E.I.C.
GALLAHER, ERNEST E.—Vancouver
Letters   Club,   E.I.C.
GOLCMAN,  ROBERT—Vancouver
E.I.C.
HARRIS, ROBERT G.—Penticton
E.I.C.
HEAL,  DOUGLAS  G.—
Sigma   Phi  Delta,  President   of  the  E.I.C.
JOHNSON,  LEONARD  C—Victoria
E.I.C.
KOLBEINS, HENRY- Vancouver
E.I.C,   Secretary   of  the  E.I.C.
McNAUGHTON,  AMES H.—Vancouver
E.I.C.
PEATFIELD, JOHN H.—Radium Hot Springs
E.I.C.
ROBERTSON, SANDY—Vancouver
Kappa   Sigma,  Big   Block  Club,   Thunderbirds,
E.I.C.
TEEVAN, JAMES T.—Vancouver
E.I.C.
ASCROFT. GFPRLD C-
A.I.E E.
-Victoria
AULD,  BERT A.—Nelson
Skiing,  A.I.E.E.
BODNAR, MICHAEL W.—Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
BROE, KENNETH L.—Hammond
Delta   Upsilon,   A.I.E.E.,   Track,   President   of   the   Inter-
Fraternity Council, President of the A.I.E.E.
CHERITON,  W.  ROSS—Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
HAMMERSLAG, JULIUS- -Vancouver
A.I.E.E., Chess Club.
Why so worried, fellas?    That smoke doesn't mean a thing.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-FOUR   . HOWLETT, STEPHEN B.—Vancouver
Fencing Club, University Concert Orchestra, A.I.E.E.
KENNY, WILFRED E.—Vancouver
KENT, NORMAN—
Psi  Upsilon,   Golf,  A.I.E.E.
LINDENFELD, PETER—Vancouver
S.P.C.,   International   Relations   Club,
A.I.E.E.
LONG,  LUKE—Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
MARKS, WALTER—Vancouver
Outdoors   Club,   Skiing,   Track.
MOORE, WILLIAM J.—Victoria
A.I.E.E.
McMICHAEL, WILLIAM G.—Victoria
A.I.E.E.
NALOS, ERVIN J.—Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
NICHOLSON, WILLIAM V.—North Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta, V.O.C, Secretary of the V.O.C,
A.I.E.E.
OLSEN, J.  NORMAN—Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
SANSUM, JOHN D.—Victoria
A.I.E.E.,   Secretary  of the A.I.E.E.
WIGHT, LARRY—
Phi  Delta  Theta, A.I.E.E.
BIRD, OHN M.—
Sigma Phi Delta, A.S.M.E.
BURGESS, JOHN A.—Trail
Phi Kappa Pi,  A.S.M.E.
CHUTTER, PAUL W.—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi, A.S.M.E.
CROCKER,  CHARLES B—Vancouver
Phi Delta  Theta,  A.S.M.E.
EDWARDS, OWEN C—Vancouver
A.S.M.E.
GAGLAIRDI,  SAMUEL—Victoria
Table Tennis, A.S.M.E.
GALLOWAY, LESLIE C—Vancouver
Kappa Sigma.
GEORGE, STANLEY E.--Vancouver
Kappa Sigma.
GORDON, HARRY—Vancouver
Zeta  Beta   Tau,   fl.S M.E.
HORTON, BILL W.—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta, A.S.M.E.
JOHANNSON, EDGAR F. -Vancouver
A.S.M.E.
LAKE,   ADDISON   A.—Vancouver
A.S.M.E.
LATIMER, NORMAN H. -
Phi Kappa Sigma, A.S.M.E.,  Basketball,
Ping  Pong.
Mariocco and Cooper learn about  engineering—by  watching.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND     FIFTY-FIVE LeBRUN, JULIUS A.    Vancouver
A.S.M.E.
LEWIS,  L.  ALLEN—New  Westminster
Phi   Delta Theta,  Golf,   Swimming,   A.S.M.E.
LYLE, WALACE E.—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta, A.S.M.E.
MITTEN,  LEONARD A—Powell River
Zeta Psi,  English   Rugby,   A.S.M.E.
MORAN,  JOHN  R.—Victoria
Rowing  Club,   A.S M.E.
MORRISS,  HARRY P.—Vancouver
A.S.M.E.
McLELLAN, ROBERT N.—Vancouver
Musical  Society,  A.I.M.E., Outdoor Club.
McLEOD, GEORGE W.—Vancouver
A.I.M.E.
NEWBERRY, GORDON E— Barriers
A.I.M.E.
NEWSON, DON-Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta.
PARKINSON,  GEOFFREY V.—Vancouver
A.S.M.E.,   Tennis.
RHODES, ERNEST S.—Vancouver
SCOTT, TOM F—Vancouver
A.S.M.E., Sigma Phi Delta, President of the A.S.M.E.
SKENE,   ALEXANDER  W.—Calgary
Kappa  Sigma.
STEVENS,  DONALD  R.—Calgary
A.I.M.E.
STUART,  WILLIAM  B— Ocean  Falls
SUTHERLAND, JOHN H.~Vancouver
TAPAY,  HAROLD M.—Nanaimo
A.S.M.E.
TAYLOR, DAVID H.—Vancouver
A.S.M.E.
WALES, DONN—
Phi  Gamma  Delta.
WALLER, ARNOLD B.—Wellington
WARRENDER, ALEXANDER C    Victoria    .
Kappa  Sigma,  Musical  Society,  Badminton.
WONG, GILBERT—Vancouver
Badminton,  President of the Chinese Club.
WONG, D. WILLIAM
Chinese Student  Club.
ALLISON,  GEORGE W.—Hollyburn
Musical Society, Forestry Club.
AQUA, HARRY—Vancouver
Forestry Club, Menorah  Society,  Golf,  Tennis.
Our busy little Sciencemen
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED     AND     FIFTY-SIX BYERS, ARCHIE M.—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma, Golf,  Swimming, Canadian Football.
COTTER, HARRY B—Victoria
Psi Upsilon.
DeGRACE, LAWRENCE A.—Vancouver
Forestry   Club.
HARDY, GORDON—Vancouver
KORSCH,  STANFORD—Vancouver
Zeta  Beta  Tau.
MARPLES,   EDWARD   G.—Invermere
NASH, ANDREW C—Vancouver
PRIOR,  DENNIS C—New Westminster
Psi   Upsilon.
SMITH, DOUGLAS S.—Vancouver
Delta Upsilon, Forestry Club, Biology, Skiing.
WALDIE, ARTHUR R.—Trail
Biological Discussions  Club,  President of the Biological
Discussions Club.
CAMPBELL, DOUGLAS D.—Vancouver
Dawson Club.
FYLES, JOHN G.—Vancouver
G.M. Dawson Club, Secretary of the Dawson Club.
GOUIN, LEON O.—St. Paul
Dawson Club.
HODGSON,  ALEXANDER  G.—Marysville
Dawson  Club.
BEWELL, BRUCE E—Cadboro Bay
Sigma Phi Delta, Sigma Tau Chi, Outdoor Club, Dawson Club,
Senior Editor of the Ubyssey.
HANSEN, HARRIS T— Vancouver
Delta Upsilon,  Dawson Club,  Badminton, Softball.
HILTON, HERBERT B—North Vancouver
Dawson Club, Outdoor Club, Basketball.
KILBURN, JAMES H.—Vancouver
Outdoor Club,  Dawson Club,  Camera Club.
RUTQUIST, FRED E.—Wells
Treasurer of Dawson Club.
SCOTT, DONALD A.—Victoria
Dawson Club, Intramurals.
WOODWARD, JACK R.—Vancouver
ODYNSKY, PETER G.—Vancouver
Musical  Society,  Dawson  Club.
Bewell's device on Page 154 Just blew up.
____    ' '____P*3
JJ
\i_r_P
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-SEVEN hughes, james h. c.
larson, n. lawrence
levelton, bruce h.
lloyd, don b.
McDonnell, basil
McLELLAN, HAROLD D.
NELSON, ALAN P.
NEWMARCH, THOMAS F.
REAVILLE,  ERIC T.
SHERMAN, DEANE D.
STROUD, ROSS C.
ANDREW, FRED J.
BATEMAN, WILIAM  A.
BERSON, MORRIS J.
GALLON,  ALLAN V.
QUIRK, EDWIN T.
BEAL, EVAN S.
CARTER, A. GORDON
COOPER, ERNEST E.
GAMBLE,  GEORGE H.
GENGE, GORDON M.
GILL,   LAWRENCE
GILL,   WILLIAM D.
HAYES, JOHN
HAZELWOOD,  DAVID A.
HESLA, ERLING C.
LISTER, ROBERT W.
MARZOCCO,   EDO
MILLER,   WALLACE   B.
Must be reminiscing over that Science BaU.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-EIGHT MACDONALD, RODERICK M.
McLENNAN, JOHN R. B.
RACINE, REJEAN W.
ROSE, DAVID J.
WOODS,, ERIC J. H.
ADIE,   LAWRENCE
LEA,   EDGAR  R.
LEE.. JAMES W.
WHEELER, JOHN O.
WHITNEY, GORDON E.
CAINS, RICHARD W.
DOUGLAS, COLIN McK.
HARRISON, GERALD E. G.
KIRKPATRICK, EDWARD T.
KLOMPAS,  NICHOLAS
LAYARD, CAMVILLE P.
LOCKHART,  GERALD  P.
McEWEN,  J.   RICHARD
MacKAY,   JAMES  W.
MacLEAN, FRASER A..
ross, william j.
beveridge, james a.
greenius, arnold w.
john, john g.
McGinn, Alexander
McPHERSON. DUGALD
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-NINE Science '48
Now past the half-way mark on their road to
the precious B.A. Sc. degree, Science '48 is heaving a collective sigh of relief at the .relative proximity of their goal.
Although returned servicemen have inflated
the class considerably, the third year men have
not been crowded to the same extent as some
other classes. They claim that their year is "just
comfortably full." Many of the ex-servicemen are
no strangers to U.B.C, having taken the Canadian
Army Course here two years ago. All express
their pleasure at being back.
Still in there wielding tee squares and slide-
rules with the best of them are those outstanding
co-eds, Lorna Lang and Marg Stokkeland. After
three years they are more convinced than ever
that there is a place for women in engineering.
The girls' enthusiasm and help in such matters
as pep meets has gained them the admiration of
the class.
Class President Ron Grantham worked tirelessly all year for the E.U.S. Readily identified
by a mop of flaming red hair, Grantham was an
easy and willing target when there was a job
to be done.
Representative of Science '48 on Council was
Fred Lipsett, of Players' Club fame, who held the
chair of the Literary Scientific executive.
Another notable redshirt Green Roomer was
Jack Duffus, President of the Thespians this year.
Frank Woodward held the Presidency of the
ever expanding Thunderbird Gliding and Soaring
Club.
Science '48 did not neglect the sports field
either. In addition to supplying most of the two
intra-mural teams, the Engineers and the Science-
men, third year also produced such stars as
Thunderbird Harry Kermode, who has always
done more than his share towards the success of
the Birds.
Executive this year was: President, Ron Grantham; Vice-President, Alan Fletcher; Secretary-
Treasurer, Lorna Lang; Sports Repesentative,
Harry Kermode.
Above:    Grantham
Below:    Kermode, Lang. Fletcher
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED     AND    SIXTY ADAMS, WILLIAM S.
ANDREWS, JOHN H. M.
ARCHIBALD, ROY W.
ARMSTRONG, HARRY B.
BABB, ALBERT L.
BARTLET, A. WILLIAM
BENE,  JOSEPH
BLUECHEL, ALLAN J.
BURCH, W. GERALD
BURNS, CECIL A
CHERNIAVSKY, PETER A.
CRAIG, ROBERT A.
DAVIS, EVAN T.
DEAN, DOUGLAS A.
DENLUCK, ROBERT N.
DENNYS, RONALD G.
DOBIE, THOMAS T.
DRYER, LORNE K.
DUFF, PHILLIP A.
DUFFUS, HENRY J.
DUNDAS, ROBERT M.
EAGLE, MALCOLM
EDWARDS, INGLIS W.
ELIA,  NICK
ENG, THOMAS S.
FULTON, ANDREW W.
GRANTHAM, RONALD D.
GRAY,  ROBERT V.
GRAY, WALTER J.
HARBELL, JOSEPH L.
HARRISON, JOHN H.
HARRISON, ROLAND S.
HIRTLE, J. GORDON
HOBSON, GEORGE W.
HOLMES, DAVID C.
HOTHAM, GEOFFREY A.
JEFFERY, CHARLES B.
JOHNSON, ROBERT W.
JOLLY, ROY D.
JONES, C. PETER
KERR, J.  S. STEVENSON
KOLBERG, JOSEPH
KRMPOTICH, MICHAEL E.
LAMBE, EDWARD B. D.
LAWRIE, WILLIAM E.
LEITH, WILLIAM C.
LIPSETT, FREDERICK R.
Three, two, one. read!
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-ONE morgan, david w.
morrison, robert j.
macdonell, alexander
McGregor, fredrick c.
McKAY, DUNALD F.
McLELLAN, GORDON N.
McLELLAN, JOHN W.
MacLEOD, DONALD M.
NAROD, LEONARD K.
NELSON, SAMUEL J.
NEWALL,  NORMAN
OLSON, PHILIP E.
PARKER, JOHN M.
PELLICANO,  JOE
PETERSON, EARL R.
PHARE, G. ROWLAND
PIERCY, JOSEPH E.
POLLOCK, WILLIAM O.
PRIOR, CHARLES A.
ROBERTS, A. KENNETH C.
ROBERTSON, JAMES D.
ROBERTSON, PHILIP W.
ROBERTSON, ROBERT W.
ROBINSON, MALCOLM C.
ROSE, WILLIAM E.
RUDOLPH, JOHN C.
SCHOENING. M. ALLAN
SHORE, ALBERT G.
SISSONS, W. JOHN
SMITH, LESLIE F.
SMITH, THOMAS F.
STOKKELAND, MARGARET C.
TAYLOR, CHESTER C.
THOMPSON, MAVOR S.
TRADEMAN, EUGENE
WARNER, KENNETH M.
WELLBURN, GERALD V.
WINTER,  WALLACE H.
WOLFRAM, GORDON
YOUNG, WILLIAM H.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-TWO Science '49
Hardly started on the road to the coveted
sheepskin, the 566 members of Science '48 are
record-breakers. This session there are more
second year students than there were students in
the whole four years, a scant two sessions ago.
Most of these students are men fresh from the
forces where they have learned some technical
skills which they wish to pursue further. These
men work with a singleness of purpose which
will inevitably result in an even higher standard
for the engineering graduate of the University
of British Columbia.
In spite of this studiousness and the strange
feeling that comes with totally new surroundings,
this newest crop of embryo engineers was quick
to show its spirit. They were always in the van
when it came to organizing meetings and pep
meet skits.
Science '48 has another claim to distinction.
They, too, have a fair damsel who has forsaken
the caf and knitting needles for the drafting room
and tee-square. Nelda Ozel has also shown her
devotion to the cause of the slide-rule by entering
wholeheartedly into the activities of the rambunctious redshirts. She will long be remembered for her role in the skit at the Science
Banquet.
As any second year engineer will admit,
battling the combination of Physics 4 and Civil
30 is no pushover, but in spite of this, the boys
still find time for relaxation in one form or
another.
Jerry Macdonald took time out to act as Advertising Manager for the Musical Society's production of "Merrie England."
Tom Preston wrote an occasional column for
the Ubyssey under the heading "Seeing Red,"
and Roy Dougans seemed to be in one continual
blaze of glory as he shot flashbulb after flashbulb
for the Ubyssey and Totem.
Ritchie Nicol, formerly of the Victoria
Dominos, ably represented second year on the
Thunderbirds.
Executive of Science '49 was: President, Mike
Dunn; Vice-President, John Kyle; Secretary-
Treasurer, Don Elliott; Sports Representative, Daynard Welsh.
Above:   Mike Dunn
Below: John Kyle. Don Elliott
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-THREE ADAM, JAMES C.
AHO, AARO E.
AINSCOUGH, RALPH E.
ALLMAN, ARTHUR W.
BAAL, GEORGE G. G.
BAILEY, JAMES M. M.
BAKER, DAVID J.
BARRETT, ROBERT J.
BARTON, DONALD C.
BELANGER, MAURICE J.
BERRY, HUGH E.
BLAIR, ALBERT D.
BLAKELY, WILLIAM J.
BRADWELL, OWEN K.
BROADLAND, THOMAS R.
BROTHERTON, LORNE W.
BUHLER, WILLIAM A.
BURMEISTER, RUSSELL M.
BURWELL, JAMES D.
BUTCHART, LEONARD G.
BUTTERFIELD, FLOYD N.
BYRN, JAMES S.
CAMERON, D. IAN
CAMPBELL, IAN McK.
COLLINS, KENNETH McC.
COOK, RICHARD M.
COPLICK, WALTER I.
CORBETT, LEVI V.
CRAVEN, JOHN H.
CURRIE. IAN H.
CURTIS, JOHN S. ■
DAVEY, GRANT McC.
DAYTON, MARTIN J. J.
DILWORTH, LOUIS R.
DOOLAN, ARTHUR A.
DOW, WALTER H.
DUNLOP. WILLARD G.
EDWARDS, JOHN S.
ELLIOT, CHARLES W.
ENGLISH, ALLEN J. M.
FISHER, DONALD C. M.
FOX, CHARLES R.
FRANKOVTTCH,  CECIL J.
FRASER, FRANK S.
FREY, JOHN D.
GATTENMEYER,  JOHN L.
GIBSON, HOWARD B. G.
GORDON, JAMES S.
GORDON, MERRITT E.
GRAHAM, PETER
GRAY, KENNETH P.
GUSTAVSON, STANLEY E.
HARRISON, ARTHUR E.
HATCH, WILLIAM R.
HEWLETT, CECIL G.
HOLDEN, RICHARD C.
Acadia from a treetop
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-FOUR   . HOLTBY, I.. GWYNN
HOOVER, GEORGE L.
HYDE, ERIC N.
JACKSON, L. EDWARD
JAMIESON, ROBERT D.
JENKINS, STANLEY H.
JOSEPHSON, HELMER W
KAYLL, S. JOHN
KENT, C. ERNEST
KINGHORN, JAMES M.
KIRK, KENNETH I. R.
KITSON, JOHN A.
KNAPPETT, ALAN H.
LEE, HARRY
LONGLEY, CHARLES E.
LOW, JOHN
LUM, MUN G.
MAIDMENT,  HOWARD
MALCOLM, ROBERT A.
MANNING, RODGER P.
MARKER, GEORGE A.
MASON, ROY B.
MASON, STANLEY J,
MERRIFIELD, GLEN S.
MERRIFIELD, SAMUEL S.
MERRITT, REX D. V.
MILBURN, JAMES V.
MILLS, ROBERT M
MITCHELL, JAMES A. W.
MONTGOMERY, ROY W.
MORRILL, G. LLOYD P.
MOUL, ALBERT A.
MOULSON, DONALD C.
MUSSENDEN, RAYMOND N
McADAM, JOHN R. G.
McCOLL, H. STUART
McCONACHIE, C. ERIC B.
McCORQUODALE, WILLIAM
MACDONALD, JERRY A.
MacDONALD, ROBERT G.
MacFADDEN, JACK H.
McGINNIS, KENNETH J
McLEAN, TERENCE A.
McLENNAN, DONALD J.
McPHERSON, D. KEITH
McPHERSON, JOHN D.
McQUARRIE, JOHN G.
NESBIT, DONALD R.
NORTHROP, DAVID N,
It's a bird
,   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-FIVE OLIVER, WELLS R.
OLSEN, MARK T.
OZOL, NELDA
PAGE, HAROLD J.
PEARSON, HANS L.
PEARSON, IVOR D.
PETERS, ERNEST
PLANT, GEORGE E.
POOLE, WILLIAM H.
POPE, STEPHEN H.
PORTER, KENNETH H.
REDEL, W. ROBERT
REID, JOHN D.
ROBERTSON, JAMES D.
ROPER, GORDON J.
RUSSELL, CHARLES H.
SANDRIN, JOSEPH O.
SAUNDERS, R. HENRY
SCHJELDERUP, HASSEL C.
SCOTT, S. ALEX
SMITH, JAMES A.
SMITH. NEVILLE
SMITH, ROBERT R.
SOMMERFIELD, LELAND E.
SPRAY, DONALD R.
SPRUNG, DOUGLAS L.
STORY, DAVID M.
STREET, GEORGE T.
STUART, ROY A.
STUCKEY. LESTER R.
SUTHERLAND, JAMES G.
SWEATMAN, HENRY C.
SWEENEY, W. ALAN
TAYLOR, RALPH E.
THOMPSON, FRANCIS D.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-SIX   . Agriculture
Although Agriculture, along with other campus
faculties, has more than tripled in size, the Aggie
students, unlike those in the other faculties, while
working together in their classes, in their labs,
in the barns, and in field work, have kept up their
remarkable faculty spirit through all the overcrowding.
Naturally enough, with the growth of the
faculty, a separate crest was needed. The accepted creation was designed by John Seiburth, a
freshman, and the leading Aggie cartoonist.
A new venture of the Aggies was the edition
of the first Aggie Ubyssey. In charge of the green
sheet were Fred Maurer, Doris Larkin, and Harold
Huff.
The highlight of the Aggie's social calendar
is the annual Aggie Barn Dance. Here the oldest
and shabbiest thing wearable makes a fitting
costume. Gordon Bell was in charge of this function, and the Leavy brothers, the official bouncers
at all Aggie parties, were on hand.
Also on the social calendar are the class
parties, and the faculty banquets. The Fall Banquet is the official initiation of the Frosh into the
faculty. Traditionally, the Freshman Class provided the necessary humorous touch in the form
of a skit.
The Spring Banquet is a formal function. The
prizes won during the Spring Field Day, held at
Agassiz Experimental Farm, are presented to
the winners at this time.
Not to be outdone by the other faculties, the
Aggies entered the intra-mural sports, in which
they always rank with the leaders. Looking after
athletics was Doug Knott, also of cross-country
fame. Accompanying him to the Spokane meet
was track star, Lloyd Tamboline. Jackie Stephenson was in charge of the girls' sport activities.
The Society executive consisted of: David
Blare, President Bob Nilan, Vice-President; Halcyone Webb, Secretary1 Grant Larkin, Treasurer;
Ken Devlin, Athletic Representative, and Kay
Deas, Women's President.
The Executive Council was assisted by the
class executives. These consisted of: Class '46
Honorary President, Professor Laird; President,
Gordon Bell; Secretary, Joan Stevens; Class '47
President, John Day; Secretary, Jackie Stephenson; Class '48 President, Ian Greenwood; secretary, Margaret Gibson1 Class '49 President, Bill
Barrie; Secretary, Doris Larkin.
Front:
Above:    Dave Blair
Lower:    Grant Larkin. Dave Blair
Bob Nilan. Halycone Webb. Ken Devlin
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED     AND     SIXTY-SEVEN BELL, GORDON R.
BLAIR, DAVID J.
BUCHANAN,   SHEILA C.
CALDECOTT, RICHARD S.
CARSON, DOUGLAS J.
DEAS, CATHERINE P.
DEVLIN, KENNETH A.
DOMVILLE, WINSTON
GASPERDONE, HERBERT C.
GYLES, N. ROY
HALL, SYLVIA R.
HUNTINGDON. A. RONALD
JAMESON, KENNETH R.
KLINKHAMER, THOMAS L.
LEAVY, JACK A.
Back to work, boys, she got away
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-EIGHT   . LEAVY, LEO F.
MILLER, ROBERT A.
MILROY, JAMES E.
MONK, FRED C. J.
MOWATT, J. GRAHAM
MacCARTHY, JAMES A.
McCRADY, EL WOOD R.
NEY, PHYLLIS W.
NILAN, ROBERT A.
NOBLE, S. ROY
RIPLEY, THOMAS A. F.
SHEWAN, ROBERT H.
SMITH, ALEXANDER F.
STEVENS, JOSN M.
TURNER, JOHN H.
WATT, ALEXANDER W.
WEBB, HALCYONE
WOO, EFFIE
AGGIE '46
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-NINE BAXTER, BERNICE M.
BAYFIELD, JOHN T.
BUTTERWORTH, EARL McK.
DAVIDSON, KENNETH E.
DAY, -JOHN H.
GEE, W. KUEY
GREGORY, KENNETH F.
HARMS, HAROLD F.
HEAL, RONALD R.
JONES, NORMAN O.
LAMBERT, NONA C.
LARKIN, GRANT B.
MAURER, ALFRED R.
MAXWELL, J. STEWART
MacLEOD, DOROTHY M.
STEPHENSON, JACQUELYN.
TAYLOR. JAMES W.
WALLACE, MYRON T.
AKEROYD, JAMES H.
AUGUSTUS, JOSEPH
BAWDEN, ROSEMARY J.
CAMPBELL, DAN R. J.
COULTER, MAUREEN A.
CRAWFORD, DONALD H.
CUNNINGHAM, FREDERICK
DEAN, ROBERT E.
DOUGLAS, MARY A.
FERGUSON, NORMAN J.
FERRIES, CLARKE H.
GAYTON, RAYMOND R.
Prexy Day
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY    . GEDDIE, TALBOT
GIBSON, DAVID L.
GIBSON, MARGARET P.
GILLESPIE, DOUGLAS C.
GOODWIN, DONALD E.
GREENWOOD, IAN F
HAMILTON, JOHN C.
HICKS, ETHEL S.
HODY, REGINALD E.
HOLLOWAY, ELAINE P.
HORSFIELD, ELEANOR M
HYDE, RONALD B.
IRWIN, E. LOUISE
IRWIN, ROBERT E. T.
KENDALL. CONSTANCE J:
KING, JOYCE V.
KLINE, CECIL M.
KNOTT, DOUGLAS R.
LEE, JONE K. D.
MARLOW, DIANA J.
MARSHALL, FREDERICK L.
MAY, JAMES
MacDONALD, DONALD H.
McKAY,  KENNETH A.
NEWTON, DONALD W.
NORRIS, FLORA C.
PICKLES, NORMAN R.
REYNOLDS, ROBERT T.
RICHARDSON, DONALD W
RIDEOUT, ELDON F.
RUCK, JOHN A.
SMITH, ERIC S.
SPICER, VIVIEN A. M.
STEWART, RICHARD
TALBOT, M. KATHLEEN
TONNING, EILA M.
TOWNSLEY, PHILIP McN.
TUPPER, NORMAN E.
VERNON, JOAN K.
VINCENT, RONALD J. A.
WIGGINS, MURRAY M.
YOUNG, DAVID B.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-ONE BERRY, WILLIAM J.
COLES, BARBARA M.
CRAM, W. THOMAS
CROSBY, RICHARD H.
DODWELL, PETER L.
FARYNA, GENE WM.
FREEMAN, JACK A.
FULTON, W. GRAHAM
GREENHORN, STANLEY M.
GUEST, C. RUSSELL
HAZLEWOOD, JOAN I.
HENDERSON, A. DONALD
HENNELL, PAUL
HOOFER, CHERRY A.
KNIGHT, URSULA H.
LARKIN, DORIS E.
LOCKHART, SHIRLEY R.
MADDIN, CAMERON A.
MALCOLM, ELIZABETH H.
MANTEN, BETTY J.
MITTEN, ROBERT A.
MOLONEY. JAMES V.
MOORE, RODNEY J.
McDONALD, I. MARGARET
McDONALD. PATRICIA G.
NORRIS, MARGARET E.
RACEY, K. ALAN
SIEBURTH, JOHN McN.
SIEBURTH. LOUISE R.
SOMMERS, GERALD A.
SOUTHCOTT, BURNETT A.
STACEY, MICHAEL W.
SYMONDS, C.  MARGARET
TOWNSLEY, DAVID S.
WESTON, JOHN R.
WILSON, V/ILMA J.
CHANCEY, ROBERT H. W.
CORRY, GEOFFREY D.
PARRISH, PETER D.
Hayseeds in the hayseeds
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-TWO Home Economics
A degree from the faculty of Home Economics
was awarded for the first time at Congregation
in May, 1946. Approximately a dozen co-eds
received the Degree of Bachelor of Home Economics, after completing the necessary four-year
course at U.B.C.
In the four-year course, Home Economics students have learned to prepare food on a large
scale, and have had practical work along this
line at the Acadia Camp, where the meals were
planned and prepared by rotating groups of
students. Courses in dress making, pattern designing, family management, family relations and
many others were also included ior the degree.
It was planned to institute a home management house on the campus, the funds for which
have been provided by the Parent Teachers' Association, but building restrictions and priorities
made this impossible. In place of the course on
baby care at the home management house, the
Home Ec. students went to the Baby Clinic for
their practical work.
To help the students in their fashion and color
courses, the Home Economics Undegraduate Society instituted a series of talks, given every two
weeks by guest speakers on clothes, accessories,
cosmetics, color schemes and many other phases
of fashion work. Each speaker brought equipment to demonstrate her talk, and in that way,
the Home Ec. students saw dress displays, cosmetic demonstrations and fashion movies at first
hand. Other speakers gave talks on the future
of Home Economics graduates in the industrial
world.
In a lighter vein, a tea was held for the new
members of the Undergraduate Society in October, and a graduation tea was given for the
graduating members in April. Highlight of the
year was the Valentines dance, held in the Brock
on February 14.
Responsible for the many activities of the
Home Economics Undergraduate Society this year
were Doreen Parks, President; Casey King, Vice-
President, and Joan Park, Secretary-Treasurer.
Above:    Doreen Parks
Lower:    Joan Park. Dot Pearson. Barb. Simpson. Casey King
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    S E V E N T Y - T H R E E CURNOW, BERNICE—Britannia  Beach
Home   Economics,   Musical  Society.
FORBES', MARY A.—Vancouver
Home Economics.
FROSTUP, EILSHA—Vancouver
Home  Economics,  Kappa  Alpha  Theta, Phrateres,
Skiing.
GIBBARD, MARGARET HELENA—Okoioks, Alberta
Home Economics.
GULLOCH, MURIEL ISABEL—Vancouver
Musical  Society,  Outdoor Sports.
HAMMOND,  MARY BETH—Vancouver
Home  Economics,  Kappa Alpha  Theta.
JOHNSON, MAXINE—Vancouver
Home Economics, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Undergraduate Society,
Archery.
KATAINEN, VIOLET ONERVA—Webster's Corner, B.C.
Home Economics, Outdoor Club, Musical Society, Hiking,
Swimming.
McEACHERN, LILLIAN—Vancouver
Home Economics, Alpha Gamma Delta, Ping Pong,
Baseball.
MacKENZIE, AGNES ISABEL—Vancouver
Home   Economics,   Kappa  Alpha   Theta.
PARKS, DOREEN MAUD—New Westminster
Home  Economics,   President  of H.E.   Big  Block,  Grass  Hockey.
ROGERS, MARJORIE ELAINE—Vancouver
Home  Economics,  Kappa Alphat Theta,  Golf.
ROSENBURG, JEAN S.—Vancouver
Home   Economics.
STEAD, URSULA—Duncan, B.C.
Home  Economics,  Newman Club, Home  Ec. Club.
WEBER, MARJORIE ELEANOR—Vancouver
Alpha Gamma  Delta,  Home Economics.
PAGE    ONE    HUUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-FOUR   . ALLMAN, MARY B.
ANDERSON, EVELYN M.
BRODY, FLORENCE V.
BROWN, PATRICIA R.
DAVIDS, DOREEN A.
DUNLOP, AUDREY M.
DYSON,  SYLVEA
EDDY,  GERALDINE M.
GADBOIS, LORRAINE M.
GAFF,  BERYL  A.
GEORGE, CATHERINE B.
IRVING, LORNA E.
KING, KATHLEEN F.
LOWES, H. ANN
MJOS, LILLIAN
MURPHY, GLORIA M.
MacGILLIVRAY, VERDA I.
McKENZIE, JEAN  B.
McRAE, MILDRED D.
ROSENBERG, NETTY C.
RATHLEF, ELIZABETH I.
SIMPSON, BARBARA
SYMONDS, ANN P.
VOSS, HELEN L.
WALTON,  VIVIAN M.
WHITE, LESLIE A. H.
■WILSON, H. ROSEMARY
WILSON, IRENE
WILSON, LORNA M.
WILSON, M. JEAN
BALDWIN, M. BETTY
BENNETT,  MAVIS G.
BERRY, FRANCES E.
BIGSBY, E. JEAN
BISHOP, DORIS M.
BLACK. EVELYN A.
BONE, MARGARET M.
BOWE, MARGUERITE W.
BOWEN, JEAN E.
CAMPBELL, MARION E.
CHRISTIE, EILEEN A.
CLARK, CATHERINE McR.
COTTERALL,  GERTRUDE
DIAMOND, RITA
DUNN, EILEEN M.
DYRNDAHL, LILLIAN C.
ELLIS,   BEVERLEY   G.
GEE, E. ROBERTA
HARRISON, M. BERNICE
HOPKINS, M. ISABEL
HUTCHISON, DORIS H.
JAMIESON, JEAN E.
.   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-FIVE KIRK, EVA W.
KLUSENDORF, EDITH M.
MOFFATT, A. SHEILA
MONTGOMERY, MARY M.
McKINLEY, F. EVA J.
MacQUEEN, M. JEAN
ROANTREE, FRANCES
SMILLIE, ELSIE R.
TECHY, MARGARET T.
TORRANCE, ETHEL E.
TREDAWAY, EDNA P.
TURNER, BLANCHE M.
ZINK, NORMA M.
ANDERSON, AGNES M.
ARCHIBALD, MARGARET E.
BACON, EILEEN N.
BRETHOUR, HELEN S.
BURR, M. ELEANOR
CAWSTON, MARJORIE V
COATES, DONNA V.
COX,  M.  JANE
DALRYMPLE, JEAN W.
DOW, MARION E.
FAIRWEATHER, PAULINE
FARQUHARSON, BETTE
HATFIELD, HELEN E.
HAYDUK, PEARL
HORRIDGE, JUNE J.
HUNT,  BETTY  N.
KERR, MILDRED E.
LAHMER, BETTY M.
LONG, CATHERINE B.
MICHAS, VIRGINIA N.
MURRAY, IRIS E. E.
McTAVISH, SHIRLEY A.
OLSEN, SHIRLEY W.
PATERSON, MARY J.
PEARSON, DOROTHY B. I
REE,  C.  MARY
RICHARDS, BARBARA
ROSE, JOAN F.
SAMPSON, E. PAMELA
SIER, HELEN
TERRACE, IVY A. J.
WESTOVER, DOROTHY M
WOO. KATHERINE T.
WORRALL, GLADYS E
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-SIX Nurses
Torn between an allegiance to the General
Hospital or to the University, the ninety-three
members of the Nurses' Undergraduate Society
have completed yet another year of successful
campus activities, both along social and scholastic lines. The Nursing Undegraduate Society
serves not only to direct the activities of the
nurses, but also to keep them in touch with their
sisters down at the hospital.
There are several courses open to those students wishing to go into nursing as a career.
It is possible for a student to go into training at
the General immediately after high school, or she
may take two years in Arts at the University,
followed by three sessions at the hospital, and
finishing up the course at U.B.C. with one more
year, at the end of which the candidate may receive a B.A.Sc. degree.
The graduates include both Public Health
nurses and nurses in Teaching and Supervision.
The Public Health course consists of a short series
of lectures followed by a period of field work.
This field work takes the students to various
clinics and institutions both in the city and outside. Classes for Teaching and Supervision of
nurses are held both at the General Hospital and
at the University.
Aside from the business meetings, the Nurses
held four socials—a fireside held at the end of
October at the home of Mary-Gordon Hazlewood
—a Christmas brunch at the Devon Cafe—the
annual Nurses' formal, given this year in collaboration with the Pre-Meds, in the Brock in November—and a Spring Tea held in the rotunda of
the Nurses' Home at the Vcncouver General Hospital, in April.
Along with the rest of the campus, the Nurses
put on a display at Open House, as well as operating a "baby center" to look after small children
for parents visiting the campus.
This year has undoubtedly been one of the
most outstanding for the Nurses' Undergraduate
Society, and much of the credit for its success
goes to its hard-working executive composed of
Mary Wilkinson, President1 Betty Haliden, Vice-
President; Jessie MacCarthy, Secretary; Dorothy
Parfitt, Treasurer; Mary-Gordon Hazlewood, Publicity; Shelagh Wheeler, Sports Representative,
and Thelma Whitman, War Work Chairman.
Above:    Mary Wilkinson
Lower:    Mary Gordon Hazlewood. Jessie MacCarthy,
Mary Wilkinson, Thelma Whltlcun.
Shelagh Wheeler. Dorothy Parfitt
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-SEVEN ABERNETHY, MARGARET J.
ADES, AUDREY I.
ATKINS, ROMA J.
AUGUSTINE, BETTY V.
BOYES, MARGARET M.
BUTLER, EMMA I.
DOBSON, M. PAULINE
DRIVER,  JOYCE I.
DUNCAN, MARGARET W.
GORDON, BERNICE McK.
HAZLEWOOD, MARY G.
HOBDEN, FRANCES E.
Masonlte tiles
HUMPHREYS, MARJORIE E.
LANE,  RUTH A.
MARTIN, SALLY V   W.
MORISON, JOAN D.
MORRIS, DOROTHY R. A.
RENDELL, NORAH J.
TAYLOR, JEAN E.
TAYLOR, JOYCE M.
WILKINSON, MARY H.
Winter strikes fountain
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-E I G H T ALLPORT, MARGARET H.
ALLSEBROOK, NAOMI J.
BYERS, DOROTHY J.
CAPLETTE, M. ELIZABETH
CHALMERS, BEVERLEY R.
HODGES, JUNE L. M.
KERR, JOAN I.
MacCARTHY,  JESSIE G.
McDIARMID,  MARY E.
NEIGHBOR, FRANCES M,
PARFITT, DOROTHY R.
PENN, MURIEL B.
PONSFORD, ADA M.
.   POPE, M. DOREEN
REID, DOROTHY M.
RIDDELL, HILDA
ROBINSON, KATHLEEN E.
ARMSTRONG, JEAN A.
BARISH, DORIS F.
BOE, MRS. VERA I. L.
CARRUTHERS, LORRAINE J,
CLARK, CONSTANCE S.
DANGERFIELD,  PHYLLIS
DOUGLAS, MRS. RUTH
FORRY, MARGARET M.
GALLOWAY,  DOROTHY  M.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-NINE GERRARD, DOROTHY E.
GREENFIELD, MARY I.
IRWIN, MILDRED E.
JONES, KATHERINE E.
KYDD,   MARGARET  M.
LATTIMER, MARGARET L.
LEE, NANCY V.
LLOYD-YOUNG, MRS. F.
LUND, CHRISTINE L.
MILLER, BERNICE C.
NEDELEC, YVONNE L.
NEUMAN, DOROTHY L.
OXLEY,  GWENDOLINE
PROVINS, HAZEL
SCOTT, THELMA J.
STEVEN, MARGARET H.
URVOLD, ELLEN B.
WHEELER, JEAN E.
WHITLAM, THELMA I.
WHITE, M. LILLIAN
BROWN, MARJORIE T.
HODSDON, JEAN E.
LAING, GRACE M.
MAY, G. JANET
MITCHELL, DOROTHY J.
RINES, ALICE R.
ROUTLEDGE, WILLA J.
ZANIN, EVELYNE A.
Big Block luncheon guests
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY Law
Composed largely of ex-servicemen, U.B.C.'s
newest faculty has done much to justify Dean
George Curtis' proud description of his charges,
"They're eager."
Sparked by the enthusiasm and friendliness
of Dean Curtis, the 73 first year students spend
long hours perusing the myriad volumes in their
own Law Library which is housed in one of the
bright,  newly painted huts beside the Library.
Although the Faculty of Law of necessity consists mainly of Freshmen, there are a few students
in second and third year who have taken their
lower years at other universities.
The degree of LL.B. is awarded at the completion of a three-year course. To enter First Year
Law a prospective student must have completed
Second Year Arts.
Although the full time teaching staff of the
faculty numbers only two. Dean Curtis and- Professor F. Read, several prominent local barristers
come to the University to give instruction in their
specialties.
Crown Prosecutor S. J. Remnant lectures on
criminal law, C. Schultz discusses homicide cases,
and C. W. Brazier gives two lectures each week
at the Court House on procedure.
In addition to lectures in their huts and the
Court House the budding attorneys take lectures
in the Brock stage room.
Indicative of the great interest taken by the
students in their work is the appointment of three
student librarians. W. R. Stubbs, J. C. Blewett,
and A. E. Kobus hold the positions.
Because of the small size of this new but
highly important faculty close personal contact
between the students and staff is evident. Dean
Curtis and his professors spare no efforts to aid
the studies of their charges.
Unique also is the method of study used by
the embryo barristers. Instead of devoting their
time entirely to lectures the seminar method is
widely employed.
As the law magazine "The Advocate" says:
"Here, indeed, is a fresh and eager beginning."
Executive of the Law Undergraduate Society
this year consisted of: Tom Fisher, President1 Tom
Marshall, Vice-President; Ormie Hall, Treasurer;
Tony Kobus, Secretary.
Above:   Tommy Fisher
Below:    Tony Kobus. Ormie HalL
Dean G. F. Curtis, Tom Marshall
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-ONE ALEXANDER, ERNEST A.
BEAVAN, RODNEY
BIRNEY, WILLIAM J.
BONNER, ROBERT W.
CAMPBELL,  WILLIAM E.
CANTELL, E. THOMAS L.
CARMICHAEL, H. ANGUS
CARROTHERS, ALFRED W. R.
CROSS, GERALD H.
CUNNINGHAM, JACK R.
ELLIS, HUGH MacK.
FISHER, THOMAS K.
FRANKLIN, HENRY J.
GARDOM, GARDY B.
GOLDBERG, ARTHUR H.
GOURLAY, JOHN L.
HALL, ORMONDE J.
HANBURY, ARTHUR W.
HANNESON, RICHARD S. M.
HUNTER, DOUGLAS L.
LANE, WILLIAM G.
LANE, WILLIAM T.
LAWRIE, FRANK D.
LIGHTSTONE, JACK
LONG, CHARLES F.
MARGACH, JOHN A.
MARSHALL, THOMAS C.
MILLAR, PERRY S.
McDONALD, LESLIE M.
McINTOSH,  G.  BUCHAN
McKENZIE, LLOYD G.
PLOMMER, ROBERT D.
RITCHIE, HUGH J.
TUPPER, DAVID W. H.
WALSH, JOHN W.
WARK, BRUCE E.
WARNER, WILLIAM L.
WHITE, E. JEAN
WHITELAW, GLENN R.
250,000 Books
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-TWO Social Work
For the first time at U.B.C, a Bachelor of Social
Work degree will be awarded in 1946. Fifty-
eight students will receive the new degrees at
Convocation in May.
The Department of Social Work, headed by
Miss Marjorie Smith, has worked tirelessly to
obtain the courses for this new degree and has
also instituted for the first time, courses in group
work. Other courses which social work students
undertake include case work, social psychiatry,
medical information, social research, public welfare, child welfare and community organization.
As well as courses taken at the University, each
student must fill in fifteen hours a week in field
placements, under a qualified supervisor.
Various field trips undertaken by the students
include work at the Provincial Mental Hospital at
Essondale, Division of T. B. Control, Division of
V.D., B.C. Cancer Institute, Canadian National
Institute of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb School and
the Crippled Children's Hospital.
In collaboration with the other faculties at
U. B. C, Social Work class exhibited a display
at Open House in March. The student bodies in
the various Social Work courses across Canada
are undertaking the publication of an exchange
pamphlet quarterly. Vivian Vincent and Con
Ashby served as associate editors from the
U.B.C. Social Work class. The pamphlet will be
published in the very near future.
The students of the Social Work class held
their annual Class Party in the Brock Snack Bar
on March 18. Sheila Carlisle made the arrangements for the entertainment, part of which was
produced by the men in the form of a skit. The
theme of the party was "One Night in a Harem."
Another Class Party will be held after exams.
In the Fall term, the class held a banquet and
social, and later in the year, two mountain hikes.
The executive, elected in the Fall term, consisted of Eric Winch, President; Julie Van Gorder,
Vice-President; Stan Whitehead, Secretary-Treasurer, and Mary Chatwin, Dora Porter, Members
at Large.
Above:   Eric Winch
Lower:    Mary Chatwin, Stan Whitehead
Dora Porter. Eric Winch. Julie Van Gorder
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-THREE Teacher Training
In the Teacher Training Course, as in most of
the courses on the U.B.C. campus, the influx of
veterans has resulted in a greater enrolment of
men than women. The total enrolment of 46
breaks a precedent of many years with this increased predominance of males.
Courses stepped up to handle the new enrolment included lectures on educational theory
and methods, supplemented by practice teaching
in junior and senior high schools throughout
the city. In this way classroom techniques,
studies in lectures, are put into practical use.
The Educational Course activities are many
and varied. The social colender arranged by
Amy Hackney and Tom Crone resulted in a number of social gatherings throughout the term, climaxed by the traditional Class Party and Banquet at the end of the year.
The educational activities provided valuable
experience in almost every field. American
methods of teaching and educational facilities
were observed on a field trip to Bellington, Washington, where the class visited many of the city's
high schools.
Tips on Child Guidance work were picked up
on a visit to the Child Guidance Clinic here in
Vancouver.
The application of educational theory to mental cases was observed, first hand, in an afternoon spent at the Essondale Clinic of Mental
Health.
The Deaf and Blind School provided valuable
lessons in this specialized branch of teaching.
The class rounded off their field trips by a trip
to the Boys' Industrial School for the purpose of
observing educational procedures in that institution.
The year's executive for the Educational
Course included: President, Elmer Sinclair; Vice'President, Lulla Ireland; Secretary-Treasurer,
Terry Julian; Social Conveners, Amy Hackney,
Tommy Crone; Athletic Representatives, Louise
Reid, Walt Green.
Above:   Elmer Sinclair
Lower:    Walt Green, Elmer Sinclair, Lulla Ireland, Terry
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-FOUR ANDERSON, ELIZABETH M.
CARLISLE, SHEILA J.
CHATWIN, MARY K.
CHRISTIE, MRS. ELIZ. M.
CLARK, RICHARD J.
CLENDENNING, BEATRICE E.
CROFT, MRS. MONTIE J.
DALRYMPLE, SUZANNE I.
DE ROOSE, CLARA H.
ELLIS, MRS. VIVIAN M.
HAUGAN, WILBERT M.
HORRIGAN, MILDRED C.
JESSOP, HARVEY C.
JOHNSON, HELEN L.
KINNAIRD, ELLEN A. S.
MEIER, HILDEGARD A.
MUNROE, F. MARGUERITE
McPHERSON, HUGH J.
PEARCE, IRENE S.
SKITCH, FLORENCE C.
STAMATIS, D. PATRICIA
THOMASSON, AUGUSTA M.
TRENHOLME, DOROTHY E.
VAN GORDER, C. JULIA
VINCENT, VIVIAN A.
WEEKS, DONALD J.
WHITEHEAD, STANLEY W.
WINCH, ERIC W.
ARMSTRONG, KENNETH S.
BAUMBROUGH, EDNA D.
BARRETT, L. T.
CRONE, THOMAS H.
EVANS, HARRY MacD.
JULIAN, TERENCE S.
NALOS, ERIKA M.
REID, C. LOIS
SINCLAIR, R. ELMER
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-FIVE ____H              __f____r^    _______
______!        ________■     .--H
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BAKONY, E. G. T.
Commerce  Post Graduate
CHRISTIE, H. G.
Assistant in Economics
COLE, K. M.
Assistant in Biology and Botany
FISHER, H. DEAN
Assistant in Zoology
IVEY, D. G.
Assistant in Physics and Mathematics
KETCHEN, K. S.
Arts Pdst Graduate (Zoology and Biology)
MAYO, ELEANOR G.
OSTLE,  BERNARD
Assistant in Mathematics
Campus scene at wintertime
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-SIX ANGLICAN
COLLEGE
Affiliated with the University are two
theological colleges. These colleges
co-operate closely in courses offered,
thus making available a wider variety
of subjects to the students of both.
Also, the facilities of their libraries are
at the disposal of the students of either
institution.
The Anglican College offers courses
leading to the Diploma of Licentiate in
Theology and the degrees of B.D. and
D.D. The faculty consists of Rev. H.
R. Trumpour, Principal; Rev. D. P. Wat-
nig, Librarian and Registrar; Rev. C. B.
Reynolds, Rev. T. S. Boyle, Rev. J. B.
Thomas and Rev. G. P. Gower.
The residents of the College entered
teams in intra-mural sports, and ping,
pong games are played in the College
recreational rooms.
Each fortnight outside speakers come
to address the students on some timely
topic. An oratorical contest is held
among the theologs and the McGeer
Cup is awarded to the winner.
Students  delve   into   theological  studies
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED     AND     EIGHTY-SEVEN UNION
COLLEGE
Situated on the heights of the promontory that is West Point Grey, the
chaste and dignified Tudor Gothic
tower of Union College is a well-known
sight to fishermen and sailors who frequent the coast of British Columbia.
Gazing serenely up at the majestic
Hollyburn and Grouse mountains, the
College towers above the trees and
smaller buildings around it as if scorning their part in campus activities.
Within the building itself there is included a large library, a recreation
room, a chapel, offices, and a complete
kitchen with all culinary facilities as
well as the many individual rooms for
the residing students.
To help out the critical housing situation, all the spare rooms not used by
the Theologs are let out to other students. Board is provided for these residents as well as for the regulars.
Union College offers courses leading
to the degrees of B.D. and D.D., as well
as diploma and degrees in Religious
Education. Dr. Gordon Dickie, Dr. G.
B. Switzer, Dr. A. M. Sanford, Professor
Mathews, along with the principal, Dr.
J. G. Brown, constitute the staff.
Theologs study and play amidst austere
surroundings.
What do you want boyi
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND     EIGHTY-EIGHT 1.   Ed. McNalley relaxes, while other Zoo. 2 students work.   2.  Ace Joker Hayward makes an announcement.   3.  Athy, Ynette!
4.  Serious students.   5. Aggies display apples on Open Day.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-NINE ATHLETICS "V- Athletic Administration
Athletics at U.B.C. made great strides
towards a full peacetime program during
the 1945-46 session, and much credit is due
to the leaders of campus athletics as U.B.C s
athletes produced another successful year
to go down in the annals of U.B.C's sport
history.
Bob Osborne and Mrs. Jean Sleightholme
organized the men and women athletes and
paved the way for a much-needed Department of Physical Education.
A U.B.C. graduate, Bob took over the
athletic reins from Maury Van Vliet last
Fall. Himself a member of the Thunderbird
basketball team which won the Dominion
Championship in 1931, he again proved his
ability in the casaba game as he coached
this year's flock of cagers to the Northwest
Conference title in this, their first season.
Controlling bodies of U.B.C's sports are
the Men's and Women's Athletic Directorates. Chairman of M.A.D. this year was Ole
Bakken, Thunderbird basketball star who
became President of the Men's Athletic Association. Mary Ann Norton was chairman
of W.A.D.
Top:   Robert F. Osborne.    Lower:   Men's Athletic Directorate
PAGE    ONE    HUNDREP    AND    NINETY-TWO Athletic Administration
Members of the Men's Athletic Di ectorate were
Ron Weber, Treasurer; Jack McKercher, Secretary;
Dr. Dickson and Dr. Gunning, Faculty Representatives; Bob Osborne, Director of Physical Education;
Ralph Thomas, Alumni Representative; Maury
Physick, Senior Manager of English Rugby; Cliff
Wyatt, Senior Manager of Canadian Football
Dave CompareUi, Senior Manager of Soccer
Gardy Gardom, Senior Manager of Basketball
Norm Denkman, Representative of Minor Sports,
and Luke Moyls, Sports Editcr of the Ubyssey.
The Women's Athletic Directorate included
Audrey McKim, Director of Women's Intramurals;
Dr. Joyce Hallamore, Faculty Representative; Mrs.
Jean Sleightholme, Director of Women's Physical
Education; Audrey Thomson, Secretary; and
Taddy Knapp, Representative of Minor Clubs.
While the W.A.D. continued under direct control of the Students' Council, the M.A.D. went
through its first year as a reconstitutad autonomous
body.
With control of its own finances, the M.A.D.
put U.B.C's athletics on a paying basis for the
first time in the University's history.
Idra. Jean  Cleightholme  and  assistant.  Isabel Clay,  above.   Below,  the  Women's  Athletic   Directorate.
.   PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND     NINETY-THREE Men's Big Block Club
Above, the Men's Big Block Club, and left, Ole Bakken,
president oi the Men's Athletic Association, and Ken McPherson, president oi the Men's Big Block Club.
U.B.C's Men's Big Block Club again offered its
services to campus sports this year.    The main
_^    function of this club is to provide willing helpers
for organizing and promoting athletic activities at
the University.
Big Block sweaters also indicate ushers at
most sports events, either in the stadium or in the
gym. However, the Big Block men were under
a handicap again this year with the lack of their
bright Blue and Gold sweaters.
The club held its eighth annual Homecoming
Luncheon in the Brock Hall to welcome graduate
Big Block members to homecoming. The club
includes all students who have received the major
athletic award, the large block "BC", in any
sport, either as a player or as a senior manager.
President of the organization this year was
U.B.C's speedy track star, Ken McPherson. Secretary was Keith MacDonald.
Among this year's active members were Hunk
Henderson, Fred Joplin, Dave Hayward, Phil
Guman, Luke Moyls, Ole Bakken, Jack McKercher, Hank Sweetman, Reg Clarkson, Sandy Robertson, Don Petrie, Jack Rush, Pat Campbell, Frank
Adams, Bob Lawson, Johnny Wheeler, Joe Pegues,
Harry Kermode, Ron Weber, Bill King, Harry
Franklin and Gerry Lockhart.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-FOUR Women's Big Block Club
On a parallel with the men's setup, the women
athletes at U.B.C. also boast a Big Block club
which serves women's athletics.
The girls also held a special luncheon on
Homecoming Day, taking advantage of this opportunity to introduce their new athletic director,
Mrs. Jean Sleightholme, who was guest speaker.
President of this year's Big Block Club was
Jenny Rodenchuck, and Audrey Thomson was
Secretary.. Other Big Block members were Mary
Ann Norton, Audrey McKim, Joan Stevens, Doreen
Parks, Helen Matheson, Lois Reid, Jean Handling,
and Irene Pierce.
The Women's Awards Committee looks after
the awarding of big blocks, small blocks and intramural blocks for athletic participation. Jenny
Rodenchuck, President of the Big Block Club, was
chairman of this group.
Other members were Mrs. Jean Sleightholme,
Director of Women's Physical Education; Dr. Joyce
Hallamore and Dean Dorothy Mawdsley, Faculty
Representatives; Mary Ann Norton, President of
the W.A.A.; Taddy Knapp, Club's Director; and
Audrey McKim, Manager of Intramurals.
Below, the Women's Big Block Club, and above right, the Women's Awards Committee
.    PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-FIVE Thunderbird Basketballers
THUNDERBIRD CAGERS—Coach Bob Osborne, Captain
Sandy Robertson, Hal McKeniie, Ole Bakken, Harry Kermode, Hunk Henderson. Ritchie Nicol. Senior Manager
Gardy Gardom. Front Row—Reg Clarkson, Harry Franklin.
Pat McGeer, Ron Weber, Manager Dick Penn.
Left—Managers Penn and Gardom watch the 'Birds in
a workout.
U.B.C's Thunderbird basketball team cleaned
up all competition in its first year of inter-collegiate
competition this year, waltzing to the championship of the Pacific Northwest Basketball Conference.
Playing a total of 34 games during their heavy
schedule, the Thunderbirds lost only six during
the entire season, totalling 2006 points for an
average of 65 points per game, while only 1475
points were scored against them.
Coached by Bob Osborne and captained by
high-scoring Sandy Robertson, the team started
off against the tough competition, playing the
University of Oregon, the University of Washington, Washington State College and Victoria Dominoes in the pre-season slate.
The U.B.C. quintet split with all four of these
teams, playing two-game series with each except
Oregon to whom they lost two games at home,
but evened the series by beating them twice at
MacArthur Court in Eugene.
The latter pair of tilts were just two of the
seven contests that the 'Birds played on their
successful tour of the Pacific Northwest during the
Christmas holidays.
Defeating Sandpoint Naval Base at Seattle,
Whidbey Island Flyers at Whidbey Island, Bremerton Rockets at Bremerton, and the Webfcots at
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND     NINETY-SIX Thunderbirds
Eugene, the British Columbia cagers ran into difficulties at Salem, Oregon, losing their opening
conference contest by a 43-41 margin. However,
they made up for this loss the next night by
trouncing the Willamette University team, 52-27.
One of their greatest victories of the season
was over the famous Harlem Grobe Trotters, shortly after returning to University in January. Playing
before a crowd of more than 2000 students, the
Blue and Gold outlit scored a 42-38 triumph.
Coach Osborne's charges went undefeated
throughout the rest of the season, having little
trouble with the rest of the Northwest Conference
competition, although the title wasn't decided
until their final game against Puget Sound.
Another outstanding triumph was scored when
the Thunderbirds notched a record total over the
College of Idaho Coyotes, winning by scores of
124-33 and 110-38.
The U.B.C. hcopers finished off the season with
three exhibition tilts for the benefit of the War
Memorial Gymnasium drive, playing two games
in Powell River and one in Chilliwack.
Altogether, they helped bring in more than
$2000 for the fund, establishing themselves as the
top team on the campus in furthering the drive.
Members of the Thunderbird flock this year
were Ole Bakken, Ron Weber, Sandy Robertson,
Harry Kermode, Ritchie Nicol, Hunk Henderson,
Pat McGeer, Harry Franklin, Reg Clarkson, and
Hal McKenzie.
1—Ole  Bakken.   2—Pat  McGeer.   3—Ron  Weber.   4-
Harry  Kermode.    5—Harry   Franklin.    6—Ritchie  NlcoL
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-SEVEN Thunderbirds
Gardy Gardom was Senior Manager of Basketball, ably assisted by Dick Penn, Manager of the
Thunderbird team. Art McPhelan was the team's
Trainer.
Altogether, it was one of the most successful
basketball seasons in U.B.C's history in spite of
the fact that the Thunderbird team has broken
away from the B.C. Basketball Association and
thus established itself strictly as an inter-Collegiate team.
For proof, here are the final standings and the
complete scores for the season.
NORTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDINGS
W
BRITISH COLUMBIA  9
Linfield College   8
College of Puget Sound.... 9
Willamette University   7
Pacific University ,  3
Whitman College   2   8
College of Idaho ..  0 12
Pet
.900
.800
.750
.583
.300
.200
.000
PF
734
552
721
556
473
366
363
PA
423
422
598
515
539
606
753
COMPLETE SEASON SCORES
Played—34.    Won—28.    Lost—6.    Percent—.824
U.B.C. Op'nt
Nov. 10—Western Wash.  College    46 33
Nov. 16—University of Oregon     50 58
Nov. 17—University of Oregon     35 49
Nov. 24—Victoria Dominoes      52 69
1—Coach Osborne and Sports Editor Luke Moyls comment on the lop-sided score.   2—Hunk
Henderson.    3—Sandy  Robertson.   4—Hal  McKenzie.    5—Reg  Clarkson.
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-EIGHT U.B.C.   Op'nf
Dec. 1—Victoria Dominoes   73 56
Dec. 7—University of Washington  66 69
Dec. 8—University of Washington  58 51
Dec. 20—Washington State College.... 65 51
Dec. 22—Washington State College.... 44 52
Dec. 27—Sandpoint N.A.S. __^ __ 70 40
Dec. 28—Whidbey Island N.A.S _.. 65 49
Dec. 29—Bremerton Rockets   46 40
Jan. 2—University of Oregon   72 61
Jan. 3—University of Oregon   62 60
Jan. 4—Willamette University   41 43
Jan. 5—Willamette University   52 27
Jan. 11—|krrlem Globe Trotters  42 38
Jan. 12—Sandpoint N.A.S  68 46
Jan. 19—Whidbey Island N.A.S  82 63
Jan. 25—Whitman College   _. 74 38
Jan. 26—Whitman College   65 53
Feb.  1—Portland University   70 46
Feb. 2—Portland University     52 38
Feb. 7—College of Puget Sound      65 47
Feb. 8—Portland University _._ _.. 82 38
Feb. 9—Portland University   72 45
Feb. 15—Pacific University   70 43
Feb. 16—Pacific University   77 51
Feb. 22—College of Idaho  124 33
Feb. 23—College of Idaho   110 33
Mar. 2—College of Puget Sound  56 50
1—The crowd leaves after the final slaughter oi Idaho,
Ritchie Nicol's ankles. 3—Coed Shirley Olsen presents Bob
the Oregon Webioots, with a real, live webfool.
2—Trainer Art McPhelan tapes
"Hammy"  Hamilton,  captain oi
PAGE    ONE    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-NINE I—Reieree Brian Lewis tosses the ball ior a Jump as the 'Birds play Washington's Huskies.
2—Big Olo Bakkon puts a left-handed shot through the hoop as UBC beats Whitman's Missionaries. 3—Gordy Sykes Jumps against Gene Sivertson in the Western Washington exhibition.
4—Action around the Washington State Cougars' basket. 5—All eyes are on Reieree Lewis
at a Webioot contest   6—The boys get rough with the Washington Staters.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED 1—Ole Bakken jumps against All-American Vlnce Hanson. 2—The opening lump oi the
sensational Globe Trotter battle. 3—Waiting ior the rebound under Whitman's hoop. 4—Ritch
Nicol helps build up the score against Pacific University. 5—Players close in on the Jumpers
in the final Webioot contest. 6—Not a Coyote in sight as Sandy finishes oii Ids night's total
at 40 points against Idaho. 7—LeDon Henson and Gordy Sykes take the Jump as Washington
and UBC square oii.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    ONE Chief Basketballers
CHEEF HOOPERS—Coach Art Johnson, Manager Doug
Fraser, Dave Campbell, Frank Mylrea. Bob Haas, Captain
Jerry Stevenson, Red Ryan, Len Letham, Herb Capozzi,
Nick  Anderson,  Pete  McGeer.
Lett—Sharpshooters Dave Campbell and Jerry Stevenson.
U.B.C's second basketball team, the U.B.C.
Chiefs, went through a tough season in the Senior
A Intercity League this year. After pacing the
other three teams, Lauries Pie-Rates, Stacys, and
New Westminster's Adanacs, all through the
season, the Laurie squad nosed out the Varsity
Tribe in the stretch drive.
Ending up in second place, the Chiefs played
Stacys in the best-of-three semi-finals. They won
by a 54-43 count in the opener, but the Shoemen
squared the series with at 47-44 win in the second
game. However, the Chiefs came through in the
final contest with 39-35 victory.
Meeting Lauries Pie-Rates in the finals, U.B.C.
dropped the opener 36-33 before coming back
with two wins, 56-41 and 41-33. Lauries forced
the series with a 36-28 decision and won the title
by a 36-32 count in the deciding contest.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    TWO   . Chiefs
Coached by Art Johnson for the second straight
season, both the mentor and the team had another
year of tough luck. Red-headed Jerry "Jake"
Stevenson was captain of the young, hard-working outfit.
Other members of the squad were Dave Campbell, Bob Haas, Herb Capozzi, Len Latham, Red
Ryan, Pete McGeer and Frank Mylrea. Managers
for the club were Doug Fraser and Nick Anderson.
Two other contests were featured in their
schedule, the Tribe travelling to Bellingham to
play the return game against Western Washington's Vikings for their big brothers, the Thunderbirds. The second feature was a home tilt against
Seattle College. The Chiefs won the first contest
by a 50-43 count and the second game, 62-30.
Leading the team in scoring was hefty pivot-
man, Herb Capozzi, followed by forwards Dave
Campbell, Bob Haas and Pete McGeer.
Here are the final standings:
INTERCITY LEAGUE STANDINGS
Lauries Pie-Rates
U.B.C. Chiefs 	
Stacys 	
Adanacs 	
p
W
L
Pts
12
10
2
20
12
9
3
18
12
4
8
8
12
1
11
2
I—Bob Haas, Red Ryan, Pete McGeer. 2—Len Letham.
Dave Campbell. Jerry Stevenson. 3—Chiei mentors Doug
Fraser, Art Johnson and Nick Anderson. 4—The Tribe
gathers around the hoop ior a paw-wow.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THREE Top left—Stacy stalwart Irwin Stout pulls down a rebound in spite oi the eiiorts oi Chieftain
Kenny Thomas. Top right—Stout again, and McGeer go after a rebound. Lower left—Lance
Hudson oi Lauries nabs a rebound, but Capozzi (12) and Campbell (13) are waiting ior him.
Lower right—Pie-Rate Doug Baius receives the melon while Jimmy Bardsley, former Varsity star,
blocks out UBC's Bob Haas.
PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND FOUR 1—Len Letham gets set ior a shot. 2—Freddy Bossons lets one go. 3—Jerry Stevenson
hops up to the basket. 4—Peter McGeer comes oii the floor smiling. 5—Too many Pie-Rates!
6—Capozzi demonstrates the strong-arm.   7—Ken Thomas concentrates on a long shot.
,   .   PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIVE Inter B Basketball
ABOVE—Long John Forsythe and Gordy Selman, leading
scorers ior Pat McGeer's squad. Right—Look at the laces!
Jump ball in a contest with Duke oi Connaught's high
school team.
Below, left—Action in their game against the Lancers.
UBC's youngest basketball team showed the
others how to keep atop a league during the
season, winning their first 12 games before losing
three at the end.
However, the Blue and Gold squad ran into
trouble in the playoffs as they absorbed defeat
in'the finals at the hands of Tookes.
After finishing atop their loop, the Inter B's
went through their semi-final series, beating the
Vancouver College squad 58-48 in the first game,
losing by a 25-21 count in the second, and winding up with a 56-52 triumph.
Tookes took the edge in the finals with a 40-37
win in the opener, but Varsity squared the series
by taking the Shirtmen 35-33 in the second contest. Finally, the title went to Tookes with a
27-#6 score in the last tilt.
Long John Forsythe and Gordy Selman were
the stars of the squad, Forsythe averaging better
than 10 points per game.
Pat McGeer, Thunderbird eager, coached the
outfit throughout the season. Players included
Forsythe, Selman, Paul Plant, Bob Boyes, Les
Matthews, Dave Barker, Ron Bray, Gordy Young,
and Jim Costigan.
LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Top four teams)
Varsity         12 3 24
Tookes           11 4 22
Duke of Connaught        10 5 20
Vancouver College   9 6 18
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SIX   . Senior B Basketball
Although overshadowed by the impressive
records of the other five hoop squads on the
campus, the Senior B basketball team went
through a torrid season on the maple courts, only
to lose out in the last few weeks of play.
With Coach Vic Pinchon moulding a green
bunch of melon-tossers into a smooth-working
quintet, the club got off to a successful start in
the Fall, winning four of their first six games.
After Christmas, however, the others teams,
Dowlings, B.C. Packers, and New Westminster,
strengthened their rosters and outclassed the
UBC Senior B's.
Although the Varsity Senior B's continued to
play good basketball, they consistently lost their
gamss by narrow margins, until the growing list
of defeats finally got the better of the team,
dumping them into the league cellar.
Leading the lineup were Ken Butchart, Bill
Henderson, By Straight, Dave Hoskins, Don
Holmes and John MacDowell. Other Senior B
cagers were Bill Nelson, Bud Huyck, Ingie Edwards, Ches Pederson, and Vic Vaughn.
LEAGUE STANDINGS
P
B.C. Packers          13
Dowlings            12
New Westminster        12
Varsity         13
w
L
Pts
9
4
18
8
4
16
4
8
8
4
9
8
SENIOR B'S—Ingie Edwards. Bud Huyck. Ches Pedersen.
Bill   Nelson   and   Dave   King.    Right—Smartly   checked.
Below—Action in the Frosh-Soph battle.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SEVEN Inter A Basketball
INTER A'S—Lome Swanson, Dave Hinds, Gordy Lade,
CliH Henderson. Coach Pete McGeer. Reid Mitchell, BUI
McLeod, John Anderson, Ian Blake and Manager Jack
Hough. Left—Held Mitchell leaps to stop a shot by Mc-
Kenzie-Fraser star. Dick Kennedy.
Varsity's two Intermediate A entries in the
Vancouver and District minor basketball leagues
came through with flying colors in spita of the
fact that neither won any championship.
Ending in a tie for the third spot in the league
standings, both clubs lost out to superior outfits
in the playoffs after a very successful season.
The Frosh team, coached by Doug Whittle,
was slow starting, holding down sixth place at
Christmas. They acquired Nev Munro when the
spring term started, and the addition of this hoop
star made the difference.
Playing the championship Farina squad in the
semi-finals, they lost out by a narrow margin.
The Freshmen took the opener, 39-35, but dropped
the next two by scores of 39-37 and 40-38.
Cam McLeod took high scoring honors for the
team. Dal Towne was captain and Al Taylor
managed the club. Other members were Clair
MacDonald, Dick Ostrosser, Roy McBride, Bob
McKenzie, Eric McConachie, Don McKay, and
Dave Saunders.
Meanwhile, the Inter A Sophs from Varsity,
winning the playoff for third spot, went into the
semi-finals against Arrows.
However, the second year hoopers didn't fare
so well as their brother squad, for they lost the
playoff in two straight games as the Transfermen
took them by scores of 34-32 and 40-28.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHT Inter A Basketball
Coached by Pete McGeer, the Soph squad
played consistently good ball throughout the
season. Among the standouts on the team were
Bill McLeod, John Anderson, and Reid Mitchell.
McLeod, the captain of the club, was presented
with the Most Valuable Player Award by Wilf
Moffat, commissioner of the Vancouver and District Minor Basketball Leagues.
The team roster also included Ian Blake, Gordy
Lade, Cliff Henderson, Lome Swanson and Dave
Hinds. John Hough looked after the managerial
duties for the Sophs.
Here are the final standings for the top four
teams in the Intermediate A League:
LEAGUE STANDINGS
W L      Pts
Farinas         11 4       22
Arrows          10 5       20
UBC Sophs         9        6       18
UBC Frosh  9 6       18
(UBC Sophs won sudden death game for third
place, 42-37).
1—Ian Blake. 2—Gordy Lade. 3—Lome Swanson. 4—
Pete McGeer and Jack Hough, team mentors. 5—Reid Mitchell and Ian Blake work out.
.   .   PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINE Canadian Football
1. Herb   Capozzi dives on the pigskin;    2. Power in the
line—C11H Wyatt. Al Lamb, Dave Duncan, Herb Capozzi,
Bill Macintosh, Nate Kalensky, and Bert Horwood;   3. Harry
Mark goes up to rifle a pass.
UBC re-entered competition for the Hardy Cup
as the university grid experts got together, producing one of the finest teams ever to represent
the Blue and Gold in very short order, and recapturing the prized trophy.
With Greg "Hardrock" Kabat taking over as
coach, the Canadian football squad went through
only two weeks' training before embarking on
their invasion of the Universities of Alberta and
Saskatchewan.
However, the lack of training and experience
showed up on the trip east as the Thunderbird
gridders lost both games on the Prairies.
Meeting the University of Alberta's Golden
Bears on October 24 at Clarke Stadium in Edmonton, UBC absorbed a 12-0 defeat. A kick to the
deadline in the first quarter, an unconverted
touchdown in the second quarter, and a converted
touchdow in the final period, accounted for Alberta's 12 points.
Scoring a touchdown in the first quarter of
their game against the University of Saskatchewan, the Thunderbirds completely outplayed their
opponents throughout the rest of the contest, but
long kicking by Bob Shore resulted in a pair of
rouges for the Huskies.
Then, with but four minutes remaining, Saskatchewan scored on a fluke touchdown as their
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    TEN Canadian Football
end, Steve Molnar, picked up a loose ball and
scampered across the UBC line to finish the score
at 7-5.
But the Thunderbirds fared much better in
their home series after two more weeks of practice.
Finishing off the Hardy Cup series by meeting
the Prairie winner, Alberta, twice in Vancouver,
UBC showed a complete reversal of form.
Winning by a 19-3 score in the first game at
Capilano Stadium on November 7, and 17-1 in
the final tilt at Varsity Stadium on November 10,
the 'Birds didn't allow the Golden Bears to score
a single touchdown.
First string for UBC included Bert Horwood and
Cliff Wyatt, ends; Alex Lamb and Herb Capozzi,
tackles; Nate Kalenski and Dave Duncan, guards;
Bill Macintosh, centre; John Tennant, blocking
back; Rex Wilson, halfback; Reg Clarkson, tailback; Phil Guman, fullback; and Dmitri Goloubef,
flanker.
Other Thunderbird gridders were Fred Joplin,
Harry Mark, Bill Sainas, Don McKerricker, Les
Strang, Paul Kitos, Pat Frith, Larry Pearson,
Johny Gray, Tony McLorg, Gus Carmichael,
Archie Byers, and Ole Bakken.
University of B.C     4
University of Alberta  _,~
University of Saskatchewan..
Alberta bt. Saskatchewan 27-5
U.B.C. bt. Alberta 36-16.
p
W
L PF
PA
4
2
2
41
23
5
3
2
43
41
3
1
2
12
32
27-5
(Total Points)
(Total Points)
1.  Thunderbirds smother  Golden Bears;    2.  Harry   Mark
lakes a flying tackle at Alberta's star ball-carrier. Mickey
HaJash;    3. Dmitri Goloubef, ace pass-catcher;    4. Brain-
trust Rex Wilson, smart backiield star ior U.B.C.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    ELEVEN 1. Learning the plays in that short training period: 2. There's power in that line . . . look out
Golden Bears!; 3. Mickey Hajash cuts around right end ior a short gain against the 'Birds in
the final contest;    4. Dmitri Goulobei wards oii   awould-be tackier as he  carries the ball deep
into Alberta's territory.
PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND TWELVE . ]. Reieree Ken Roberts raises his  arm as Thunderbird Phil Guman packs the pigskin over the
line ior another U.B.C. touchdown;    2. Rex Wilson hurls a forward;    3. Goulobei pulls one down
and starts running;    4. Wilson carries the ball around right end for another first down.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTEEN English Rugby
1. Action in the final game;    2. McKechnie Cup returns to
U.B.C;     3.  'Birds  and  Lions   line   out  ior  the   throw-in;
4. Lloyd Williams takes a penalty kick in the Homecoming
feature.
Varsity's English rugby teams went through
their second straight successful season as they
recaptured three of the four major championships
of the Province.
Of the four trophies that the rugger squads
won last year, only the Rounsefel Cup will be
missing.
Because of the increased enrolment due to
returning servicemen, U.B.C. entered three teams
in the Vancouver Rugby Football League instead
of the usual two. The six-team circuit included
Varsity, Varsity Vets, U.B.C, Meralomas, Vancouver Rowing Club, and Ex-Britannia.
In the Miller Cup race, Varsity lost only one
game, that to the Vets in the annual Homecoming
Game, to cop the silverware for the third straight
year.
It was a three-way battle between Varsity, the
Vets, and Meralomas right from the season's
opener, and the championship wasn't decided
until the final game of the schedule.
Following close behind the Varsity fifteen were
the Vets who suffered but two defeats. U.B.C.
wound up in fourth spot.
The Vets, composed entirely of ex-servicemen,
added plenty of colour to the league, and certainly gave the other teams fine competition.
Although the Varsity Thunderbirds retained
the highly-coveted McKechnie Cup, the best they
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FOURTEEN English Rugby
could do was finish the series in a three-way tie
for top spot with Vancouver Lions and Victoria
Crimson Tide. As the trophy is a challenge cup,
it is retained by the previous year's winner in the
event of a tie.
Varsity got off to a fine start when they turned
back the Crimson Tide by an 8-3 score in the first
game of the series. Lloyd Willians opened the
scoring for Varsity with a long pendlty kick but
the Victorians evened the count mid-way through
the first half.
Captain Bud Spiers became a hero with only
five minutes remaining in the game when he
scored the winning try through a maze of players
from the four-yard line. Williams converted to
complete the scoring.
Going into their first struggle with the Lions as
prime favorites, the 'Birds were taken by surprise
as Vancouver romped to an 18-10 victory for the
upset of the year.
The match was decided in the opening stanza
as the Green and Gold scored two quick tries only
30 seconds apart at the thirty-five minute mark.
Although Varsity rallied in the dying moments
of the game to score two converted tries, the first
period deficit was too much and the 'Birds went
down to their first defeat in six games.
Strengthening their lineup for the annual jaunt
to Victoria, the Blue and Gorld held the lead
throughout most of the struggle before succumbing to defeat in the last few minutes of play. The
final score was 12-8 in favor of Victoria.
I. Chuck Wills roughs it up for the Vets as they tangle
with their brothers, the Thunderbirds;   2. Bob Croll attempts
a place kick in another contest with the Varsity Vets.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTEEN English Rugby
At one time Varsity led by eight points via a
try by veteran Johnny Wheeler and a penalty
kick and convert from the toe of Don Nesbit. But
the Tide surged steadily forward and finally took
command of the game mid way through the last
half to seriously dampen the Thunderbirds'
chances to retain the cup.
However, Varsity came back strong and, led
by their diminutive kicking star, Don Nesbit, eked
out a close 11-8 victory over the Vancouver Lions
in the final and deciding contest.
Besides kicking two penalty goals and a convert, Nesbit played an outstanding game on the
wing and was indeed the star of the fixture.
Varsity's only try was scored by Barney Curby.
Although the Thunderbirds' lineup changed
many times during the season, their regular starting lineup included forwards Alex Carlyle, Tom
McLaughlan, Barrie Morris, Joe Pegues, Hartt
Crosby, Keith MacDonald, Harry Kabush, and
Geoff Corry.
The starry backfield included Johnny Wheeler,
Bud Spiers, Bob Croll, Don Nesbit, Maury Moyls,
Andy Johnson, and Bill Dunbar.
Substitutes were Andy Fleck, Ray Grant, Harvey Allan, and Barney Curby.
The   leading   scorer   in   the   University  and
1.  Don   Nesbit;     2.   Joe  Pegues:     3.   Bill  Choukolos;     4.   Gerard   Kirby;     5.   Barney   Curby;
6.  Hilary Wotherspoon;     7.  GeoH  Corry;    8.  Don  Barton;    9. Doug Knott;     10.  Bob  Lawson;
11. Johnny  Owen,  trainer;     12.  Tom  McCusker;     13.  Harry  Kabush.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTEEN English Rugby
incidentally the entire province, was Varsity's
captain and five-eighths, Don Nesbit, who
amassed the outstanding total of 73 points in the
15 games in which he participated. Other high
scorers were Harry Kabush, Barney Curby, Lloyd
Williams, and Bob Croll.
Captains of the teams were Bud Spiers for
both the Thunderbirds and the Vets, Nesbit for
Varsity, and Harry Kabush for U.B.C. Much of
the credit for this year's success goes to head
coach Dan Doswell and his assistants, Roy
Haines and Gordie Morrison.
The senior manager of rugby was Maury
Physick and he was ably assisted by Fred Crom-
bie and Mac Cameron who managed Varsity
and the Vets respectively.
MILLER CUP STANDINGS
P       W     L       T     Pts
Varsity         10       9        1        0      18
Vets       10       8       2       0      16
Meralomas       10       7       3       0      14
U.B.C       10       3       7       0       6
Rowing Club        10       2       8       0       4
Ex-Britannia         10        1        9       0       2
McKECHNIE CUP STANDINGS
Varsity          4       2       2       0       4
Victoria        4       2       2       0       4
Vancouver           4       2       2       0       4
1. Ray Grant;    2. Barry Morris;    3. Bill Tisdall;    4. Chuck Wils;    5. Andy Johnson;    6. Harry
Cannon;    7. Maury Moyls;    8.  Massie White;    9. Bob Ross    10. Bill Dunbar;    11. Keith MacDonald;    12. Johnny Wheeler;    13. Bob Croll.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED     AND     SEVENTEEN 1. Harvey Allan takes oii;    2. Roughing it up in the scrum;    3. Johnny Wheeler waits patiently
ior the 'Birds to heel the bail;    4. Mad scramble in a lineout;    5. Waiting for the ball to come
down;    6. Barry Morris climbs up on various players to nab the ball.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTEEN   .   .   . UBC Soccer Teams
i
U.B.C. entered two teams in the Vancouver
and District Soccer League this year, Varsity, the
senior team, in the "A" Division, and U.B.C, the
junior team, in the "B" Division.
Both teams included many ex-servicemen in
their lineups, as well as many freshmen, indicating that soccer has a healthy future in store on
the campus.
The Varsity team had only two hold-overs
from the previous season, Captain Don Petrie and
Pat Campbell. Bob Wilson moved up from the
U.B.C. squad, and Jack Rush, Frank Adams,
Chuck Gudmundson, and Stu Todd all returned
to the team after several years of war service.
U.B.C. had team captain Dave Bremner and
Alex Jones from the previous season. The remaining players were freshmen either from the
services or from the high schools.
Varsity again made a splendid showing in
the Imperial Cup Ties, reaching the finals for the
second straight year, only to lose out to Vancouver Uniteds.
The Goldshirts defeated South Burnaby, 3-2,
in the first round, drew with U.B.C, 1-1, before
knocking them out with a 3-1 victory in the replay, then ousted Collingwood, 3-2, in the third
round. Vancouver Uniteds won by a 3-1 score
in the finals.
The coaching job was taken over by Millar
McGill, who graduated from U.B.C. in 1934 and
played Coast League soccer. Organization of
the teams was in the hands of Senior Manager
1. Action   in   the   Imperial   Cup   finals   at   Larwill  Park;
2. Varsity  roundballers  know   how  to   use  their  heads;
3. The   victors   pose   after   stopping   Victoria;     4.   Four
against one isn't lair;    5. Hands oii, it's mine.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETEEN UBC Soccer Teams
Dave Comparelli who was ably assisted by Bud
Hartford and Alf Blashill. Dr. Todd was faculty
representative.
To wind up their season, the Varsity team
played an exhibition against the Canadian Championship Radials in the stadium and won, 3-2,
the two clubs donating their services and all
proceeds to the War Memorial Gymnasium drive.
LEAGUE STANDINGS
"A" Division
P   W     L D F A Pts
Bluebirds     14    12      1 1 40 11 25
Norvans      15     9     2 4 44 20 22
Vancouver U's      13     5     3 5 30 15 15
Collingwood       14     4     7 3 31 40 11
Savoys      14     3     6 5 24 37 11
Varsity      11     3     5 3 32 25 9
Pro Rees     14     2     8 4 18 43 8
South Burnaby      12      1    10 1 14 46 3
"B" Division
South Hill  14 11 1 2 50 15 24
Girardis     13 8 3 2 42 29 18
U.B.C...   13 7 5 1 43 28 15
loco ..   14 4 7 3 35 53 11
Coquitlam     13 4 7 2 31 28 10
Pro Rees   15 1 21 2 15 63 3,
______________                                  \
- V
■ -.
m
Sid Gorrie, international star with the Varsity squad, gives
a iew pointers.    Left, above:  Bud Hartford. Manager of the
Blue and Gold squad.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY   . Top Row: Jack Rush. Bill Berry. Jack Cowan. Geofi Biddle, Lex Henderson, Pat Campbell.
Second Row: Jack Harrower. Frank Adams, Chuck Gudmundson, Ali Scow, Stew Wilson, Dick
Stewart. Third Row: Bob Wilson. Stu Todd. Elso Genovese, Grant Moreton, Gordy Shepherd,
Armand Tenoin. Four Row: Ivcm Carr. Sid Gorrie, Gordy Coultice, ack BlackhalL Don Petrie,
Bill Thomas.    Bottom  Row:    Dave  Comparelli,  senior manager,   Pat  Harrison,  Gus  MacSween.
Temoin passes back to Todd.
.   .   PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-ONE Track and Field
Trackmen   start   work   in   the   spring,   and   so  does   this
discus star who displays near-periect Grecian form.    Left:
Ken McPherson breezes to an easy win in the 880.
UBC's Track Club1 became re-organized for the
first time in several years this season, and after
holding their intramural meet in the Varsity
Stadium on April 6, selected a track team to represent UBC in the Pacific Northwest Inter-Collegiate
Conference track meet in May.
With Bob Osborne, who specializes in track
coaching, looking after the schedule, the club
concentrated on developing runners in this, their
first year of re-organization.
Many former high school stars came to the
fore near the start of the year with the annual
running of the Intramural Cross Country.
Winners of the road race were the Lambda
Club, a group of ex-Lord Byng High School students, which was paced by Al Bain, who led the
field from start to finish.
Bain covered the 2.6-mile course in 14 minutes,
2.4 seconds.
Jack Carlyle and Pat Minchon battled for second place in the stretch drive around the stadium
track, the former taking the runner-up honors by
a margin of .2 seconds.
Peter De Vooght, another freshman star with
the Lambda outfit, placed in fourth spot with Doug
Knott, Ace Williams and Bill Husband following
him in that order.
The Cross Country Team, picked and coached
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-TWO Cross Country
by Bob Osborne, again brought fame to UBC as
they walked off with the Pacific Coast Cross
Country Championship for the third straight year.
Paced by Al Bain, who placed second to the
University of Idaho's Jack Anderson, the team ran
in a group as has been their practice every year.
Jack Carlyle, Pat Minchon, and Doug Knott
followed close on the heels of Bain in the third,
fourth and fifth places respectively.
Ken McPerson placed 10th to finish off the
UBC score at 24 points, a new record low total,
three points less than the sum amassed by the
1944 team.
UBC's second team also ran well, taking fourth
place and thus establishing this university as
undisputed leaders in cross country competition.
University of Idaho placed second, followed
by the University of Oregon's squad. The second
UBC team included Al Pierce and Peter DeVought,
another pair of freshmen who placed 12th and
13th respectively, and Ken McLeod and Bob Lane
who took number 15 and 16 spots, and Bill Wood,
placing 21st.
The two spares, Art Porter and Bob Ross, finished in the 25th and 30th spots respectively.
With most of the competitors freshmen and
sophomores, the UBC Cross Country team expects
to continue its successful exploits for many years
to come. i
Lining up with their numbers blowing in the breeze, cross
country experts get set ior the  intramural event    Right
Stocky   Al  Bain crosses  the  line  first,  and  also  led  the
U.B.C. team to victory at Spokane.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-THREE UBC's Ice Hockey Team
Left—Ed Shumka and Jim Rowledge pose for the cameraman between periods. Bottom—Bill Buhler, manager and
fast forward oi the Thunderbird ice squad.
Top, left to right—Coach Maurice Lambert. Bob Saunders, Owen Woodside, Chuck Keating, Bill Buhler, Hugh
Berry, Mac Porteous, Jerry Neliord, and Dave Baker.
Front row—Bill Leith, Jim Rowledge, Ed Shumka. Murray
Wiggins,   Bob   Smith,   Lloyd   Toriason,   and   Jim   O'Brien.
Varsity's Thunderbird ice hockey sextet romped
through a successful season of puck-chasing this
year, entering the New Westminster industrial
league, and pacing the other five teams throughout the year to cop the Twilight Hockey League
trophy, symbol of supremacy in the Royal City
loop.
At the conclusion of league play, the. U.B.C.
outfit entered the Intermediate playoffs, losing out
in the semi-finals to the New Westminster Indians,
winning the opener 4-2, but dropping the next two
by scores of 10-0 and 7-3.
They concluded their season with an exhibition against Nanaimo's Junior Championship Clippers, losing by a 9-4 count but collecting some
$200 for the War Memorial Gym fund.
For the total season's play, the Thunderbird
pucksters racked up a record of 13 wins against
4 losses.    Here are the final leqgue standing:
U.B.C. Thunderbirds
Shepherd & White ...
Pacific Veneers 	
Paper Mills 	
Aleska Pines 	
Adanacs 	
P
W
L
13
12
1
13
9
4
13
8
5
13
5
8
13
3
10
13
2
11
PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOUR UBC's Swimming Club
Varsity's Swimming Club was again organized to take its place in UBCs rapidly expanding
sports circles this year. Swimming practices
were held regularly twice every week at the
Crystal Pool with consistently good turnouts.
Doug Whittle, newly acquired member of the
Physical Education staff of the University, was
the coach, and the officers were Chuck Bakony,
President, Jim Marshall, Manager, Irene Berto,
Secretary, and Kay Worsfold, Treasurer.
UBC's swimming teams participated in two
feature meets during the year: the B.C. Championships and their own Swimming Gala which
was instituted as an annual affair on February 2
at the Crystal Pool.
Although the Thuderbird team placed third in
the B.C. meet, they gave the Victoria and Vancouver clubs some stiff competition.
As for their own meet, the ever-surprising
Jokers' Club walked off with the Seaweed Crown
in the intramural competition.
Leading the Varsity splashers were Lou Attrell,
Dick Ellis, Jack Turner, Jim Hawthorn, Archie
Byers, Don Morrison, Pete Townsend, Don Deans,
Jim Marshall, Chick Turner and Bob Stangroom.
UBC's school of mermaids included Irene
Berto, Kay Worsfold, Pat Gardiner, Gwen Avery,
Elaine Twilley,  and Rosemary Bell-Irving.
1—The Strip-Relay . . . more fun! 2—Coach Doug Whittle
gives last-minute instructions. 3—They're off to a flying
start! 4—The Candle Race . . . don't breathe. 5—The
Strip-Relay . . . before they stripped. 6—The swim class
poses ior their photo.   7—The Aggie girls show oii.
. PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE Women's Basketball
Senior B's—Elaine Carrothers, Winnie Tait. Norah McDermott. Pat Gardiner. Front row—Phoebe Manley. Audrey
McKim. Taddy Knapp. and Pat Macintosh.
Below—Carol Lewis takes a shot. Bottom—Audrey
McKim, captain and manager oi the Senior B's.
Two girls' basketball quintettes represented
U.B.C. in the Vancouver and District basketball
league during the 1945-46 season. Gladys Munton coached the Varsity entry in the Senior B
loop, and Marj. Watt was the mentor for the
Intermediate A squad.
Although both of these hoop clubs played consistently good ball, neither of them managed to
take any honors in their respective leagues.
Audrey McKim captained the Senior B squad
and Jacque Sherman led the Inter A's.
Trips included jaunts to Seattle and Port Al-
berni, the Senior B's meeting the Skyroom Skylarks and losing by one point, 33-32, in Seattle,
while the Inter A's travelled to Port Alberni to
play the champion Vancouver Island team.
The same Port Alberni outfit came to Varsity
earlier in the season to play the Senior squad,
the Blue and Gold five taking a 28-20 victory.
Among the star point-getters on the hoop clubs
were Audrey McKim, Senior B captain, Norah McDermott, Pat Macintosh and Phoebe Manley.
Jacque Sherman and Carol Lewis paced the Intermediate team scorers.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-SIX UBC's Archery Club
Archery made its first steps towards a full-
fledged sport on the campus during the year in
spite of lack of equipment. With the help of the
Women's Athletic Directorate, the UBC Archery
Club was formed in the Fall, and although equipment was scarce until a shipment arrived from
Alberta in February, the organization got off to
a healthy start.
The club had a membership of 32 enthusiastic
would-be Robin Hoods, including a dozen girls
who gave the men some stiff competition, not to
mention a few lessons on form.
Aside from the Archery Club, the bow and
arrow sport gained in popularity on the curriculum of the women's physical education program.
Under the instruction of Miss Isabel Clay and
Mrs. Jean Sleightholme, some 300 co-eds learned
the art of archery.
In October, an inter-collegiate team was organized and sponsored by the W.A.D. This team
of eight co-ed archers competed in the annual
Canadian University Telegraphic Archery Tournament to represent UBC for the first time in three
years and win the title.
1—Boys from the Archery Club show off on Visitors' Day.
2—Bev Cox displays  some neat  form.
PAGE    TWO     HUNDRED     AND     TWENTY-SEVEN Top—The Varsity Girls' Grass Hockey team. Left to
right—Evelyn Wally. Joan Smith, Cherry Hooper, Audrey
Thomson. Connie Liddel. Joy Curran. Front row—Audrey
Sherlock. Barbara Coles. Jean MacKinnon, Pat Macintosh.
Above—The UBC squad. Left to right—Joyce Hovelaque.
Mary Sainas. Vivian Spicer. Mary Ann Norton, Sheila
Wheeler, Cecilia Fleetwood, Marg Gamey. Front Row—
Jacque Sherman, Isabel McKinnon, Peggy Bowes, Norah
McDermott
Left—Ev Wally and Pat Macintosh, fleet forwards.
Bottom-—Barbara Coles and Joy Curran, stalwart defence
stars.
Grass Hockey
Varsity's women grass hockey enthusiasts
fielded three teams in the Women's Lower Mainland and District Grass Hockey League this year,
and all three of the squads are doing well this
season.
Defending their title, the Varsity outfit is battling with a powerful Ex-Kits team for top spot
in the league, while the other two Blue and Gold
elevens are close behind.
Varsity and U.B.C. both travelled to Victoria
in the feature grass hockey trip of the year, the
first team managing to defeat Oak Bay High
School's aggregation by a 2-0 score, while the
U.B.C. club absorbed a 1-0 defeat at the hands
of Victoria College's girls.
Coaches of the teams were Dr. Black and
Isabel Clay, and the captains, Kay Hedalaye of
Varsity, Yvonne French of U.B.C, and Norah McDermott of the third team, the Collegiates.
Outstanding goal-getters for the campus girls
this season were Kay Hedalaye, Pat Mcintosh and
Isabel MacKinnon, while Jenny Rodenchuck and
Irene Pierce starred on defence. Cherry Hooper,
former R.C.A.F. player with the Pat Bay team,
played goal most of the season.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-EIGHT Men's Grass Hockey
Though Grass Hockey was one of the first
victims of the war, its return to the campus this
year was as prompt as it was welcome. With
increased enrollment at the University, little difficulty was met in forming two teams, Varsity and
UBC, and with the competition provided by those
two well kown Vancouver squads, the Oldtimers
and the East Indians, a city hockey league was
quickly instituted.
From the mixed group of players at the beginning of the term, two separate squads were picked
to represent the University. One, the Varsity
team, under the direction of Don Currie, succeeded
in taking first place in the league this year.
Varsity stalwart Norm Tupper led the league
in scoring with eight goals. Varsitys' line-up:
Eric Greenius, Jim Files, Arnold Greenius, Don
Grieve, Joe Piercy, Bob Riddell, Amos Eddy, Norm
Tupper, Don Currie, Ned Larsen, and Tony Canic.
UBC's line-up: Herb Gasperdone, Fred Joplin,
Joe Augustus, Allen Meavis, Elmer Cheng, Les
Bullen, Bob Ross, Tom Wilkinson, Art Hill, Denny
Bullen, Dick Massy, Stefen Arnason, Jim Taylor
and M. Macdonald.
LEAGUE STANDINGS
P
W
L
D GF
GA Pts
Varsity 	
  6
4
1
1    16
11      9
Oldtimers	
  6
3
2
1      8
9     7
UBC 	
  6
2
3
1    15
15     5
East Indians	
  6
1
4
1    14
18'     3
Above: The U.B.C. Team—Tom Wilkinson. Dennis Bullen,
Bob Ross, Joe Augustus, Fred Joplin, Alan Meavis, Les
Bullen.   Front Row:   Art Hill, Steve Arnason. Elmer Cheng,
Mac MacDonald, Herb Gasperdone.
Below:    The Varsity Team—Joe Piercy. Amos Eddy. Bob
Riddell,  Jim  Files, Norm  Tupper,   Arnold  Greenius,  Tony
Canic.   Front row:   Ned Larson, Eric Greenius. Don Grieve.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-NINE UBC Golf Club
1. Bob Esplen;    2. Jack Dornan;    3.  Howie Fry;    4. Dick
Hanley;     5.   Malcolm   Tapp;     6.   U.B.C.   dlvoters   talk  it
over at the 19th hole.
Golf enjoyed one of the best years in U.B.C's
history this year. More competitions, both individual as well as team play, were sponsored by
the U.B.C. Golf Club than ever before.
The first outstanding event was the Golf Club
Championship, which was won by Bob Plommer,
with Dick Hanley taking runner-up honors.
In February, the University Open Championships began with Malcolm Tapp winning the
qualifying round with a crisp 76.
March saw the Varsity golf team in action for
the first time. After a sound beating from Quil-
chena's experts, the team, which included Dick
Hanley, Bob Plommer, Dave Dale, Ormie Hall,
Malcolm Tapp, and Hans Swinton, played an
exhibition against Vancouver's  top six pros.
Although the student divoters lost out, they
played heads-up golf which had the pros scared,
and they raised another $20 for the U.B.C. War
Memorial Gym Fund.
A tour of the Pacific Coast Universities will
wind up this year's schedule for the golfers.
Jack Collum, who was largely responsible for
reorganizing the club this year, and the retiring
President, Howie Fry, who managed the affairs
of the rapidly expanding outfit, were outstanding
in their work during the year.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY Rowing
Frustrated effort marked this session's rowing
year for U.B.C's two sculling eights. Although
Coach Hale Atkenson turned out two well trained
teams, efforts to arrange meets met with no
response.
With Washington unable to boat a crew, Oregon's club house washed downriver, Victoria's
shells leased to the Navy, and Vancouver Qub
scullers still not organized after the war, the Blue
and Gold oarsmen had to content themselves with
a Henley mile-and-a-quarter race against themselves.
A meet with Kelowna near the end of July
and a regatta with Vancouver Club's fours in the
forthcoming Jubilee celebration will give the scullers a little recompense for their wintry bouts.
Training started last September, fledgling oarsmen receiving instruction in 16-oared barges, and
continued after Christmas when the heavy and
lightweight crews turned out together for the expected inter-collegiate   competition.
Line-up for the "eight" included: Heavies—
Dave Moon, Johnny and Dyne Kayl, Neve Smith,
Mike Fitz-James; Norm Denkman Club President,
and Harry Castillou, Crew Captain, with Johnny
MacDougall as Coxswain.
Lightweight—Tommy Neumarch, Al Frazee,
Don MacLeod, Cam Wilkinson, Johnny Moran,
Norm Sawyers, Eric Hojarth, and Bill Reid. George
Lee sat in the stern.
Top—Coach Atkenson shouts instructions as he coxes
the "heavies" in a workout on the muddy Fraser River.
1—Hale Atkenson, Coach. 2—Bob O'Grady. 3—Chuck
Wills. 4—Bill Ross. 5—Dave Moon. 6—Dave Manning.
7—Neve Smith. 8—Johnny Kayle. 9—Dyne Kayle. 10—
Harry Castillou.   11—Mike Fitz-James.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-ONE UBC Boxing Club
Above:     Johnny   Owen   proudly   poses   with   his   trio   oi
pugilists,   Walter   Gray,   Phil  Olsen.   and   Art   Beaumont.
Below:     Phil  Olsen   in  a  fighting  pose.
UBCs hard-working Boxing Club had only one
chance to display their wares during the year,
but they proved themselves champions when they
walked away with the hearts of Vancouver's
fight fans in the Vancouver Golden Gloves on
February 14-15.
Trained by Johnny Owen and coached by
Hec MacDonald, the trio of pugilists, which included Art Beaumont, Walter Gray and Phil
Olsen, showed well against the tough competition in spite of the fact that Beaumont was the
only one to take a title.
Fighting in the novice middleweight class,
Beaumont won a clear decision over Reg Simpson
of the Eagletime Club in his first battle, and was
robbed of a knockout by the final bell.
Meanwhile, Walt Gray scored a technical
knockout in his first round contest against Jack
MacDonald of Ocean Falls in the novice lightweight division, and Phil Olsen decisioned Eric
Smith of the Wallaces Club in the semi-finals for
the heavyweight title.
These three victories went to make the first
night a great success for the UBC boxers, but
Olsen and Gray lost out by close decisions in
their finals on the second night.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-TWO Badminton Club
Varsity's Badminton Club, boasting an all-
time high membership of 80 active members, enjoyed one of its most successful seasons this
year, taking over the gym and the armoury every
Thursday night and Saturday afternoon.
From the top players, a university team of
eight was formed which participated in the top
city league division, competing with Vancouver,
Hill, and Quilchena Clubs.-
Lois Reid, Nancy Raine, Barbara Twizzell,
Audrey Crease, Jim Watt, Ken Meredith, Darryl
Thompson, and Murray Creighton were the steady
members of the squad of shuttle-swatters.
This team also took part in the Vancouver
Invitational Tournament, February 28, March 1-2,
held at the Vancouver Badminton Club. Proceeds
from the semi-finals went to the UBC War Memorial Gymnasium Fund.
■ Both of Varsity's men's doubles teams made
the semi-finals against the top-seeded teams of
Johnny Samis, Jack Underhill, Jim Forsythe, and
Stan Hayden, extending them to three close
games in both cases.
The team also took in the Washington State
Open Championships at Seattle, March 22-23-24.
Jim Watt and Ken Meredith had more success
here, taking the men's doubles title.
President of the club for the year was Don
Outram, supported by Secretary-Treasurer Nancy
Raine, and Team Manager Phil Heaps.
1.  Murray Craighton and  Darryl  Thompson team up  for
a   workout   in   the   Varsity   Gym;     2.   Barbara  Twizzell;
3. Lois Reid;   4. Jim Watt and Ken Meredith match swings
inu a test match.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-THREE UBC Cricket Club
1. Wicket keeper  Dick Massy snatches the ball as Ned
Larsen   swings and misses;    2. Dennis Bullen bowls one
over;    3. Well caught, sir.
UBC entered only one team in the Mainland
Cricket League during the summer of 1945, and
the loop included seven other teams. Although
the Varsity eleven reached the top of the standings several times during the summer, the Brockton Point squad won the league after two complete rounds of play.
Continuing through another round, the UBC
team bowed out again as the Brockton Pointers
walked off with both the Fyfe-Smith and the
Gardner-Johnson trophies.
Since it was impossible to field a complete
undergraduate roster, several graduates and faculty members joined the eleven during the season.
Aided by Dr. Warren, Frank Turner, Jim Brandon
and Charlie Pillar, Varsity led the league throughout the first round.
It was mainly because of lack of players that
the UBC outfit dropped off and finished in fourth
place.
Captain of the team was Jim Beard, who became President of the UBC Cricket Club last Fall.
His Secretary-Treasurer was Dick Massy, and
during the winter months they have trained and
equipped two full teams for this summer's play.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-FOUR   . UBC Fencing Club
Fencing became one of the most popular
sports on the campus almost overnight, this year,
as a UBC Fencing Qub was brought to life. Following the lead set by this organization, the
Physical Education program was expanded to
include the chivalrous activity also.
With fencing master Hale Atkenson taking
over the coaching duties both of the club and of
the special physical education classes, the sport
gained rapidly in favor and popularity with the
UBC students.
, Steve Howlett, President of the Fencing Qub,
organized regular classes for his organization.
They took over the new gym room in the UBC
Stadium for regular meetings every Tuesday and
Thursday at noon, and Wednesday afternoons
as well.
Physical education fencing classes weren't
limited to the male students. As a matter of fact,
there were more classes for the girls than there
were for the men.
Altogether, the classes took up some eight
hours per week, and they were held either in the
Stadium Gym or in the Armoury.
The UBC Fencing Qub staged several displays
during the year, including an exhibition match
against The Blades Qub between halves of a
Whitman College - UBC basketball game on January 26.
The student fencers also played a large part
in the Physical Education Display at UBC Gym
on April 5.
Even girls must learn the art of sell defence. Here they
line up for inspection. Right Fencing Master Hale Atkenson instructs them in the finer points. Below: Warding
off a thrust,  this fencer smiles  through his head  guard.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-FIVE Ski and Outdoor Club
Above:    Don  Shafer   executes   a  sharp  turn.    Left:    Bill
Nicholson, Secretary-Treasurer oi the Outdoor Club, goes
out ior a run in the early morning  sun.    Below:    There's
nothing like those wide open spaces.
Supported by enthusiastic memberships, the
Varsity Outdoor and Ski Clubs produced one of
the most successful ski seasons ever recorded
here at UBC.
Both clubs offered many events for the outdoor
enthusiasts, including inter-collegiate ski meets
for the first time in many years.
The Outdoor Club boasted more than 180
members, and as a result, the Vee-O-Cee Cabin
and Schuss Inn were crowded every week-end
and during Christmas holidays.
Competitive skiing, which was handled by
Thunderbird Ski Captain Sandy Martin, took over
the first weekend in January with downhill and
slalom trials on Grouse Mountain.
From the results of these, the ski team was
picked, and this group represented UBC in all
local meets as well as the Western Canada
Championships at Princeton, B.C., and inter-collegiate meets with the University of Washington
both at Mount Baker arid at Martin's Pass.
Peter Vadja, outstanding Vancouver ski expert, was obtained in February to take over the
coaching duties of both the Ski Club and the
Outdoor Club. The success of this move indicates
that skiing may well be included in the physical
education curriculum in the not too distant future.
Among the greater ventures of the Outdoor
Club were the conquest of such peaks as Garibaldi, Mamquam, and Mount Panther.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTY-SIX   . ^m
Top oi the world;    Final instructions;    Let it snow;    Nick and  Millie admire Garibaldi;    Bewell pulls one in;    Back view;
Cookie comes down the hard way;    President Roots in fine form;    Oh, the wild ioys of living!;    Excelsior!;    Going down.
.    PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND     THIRTY-SEVEN GREEKS  Pan-Hellenic Society
Edith Katznelson,  Phyllis  Grant,  Annette  Campbell
Working in close co-operation with the Inter-
Fraternity Council, the Pan Hellenic Council sponsored many activities during the past year.
Beginning the fall session with the hectic
month of rushing, the Council directed its efforts
towards the regulation of various Sorority activities, including Red Cross work, its major ac
tivity. All pledges were required either to knit
or to sew, while the senior member's work was
on a voluntary basis. Completing the Council's
pre-Christmas schedule, was the inter-sorority
bridge tournament.
This term the Mardi Gras occupied the position
of major importance. The War Memorial Gymnasium drive, too, received vigorous support. In
this connection, each sorority operated a stall in
the Armory for the Visitors' Day Carnival. The
Song Fest, the bowling league, and the annual
Pan Hell banquet completed an energetic year.
Phyllis Grant, Delta Gamma, presided over
the Council during the Fall term. Her position
will be taken by Roma McDonald, Alpha Phi,
next year. Annette Campbell served as Secretary, while Edith Katznelson was Treasurer.
In the Spring term, both Phyl Grant and Roma
McDonald went to Pan-Hellenic Conference at
Whitman College in Washington. The ideas
gained from that gathering were presented to the
sororities in the Annual Spring Workshop in
March.
Pan-Hellenic Society
PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND FORTY CHATWIN,   MARY
COGHILL, JOY
DEAS, KAY
DUNCAN, HELEN
JOHNSON,  MAXINE
NALOS, ERICA
FAFKS, DOREEN
PEELE,  ROHAN
SMITH, MARJORIE
STEVENS,  JOAN
VAN GORDER, JULIE
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PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND     FORTY-ONE DIANA BAMPTON
VIRGINIA BAMPTON
EMMA BEECH
MARY BELL
SHIELA CALDER
BEVERLY CHALMERS
JOYCE CLARK
JUNE COLLINS
NONI COLQUHOUN
SHIELA DAVEY
JUNE DAY
MARGARET DRIVER
JOY EYRES
JOAN FEAST
JOANNE FERGUSON
AUDREY  GARRARD
BERNICE HARRISON
BETTE HODGSON
BARBARA KELSBERG
LILLIAN MJOS
MARY MONTGOMERY
JOAN MOORE
YVETTE MORRIS
CORA McKINLEY
HELEN McTURK
KAY NICHOLSON
MARY-ANNE NORTON
DOROTHY PARFITT
ELIZABETH RATHLEF
DOROTHY REID
JEAN RENNIE
KAY ROBINSON
JENNY RODINCHUCK
MARGARET ROSS
ANITA SCOTT
PEGGY SCOTT
CATHERINE SMART
SHIRLEY TAYLOR
PEGGY VAUGHAN
RUTH VEEBERG
HELEN VOSS
NANCY WILSON
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PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-TWO   . DORIS M. BISHOP
MARGARET M. BONE
MARGARET BOYES
HELEN BURNS
EUGENIA R. BUTLER
MARY CHATWIN
ANITA G. CHISHOLM
MARY M. COADY
GERTRUDE  COTTERALL
BARBARA  CULTER
MARGUERITE DAVIES
HELEN DUNCAN
MARDEE DUNDAS
CATHERINE ELLIS
PATRICIA FORBES
MARY G. HAZELWOOD
ISOBEL HOPKINS
BEATRICE IRWIN
LOUISE IRWIN
JOAN JARVIS
JOAN KERR
RUTH KETCHESON
MURIEL MARTINSON
BETTY JANE MATHESON
JESSIE MacCARTHY
FRANCES McDONALD
LILLIAN McEACHERN
DOROTHY NICHOLS
ADA PONSFORD
DIANNE REID
JUNE REID
JACQUELYN ROBINSON
WINONA ROSS
JOY SANDERSON
PATRICIA SALTER
MARY BETH SAUNDERS .
RITA STANDEVEN
ETHYL THOMAS
AUDREY THOMSON
GRAHAME THOMSON
MARJORIE WEBER
BIDDY WHITE
LESLIE WHITE
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.   PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED-   AND    FORTY-THREE- MARY ALLMAN
BETTY ANDERSON
BEVERLY BASSETT
JEAN BOWEN
ROSEMARY BROUGH
MARGARET BURNS
SUZANNE DAYRYMPLE
JUANITA GOODMAN
JUNE HODGES
MAY JOHNSON
JOAN McCALLUM
ROHAN PEELE
JACQUELYN PHILLIPS
MARY ROGERS
MARJORIE SMITH
PATRICIA STAMATIS
JACQUELYN STEPHENSON
LYN TORRENCE
EILA TONNING
BLANCHE TURNER
MARGARET WATSON
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PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-FOUR   . JOYCE ANDERSON
BERNICE BAXTER
OLIVE BLAIR
PATRICIA BORGERSON
JOY BUCKNALL
MARGERY CAWLEY
MARY CLARK
CHARLOTTE CORBITT
PATRICIA COYLE
EDITH MARY DE PENCIER
AUDREY DUNLOP
RUTH MILLS
ROMA McDONALD
JEAN MacFARLANE
kay Mclaughlin
hetti outerbridge
mary parker
nancy pitman
frances roantree
joan stevans
patricia tiedje
ANN VLAG
DOROTHY WELSH
MABLE WOODMAN
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PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-FIV MIGNON BARCLAY-ROSS
JOAN BAYNE
HEATHER BLUNDELL
LOLA BULMAN
ANN BROWN
RUTH BURKE
MAUREEN COULTER
PAT COWAN
MARIAN CUMMING
PAMELA DEWDNEY
MYLEEN DeBECK
MARY FAGAN
MARY FRANCES FLESHER
JOAN FRASER
PAT GRANT
PHYLLIS GRANT
PEGGY GIEGERICH
BETTY HARRIS
JULIENNE HARRIS
ROSEMARY HODGINS
BARBARA JONES
NANCY LEWIS
FRANNIE MATTHEWS
JOAN MITCHELL
MARY McALPINE
CONNIE McLEOD
JEAN MacKENZIE
PEGGY PARKER
1ANE SEYMOUR
BETTY THOMPSON
FEGGY WILKINSON
CASH WILSON
TWIGG WOODWARD
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PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-SIX   .   . LILLIAN ARCHECK
RENEE BAKER
FREDDIE BECK
RUTH  BECKER
FLORENCE BRODY
EVA CHERNOV
DOREEN DAVIDS
RITA DIAMOND
ROCHELLE EPSTEIN
AUDREY GOLDBERG
RUTH-CLAIRE GOROSH
CYNTHIA  GURVITZ
JENNIE HANEN
HARRIET HOCHMAN
IRMA KOCH
EDITH KATZNELSON
MOLLIE LEVISON
PEGGY LIPSON
JEAN ROSENBERG
NETTIE ROSENBERG
ANNETTE SEGAL
RETA WEINSTEIN
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.    .   .   PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-SEVEN DOROTHY ANDREW
GWEN BAMFORD
NANCY BELTON
ANDRE BLAIS
PADDY BROWN
AUDREY BUCHANAN
MARY CHAMBERS
BARBARA COTTER
MARY DOLMAGE
JOY DONEGANI
PATRICIA DROPE
SILVEA DYSON
SIDNEY FLAVELLE
FRANCES HILLIER
BETTY JEAN HORN
LORNA IRVING
TADDY KNAPP
NONA LAMBERT
DAPHNE LAIRD
MURIEL MARTIN
DIERDRE MARTIN
DOROTHY MOORE
BARBARA MacASKILL
MAXINE McCLUNG
DOROTHY MacLEOD
VERDA MacGILLIVRAY
SUSANNE PENDLETON
MURIEL PENN
JOAN PRATT
BEVERLEY QUICK
MARITA ROBSON
RUTH RYAN
LORNA SHIELDS
ANN SYMONDS
PEGGY  SYMONDS
BARBARA TWIZELL
JEANNE WILLCOX
DOROTHY WILLIAMS
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PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-EIGHT BETTY BALDWIN
MARIAN BALL
KAYE CARMICHAEL
EILSHA FROSTRUP
PEGGY FULLERTON
ELEANOR GOODERHAM
MARY HAMMOND
SHIRLEY HILL
NANCY MacDONALD
PHYLLIS McINTOSH
JANE MACINTOSH
ISABEL MacKENZIE
MARGARET McNAUGUHTON
MARY RIPLEY
ELAINE ROGERS
SHIRLEY-RUTH  STEDMAN
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GAE VOSPER
ARDETH WALLACE
VIVIAN WALTON
SHEILA WEIR
LORNA WILSON
DIANA YOUNG
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PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FORTY-NINE ELIZABETH BELL-IRVING
MARGARET BENNETT
RUNA BLACK
PATRICIA BOULTBEE
PATRICIA CHENOWETH
JOAN CLARKE
CATHERINE COOK
MARION COPP
FRANCES EWING
MARY LOU GILLIES
BEVERLEY HALL
MAXINE JOHNSON
KATHLEEN KING
ANNE LAIRD
JEAN LECKIE
HELEN LEES
CAROL ANN LEWIS
MARY FRANCES McDONALD
^ANNE McLENNAN
EMMA PEARSON
MARY PHELAN
HELEN REITCHEL
NORAH RENDELL
PATRICIA ROGERS
PEGGY ANN ROSE
DOROTHY SMITH
PATRICIA TURNER
ELSIE VANTREIGHT
■&*,_ M^~-eu~~*-
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND     FIFTY Inter-Fraternity Council
The Inter-Fraternity Council is the organization
elected from the twelve fraternities to coordinate
fraternity campus activities and to regulate rushing and bidding of new men. The council is
composed of a Faculty representative, three Executive members, and two members from each
Fraternity.
With the aid of the Pan-Hellenic Association,
the council set up a committee, headed by Don
Newson, and Audrey Buchanan, which arranged
for the annual Greek Lelter Societies' Ball, the
"Mardi Gras". The proceeds, $6200, were divided
between the Red Cross and the I.S.S. The council lent its full support in boosting the War Memorial Drive morally and financially. Proceeds
from the annual Song Festival, sponsored by
them, were devoted to this cause.
This year the council revived the annual prewar Inter-Fraternity Smoker, making possible a
get-together for all campus Greeks.
The present rushing system was thoroughly
investigated this year, and some definite changes
in policy are imminent.
Jack Burgess, Ken Broe, Ches Pederson
The current Executive includes: Ken Bros,
President; Jack Burgess, Vice-President; Chas.
Pederson, Secretary-Treasurer; Faculty Representative, Dr. J. Allen Harris.
Inter-Fraternity Council
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-ONE AINSWORTH, ALLAN
BAKKEN, OLE
BEWELL, BRUCE
CREIGHTON, KEN
DUFFUS, JACK
FOWLER, PAT
FRANKLIN, HARRY
KIRKPATRICK, TED
MILLER, GARRY
NILAN, BOB
PIERSON, GEORGE
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-TWO J. W. ASSELSTINE
J. T. BAYFIELD
D. C. BLAIR
R. H. BRINE
K. H. DEANE
J.'B. FLEMING
J. D. FRAZER
G. G. FREEZE
G. R. GILLEY
P. S. HOWSAM
A. W. JEFFERY
J. R. KELLER
J. R. KER
M. G. KING
E. W. MUIR
J. F. MacDOUGALL
G. B. McKEEN
A. M. WRIGHT
F. H. SEYER
OJ^^fc(Ek
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-THREE A. AINSWORTH
D.  BARLOW
A. BLUECHEL
J. BORTHWICK
L. CANTY
P. CHUTTER
K. COLLINS
P. COTE
J. CUNNINGHAM
R. FARR
D. FERGUSON
D. FOERSTER
W.  GILL
R. GRANTHAM
"   .       R. GUEST
I >        S.  GUSTAVSON
D. HAZEL WOOD
G. HENDERSON
G. HIRTLE
W. HIRTLE
T. JOHN
A. JOHNSTONE
F. JOPLIN
T. KIRKPATRICK
W. LISTER
W. LOCKHART
H. LYONS
W. McGHEE
I. MacCARTHY
J. MacKAY
c. McGregor
d. McGregor
T. McLEAN
D. MANN
K. MORTON
G. MOWATT
R. NICKELLS
P. OLSON
D. RAE
D. RICHARDSON
M. ROBINSON
W. RUSH
M. SAGER
R. SHEWAN
J. STEVENSON
W. STEWART
W. WALLACE
W. WARNER
K. WATE
P. WHITE
C. WHITEHEAD
D. WILLIAMS
D. WILSON
L. WILSON
E. WOODS
A. YOUNGER
^j^1^fc(&
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-FOUR   .    ,   . K. ARMSTRONG
W. BENTLEY
K. BROE
C. BULLEN
L. CUTHILL
G. DAVEY
L. DRYER
L. DYER
J. FORBES
D. FORDYCE
D. GALT
J. GILBERT
H. HANSEN
E. JOHANNSON
G. JOSEPHSON
C. LAYARD
E. LEA
L. McDONALD
McGOWAN
D. LEE
R. LISTER
G. MILLER
W. MacKAY
R.  NILAN
W. PAULIN
W. PETTIT
G. RITCHIE
A. SMITH
H. SUTHERLAND
H. SWEATMAN
J. VARCOE
F. SMITH
I. SMITH'
G. WHEELER
T. WILLIS
R. WILSON
W. WINTER
L. WOODS
V*S^%*JU^
9b
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-FIVE O. BAKKEN
E. BUTTERWORTH
K. DAVIDSON
H. FRANKLIN
L. GALLOWAY
S. GEORGE
C. GLOVER
K.  GREGORY
G. HARDY
E. ERRICO
G. HARRIS
H. JORGENSON
T. KLINKHAMER
A. KNUTSON
W. MOORE
D. MacDONALD
J. McPHERSON
H. PEDERSON
A. ROBERTSON
W. SISSONS
A. SKENE
T. SOLLERS
R. STEWART
A. WARRENDER
Cf»
Hn*H»«~^
<MMI-»
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-SIX J. ALLAN
D. ANDERSON
K. BEGERT
R. BRODIE
F. BOSSONS
J. BOYD
R. BURNEY
V. CHEW
W. CRAWFORD
C. CROCKER
R. ESTEY
D. FRASER
P. FRITH
G. GARDOM
D. GORMAN
A. JONES
S. JONES
L. LEWIS
F. LIPSETT
J. LONG
M. McBRIDE
R. McBRIDE
R. McEWAN
D. NEWSOM
J. NICHOL
E. PRATT
C. RUSSELL
W. SAUNDER
G. SCOTT
R. WEBER
L. WIGHT
(Bfe^_fe-p_fe
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-SEVEN T. ABBOTT
D. ANDERSON
G. BRADNER
D. CAINES
D. CAMPBELL
A. CARMICHAEL
J. EAK1NS
T.  FISHER
W. HILL
<_?.r.A.
D. KING
P.
GRAHAM
O.
HALL
c.
HILL
B.
JACKSON
T.
JULIAN
H.
KABUSH
G.
LOCKHART
S.
MASON
D.
McLEOD
C.
McPHERSON
J. McPHERSON
K. PEDLOW
E.  PREVOST
W. REDPATH
D. RIPLEY
J. RUDOLPH
P. SHIER
B. SMITH
D. SMITH
R. THOMPSON
R. S. THOMPSON
D. WALES
W. WHITTAKER
D. YATES
A. YOUNG
(?JL HtmmJk^ -JfcSfc
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY-EIGHT G. C. ANDERSON
G. H. BEAMER
A. C. BEGUIN
J. A. BURGESS
S. T. FITZPATRICK
T. L. HACKETT
R. D. JOLLEY
G.  B.  LARKIN
C. F. LONG
D. K. MacDONALD
J. PEGUES
F. A. PERRY
L. H. SALT
R. STROUD
W. WOOD
QLMe*»-6k
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    FIFTY -' N I N E J. AIRD
G. ALLEN
G. BARTON
M. BURROWS
A. BYERS
W. CAMPBELL
T. CRONE
H. EDWARDS
G. GAMBLE
D. HAMMERSLEY
N. LATIMER
T. MARSHALL
P. McLEOD
W. O'BRIEN
B. OSTLE
P. PUDNEY
N. RODIN
A. SABA
E. SINCLAIR
R. TAYLOR
W. WAITS
V. YOUNG
9L •&*«- Sx
T-«-
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY R. D. BOOTH
C. W. BRYANT
R. S. CALDECOTT
H. B. C. COTTER
K. D. CREIGHTON
R. W. FOWLER
T. GREER
P. GUMAN
W. HACKING
W. J. INMAN
C. A. JOHNSTON
N. S. KENT
J. LIGHTSTONE
W. J. MacMASTER
J. P. PAPPAJOHN
D. PAYNE
D. C. PRIOR
A. THOMPSON
G. WILSON
N. WOOD
(B-C ^ptSL*r~
.   PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND     SIXTY-ONE B. ARMSTRONG
W. BATEMAN
B. BEWELL
J. M. BIRD
S. BOWELL
J. HAYES
G. HEAL
E. HESLA
W. HORTON
R. JOHNSON
W. LYLE
a. McGinn
A. MEARNS
W. MILLER
R. MILLS
C. MOORE
J. MORRISON
W. NICHOLSON
N. OLSON
G. PERRIS
J. PIERCY
D. ROSE
F. RUTQUIST
T. SCOTT
B. SHORE
A. THORSEN
K. WARNER
W. WINTER
_&*___
5
<?JL <lQ*S*Za
PAGE    TWO     HUNDRED     AND     SIXTY-TWO    . J. ABRAMSON
M. BERSON
A. GOLDBERG
H. GORDON
L. HYMAN
J. KOLBERG
S. KORSCH
J. LESHGOLD
L. NAROD
M. ROTHSTEIN
E. TRADEMAN
W. ZACKS
.ZHT7
PAGE    TWO     HUNDRED     AND     SIXTY-THREE P. B. BALLENTINE
H. BELL-IRVING
A. D.  BELYEA
F. CARROTHERS
P. A. CHERNIAVSKY
P. CROMIE
E. EMERSON
J. FERRY
D. M. GOLDIE
H. GORDON
J. GOURLAY
P. W. GRAHAM
N. M. HAY
B. HODGINS
S.  JENKINS
W. LANE
R. LEWIS
N. MANZER
J.  MARGACH
H. MILLER
L. MITTEN
F. MYERS
R. McDOUGALL
B. MacINTOSH
L. McKENZIE
W. OUGHTRED
G. PIERSON
H.
H.
SWINTON
E. UNDERWOOD
s.
WALLACE
B. WARK
G.
WHITELAW
G.
WHEATLEY
'mWaXSi (RU.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTY-FOUR Phrateres
Co-eds who come to U.B.C. for the first time
miss something if they do not join Phrateres. Ask
any member and see if she doesn't agree. To
most Freshettes, Phrateres, and its motto—
"Famous for Friendliness"—are synomymcus with
FUN. And this year was :io exception I
After a short pledge term in the Fall, the
largest group of women in the history of the
University were pledged into the twelve subchapters of Phrateres. Each chapter held its own
ceremony at the home of one of their members
with members of Phrateres executive and chapter
sponsors as guests.
November 9 was a highlight in the life of
Phratereans, when the annual Autumn Waltz-
time formal was held in the Brock. The last
month of the Winter term was spent on subchapter efforts for Christmas charity. Various
charitable organizations throughout the city benefitted from gifts of toys, food and money.
Candlelight and the soft strains of "To the blue
and the gold of Phrateres," created the atmosphere for the formal January initiation held in
the Brock. Almost three hundred new members
were welcomed into Phrateres by President Pat
Mayne, Honorary President Dean M. Dorothy
Mawdsley, Faculty Representative Dr. Dorothy
Blakey Smith, and W.U.S. President Nancy Pitman. Beta Chapter at the University of Washington was represented by four members of their
executive.
With the announcement of the War Memorial
Gym drive, Phratereans threw themselves wholeheartedly into the campaign, assisted Joker members with their crazy stunts, ran a refreshment
booth at the Open House Carnival and served as
guides to the many visitors on that day.
Proceeds from the Spring Formal held in the
Brock on March 1, were also donated to the Gym
Fund. Theme of this dance was P2B2. . . . President of Phrateres Birthday Ball, in honor of Pat's
twenty-first birthday.
This year's hard worked executive consisted
of Pat Mayne, President; Audrey Jutte, Vice-President; Nancy Macdonald, Treasurer; Betty Scott,
Recording Secretary; Ruth Hardy, Corresponding
Secretary; and Nancy MacLaren, Sub-Chapter
Chairman. Dean M. Dorothy Mawdsley acted as
Honorary President and Dr. Joyce Hallamore as
Honorary Vice-President.
Upper:    Pat  Mayne.  President
Lower:    Audrey  Jutte. Pat  Mayne,  Nancy MacLaren, Nancy
Macdonald. Ruth Hardy, Taddy Knapp, Betty Scotl
PAGE    TWO     HUNDRED    AND     SIXTY-FIVE ORGANIZATIONS  1. That Ellis is a card;    2. Convert, oker style;    3. Joker cerem onial;    4. Unbalanced line play;    S. We love our goldfish.
PAGE     TWO     HUNDRED     AND     SIXTY-EIGHT   . Jokers
No, this is  not a freak show;    2. A fugitive from Sing Sing;    3. What  am I bid?;    4. Dave and the crowd;
5. Two Jokers  teeing  off;     6.  Some  UBC "morons"  get caught;    7.    Hidden p lays at half time.
Coming from a nonentity to gain a notoriety
second to no other organization at U.B.C, the
Jokers' Club have taken upon themselves the
job of returning a post-war brand of Varsity spirit
to a formerly war-weary campus.
The club really came into their own when
the War Memorial Gymnasium drive gave them
unlimited opportunity to perform their stunts,
making goldfish swallowing, egg throwing, lily-
pond swimming, freak auctions, comic songs and
snake parades common on the campus. So
active did the club become that it had to split into
five "decks"—Green, Mauve, Black, Blue and
Royal—in order to keep the club organized and
let everyone in on the fun.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND     SIXTY-NINE Legion
1. President   Tony   Greer;     2.   The  presentation   of   the   Charter;     3.   A   Legion   party;     4.   Dr.   Mackenzie   addresses
the   vets;      5.   Grant  Livingstone.  Second  Vice-President;     6.  Fun  at  the  Le.ion mixer.
Early in October, 1000 ex-service University
students attended a meeting of the Canadian
Legion, University Branch. From these, over 600
men and women joined what has become the
most important instrument for dealing with the
problems of veteras on the campus.
Shortly after, Tony Greer, John MacKenzie and
Perry Miller attended a national conference in
Motreal which discussed cost of living, housing,
general problems and employment.
The Executive consists of Tony Greer, President; Gordon Kersey, Secretary; Keith Ralston,
1st Vice-President; Grant Livingstone, 2nd Vice-
President; Effie Smallwood and Baptiste L'Hon-
delle, Executive Members; Don MacLean, Treasurer; John McKenzie, Housing; Roy Dewar, Employment; Perry Miller, Grants and Gratuities.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND     SEVENTY Band
A lot oi brass;    2. Fortissimo.
Johnny and  Arthur;    4. Close  harmony  at rehearsal;    5.  At  the  Home  Ec.  balL
Everyone loves a parade, and the nucleus of
any parade is the cymbal crashing, flute-playing,
spirit-raising band. This reason alone would
guarantee the popularity of the Varsity Band at
any function. Add to this their musical ability
and spirit and you get the picture of an organization that instills enthusiasm into any affair at
which they present their music.
Under the direction of Arthur W. Delamont,
the thirty-nine men and a girl practise every Friday noon in the Brock.
Much of the enthusiasm of the band came
from the Executive, which included John Bayfield,
President; Ken Grant, Vice-President; and Reg.
Anderson, Secretary-Treasurer.
.   .   .   PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-ONE Film
Society
Education of the public by films has been the
object of the Film Society this year. To facilitate
this aim, the society has shown films of an educational and general interest each Wednesday at
noon hour, in the Auditorium.
After Christmas full length feature pictures were
shown for the benefit of those students living on
the campus.
Gwynn Holtby. Harry Nicholson.
Norman Barton, Lou Henderson,
Tommy Klopp.
As well as education of the public, the society
took care of its own education by sponsoring a
series of talks on the fields of movie camera
operations and the taking of films.
The executive this year was Norman Barton,
Honorary President; Harry Nickolson, President;
Clarence Henderson, Vice-President; Tom Klopp,
Secretary-Treasurer;    Gwynn   Holtby,    Publicity
The membership of the Newman Club is composed of members of the Catholic faith. Throughout the year the members carry out a three-fold
programme, consisting of the promotion of religious, cultural and social activities.
This year meetings were held twice a month.
Guest speakers were invited to address the club
Newman
Club
Leo Leavy. M. Francis, Aline Ralston, Herb Capozzi, Jack Leavy.
at these meetings. Discussion meetings were also
held. Several social meetings at the homes of
members were featured throughout the year.
The executive this year consists of Leo and
Jack Leavy, co-Presidents; Marguerite Byrnes,
Vice-President; Alene Roulston, Recording Secretary; Dave Francis, Secretary; and Herbert Capozzi, Treasurer.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-TWO   . Biological
Discussions
Club
Norman   Wright  Art   Waldie.   Joan
Anderson, Don Alderdice.
The Biological Discussion Club was organized
to stimulate interest among students in the fields
of biological science, and to give the members
training in the preparation and presentation of
papers of a scientific nature.
The members, both graduates and undergraduates, sponsor a series of lectures.
Another interesting meeting was "Observation
night". Field trips were made to the Frasea
Dairy Farms and  the Western Peat  Company.
The executive was Professor G. J. Spencer, honorary president; Art Waldie, president; Norm
Wright, vice-president; Joan Anderson, secretary-
treasurer; and Don Alderdice, curator.
Dawson
Club
John   Fyles.   Bob   Seraphim.   Fred
Rulquist,  John  Wheeler.
The G. M. Dawson Club comprises fourth and
fifth year Metallurgical and Geological Engineers
and Arts students who are taking required geology courses.
This year's meeting were held weekly. Here
each member gave a talk on topics related to
various branches of metallurgy and geology.
Meetings were held monthly to provide oppor
tunity for speeches from members of the Faculty
and from practising engineers.
These meetings were followed by a discussion
and a social evening.
This year's executive was Bob Seraphim, President; Fred Rutquist, Vice-President; John Fyles,
Secretary-Treasurer; and John Wheeler, fourth
year representative.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND     S E V E N T Y - T H R E E University
Symphonic
Club
Tom    Mallinson,
Steve Howlett
Jean    Thompson.
The University Symphonic Club was organized
last year to foster an interest in classical music
among the students on this campus.
The club presented three concerts each week
throughout this year. The programs were chosen
fror a survey taken among members as to the
music they enjoy most.
The club secured a reduced rate for students
attending the Vancouver symphonies.
The Societys' programmes were open to all
students interested. The club endeavors to fill
the gap left by a non-existent Department of Music
at the University.
The executive this year consisted of Steve Howlett, President; Jean Thompson, Secretary-Treasurer; and Programme Director, Tom Mallinson.
Menorah
Society
The Menorah Society is an international organization open to all University students of the
Jewish faith. The primary purpose of the Club
is to act as official spokesman of the Jewish men
and  women.
This year Menorah has held open meetings
which were addressed by such prominent speakers as Mr. Saul Hayes, who attended the San
Rochelle Epstein, Harriet Hochman.
Rae Pastinsky. Al Schulbaum. Florence   Brody.
Len Hyman. Reta Weinsteln, Art
Goldberg.
Francisco and UNRRA conferences.
The club sponsored bowling and skating parties, social, musicals and discussions groups during the year.
Members of the executive were Arthur Goldberg, President; Harriet Hochman, Vice-President;
Rochelle Epstein, Secretary; and Rae Pastinsky,
Treasurer.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND     SEVENTY-FOUR Forestry
Club
Dave Bakewell. Tonunp Thomphon.
AL Webster, Harry Castillou.
The promotion of, and interest in forestry is the
object of the members of the Forestry Qub. They
also strive to establish a closer contact between
students and outside interests in forestry.
During the year, lectures were given to the
students by prominent members of the lumbering
industry, forestry profession, and the faculty.
Members also offered papers to the club.
The club published the "Forestry Qub News
Letter" which contains addresses and general
information of graduates of recent years. The
executive consists of J. Liersch, Honorary President; D. Bakewell, President; A. Webster, Vice-
President; S. Korsch, Acting Secretary; T. Thomson,
Treasurer, and H. Castillou, Publicity Manager.
Chinese
Club
Gilbert  Wong.   Elsie  Wong.   Vivien
Wong, Man Chum.
The Chinese Students' Club is organized to promote friendly relations among Chinese students.
It also aims to promote international good-will
between it and other campus organizations. All
Chinese students automatically become members
upon entering the University.
The club promotes discussion groups and holds
a series of social evenings throughout the year.
At the beginning of the year the club welcomed
its new members with a private Froash reception.
The club also sponsored a Christmas party and
an open dance in the Spring.
This year the Executive consisted of: Gilbert
Wong, President; Vivian Wong, Vice-President;
Elsie Wong, Secretary; Mun Lum, Treasurer; and
Dick Chow, Social Convener.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-FIVE Women's
Public
Speaking
Club
Poise and personality in speaking is the purpose for which the Women's Public Speaking Club
was organized.
Much support was givn to the club this year
by outside critics, who were invited by the club
to hear these speeches. These critics offered their
opinions to help the speakers improve.
In the spring term the agenda was varied with
Marguerite   Byrnes,    Hazel   Greenwood.  Helen  Kitos.
a series of guest speakers. A special course by
a dramatic coach in the mechanics of speech
and voice was also given.
Social meetings were held each term.
The executive consists of Dean Dorothy Mawdsley, Honorary President; Marguerite Byrnes, President; Hazel Greenwood, Vice-President; and
Helen Kitos, Secretary.
Chess
Club
From the beginning of our historical world, the
game of chess has been played by all peoples.
As University students, the members of the club
find that the endless numbers of combinations of
plays, the unlimited possibilities in planning and
cocentratio which chess offers has for them a
special appeal.
The club activities  include organized  tourna-
M. Rothstein. J. Hammerslag, Chuck
Dowding.
ments both on the campus and with outside clubs.
The older members also give tuition to the novices of the game. Any week members may be
seen playing individual challenge games in the
Brock.
The executive this year was Chuck Dowding,
President; Julius Hammerslag, Secretary; and
Morton Rothstein, Treasurer.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-SIX Letters
Club
Sheila Davy. Peter Ajello.
The Letters Club, the oldest discussion club on
the campus, has as its purpose the study of literature as a joy.
The club meets twice a month to discuss the
works of various English authors. Some of the
subjects which were discussed this year were:
Aldous, Huxley, Satire and Irony in Jane Austin,
The Poety of Two Wars, The  1930's in Drama,
Virginia Woolf, Joseph Conrad, E. J. Pratt, British
and American Humour Today, and Thomas
Wolfe.
One meeting was set aside for the presentation
of original works of the members.
The executive consists of Professor J. H. Creighton, Honorary President; Peter Ajello, President;
and Sheila Davy, Secretary-Treasurer.
Varsity
Christian
Fellowship
Jean Oben, Joan Frewing, Bill
L'oyd, John Vandrick. Jim Martin,
Bob  Hampton, Nora Campbell.
The Varsity Christian Fellowship is primarily
concerned with promoting faith in God and His
Son Jesus Christ, as the justification for a way of
life and as the basis of successful living.
To promote this ideal, the Fellowship held this
year, a programme of study groups, devotionals
and inter-Varsity conferences.
This year the executive was Jim Martin, President; Nora Campbell, Vice-President; Jojan Frewing, Corresponding Secretary; Jean Oben, Treasurer; Bob Hampton, Membership Secretary; John
Vandrich, Missionary Secretary; Bil Lloyd, Engineers' Representative; and Ken Smith, Advertising
Manager.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND     S E V E N T Y - S E V E N Psychology
Club
The study of psychology, the science of the
working of the mind, is the object of the members
of the Psychology Club.
Field trips are made to Gordon House and
Essondale, as well as to other places where the
use of psychology is extensively practised.
Members are addressed by prominent speakers
on subjects which are closely allied to psychol-
Tom   Mal'inson.   Virginia   Bampton,
Emma Beech. Frank Bishop.
ogy. This year these speakers included Doctor
Topping, whose subject was marriage predictions,
and Miss Gorrie of Gordon House, who spoke on
community work.
The executive members for 1945-46 were: Frank
Bishop, President; Virginia Bampton, Vice-President; Tom Mallinson, Secretary-Treasurer; Irene
Wilson, Social Convener.
Glider
Club
The building and flying of gliders is the object
of the members of the Thunderbird Gliding and
Soaring Club. With an eye to the future, the
members hope to graduate into an aviation club.
The membership has been large.
The club members have taken wings in a
wooden frame glider of their own construction.
It is thought that a second glider, appropriated
Hank Zitko, William Adams. George
McLeod, Frank Woodward, Barry
Jeffries.
from the Vancouver Glider Club, will be in the
air before long. A new project of the Thunderbirds is the construction of a sailplane, when
prefabrication kits become available.
The original executive remains in office. It
consists of: Frank Woodward, President; Bill
Adams, Secretary-Treasurer; Barry Jefferies and
George McLeod, Production Managers.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY - E I GHT 'it American
Institute Of
Chemical
Engineers
Don Stewart. John Welton, Gordon
Barrow, Dr. Seyer. Gordon Ames,
Eric Raeville.
All fourth and fifth year chemical engineers are
members of the Student Chapter of the American
Institute of Chemical Engineers.
The purpose of the Chapter is to promote student interest in Chemical Engineering. The club
provides an opportunity for the members to present technical papers.
On the social side the members held a dance
in the Fall term. The fifth year students were
also guests of Dr. W. F. Seyer at his annual stage
party.
The executive this year consisted of John Welton, President; Gordon Barrow, Librarian; Eric
Raeville, Vice-President; Gordon Ames, Secretary-
Treasurer; Don Stewart, Corresponding Secretary;
and Dr. W. F. Seyer, Coordinator.
Fencing
Club
Steve Howlett. Evelyn Atkinson. Ken
Carter.
Entirely new on the campus this year was the
fencing club, which rose from the ranks of those
who took fencing classes in Physical Training.
The club employs a professional instructor, Hale
Atkenson, who has had considerable experience
The fencing meetings were held in the Armouries. A series of discussions on the art of
fencing were sponsored by the club.
Because of the newness of the slub, skill was
no requisite to membership this year. However,
it is expected that by next year the club will field
a trained fencing team with which they hope to
enter inter-collegiate contests.
The executive consists of Ken Carter, President;
Steve Howlett, Vice-President; and Evelyn Atkenson, Secretary.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTY-NINE »    Pre-
Optometrists
The Pre-Optometry Club is the youngest club
on the campus, being organized early in January
to congregate students—those students whose
future lies in optometry.
Because of the increased interest by students
of optometry at U.B.C, and the possibility that
some would not be able to attend the only school
in Canada at Toronto, the predominant purpose
Gerry   Hilton.   Dr.   A.   M.   Crocker.
John  Tennant  Desmond Littlewood.
at present is to ascertain the possibility of an
optometry school here.
The Executive consists of Dr. A M. Crooker,
Honorary President; Geny Hilton, President;
Gordon McKee, Vice-President; Desmond Little-
wood, Secretary-Treasurer; June Lawrence, Recording Secretary, and John Temmant, Programme
Convenor.
Camera
Club
The Camera Qub was organized to further on
the campus the science and art of photography
and its applications. The club also aims to facilitate the exchange by its members of information
and ideas on the subject.
Somewhat cramped by the loss of its darkroom
early in the fall term, the club managed to set
up another room before the end of the term.   Lec-
Bob McLellan. Ingrid Granberg.
tures were given by guest spakers on all artistic
and technical aspects of photographic work.
Something entirely new to the club, a photographic display, was held on the campus early in
the Spring term.
The executive of the club this year consisted of
Bob McLelland, President, and Ingrid Granberg,
Secretary-Treasurer.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY   .    .   . Engineering
Christian
Fellowship
Gordie   Wolfram,   Jack   MacLellan,
Bill Lloyd. Bob Cox.
Established last year, the Engineers' Chapter
of the Varsity Christian Fellowship aims to present in a straightforward way the practical
Christian Life as set forth in the Bible.
This year the club sponsored a series of
talks by business men, Engineers, and Sportsmen, who spoke of the facts upon which the
future Engineers could base their faith.
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Featured on the program this term was a
large and very successful "Engineers' Project"
at the Vancouver Bible School.
The fellowship also held a weekly Bible
Study Group, and together with the Varsity Christian Fellowship, entered a powerful team in the
intra-mural sports.
Mathematics
Club
Michael Ozeroff. Dave Carter, Bernie
Ostle.
The mathematics club, open to all third and
fourth year students as well as to graduates interested in mathematics, enjoyed a very successful
year with many prominent members of faculty
addressing the club at its bi-weekly meetings.
The club, formed to foster student interest in
things mathematical, held meetings at the houses
of the various members during the term.    Stu-
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dents gave talks on a wide range of topics of
current interest to the club. The typical subjects
included Peter Pudney's lecture on Stereographic
Projection, and Dr. Murdoch's on Map Projection.
Book prizes were by the club.
The Executive included: Michael Ozeroff,
President; Dave Carter, Vice-President; Bernie
Ostle, Sec'y-Treasurer.
.    .    .    PAGE    TWO     HUNDRED    AND     EIGHTY-ONE The electrical engineering students of the fourth
and fifth years are given a helpful introduction
to their future professional life through the Students' Branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers.
Through movie projections, inspection trips,
and guest speakers, members become acquainted
with a variety of professional questions.
American
Institute of
Electrical
Engineers
•
Prof.   W.   B.   Coulthard,   Ken   Broe.
Mike Bodnar. John Sansum, William
Gill. Bob Lister
In special trips have been made to H.M.S.
Implacable, the hydro power plant at Stave Falls,
the studios of "C.B.R." and the central station of
the B.C.  Telephone Company.
This year's executive consists of Professor W.
B. Coulthard, Counsellor; Ken Broe, Chairman;
John Sansum, Secretary-Treasurer; William Gill,
Assistant Secretary; and Mike Bodnar, Librarian.
Engineering
Institute
The Engineering Institute of Canada, Student
Branch, is composed of students from all branches
of engineering. During the year, the club sponsors
addresses by speakers on various aspects of the
Among those features this year were L. Austin Bright, who spoke on "Floating Harbours used
after D-Day", and W. P. Henderson who discussed
the famous Ripple Rock Project.
Hank     Kolbeins,     Philip     Herring,
Gordon Heal, Bill Batsmen.
Members also attend the student night at the
Vancouver Chapter of the E.I.C, at which members from the student chapter give papers.
The Executive for this year consists of Gordon
Heal, President; Hank Kolbeins, Secretary-Treasurer; Philip Herring, Pres. 4th year; Bill Batemen,
Secretary-Treasurer 4th year, and Roy Hooley,
E.U.S. Representative.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-TWO Historical
Society
Pat   White,   Jane   Macintosh.   Don
Oliver.
"The present day political problems of the several countries of the world" was the historical topic
chosen by the members of the Historical Society
for this year. Made up almost entirely of third
and fourth year students majoring in History, the
Society meets every two weeks to listen to papers
presented by the members pertaining to the topic
chosen at the beginning of the year.
At the end of the year the reports are bound
and filed in the Library.
In addition to these talks, several panel discussions were held in the course of the year upon
topics of current historical significance.
The executive of the club htis year were: Pat
White, President; Don Oliver, Vice-President; and
Jane Mcintosh, Secretary.
Chemical
Institute of
Canada
Dr.   M   J.   Marshal.   Betty   Olson.
Charlie Bullen. Joan Richards, Ross
Stewart.
The former Chemical Society this year joined
a nation-wide organization, the Chemical Institute
of Canada, as a student chapter. This new organization, for professional chemists, was formed to
advance chemistry and the chemical industry.
The club has been fortunate this year in obtaining several excellent speakers at their noon
hour meetings, including Mr. E. R. Rowzee of the
Polymer Corporation at Sarnia, and Dr. Blythe
Eagles of the Dairying Department of U.B.C. Other
activities of the Qub have included films.
Officers for this year included Dr. M. J. Marshall, Honorary Chairman; Ross Stewart, Joan
Richards, Vice-Chairmen; Betty Olson, Secretary;
Charles Bullen, Treasurer; Neil Henderson, Third
Year Rep., and Jim Buchanan, Graduate Rep.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-THREE Le Cercle Francaise
The Cercle Francais is a club organized by
students interested in the French language and
customs. The club gives the French student practice in carrying on conversations in French; it
also gives them an opportunity of learning more
of "La Belle France".
At the monthly meetings this year, the members
heard talks on the French people, their ways, and
their culture, given by members of the faculty.
The executive for this year consisted of Rohan
Peele, President; Aline Roulston, Vice-President;
Ruth White, Secretary-Treasurer; and sponsor,
Dr. Deborah Aish.
American Society of Mechanical  Engineers
The student branch of the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers aims to acquaint its members with the practical side of engineering. It
also gives them an opportunity for practice in
the presentation of technical papers.
Weekly meetings were held throughout the
year, at which student papers were presented.
.   During  the  year,   the  Society makes  several
field trips to observe the operation of local factories. This year the factories visited included
B.C. Marine Engineering, Vivian Diesel, and
H.M.S. Glory.
This year the executive consisted of Professor
F. W. Vernon, Honorary President; Tom Scott,
President; Ernie Rhodes, Vice-President; Don
Stevens, Secretary; Geoff Parkinson, Librarian;
and Dune. Pitman, fourth year representative.
International  Relations Club
Performing one of the important jobs on the
campus, the International Relations Club has had
a successful year in keeping students interested
and informed on world affairs.
Speakers of national and international renown
has been brought to the campus uder the auspices
of the club to give the student body both the
broader aspects and the colse-up views of International problems.
The United Nations Charter, and the future of
world organization, have been the main interests
of the IRC this year.
The executive this year consisted of Dave
Reimer, President; Doug. Leiterman, Secretary-
Treasurer; Peter Lindenfeld, and Irene Grayston.
Physics Society
The Physics Society is composed of a small
group of upper-class students who are interested
in studying the extra-curricular aspects of Physics.
Meetings are held every two weeks. At each
of these meetings, a paper is given by a professor, student or visitor.
After  Christmas,   students  present  papers  for
a contest for which book prizes were awarded to
the Senior students.
Although membership in the club is limited to
Junior, Senior and Graduate students in Physics,
the meetings are open to all persons interested.
The executive for this year consistd of Bill
Thomson, President; Art Johnson, Vice-President;
Dave Carter, Secretary-Treasurer.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-FOUR Economics Club
The discussion of current economic problems of
local and world-wide interest is the purpose for
which the Economics Society was organized.
At the regular meeting of the club, papers on
these subjects are presented by senior members
of the society. Many animated discussions were
there result of the vitally important and often
controversial topics of world affairs, chosen for
this year.
Dr. H. F. Angus, head of the Economics Department of the University, addressed the opening
meeting in the Fall. He spoke on the London
conference of the UNRRA which he personally
attended.
The executive this year was Dr. C. W. Topping,
Honorary President; Marjorie Smith, President;
Doug. Belyea, Vice-President; and Jacqueline
Batt, Secretary-Treasurer.
Physics Exchange
The Physics Exchange Society was formed last
year by those students in advanced physics and
mathematics desiring informal talks in the general field of science. The purpose of these "Seminars" is not only to present the information to
the students but also to give each member some
practice in organizing material, in presenting this
material to an audience and in abstracting the
material for publication."
Another objective of the club is to give members some practice in the technique of conducting
a business meeting by having the speaker of
one week the chairman of the following meeting.
Consequently the only club officer necessary is a
Recording Secretary, responsible for organization.
This position was held this year by C. D. Maun-
sell.
Radio Hams
The Amateur Radio Operators' Association,
frequently known as the "Radio Hams", was
formed this year to congregate those on the
campus interested in Amateur Radio.
This year the club has almost completed a
250 watt transmitter to operate on the short wave
bands. A short wave receiver was also been
Durchased. Morse code practises are given daily,
as well as instructive lectures by prominent radio
experts.
In the near future, the club hopes to communicate with other amateurs, especially those of
other Universities.
. The Executive consists of Dr. G. M. Shrum,
Honorary President; Cecil Yip, President; Mike
Kelcey, Vice-President; Ralph Gordon, Secretary-
Treasurer; R. K. Brown, Technical Advisor; R.
Cooper and E. V. Hird, Code Instructors, and
Tom Whittemore, Theory Instructor.
Latino Americano Club
Following the organization of the Spanish department, a new club, El Circulo Latino Americano
was founded on the campus this year. The
object of this club is the study of South American
customs and Spanish conversation.
This year the club met twice a month.
At these meetings, the students carried on a
series of Spanish conversation. They also learned
Spanish songs.   These activities were interspersed
with the showing of films.
The executive included Dr. C. Vyner Brooks,
Honorary President; Walter Hirtle, President;
Helen Brown, Vice-President; Genevieve Johnson,
Secretary; Bob Armstrong, Treasurer; and Heather
Blundell, Program Convener.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-FIVE RESIDENCES
1. Co-op house mother;    2. Barney fries:    3. Obviously posed;    4. Sun worshipper;    5.  and puppy dogs' tales;    6. Dainty;
7. Inhuman;    8. 16 more days;    9. ergo pu is constant.
Forerunning the establishment of student residences on the campus are three organizations:
Acadia Camp, the Fort Camp, and the University
Students'  Co-operative Association.
Largest of these boarding places is the University-operated Acadia Camp housing 145 single
men, 50 women, and 25 married men and their
families.
Siturated about a mile from the campus just
off University Boulevard, the nucleus of the residence is a former Provincial Government forestry
camp. The buildings have been renovated and
steam heat installed. Since starting operation last
September several army huts have been reconverted and added to the ever-growing establishment.
Out on the end of the Point about fifteen minutes' walk from the campus nestles the Fort Camp,
also operated by the University.   Arrangements
at the Fort are similar to those at Acadia except
that men only are accommodated and the kitchen
is presided over by C.S.M. A. P. MacDowell.
Oldest of all student residences are the houses
operated by the University Students' Co-operative
Association Although hard hit by the housing
shortage, the Co-op has managed to keep one
men's and one women's house in operation. Because of this severe limitation of accommodation
the Co-op has been forced to turn away over a
hundred applicants, but plans for expansion are
well underway.
In the two residences the keynote is co-operation, with all members doing their share of
the housework. Only the evening meal is prepared by the housemother.
Living and working together the residents
develop a spirit of co-operation and responsibility
which will serve them in good stead in the years
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-SIX 1. Chief cook and bottle washer:    2. Maurer looking silly:    3.  Oh babe;    4. Chow;    5. Catnap;    6. How  do you like my
shorts. Ma?:    7. Line-up:    8. Lois and food;    9. Bliss:    10. The Pied Piper.
.   .   PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-SEVEN 1. Home sweet home:    2. Who's he?;    3. Working hard;    4. Home work;    5. Chore lists;   6. A lighter moment;    7. HI, there;
8. A Joker;    9. I can't lind it;    10. School loyalty;    11. What'sa scienceman without his sliderule?;    12. Chel
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTY-EIGHT   . 1. The turning of the sod. 2. At the Medical Ball. 3. Open House display. 4. Lunch-time. 5. Gas rationing is over. 6. Reflections. 7. Open, sesame. 8. Harry Castillou in a serious mood. 9. You can see anything during rushing. 10. Alpha Phi booth
raises money for the gym.
PAGE    TWO     HUNDRED     AND     EIGHTY-NINE %-y
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CLASSMATES
y
ENTERPRISE
h
CHIEVEMENT is not a single performance
but the teamplay of loyal and conscientious
endeavor. In British Columbia the builders are
those who have invested energy and money in the
future growth of the province of their choice.
B. C. Electric is proud to belong to this team.
It regards high in its assets the loyalty of over
5,500 employees and the confidence of 30,000
persons who have their savings invested with the
company.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-TWO
% BADGE OF STYLE LEADERSHIP
The   label   in   the   garment   is   a
matter   of   pride   or   indifference
Vancouver women  are proud to have this
"WILLARD'S" label on their clothes because
it is the "BADGE of STYLE LEADERSHIP"
Index . . .
Abbott, Arnold T. 121
Abbott, Clifford Robt. 132
Abbott, Robert W  148
Abbott, Tom   258
Abercrombie, Evan W. 132
Abernethy, Margaret.. 178
Abrahamson, J. J. 125, 263
Abrahamson, M. R  125
Adam, Frank  ,. 132
Adam James C.   164
Adams, Wm. S. _. 161, 278
Adamovich,   Claudette 132
Adams, Anne-Ellen 149
Adams, Donald K  144
Adie, Lawrence   159
Ades, Audrey   178
Agnes, Phyllis   132
Aha, Aaro Emil .. 164,    90
Ainscough, Ralph   164
Ainsworth,   Allen  	
  113, 72, 254,  252
Aird, Wm. J.        158
Aird, J.   260
Aitchison,   Kennth  M.  125
Aitken, James D.   132
Aitken, Thos.   153
Ajello, Peter   113, 277
Akeroyd, Jas. H  170
Alaric, Perle W  132
Alderdice, D. F... 113, 263
Alexander, E.A   182
Allan, Harvey M.   218
Allan, John Dykes __    57
Allan, John R. 257
Allder, Frank Harris _ 132
Allen, Ella Kathleen .. 121
Allen, George   153, 256
Allen, James   132
Allman, Arthur Wm. .. 164
Allison, Geo. W  156
Allman, Mary B. 175, 244
Allsebrook, Naomi J... 179
Allport, Margaret H. .. 179
Ames, Gordon Wm  279
Anders, Benjamin   148
Anderson, Albert A. __ 153
Anderson, Dan   257
Anderson, Donald M. 258
Anderson, Eliz. .. 185, 244
Andrews, Ernest H. __ 148
Anderson Evelyn M. .. 175
Anderson, Geo. C. 121, 259
Anderson, Joan _ 263
Anderson, John Jas. .. 132
Anderson, K. J. _. 113, 245
Anderson, R. S  271
Anderson, Richd. P. .. 125
Andrew, Fred John _ 158
Andrews, D. A.   248
Andrews, Dorothy J. ~ 132
Andrews, John H. M. 161
Angel, Donald M.   132
Angus, Anne Seton   125
Angove, Edith   113
Apps, Geo. Edw.     132
Aqur, Harry 136
Archeck,   Lillian   125, 244
Archer, Elmer R.  149
Archibald, Roy Wm. .. 161
Arlidge, Jos. W. C. ____ 125
Armstrong, Bruce   262
Armstrong, Jean   179
Armstrong, K. S. 185, 255
Armstrong, Robt. J.   121
Armstrong, Wm. N. _ 132
Armytage, Margt. E. ._ 125
Arneson,  Geo. B.    149
Ascroft, Gerald C.  144
Ashton, Philip Wm. ._ 88
Asselstine, Jas. W. .... 253
Atkins, Roma Joyce .. 172
Atkinson, Evelyn   279
Atkinson, Donald Jas. 132
Aubrey, Roland Geo... 132
Augustine, Betty V.  172
Augustus,  Joe        170
Auld, Bert Alex.   144
Auld, Jean Thelma   125
Avery, Elsie G  125
Ayers, John Douglas .. 125
Baal, Geo. Gilbert .... 164
Baalim, Barbara   132
Babb, Albert Leslie _. 161
Bailey, Jas. M. M  164
Baillie, Christine M. _. 121
Bain, Wm. Arthur  223
Baker, David J.   164
Baker, R. M.   125, 247
Baker,  Wallace   113
Bakewell, David R.   ... 275
Bakken,   Ole	
146, 247, 256, 194, 196
Bakony, Chas. E.   132
Bakony, Stella C.      ... 125
Bakony, E. B.  186
Baldwin, Geo. Walter 132
Baldwin, Betty _ 175, 149
Ball, Marian 113, 98, 249
Ballentine. Patrick        264
Bamford, G. J  125, 248
Bampton, D. L. .. 121, 242
Bampton, V. 127, 278, 142
Bancroft, Gilbert L. _ 132
Banman, John  153
Banning, Stanley E. _ 149
Barclay-Ross, L. Mignon
  121, 246
Bargus, John W.       ... 132
Barish, Doris F.   179
Barker, John David .. 149
Barker, Thos. Wm. ___. 132
Barnwell, John A _. 148
Barraclough, Lila P. ._ 149
Barrett, Lilian Joan .. 185
Barrett, Robt. Joseph 164
Barrett, Dorothy E. .. 125
Barrow, G. M. .... 153, 279
Bartlet, Alexander W. 161
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-THREE THE UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium Building, was established for the convenience
of the Students and has effected a considerable saving to the Students in time and money. It is prepared
to supply all Text Books required for the various
courses offered in the University, also such articles
as Note Books, Loose-Leaf Sheets, Fountain Pens,
Drawing Paper and Instruments.
Bartlett, Leslie H. .  125
Barton, Donald C. 164, 216
Barton, George __ 113, 260
Barton,  Norman    272
Bassett, B. A  125, 244
Bateman, Ellen Leona 132
Bateman, Wm. A. 	
   158, 282, 262
Bates,  Elmer  Wallace 149
Batty,  Ruth A. .. 125
Baumbrough, Edna D. 185
Bawden, Rosemary J. 170
Baxter, Anne Hewitt ~ 121
Baxter, Bernice M.   245
Bayles,  Ted    125
Bayfield.   J.   170, 253, 271
Bay lis, Gregory F  132
Bayle, Lemuel   144
Bayne, Margt. J.  125, 246
Beal, Evan S.      ._ 158
Beamer, G.  H. .. 149, 259
Bean, John Massie   132
Beard,   Jas.   Seymour    88
Beaumont, Evan A.   232
Beavan,  Rodney    182
Beck, Fridella .... 125, 247
Beck, James _     132
Becker,  Ruth  R.   125, 247
Becker, Wilfred H  132
Beduz, Louis Bernard 132
Beech, E.  _.  113, 278, 242
Beesley, Bernard   125
Begert, Henry K. 146, 257
Beguin,   Andre     259
Beharrell, Alice    .....   . 132
Behnsen,   Kenneth   C. 132
Belanger,   Maurice    164
Bell, Doreen C  148
Bell, G. Mary  168
Bell, Gordie   168
Bell, Gertrude   121
Bell,   John     132
Bell, John Murray ._.. 132
Bell, John Nairn   132
Bell, James Lewis   132
Bell, Kenneth Edw.   132
Bell, Lois Jean  132
Bell, Margery Irene .. 132
Bell, Mary A   242
Bell-Irving, H 148, 264
Bell-Irving, E..... 121, 250
Bell-Irving, R. H.     .... 132
Belrose, John Skelton 132
Belton, Nancy   113, 248
Belyea,   Douglas     264
Bentley,  Wm. F.  125, 255
Bennett,  Mavis     175
Bennet, Margt. K. 146, 250
Bennett, Owen K _ 113
Bergstrom, J. A.   149
Berisford, Robert     125
Berry, Frances E.   175
Berry, Hugh Ervin   164
Berry, William J.      ._ 172
Berson, Morris J. 158, 263
Bertram, Donald W. .. 132
Berto, Irene Mildred 121
Best, Helen Louise   125
Beveridge, Jas. A. 152, 159
Beveridge John Wm. ._ 153
Bevan, R. D.        153
Bewell, Bruce E . 137, 157
   98, 252, 262, 237
Biddle, Geoff rev R. ._ 132
Bigsby, Elizabeth J. _. 125
Biggs,   Florence  Ethel 132
Billings,   John            132
Bird, John M  155, 262
Birkinghaw, Adele G. 125
Birmingham, Wm. P. 148
Birney, Wm. Jack .. 182
Bishop, Doris M. 175, 243
Bishop, Frank 113, 278
Bishop, Herbert P. .... 132
Bishop, L. G. _— 148
Bissell, Glenn Edw. _ 132
Biss, Frank Alan . -132
Black, Evelyn A. . - 175
Black, Daphne J. 131, 132
Black, Francis Lee . 121
Black Runa A. _. 146, 250
Blair, Albert Donald . 164
Blair, D. C. 167, 168, 253
Blair, Olive M. _. 146, 245
Blais, Marie A. .. 121, 248
Blake, Ian S. 148, 208, 209
Blakely, Robt. K. .  132
Blakeley, Wm. John .. 164
Bloom, Norma E. 132, 80
Bloor, Geo. Albert .... 132
Bluechel, Allan    161
Blundell, June Rose _ 132
Blundell, H. 120, 121, 246
Bluechel, June Edith .. 125
Bodie, Donald Osborne 132
Bodie, Robert T.  148
Bodnar, A.  W.       144, 282
Boe, Vera I. L.   179
Bogas, Kenneth Peter 125
Bolton, Jane Elizabeth 132
Bone,  Margt.  M.   175, 243
Bonel, William E.  146
Bonner, Robt. Wm. ... 182
Booth, Elizabeth Alice 121
Eooth, Richard D. 148, 261
Borden, Jane L. 113
Borgerson M. Patricia 245
Borthwick, John Wm. 125
Bossons, F. H. ... 149, 259
Boultbee, H. P. . 121, 256
Bourns, Thos. Richd. .. 125
Bowe. Marguerite W. 175
Bowell, Steve ... 153, 262
Bowen. Jean E. . 175, 244
Eowkett, Mary-Frew _ 133
Bowie, Joan        133
Boyd, John R. 121, 257
Boyes, Margt. M. 178, 243
Boyes, Pobt. Crichton 133
Boyle, Jas. Crawford 133
Bradbury, Thelma M. 133
Bradner, G. G. _ 148, 258
Bradwell, Owen K.  „ 164
Bramhall, George   153
Brault. Madeline R. _ 133
Bray, Marshall P 133
Bray, Ronald Clifton 133
Brett, Audrey June .... 133
Briggs, Beverley H. __ 133
Brine. Ralph ___ 113, 253
Broadland. Tho«. R. . 164
Broatch, Geo. K.  133,    87
Brodie, R   257
Brockman, Arthur M. 113
Brody,   F __ 244, 247
Broe, Kenneth L. 	
152,   144,   282,   255, 251
Broman, Kurt 1  149
Brooks,  Diana E.   125
Brooks, Greta Ann   133
Brody, Florence V. ... 175
Brough, R. J. .... 121, 244
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-FOUR FOR
VALVE
DEPENDABILITY
RELY ON
VALVES WITH
THIS
TRADEMARK
JENKINS BROS. LIMITED
617 St. Remi Street   Montreal
Branch.- Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver
and  6  Great Queen   St.,   Kingiwoy,
London, W. C. X England.
JENKINS VALVES
For   industrial, engineering,   marine   and   power   plant   service
Bronze,   Iron,   Cast   Steel   and   Cor r osion - Re si sti n g   Alloys.
Sold Through Reliable Distributors Everywhere.
Jenkins Bios. Limited
617 St. Remi Street, Montreal
Branches: Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver and 6 Great Queen St.
Kingsway, London W.C.2, Eng.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-FIVE Smart Sportswear
The Year 'Round
• R captivating swim suit for your gay summer holidays ... a tailored
skirt and jacket for you who enthuse over hikes on Grouse Mountain . . .
perky dungarees for you who like to putter in the back garden ... or trim
ski jacket and slacks for swooping down the hills at Hollyburn . . . Each
Sport has its type of Clothes and the Bay Sportshop has you and your choice
of sports in mind when year 'round it specializes in having everything you
want for Sportswear. Choose your sport and match your clothes from the
Bay Sports Shop. THIRD FLOOR.
T^tttetmyl^ (Eiimptiqt.
INCORPORATED   -M M ^Y 1670
Brown, Betty B  121
Brown, Beverly M  133
Brown, David H. __ 125
Browne, E. Anne 113, 246
Brown, Frank A 133, 125
Brown,   Helen   Margt. 113
Brown, John J 133
Brown, Martin L.   113
Brown, Patricia  . 175, 248
Brown, W. Allen 149
Brown,   Thos.  L.   149,  125
Bruce, Chas. D. 146
Brummitt. Wm. M. 125
Bryant, Chas. W.  125, 261
Bruce, Marion D. 133
Bryce, John H. G. ~ 133
Buchanan, Audrey J. ....
   113, 43, 249
Buchanan, Sheila C. . 168
Bucknall, Joy .__. 121, 245
Buhler, Wm. A   164
Bullen, Chas.  F.
.     113. 112. 283, 255
Bullen, Dennis C. T. 234
Bulman, Lola M. 125, 246
Bulmer, Lloyd — -    87
Bunker, Alan P. S. 133
Bunker. .Tacoueline _ 113
Bunting, I. Joan G. . 121
Burbridpe, Eileen M. 133
Burch, O. —— 1^8
Burch. William G. ... 161
Burd, Helen Dorothy .. 125
Burgess, Richard A. .. 133
Burgess, John A	
   155,  259. 251
Burke. Ruth E. . 125, 246
Burmeister, Russell M. 164
Burnell, Joan C  125
Burnett, Wm. E  133
Burney, Ross H. 113, 257
Burns, Cecil Albert .. 161
Burns,   Helen 125, 243
Burns, Jean Audrey .. 133
Burns, Margt  121, 244
Burnside, Anson D  149
Burrows, Ivor Roger.. 149
Burrows, Michael 153, 260
Burwell, Jas. D.   164
Bushell, Norman F. .. 148
Buss, Jas. Thos. ... _ 133
Butchart. Leonard G. 164
Butler, Chas. Fredk. . 133
Butler, Eugenie  . 121, 243
Butler,  Emma I. 178
Butler,   William 125
Butterfield, Floyd L. . 164
Butterworth. Carl 170, 2^6
Byers,   Archie          260
Byers, Dorothv J _ 179
Byrn, James S.       164
Byrn, Muriel R    133
Byrnes, J. Lo.in 125
Byrnes. L. M. 121, 2^6
Cains. Richard W. ... 3 59
Cairns,   D, ... 2^8
Caldecott. PichH. S. .168
Calder, Sheila H. 113, 242
P^meron, DonaM G. .. 145
Cameron, Donald Ian 164
Cameron. Patricia A. 133
Campbell. B. J. .. 145, 146
Campbell. Dan   170
Campbell  D.   . 258
Campbell, David Fecto"
  202, 203, 204,
Campbell, Douglas D. 157
Campbell, G. G.   125
Campbell, Ian Jas  125
Campbell, Ian McN... 164
Campbell,  A.  B.   125, 240
Campbell, Marion   175
Campbell, M. McG  133
Campbell, Nora V.   277
Campbell, Thos. C  133
Campbell, Wm. E. 182, 260
Canic, Anthony J  133
Cannon, Geo. H _ 217
Cannon, Lourene   133
Cant, Jas. C _ 133
Cantell, Tom   ...  182
Canty, John Leslie  113
Caplette,  Betty    179
Capozzi, Herb	
_. 272, 202. 204. 205, 210
Carey, Leo Patrick .... 148
Carlisle, Sheila J.   185
Carman, Hel°n Ann . 133
Carmichael, H. A. 185, 258
Carmichael. C. McK. _. 133
Carmichael. D. J. ... 133
Carmichael, David J. . 133
Carmichael, Kath. 125, 249
Carney, Anne   133 ,
Carnsew, Helda M. __ 133
Carr, Monica Jnvce 133
Carrothers, A. W. 182, 264
Carruthers, Lorraine J. 179
Carson, Doue.   168
Carson, Patrick Jas. .. 133
Cprter,  A. Gordon 158
Carter, David S. .. 114, 281
Carter, DonaH G. 125
Carter, Ken. B. .. 149, 279
Carter, Stewart Mac. ~ 149
Castillou, Josephine M. 133
Castillou, H. 289, 275, 231
Caulderwood, Joan M. 114
Cawley, Marg. M. 125, 245
Challis, Thos. Wm. .... 125
Chalmers, Bev. R. 179, 242
Chambers, Jos. Earl ... 125
Chambers, M. L. _ 125, 248
Chancey, Robert  „ 172
Charters, John  .. 114
Chatwin, Mary	
  183, 185, 241, 243
Chell, Richard            .. 133
Cheng, Elmer Melville 133
Chenoweth, P. M. 114, 250
Chercover, Merwin   144
Cherniavskey, Peter A.
   161, 264
Chernov, Eva T. _ 125, 247
Chew, Barbara K.   133
Chew, Vernon B. 148, 257
Chisolm, Anita G. 126, 293
Chisolm, Shirley M. ._ 133
Chorlton, Ronald   149
Choukolos, Bill  216
Christie H. G   186
Christian, Cath. J  164
Christian, Patricia M.. 164
Chrysler, Cameron K. 149
Christie, Eileen A.      . 175
Christie,  Elizabeth M. 185
Christie, Joan  133
Chu, Jennie  148
Chum, Man  275
Churgin, Arnold   133
Chutter, Paul Walter .. 155
Clark, Constance S.  129
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-SIX Jmmh _Bh|__^_U__L   _DB____.
*■■■ ^'.r__---PH_iB_h_i_^_K_BHPiBB.
Business Is Moving To
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
E. G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister.
Forward-looking Industrialists all over the world are paying close attention to British Columbia.
With its wealth of natural resources, its open ice-free ports with their
splendid terminal facilities, its abundance of power, its climate so salu-
bious as to permit of year-round operations, it is unique from the industrial standpoint	
Its attractive living and labour conditions make for contentment and a
low labour turn-over. Its attitude towards new enterprise, and its readiness to assist with all its facilities for study and research are distinctly
encouraging.
WHAT THIS MEANS TO OUR YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN NEEDS
NO EMPHASIS. Trained and equipped to take their places in the industrial picture, the movement of business to British Columbia opens up a
fascinating field of opportunity.
Logging and Lumbering, Mining, Agriculture and Fishing all demand
their trained personnel. In the secondary industries—manufacturing in
all its branches—the possibilities are infinite.
Great years are in store for Canada. Still young among the nations, still
thinly populated, her genius, toil and daring enterprise, and the intelligence with which she has developed her vast resources, have placed her
in an unassailable position in the eyes of the world.
What applies to Canada applies equally to British Columbia. British
Columbia shall reap her full share of whatever lies in store, shall participate in full measure in Canada's prosperity and advancement. Climatically, industrially, and socially, forward-looking individuals and industrialists all over the world already see it as a great field of opportunity.
The Department of Trade and Industry
PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, VICTORIA
HON. E
C CARSON,
Minister.
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-SEVEN Planning your future...
V^OU ARE building a foundation for your career
in the business or professional world by.
obtaining a good education.   It is wise for you
to make sure early in life that you build
a good foundation for your financial future
by obtaining the right kind of life insurance policy.
mutual life representatives do not merely
sell "policies", but are trained to arrange
for you the best contract to suit your
particular circumstances and plans.
THE
MUTUAL IIF|
HhiO. CANADA k-HH
HEAD  OFFICE • WATERLOO, ONTARIO
BRANCH OFFICES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA:
402 W. PENDER ST. - - - VANCOUVER
201-4 TIMES BUILDING     -     -     -     VICTORIA
Clark, George W. P. .. 126
Clark, Joan  250
Clark, J  242
Clark, Mary  121, 245
Clark, H   133
Clark, Pauline K  133
Clark, Richard J.    185
Clarke, Joan Louise .. 114
Clarke, Joyce __.  146
Clarke, Kenneth _ 133
Clarke, Nora ..... 124, 126
Clarkson, Reg L. 196, 198
Clayton, Blanche P.      114
Clearihue, Joyce   121
Clendenning,   Beatrice 185
Clement, Earl H.   126
Clerkson, Gladys   126
Climie, Robert C.  .. 133
Coady. Mary M... 126, 243
Coan, Joseph  133
Coates, George D  133
Coates, Jack  126
Cocking, Raymond E.. 133
Cohen, Jack       149
Cocke, Kenneth R.  133
Codrington, Robt. S.      114
Coghill, Joy D  28, 241
Cole, D. P.    126
Cole, K. M.   186
Coleman. R.     ____    _  _ 134
Collins, Franklin K. S. 126
Collins, James Roy . 134
Collins, June V. 121, 242
Collins, Kenneth Mc. ._ 164
Colquhoun, J. L. 114, 242
Compsreli. David E. _ 121
Connolly, Muriel A 126
Cook, Catherine   250
Cook, Cecil   126
Cook, Richard Moxley 164
Cook, William Clifton 134
Cools, Adrienne E  121
Cooper, Donald Robert 134
Cooper, Everard L.   134
Cooper, Ernest Edgar.. 158
Coplick, Walter I. .... 164
Copp, Marion E. 114, 250
Corbett, Levi Victor .. 164
Corbitt, C. W. 126, 90, 245
Cordoni, P.   134
Cormier, Beverley M. _ 121
Cornett, Lloyd Elwood 134
Corry, Geoff  172, 216
Cory, Allan M  134
Cotter, Barbara J. 126, 248
Cotter, H. B. C. .. 157, 261
Cotterall, Gert. ._ 175, 243
Cottle, Walter       134
Cotton, Peter Neve   134
Couling, Phyllis M  114
Coulter, M. A   170, 246
Courtice, Gordon L  134
Cowan,  John    126
Cowan, Patricia 149, 246
Cowan, Peter Robert _. 148
Cowen, Stanley C. _.. 134
Cowie. Lillian M  126
Cox, Frances V. B  227
Cox, Robert Albert ... 281
Coyle, Patricia F. 114, 245
Craig, George Louis  149
Craig, John Smith   126
Craig, Margaret H.   121
Craig, William Mc.   161
Cram, William T _. 172
Crapko, Onysia  121
Craven, John Harold .. 164
Crawford, Donald H. ._ 170
Crawford, William M... 257
Creber, Ernest Basil __ 134
Creelman, Claude W. __ 149
Creery, Leslie John  134
Creighton, Kenneth David
 _ . . 146, 252, 261
Creighton, Murray T._ 233
Cribb, John Miles  148
Cribb, Reginald S  121
Crocker, C. B. .... 155, 257
Croft, Montana Joy   _ 185
Croll, Robert 215, 217
Cromie, Peter E. 148, 264
Crone, Thomas H. 185, 260
Crosby, Richard Hartt 172
Cross, Gerald Herbert 182
Cross, June Kathleen .. 134
Crossley, Edward T  134
Crowe, Mary Patricia 134
Cruickshank, John M. 134
Culos, Raymond Peter 134
Culter, Barb. A. 114, 243
Cumming, M. S. _. 126, 246
Cunningham, Fred M. 171
Cunningham, Jack 53, 182
Curby, Bernard   216
Curnow, Thea Bernice 174
Curran, Joy M. R  134
Currie, R. H  144
Currie, Hugh   134, 182
Currie, Ian H  164
Curtis, Bertram Ed.  121
Curtis, John S.   164
Cutcher, Charles A  134
Cuthbert, Betty J  149
Cuthill, L. D. J. 149, 255
Dahlquist,  Herbert  E. 114
Dain, Doris Mary  121
Dale,  David William. 134
Dalrymple, S  185, 244
Darling, John   114
Damer, Warren R.   126
Danard, Douglas C  134
Dangerfield, Phyllis .. 179
Darby, George H.  126
Davey, Grant Mc. 164, 255
Davey, Sheila .......       . 242
Davids, Doreen A. 175, 247
Davidson, Ken. E. 170, 256
Davidson, E. Merle   126
Davidson, Nancy M. .. 134
Davies, David William 134
Davies, M. E  150, 243
Davis, Evan Thomas      161
Davy, Isabel S.  114, 277
Dawe, Alan E.   104
Dawes, Sydney T.   150
Dawson, Ernest Trevor 134
Day, Alison  126
Day, John H   170
Day, June  146, 242
Daykin, Harold C. 114, 85
Dayton. Martin J. J. .. 164
Dean, Douglas A  161
Dean, Robert E.        170
Dean, Roland Richard 148
Dean, Vernon  134
Deane, Ken. H. 148, 253
Deas, Cath. P. .... 168, 241
DeBeck, Betsy-Ann . 121
DeBeck, Myra E. 114, 246
DeGrace, Lawrence A. 157
Delaney, Paul E. 131, 124
PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-EIGHT   . PHDTD    BY   HUOH   AIKINS
FDR    BEAUTY IN    REPRDDUCTIDN
PRINT    IT    LETTERPRESS
CLELAND-KENT ENGRAVING CD. LTD.
534   CAMBIE   STREET
PACIFIC   1351 VANCOUVER,   B.C.
.   .    .   PAGE    TWO    HUNDRED    AND    NINETY-NINE shoes alive with YOUTH!
608 GRANVILLE ST.
"Canada's
LARGEST exclusive *
Ladies' shoe store..."
DeLisle, Elaine M.  134
Dempster, John R. H. 134
Denholm, Isabella M. 126
Denholm, Mary P. _   126
DeNluck, Robert N  161
Dennis, Melvin Wm. .. 146
Dennys, Ronald G  161
Denton, Robin M  126
DePencier, E. M. 114, 245
Derrick, Jack B. D. .. 134
DeRoose, Clara  185
Desautels, Odille M  126
Des Brisay, Diana E. .. 134
Devlin, Ken. A. .. 167, 168
De Vooght, Peter John 134
Dewdney, Pamela 114, 246
Diamond, Isadore P. 134
Diamond, Rita ..    175, 247
Dickson, G. Ronald   134
Dilworth, Louis Revet 164
Dimock, Arthur C  144
Dines, Richard A  150
Dixon, Thomas David 134
Dmytryshyn, Stan. R. 134
Dobbin,  Lillian C. N. 134
Dobbin, Mildred M  121
Dobie, Thomas T  161
Dodd, Robert Rondell 134
Dobney, Millicent E. _ 134
Dobson. Marion P  178
Dodwell, Peter L  172
Dolmage, Mary Evelyn
   120,  121, 248
Domville, Herbert C... 168
Done, Dorothy M _ 114
Donegani, Joy 	
  112, 121, 41, 248
Doolan, Arthur Alex... 164
Dornan, Jack   230
Douglas, Colin McK. „ 159
Douglas, Mary A.  170
Dougans, Roy Andrew 108
Douglas, Ruth   179
Douglas-Tourner, 	
Philip Walter   134
Dow, Walter Huntley .. 164
Dowding, C. W. .. 153, 276
Dowman, Lorna M.  121
Downs, Kenneth Wm. 134
Driver, Joyce I.    178
Driver, M. W. J. __ 121, 242
Drope, Patricia J. 121, 248
Dryer, L. K. 150, 161, 255
Duckitt, Louis Stuart. 134
Duff, Phillip Andrew.. 161
Duff, William T.   150
Duffus, Henry J. 	
  161, 42, 78, 252
Duller, Jack A  150
Duguid, Mary Kath. .. 134
Dunbar, William   217
Duncan, Dorothy A. .. 126
Duncan, Helen J. 	
  146, 43, 241, 243
Duncan, Margaret W.. 178
Dundas, M. I. 114, 98, 243
Dundas, Robert M  161
Dunfee, D. R   150
Dunlop, A. M. ... 175, 245
Dunlop, R. D. 134, 61,    75
Dunlop, Willard G.   164
Dunn, Mike  163
Dunn, Eileen M _. 175
Durham, James T  159
Durston, Jean Marie ~ 134
Duxbury, James H.   134
Dubhaun, Thomas S. _ 134
Dyer, Laurie   150, 255
Dyrndahl, Lillian ... 175
Dyson, Sylvea   175, 248
Eagle, Malcolm  161
Eakins, Jam_s J... 126, 258
Eckman, Howard W. .. 134
Eddy, Geraldine M  175
Edgett, James R   134
Edmonds, Mildred  114
Edwards, Glyn M.  134
Edwards, Harvey 121, 260
Edwards, Martin H  134
Edwards, Robert   134
Edwards, I. W  161, 207
Edwards, John S  164
Efford, Robert J  126
Egan, Thomas J  126
Elart, Alice J   126
Elia, Nick   161
Ellingham, Joan C.   114
Elliott, Donald R.   163
Elliott, Charles Wm. .. 164
Ellis, Beverley G.   175
Ellis, Catherine  243
Ellis, Dorothy C _ 121
Ellis, Gordon M... 152, 154
Ellis, Richard Carlyle 135
Ellis, Vivian Mauretta 185
Emerson, Elliott  264
Emmons, Donald Edw. 135
Emmons, Margaret J... 135
Eng, Harry   126
Eng, Thomas S.   161
English, Allan John M. 164
Epstein, R. .. 121, 274, 247
Erickson, Everett R. .. 150
Errico,  Ernest   256
Esplen, Robert W. 135, 230
Estey, Robert M.   257
Etchell, Charles T. .... 135
Evans, Alfred E. 126, 108
Evans, Ben. H. P. 131. 135
Evans, D. S  150
Evans, W. M.   153
Ewart, Elizabeth M. .. 126
Ewert, Robert Alfred.. 135
Ewing, Frances M. 114, 250
Ewing, Sheila McG  135
Exel, Frederick L.   135
Eyres, Roberta J. 126, 242
Fadden, Patricia Kath. 135
Fagan, M. S.  121, 42, 246
Raghin, Jack  105
Fairfax, Eva M. 126
Fairweather, David M. 135
Fairweather, P. O. M. 176
Farr, Robin  121
Farquharson, Bette M. 176
Faryna, Gene William 172
Fawkes, Norman   135
Fawsitt, Joyce C  135
Feast, Joan E. C. 126, 242
Federoff, Milla  126
Fell, Glenn Macaulay.. 135
Ferguson, Donald C. .. 99
Fergusson, Eleanor J... 135
Ferguson, J. S. _ 126, 242
Ferguson, Marion A. .. 115
Ferguson, Norman  170
Feme, Harry C.   121
Ferries, Clarke H.  170
Ferry, J. N  146, 98, 264
Field, Ross Benson   135
Field, W. L   150
Finley, Russel H.   126
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED The
BRITISH COLUMBIAN
— DAILY AND WEEKLY —
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED NEWSPAPER IN B.C.
X HE Daily and Weekly BRITISH COLUMBIAN is the only
established medium that completely covers the rich New Westminster and Fraser Valley trading area.
COVERAGE IN EXCESS OF COMBINED METROPOLITAN
PAPERS
Hfc
______ ',^..-^:...^.....;...„,;......,.-;...„.7..,.	
Published in New Westminster, British Columbia Continuously
for Eighty-six Years
I.   G.   MacFARLANE,    Publisher.
.   PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    ONE Challenger Watches
are known throughout
Canada for
dependability and
long service
SELECT YOUR CHALLENGER
at
Jewelers
Silversmiths
VANCOUVER, B.C.
YOU MAY DO BETTER
WITH
KEYSTONE
BRAND
Looseleaf Sheets
and Binders
Choose Keystone Brand for all
your class and study work
Smith Davidson & Wright
Limited
VANCOUVER — VICTORIA — EDMONTON
CALGARY
Finning, Joanne E  135
Fisher, Donald C. M. .. 104
Fisher, Eleanor Jane     135
Fisher, H. Dean   186
Fisher, T. K.     181, 258
Fitzpatrick, R. C. D. .. 126
Fitzpatrick, S. T. 159, 259
Flann, Beverly     135
Flavelle, Sidney 115, 248
Fleetwood, Cecilia C._ 115
Fleming, John Blair .. 253
Fleming, Tom __„..  148
Flesher, Mary F._ 115, 246
Fletcher, Alan E _ 160
Foerster, Darryl K.   121
Foote, Geraldine . 126, 83
Forbes, Jack Andrew.. 146
Forbes, James W. 150, 255
Forbes, Mary Agnes .. 174
Forbes, Patricia I. 126, 243
Ford, Margaret J.   121
Fordyce, D. B. 153, 72, 255
Forrest, Jim ._  150
Forrester, Annie L.   135
Forrester, Barbara S... 150
Forrester. James H. A. 126
Forrest, Hugh Lindsay 135
Forsythe, Beatrice E.. 126
Forsyth, John Alex. .. 206
Forward, Charles N. _. 135
Foster, Lois Corinne .. 135
Fowler, Evelyn M.  115
Fowler, Rae Eliz. E. .. 115
Fowler, Richd. W. 146, 261
Fowler, S. Pat 	
  121, 75, 105, 252
Fox, Charles Raynor .. 164
Foxeroft, Joseph D.  126
Francis M. D  115, 272
Franklin, Harry J.     _
  252, 256, 196, 197
Frankovitch, Cecil J. _. 164
Fraser, D.   257
Fraser, Frank S 164
Fraser, Geraldine J. .. 126
Fraser, Joan       84, 246
Fraser, John D   253
Freeman, Charles B. .. 126
Freeman. Jack A.   172
Freeze, George A _. 253
Freudiger, Ronald _ 148
brewing, Joan H. 121, 277
Frey, John Dallas   164
Frey, John Henry   230
Frith. Patrick         257
Frolie, Gordon E. _ 148
Frostrup. Eilsha 174, 249
Fullerton, Margaret A. 121
Fullerton, P. A. 126, 249
Fulton, Andrew W. _ 161
Fulton, W. Graham 172
Fuoco, John Raymond 122
Fundy, Walter          150
Fyffe, Gordon John .... 135
Fy'es, James T. .... 159
Fyles, John G. __ 157, 263
Gadbois, Lorraine M. ~ 175
Gaff. Beryl Alice   175
Gagliardi, Samuel     155
Galbraith, Arnold V. _ 135
Gale, Arthur Leake 135
Gallaher, Ernest E. _ 154
Gallardo, Roberto .__ 135
Gallicano, Warren B. ._ 135
Gallon, Alan Vivian . 158
Galloway, Les. G. 155, 256
Gait, Thos. D. .._ 150, 255
Gait, William   101
Gamey, Margaret D. ... 126
Gamble, Geo. H. 158, 260
Garbuth, Marjorie J. 135
Gardiner, Stephen G... 135
Gardiner, Patricia A.. 135
Gardner. Lois Mildred 135
Gardner, Robert R. .... 135
Gardom, G. B. —. 257, 196
Gargrave, Anthony J. 135
Garrard Audrey.- 115, 242
Gasperdone, Herb. C. 168
Gattenmeyer, John L. 164
Gava, June P. E.      126
Gayton, Raymond R. _ 170
Geddie, Talbot _.  171
Gear, William I.   126
George, Catherine B. . 175
George, Stan. E.    155, 256
Gee, Edith Roberts   175
Gee, Roy    153
Gee, Wing K. .  170
Gelofarb, Sam William 135
Genge, Gordon M. 152,  158
Gennis. E. H. 150
Gernsey, Shirley M. ... 135
Gerrard, Dorothy E. .. 180
Gerrity. Ernest ...      ... 126
Gibbard. Margaret H.. 174
Gibson, David Lachlan 171
Gibson, Howard B. G. 164
Gibson, Janette I.   115
Gibson. William G. .135
Giegerich, M. A. 126, 246
Gilbert, J. A. ___ 148, 255
Gilbert, Shirley ._. 3 22
Gilgan, William Wren 135
Gill, Lawrence —. 158
Gill, William D. .. 158, 282
Gillespie, Douglas C. _ 171
Gillies, Donald M. .135
Gilley, Gordon R. 1*6. 253
Gillies. Mary L. .. 122. 2Rn
Glennie, Douglas Wm. 135
Glover. Cliff. J. .. 127, 256
Glover, Donald .35
Goldberg, A. A. .. 274, 263
Goldberg, A. D. 135, 247
Goldberg. Mver Allan 135
Goldie, D. M. M. 148, 264
Goleman, Po^ert 154
Goloubef, D. P. 2H. 212
Gooderham. M. E. 115. 249
Goodman, J. V. 148, 244
Goodmurphy. R. M. __ 150
Goodwin. Don    _     .  171
Goodwin, Gwen F.   J«?
Gordon, Audrev J _ 135
Gordon, Bernice        1 ^8
Gordon, D. Kenneth .... 135
Gordon, Harry
_  155, 57, 263, 264
Gordon, Hugh W. 145, 146
Gordon, James Smith . 164
Gordon, Norman F  135
Gordon, Merritt Edw... 164
Gordon, Ralph M. ... 135
Gorman, David G. 150, 259
Gorosh, Ruth C.    135, 245
Gorrie, Sidney Wm  220
Gosse, Alan F. G.  135
Gouin, Leon   157
Gould, Isabel Margaret 135
Gourlay, Colin C.   150
Gourlay, John I,.     264
Gowans, Helen-Mary .. 135
Graham, George —  150
Graham, Peter .. 164, 258
Graham, Peter Wm. ... 264
Grahame, Richard W.. 146
Granberg, Ingrid   280
PAGE THREE HUNDRED AND TWO V.B.C.
Students  and
Staff are
always  welcome
at Spencer's.
I HROUGH 73 years of British Columbia's progressive history
many thousands of citizens throughout the Province have learned
the wisdom of "buying quality"—the best procurable goods—at
Spencer's. "Quality" has been the tradition of Spencer merchandising down through the years, and it has become the wise tradition in many families, generation after generation, to do all their
shopping under one roof—"in the big family store" . . . Spencer's.
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED
Stores—Vancouver, Victoria,
Nanaimo, Chilliwack,
New Westminster.
PAGE THREE HUNDRED AND THREE OUTFITTERS TO
HUNTSMEN  -   FISHERMEN  -  SURVEYORS
PROSPECTORS  -  LOGGERS -  MINERS
Down Sleeping Robes - Silk Tents - Pack Boards
Waterproof Clothing - Mackinaws - Venetian
Blinds - Awnings - Window Shades - Garden
and   Camp   Furniture   -   Flags   -   Pennants,   etc.
Jones
43 West Hastings St
TENT AND
AWNING
Limited
Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
BEVERLY
Hosiery & Lingerie Shop
648 Granville St.
Vancouver, B.C.
FREDERICK GOERTZ
Ltd.
CERTIFIED   INSTRUMENT  MAKERS
Specialists in the Repair of
Instruments for Engineers, Aviators
Surveyors and  Navigators
All Work Guaranteed
569 Howe St., Vancouver     -     MArine 3822
MACAULAY, NICOLLS,
MAITLAND 0 CO. LTD.
Insurance, Financial and Estate Agents
•
435 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:
PAcific 4111
Granger, Harry Martin 135
Granhold, Ella M  122
Grant, Dorothy W  135
Grant, Gerald Albert _ 135
Grant, Gordon   135
Grant, Harold Ken. .... 271
Grant, Jack Robert   127
Grant, John W. R  127
Grant, Norma May   136
Grant, Patricia M. 147, 246
Grant, P. F... 115, 246, 240
Grant, Thomas C  150
Grant, William Ray  217
Grantham, John L.   136
Grantham, R. D.  160, 161
Gratton-Smith, D. G. .. 127
Gray, Duncan S.   122
Gray, Elizabeth P     72
Gray, Kenneth P  164
Gray, Robert Vernon .. 161
Gray, Walter J. __ 161, 232
Green, Joanna Eliz  122
Green, J W. .. 122, 72, 104
Green, Mary C.   127
Green, Robert J  136
Green, Walter Chester 184
Greenaway, Jean E. _ 150
Greenfield, Mary 1  180
Greenwood, Ian 171
Greenwood, Hazel V. E.
  122, 276
Greenwood, Lionel S... 136
Greenius, Eric O   127
Greenius, Arnold W. _ 159
Greenhorn, Stanley M. 172
Greer, Betsy Ann  136
Greer, Fred J  148
Greer, T  261, 270
Gregg, Harold Martin.. 136
Gregory, Ken. F... 170, 256
Greig, Ame W.   136
Grieve, Donald McE. .. 136
Greyell, Velma E.   127
Griffith, G. Margaret.. 127
Grigg, Naomi Isabel  148
Grimmett, Joan Anne_ 136
Gritten, Richard  122
Grover, Frederick W... 108
Grunland, Barbara  127
Grunland, Jean M.  127
Guest, Charles R _. 172
Gulloch, Muriel I.  174
Gubbins, Patricia Mae 127
Gueho, Victor N —. 136
Guilhamoulie, A. M. A. 127
Guman, Philip G. 261, 213
Gummow, John —  122
Gurevich, Balfour S. .. 136
Gurvitz, D. C  136, 247
Gustavson, Stanley E. 164
Guthman, Michael C.. 136
Guttormsson, Peter T. 136
Gyles, Nicholas R  168
Haahti, Laura  136
Haas, Robert L 	
    150,   202,  203, 204
Hackett, Thos. L. 150, 259
Hackett, William Geo. 261
Hadwen, Coleen V. — 150
Haeber, John   136
Hage, Keith   136
Haggart, Ronald B. .— 99
Hall, Beverley E. 127, 250
Hall, Dauphne M.   136
Hall, Kenneth W  136
Hall, Jean E   150
Hall, O   258
Hall, Ross Hume  127
Hall, Sylvia R  168
Hall, William Henry _. 136
Halpin, Kathleen B     42
Hamilton, Betty Mae .. 136
Hamilton, Christine A. 136
Hamilton, D. G.   136
Hamilton, Eleanor J. .. 136
Hamilton, John C  171
Hamilton, John D.   136
Hammerslag, J. .. 164, 276
Hammersley, Donald W.
  147, 260
Hammond, M. B. 1*4, 249
Hampton, Bob      277
Hanen, Jennie        127, 247
Hanley, Richard W.  230
Hansen, H. David  255
Hansen, Harris Torole 157
Harbell, Joseph L  161
Hardy, Gordy .. 157, 256
Hardy, Ruth E. ... 115, 265
Hardy, Stafford Lee .. 150
Harford, Ian M  150
Harms, Harold F  170
Harris, Bettv H.. 115, 246
Harris, Donald Guthrie 136
Harris, Gordon R. 115, 256
Harris, Hal  107
Harris, Lewis H  127
Harris, Julienne. 115, 246
Harris, Richard Chas... 148
Harris, Robert Gordon 154
Harrison, Arthur Ely .. 164
Harrison, Gerald E. G. 159
Harrison, Mary B. 175, 242
Harrison, John H _._ 161
Harrison, Paul H.  148
Harrison, Roland S  161
Harstone, Joan  136
Hart, Suzanne Marie ._ 127
Hartree, Shirley A.  136
Hartree, Beverley M. .. 136
Hartrick, Walter J. .... 127
Harvey, David L.  136
Harvie, Carolyn F  136
Harwood, Robert S     84
Hatch, William R  164
Hatcher, Thos. G. 136, 107
Hatfield, Henel E.   176
Hatton, Walter Lewis.. 136
Haugan, Wilbert M. ._ 185
Hawkens, L. .. 122, 82, 81
Haworth, Gerald N. __. 115
Hawthorn, James W. .. 136
Hay, Norman   264
Hayduck, Pearl  176
Hayes, John  158, 262
Hayes, John  158
Hazeldine, Lorraine M. 137
Hazlewood, David A... 158
Hazlewood, Joan I. ... 172
Hazlewood, Mary Gordon
  177, 178, 243
Heal, Douglas G. . 154
Heal, Gordon 152, 282, 262
Heal, Ronald R. ...      . 170
Heaps, P   127, 105
Heard, Susan _.    136, 127
Heath, Roberta S _ 136
Heeney, Alice Jane   136
Heisler, Earle L.   120
Henderson, Alex. L. .. 136
Henderson, A. D. H. .. 172
Henderson, Barb. M. .. 115
PAGE THREE  HUNDRED  AND FOUR :
Increased capacity, greater output and a related flow of production follows
where clever minds and dependable machines are united. The history of
western commercial development is being written on this formula.
Vancouver Engineering Works Ltd., newly organized under British
Columbia ownership, specializes in supplying custom built machines
required by lumbering, fishing, mining and agriculture.
Its watchword is to produce quality equipment on order and key it to
the specific needs of the basic industry it will serve. Prompt delivery of
every production installation is of foremost importance.
VANCOUVER   ENGINEERING   WORKS   LTD.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ENGINEERS    •    BOILERMAKERS    •    STEEL   FOUNDERS    •    IRON   FOUNDERS
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    FIVE Class Leaders Always
Vacation and study time alike, there are
exclusive fashions at PLANT'S to delight the
feminine heart and captivate the admiring
glance of the holiday and the campus crowd.
Newest Styles in
Suits - Coats - Dresses - Blouses
Sportswear and Skirts
mNTS h.s
Youthful Fashions
a
nnlsert
CANADA'S FINEST
Wherever you find the Jantzen label —
whether it is on swim suits, sun clothes,
sweaters or swim caps — you have found the
best design, in tailoring and fit. Look
for the Red Diving Girl, your assurance
of quality.
JANTZEN  KNITTING MILLS
OF CANADA LTD.
Vancouver, B.C.
Henderson, Clifford B. 208
Henderson, J. Neil  122
Henderson, M. L.   272
Henderson, R. R. 196, 198
Henderson,  Robert G. 122
Henley, Ian G. T.   136
Hennell, Paul   172
Henniger, Ezra C.   136
Henschel, Isobel E  136
Herrmann, George  G. 136
Herring, Philip   282
Hermann, Richard C... 136
Hern, Margaret J  127
Herring, Stephen H  150
Hertig, Lucienne B. .. 127
Hesla, Erling C. .. 158, 262
Heslop, John Alfred  136
Hess, Forest G  136
Hewitt, Peter T  136
Hewlett, Cecil George 164
Hicks, Ethel S  171
Hicks, Roget B.   115
Hickey, Gordon R  115
Higginson, Samuel R... 136
Hill, Arthur     80
Hill, Clifford J. - 147, 258
Hill, Guida E  136
Hill, Roberts Joseph _ 150
Hill, Shorley J.      127, 249
Hill, William McC  148
Hill, Wm. R. W. .. 136, 258
Hillier, Francis .. 122, 248
Hilton, Herbert B  157
Hilton, E. G. R. .. 136, 280
Hinds, David B... 127, 208
Hird, Edward V  136
Hirtle, James G  161
Hirtle, Walter H  127
Hirvo, Roy  136
Hives, Arthur R.   136
Hjorth, Carl E.  136
Ho, Arthur   122
Hobden, Frances E.  178
Hobson, George W  161
Hochman, H. 127, 274, 247
Hodges, June L... 179, 244
Hodgins, B. Lyall 122, 264
Hodgins, R. E. 127, 85, 246
Hodgson, Alex. G  157
Hodgson, E. J. .... 148, 242
Hody, Reginald   171
Hole, Leslie   115, 136
Hogan, John F  127
Hogarth, Gordon L.  136
Hogarth, Loyd Harvey 137
Hogg, David M  127
Holden, Richard C  164
Holland, Harold Edw. 137
Holliday, John Rolan.. 137
Holloway, Elaine P. .. 171
Holmes, David C  161
Holman, T. D. 122, 82, 81
Holmgren, Eric J  122
Holtby, L  165, 272
Hooker, H. F   137
Hooper, Cherry A  172
Hoover, George L.  165
Hope, Keith Gilchrist.. 137
Hopkins, Mary I... 175, 243
Horcoff, John   137
Home, Betty-Jean 127, 248
Hornibrook, Jack L. .. 137
Horridge, June Jordan 176
Horrigan, Mildred C. _ 185
Horsfield, Molley  171
Horton, Wm. W... 155, 262
Horwood, Bertram I. .. 127
Hoskins, Alfred D  127
Hoskins, Marcella R. .. 127
Hothan, Geoffrey A. .. 161
Hough, John D. .. 208, 209
Houghton, Kenneth D. 127
Hovelaque J. Y. M. .... 122
Howe, Daphne Doreen 137
Howlett, Stephen B	
 155, 274, 279
Howsam, Peter _. 148, 253
Hrigorew, Andro   150
Hudson, Grace B.  127
Hughes, James H. C. _ 158
Hudson, Jessie May  122
Hughes, Patricia M. .. 137
Hughes, Richard D.   115
Hulford, E. J. .... 115,    82
Humphreys, M. E _ 178
Hunt, Betty N.     176
Hunt, Edward G  127
Hunter, Allan J.   127
Hunter, Dale Stuart.... 137
Hunter, John L _ 137
Huntington, A. R  168
Hurst, Maud Hazel   137
Hutchison, Colin C  137
Hutchison, Doris H. .. 175
Hutchins, Pat. I. M. _.. 137
Hutt, Rita Marie   137
Huwyler, Frank R  137
Huyck, Edward R.  207
Hyde, Eric Norman .... 165
Hyde, Ronald B.   171
Hyman, L. N. 127, 274, 263
Inkin, Geoffry L.  137
Ireland, A.   184
Iannacone, Ernest M. ~ 150
Inman, William Van...
 Norman 147, 261
Irish, Ruth Irene _ 127,    93
Irving, Lorna E... 175, 248
Irwin, Elsie L. L   171
Irwin, Lula B.   127
Irwin, B.   243
Irwin, L.   243
Irwin, Mildred E  180
Irwin, Robert E. T.   _ 171
Irwin, Winnie 42,    81
Isaacson, Clarence T. ~ 150
Ivey, D. G   186
Jackson, Brian P  258
Jackson, L. E __ 165
Jackson, Ruth B.   137
Jaffray, Paul A __ 127
James, Francy Eileen.. 122
James, Robert C — 137
James, William Chas... 137
Jameson, Kenneth F. .. 168
Jamieson, Jean E.   175
Jamieson, R. D   165
Jardine, Judith —  115
Jarvis, Nancy J... 127, 243
Jeffery, A. W. .... 127, 253
Jeffery, Charles B  161
Jeffery, Mary-Lou   122
Jenkins, James R.   127
Jenkins, Stanley B.  264
Jenkins, Stanley H.  165
Jenvey, George Edw.     137
Jessop, Harvey C _ 185
Joe, Edward D. ....   ... 127
Johannson, Ed. F. 155, 255
John, John Gilbert _  159
Johnson, C. L. ..... 116,    78
Johnson, Chester A. 261
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SIX A MESSAGE
TO
THE CLASS
OF '46
You are leaving the relatively sheltered atmosphere of the University
to take your places in the world of professional, business and industrial
enterprise, a world in which the competition is keen and unremitting. But
you enter it with the inestimable advantage of minds trained and disciplined by your years of study and research, and equipped with skills which
place you in the forefront wherever technical ability is in demand.
No Province of Canada offers a finer field of opportunity than British
Columbia. Its huge basic industries call constantly for specialized knowledge. Its great and growing industrial structure presents fascinating possibilities, rich in promise and reward.
May Good Fortune attend you in your new sphere, and may the years
bring you that measure of satisfaction which comes from work well done
and responsibilities well borne.
GEORGE M. WEIR,
Minister of Education.
.    .   .   PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVEN FOR   THE   SMARTEST
IN    FUR    STYLES...
E. ANDERSON
fur l^raltsmen
PAcific 7654
STORAGE
653 Howe St.
QUALITY FURS
Good News! There is more film available . . .
KODAK FILM
Once again you can make the pictures you
want—outdoors with Verichrome Film—indoors with Super-XX Film. Stop at our store
for the film you've been wanting, and plan
to return  it to us later for expert finishing.
EASTMAN
Photographic
Materials
LTD.
610 Granville St.
Vancouver, B.C.
A New World for Sale . . .
Your optical prescription, when interpreted to the finished eyewear, means a new world of seeing comfort for
eyes fatigued by faulty seeing. A complete visual service
must be equipped to meet prescribed eye-needs in personally designed stylings to meet the most discriminating
of tastes. For convenience remember, two offices—
•   Plastic Contact Lenses •   Plastic Artificial Eyes
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL
CO. LTD.
424 Vancouver Block      -      413 Medical Dental Bldg.
Exclusive  Opticians to the   Eye   Physician  for  Over 20
Years.
Your Campus Barber Shop
Union Shop  (A.F.L.)
FOR   TONSORIAL   REHABILITATION
Get the Cut You Specify
We Always Try to Satisfy
PETER DYKE,  Proprietor
(Formerly with   Hotel  Vancouver  Barber Shop)
South   Basement
Brock  Hall
Johnson, Gladys M. 122
Johnson, Helen L. 185
Johnson, Joan L. 127
Johnson, Leonard C. . 154
Johnson, Lily Annie _ 137
Johnson, Mae L. . 137, 244
Johnson, M.    174, 241, 250
Johnson, R. W  161, 262
Johnson, Violet      137
Johnston, Ellen R. 116
Johnston, Joyce R. _ 137
Johnston, May S.   122
Johnston, Winifred E.„ 137
Johnstone, Alan Don .. 148
Johnstone, Robert   . .. 150
Jokisch, Carl R. 137
Jolly, Roy D 161, 259
Jones, Arnold Robert.. 137
Jones, Art   257
Jones, Barbara M. 122, 246
Jones, Cvril P   161
Jones, El vet Glyn  116
Jones, Estelle Pharis .. 137
Jones, Kay Edith   180
Jones, Lucile L.  137
Jones, Norman O.  170
Jones, Stanley C. 150, 257
.Torgensen, H. D.. 153, 256
Josephson, G. M. 153, 255
Josephson, Helmer W.  165
Julian, T. S.  184, 258
Jutte, Audrey D.. 122, 265
Kabush, H.      127, 258, 216
Kachuk. Willis T. 137
Kask, Alexander C. ... 150
Katainen, Violet O. _ 174
Katznelson, Edith _	
     116,  247, 240
Kayll, Dyne A..... 127, 231
Kayll, S. J.   165, 231
Keenan, R. G.  150
Keller, John Robert  253
Kelsberg, B. J. 122, 43, 242
Kendall, Constance J... 171
Kenny, Edith W.   127
Kent, Chan Enrnest  165
Kent, N. S   261
Ker, James Ross     253
Kermode, Harrv D. 	
  160,  196,  197
Kerr, James S. S. . ... 161
Kerr, Joan I. . 179, 245
Kerr. Mildred Emily _ 176
Ketcheson. Helen R. 127
Ketchen, K. S. __ 186, 24
King, Donald N... 150, 258
King, E. Ilene N.   116
King, Joyce V  171
King, K. F. __ 173, 175, 250
King, Malcolm G. 253
Kine, Philip J. _ _ 127
Kinghorn, James M. __ 165
Kinnaird.  Ellen A.  S.  195
Kirby,  Gerard   216
Kirk, Andrew P.  150
Kirk, Kenneth I. R. .. 165
Kirkpatrick, Edw. T. ._ 252
Kitos, Helen A. .... 122, 276
Kitson, John A  165
Klenman, Norman H. _ 127
Kline, Cecil M.   171
Klinkhammer, Tom L.
  168, 256
Klopp, Tom 116, 272
Knapp, K  127, 248, 265
Knappett, A. .  165
Knight, Ursula H  172
Knott, Douglas R - 171
Knutson, Alvin L  256
Kobus, Tony  181
Koch, Irma   247
Koerner, Nicholas T. _ 127
Kolbeins, Henry  282
Kolberg,  Joseph.. 161, 263
Korsch, S   263
Kouches, Mary  127
Krmpotich, Michael E. 161
Kydd, Margaret M  180
Kyle, Andrew J   163
Lade, G, W._ 150, 208, 209
Lahmer, Betty Marion 176
Laing, Margaret A. 61, 250
Laird, Daphne 122, 248
Laird, Elizabeth A. ___ 127
Lambe, Edward B. D. 161
Lambert, Nona C. 110, 248
Lane, Ruth   178
Lane, Mary E.  122
Lane, Pauline H.   138
Lane, William Tierney 264
Lang, Frank Alex  116
Lang, Lora    160
Lang, Marvin Ray.  138
Langdale, Glyn Harold 138
Langford, June V.   128
Langley, Brent A  138
Larkin, Doris Edith _ 172
Larkin, G. B. 167, 170, 259
Larsen, Edward R.  128
Larson, Ned  __ 234
Latimer, Norman H. __ 260
Latsoudes. Vivian    138
Lattimer, Margaret ... 180
Laubach, Anna Louise 122
Laudrum, William A... 128
Laurie, George A.   138
Lavan, Marv K.      ..... 128
Lawrence, Glenn G. ...   138
Lawrence, Henry B. . 150
Lawrence. June Lois 138
Lawrie, William E. .._ 161
Lawson, Robert   216
Layard. C. P  57, 255
Lazareff, Anne E.   116
Lazareff, Elsie Arleen _ 138
Lazzarin, John A. 150
Lea, Edgar R.  _.. 255
Leak, Norman A. J. _ 138
Leavy, J. A. .. 72. 168, 272
Leavy, L. F. __ 169, 72, 272
Lederman. Jack   138
LeBrun, Julius A. 156
LeBlanc. Ray L. ... . 138
Leckie, Jean F.  122, 250
Lee, Dart L.  116
Lee, Douelas H. T. 128, 255
Lee, H. S. Tim   165
Lee, Henry W. C 122
Lee, Jone K. D. _. ... 171
Lee, Nancy V  180
Lee, Sybil    122
Lees, Helen M. ____ 128, 250
Lees, John C. , 138
Leegatt, John N. ..__ 128
Lehn, Sara     128
Leiterman, D. S.. 122,    84
Leith, William C.  161
Letham, M. Leonard  _
 202, 203,  205
Lenardon, Joseph R. 138
Leshgold, Jack B. 128, 268
Leslie, Alex A.   128
Levey, Donald Howard 128
Levison, Mollie  247
Lewis, Allen   166
Lewis, C. A. 128, 250, 226
Lewis, Florence N. 128
Lewis, L.  258
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND     EIGHT Vancouver
Get it at .  . .
^filS^^
HASTINGS, ABBOTT AND CORDOVA STREETS
PAGE THREE HUNDRED AND NINE Gestetnei
(Canada) Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF THE
WORLD'S  PREMIER  DUPLICATOR
FINE PAPERS, STENCILS
AND INK
!
660 Seymour St. - Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 9644
HEAD OFFICE FOR CANADA — TORONTO, ONT.
FACTORY — LONDON, ENGLAND
COLUMBIA
PAPER CO. LIMITED
Wholesale
Paper Merchants
Manufacturers   of   "Columbia"   Quality
Scribblers and Exercise  Books
Vancouver,   B.C.
Victoria,   B.C.
Lewis, Nancy   246
Lewis, Robert  264
L'Hevison, Mollie  138
Liddell, Constance A... 122
Lightstone, Jack  261
Limbrick, Patricia J. .. 128
Lindenfield, Peter 42, 93
Lindow, Maxine L  116
Lindsay, Helen M _ 138
Linzey, Dorothy J.  ..... 128
Lipsett, F. R. 161, 42, 257
Lipson, Peggy   ... 122, 247
Lisicka, Iva Maria  .  122
Lister, Evelyn Pauline 138
Lister, Robert W.	
  152, 141, 282, 255
Lister, William G. —. 150
Littlewood, Charles A. 138
Littlewood, D. T  280
Livingstone, G. B. 85, 270
Livingstone,  Kath. M. 138
Livingstone, M. A  138
Livingstone, Muriel B. 138
Lloyd, W. E  281, 277
Lockhart, G   258
Lockwood, Ernest J. .. 138
Loiselle, Harold Albert 138
Lomow, William L. .. 138
Long, John H.      150
Long, Catherine   176
Long, J.      257
Longstaff, Fred. A. .... 138
Loomer, Eva L.  138
Lougheed, Henry V  138
Lowther, Bruce A  106
Lucas, April Jane   138
Lund, John A.   138
Lyle, Wallace E.._ 156, 262
MacCarthy, James A... 169
MacAskill, B. J.._ 148, 248
MacCarthy, Jessie G...
 177, 179, 243
MacDonald, Donald H. 171
MacDonald, Donald J. 147
MacDonald, K. .. 139, 259
Macdonald, F. L. 139, 243
MacDonald, Gordon M. 139
MacDonald, Harold M. 151
MacDonald, J. A. 165, 82
MacDonald, Uancy K.
    122,   100,   249, 265
MacDonald, Ronald G. 165
MacDonald, Rod M. .. 159
MacDonald, Roy A. ..... 139
MacDongall, John F. 253
MacEwen, Paul R. _ 139
MacFadden, Jack H. 165
MacFarlane, Jean .   -
112, 122, 106, 105, 245
MacFarlane, Thos. G. 128
MacGillivray,  Verda  I.
    175, 248
Macgowan, Kenneth O.
    147, 255
Macintosh, Margt. J. .. 122
Macintosh, Pat M. ... 249
Macintosh,   Jane   283, 249
MacKay, Bruce S.   128
MacKay, James W. 159-
MacKay, R. H. 128
MacKenzie, Agnes I. 174
MacKenzie, Fergus E. 139
Mackenzie, M. A. .    . 139
MacKenzie, S. M. 139
MacKinnon, I. F. 139, 249
MacKinnon, J. B. 128,    93
MacKinnon, Wm. N. .. 88
MacKintosh, Alex F... 139
MacLean, Alistair J. .. 128
MacLean, Chas. F.   139
MacLaren, N. A. 117, 265
MacLeod, Donald M. .. 162
MacLeod,  Dorothy M.
  170, 82, 248
MacLeod,  Ian M. 140
McLeod, Marilyn J. 129
MacLeod, M. G.  . 129
MacLeod, N. P.   260
MacMillan, Mary K. _ 140
MacNab, Phillip Ian _ 140
MacPherson, John S... 129
MacQueen, Margt. J. . 176
McAdam, John R. G. 165
McAllister, John B. _ 139
McAlpine, Mary 128, 246
McBride, Gerald P. _ 139
McBride, M   257
McBride, R. W... 139, 257
McBride,  Roy  D.   139
McCaig,  Geo. F.   139
McCallum, Joan M. __ 128
McCallum, Mary F. 244
McCarley, Dean R. .... 139
McCarthy, Noreen A. 139
McClean, Donald T. 100
McClement, F. P. __._. 139
McClung, P. M. _ 128, 248
McColl, Howard S. __. 165
McConachie, C. E. B. 165
McCready, Edw. R. __ 169
McConnell, Catherine 128
McConnell, John A. .. 116
McConnell, S. W  128
McConnell, Thos. Wm. 148
McConnell, Wm. J. C. 139
McConville, Marion S. 139
McCorquodale, W. A. 165
McCubbin, Wm. D. .... 148
McCulloch, Ross G. _. 151
McDiarmid, Mary E. .. 179
McDonald, Douglas .. 256
McDonald, Frances S. 128
McDonald, Isabel __ 116
McDonald, I. Margt. _ 172
McDonald, Lilliam A. 139
McDonald, M. F. 122, 250
McDonald, Pat Grace 172
McDonald R. F. _ 122, 245
MacDonell, Alexander 162
McDonnell,   Basil     158
McDonnell, G. E.   139
McDougall, Donald N. 78
McDougall, Edna M. _ 122
McEachern, L. .. 174, 243
McEwen, J.  R. .. 159, 257
McFarlane, Alex   147
McGavin, Wm. A.   128
McGeer, Patk. L. 196, 197
McGill, Allan S.   139
McGill, Gordon Wm. .. 139
McGinn, Alex. .. 159, 262
McGinnis, Kenenth J. 165
McGregor, Fredk. C. .. 162
McGregor, Duncan W. 149
McGregor, Iona M  128
Mcintosh, Phyllis J. .. 116
Mclntyre, Helen E  139
McKay, Donald F __ 162
McKay, Gloria B.  139
McKay, Kenneth A. .. 171
McKay, Muriel R. .... 139
McKay, Wm. T. .. 151, 255
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    TEN ANNOUNCEMENT
WE DESIRE TO ANNOUNCE TO YOU THAT ON AND AFTER MONDAY,
APRIL 8th, 1946, OUR OFFICES AND PLANT WILL BE LOCATED IN A NEW,
MODERN BUILDING RECENTLY COMPLETED AT
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THUS WITH THE MODERNIZATION OF OUR FACILITIES, WE ARE IN A
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OUR NEW TELEPHONE NUMBER WILL BE
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A CALL WILL BRING IMMEDIATE RESPONSE TO YOUR NEEDS
We hope to announce the addition of lithography to our process of printing as soon as equipment
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G&e&veftg ¥%&£<fa&s ££*9*£f&ef
COMMERCIAL and ADVERTISING PRINTERS
Printers  of  the   TOTEM  since  1939
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    ELEVEN EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY
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CLARKE 0 STUART
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Congratulations to the Graduates of  1946
It  is our sincere  wish  that  in  this year of
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McKeen, Geo. B  253
McKendrick, Bruce J. 149
McKenzie, H. A. 196, 198
McKenzie, J. B. 175, 246
McKenzie,  Robt. H. .. 139
McKeown, Wm.  J.    139
McKim, A. E. .... 116, 226
McKimm, Dennis S. - 128
McKinley, Doreen E. _ 139
McKinley, F.  E. J   176
McKinnon,  Jas. D.     139
MacLean, Fraser A. _. 159
MacLean, Jackie M. __ 139
McLean, Sinclair N. .. 139
McLean, Terence A.      165
McLeish, John A.   139
McLelland, Bob        280
McLelland David G. 139
McLelland, M. S. G. .. 139
McLennan, Donld J. _ 165
McLennan, A. H. 117, 250
McLellan, Gordon N. _ 162
McLellan, Luella M. 122
McLellan, Harold D.      158
McLellan, Robt. N  156
McLennan, J. R. B. . 159
McLellan, J. W. 162, 281
McLellan, Marney J. 128
McLennan, Margt. E. 139
McLennan. Robt. P. .. 140
McLeod,  C.  D.  .. 128, 246
McLeod. Donald C  117
McLeod, D. J.   140
McLeod, G. W. .. 156, 278
McLeod, H. N. .... 117,    41
McLeod, Jean M  140
McLeod, Mary Jean .. 140
McLorg, Anthony F.      140
McLoughlin, K. F. 	
    129, 245
McMahon, Eugene B. 140
McMahon, Dorothy E. 140
McMaster,  Wm. J	
    147, 261
McMichael, Wm. G.   155
McMynn, Audrey G. .. 140
McMynn, Robt. G  129
McNair, Beverly A 140
McNair, Marjorie H. .. 140
McNaughton,  Margt. _. 249
McNaughton, Mary   123
McNaughton, Jas. H. _. 154
McNicol, Wm. Jas.   140
McOuat, Walter G  140
McPherson, Chas. J. . 117
McPherson, Donald K. 165
McPherson, Dougald .. 159
McPherson, Hugh J. _ 185
McPherson,   John  D.
 ..   165, 256
McPherson, Kenneth F.
_        194, 222
McPherson, Wm. S  140
McQuarrie, John G.  165
McRae, Donald A. 151
McRae, Lois May   140
McRae, Mildred D.   175
McRae. Norman H.  151
McTurk, Helen G. 129
McTavish, Shirley A. 176
McWilliams, Vera B. _ 140
Macaulay, Archie R. „ 151
Macey, John K.     138
Macor, Donna J  138
Malcomson, S. M. B. .. 138
Mallinson, T. J. 278, 274
Mallet, Dorothy M. ..... 138
Manning, L. L  138
Manson, Helen E.   138
Manzer,  N. R. .. 116, 264
Maddin, Cameron   172
Malcolm, Elizabeth   172
Marlow, Diana J  171
Marker, Geo. A.   165
Mason, Roy B.   165
Macon, Stanley   165
Marshall, Fredk. L  171
Marshall, Warren   148
Martin,  Ruth E.   122
Matheson, Joan I.   122
Martin, Sally V. W. .. 178
Martin, Gordon      93
Manten,  Betty   172
Malensek, Tina    128
Martin, Russell G  128
Masson, Irene   128
Maidment, Howard   165
Malcolm, Robert   165
Manning, Rodger P. .. 165
Mare, Mary E  138
Marks, Walter   155
Markham, Wm. G  138
Marples,   Edward       157
Marshall, Tom        181
Martin, Muriel E     116
Martin,  Alexander 138
Martin, Jas. P. .. 153, 277
Martinson, M. E. 116, 243
Marzocco, Edd   158
Matheson,   Betty-Jane
    122, 243
Massy, David H  138
Massy, Richard 0  138
Matheson, Allen H  138
Matthew, F. L. .. 128, 246
Mathews, Herbert L. .. 138
Maurer, Fred R  108
Mawer, Carol B  138
May, James   171
May, G. Janet  180
Mayne, Patricia E.  265
Mayo, Eleanor   186
Mearns, Alan M. 153, 262
Megaw, Robert E  138
Mehling, Agnes E  122
Melvin, Ronald M.   138
Meier, Hildegard A. .. 185
Mellish, Donald   138
Menzies, B. R.   138
Menzies, Chas. N  138
Menzies, Dora K  122
Mercer, Geo. Edw  138
Mercer, Peggy   128
Meredith,  Kenneth E. 150
Meredith, Thos. W. .... 147
Merrifield, Glen S  165
Merrifield,  Samuel  S. 165
Merritt, Rex D. V. ._.. 165
Messum, Roy P  128
Michas, Virginia N  176
Milan, Betty E  128
Milburn, Jas. V  165
Miller, Bernice C  180
Miller, Con D  116
Miller, Donovan F  150
Miller, Hugh S  264
Miller, John G  138
Miller, Olive May  138
PAGE THREE HUNDRED AND TWELVE Compliments of
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KErr.   1944 ENROL ANY TIME KErr.  0317
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During 1945 you saw many memorable motion
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Famous Players Theatres
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PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    THIRTEEN rUiifarl Mfairfo+risZ,
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EXTEND  CONGRATULATIONS
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OF
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NELSONS LAUNDRIES
VANCOUVER, B.C.
FAirmont 6611
Miller, Robert A  169
Miller, G. _ 147, 255, 252
Miller,  W. B. .... 158, 262
Miller, Thos. P _.. 150
Mills,  Alan W  138
Mills, Ruth C. .. 128, 245
Mills, Robt. M. .. 165, 262
Milner, Allan R.   151
Milner, Ronald S  151
Milroy, James E _ 169
Milroy, Roderick J  138
Minchin, Pharic W  128
Miniato, Oswald K.   153
Mitchell, Beverly J. ._ 139
Mitchell, Dorothy J. .. 180
Mitchell, Ian A. .... 122
Mitchell, Jas. A. W. .. 165
Mitchell, P. A. M  116
Mitchell, James R.
  128, 208, 209
Mitchell, Joan B.
   124.  128, 246
Mitten, Robert A  172
Mitten, L. A  156, 264
Mjos,   Lillian      . 175, 242
Moe, Kenneth G  139
Moffat, Ann Sheila .. 176
Moffatt, Norah Jean ..139
Moffat, Peter J. .. 128
Moffatt, Wilma Anne 139
Moisey, John Alex 139
Moll, Joyce Eileen M. 116
Moloney, James V.   _ 172
Molson, David H.   148
Monk, Fred C. J. 169
Montgomery, Chas. G. 139
Montgomery, Mary M.
    176, 242
Moon, Dave  _ 231
Moore, Charles .. 153, 262
Moore, D. E  116, 128
Moore,  D.  P   116, 128
Moore  Joan I. .. 128, 242
Moore, Walter      256
Moore, Rodney J. 151, 172
Moore, Wm. J. M  155
Moran, John R   156
Morgan, David W  162
Morrison, Joan D _. 178
Morrill, G. L. P  165
Morris, Dorothy R. A. 178
Morris, Muriel   139
Morris, Philip Alvin ..116
Morris, R. A. .. 145, 147
Morris, Y. M. .... 122, 242
Morrison,  John  _ 262
Morrison, R. F. .. 162, 128
Morriss, Harry P  156
Morse, Hugh F  128
Mort, Beverley M. 139
Mortimer, Dorothy E. 139
Morton, Kenneth S.  116
Moskovitz,   Israel     128
Motherwell, Eliz. L. .. 128
Mouat, Margt. M  128
Moul, Albert A.    165
Moulson. Donald C. ._ 165
Moyls, F. D. __ 46, 99, 198
Moyls, Fredk. J. . . 139
Muir,   Eric W.       151, 253
Muir, Thos. W.   139
Muirhead, Mary L  139
Mullen, Albert C. ..... 139
Mulligan, Maurice W. 128
Mulroney, John A. _.__ 139
Munro, Geo. N.   139
Munro, Kathleen R. - 139
Munroe, Frances M. .. 185
Murphy, Calvin F  139
Murphy, Gloria M  175
Murray, Iris E. E. „ 176
Murray, Richd. D  139
Mussenden, R. N. 165
Mylrea, Frank H. 202
Myers, Fred C  264
Nagle, Joan B   140
Naftel, Cecil O.   151
Nalos,  Erika M	
  185, 83, 81, 241
Nalos,   Ervin    155
Nanson, Wm. L  140
Narod, L. K  162, 263
Nascou, Shirley   140
Nash, Andrew   157
Naylor, Jos. Yates  140
Nedelec, Yvonne L. .. 180
Neelands, Douglas J. .. 151
Neighbor, Frances M. 179
Nekrassoff, M.   151
Nelson, Alf S  162
Nelson, Alan P  158
Nelson, Chas. D  129
Nelson, John Wm  207
Nemetz, Milton M  140
Nesbit, D. R  165, 216
Newall, Norman   162
Newby, Jack D.   140
Neuman, Dorothy L. .. 180
Newman, Russell G. .. 123
Newmarch, T. F. R. .. 158
Newberry,  Gordon E. 156
Newson,   Don     156
Newson, Don   257
Newton,   Clifford     140
Newton, Donald W  171
Ney,  Mary E.    140
Ney, Phyllis W  169
Nickel, Wm. J   140
Nicholls, John W  236
Nicholson,   Harry    272
Nicholson, K. M. 123, 243
Nicholson, Wm... 155, 263
Nielson, Alfred A. N. 117
Nightingale, Frank H. 129
Nilan, Robert A. 	
    167,   161,  255, 252
Nimmons, Arlene A. .. 140
Nisbet, Patrick P  140
Noble, Stanley R  169
Noel, Gerald  A  140
Noel, Helen.R  129
Nordan, Harold C  123
Norris, Flora C  171
Norris, Margt. E.   172
Northrop, David N  165
North, Mary B .._ 140
Norton, Marry A. 117, 242
Nichol,   Richard  Jas.
  196, 197, 199
Nichols, Dorothy   117
Nicholson. Kay   242
Nickells, Robt. Geo. .. 117
Nordin, Vidar John .. 117
Nutchey,   Henry    117
Nutt, William George 140
Oben, D. J.   117, 277
O'Brien, Jas. M.   140
O'Brien, Wm.  J.  147, 260
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    FOURTEEN \\^^   COLLE
COLLEGE
OF BUSINESS
A   School   of   Distinction
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O'Connor, Gerald T. .. 129
Odynsky, Peter Geo. _. 157
O'Flaherty, B. J  140
O'Grady, Robt. H  140
O'Hara, Richard N  140
Oldenburg, D. M  140
Oliver, Wells R.   166
Oliver, Donald   283
Olson,   Betty     283
Olsen, J. Norman 155, 262
Olsen, Mark T.   166
Olsen,  S.  F  176, 199
Olson, Beatrice E.   117
Olson, P. E.  162, 232
Orme, C. Eric   129
Orton, Aanthony C. _ 149
Ostle, B. _ 186, 281, 260
Ottenell, Patricia M. .. 87
Oulten, R. G. _ 140, 108
Oughtred,  Wm.   264
Ourom, Lorraine Ida .. 123
Outerbridge, Helen —
  53,  123, 245
Owens, Nancy E. 140
Oxley, Gwen   180
Oxley, Mary H  129
Ozeroff, Michael J  117
Ozol,  Nelda   166
Paddon, Betty L  129
Page, Barbara V  140
Page, Harold J.   166
Paine, Norah   140
Painter, Ann M. .  140
Pallas,   Ethel    117
Palmer, Joan E.   140
Pappajohn, Jas. P. 261
Parfitt, Dorothy R	
  177,  179, 242
Park, Joan E.   173
Parke, Margt. L  140
Parker, John M.   162
Parker, M. J  117, 246
Parker, Mary E. 123, 245
Parkinson, G. V  156
Parkinson, M. H. 140
Parks, D. M. _ _ 174, 241
Parish, Pete David   172
Pastinsky, R. R. 151, 274
Paterson, Herbert F. .. 140
Paterson, Mary Jane ~ 176
Patrick, Wm. N.   129
Patterson, Fredk. J. .. 140
Patterson,   W.   Joseph 129
Pattison, Jas. P.   140
Paul,  Nedra J  129
Paul, Yvonne L.   123
Paulin, Wm.    123, 255
Payne, David K.   261
Payne, Doris D  129
Peacock, Jas. R.   140
Pearce, Irene S.   185
Pearson, Carl E.   140
Pearson, D. B. H. 	
__.    176, 173
Pearson,  E.  S.  _ 129, 250
Pearson, Hans L.   166
Pearson, Ivor D __ 166
Peart, Arthur E. .    ..140
Peatfield,  John  154
Pedersen,   Chester   H.
  256, 251, 207
Pedlow, Kenenth D. _ 258
Peele, R. F. 117, 241, 244
Pegues,  Josiah James
  151, 259, 216
Peirson,  G.  F.  .. 145, 149
Pek, Michael   151
Pellicano,  Joe     162
Pelter, John A.  .  140
Pendleton,  S. K.  129, 248
Penn,  M.  B.  179, 248
Penn, W. R. 140, 196
Pepper, Peggy E.   117
Percival, Jos. K  149
Perks, Ronald L.    129
Perrault, R. J. 	
  123, 87, 88
Perris, Geo.   153, 262
Perry, Francis A. 149, 259
Perry,   Frank   S. 100, 101
Peters,  Ernest   166
Peters,  Robt. K.   140
Petersen, Fred W.   140
Peterson, Earl R  162
Peterson, Nancy F  117
Pettit, W. A. B. .. 117, 255
Phare,  Geo.  R   162
Phelan,  Mary E.   123, 250
Phillips, Frank A _ 151
Phillips,  J. N.  .. 117, 244
Philpott, Eliz. J _ 129
Pickles, Norman   171
Pierce, Alan F.   140
Piercy, Jos. E. .. 162, 262
Pierson,  Geo.  .... 252, 264
Pinsky, George   141
Pitman,  Nancy M. A.
   117, 43, 245
Plant, Geo. E.  166
Poje, Tony   117
Pollock, Wm. O  162
Polos, Jas. Jr.       141
Poison, Robt. C.   117
Ponsford, Ada M. 179, 243
Poole, John K. 141
Poole,  Wm.  H. 166
Poore, Dorothy E. 118
Pope,  Mary D.    179
Pope,  Stephen ...       166
Porteous, John W  141
Porter, Dora J  183
Porter, Kenneth H  166
Pozer, John H. N,   141
Pratt, Edw. A. _ 151, 257
Pratt,  Joan   149, 248
Pratt, Lome A.   141
Prescott, Paulin M. A. 127
Prevost, Edw. C. 129, 258
Pride, Archibald H. _ 141
Priest, Robt. Thos  141
Price, Trudie   129
Prior, Chas. A  162
Prior,  Dennis C.  157, 261
Pritchard, C. L.    141
Pritchard, Mary G  141
Provins,   Hazel    180
Pudney, Peter H. 118, 260
Pudney, John W. D. .. 141
Pullen, Betty P.   141
Punter, Wm. F. G  147
Purvis, Dorthy B. A. .. 141
Pye, Margaret A. E. _ 129
Quail, Wm. D.   129
Quick, B. C  149, 248
Quirk, Edwin Thos.      158
Racey, Kenneth A. 172
Racine, Rejean W. 159
Radcliffe, Kathleen M. 141
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Radcliffe,   Roland   W. 123
Raeville.   Eric    279
Raine, Nancy I.   129
Rales, Roy B. H.   149
Randall, Robt. M  151
Rathlef, E. I. L... 175, 242
Ray,  Naomi      151
Raymur, B. E. D.   141
Reaville. Eric Thos. ~ 158
Redel, Walter R. 166
Redlich, Aline Berta .. 129
Dedpath, Donald C. ~ 141
Redpath, W. E. .. 151, 258
Ree, Carolyn Mary   176
Reed,  Beryl C _ 129
Reed, Thomas G  129
Reid, Audrey Jean — 141
Reid,  Birnie  Ella   141
Reid. D. E  123, 243
Deid, D. M.   179, 242
Reid, John D  166
Reid, J.  C   118, 243
Reid, Lois C. .... 185, 223
Reid, Mary R.   129
Reid, Phyllis Marion ~ 141
Reid, Robert Russel .. 141
Reid, Stanley L.   144
Reimer, David P. ...  118
Rietchel, H. E. .. 129, 250
Rendell, N. J. .. 178, 250
Rennie, J. M. .... 123, 242
Rennie,  Nancy J.   141
Reynolds,   Robt.   __  171
Rhodes, Ernest S.   156
Rice, Ernest Thos.   123
Richards, Barbara J. ~ 176
Richards, J. A. .. 118, 283
Richards, John L.    141
Richardson, Donald W. 171
Richardson, Henry G. 141
Richardson, M. L. 141
Rickaby, John D.    .... 118
Riddell,  Hilda   179
Riddell, Robt. H  141
Riddle, Robt. W  149
Rideout, Chester F. ... 171
Ripley,  Mary  E.  118, 249
Ripley, T. A  169, 258
Ritchie, Eliz. A  _    141
Ritchie, G. J. .... 151, 255
Roach,  Mark      129
Roantree,  F  176, 245
Roberts, Arthur K. ._ 162
Roberts, Beverly A. .. 141
Roberts, Evelyn M  118
Roberts, G. E  123
Robertson, A  154, 256
Robertson, Edward A.
  196,  198, 201
Robertson, J. D. 166, 162
Robertson, J. D. 162, 166
Robertson, Philip Wm. 162
Robertson, Robt. W. _ 162
Robertson, Strawn — 104
Robinson, Donalda A. 151
Robinson, J. R. .. 151, 243
Robinson, Joan E.   129
Robinson, John W. —. 159
Robinson, K. E. 179, 242
Robinson, Malcolm C. 162
Robinson. Mary K. .... 129
Robson,  M. H. .. 118, 248
Robson, Wilma  C.   141
Rochester, Janet B  141
Rodenchuk, Eugenia .. 242
Rodin,   Nicholas      260
Roeder, Elmer W. .... 141
Roeher,  G.  Allan 85
Rogers, Elaine 174, 249
Rogers, M. E. M. 129, 244
Rogers,   Trish    . 123, 250
Rolls, Wallace E  141"
Ronald, Eva M  141
Roper, Gordon Jas. 166
Rose, Andrew H. ._ 141
Rose, David J. _ 159, 262
Rose,  Joan  F. . 176
Rose, Margt. A. .. 118, 250
Rose, Wm. E  162
Rosen, Linda C. .. — 123
Rosenberg, J. S. 174, 247
Rosenberg, N. C.  175, 247
Rosenthal, Marta   141
Ross, Aileen P.      141
Ross, Madeleine L.   _. 141
Ross,  M. J _. 151, 242
Ross, Robert D — 217
Ross. Wm. J  159,231
Ross,  Win     118, 243
Ross, Shirley Joan .. 141
Rothstein, M.118, 276, 263
Roulston, A. M. 118, 272
Routledge, Willa J . 180
Rowllings. Marjorie E. 141
Ruck. J. A.  171
Rudolph, J. C.    - 162, 258
Rumsey, Jane S       118
Runnels, David E __ 141
Russell, Bette Anne _ 141
Russell, Bernice J.   141
Russell,   Charles    257
Russell, Neil G  141
Russell, Patricia D  141
Rutquist, Fred Ernest
     157, 263, 262
Rutt, Byron R  141
Ryan, Aruth B. ._. .... 141
Ryan, Jas. E. .... 129, 202
Ryan, Ruth C.  .. 129, 248
Rywak, John     141
Saba, Albert H.      . 260
Sager, S. M. _.    . 118, 105
Sainas,  Mary   129
Salt, Lionel H. .. 118, 259
Salter, James M. ..   ... 129
Salter, P. M   123, 243
Samchuck, Geo. G. ._.. 129
Sample, John Thos. .. 129
Sampson,  Hubert    141
Fanderson, J. E. 123, 243
Sanborn, G. W. 129, 93
Sanford, Don McLean 141
Sanford, Malchia — 118
Sanford, Robert M. .. 129
Sansum, John D. 155, 282
Sauder, William L  151
Saugstad,  Eric F _ 141
Saunders,   M  118, 242
Scaia, Angus Jas.   141
Scanlon. Vivian D. 141
Scarr, Roy Warren _ 141
Schildmeyer, Robt. F. 159
Schinbein, John E.   ... 129
Schmidt,  Ralp L.   151
Scholfield, Arthur J. 141
Schoening, Mervin A. 162
Schon, Herbert A  142
Schulbaum, A.      142, 244
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SIXTEEN With the Compliments and Best Wishes
of
RUSSELL STUDIOS
TOTEM  PHOTOGRAPHERS  FOR  1946
•
445 Granville St. ... PAcific 7642
To the Student Body . . .
OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND
BEST WISHES
BELL & MITCHELL LTD.
541 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
BEST WISHES
TO THE STUDENT BODY OF U.B.C.
FOR SUCCESS IN
1946
McLennan, McFeely &
Prior Ltd.
VANCOUVER   -   VICTORIA   -   NEW   WESTMINSTER
British Columbia's Pioneer Hardware Supply House
University People
—students, faculty and alumni
alike—are among the million
Canadians who find friendly,
helpful banking service at
Canada's pioneer bank.
E. J. SCHIEDEL, Manager.
Bank or Montreal
working with Canadians in every walk of life since 1817.
West Point Grey Branch — Sasamat and Tenth
Scott,   Alan     164
Scott, Anita J. .. 118, 242
Scott, Anthony .. 149, 264
Scott, Donald A  157
Scott, Gracey A.   257
Scott,   Elizabeth     265
Scott,   Margt,   C. 123, 242
Scott, Priscilla R.   142
Scott, Ruby V.    142
Scott, Thelma J.   180
Scott,  T.  F.   152,  156, 262
Scott, Wm. M.   142
Scow, Alfred John  142
Scudamore, R. J  142
Seale, Reginald C  142
Sears, Vallance C.  142
Searle, Marion E  129
Seaton, Johann B  142
Segall, Annette..  129, 247
Seibold, Ervin A  142
Segur,  Dolphine    123
Selkirk, Daryl R  129
Selkirk, Robt. B  129
Selman, G. R.    - 131, 206
Seraphim,  R. H.   152, 263
Service, P. Kelvin     81
Severide, Norman   142
Seyer, Frank H  256
Seyer, Rose Marie   142
Seymour, Jane D. 123, 246
Shafer, Donald G 236
Shankland, David H. .. 142
Shaw, Eleanor J   123
Shaw, Geo. Chas _ 142
Shaw, Mary Willis  142
Shaw, Lois E     75
Shearman,   Jacqueline 129
Sheffield, Edw. A  142
Sherlock, Audree J. 129
Sharman, Beverley J. 142
Sherman, Deane  D. .. 158
Shepherd,   Mike     105
Shewan, Robert H. .... 169
Shields, L. M. 118, 248
Shier, Robt. P. .. 129, 258
Shockley, Helen M. .. 142
Shopland, Harold J. .. 142
Shore, Albert G  162
Short, Henry R.   151
Shore,   B      262
Shore, Marbyn A  142
Shott, Grahame B  129
Shug, Harold F. __ ... 142
Shum. Alfred   142
Siddall, Arthur C.   142
Sieburth, Louise R. .. 172
Sigalet, Harold J _   149
Sihota, Dedar Singh _ 142
Silver, Lorna M.   118
Simpson, Barbara   173
Simpson, M. G.   129
Sims, Norman C. ..  260
Sinclair,   E.    ,_ 260
Sinclair, Jean G _ 118
Sinclair, John C  142
Sinclair, R. E. _. 184, 185
Sissons,  W.  John 162, 256
Skelding, Eliz. E _ 142
Skene, Alex. W. 156, 256
Skilling,   Caroline   D. 142
Skipsey, Arthur N  142
Skitch, Florence C.  .. 185
Smallwood, Effie I. __ 142
Smart, Arthur D  255
Smart, C. J.   118, 242
Smee, Donald A  142
Smith, Alexander F. .. 169
Smith, Arthur Brett .. 147
Smith, M. Bruce  123, 258
Smith, D. A  123, 258
Smith, D. B   118, 250
Smith, Dorothy 0  142
Smith, Douglas S.   157
Smith, Eric S _.. 171
Smith, Frank E.   255
Smith, Helen A.   129
Smith, James H.   142
Smith, Jessie A  142
Smith, J. H. G.   151
Smith, Kenneth O.   151
Smith, M. C. 119, 241, 244
Smith,   Neville     231
Smith, Thomas H.   162
Smith, Wm. H.   151
Smith,  Wilma    142
Smitton, Frank A.  130
Smuin, Donald E  142
Sollers, T. H. .     119, 256
Solloway, John F  151
Solloway, Ruth-Mary._ 14
Solloway, Ruth-Mary.. 142
Sommerville, Wm. R. 151
Sommers, Gerald A. .. 172
Sortome, Emma E  123
Southcott, Burnett A. 172
Sowerby,  Raymond   .. 142
Spencer,  Ann M  142
Spencer, Herbert W... 130
Spicer, Vivien A. M. .. 171
Stacey, Michael W. .. 172
Staf, Bernice G.  130
Stainsby, D. O. .. 130,    99
Stamatis,  P     185, 244
Stambuski,   Velma   J. 142
Standeven, R. D. 119, 243
Standfield, B.  M  142
Stanhope, John H.   142
Starrack, Herbt I. L. .. 142
Stead,   Ursula 174
Stearns, Patricia G.   ... 142
Stedman, S. R. _ 130, 249
Steele, John A.  ..... 142
Stein, David Jack  142
Steiner, Robert R.   107
Stephen, Helen E. 142
Stephenson, B. Kyle .. 119
Stephenson, Dorothy . 142
Stephenson, J. 170, 244
Sterling, Doreen M. .. 130
Steven, Margt. H. 180
Stevens, Donald M  156
Stephens,  John Kelso 142
Stevens, Joan M. 	
    169, 241, 245
Stevenson,   Gerald  H.
  151, 202, 203, 205
Stevenson, M. A. F  142
Steward, C. H.   142
Stewart,  D. L. .. 153, 279
Stewart,   R. 171,   283, 256
Stewart, Ross  119
Stewart, Wm. D ___ 123
Stewart, Wm. E. _. 42,    90
Simpson, Wm. A _ 151
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    SEVENTEEN •
SMART
DRESSERS
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years that will follow your gradu
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Anderson Printing Co.
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PAcific 5838
455 Hamilton St.      -      Vancouver, B.C.
Stockstad, Dolores   142
Stokkeland, Margt. C. 162
Stone, David R. 130
Stone, Dorothy I.  1.19
Stone,  Jas.  S. 142
Stone, Lome M.  142
Stonhouse, Alice H     83
Stouse, Dennis L. J. ~ 142
Strachan, Jessie   119
Strachan, Norma H. .. 143
Strang, Harvey A.  143
Stroud, Ross C. .. 158, 259
Stuart,   Elizabeth     143
Stuart, Wm. B.   156
Sume, Raino Robert .. 143
Summers, Grace E. ... 130
Sutherland, J. .. 143, 255
Sutherland, John H. .. 156
Sutherland-Brown,   A. 143
Sutton, Gwenda R  143
Swain, Thelma J.   143
Swanson, L. E. .. 208, 209
Sweatman, H   255
Swenson, Paul A  130
Swinton, A. Hans   264
Swistoon, Jos. B  149
Sykes, Gordon G. 200, 201
Symonds, Ann P.  248
Symonds, Clarice M. .. 248
Symonds, Pegy    248
Syrett, John Henry ..119
Szende, Peter P   130
Tait, Bruce   143
Tait, Bruce   143
Tait, Margt. M. M  143
Tait, Winnifred G. M. 143
Talbot, Colleen A. 130
Talbot, Edith Annie .. 143
Talbot, Edmund H. .... 143
Talbot, Mary K. T  171
Tailings, Gordon T  130
Tannar,  Norman E. .. 130
Tapay, Harold M.   156
Tapp, M. G. A. .. 143, 230
Tassie, Peter   130
Taylor,  C. C.  .._ 162,    75
Taylor, Jean E.   178
Taylor, J. Wm.   170
Taylor, Joyce M  173
Taylor, Ralph E.  166, 260
Taylor, Shirley   242
Taylor, Wm. R  130
Techy, Margaret T.   176
Teevan, James T.  154
Temoin, Armand C. ~ 143
Temoin, Maurice D. .. 130
Tener, Gordon M  143
Tener, Norma M.   119
Tennant, J. M. _ 143, 280
Terrace, Ivy A. J  176
Thodos,  C. N  143
Thom, Margaret H. 130
Thomas, Blodwen   119
Thomas, E. B  123, 243
Thom, Henry G  151
Thomas, Jas. Wm. 143
Thomas,  K.  J. __ 204, 205
Thomasson, A. M.   185
Thompson, A 216, 243
Thompson, Darry   233
Thompson, Douglas G. 143
Thompson, Francis D. 166
Thompson, Gordon M. 143
Thompson,  Jean    274
Thompson, Joy E. M. 143
Thompson, Mavor S. ~ 162
Thompson, R. S. 147, 258
Thompson, S. E. 119, 246
Thompson,   Tommy   .. 275
Thompson, W. A.   123
Thomson, Anna J  130
Thomson, Marguerite 130
Thomson,   Patricia   G. 243
Thomson, R  130, 258
Thorne,  Alice G  151
Thorson, Allan .. 166, 262
Thorson, Stephen C. ~ 143
Tidmarsh,   Malcolm   .. 143
Tiedje,   P.     130, 245
Tisdale, Bill  .  217
Tobiasen, Jerome B. ~ 143
Todd, Harold B.,   151
Todd, Paterson A _143
Toews, Frank F.   166
Tomlinson, K.    130
Tomlinson, Neil   143
Tomlinson, Raymond - 143
Tonning, E. M. .. 171, 244
Tonks, C. E. M  143
Topham, Ernest A  143
Torok, Bill   166
Torrance, E. E. .. 176, 244
Town, D'Abert A.   143
Townsley, Dave S. - 172
Townsley, Phil McN... 171
Townsend, Peter C. .. 143
Townshend,   Peter  A. 166
Toynbee, R. M   143
Toynbee, Wm. M  143
Trademan, E. .._ 162, 263
Travis, Phyllis Talbot 130
Tredaway, Edna P. _ . 176
Trefrey, Ethel L.     .... 123
Tremaine, Mary C. .  143
Trenholme, Dorothy 185
Trgis, Rosalie E.     130
Tryon, Muriel Joan .. 119
Tull, Thos. Jos _. 143
Turnbridge, M. A.   119
Tupper,  David W.  H. 182
Tupper, Norman E. .. 171
Turland, Douglas Jas. 166
Turnbull, Margt. L. .. 143
Turner, Barrie J  143
Turner, B.  M.  .. 176, 244
Turner, John H.   169
Turner, John J.   130
Turner, John N  143
Turner, Leonard J  130
Turner, P. A.   130, 250
Twilley, Margaret E. .. 143
Twizell,  Barbara 248, 233
Underwood,   Clyde  E. 153
Underwood, E. S. 153, 264
Upson, Margaret P  143
Urquhart, Robt. D  143
Urvold, Ellen B  180
Usher, Audrey K  143
Vallee, Lloyd H  166
Vandrick, S. J. A. .... 277
Van Gorder, Julie 	
  183, 185, 241
Vantreight, E. E. 119, 250
Varty, Thos. N.   143
Varcoe, J. B. 149, 93, 255
Vaughan, Margaret   242
Vaughan, Margt. E. .. 149
Veeberg, R. E. .. 119, 242
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    EIGHTEEN WHEN YOU TRAVEL
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Serving  the Coastal Communities of
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Venables,  Wm.     143
Vernon, Joan K  171
Vernon, Victoria M. .. 143
Vernon-Jackson, H. O. 147
Vesterback, Carl G. .. 123
Vierheller, J.   143
Vigar, Sydnie C _. 143
Vincent,   Vivian     185
Vincent, Ronald J. A. 171
Vlag, Ann A.  _ 123, 245
Vogel, Henry B. A  143
Vosper, C. E. 123, 60, 249
Vosper, Janet M  143
Wakefield, Philip   143
Waldichuk, M. H  130
Waldie, R. A. .... 157, 263
Waldrop,   Claybourne   143
Wales, Donn   150, 258
Wallace, A.  E.  .. 130, 249
Wallace, Chas. H  149
Wallace, Myron T.   170
Wallace,   Robert    .._.... 166
Wallace, Stuart H  264
Waller, Arnold B  156
Walls, Lewis J.   151
Walmsley, Lawrie S. ... 143
Walsh, Helen     119
Walsh, John Walter 182
Walton, Vivian M. _ 249
Ward,  Donald  Kinsey 143
Ward, Greta L  143
Ward, Richard J.  144
Warden, Geoffrey   130
Warden, Stella P  130
Wardoper, J. E. .. 130, 100
Wark,  B. E.    182, 264
Warner, Donald L  144
Warner, K. M. .. 162, 262
Warner, Wm. L.   182
Warren, Marjorie I. .. 119
Warren, Roy A  144
Warrender,   C.   .. 156, 256
Wartnow, Floyd C  244
Wate, Kenneth G  154
Waters, H. Bryce   154
Watson, Arnold W  130
Watson, Bruce W  144
Watson, Donna Jean .. 144
Watson, G. M. _ 151, 244
Watt, Alexander W. .. 169
Watt, Jas. M   233
Watt, Nancy W.      119
Watt, Wm. C  119,    87
atts, Wm.  B.   260
Webb,  Gerald K.   144
Webb, Halcyone 169, 167
Webb, Phyllis J.  144,    84
Webb, Wm. E   151
Weber, M. E.  174, 243
Weber, Ron 257,  196, 197
Webster, Alan W.   275
Webster, David   166
Webster, Patricia F. .. 144
Webster, Ronald J.   144
Weeks, Donald J  185
Weetman, Philip H. .. 144
Weinstein, Rita R	
   144, 274, 247
Weir, C. S.   130, 249
Weir, K. Marguerite   . 130
Welch, Herbert C. ..... 130
Wellburn, Gerald V. ..  162
Wellwood, E. W.   166
Welsh, Daynard M  166
Welsh, D. A.   119, 245
Welton, John 	
  152, 154, 41, 279
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LIMITED
NORTH VANCOUVER, B.C.
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West, Charles John — 151
West, Donald R.   130
Westaway,   Arthur  G. 144
Westinghouse, M. V. _ 130
Westlake, Chas. A  119
Westman,   Herman   J. 144
Weston, John R _ 172
Westover, D. M  176
Wheatley,   Gordon  H. 264
Wheeler, John O. 	
159,   263,   255,   217, 218
Wheeler, Shelagh J. .. 177
Wheeler, Jeane   180
White, Cyril Stuart ._. 144
White, Doreen L.   130
White, Douglas A  130
White, Eleanor J.   182
White, Leslie A. H  243
White, Mary Lillian _ 180
White, Massie L. 130, 217
White, Neil R.   144
White, P. B.   119, 243
White, P. C. T. .. 119, 283
White, Robert D  123
Whitehead,   Calvin  J. 130
Whitehead, S. W. 183, 185
Whiteley, Frank G  144
Whiteside, Fredk... R, 144
Whitelaw,  G.  H.  182, 264
Whitlam,  T. I. _ 177, 180
Whitney, Gordon E. __ 159
Whitney, Joan E.  130
Whitney,  Nancy A. .. 144
Whitney, Raymond B. 130
Whittaker,   Wm  123
Whittaker, W. E. 144, 258
Whittall, Hubert V. .. 144
Wickson, Ralph Roger 144
Widman, Beverley  A. 144
Wight,   Larry  .... 155, 257
Wigins, Murray M  171
Wilcox,  Edie A — 151
Wilcox, Jean   248
Wilkinson, Frank C. .. 151
Wilkinson, Hugh C. . 149
Wilkinson, John W. _. 144
Wilkinson,   Mary  H.
  177, 72, 178
Wilkinson, P. .... 123, 246
Wilkinson, Thos. A. .. 144
Wilkinson, Thos. D. .. 144
Wilks, Roderick J. .... 151
Willan, Audrey M. V. 144
Wilcox, Jeane M  130
Williams, D. R. .. 123,    84
Williams, D. E. D  123
Williams, Dorothy  M. 248
Williams, Lloyd   214
Williamson, Danel F. 166
Williamson, Hugh J. .. 151
Willis, Nancy E  144
Willis, J. ■— 255
Wills, Charles H. 	
  130, 215, 217, 231
Wilson,  Beverly    130
Wilson, C. A  130, 246
Wilson, David Arnold 123
Wilson, David Reid .. 144
Wilson, Donald J.   144
Wilson,   Donal   .. 119,    75
Wilson, Edward P.   144
Wilson, Eric P  149
Wilson, George A.   261
Wilson, John R  144
Wilson, Lawrence L... 144
Wilson, Lorna M.   249
Wilson, N. M. .... 147, 242
Wilson, Neil Leslie   123
PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND     NINETEEN «,
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Woodworth, Mary J. .. 144
Wilson, Phyllis H. .... 144
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Wilson, Priscilla J  144
Wilson,   Rex    211, 213
Wilson, R. G. .... 130, 255
Wilson, Wilma J.   172
Wilson, W. Laird   149
Winch, E. W  183, 185
Wingert, Frank A  144
Winter, W. H  162, 262
Winter,  W.   E.   ....123, 255
Wolfe, Harry B.   144
Wolfram,  G  162, 281
Wong, Dia W.   156
Wong,   Elsie     130, 275
Wong,   G.     156, 275
Wong, John   144
Wong, V. M.   123, 275
Wong, Wah
Woo,  Effie
  130
  169
Woo, Katherine Tai .. 176
Wood,  N.  M  154, 361
Wood, Wm  123, 259
Woodland, Victor C. .. 151
Woodley, John Lyle .. 144
Woodman, Ila R.   123
Woodman,  Mable   245
Woods, Eric J. H _. 159
Woods, Ernest F. C. .. 278
Woods, Leslie V.   130
Woodward, Faith M. .. 119
Woodward, John R. 157
Woodward, Shirley A. 130
Woodward,   Twigg    246
Woodward, Mary T. ..
Worrall, Gladys E. ___
Worsfold, Catherine E
123
176
144
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Worth, Edward J. — 144
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  119,  101, 106
Worthen, Leonard P. 144
Worthington, G. _ 123, 10
    123, 107
Wotherspoon, A. H. B.
    144, 216
Wright, A. M.   256
Wright, Charles W  166
Wright, Donald S  144
Wright, Jack  C.   144
Wright, Norman   263
Wright, Peter L  144
Yates, Doug E.   258
Yates,  Maureen S.   123
Yeo, Shirley-Anne A. 119
Yip, Cecil   108
Yorkston, Doreen M. _ 123
Young, A. D  123, 258
Young, David B  171
Young,  D. R. .._ 119, 249
Young, Edith B  123
Young, Gordon R  108
Young, Margaret M. .. 123
Young,   Robert    166
Young, Robert A.   144
Young, Wm. H.   162
Young, V. M. .... 123, 260
Yuill, Lois Audrey   130
Yuskow,  Walter  144
Zacks,   Wm  151, 263
Zahar, Franklin A  151
Zanin,  Evelyne A  180
Zink, Norma M.   176
Zimmerman, H. W.   144
Zitko,   Henry  .... 166, 278
Zahar,   Edward   Louis 147
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.   .   PAGE    THREE    HUNDRED    AND    TWENTY-ONE 3tt UtettuirtMtt
The death of Cecil Everett Yip, on March
7th, 1945, spelt the loss of one of the best
■liked and most willing men on the Publications Board photography staff. He was
active in many ways around the University
which he had been affiliated with for nine
years. Cecil was a member of the research
staff in the Physics Department, where Dr.
Smith speaks very highly of his ability and
his willingness to undertake the most arduous tasks. He was a member of the Amateur Radio Operators at University, and had
operated his own radio station for some
years prior to the war.
His loss will mean a great deal to the
many people with whom he came in contact
every day in the course of his varied activities. Apologies and Acknowledgements
As the end of the year approaches, and the
staff is swamped with mountains of proofs and
layout forms, amid the last minute flurry of preparation for final exams, mistakes begin to creep
in. Many of them were caught by the proofreaders, several slipped by, and for any of these
which time did not permit us to correct, both in
pictures and copy, the editor and staff of the
Totem offer their most sincere apologies.
In a few specific instances: To Harry Castillou, for the omission of his picture in the Publications Board section, and to Gordie Heal and Roy
Hooley, whose pictures we mixed up on the
Science '46 Executive page, we tender our regrets. In the Minor Clubs, two or three pictures
of the Executives were misplaced in the process
of engraving, and turned up too late to appear
in the book.   We regret this omission very much.
In the way of acknowledgement, we would
like to mention the assistance of several individuals and organizations whose help and co-operation was greatly appreciated.
The staff of President's office, for their aid with
A.
the faculty information; Allan Dawe, whose excellent poem appears on the Memorial page;
Art Jones, for the use of several of his very good
photographs; Mr. and Mrs. Gray for the picture
of their son; Mr. Walberer, of Russell's studios;
the staff of the Ubyssey; the Vancouver Daily
Province; the Vancouver Sun; and the student
organizations that appear in the book for their
co-operation in handing in copy of their activities Printed  by
Ward & Phillips Limited
382   West  Broadway
Vancouver, B. C.

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