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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

1945 Totem 1945

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,V-C^» The year 1939-40 saw the appearance on the
campus of a rather unusual freshman. His title at
first was "Sho-You-Hwa," but as he got into the
swing of things at Varsity he acquired the name oi
Totie, and the name stuck.
His fellow students first made Totie's acquaintance in the 1940 Totem. They soon learned that he
was more than an ordinary undergraduate. Totie,
in his true character, was, and is, the personification of UBC's mascot, the thunderbird.
More than that, he is the symbol of all that the
University does, and of all that it stands for.
Totie never finished his course at UBC. Like so
many students of his year he heard the call to fight
for his country, and in the spring of forty-two, at
the end of his junior year, he left University for what
Totie returns to view campus . . •
ROLL    OF    HONOUR
CAMPUS
ADM INI ST RATION
ACTIVITIES
Page Four . was originally intended to be the duration.
True, his memory was not gone, the friends he
had made still remained, and even the freshmen
learned something about him from those who had
been his companions, but the real Totie, the undergraduate par excellence, was gone.
This year Totie returns again, back from the
wars, along with many more ex-servicemen. This is
Totie's senior year, the first of a long line of senior
years, for Totie, being the perfect undergrad, can
never graduate.
In the pages of this book we will follow Totie as
he renews old acquaintances, and meets the many
newcomers, both among students and among organizations, who have arrived in his absence.
We join  him  in  paying  tribute to  the men  and
women who have given up their studies, and their
play, so that others could continue to enjoy these
things.
We follow him as he visits the buildings, and
watches the students in their classrooms and labs,
studying the library, or relaxing in the Brock.
We see him as he visits the heads of University
Administration, as he joins in campus activities,
athletics,  and  war effort.
He is here also in the class sections, and with the
clubs and the Greeks.
Totie has returned to a campus still at war, and
it is a campus at war that he presents to you in this
book.
His hope for next year, and for every year is that
he will not have to do so again.
. • . still in the midst of the war effort
WAR    EFFORT
ATHLETICS
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UNDERGRADUATES
ORGANIZATIONS
Page  Five  ROLL OF HONOUR   * I ll
dZ^H    lllCJC   Y)dCICA   tve have tried to include the names of as many as possible of the former students, whether graduates or undergraduates, who have left the University since the beginning of the war to ■
go on active service.   Since no complete list of this sort is in existence we have been obliged to compile one
of our own from the various sources available.
We would appreciate any information as to names which we have omitted that you may be able to submit, in
order that next year's list may be a more complete one.
W.   F.   McLellan        Austin   Frith
Abbott, Hugh M., Science '44, R.CA.
Adams, Frank, UBC '42, well-known
soccer  player, R.CA.F.  overseas.
Adam, Joseph M., B.Com. '42, R.C.N.
V.R.,  Mosquito  fleet.
Armitage, David Harold, B.A. '39,
R.C.A.F., killed in a plane accident
at Indian Head, Quebec, June, 1942.
Anderson, William R. W., R.CA.F.,
D.F.C, August,  1943.
Armstrong, Douglas Allan, R.C.A.,
wounded in action in Italy, October,
1944
Arnell, Algot Leon, R.C.A.F., missing,
July, 1944.
Ash, A. Bruce, Aggie '44, R.C.N.V.R.
Auer, Oscar Ludwig, South African
Artillery, killed  in  action  in  Libya.
Aves, Radford Edward, Seaforths,
Second Army Course, UBC, died in
Italy,   October,   1944.
Avis, Stanley F., Science '45, R.C.A.F.
Baker, Jocelyn, Comm. '43, W.R.N.S.
Barlow, C. Wernon, Arts '43,
R.CN.V.R.
Bain, Davis Lachlan, R.C.A.F., presumed dead after raid over Berlin,
March, 1943.
Barrett-Lennard, Dacre L., B.A. '39,
Seaforths, killed in action, Sicily,
October, 1943.
Bartholomew, Yvonne, undergrad '44,
W.R.N.S.
Beach, A. Mansfield, B.A. '40,
R.C.A.F.,   (now home), D.F.C.
Buerk,   Robert,   Commerce   '43,
R.CN.V.R.
Roy Frank, R.C.A.C, commanded an army co-operation squadron in the Dieppe raid, 1942. Home
in  August,  1944.
Bromley, R. B., British Army, missing.
Bell, Roy Gordon, R.C.A.F., torpedoed
troopship and destroyer off the coast
of Sicily, to win the D.F.C., January,
1944.
Bell, Roderick M., R.C.N.V.R,, D.S.C,
September, 1942.
Boe, Bernard, R.C.A.F., missing.
Beaton, Frank Bardner, Seaforth
Highlanders, killed in action in
Italy,  1944.
Barnett, John H. D., B.A.Sc, died of
injuries on Western Front, November,
1944.
Bell-Irving, Henry Pybus, R. C. A.,
D.S.O.
Bill   Wilson
Dave Young
Beaumont, Leys Middleton, R.CA.F.,
killed in action, 1942.
Bently, Robert 0., Aggie '42, R.C.A.F.
Beger,  John   Moor,  R.CA.F.
Bird, John Irvine, R.CN.V.R., naval
engagement, H.M.S. Trinidad, March,
1942.
Brayshaw,   Thomas   Christopher,
R.C.A.F.
Birmingham, W. H. (Bill), B.A.,
R.CA.F., returned home after four
and a half years service overseas.
Bolton, Ruth Picken, W.R.CN.S. (now
discharged).
Bell, Ronald George, R.C.A.F., killed
on active service, D.F.M., 1942.
Bonner, Robert W., B.A. '42, Army,
wounded in the Italian Campaign;
former president of L.S.E.
Berrg, Keith Gregory, R.C.A.F., killed
in action after air operations, 1944.
Borthwick,   Roy  M.,  Science  '44,
R.C.A.F.
Boss, Norman Holmes, Science '42,
R.C.A.F., killed on active service,
November, 1944, winner of the Phil
Wilson   Bursary  in  Forestry.
Boyd, Ruth, W.R.CN.S., stationed at
Esquimalt.
Braathen, Harold, R.C.A.F., missing on
active   service,   August,   1944.
Braun, William Thomas, R.CA.F.,
reported missing, presumed dead, on
active   service,   October,   1942.
Bell, G. Douglas, Arts '42, R.CN.V.R.
Brereton, Gilbert Wm., R.C.A.F., killed
on  active   service,  June,   1944.
Brown, Eric W., R.CA.F., former
prisoner of war in Germany, rescued
by American troops, now in Canada.
Brown, Reginald, B.A. '40, Army,
Jahore Engineers, prisoner of war
in Japan.
Bessette, Gordon, R.C.A.F., reported
missing   after  air  opreations,   1944.
Branson,  Thomas   L.  C, Arts  '40,
R.C.A.F.
Butters, Thomas W. F., Army, wounded
overseas for the second time on
November 7th, 1944, on Western
Front.
Harry   Curran Hunter   Wood
Page Eight . . Black, John Hannah, R.C.A.F., died
overseas, 1943.
Briggs, William Edward, R.C.A.F.,
killed on active service overseas,
March,  1944.
Brown, Malcolm L., B.A. '39, Armoured
Regiment, seriously wounded in Italy.
Burke, Harold H., Arts '44, U.S. Navy.
Burke, Cornelius, R.C.A.F., D.F.C. and
Bar.
Campbell, Dan, Aggie '44, R.C.A.
Campbell, Gordon, Arts '45, R.C.N.V.R.
Campbell, William Weir, R.C.A.F.,
D.F.C., March, 1942.
Carncross,  Charles  A.,  Science  '44,
R.C.M.E.
Calquehoun, F. D., killed on active
service, 1943.
Carlyle, Jack C, Science '44, R.C.C.S.
Charters, John A., Army, mentioned in,
despatches,   1944.
Carrothers, A. Brian, Arts '44, Canadian   Scottish.
Cook, Garrett Monro, B.S.A. '39,
R.C.A.F., Air Force  Cross.
Carter, Stewart M., R.C.A.F., D.F.C,
October,   1944,  home   on  leave
Chatwin, James C, Arts '43, R.C.A.,
C.A.O.
Child, Colin Gartrell, R.C.A.F., presumed dead after plane disappearance, April, 1943.
Church, Edward John Maxwell, Seaforth Highlanders, wounded in Agua,
1943.
Cline, Richard Emmett, R.C.A.F.,
D.F.C., March, 1943, now back at
UBC  to  finish  his   degree.   •
Chambers, Stewart Leslie, Calgary
Highlanders, badly wounded in Holland,  November,   1944.
Claridge, Charles, B.A. '43, R.C.N.V.R.,
sports  editor  of Ubyssey.
Clark, John Duncan, R.C.A.F., missing
after  air  operations,   August,   1944.
Cornish, Oliver Mansell, R.C.A.F.,
missing, presumed dead, February,
1944.
Cochrane, Arthur Charles, R.C.A.F.,
D.F.C., reported missing after air
operations,  April,   1943.
Craig, John Douglas, Canadian Armoured Corps, wounded, September,
1944.
Colledge, William Wilson, R.C.A.F.,
D.F.C., killed on active service, July,
1943.
Craig, Neal Leonard, R.C.A.F., injured
on active  service.
Caulfield, William James, killed on
active   service  overseas,   1943
Corbet,  Les,   R.C.A.F.,  undergrad.
Cranston, Robert Brooks, R.M.R.,
wounded, August,  1944.
Cooke, Dewar B., Arts '44, Ontario
Tank Regiment.
Charlie Cotterall
Al Dean
Al Young
Keith Porter
Cruise, George T., New Westminster
Regiment, severely wounded in
Italy, July, 1944, now home.
Charters, John Alfred, Army, mentioned in  dispatches, July, 1944.
Cross, Garfield. Wallace, R.C.A.F.,
missing on active service after a
bombing raid over Germany, January, 1945.
Clark, John A., recovering from
wounds,  April,  1944.
Curtin, Francis Jerry, R.C.A., killed in
action   overseas,   July,   1944.
Chartes, James, Army, killed at Dieppe.
Clark, Donald Hartford, R.C.A.F.,
D.F.C, missing after plane collision
over the Gulf of Mexico, February,
1944.
Curtin, Francis Jerry, Canadian Armoured Corps, killed in action, July,
1944.
Peggy  Moyles Mickey Stewart
Curwin,  Guy,  Comm.  '43,  CA.O.
Coe,  Allen,  R.C.A.O.,  wounded, Italy.
Cruet, Richard Noel, R.C.A.F., reported missing, now presumed dead,
February,  1944.
Clark, Robert Scott, Seaforth Highlanders, killed in action in Italy,
November, 1944.
Cowan, Robert Peter, R.C.N.V.R.,
D.S.C.,  May,  1943.
Cote, Pault T., Arts '43,  CA.O.
Cotterall, Charles L., Comm. '43, U.S.
Army Air Corps, Air Medal, Big
Block Club.
Coutts, James W., Comm. '44, R.C.A.F.
Cruit, Richard N., R.C.A.F., missing,
presumed dead, February, 1944.
Cox,    Edmund   Thomas,   Science   '41,
R.C.A.F., reported missing, now presumed dead, October,  1943.
Clark, John D., missing, August, 1944,
R.C.A.F.
Cox, John C, Science '40, R.C.A.F.
Cleveland, Charles Cunningham,
R.C.A.F., D.F.C, seroiusly injured on
active  service,  1944.
Crombie,  Peter  E., Arts  '43,  Infantry.
Crosby,  Gordon,  Science  '40,  R.C.A.F.
Custance, John Patrick, B.A. '38,
B.A.Sc. '39, R.C.A.F., killed in
action, 1943.
Cunningham,  John   R.,  Comm.   '44,
R.CN.V.R.
Cunningham, Charles C, R.C.A.F.,
D.F.C, seriously injured on active
service,  April,   1944
Cook,    Hugh    Archibald,    Seaforth
Highlanders.
Cooper, Burt M., B.A. '39, 8th Army,
wounded in Italy, October,  1944.
Cormack, William Thomas, R.C.A.F.,
missing, presumed dead, as a result
of air operations, December,  1942.
. . . Page Nine Vic Motherwell      C.   A.   Carneross
DeBeck, Henry Keary, R.C.A.F., D.F.C.,
October,   1944,   Science   '40.
Detwiller, Lloyd Fraser, R.C.A.F.,
birthday honors, June, 1943—commendation, B.A. '39, M.A. '40.
Day-Smith, Lyman Cyrus, Comm. '40,
Seaforth Highlanders, killed in action in Italy,. December, 1944, outstanding  rugby  player.
Davidson, Bob, Science '44, R.C.N.V.R.,
president of Engineers Undergrad.
Davidson, John A., Aggie '42, R.C.A.F.,
now in  Holland.
Day,   Catherine,   Aggie    '43,    R.C.A.F.
Darby, James Lloyd, R.C.A.F., killed
on active service  overseas,  1943.
Darling, Thomas Grahanie, B.A. '39,
R.C.N.V.R., attacked Tirpitz, May,
1944.
Davis, John Cecil, Science '42, R.C.A.F.,
killed in action,  1944.
Daunt, Acton, R.C.A.F., B.A. '41, killed
on active service in Newfoundland.
Ditmars, Eric Soulis, R.C.N., missing
on active service, presumed lost,
December,   1941, citation.
Dayton, Frances, Arts '43, W.R.N.S.,
Fleet Air Arm.
Dockrill, Joseph Frederic, R.C.A.F.,
killed  in action,  1943.
Dean, Alan Wardner, Canadian Scottish, wounded in Normandy, August,
1944.
Doherty, Robert Spencer, R.C.A.F.,
missing, presumed dead after air
operations.
Deither, Barbara, W.R.N.S., Arts '43.
Dennis, Pierce James A., R.CA.F-i
missing on active service, July, 1943.
Dixon,   Harold,  Arts.   40,  R.C.A.F.
Dixon, Hugh C, Science '42, Canadian  Army  Engineers,  Holland.
Dorchester, J. E. C, Science '40,
R.C.A.
Dilworth,  Joseph  Gerald,  Army,  missing in action in France, September,
1944.
Douglas, Gordon, Arts '40, R.C.A.
Dunell, George Eric, R.C.N.V.R., reported missing and presumed killed
on active service, January, 1944, on
Royal Navy  ship, Science  '43.
Eadie, Charles, Comm. '42, R.C.A.F.
Eadie, J.  Keith, Science '40, R.CA.F.
English, Earl Thomas, R.C.A.F.,
D.F.C.,  September,   1943.
Elsey, Howard, R.C.A.F., reported
killed during flight as test pilot
overseas,  1944.
Edwards, John Hamilton, R.C.A.F.,
missing after air operations overseas,
June, 1943.
Elsdon, Walter Douglas, R.C.A.,
undergrad '41, wounded in Italy,
December,  1944.
Elder, T. Peter, Arts '43, R.C.N.V.R.
Emerson, Bruce E., Arts  '41, C.A.F.
Farrow, Francis Alfred, Aggie '42,
Army, slightly wounded in Italy, but
returned  to duty,  Military Cross.
Don Palethorpe     Clive Cunningham
Field, Robert Charles, R.C.A.F., killed.
Farr, David M. L., B.A. '44, R.C.N.V.R.,
now   discharged.
Foster, John Ansley, R.C.A.F., killed
in   action, August  29,   1942.
Fairbnrn, Robert Douglas, R.C.A.F.,
killed   in   action,   March,   1942.
Fleishman, Edmund David, R.C.A.F.,
Air Force Medal, court order presuming death, March, 1944.
Ferguson, Byron Laird, UBC graduate,
South Saskatchewan Regiment,
wounded, remaining on duty on the
Western  Front.
Ferguson, Donald N., B.S.A. '41,
CA.O., killed in action in Holland
with the Canadian Scottish, February,   1945.
Ferguson, Donald, undergrad '44,
R.C.A.F.
Field, Donald  B., B.Coni. '43, CI.C
Fields,  James  M.,  Science  '40,
R.C.N.V.R.
Field, Robert Charles, R.C.A.F., killed
on active service.
Flynn, John Patrick, R.C.A.F., undergraduate '41, reported missing, now
presumed killed, outstanding basketball star of the 1940 Thunderbird
champions.
Fleck, A. B. (Drew), R.C.A.F., D.F.C,
January,  1945.
Francis,  John  I.,   undergraduate,
R.CN.V.R.
Falkins, Gordon 0., Canadian Scottish,
wounded,  Holland.
Frith, Austin Francis, Loyal Edmonton
Regiment, CA.O., wounded for the
second time in Italy, January, 1945,
B.A.  '42,  outstanding   UBC  athlete.
Frost, David William, R.C.A.F., missing,
September, 1942.
Frost,  Joan,  Arts   '42,   W.R.N.S.
Fraser, Alan Raymond, Science '42,
Forestry, Engineering, Army, wounded for the second time while fighting  in Italy, November,  1944.
Fraser, William MacMillan, R.C.A.F.,
missing, presumed dead, after air
operations, returning from mine-
laying  flight,  March,   1944.
Fairgrieve, William (Bud) Chard,
R.C.A.F.,   killed,   1944.
Fletcher, William John K., R.C.A.F.,
missing, presumed dead, September,
1944.
Francis, Margaret Ecker, Canadian
Army  Press  Correspondent  overseas.
Fleishman, Edmund David, R.C.A.F.,
awarded Air Force Medal, April,
1943.
Frisken,  James,  Arts  '44,  R.C.A.F.
Roy Sworder
].   W.   Coutts
Page Ten . Ferry, Jack  A., Comm.  '44, R.C.A.F.
Gilmour, W. A., Com. '41, R.C.N.V.R.
Gilbert, William Delmar, R.C.A.F.,
died  overseas,  March,  1944.
Goodwin,  W.  H.,  Science  '43,
R.CN.V.R.
Glen, William Reid, R.C.A.F., prisoner
of war in Germany, March, 1944.
Gorse, Fred W., Science  '44, R.C.A.F.
Cordon,   Hugh  W.,  Science   '41,
R.CN.V.R.
Gosse,  Richard  F.,   Comm.,  R.C.A.F.
Goulay, John L., Com. '43, R.C.N.V.R.
Goldie, Micharl M., Coram., R.C.A.
Gross, Douglas Haig, R.C.A.F., missing
on active service after air operations,
August,  1944.
Grant, Ian MacDonald, R.C.A., served
with the Eighth Army, established a
military precedent when awarded the
D.S.O., usually only given to officers
above the rank of major, mentioned
in dispatches.
Gunn, William Donald, R.N., in Hong
Kong.
Green, Philip Sanson, R.C.A.F., missing after air operations overseas,
July, 1944, since reported died of
wounds.
Griffin, Philip, Black Watch, killed in
France, July,   1944.
Greenwood, George Armstrong, R.C.N.
V.R., at  Anzio, February, 1944.
Granger, John D., Arts. '40, R.CA.F.,
killed in  action  overseas,  1942.
Colliding, Arthur William, R.C.A.F.,
killed  in action,  February, 1942.
Graham, David Robert, R.C.A.F., died
in  action  overseas,  1944.
Cibson, Howard B. C, R.C.A.F., mentioned in dispatches, November,
1944,
Gustavson, Stanley E., Science undergrad,   R.CA.F.
Halstead, John H., Arts '43, R.C.N.V.R.
Gardner,   Alan,   Navy,   in   Sicilian
Campaign.
Hall, William, R.C.E., M.C, wounded,
February,  1944.
Hall, Hugh U., Com. '43, R.C.A.
Haggitt, Clarence Edward, R.A.F.,
killed in air operations, buried at
Amsterdam,  September,  1941.
Hall, J. Gordon, Arts '43, C.A.D.A.
Hanbury, Paul K., Arts  '41,  R.C.A.F.
Hale, Frederick Montague, prisoner of
war in Hong Kong since December,
1941.
Hamilton, John Peter, R.C.N.V.R.,
reported missing on H.M.C.S. Al-
berni,   now   presumed   dead.
Hammitt, Virginia, B.A. '44, U.S.
Navy,   senior  editor  of  Ubyssey.
Mary Montgomery    Hazel Hutchison
Harmer, James C, B.Com. '41, C.O.A.,
missing in action in France, president of  MAA,(   1939-41).
Haines, Alfred Roy, B.A. '40, R.C.A.F.,
D.F.C, reported missing, but later
reported   safe,   March,   1943.
Hamilton, David Allan, R.A.F., missing,   presumed  dead,  January,  1943.
Hamlin, Orlando Guthrie, U.S. Army
Air Corps, Air Medal, March, 1944.
Hitchcock, John 11., Canadian Scottish,
severely   wounded,  September,   1944.
Hay, Sandy, Canadian Scottish, wounded  in France,  July,  1944.  "
Hodges, Ronald George, R.C.A.F.,
killed on active service overseas,
February,  1943.
Hay,   Norman   M.,   undergrad,
R.C.N.V.R.
Harper, David Alan, B.Com. '42, Army,
wounded in Italy, February, 1944.
Hetherington,    Ewart     Sim,    reported
missing,   later   reported   prisoner   of
war in Germany, April, 1944.
Paul Cote
Lois  Nicholson
Hudson, Alan Gray, R.C.A., killed in
action in France, July, 1944, B.Com.
'40.
Heaslip, J. L., R.C.A., awarded the
Military Cross for gallantry in the
Normandy  invasion.
Henderson, Ralph R. (Hunk), R.C.
A.F., prisoner of war in Germany,
former  Thunderbird  basketball  star.
Holland, D. C, R.C.E., killed in action
in Holland, November, 1944, Science
'40.
Horswill, Sydney Richard, R.C.A.F.,
killed on active service overseas,
1942.
Howatt, J. D. W., Arts '43, R.C.A.F.
Hutchison, Hazel, W.R.CN.S., B.A. '43.
Hutchison, George T., R.C.A., B.Com.
'43.
Houghton, K. D., Arts '42, R.C.A.F.
Jackson, Douglas  L., Arts  '43,  R.C.A.
Jeffries, J. G., R.C.A., Fort Garry
Horse.
Johnson,  Alan   D.,  Coniiu.  '44,  CA.O.
Jones, Philip A., Arts '43,  R.C.N.V.R.
Joplin, A. Fred, Science '42, R.C.A.F.,
Big  Block Club.
Jordan-Knox, Trevor, R.C.A.F., dangerously wounded while dropping
supplies to Burma outposts, last
heard of at the Mobile Field Hospital  at  Imphal.
Killam, David Allison, R.C.N.V.R.,
missing in action, awarded D.S.C,
July,  1944.
Kingston,     John     Sargent,     R.C.A.F.,
prisoner  of  war,  August,   1944.
Keith, Kenneth L., Arts  '42, R.C.A.F.,
president of the  Munro Pre-Med.
Keller,    Cornelius   W.,    B.Comin.    '43,
R.CA.S.C,   CA.O.
Kelly,   Valerie   Gardner,   U.S.   Marine
Corps.
S. F. Avis Jack Stevenson
. . Page Eleven George Cruise        Douglas Pedlow
Lakes, M. J., C.A.R.R., undergrad.
Lane, Stuart Clarke, R.C.N.V.R., B.A.,
B.Comm.   '43,   presumed   dead.
Laronde, Harry D., B.A. '41, R.C.A.F.,
killed  on  active   service.
Laird, Reginald Robert, RCA.M.C,
wounded at Dieppe.
Lane, William T., Arts '44, infantry.
Logan,  H.  F.  M., B.Sc, R.C.A.F.
Lucas, Colin R., Arts  '43,  R.C.N.V.R.
Lundell, F. W., Arts '43, R.C.A.F.
Latornell, Maurice Coupland, B.A. '38,
R.C.A.F., missing after air operations
overseas, April,  1944.
Law,   Henry,   R.A.F.,   presumed   dead
after   bombing   operations   over
Germany.
Lemare, John David, R.C.A.F., B.A.Sc,
presumed dead after air operations,
February,  1944.
Leitch, Archibald Havill, R.C.A.F.,
killed in action, November, 1944.
Lopatecki, Eugene Leighton, B.A. '38,
B.S.A. '39, interned in Netherlands
East Indies.
Lunn, Gerald Alfred, R.C.A.F., r.iLs 113,
presumed  dead.
Logan, John Elmo Murray, B.A. '37,
Cameron Highlanders, killed in
Normandy, September, 1944, Rhodes
scholar, and member of Students'
Council.
Mackie, Geoffrey deFylton, B. A.,
R.C.A.F., killed in a flying accident
near  Trenton, Ont., February,  1941.
Maddin, Cameron, R.C.A.F., prisoner
of war ni  Germany.
Maitland, William John, R.C.A.F.,
D.F.M., kiled in action, August,
1944.
Markham, Douglas A. W., B.A.Sc '41,
R.C.E., killed in train crash in
Ontario.
Marlatt, Sholto P., R.C.A.F., killed in
action, 1942.
Martin, Robin McCulley, Royal Winnipeg Rifles, killed in action in
France,  September,   1944.
Mather, Robert Addison, R.C.A.F.,
missing,   presumed  dead.
Mathers, William Whelan, Royal Canadian Regiment, wounded in action
in Italy,  August,  1944.
Matheson, Alexander MacKenzie, So.
Saskatchewan Regt., wounded in
action   in  Normandy,  August,   1944.
Matthew, Robert Duff, killed on
active  service, October,  1944.
Millerd, William Francis, R.C.A.F.,
missing after air operations, May,
1942.
Milne, Colin Stewart, R.C.A.F., died
of wounds, March,  1942.
Moffat, Bernard Joy, R.C.A.F., missing
in   air operations, December,  1942.
Monckton, John P., B.S.A., R.C.A.F.,
killed in air operations over Germany, February, 1943
Moody, Donald  Beverly,  R.A.F.,  missing, presumed dead, April, 1943.
Ken McBride      John  Cunningham
Moore, Victor Campbell, B.A. '40,
Canadian   Scottish.
Morritt,  Jack,   R.C.A.F.,   missing.
Morrison, Gilmour Innis, B.S.A.,
R.C.A.F., died of injuries,   1943.
Morrow, David J., B.A. '40, R.C.N.V.R.,
killed in action, 1944.
Motherwell, Victor George, R.C.A.F.,
safe after being reported missing,
D.F.C.
Moxon, Jack, Seaforths, B.Comm. '42,
injured   1943  and   1944.
Mathews, Frank S., Arts '44, R.C.N.V.R.
Mann, Donald  E., Commerce  '45,
R.CN.V.R.
Mayers, Helen, nursing sister with
R.C.A.F.
Maxwell, Noel R., B.A.Sc, R.C.A.F.
Margeson, John M. R., Arts '42,
R.C.A.F.
Myers, Fred C, Arts '44, R.C.AJ.
Michas, Lucas, Commerce '45, R.CA.F.
Mathewson,  Peter   S.,  B.A.   '42,
R.CN.V.R.
Miller,   Richard   C,   Science   '43,
R.CN.V.R.
Mitchell,  Frank   G.,  Arts  '43,
R.CN.V.R.
Mains, Jack, B.A. '43, R.CA.
Manzer, Carson G., B.Comm. '44,
R.CA.
Murphy, Gloria, W.R.CN.S.
Montgomery,   Mary  Boyd,   W.R.CN.S.
Margerison, Christopher Clarence William,   D.F.C.,  R.C.A.F.
McDougall, Alex, B.A. '44, Special
Army Service Corps.
McKinnon, Neil  C,  Aggie, R.C.A.
McLaren, James B., Applied Science,
R.C.A.F.  overseas.
McLeod,  D.  C, Arts   '44,  R.C.N.V.R.
McManus,  G, Aggie   '44, R.C.A.F.
McMillan, Mary, Arts '43, W.R.CN.S.
Maconachie, Roy, M.A.Sc. '40, well-
known rugby player, killed in air
crash   overseas,   R.CA.F.
MacKenzie, Andrew Ian, Arts '43,
R.CA.
McBurney, Samuel Lome, R.C.A.F.,
presumed   missing,  July,  1943.
McCulloch, William Donald, R.C.A.F.,
killed on active service overseas,
June,   1942.
McDowell, Thomas Alexander, R.C.A.F.,
missing in air operations over Germany,   September,   1943.
Mildred Twiss        J. H. Harmer
Page Twelve . . . Mclntyre, Robert Francis, B.A. '40,
R.C.A.F., presumed dead, November,
1943.
McLellan, William Fraser, B.Comm.
'40, killed in action,  1943.
McMullin, Francis Hugh, R.C.A.F.,
killed  in action, March,  1943.
MacFayden, Robert Duncan, B.Comm.
'41/ R.C.A.F., prisoner of war, 1944.
McGhee, William P., Forestry '41,
R.CN.V.R.
McGregor,  F.  Chris,  Ap.  Sc.   '46,
R.CN.V.R.
McCarry, James Joseph, R.C.A.F.,
missing,  presumed  dead.
McLachlan, Ross Sheldon, R.C.A.F.,
prisoner   of  war  in   Germany.
McMullin, Francis Hugh, R.C.A.F.,
killed on active service, March, 1942.
McRae, John Gordon, R.C.A.F., killed
on  active  service., October,  1943.
McBride, Kenneth Gilbert, 8th Army,
killed  in action in Italy.
McCarvill, Cyril James, R.C.A.F.,
missing after air operations oil the
coast   of   Holland,   March,   1944.
MacDonald, James A. S., R.C.A.F.,
previously reported missing, now
safe.
Macdonald, Ian Alastair, R.C.A.F.,
missing in  Canada.
MacFarlane, M. Ernest R., R. C. A. F.,
missing on air operations overseas,
July, 1944.
McGeer, Michael Grattan, R.C.A.F.,
prisoner  of war  in  Germany.
McKenzie, Cameron Wesley, R.C.A.F.,
seriously injured on active service in
Canada, May, 1944.
McLachlan, Ross Sheldon, R.C.A.F.,
prisoner  of  war   in   Germany.
McLean, J. F., Seaforth Highlanders,
D.S.O., wounded on active service
in Italy, 1944.
McLeod, John Malcolm, R.C.A.F.,
missing after air operations overseas.
McLeod, Joseph Donald Penn, R.CA.F.,
prisoner  of  war.
McMillan, Roddy, R.C.A.F., previously
reported as missing, now listed as
killed.
McRae, John Gordon, R.C.A.F., killed
on active service, October,  1943.
McLeod,  John  N., B.A.  '40,  R.C.A.F.
McLeod, Donald T., Commerce '45,
R.C.A.F.
Macdonald,    M.   A.,    Arts    '46,
R.CN.V.R.
McKenzie, Lloyd G., grad. '42, CA.O.
McBride,   Ted,  Arts   '42,   R.C.N.V.R.,
former    president   Alma    Mater
Society.
McBride, Mervin, Arts '47, R.C.N.V.R.
Robert  Sinclair     Jack   MacArthur
Bob  Mclntyre        Bud Fairgreaves
McBride,  Ron,   R.C.N.V.R.
McDiarmid,   Barbara,  W.R.CN.S.
McKelvey, William Watson, U.S. Army
Air Corps, presumed dead, lost in
Libyan  desert.
McNaughton, Duncan, R.C.A.F., D.F.C,
former Olympic high jump champion.
McLagan,   Mori,   R.C.N.V.R.
McCarthy   James   A.,   B.S.A.   '43,
R.C.A.F.
Nobbs, William H., Commerce '44,
R.C.A.
Nicholls,    John    W.,    Arts    '44,
R.CN.V.R.
Neilson, Jack Alexander Foster, CA.O.
Nordale, Arnold Mauritz, U.S.A.A.F.,
killed in training action, Chico, Cal.,
Dec. 5, 1943.
Nichol,  Eric,  B.A.  '41, R.C.A.F.
Nicholson, Lois, former WUS president, W.R.CN.S.
Ruth Boyd
Philip  Griffin
Neilson, Jack, R.C.A., wounded, February,  1944.
Oldfield, James E., B.S.A. '41, Westminster Regt.,  wounded in Italy.
Orr, Alexander G., R.C.A.F., missing,
December 30, 1943.
Osier, Kenneth S., B.Sc, killed in
action   in   France,   1944.
Oughtred,   William    T.,   Arts   '43,
R.C.A.F.
Oughtred, Aulay, Arts '44, R.C.A.F.
Paterson, Pauline, R.C.A.F.
Pearson, William E., R.CA.F., missing,
October,   1944,  reported  prisoner.
Pellant, Ernest, B.A. '40, Princess Pat
Regt.,   prisoner   in   Germany,   1944.
Perry, Keith 0., R.C.A.F., died in
prison  camp overseas,   1943.
Pickell, Owen F., R.C.A.F., missing
since   1941.
Pike, Gordon C, R.C.A.F., prisoner of
war in Germany in  1944.
Plows, Arthur H., Canadian Scottish,
severely  wounded,  August,  1944.
Poole, Harold C, B.S.A. '40, Jahore
Engineers, prisoner of war in Japan,
1943.
Porter, Charles E., Moose Squadron,
overseas, killed in action, 1943.
Preece, Gordon L., R.C.A.F., missing,
May,  1944.
Pringle, Rev. George R., B.A. '34,
R.C.A.F., former basketball star,
killed  overseas,   1943.
Proby, Carson, missing, May, 1942.
Pruder, Henry F. G., R.C.A.F., killed
overseas,   1943.
Purdon, Richard M. H., R.C.A.F.,
missing, presumed dead, Dec. 7,
1943.
Paisley, John K, Arts '43, R.C.A.F.
Parnum, Sam, Science '43, R.C.N.V.R.
Poole, D. B., Ap. Science, R.C.N.V.R.
. . . Page Thirteen Donald Stewart        Thomas  Vance
Parkinson,  Robert  H.,  B.A.  '41,
R.CA.S.C
Prickett, Donald I., Ap. Sc. '44, U.S.
Army.
Pnrslow, John Edward, R.C.A., killed
in action, May,  1944.
Porter,  Rex, American Army, missing.
Pedlow, Douglas, R.C.A., killed in
action, July,  1944.
Porter, R. Keith, B.Comm. '44, treasurer   A.M.S.,   R.CA.S.C
Quick, John A., 23rd Armoured Tank
Regiment, killed in action, May,
1944.
Robertson, Struan Turner, B.A. '39,
Coast Artillery, U.S. Army, killed in
train   accident,  July,   1942.
Robinson, Edward LaPage, R.CA.F.,
killed in air operations on Atlantic
Coast,   September,   1943.
Rose, Stephen Gregory, R.C.A.F.,
killed.
Richardson, S. G., Arts '43, R.C.A.F.
Robertson,  D.,  Arts  '42,   R.C.A.F.,
wounded.
Robinson, Valerie, Arts '42, R.C.A.F.
(W.D.)
Russell, J. Hector, Commerce '44,
R.CA.
Rose, Robert II. M., Commerce '42,
missing, R.C.A.F.
Reed, Kenneth Wilfred, Seaforths,
wounded  in Italy, December, 1943.
Ricardo, David William Crawley,
R.CA., wounded September 20, 1944.
" Richardson,    Jack,    R.C.A.F.,    missing
overseas.
Roberts, John Milne, CA.O., killed in
action  in  Belgium, September, 1944.
Robertson, James Donald, R.C.A.F:;
missing after air operations overseas,
June, 1944.
Robertson, Donald Wright, R.C.A.F.,
escaped   from  occupied  territory.
Robinson, Clifford, R.CA.F., missing,
presumed  dead,  March,  1944.
Robson, Donald Mathew, R.C.A.F.,
missing, presumed dead, September,
1944.
Roddan, Stuart, Seaforth Highlanders,
wounded in action in Normandy,
July,   1944.
Sanderson, George Benjamin, R.C.A.F.,
killed  in  air  action,  June,  1944.
Sarles, Lloyd Norwood, R. C. A. F.,
missing on air duty, November,
1942.
Schjeldernp, Vilhelm Roger, Military
Cross, R.C.A., missing in action,
November,  1944.
Scott. John Charles, R.C.A., wounded
in  Sicily,  September,   1943.
Scrivener, Jack Vincent, R.C.A.F.,
missing after air operations, March,
1944.
Scendall, George Edward, R.CA.F.,
prisoner of war in Germany, May,
1943.
Robert Mather      Lome McBurney
Shives, Arnold Beldon, R. C. A. F.,
killed   in   action,   March,   1942.
Sibbett, Clarence Deane, R.C.A.F.,
killed   in  action,  July,  1944.
Sims, Mervin, R.C.A.F., wounded
overseas.
Sinclair, Robert Meade, R.C.A.F.,
killed  in  action, February,  1944.
Scudamore, John Trelawney, R.C.A.,
killed   in  action,  November,  1944.
Smith, Derwood William, R.C.A.F.,
missing after air operations over
France, July,  1944.
Sleeves, Hugh Douglas, R. C. A. F.,
killed  in action, 1943.
Stewart, Harold Charles, R.C.A.F.,
killed   in  flying  accident,   1944.
Stodart, Dave Shearer, R.C.A.F., prisoner of war, August, 1944.
Storey, John Edmond, B.A.Sc. '41,
R.C.N.V.R., missing at sea, June,
1944.
Strong, George Frederick, R.C.A.F.,
killed in bomber crash, May, 1942.
Stewart, Richard Charles, R.C.A.F.,
missing after air operations, September, 1942.
Stanisby, Jack C, Ap. Sc. '42, R.C.A.F.
overseas.
Stewart, Elizabeth G., Nursing '40,
R.CA.M.C
Smalley, Robert, R.CA.F., killed in
action over Germany during air
operations,  February,   1944.
St.  John,  Clair,  C.W.A.C
Stewart, Norman S., Sc '42, R.C.E.
Scott, Anthony D., Comm. '44, R.C.A.
Swinton, Anthony H., Arts '43, R.CA.F.
Stevenson,   John   H.,   B.A.,   B.Comm.,.
treasurer of AMS 1940, R.C.N.V.R.
Shewan, Robert E., Arts '42, R.C.A.F.
Twiss, Robert D., R.CA.F., men's Big
Block   Club.
Thomas,  Philip J., Arts  '44,  R.C.A.F.
Turnill, Eric S.,  B.A.  '41, R.C.N.V.R.
Tornroos, Alfred H,  Arts  '44, R.C.A.
Twiss,  Mildred, R.CA.F.   (W.D.).
Thomson, Pat, Arts '44, C.W.A.C.
Thurgood, M. F., Seaforth Highlanders,   wounded   in   Italy.
Tater, Simon George, R.CA.F., missing,  May,  1940.
Tully, Ralph Wilbert, R.C.A.F., prisoner of war, December, 1943.
Taylor, Robert Douglas, R.C.A.F.,
missing on air operations, June,
1944.
Willis, C. A., R.C.A.F.,  missing.
D. B. Fields
Jack  Roberts
Page Fourteen . . . Taylor, Charles Hugh, R.C.A.F.,
missing   overseas.
Thicke, Douglas Andrew, R.C.A.F.,
killed  in  action,  March,  1944.
Urquhart, Alex. Norland, R.C.A.F.,
missing and presumed killed, June,
1942.
Vickery, Phillip Arthur, R.A.F., missing, believed killed on a ferry flight,
July,  1943.
Vickers, George Peter, R.C.A.F., recommended for D.F.C, missing after
air operations,  August,  1944.
Wilkinson, Edward David Hooper, 4th
Armoured Division, wounded in
Belgium, October,  1944.
Willoughby, Arthur Weatherly, R.C.
A.F., killed in flying crash in Manitoba, June,  1942.
Wilson, Hugh Ross, R.C.A.F., D.F.C,
missing in air operations over Berlin,
now presumed  dead, March, 1944.
Wilson, John Alexander, R.CA.M.C,
killed in action in Italy,  1944.
Wilson, Robert Alfred, B.Comm. '40,
R.C.A.F., missing in air operations,
now presumed dead, July, 1943.
Robin  Yellowlees  E. S.  Hetherington
Wilson,  William   Alexander,   R.C.A.F.,
prisoner  of  war,  August,   1944.
Widdess,    Edward     Henry,    R.C.A.F.,
missing in air operations, June, 1944.
Witt, Ernest Morris, R.C.A.F., missing
in  air operations overseas,  1943.
Wood, Dudley Hunter, Seaforth Highlanders, died of wounds,  1944.
Waldie,     Robert     Jackson,     R. C. A.,
wounded in Normandy, July,  1944.
Wallace, Richard, R.C.A.F., prisoner of
war in  Germany, February, 1944.
Edgar Dewdney
Richard
Montgomery
J.  P.   Flynn
Dick Stewart
Wallace, Philip, R.C.A.F., missing,
now  safe.
Ward, Leslie John, R.C.A.F., interned,
Eire, January, 1941.
Wardroper, Wilfred Kenneth, CA.O.,
severely  wounded,  1944.
Weston, Stanley, Volunteer Militia,
Singapore, prisoner of war in Italy,
June,   1943.
Whelan, Jim H., R.C.A.F., missing
after air operations over Burma,
April, 1944.
White, William Alfred, R.C.A.F., presumed dead during flying operations
in  Malta,  May,  1943.
Whitehead, Frederick George, R.C.N.,
presumed  lost  at sea, June,  1942.
Whittle, John Curran, Lord Strathcona
Horse,   M.C,   wounded.
Wilson, Richard Alexander, B.A. '41,
Seaforths,  killed  in  action   in  Italy.
Wood, Thomas Clinton Stuart, R.CA.F.,
missing, presumed dead, October,
1943.
Bob  Twiss Gloria Murphy
Wyrzykowski, John Domonic, R.C.A.F.,
killed on active service in Canada,
1944.
Worthington, Donald Grant, 38th Armoured Regiment, killed in action in
Normandy, August  19, 1944.
Welsford, William D., B.Comm. '43,
R.CN.V.R.
Wilson, Wm. Liard, B.Comm., '44
R.C.A.F.
Warner,  William  L.,  C.I.C.
Wate, G. Kenneth, R.C.A.F.
Williams, David R., R.CA.
Wyness,  Donald  P.,   B.A.Sc.  '41,
R.C.O.C,  C.A.O.
Weed, Joseph  D., R.CN.VR.
Wood, Gordon, 7th Field Artillery.
Webb, Frances,  B.A.  '41,  R.C.N.V.R.
Worth,  Douglas,  B.A.  '40,  Infantry.
Wallace, John  A.  G.,  B.A.   '43,
R.CN.V.R.
Whitelaw, Glen R., Comm. '44, R.C.A.
Watt,  R.   D.   (Bert),  R.C.A.F.
Wallace, Jean, Western Air Command,
R.CA.F.   (W.D.).
Young,  Michael   G.,   Arts   '44,   R.C.A.
Young, Alastair James, R.C.A.F., missing, believed killed, March, 1944.
Young, Thomas M., R.C.A.F., killed
overseas, 1944.
Yellowlees, Robin, Arts '42,  Army.
. . Page   Fifteen  •   CAMPUS AUDITORIUM
Two alternatives offered .
The Auditorium is the scene of two very different
aspects of campus life. Here the student goes for
his entertainment at the many pep meets, plays, and
other pajss features, and here it is that he passes his
noof* hoiJts «iaxing from his studies in the crowded
at*TKSS>tfher<* ait fhe cafeteria. Here he also finds himself jit that fjfribdf Jif^crisis that comes in every college student'* £fe, ,llj|£Jiflteg.of his deepest trouble
and greatest despair- examination time.
/tltfeVljof the
cjwvijtos hav
UpSlaij-s afcaVe trw main audllojiym
largest mft j^fost iinpo*ta«jt dafas on th>
Club,
Mofetnent' all
Maestro  Micelli  makes  music.
their heai
Society,   am
have rooms on tl
Also in this ggfVr■'seini-.pferniS^lt building are the
University Health Service offica tffld the Book Store.
The main part of the Dujjklinp, however, is the
hall itself which seats about 6t)0 peojje in comfortable theatre style seats, and boasts a well lighted
stage with all the backgrounds and lighting equipment needed for the most difficult stage effects.
Page Eighteen LIBRARY
. for seekers of culture
Surrounded by the most beautiful landscaping on
the campus, the Library stands, serene and dignified, the best known and most occupied ftfathe buildings at UBC.
In spite of the continual warningspfi^g^.Ijmari-
ans to the students to stay away frorti tlu? fjbfary
unless they intend to study, llrrs building somriKtw
seems to be more of a^awaaLjBe^flpnfcMi till; B«)ck,
perhaps because a studwt feels trio** conscientious
surroi^IJfld^by bo^finan he djfres Iiiij(rjjr.ir>£in the
Irock Iphestertieras. £^     )  S\ \
*^neht striJMwfr-prgreV gVapite^tne Library
is a. butltrog seqond\to Vone irV l^eavj^y and dignity
of appearance. -ItVbltainS more thifn 140,000 books
on all subjects, as wefl a*s manj'-ttit^resting exhibits.
The Library willsfthjo be^Jhe of the first buildings
to be enlarged wheii futUif? plans for university expansion comej
Closely associated with the Library is the famous
lily pond, the first important step in a freshman's
university career.
Some  of  us  are studious,  sometimes.
Page Nineteen AGGIE  BUILDING
Scientific Aggies are .
cup  of
backw
Situated    conveniently    close    to    the    bus    stop,
so that students and profs can slip over for a quick
ee  between  lectures,  the  building  looks
the low, sprawling Arts Building, and
jand across the mall towards the im-
me uf pure science.
its ttallf  are found the numerous lecture
y"^Tjijfe*!6~Htf&y^ jhe royal road  to  a
'itwk oir the<ymm^4-   OfficeaCTitoo,   are
s buliding,  where tiwil   rfroSrVfleceiv?
I»&4ing ie^reVlafc
The  commohQrYj/fljtfis   cai
they are the trueyhGjne of
meets his -friend&fsnrl eve'
the scene of many a battle
their old enemies, Arts.
The building would not
labs. ThSsfe are stuffy little rooms where students
callously record the pulse beats of dying chickens, or
analyze the bacterial content of milk.
wh£re he eats,
comp
Iwy  are also
MS/ Aggies and
ithout its
These  hard-working Aggies.
Page  Twenty AGGIE BARN
not necessarily farmers
Isolated by their position in the extreme southern
fields of the University, the Aggie barns are a constant source of interest and mystification to Engineers and Artsmen alike. ,V^\
However, to  the  students  of aninrai And   paltry
husbandry,  they   represent  a   workingu*g*H9Jn
portant and instructive as any^JA^tfi-jjJel
In these buildings budding, fai^n leajrn ,kich
subjects as the fundimerttel ana advamttd. teclriiiqiies
of feeding,, vare, and -scieMTfic h)ee<Hng t>t attimals.
Pigs.
The
the
tion for A\tsmen
The other ^nim;(ts are
tional barns, of a
a  sizable  array
cers on
w eatest fascina-
ineer>.
ded for in four addi-
modern design, while
establishments  are  used
These  are  not  Aggies.
for the pourf^r Several buildings are also set aside
for testing labs, cheese making, bottling milk, and
the like.
Page  Twenty-one APPLIED SCIENCE BUILDING
Engineers learn techniques . . .
their
Future Geologists at work.
On the West Mall, overlooking the forest belt,
stands the Applied Science Building, occupied mainly
by laboratories. The north end of the building contains bi«lt&y and zoology laboratories and the south
contains fb^ drafting rooms and geology labora-
t<^w./{Ta'-4wjlJveen are the forestry laboratories.
Aljfiou^h tnP">ra(filOeems to signify that the building/is tfre ewjJBSiv& pDssessiern #i the engineers and
it (feary, scat* of septal Jrfcated (dispute
right nf otssup^tioUi all faculty
facilities/ /tn^rhosflN
second ana^lhird /ye
second flroF^drafung room?
are home to the engineer^ $fid t|
fully decorated wnl),JJif works of
The geology laboratories situ
floor, are well known to"
British Columbia. Innumerat
ried out in these rooms has given a new lease on life
to some mine faced with seemingly insurmountable
obstacles.
aftlng. rooms
e,usually taste-
4r>d Hurrell.
on the ground
operators of
arch car-
Page   Twenty-two . ENGINEERING BUILDING
to aid Canada's War Effort
In the south-west corner of the campus stand the
Engineering buildings, centre of the activities of the
mechanical, electrical, metallurgical, and mining
engineers. Largest of the three is the Mechanical
Engineering Building which houses ijie thermodynamics laboratory with its formidable* array x£ feat
engines which has somehow SjwfeeaTyeatS of punishment at the hands of enthusiastfrt rtiginfters-t(»-be.
The engineers machin* shops a
buildid&i'
\U5Ty~--^m^«*ts  ma»t-tiJ -Motota, ^generato^s,  wiring
""lectricians
with volts  and
Iso
this
Labora-
rts  mai
svutchhwards an
struggle- tarougl
ohms.
The Mining Bujlrjing stands down in the corner of
the block. In addition tj>Ahe spectacular fire assaying laboratory _jMltr^rfi© mineral dressing equipment
the building also contains the hydraulics laboratory.
Here the engineers assemble and make computations
about the flow of—believe it or not—water.
At  least  the  Professor knows.
. Page   Twenty-three ARTS  BUILDING
A diversity of Creatures
The Arts building, centre of the block of semipermanent buildings, houses the largest faculty on
the campus. It is bordered on the north by the
quad, thlMjrossroads of University life.
Erected m W25, the Arts building has served the
of thousands of "men  of culture",
re that students become versed
tj£)§t£j:^i>Strict problems of phil-
osoTpiTyif/aZiaff imbiH^ laniw jaufyntities   oil English
literati
Unfor
building
storey bur
class rooms has
of students in ti
students to overflow to
on the campus.
Artsmen through the yean
what attached to their present home, but few of them
would be sorry to see it replaced by a more adequate structure.
tWQ-
ve
number
ssary for
buildings
The  Arts  Building could  be  overcrowded.
Page  Twenty-jour SCIENCE BUILDING
•   •   •
but all of them Artsmen
The centre of the university, both physically, and
from the point of view of importance is the Science
Building. Here, in the first of the permanent buildings to be constructed on the campus,
and graduates from all three faculties
to assist Canada's war effort.
In   this   building   are
where students work
tributed
against
iich  toward*
(is J>ow*r:
v
no
demanded
For the
never made
ing,  it  contair
and   Bacterii
f*i  labor<Hory   eq
Fuctwnal S&ffy the«*~Tms  been
ligh standWajPof scholarship
There's a man in there somewhere.
ents who have
of the Science Build-
js for Chemistry, Physics,
as well as private laboratories
where students and professors labour over original,
and often secret experiments.
Page  Twenty-five BROCK HALL
Relaxing easy in the Brock .
Brock Hall was erected in 1938 in memory of the
late Dean Reginald W. Brock and his wife Mildred
Brock. It was planned for the purpose of centering
in it tlfe'^xtra curricular life in which Dean Brock
had tafceri)sHt|h an active part during his lifetime.
Jn the main social lounge those students who wish
rela'yatieg ftt>m Tbe>£tind of studying can find magazines to read, »«»fds ta pfa^f a»d friends with whom
Is saj^y jijiUige is
md   events  speiis
Their first view of the Brock.
to piny bri(j
point (%§
groups
The
governing
the main floor
In the Red C^
the   co-eds   of   UBC
doing their share of kni
Organizations such as the P^licafhwijfc>Board, the
Radio Society, the Mamooks and the Camera Club
occupy their own offices in the basement of the
Brock.
Page Twenty-six ARMOURY
if the Army will let you
In the Armoury, another student building, approximately 1400 members of the Canadian Officers
Training Corps and the University Naya^. Training
Division learn the rudiments of modern warfare.
Until the middle of January this ypaT tttt* AnVKiury
was also the headquarters of the UBC \ nivvritlfirAir
Squadron, but with the stren^tX decrease flarrie*} out
by the air force, the \_A& was dfelrarftled.      ^R^
Since it was built? lmHtefall iftf lQll^fee , iftmoury
has bofMifuie centrf^TffLafi miloar/tf\a$r^il<ron the
campu^ar\l^3|f^/asj
IfMdiiidrHaLthed^iHJ^Tdrrle)
and   the   a-fniy, .loclqer \oOms,
of ficers-nii^^kL.^^
This building *\^CJ#lfft^Jf<jr.
ude, in
or the navy
rooms,   and
by the students
the COTC, who have v(H«ntarily waived their pay
each year since 19?8, to^contribute toward such a
building. Tlvis utOWJ^vas put into a fund which
rapidly accuSrrnlated until 1941, when with the aid
of a grant from the provincial government the
building was finally constructed.
We do sell for less
Page  Twenty-seven GYYMNASIUM
Some Campus Athletics
• •
The Gymnasium is the home of the Thunderbirds,
UBC's perennial contenders for the Canadian Basketball Championship. It is also the scene of their
many eggj) battles with the Pat Bay Gremlins, and
Emerican colleges.
[also houses another Senior A team,
|h   the   Thunderbees,   and   the
make
tantly,  iA
Coeds
there, as
The   Gymnasiurj
deavour.    It   was
students themselves, and
versity by the Alma Mater'"
in 1929.
It contains a fully equipped first-aid room, as
well as a kitchen, and equipment, locker, shower,
and dressing rooms.
Iturdent   en-
i^d   by   the
to the Uni-
completion
Basketballers,   not   jitterbugs.
Page Twenty-eight . . STADIUM
. survive rigours of war
Because of the curtailment of most of the major
sports at the university for the duration, the
Stadium, once the centre of campus athletic activity,
now stands empty and deserted, visited BBK^bY the
few remaining rugby and track entmiSjlHjRjutjtoeir
regular practices. j£a        ItAvw
This white concrete building, jjWgJ vested <>£ its
gay banners, remains ^Mfitnin^a^O i\Oniv^;i»rrr?* at
war of_tl*.days MjgjSfcntJisy, gpily^rlatt crowds of
studenflPMgligeflr4l*\j^Ti(Jst^nd ihkI n\.t*rflawed the
a victory.
ia  Inva-
with col-
yond the Rock-
citement of intercolle-
sioife
leges from1
ies. It ha
giate track
Now, howj
the cinder t1
For the honour of the Blue and Gold.
; pits lie unused, and
seldom feels the thrusts of running
spikes, its only brief return to glory coming with
the intramural cross-country race each fall.
J.;>.
.Page  Tivenly-nine  ADMINISTRATION   • The first formal installation of a President of UBC
Page   Thirly-two The average student on the UBC campus manages to get through his four or five years at Varsity without coming into unduly close contact with
the university administration.
In former years he met the President on his first
and last days at Varsity, and perhaps saw the
Chancellor' from a distance at the annual Homecoming Game, but that was almost the full extent of
his dealings with the leaders of his university.
"The old order changeth yielding place to new,"
and this year the retirement of President L. S.
Klinck, after 25 years at the University, and the
appointment of the new President, Dr. Norman A.
M. MacKenzie, have brought this office well into the
limelight from the student's point of view.
The few months that Dr. MacKenzie has been
with us have been enough to show that he is going
to remain in the limelight. Not only has he established a presidential precedent by finding time to
give lectures in his own field, government, but also
he has demonstrated the depth of his interest in
student affairs by his willingness to address campus
clubs and to take part in their discussions.
President MacKenzie likes to refer to himself as
a freshman. If such is the case then he is easily
the most distinguished and accomplished freshman
on the campus today.
He was born in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia.
He was educated first at Pictou Academy and later
at the Universities of Dalhousie, Harvard, and Cambridge. He forsook his studies to serve in World
War  I.    His  achievements on the batdefront were
as brilliant as his career following the armistice.
In 1921, after studying law both here and abroad,
he received his degree of LL.D. at Dalhousie and
was called to the bar at Gray's Inn, London.
President MacKenzie has always been gready interested in public affairs, particularly in the international sense. Besides being connected with the
League of Nations Society, and with the Canadian
Institute of International Affairs he held the post
of legal adviser to the International Labour Office
at Geneva. He has attended many conferences concerning international law both on the continent, and
in the Orient.
The four years preceding his presidency at the
University of New Brunswick Dr. MacKenzie spent
as professor of international law at the University
of Toronto.
Last year he succeeded Charles Vining as chairman of Canada's Wartime Information Board. Even
with his numerous presidential duties he wrote articles for legal journals in Canada, in Britain and in
the United States.
President MacKenzie made history again at his
installation this fall when he was the first president
to be formally installed in his office at a full
Congregation.
Delegates from 45 universities in Canada and the
United States attended the ceremony.
He was officially welcomed by Chancellor E. W.
Hamber, himself a newcomer, and by Dr. Isabel
Maclnnes, for the faculty, Brigadier Sherwood Lett,
D.S.O., M.C, E.D., for the alumni, and Dick Bibbs,
for the Alma Mater Society.
. . . President MacKenzie takes over
Delegates file from library  to  gym,  for   UBC's  first  congregation.
. Page  Thirty-three UBC's New Chancellor, E.  W. Hamber
in Calgary, and afterwards in Vancouver. He later
became European representative with headquarters
in London.
Mr. Hamber has acted on many boards ... he is
the governor of the Vancouver General Hospital,
president of the Vancouver Branch of the Canadian
Red Cross, honorary life member of the Canadian
Legion, a fellow of the Royal Colonial Institute,
president of the Boy Scout Association, honorary
Colonel of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, and
of the Fifth B.C. Coast Brigade.
In 1937, Mr. Hamber was made a Knight of the
Order of St. John, the investiture taking place in
Buckingham Palace.
In his youth, the new Chancellor was an outstanding athlete. He twice competed in the Diamond
Sculls at Henley, captained the Argonauts of Toronto and played on Stanley Cup teams in ice
hockey, when they won several Canadian and
American  championships.
As Chancellor he is the chairman of the Board of
Governors, a body which, with the Senate, supervises the administration of the University's affairs.
This group meets once every month in the Administration building. Their function is chiefly financial, and includes the establishment of bursaries,
and the acceptance of scholarships and gifts.
UBC's new chancellor installs . . .
Of the many changes which have taken place at
the University during the past year one of the most
important was the appointment of the new Chancellor.
With the passing of our beloved Dr. R. E. McKechnie, the students and faculty of UBC welcomed
the former Lieutenant-Governor of the province, the
Hon. Eric W. Hamber, as the new Chancellor.
Mr. Hamber, who is one of the outstanding public men in Canada today, has always shown a great
interest in the affairs of the University. During his
terms as Lieutenant-Governor he held the position of
visitor to the University.
His first official act as Chancellor was to install
the new President, Dr. Norman A. M. MacKenzie.
at the Congregation ceremony, in October.
E. W. Hamber was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba,
attended St. John's College and the University of
Manitoba. After working in the Dominion Bank in
Winnipeg  he  was  appointed   manager  of  the  bank
They maintain the campus buildings and grounds,
sanctioning the construction of new buildings, and
have charge of the appointment of new members of
the staff of the University.
The board contains a varied personnel, including
graduates, lawyers, and business men. Two of the
members, the Chancellor and the President of the
University, are ex-officio, three are chosen from the
University Senate, and the remaining six are appointed for a six-year term by the Lieutenant-
Governor-in-Council.
These citizens guide the University through the
tangles of the business and financial world. Theirs
is the great task of assuring that the University will
carry out its function as the only source of higher
learning in the province. It is a great responsibility
... in capable hands.
The fall Congregation last October, held in place
of the usual convocation for the granting of degrees
to the graduating students, comprised three ceremo-
Page  Thirty-four Dr. Liu signs for his degree.   General Pearkes receives his.   President MacKenzie does the honors on this one.
. . president at Congregation
nies, the installation of the new president, Dr. N. A.
M. MacKenzie, the conferring of honorary degrees
to four internationally known guests of the University, and also the annual granting of degrees to the
students who have taken their courses in the summer
session.
This congregation made history in that it is the
first congregation to be held at this University in
which a president has been installed into office. Dr.
MacKenzie is, in fact, the first of UBC's three presidents to be formally installed.
President MacKenzie was officially welcomed into
his office by the Honourable Eric W. Hamber, and
after several other speeches by delegates, he gave the
congregation address.
The arrangements for the congregation have been
in the hands of the committee under Dr. Todd of the
classics department for the past eight years.
In his address, the president made reference to
those grads and undergrads who have given their
lives in the present conflict. He\ mentioned the opportunities for development at this University, his
chief reason for coming here, and followed with the
welcome to the new chancellor. He gave his views
on education, its place in the University, and society,
and finally a few words about the president and his
place in the University.
In the course of the ceremony, Dr. Isabel Maclnnes spoke for the faculty. Brig. Sherwood Lett,
D.S.O., M.C, E.D., represented the alumni, and R.
M. Bibbs, president of the Alma Mater Society, said
a few words for the student body.
The following men received the honorary Degree
of Doctor of Laws: The Hon. Ray Atherton, American Ambassador to Canada; Hon. Liu Shih Shun,
Ambassador of the Republic of China to Canada;
Rt. Hon. Malcolm MacDonald, British High Commissioner to Canada; and Maj .-Gen. G. R. Pearkes,
Commanding Officer, Pacific Command.
The degree for the Rt. Hon. Mr. MacDonald was
conferred in absentia; he was represented by Mr.
Gerald Selous, British Trade Commissioner, who received the degree for the Hon. Mr. MacDonald.
Immediately after the presentation of the honorary degrees, the graduating students of the University received their degrees from the hands of the new
Chancellor, E. W. Hamber.
Attending the congregation, besides the majority
of the members of the University, were delegates
from almost, fifty universities and colleges in Canada
and the United States.
The inauguration committee, an entirely new organization on this campus, was under the chairmanship of Dean D. Buchanan.
. . . Page  Thirty-five Dean D: Buchanon
Dean Buchanan and faculty .
0. J. Todd
A.B., Ph.D., F.R.S.C
Classics.
Dean Buchanan, popular head of Arts and Science,
has led his ever-growing faculty to the end of another successful year. Completing his twenty-fourth
year at UBC, the Dean has behind him many years
of experience in handling problems peculiar to this
university. Graduates and students alike realize that
his foresight and energy have played a large part iri
its growth and development.
In his capacity as Dean, Dr. Buchanan co-ordinates and integrates the work of the various department heads. All problems relative to the faculty go
through his office. Any changes in regulations are
brought to him for consideration. He acts as an intermediary, not only between students and staff, but
also between the heads of the departments and the
President.
D. 0. Evans
M.A.,  D.Phil.,  D.Lett.
Modern Languages
A. H. Hutchinson
M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C
Botany
Page  Thirty-six . /. A. Irving
M.A.   (Toronto)   M.A.   (Cambridge).
Philosophy and Psychology
C. E. Dolman.
M.R.C.S., M.B., B.S., M.R.C.P., D.P U, Ph D
Bacteriology  and  Preventive Medicine
carry on with duties in wartime
Perhaps the biggest problem facing him this yeai
has been the arranging of courses for returned men.
UBC welcomed many veterans at various times
throughout the year. A special course was arranged
for those arriving at the beginning of the second
term. Conferring with their department heads, the
deans of the different faculties devised a plan by
which returned men would be enabled to complete
one year's work by the end of the summer school
term. A special winter session was inaugurated and
a new course planned for the months of May and
June. By taking these and attending summer
school, veterans will begin next year's fall term with
one year's work to their credit.
Dean Buchanan explained these courses to the
men and offered to assist them in adjusting their
curricula. He told them of the various courses open
to the students wishing to attain degrees in Arts and
Science. This faculty offers a wider range of subjects than any other on the campus.
Designed to give the students a well-rounded education, the Arts Faculty offers everything from
mathematics and economics to history and the study
of the classics. Abstract thought and the study of
humanity and social problems, the study of the
earth, its composition and makeup, the history of its
peoples and their languages, are only a few of the
fields open for study. Under the faculty of Arts and
Science, the Education department offers a Teacher
Training Course for all those interested in this profession. The University Extension Department gives
various courses to off-campus students.
Thus the returned men will have a wide choice of
subjects.    Their study will be of use whether they
Dr. G. M. Weir
B.A.M.A., D.PaEd.
Education
W. A, Clemens
M.A.   (Toronto)   Ph.D.   (Cornell)   F.R.S.C.
Zoology
Page  Thirty-seven Ellis H. Morrow
B.A.   (Queen's)    M.B.A.   (Harvard).
Commerce
desire a general education, or wish to follow a specl
fie course of study leading to a profession. In wartime the demand for trained men and women has
become urgent. Students trained in government,
finance and statistics will find positions waiting for
them. The city is particularly short of teachers for
its elementary and high schools. For those conversant in modern languages, diplomatic and government posts are available.
An Arts course, then, is not composed of a mere
conglomeration of useless knowledge. It not only
gives students a valuable background for future
work, but it also trains them to step immediately
into a profession.
Altering many of its courses to become more
directly applicable to the needs of wartime industry
despite shortage of lecturers
Walter N. Sage
B.A.   (Toronto)   M.A.   (Oxon)   Ph.D.   (Toronto)
F.R., Hist. S., F.R.S.C
History
the faculty of applied science has worked overtime
to aid the war effort. Almost every department is
doing some government assigned problem in essential research. The chemical engineering department
is working on several secret projects. The department of mining and metallurgy is working in close
co-operation with the B. C. War Metals Research
Board.
Affable Dean John N. Finlayson is proud of the
work his faculty is doing. In addition to the concrete contributions of the various departments, the
entire staff is working tirelessly to turn out engineers particularly adapted to cope with the problems of a world at war.
This year most of the graduating class in applied
science will go into the armed forces as technical
officers.     The   mechanical   and   electrical   engineers
^mW   *~
4
M
ft
m^mmX
m4           1
m
¥
m*
G. G. Sedgewick
B.A. (Dal.)  Ph.D.  (Harvard).
English
D. P. Lefebvre
Dept.  of Home  Economics.
Page Thirty-eight . . Dean /. Finlayson
Engineering professors instruct . • .
will go into the RCEME and the RCCS, and the mining and civil engineers will join the RCE. Members of the UNTD can join the RCNVR as special
branch officers. Other graduates may find openings in the technical branches of the armed forces
or take employment in  essential industry.
Fourth year students may apply to take summer
training with technical branches of the Army and
-Navy. Those accepted will spend the summer in
the service of their choice on active service and return to- complete their final year in the fall.
In any case the faculty and students endeavour to
serve their country to the best of their ability, realizing that they are placed in the position where their
talents can be used to greatest advantage, be it industry or the armed forces.
In spite of all the work done to aid the war the
faculty does not lose sight of the fact that the greatest job of the trained engineer and scientist will
come with the cessation of hostilities, when the
gigantic task of post-war re-construction will have
to be faced. The need for skilled technicians is
apparent, and it is towards the end of producing
these men that the faculty is working.
Much of the success of the faculty of applied
science is due in no small part to the feeling of
cameraderie that exists between the staff and students. At the meetings of the various technical
societies the professors meet the undergraduates and
discuss the problems facing the engineer when he
graduates.
As a result of these informal meetings the students  and  faculty   develop  a   spirit  of  co-operation
Malcolm Knapp
B.S.F.   (Syracuse)    M.S.F.   (Wash.J
Forestry
G. M. Shrum
M.A., Ph.D., F.R.C.S.
Physics
Page Thirty-nine M. Y.  Williams
B.A.Sc, Ph.D., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C.
Geology and Geography
/. H.  Turnbull
B.A.Sc.   (McGill).
Mining and  Metallurgy
men for vital war research
which is much more conducive to learning than the
old master and pupil attitude prevalent in some
places.
The faculty of applied science continues its tradition of service and co-operation with an eye to the
future and an ear to the ground.
During the past three years, the faculty of Agriculture, in co-operation with the Federal and Provincial departments, has striven to solve agricultural
problems arising through wartime conditions. In the
last year, moreover, plans have been devised to assist
the expansion of agricultural facilities in the postwar period.
Head of this up and coming faculty is the brilliant
Dean F. Clement. Besides his various duties as Dean,
Dr. Clement heads the department of Agricultural
economics.
The faculty of Agriculture includes the departments of Agronomy, Horticulture, Animal Husbandry, Poultry and Dairying.
Research work of the Agronomy department is
concerned chiefly with problems of soil and plant
improvement. Under Dr. Laird, the physical,
chemical and biological properties of soils are being
studied with regard to variations from the normal
and means of correcting such variations. Research
on the fertility and fertilizer requirements of Fraser
Valley soils is being carried out under Dr. Brink.
In co-operation with the Federal Department of
Agriculture and private growers, the department of
Agronomy is conducting research on potato quality
series in an attempt to maintain virus free potatoes.
Dr. Moe has been concerned chiefly with the testing
Hector McLeod
B.Sc.   (McGill)   M.Sc.  (Alberta)   F.A.A.A.S.
Ph.D.   (Harvard).
Mechanical  and Electrical Engineering
Robert A. Clark
M.A.   (Toronto)   Ph.D.   (Leipzig)   F.R.C.S.
Chemistry
Page Forty . . .*CX'
Dean F. Clement
Scientific agriculture taught. . .
and propagation of an alfalfa hybrid which has
proven most useful for pasture purposes in the province. During the past three years, the department
has produced over four tons of seed of the principal
field crops annually which have been made available to the farmers of British Columbia.
The work of the department of Horticulture has
included investigations of problems of production of
coast orchards. Research has also been done concerning vitamin assays on canned and dehydrated
products and growth stimulation by various growth
promoting substances. Investigations into the decline of the Cuthbert Raspberry have been successfully carried out and means to combat this have
been recommended. Possible future problems, concerned with post-war development in British Columbia include the location of new areas and the production of new strains and varieties and the intensifying and maintaining production in old established
areas.
The Animal Husbandry Department have begun
a group of long-term projects. Information is being
accumulated on the relative merits of different foodstuffs and rations in relation to the economic aspects
of finishing farm animals for markets.
Suggested animal industrial problems include artificial insemination, mating systems and feed quality
studies. Laboratory devices of the department are
available to veterinarians and the general public in
the diagnosis of disease, post-mortem examinations
and disease investigations.
Fish oil research, Vitamin B assays in poultry
feeds, and investigations of enzyme activity by bac-
H. F. Barss
B.S.   (Agr.)   M.S.,  Ph.d.
Horticulture
G. G. Moe
B.S.A., Ph.D.
Agronomy
Page Forty-one Blythe Eagles
B.A.  (Brit. Col.)   Ph.D.  (Toronto).
Dairying
teria were the principal problems studied by the
Poultry Department during the last few years. Poultry ration studies have proved of practical importance in Canada as regards the poultry industry.
The Dairy Department, headed by Dr. Eagles, has
aided considerably in solving wartime demands for
increased production of high quality dairy products.
During the past few years, the surface taint defect in
butter has been investigated and successful preventions have been suggested. In co-operation with the
Provincial Department of Agriculture, research regarding the cheese making industry in North Okanagan has been carried out. A solution to the problems of control of mastitis in dairy cattle is being
sought in this year's research work.
. . . by hard-working Agriculture staff
H. M. King
B.S.A.  (Toronto)  M.S.  (Oregon).
Animal Husbandry
E. A. LLOYD
B.S.A.   (Sask.)   M.S.A.   (Wash.)
Poultry Husbandry
Hampered by both the lack of laboratory facilities
and trained technical workers, the Faculty of Agriculture is nevertheless making great strides in research and in solving the specific problems of our
own province.
Smiling and generous, Dorothy Mawdsley, Dean oi
Women, is always willing to give aid and advice to
a troubled or bewildered co-ed.
Succeeding Dean Mary L. Bollert as Dean of Women in 1941, she has been the friend and counselor
of every woman student that has attended the University for the last four years.
No problem is too small or trouble too trivial to
receive her considerate attention. In the vocational
guidance and the social and intellectual life of the
co-eds she has been of inestimable aid.
To out-of-town students she has been an indispensable helper. She has drawn up a list of approved boarding houses and has personally inspected
all living quarters offered to University students.
In the many fields of endeavour that the women
students have partaken of throughout the year, she
has always been a source of enthusiasm and
assistance.
As honorary president of Phrateres, she has taken
a keen interest in the activities of this club, and has
often aided in its many and varied functions and
drives.
Another of Dean Mawdsley's interests this year is
Buttercupping Incorporated. This organization,
founded several years ago, is an employment bureau
for girls who wish to mind children in the evenings.
Dean Mawdsley has carefully supervised the hours,
wages and transportation of all girls who wished to
partake of the opportunity.
Page Forty-two Dean Dorothy M. Mawdsley
Dean of Women
Every department cooperates
By her interest, consideration and enthusiasm,
Dean Mawdsley has made herself an indispensable
adviser and friend to all women on the campus.
Registration, distribution, advice, information —
these and many other subjects come under the jurisdiction of Charles B. Wood, Registrar.
Information concerning every student in the University may be found in the registrar's office. These
facts are collected and tabulated by Mr. Wood and
his assistants.
Tabulation and distribution of examination results is another of his duties.
To every student desiring information regarding
his course at Varsity, Mr. Wood can give the necessary facts. Knowledge of every subject offered by
the University is part of his duty as registrar.
Students desiring the entrance requirements of
other universities can also get this information from
Mr. Wood.
Thus, Mr. Wood has his place in almost every field
of university life.
As custodian of the University's 130,000 books
and over 100,000 pamphlets, William K. Lambe is
perhaps one of the University's busiest men.
As Librarian, he must have a vast fund of information to answer each student with his or her varied
quests for knowledge.
With his diligence and care, Mr. Lambe keeps the
library a well functioning source of knowledge and
an excellent place of study.
Kaye Lambe
Librarian.
C. B.  Wood
Registrar.
. Page  Forty-lhree Department   of   Agricultural
Economics
F. M. CLEMENT, B.S.A., M.A.
Department of Agronomy
G. G. MOE, B.S.A., M.Sc, Ph.D.
D. G. LAIRD, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D.
STANLEY N. WOOD, M.S.A., Ph.D.
Department of Animal Husbandry
H. M. KING, B.S.A., M.S.
STANLEY N. WOOD, B.S.A., D.V.M.
J. C. BERRY, M.S.A., Ph.D.
Department  of  Bacteriology   and
Preventive Medicine
C. E. DOLMAN, M.R.C.S., M.B., B.S.,
M.R.C.P., D.P.H., Ph.D.
D. C B. DUFF, M.A., Ph.D.
LAWRENCE  E.  RANTA,  M.D.,
D.P.H.
Department  of Biology  and
Botany
ANDREW   H.   HUTCHINSON,   M.A.,
Ph.D., F.R.S.C
FRANK DICKSON, B.A., Ph.D.
JOHN DAVIDSON, F.L.S., F.B.S.E.
JOHN   ALLARDYCE,   M.A.,   Ph.D.,
F.A.A.A.S.
MISS RUTH E. FIELDS, B.A., M.A.
Department of Chemistry
ROBERT   H.   CLARK,   M.A., Ph.D.,
rp op
W.   F. 'SEYER,   B.A.,   M.Sc,   Ph.D.,
M.A.I.Ch.E.
M.    J.    MARSHALL,    M.Sc,    Ph.D.,
F R S C
W.  URE,' M.A.Sc.,  Ph.D.
J. A. HARRIS, M.A., Ph.D.
J.  G.  HOOLEY, M.A., Ph.D.
L. A. COX, M.A.
Department of Civil Engineering
J.   N.   FINLAYSON,   M.Sc,   LL.D.,
M.E.I.C,   M.Am.Soc.CE.
J. F. MUIR, B.Sc.
A H.. FINLAY, M.C, B.A.Sc, M.S. in
C E
A.  LIGHTHALL, B.Sc
E. S.   PRETIOUS,   B.A.Sc,   M.Sc,
M.Am.Soc.CE.
ARCHIE   PEEBLES,   B.A.Sc,   B.A.,
M.Sc.
ALEXANDER   HRENNKOFF,   M.A.
Sc,   ScD.,   Assoc.   M.Am.Soc.CE.
J. B. ALEXANDER, M.Sc.
Department of Classics
0. J. TODD, A.B., Ph.D., F.R.S.C.
L. A. MacKAY, M.A., B.A.
G.  B.  RIDDEHOUGH,  M.A.
Department of Commerce
E.  H.  MORROW,  B.A.,  M.B.A.
A. W. CURRIE, B.A., B.Com., M.B.A.
FREDERICK  FIELD,  C.A.
Department of Dairying
BLYTHE EAGLES, B.A., Ph.D.
MISS  LOIS  CAMPPBELL, M.S.A.
Department of Economics,
Political Science and Sociology
DANIEL   BUCHANAN,   M.A.,  Ph.D.,
LL D    F R S C
G. F. DRUMMOND, M.A., M.Sc.
C. W. TOPPING, B.A., S.T.D., A.M.,
Ph.D.
J. A. CRUMB, B.B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
MISS M. J. SMITH, A.B., A.M.
MISS M. C. GLEASON, A.B., M.S.S.
Department of Education
G.  M.  WEIR,  B.A.,  M.A.,  D.Paed.
M.  A.   CAMERON,  M.A.,  Ph.D.
F. T.   TYLER,   B.Sc,    M.A.,    B.Ed.,
Ph.D.
C. B. WOOD, B.A., A.M.
Department of English
G. G. SEDGEWICK, B.A., Ph.D.
W.    L.    MacDONALD,    B.A.,    M.A.,
Ph.D.
F. G. C. WOOD, B.A., A.M.
T.  LARSEN,  M.A.,  B.A.,  F.R.S.C.
MISS    M.    D.    MAWDSLEY,    B.A.,
M.A., Ph.D.
E. MORRISON, B.A., A.M., Ph.D.
H. C. LEWIS, M.A.
MRS. DOROTHY B. SMITH, M.A.
F. E. L. PPRIESTLEY, M.A., Ph.D.
Ph.D.
G. P. V. AKRIGG, M.A.
J.  H.  CREIGHTON, M.A.
Department of Forestry
F. M. KNAPP, B.S.F., M.S.F.,
M.CS.F.E.   M.S.A.F.
B. G. GRIFFITH, M.A., M.F., Ph.D.,
M.CS.F.E.
J. L. ALEXANDER, B.Sc.F.
R. M. BROWN, B.ScF.,  M.CS.F.E.
L. B. DIXON
WILLIAM   BYERS,   M.CS.F.E.
Department of Geology and
Geography
M. Y. WILLIAMS, B.Sc, Ph.D.,
F.G.S.A.,  F.R.S.C
C. O. SWANSON, M.A.Sc, PhD.,
F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C
H. C. GUNNING, B.A.Sc, M.S.,
Ph.D., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C
H. V. WARREN, B.A., B.A.Sc, B.Sc,
D.Ph.,  F.G.S.A.
V. J. OKULITCH, M.A.Sc, Ph.D.
MRS.  G. O'BRIEN, B.A.
Department of History
W.   N.   SAGE,   B.A.,   M.A.,   Ph.D.,
F.R.Hist.S.,   F.R.S.C
A. C.  COOKE, B.A., M.A.
MISS M. A. ORMSBY, M.A., Ph.D.
Department of Home Economics
MISS   D.   P.    LEFEBVRE,   B.H.Sc
M.S.
MISS STELLA BEIL, B.S., M.S.
MISS C S. BLACK, B.c, A.M.
Department   of   Horticulture
A. F. BARSS, A.B., B.S., M.S.
G. H. HARRIS. B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D.
F. E. BUCK, B.S.A.
Department   of   Mathematics
DANIEL   BUCHANAN,   M.A.,   Ph.D.,
LL.D., F.R.S.C
F. S. NOWLAN, B.A., A.M., Ph.D.
R.  D. JAMES, M.A.,  Ph.D., F.R.S.C
W. H.  GAGE, M.A.
S. A. JENNINGS, M.A., Ph.D.
MISS M. L. BARCLAY, M.A.
Department of Mechanical and
Electrical Engineering
H. J. MacLEOD, O.B.E., B.Sc, M.Sc,
A.M., Ph.D.
F.W. VERNON, B.Sc, Eng., Wh.Sch..
A.M.I.Mech.E.,   A.F.R.A.S.
S. C. MORGAN,, B.Sc, M.Sc, M.S.,
A.M.I.E.S.
W.   B.   COULTHARD,   B.Sc,   A.M.I.
E.E.
W.   0.   RICHMOND,   B.A.Sc,   M.S.,
Mem.A.S.M.E.
H. M. McILROY, M.Sc.
D. W.  THOMSON, B.A.Sc,  M.A.Sc.
L.  R.  KERSEY,  B.A.Sc.
Department of Mining and
Metallurgy
J. M.  TURNBULL, B.A.Sc, M.C.I.M.
G.    A.    GILLIES,    M.Sc,    M.C.I.M.,
M.A.I.M.E.
F. A. FORWARD, B.A.Sc, M.C.I.M.
Department of Modern
Languages
D. 0. EVANS, M.A., D.Phil., D.Lett.
A. F. B. CLARK, B.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C.
MISS    ISABEL    MacINNES,    M.A.,
Ph.D.
MISS    DOROTHY   DALLAS,    M.A.,
D.Lett.
MISS   JOYCE   HALLAMORE,   M.A.,
Ph.D.
C.  E.  BORDEN,  M.A.,  Ph.D.
C. V. BROOKE, B.A., A.M., Ph.D.
MADAME Y. DARLINGTON
MISS  ETHEL  HARRIS,  A.B.,  M.A.,
D.Lett.
Department of Nursing and
Health
C. E. DOLMAN, M.R.S.C, M.B., B.S.,
M.R.C.P.,     D.P.H.,     F.A.P.H.A.,
Ph.D.
MISS   EVELYN   MALLORY,   R.N.,
B.Sc.
MISS  MARGARET  E.  KERR, R.N.,
B.A.Sc
MISS  MARY  E.  ANDERSON,  R.N.,
B.A.Sc,  Cert.  P.H.N.
MISS    PAULINE   CAPELLE,   R.N.,
B.A.,  B.A.Sc
LAWRENCE      E.     RANTA,    M. D.,
D.P.H.
Department of Philosophy and
Psychology
J. A. IRVING, M.A.
A. B. MASLOW, A.B., A.M., Ph.D.
Department of Physics
G. M.  SHRUM,  M.M.,  M.A.,  Ph.D.,
F R S C
A. E.' HENNINGS, M.A., Ph.D.
H. D. SMITH, M.A., Ph.D.
R. E. LANGTON, M.A.
WILLIAM PETRIE, B.A., A.M., Ph.D.
R. K. BROWN, B.A.
J. H. L. WATSON, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
K. 0. WRIGHT, M.A., Ph.D.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
E. A.  LLOYD, B.S.A., M.S.A.
JACOB  BIELY, M.S.A., M.S.
Department of Zoology
W.    A.    CLEMENS,    M.A.,    Ph.D.,
F.R.S.C.
G. J.  SPENCER, B.S.A., M.S.
IAN   McTAGGART   COWAN,   B.A.,
Ph.D.
Department of University
Extension
G.  M.  SHRUM,  M.M.,  M.A.,  Ph.D.,
F R S P
MISS' DOROTHY  SOMERSET,  A.B.
MISS MARJORIE V. SMITH, B.A.
Department  of Physical
Education
MAURICE VAN VLIET, M.S.
MISS GERTRUDE  E.  MOORE
Page Forty-four . . . STUDENT
GOVERNMENT The Students' Council of the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Council struggles through storm
The student government of UBC has long been a
tribute to the forward-looking administration of the
University and the free, progressive spirit of the
student body. There are few, if any, universities in
Canada or the United States where the students have
as much freedom in the control of their own affairs.
This year's council has been particularly aware of
this great privilege and have done everything in
their power to maintain and increase the scope of
student services.
The student council is the controlling executive of
all student activity conducted in the name of the
Alma Mater Society. Through them all funds are
dispursed to the various clubs and undergraduate
faculties for the promotion of their activities. The
nine student officers composing Students' Council
are elected in the spring of the year and they have
the benefit of the student council's experience by sitting with them in session for several meetings before
they actually take office.
During the year, the alert student council, aware
of the expanding needs of the University, aroused
interest in plans to revise the membership of council so as to secure more adequate representation and
more assurance of continuity. This demonstrates
the general tone of council which has always been
progressive and eager to receive new ideas.
Of great importance this year was the Mutual Insurance plan which was the work of students' council. Under this scheme of mutual insurance
students have protection for small damages and the
hope is that in future years, with the accumulation of
Dick  Bibbs
Ken  Creighton
Page Forty-six Helen  Morgan
was Dick Bibbs. His activities as president are certainly worthy of praise for the cool-headed manner
in which he controlled the relations between students
and administration, student organizations and students and their student governments. The public relations of the student body fall upon him as an important duty and his handling of it was faultless. It
was Bibbs, who through his work on last year's council, as junior member, preserved the necessary link
between new and old council and enabled this year's
council to step into its official duties with a minimum of difficulty and an assurance that the machinery of student government would become operative
even before the fall term officially started. The success of this year's council must be attributed to
Bibb's hard work and aMlity as a student leader and
organizer.
The other top executive position, that of treasurer,
was handled this year by Ken Creighton. This position requires great steadiness and is the most responsible of student positions. All the budgets for the
organizations under the AMS which operate over the
whole field of student activity were cleared through
him and were fairly allotted.    His competence and
of criticism for successful year
the fund, that student service may increase in scope.
The Students' Council offices this year were an
example of smooth and efficient operation. Miss
Lynn Pearson and Mrs. Shirley Gross, the tireless
and co-operative office staff, worked in close" cooperation with the student executive for the routine
administration of student affairs.
The president of the Alma Mater Society this year
level-headedness   are   a   model   for   future   student
executives.
The president and treasurer were honoured this
year by being chosen president and secretary respectively, of the National Federation of Canadian
University Students at a conference of student officers from all Canadian universities. UBC may be
justly proud of this honor.
Les Raphael
Barbara  Greene
Page Forty-seven Gordon Bertram
Alan Ainsworth
Helen Morgan, secretary of the AMS this year,
served as an invaluable aid to the president, and
especially the treasurer, in the compilation of minutes and by serving on numerous committees
throughout the year. Her winning personality and
social prowess served as a constant boost to tired
council members.
The LSE executive, which is the controlling organization of all the clubs on the campus, was headed
this year by Gordon Bertram who did a fine job of
co-ordinating the activities of the many clubs, numbering more than fifty. He promoted new clubs
and it was his policy to encourage the old ones in
their functions. His excellent work as the chairman
of the Special Events Committee deserves a great deal
of praise.
The position of MUS president was this year filled
by Les Raphael who was in charge of the discipline
on the campus. As this year was well-behaved, the
functions of the discipline committee were seldom
called into play. The co-ordination of the social
activities on the campus was another of his jobs and
there were no clashes of events due to this function.
The WUS was handled this year by Barbara
Green, one of the most dynamic members of council.
Her activities, which were mostly concerned with
promoting the war work of the women's groups on
the campus, were handled with great efficiency and
the results were evident in the increased strength of
the women's undergraduate society as a functional
group. Their war work was aided by a reorganization of the executive to include fourteen faculty
representatives.
Present set-up survives thus far .
Dirty  nine mugs.
Page Forty-eight . . Women's athletic activities were again controlled
by Lois Reid who maintained the inter-mural sports
among the women at a very high level. Her work
was very important in its co-operation with WUS
activities which were greatly enhanced by her
capable support.
George Rush was in control of the men's athletic
directorate and he did an excellent job of the administration of sports in wartime. The difficulties
under which he had to labor did not prevent him
from organizing two championship teams this year,
one in English rugby and the other in track.- His
inter-mural program continued to encourage activity
in sports among the students.
The junior member, Alan Ainsworth, that jack-of-
all-trades and odd-job man of council, performed his
activities with skill and showed a desire to co-operate
and help all student organizations. His cleanup campaign served to disembellish the campus of
much waste material. He handled Homecoming this
year with great success.
Although the Men's Undergraduate Society's
president, Les Raphael, tried to argue before council
that the MUS be abolished because he had nothing
to do, the MUS did accomplish something this year.
The Fall Ball was the result of the faculty executives under the supervision of the MUS working in
conjunction with WUS.
The Men's Undergraduate Society is responsible
for the Freshman orientation program held at the
beginning of the year. This year after a lapse of
two years there was a formal Freshman initiation as
George Rush
Lois Reid
. . but Revision Committee is at work
Discipline Committee ponders student sins.
Page Forty-nine Council Revision Committee.
Rosemary Stewart, Janet McLean-Bell, James  Wilson, Casey King, Les  Raphael,
Graham Mowatt, Roy Morton, Doug Clark, Rosemary Hodgins
Specialized groups backing council...
far as the boys were concerned. They had to roll
up one of their pant legs.
This year saw the award for the first year of the
Honorary Activities Award. This award is given to
those students who have served with distinction in
any offices under the jurisdiction of any department of Students' Council.
The committee which makes this award is made
up of the heads of the various undergraduate
societies, the president of WUS and the president of
MUS who acts as chairman.
The MUS president is also responsible for the discipline on the campus. This year has been a good
one for discipline. Only outbreak was the incident
when one faculty turned the fire hose upon anodier
faculty in an inter-faculty fracas. The culprits were
dealt with quickly and effectively.
The energetic W.U.S. executive, under the able
leadership of Barbara Greene, has put forth a program this year which has been both varied and
interesting.
W.U.S.   has   conducted   a   well-balanced   activities
LSE
Rosemary Stewart, Roy Morton,  Gordon Bertram, Don  Brown,  Bruce  Yorke,
Ted English, Jim Wilson and Eric Ajello
Page Fifty MUS
Stu Porteus, John Farrow, Les Raphael, Sidney Flavelle, Doc Morton
program. The annual Hi-Jinx with its theme "And
so to bed" proved to be an hilarious hen party. The
Splash party, a W.U.S., W.A.A. production, was
held at the Y.M.C.A. pool. Here the various faculties had plenty of opportunity to fight to the bitter
end for the highest number of points.
The social program included the Frosh Tea Dance,
Fashion show, the annual Co-ed, and luncheon. The
Tea Dance held in the fall to increase Red Cross
funds was a two fold success, financially and socially.
The W.U.S. Fashion show gave the co-eds on the
campus a chance to see and plan their future wardrobes.
The WUS Co-ed, held March 1, climaxed a successful year.
WUS not only carried through its functions with
great success, but also aided many other organizations and drives on the campus. Its part in the success of War Aid Council, ISS Week and the Nurses'
Old Clothes Drive shows how this year's executive
have really got down to work in putting over its
program.
Barbara Greene's assistants have been Audrey
Buchanan as vice-president; Mary Chapman as secretary, and Thelma Behnsen as treasurer. For the
purposes   of   representation   and   organization,   the
come under concentrated fire
WUS
Ruth White, Thelma Behnsen, Barb Greene, Maxine Johnston, Audrey Buchanan,
Mary Frances Trumbull, Kristine Adams, Norah Clarke, Joan Stevens, Helen Duncan
. Page  Fifty-one AMUS
Sidney Flavelle, Terry Julian, Ann Brown
Undergraduate executives organize...
presidents of the eight faculty groups sit monthly at
the general meeting to discuss WUS business and
entertainment. Included also on this executive are
the Pan-Hellenic and Phrateres presidents.
The past year has been a memorable one in the
annals of the Arts Undergraduate Society. With energetic Gordy Campbell as president, the Artsmen
staged their first All-Arts pep meet in years. Held
in Arts 100, it was an outstanding event in the re-
vitalization of the Arts faculty.
A week of Arts activities was planned for the second week in January, but unfortunately the BCER
strike curtailed many of the features. However,
under difficulties, an Arts Ubyssey was published,
under the editorship of Vice-President Sidney Flavelle. Paul Robeson, who was appearing at that
time in "Othello" downtown, very kindly consented
to visit the campus, and gave an inspiring speech on
the equality of various races. An added highlight
was his rendition of several Negro spirituals.
EUS
Chuck Moore, Don Wales, Roy Morton, Bus Ellis
Page Fifty-two AgUS
John Farrow
• extra-curricular life for students
The Arts Undergrad executive co-operated with
the Sciencemen in sponsoring a debate between the
Redshirts and "the men of culture." Topic for the
debate was "resolved that an Arts education better
prepares the student for a useful life than a Science
education."
President Gordy Campbell left at Christmas time
to give his services to the Navy, and Vice-President
Sidney Flavelle carried on his job with equal capability. Other positions on the executive were filled
by: Anne Brown, secretary, and Doug Clark,
marshal.
Living up to their reputation of being the most
spirited group at the University, the Engineers' Undergraduate Society spent another busy year keeping alive the traditions of the Faculty of Applied
Science. Claiming to co-ordinate the extra-curricular
activities of the engineers the society exerts a profound influence on the campus. The men in red
sweaters are conspicuous everywhere.
Early in the fall more than 400 enthusiastic engineers crowded the Commodore for the annual
Science Banquet.
In the middle of November the executive arranged
NUS
Anne Baker, Lynn Torrance, Kirstine Adam,  Vivian Golos, Marie Sorenson
. . . Page Fifty-three CUS Executive
Les  Wong, Helen Duncan, Pat  Cunningham, Stu Porteus
letic representative.
Eight B.A.Sc. graduates and over thirty certificate students are carrying on in their chosen field
of Public Health Nursing or Teaching and Supervision. In order to get her degree a student must
spend two years at Varsity followed by three years
of training at the hospital and one additional year
at Varsity to complete her course.
The course is a long one. The final year in Public Health consists of lectures, labs, and field work
at the many Public Health centres all over the province. The girls in Teaching and Supervision must
take classes at both the Vancouver General and St.
Paul's hospitals.
Public Health and Teaching Courses involve such
Permanent staff does routine work .
an informal dance in the Brock where the sons of
the slide rule cavorted to the strains of Don Williamson's orchestra.
It was February, however, that saw the EUS go
all out to stage the annual Science Ball. The event
was heralded by a special Ubyssey printed in red
ink and an all-red pep meet where something new
was added in the form of a skit presented by members of the Nurses Undergraduate Society. The only
thing that was not in red was the balance sheet.
Proving that social activities were not their main
interest, EUS sponsored a series of vocational talks
in the spring.
Heading EUS this year was Roy Morton, president, assisted by Don Wales, vice-president; Charlie
Moore,  secretary-treasurer;   and   Gordon  Ellis,   ath-
full schedules that the nurses have litde time for
organizing extra-curricular activities. In spite of
this difficulty, the N.U.S. executive have accomplished a full social program and have aided and
sponsored various charities on the campus.
The Nurses Undergraduate Society was headed by
Kristine Adams. The executive is a large one but
it is necessary to bring the girls in the hospital and
on the campus together. Vice-president was Anne
B. Baker; secretary, Vivian Golos; treasurer, Lynn
Torrance. On the executive are representatives from
each year, a social convener, an athletic and a publicity representative.
Directed by an exceptionally able executive, composed of president, John Farrow; vice-president,
George Axen; sports representative, H. Gasperdome,
Newson, Scott and Creighton in a jovial mood  . . .  "Trum" and office staff quit for the day.
Page Fifty-four . the Aggie Undergraduate Society has successfully
handled the social and business activities of the
Aggie faculty.
The main event of the fall term was the Field Day,
an afternoon of judging and other competition, on
the University farm.
Last term's annual fall banquet that will go down
in Aggie history as the first Aggie function that
President MacKenzie attended.
The last Aggie function of the year was the Agassiz field trip at which Aggie students saw how the
man behind the plow lives and works on a modern
farm.
After many years as the Commerce Club, the Commerce students formed a Commerce Undergraduate
Society. This transformation was due to the hard
work of its president this year, Stuart Porteus.
This transformation into an undergraduate society
was necessitated by the increasing enrolment in the
Commerce Faculty. Included with the ordinary
Commerce students are those students who are taking
the double degree in Commerce and Forestry.
Early in the fall the Commerce students held a
dance for all Commerce students at the Stanley Park
Pavilion with the Air Force band playing. The decorations for the dance were stricdy in line with all
accounting students' nightmares.
In the spring the Commerce Faculty hold a banquet which is their most important event of the year.
"Procter of the Brock."
Attending   are   many   of   Vancouver's   businessmen.
The speaker was Senator W. deB. Farris.
In conjunction with this event a Commerce issue
of The Ubyssey is put out by the students in that
faculty. This year it was under the editorship of
Leslie Wong.
of campus student administration
Mrs. Shirley Gross
Lynn Pearson
. . Page Fifty-five  *    ACTIVITIES   *    * What's the good of being a record class   if  you   can't   overcrowd   the   Brock?
Record Frosh class welcomed to . . .
jH
PI    'ii''          #1 ■  :.   r
%^^B
Tl   ,
ii  m***mwUm^^m
As one freshman to another.
Last September nearly 800 lowly, uneducated
freshmen, straight from the farewell embraces of
high schools all over the province, and appearing
even more inhuman, in their ghoulish green goggles,
than freshmen usually do, invaded the broad campus
of UBC
They swamped the overloaded busses, packed the
lecture rooms, filled the Brock lounge at all times
of the day, and generally crowded themselves into
an already overcrowded campus. The newcomers
strolled about the walks and gardens, and down the
Malls, always accompanied by the derisive catcalls
of the sophomores.
The grim prospect of the war, however, was too close
and menacing for either the freshmen or the sophomores to take much time off for the traditional rivalry. There were one or two skirmishes, accompanied
by a few duckings in the pond, and a snake parade
in town, but compared to pre-war years, the class of
'48 was received into the university fold with little
fuss, and few bruises.
Page Fifty-eight . . . They  seem  to  want  that  regalia.
Look out, boys, they're out to get you.
This largest Frosh class on record, however,
entered into their freshmen week, arranged for their
entertainment by upperclassmen, with a great deal
of enthusiasm and vigor. They were welcomed by
the president, the military commanders, and the
heads of the student organizations. They attended
tea dances and pep meets, were introduced to the
caf, arid won the Frosh-Soph basketball game.
Finally they wound up the initiation period with
the Frosh Reception in the Brock Hall, where they
were introduced to the new president, himself in his
freshman year at UBC, and to the Deans. Then
they were divested of their initiation regalia and
were received as full-fledged undergraduates of The
University of British Columbia.
. . . wartime campus by upperclassmen
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Initiation is  over .
Meet President MacKenzie  .  .  .  Creighton supervises shedding of regalia
. .  . Prof.  Gage, freshman's friend . . .
Meet the Lily Pond
. Page Fifty-nine After the game.   Grads meet old friends.
Old grads return to campus .
Did We Interrupt Something?
The traditional Homecoming ceremonies were cut
down from the usual week to one day this year, and
all the efforts of the Homecoming Committee were
exerted to make that day the best remembered of all
the Homecomings.
The banners were unfurled and the blue and gold
welcome mats were laid down for all graduates who
could attend on Saturday, October 28th.
The busy day began with an English rugger game
between a Vancouver All-Star team and the University Thunderbirds, in the Varsity stadium, Chancellor Hamber making the kick-off.
Next on the program was a mass Alumnae meeting in the Brock, just after the game, when all the
grads reminisced over their memories of their years
at UBC
Later the alums were the guests of the University
at a banquet in Brock Hall and were officially welcomed back to the University by President N. A. M.
MacKenzie.    The   highlight   of   the   program   came
Page Sixty . The only good crowd the stadium saw all year.   Plenty of action  as   Varsity  starts   their  McKechnie   Cup   drive   against
Vancouver Reps.
. . . for day of gala festivities
after the banquet when the committee presented a
real old-time "Music Hall" Potlatch in which eleven
gorgeous co-eds performed a can-can chorus which
was enthusiastically approved by the audience. A
vocalist trilled some old-time songs along with the
chorus, such as "Daddy Wouldn't Buy Me a Bow-
Wow" and "The Band Played On." Then a barbershop quartet took the spotlight with several well rendered songs suitable for the occasion, with the audience joining in on the choruses. The Players Club
wound up the program with a presentation of a stirring mellerdramer entitled "He Ain't Done Right by
Our Nell."
A big dance in the Brock Hall immediately after
this put a grand climax to the evening. Rhys Williams orchestra was in attendance.
The potlatch was an innovation this year, and the
committee in charge expressed the hope that it would
be supported in a similar manner every year, so that
it might grow into a real old UBC tradition.
Last-minute score catches President unawares.
Page.  Sixty-one Undergrads don tuxedos .
Back in the good old days, before there were any
military parades, or compulsory war work, a varsity
student's life was just one long round of social functions, most of them formal, with perhaps just a little
bit of studying thrown in for variety.
Many and varied were the parties and entertainments which a student might attend, or so we are
told, but Queen of them all was that grand old lady
■of all festivities, the Junior Prom.
In 1942 a war baby, the Red Cross Ball, sprouted
suddenly into a full fledged beauty to rival the old
queen, and so completely did she win the patriotic
hearts of students that by the next year the Junior
Prom was no more, a wartime casualty.
This year another of the reigning beauties of the
pre-war days disappeared from Varsity life. The
Arts-Aggie, old-time contender for top honours in
UBC society, found itself replaced by a non-faculty
function, the Undergrad Formal.
This affair, more popularly known as the Fall
Ball, had its origin in the lack of Arts spirit which
was evident at the beginning of the term. When the
Artsmen failed in two tries to elect an executive the
students' council ruled that the faculty should henceforward be politically defunct, and as a result of this
decision the Arts-Aggie had to be cancelledi, and a
non-faculty dance substituted for it.
The Artsmen finally did manage to flaunt the
council ruling and elect an executive, but the idea
of the open formal had caught on, and it was de-
Beauty and the Beast.
Pick yourself a queen.
Page Sixty-two . . . Flowers for a Queen.
Let's all look at the photographer.
cided to go through with it.
To promote interest in the Ball the committee decided on a competition between faculty representatives for the tide of Miss UBC. The eight candidates paraded before students at a pep meet, which
included a skit topping anything the sciencemen
have produced this year, and music by Rhys Thomas'
orchestra.
Highlight of the ball was the election of Peggy
Holt, representing Commerce, as Miss UBC. Her
prize at the moment of victory was a dance with
Dean Buchanon.
Other candidates were: Dale Coughlin, second
years Arts; Phyllis Ney, fourth year Arts; Joan
Clarke, third year Arts; Jackie Robinson, first year
Arts; Joan Stevens, Agriculture; Sylvia Dyson,
Home Economics, and Dolores Traer, Nursing.
Caricatures of each candidate decorated the ballroom. Master of ceremonies after a fashion was Les
Raphael, while music was provided by Barney Olson
and his orchestra.
In charge of the arrangements were: Ted Chambers, Harry Pitts, Bill Clark, Les Wong, Stu Porteus,
Herb Capozzi, Norah Baldwin, Lorna Shields, John
Farrow, Sally Panton, George Hamilton, Maxine
Johnson, Roy Morton, Barbara Greene, Les Raphael,
and Ruth Parnum.
All proceeds from the ball were donated to the
War Aid Council.
Could she be lonesome?
Fake!!!
. . . and all crawl to the Fall Ball
Page  Sixty-three Now  About   That  Last  Experiment,  Dean   Finlayson
Thursday, February 8, was the big day for the
engineers. Sciencemen dusted off their wagons,
hitched up their horses, called their taxicabs, and
started off on their Great Trek to the Commodore.
Once there they set up their famous table decorations, which each year become more like exhibition
exhibits, and settled down to have a good time.
Winners of the coveted prize (especially so in
these days of rationing) were the fifth-year civil
engineers, with their scale model of the Quebec
bridge, but easily the most popular with the dancers
were the kissometer and the strength testing machine
devised by the electricals.
To help provide atmosphere a large mural, depicting an industrial scene, and traditional cartoons of
sciencemen were posted around the dance floor.
Arrangements for the ball were capably handled
by the Engineers Undergraduate Society, under the
leadership of Doc Morton. The art work was done
by Doug Shadbolt.
Casey Horton At The Throttle
Always A Thrill
Super Science Ball the scene . . .
Page Sixty-four . , The prize-winning bridge  display  of the  Civils.
Second Year Engineers, Science Ball—Tank going over bridge.
Chemicals pause to stare at the  photographer at the Science
Ball.
.   .   .
of Engineer's Ingenious Antics
Page Sixty-five Four Chorus Lovelies
High kicking co-eds in abbreviated costumes
formed the main attraction of the annual Red Cross
Ball at the Commodore this year. The co-eds
streamlined their routines of previous years and
came out with some entirely new pink and white,
and blue and white costumes.
The 16 co-eds danced their way smoothly through
several blues and boogie numbers and were brought
back by the enthusiastic audience for an encore.
Coeds kick high at Red Cross Ball .
• •
Chinese Students Support The Red Cross
Wyatt Has That Look In His Eye
Page Sixty-six Photographers Lead Interesting Lives
MFT. Casey. And Our Gal Sal
The highlight of the evening, of course, was the
selection of the Ball Queen from the candidates
nominated by each of the various sororities. After
being brought onto the dance floor in a huge snowball, the candidates paraded in front of the assembled students.    After a vote by secret ballot, Sally
Panton, of Kappa Kappa Gamma, was chosen as
Queen of the Red Cross Ball of 1945.
The proceeds for the Red Cross Ball amounted to
$4400, almost $1500 more than the previous year.
Mary Francis Trumbull was chairman of the committee in charge of the arrangements for the Ball.
'Trum' Looks Fascinated
Visitors From The East View Varsity Social Life
Page Sixty-seven Trum Does The Honours.   Scott Disapproves.   Hello. Let's Get Together, Girls.    Anita.    An Evening At  The Commodore.
Andree.    Must Be A, Dark Horse Entry.   A Pyramid of Pulchritude.    Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate.
Page Sixty-eight . . Joan Anderson leans into her work . . . Words fail us
Centipede  .  .  .  Teacher shows them how  .
Classy lossy with a grassy chassis . . . Such pretty faces
Just cheese cake . . . Where have we seen her before?
Page Sixty-nine Always popular with the students, the Air Force Band.
Guest concert artists perform .
The pass features this year, planned by the Special
Events Committee, under the chairmanship of Gordon Bertram, were received very enthusiastically by
the students.
The committee planned and carried out an interesting and varied series of musical concerts at noon
hours under this pass system. Among the guest
artists who appeared on the campus sponsored by
the committee were: Frances James, internationally-
known soprano; John Haddad, tenor; Adolph Ko-
dolfsky, violinist, and Gertrude Huntley Green, pianist, as well as many other well-known performers.
One very well received feature was the Homecoming Podatch, an innovation this year, which included
a real old-time "Can-Can" chorus with eleven beautiful co-eds and a silver throated soloist singing a
number of old-time tunes, also a barbershop quartette, a very special song team, and a stirring melodrama presented by the Players Club, all accompanied by the Air Force band under W/O Micelli.
The basketball games also formed a part of the
pass feature program, and although the gymnasium
was not always very full, those who did attend the
thrilling games this season saw some of the best basketball that has been played at this university in the
last few years.
The student night at the fall plays was another
very well-attended pass feature. The plays were received enthusiastically, if somewhat noisily, by the
students who packed the auditorium to its capacity
to see them. The plays were: In the Zone, Waltz
Time, and Johnny Dunne.
Attendance   on   the   first   night   of   the   Musical
Frances James sings for students.
The Deep  River Boys
Page Seventy The original "bloomer girls.'.
at A.M.S. pass features
Society production, "The Gondoliers," was also procured by presentation of student passes, and as many
students as the auditorium could hold availed themselves of this opportunity to see the famous Gilbert
and Sullivan operetta.
Other events of the year that students could gain
admission to by presentation of their passes were
the Brock Hall mixers, held at the beginning of
every month, whenever the social calendar allowed,
and the famous, or infamous, noon hour pep meets.
The special events committee this year was composed of: Gordon Bertram, Elinor Haggert, Doug
Clark, Rosemary Stewart, Burton Kurth, Greg Millar and Pete Lindenfeld.
Aggies  "dressed
up."
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This is a street car.
Pubsters at play.
At the fall ball pep meet.
Page Seventy-one Chess Cottar and Co. play for a mixer.
The   Leavy   boys   overshadow   Wassy   and   Woody.
Fireman  Walker puts  out a cigarette.
.'£
W,«.\
Cast of ''The Gondoliers " poses for the photographer.
I
■i    i ,   i •
Page Seventy-two . Begert's happy . . .   The Deep River Boys singing . . .   Robertson  and Barker at the  Barn Dance  .  .  .Alpha Phis queen
candidate  "comes  out"  .  .  .  Dean Finlayson, Prof.  Sedgewick and student prexies, chat . . . Mowatt goes into his act for
Sid . . . Commercemen all ... She just came here to be maid . . .
. . . Page Seventy-three Mamooks, pretending to work . . . Making merry at a mixer   .  .  . Elephants are small time stuff to Arthur . .  . Student
Christians eat . . . Engineers at the clinic . . .We've Seen enough . . . Another mixer . . . Tickets for Gondoliers.
Page Seventy-four . . . MAJOR CLUBS Ted English, Mary Fagen, Rita
Standeven,    Jack    Duffus,    Jim
Argue, Caroline Johnstone, Fred
Lipsett.
Student thespians take time
This year's edition of the UBC Players' Club
proved to be in an experimental mood.
True, the Green Roomers have never allowed themselves to sink too deply into any form of rut, but
still their actions in the past year have been somewhat radical.
Their first departure from conventional form came
with the fall plays in November. Along with two
fairly normal productions they presented to the critical gaze of the theatre-going public an unusual play
by the name of "Johnny Dunne".
This play, written by a student of the Banff school
of drama, employs a speech choir, which not only
sing background music, and take occasional spoken
parts in the play, but also provide the sound effects.
The second departure was a step in what might be
called the opposite direction. In recent years the
spring production has usually been the work of
some modern playwright, such as Shaw, or O'Neil,
but this year the club went Shakespearian, with
"The Taming of the Shrew".
For this comedy the Players' Club constructed a
traverse curtain, similar to that used in "Othello",
during Paul Robeson's appearance here. A new
cyclorama, procured despite wartime difficulties, was
also used.
So successful was the production of Johnny Dunne
that the club was asked to play it on the CBC
Players' Club fools around with English.
Paperhanger  plans   putsch.
Page Seventy-six . . A scene from "In the Zone."
The other two plays produced at Christmas were
"In the Zone", a drama of the submarine zone, by
Eugene O'Neil, and "Waltz Time", by Philip Johnson, a story of the introduction of the waltz into
England.
"In the Zone" was one of the most difficult plays
ever attempted by the club at a fall performance.
The all male cast did an excellent job of portraying
the intense feeling of suspense which the merchant
sailors feel in the submarine zone.
It was the good work done in this play and the
other two fall productions which convinced the
executive that the club had sufficient talent to attempt the Shakespearian play.
Making  up for  "Johnny Dunne."
The cast of "The Shrew", as the club refers to it,
consisted of Jim Argue as Petruchio; Beverly Wilson, as Katherin; Jerry Williamson, as Hortensio;
Gerald Newman, as Baptista; Derek Ralston, as Lu-
ciento; Dorothy Lowther, as Bianca; Greg Miller,
as Tranio; George Baldwin as Grumio, and John
Niewdorp, as Gremio.
Heading the Green Room executive this year was
Ted English, who was largely responsible for the
successful season. Otiier members were Mary
Fagan, vice-president; Caroline Johnson, secretary;
Peter McGregor-Eadie, business manager; and Jack
Duffus, treasurer.
out from studies to tame shrew
Informal backstage scenes from the Fall plays.
. . . Page  Seventy-seven \
MacDougal makes up Shaw
Hortensio and his widow . .
. . Blundell demonstrates to Lipsett and Fagan
Newman and Miller . . . Ralston   makes   love
"Shrew," Beverley Wilson.
to
Mrs. Graham works out the finer points . . .
Dorothy Lowther . .  . Jim Argue and his
Page Seventy-eight . . George Allison, Winnie Irwin, Norma Stowe, Bob McLellan, Elinor Haggart,
Pat Axford, Dave Holman
Mussoc goes Italian to warble .
The usual overwhelming success attended the
Musical Society's production this year. Staged before an enthusiastic audience, Gilbert and Sullivan's
"The Gondoliers" brought down the house. Soloists
and chorus, with the assistance of the orchestra, gave
a performance of the highest order. Music, costumes and comedy combined to make the presentation one of the outstanding events of the year.
Much credit must be given to Mr. C Haydn Williams who has completed his twentieth year as director.    It was he  who  presided   over   disheartening
practices, the hectic final rehearsal, gave last-
minute instructions and soothed jittery soloists.
Quite apart from the yearly production, the
Musical Society, in conjunction with the Radio
Society, has supplied the talent for a fifteen-minute
programme put over the air each week. It has also
been responsible for the noon hour concert recordings held in the Brock Hall.
The Social Calendar of the Musical Society was a
particularly full one. During the first term the
Opening  Banquet and  the  Fall  Formal were held.
Haydn Williams conducts Mussoc orchestra.
. . . Page Seventy-nine Professor  Gage  calls for  dramatic  technique  at  early  rehearsal.
This year's executive of the Musical Society consisted of: Honorary president, Professor Walter
Gage; honorary vice-president, Dean Dorothy Maud-
sley; life member, Dr. W. L. MacDonald; president,
Elinor Haggart; vice-president, Keith Simpson; secretary, Robert McLellan; production manager, Winnie Irwin; business manager, George Allison; ad
vertising manager, Pat Axford; musical appreciation, Dave Holman; Glee Club representative, Norma
Stowe.
Little brother of the Musical Society, with no pretensions of high musical ability, is the Glee  Club.
The members, people who "just like to sing," meet
regularly to try their voices at everything from college songs to three-part harmonies.
The prime achievement of the Glee Club this year
was the chorus and the barbershop quartet which
sang with great gusto at the Homecoming Podatch.
Their enthusiastic reception has led them to hope for
greater expansion next year.
This year's executive of the Glee Club consisted
of: Manager, Norma Stowe; assistant manager, Colleen Brandon; publicity manager, Mary Clark; secretary-treasurer, Helen Liehman.
. . . successful way through Gondoliers
String section of Varsity orchestra makes music.
Page Eighty Wasalkow and pipe . . . Dave Holman helps with Bob McLellan's costume . . . Duke Simpson in a haughty mood
Stars of Gondoliers Cast . . . Professor Gage instructs . . . Nancy Watt and the Grand Inquisitor.
r
. . Page Eighty-one Greg Millar conducts
Orchestra goes classical
This year saw the formation of UBC's first string
orchestra. The result of many months of weary
planning on the part of its conductor, Gregory Miller, the orchestra was hailed with great enthusiasm
by the students. Never before at UBC had classical
music been played by an all-student orchestra.
For the past few years tentative plans had been
made but never before had enough talent and initiative been found to ensure the success of such a venture. Shortage of funds, lack of a place to practise, and the difficulty of procuring instruments
were all obstacles to be overcome.
The two concerts held during the course of the
year were huge successes. The thundering applause
which followed was a clear indication of student appreciation of fine music.
It is hoped that this year's string orchestra will
form the nucleus of the full symphony orchestra
planned for next year. Organization and rehearsals
will continue during the summer so that a concert
may be held early in the first term of next year.
Many thanks are due to Dr. G. G. Sedgewick
whose keen interest and encouragement have greatly
facilitated the formation of the orchestra.
Millar  Demonstrates.
Page Eighty-two Mamooks gather behind poster table for the photographer.
Big Time Campus Organizers
The Mamook Club is the service organization on
the campus. Every day members paint signs and
posters relating to all activities on the campus from
a meeting of the Swimming Club to the Red Cross
Ball. To date about 700 posters have been made
and delivered. Besides this occupation, Mamooks
are employed as announcers over the Brock P.A.
system, ticket sellers, ushers and cheer leaders at
pep meets.
Membership on a competitive basis is no longer
restricted to men only. In the past few years women have proved that they are equal to the men in
any activity, especially cheer leading.
Mamooks sponsored one of the big events of
the 1944-45 year, the Hospital Carnival.    This huge
affair lasted three days and contained among other
things, a pep meet, a tea dance and a big dance to
wind up the events. All proceeds went for hospital aid
funds. Those on the committee were Bob Armstrong,
Vivian Golos, Frances Hillier, Catherine Anderson,
Geoff Fawcus, Arra Aho, Ernie Hall and Ron
Grantham.
The executive consisted of: President, Ron Grantham, and secretary, Frances Hillier.
Those doing poster work were Bob Nickells, Mal-
chia Sanford, Bob Armstrong, Grace Maclndoe,
Mary Lou Jefferies and Geoff Fawcus—a returned
R.C.A.F. man who contributed some of the best work
of the fear.
Things are looking up.
Fawcus,  Maclndoe,  Hillier, Jeffrey,  Golos  and Nickells
work  on   posters.
. . . Page Eighty-three Bob  Harwood,  Rosemary  Hodgins,  Jim   Wilson,   Brian  Burke,   Hal  Daykin,   Jim   Clement
Mock Parliament leaders talk . . .
Members of the Parliamentary Forum experienced
an energetic year under the dynamic leadership of
Jim Wilson as president. Fall and Spring Mock
Parliaments, Frosh Debates and McGoun Cup Debates went on as usual while weekly debates on
Thursday noons replaced the former bi-weekly
schedule.
The annual Western Universities' debating feature,
the McGoun Cup Debates, resulted in a victory for
Alberta University with UBC running a close second.
Stuart Porteus and Morris Berson travelled to Manitoba University at Winnipeg and won on the negative of the resolution, "Resolved that a tolerant attitude should be adopted towards post-war Germany."
On the affirmative side, Don Holms and Jim Clement
lost in Vancouver against the excellent Alberta team
Jim Clement, Don Holmes, Morris Berson and Stu Porteus
McGoun Cup debaters.
Page Eighty-four . . Jim  Wilson, Loyd Brydon, Doug Belyea, Hugh McLeod, Ed Zahar, Hal Daykin
. . things over before the battle
of J. H. Shoctor and H. W. Harries.
In Vancouver, Prof. F. G. C. Wood acted as chairman while the judges were the Chief Justice Wendell
B. Farris, Leon J. Ladner and Kenneth Drury.
Frosh Debates against Victoria College with Harriet Hochman and Bob Harwood on the negative over
in Victoria and Rosemary Hodgins and Alan Roeher
at UBC on the affirmative against Victoria College's
visiting team resulted in a victory for UBC in both
cities. The topic, "Resolved that university education is inadequate and fails to meet the needs of
present-day students," was finally publicly discussed
after two postponements because of the street car
strike and the unsatisfactory dates. Ron Shepherd
and Peter Castran of Vic College put up a very good
case in Vancouver against UBC's home team.
In accordance with the usual enthusiastic reception, the Fall and Spring Mock Parliaments were
"howling" successes. Last November found Jim
Wilson from Baffin Land as Prime Minister and
leader of the Independents with Hal Daykin as
Leader of the Opposition of three parties and C.C.F.
Leader.    The government was finally ousted.
In March, the government of the Mock Parliament,
Progressive Conservatives under Doug Belvea as
Prime Minister, lost out at the close of the session
by one contested vote to the Opposition under Les
Raphael, C.C.F. party leader.
A new feature, very favorably received, was the
round-table discussion of Capitalism vs. Socialism
with Jim Wilson as chairman. Les Raphael and
Marjorie Smith upheld Capitalism against Socialism
as forwarded by Hal Daykin and Bob Harwood.
With Prof. Wood as their ever-helpful honorary
president, the executive of the Parliamentary Forum
under Jim Wilson ably carried out their duties.
Jim Clement was first vice-president; Hal Daykin
was second vice-president; Brian Burke was third
vice-president; secretary was Hugh MacLeod; treasurer was Bob Harwood, and Rosemary Hodgins
handled the publicity.
Jim   Wilson
Page Eighty-five Harold Lindsay, Gordon Kersey, Fred Tessman, George Peirson,  Walter Ferguson,
Dennis Smith
U.B.C.'s Canadian Legion Branch
In the fall of 1943 the first group of ex-servicemen
started to return to the University. Some of the men
had previously been attending, others had not. These
men felt the need of something to act as a liaison
between them and the University. There is a vast
difference between the intense activity on the battle-
front and easy going, plodding life of the university.
Spring of '44 saw the formation under Bernie
Weston of an organization of ex-servicemen on the
campus. The Canadian University Returned Men's
Association was the first organization of its type at
any university in the country. At its inception the
club was a minor club of the L.S.E.
The aim of the club was to promote the general
welfare of the ex-servicemen on the campus. For
example, the club tried to help the men with their
social problems. It was to orient the men into the
University.
The club has grown from a small group numbering just fourteen to seventy-two in the fall of '44,
till now with the addition of the air force men, the
organization numbers two hundred and twelve.
During the year there have been two smokers and
a dance. Regular meetings have been held at which
have been speakers such as Fit. Lt. Sinclair, M.P.,
Mr. MacNicol, Col. Shrum, President MacKenzie and
representatives from the Junior Board of Trade who
are interested in the veterans' welfare. Presidents
of the various major clubs on the campus addressed
the men at the beginning of the term to acquaint
them with the activities on the campus.
The executive of the Canadian University Returned Men's Association for the past year has been:
President, George Peirson; first vice-president, Gordon Kersey; second vice-president, Walter Ferguson;
secretary-treasurer, Sid Poulton. The chairmen of
the various committees were: Fred Tessman, chairman of rehabilitation; chairman of education, Denis
Smith; social chairman, Harold Lindsay.
At the conclusion of the year the organization had
expanded to such an extent that it was accepted as
the UBC branch of the Canadian Legion, declaring
itself completely independent of the Alma Mater
Society.
Page Eighty-six . Brian Burke
/
•       •       9
Finding work for one and all
The Employment Bureau, under the able directorship of Brian Burke, has this year found employment, both part time and regular work, for more
students than it has ever done in previous years.
Beginning in the fall, the bureau has found work
for the students during the session, the Christmas
holidays, and at the end of the year, it has found
work for graduates or helped to give the students an
idea of the work that they could enter with training.
Helping in the bureau this year were Helen Duncan, Naomi Grigg, Tony Orton and Harold Sigalet.
Girls Sign For Xmas Work
Nice hours, good pay, how about it?
Page Eighty-seven The Radio Society "at home.
URS beats up the air waves . .
With the end of the term of 1944, the Radio
Society saw the graduation of its zany part-character Norm Campbell. The reins of the Radio Society
fell to Eric Ajello, the writer of the scripcs of 1944
season.
An unfortunate series of coincidences prevented
the Radio Society from entering the entertainment
world in 1945. The main reason was the lack of
definite word from CKWX, the mainstay of the
weekly programs, about the time that would be available after that station had joined the Mutual Network. The only program that carried on from the
year before was the Mussoc's weekly show from
CJOR.
Early in the fall term, it was decided that the conditions of operation in Room G in the agriculture
building were unsatisfactory, so the search for room
began. The book-exchange office was taken over as
the production office, and the Photography Room
was made available by the AMS to convert to a
studio for local programs. When the promise of
the studio became a reality, the technical staff went
to work on the construction of a five-channel amplifier and mixer board for use in the studio. Investigation was made into the best type of studio to build,
and finally plans were drawn up by the end of the
year, and presented to the council for action.
The production department under Keith Cutler
went ahead on the writing of numerous scripts for
radio shows, one of these series went on the air over
CBR before the Xmas holidays.
At the end of the year, the radio society finds it
self with many of its members working at the local
stations:
Eric Ajello and Loyd Brydon are at CKMO.
Keith Cutler and Tommy Tomlinson are working
at CJOR.
Executive this year was: President, E. A. Ajello;
business manager and acting president, W. B.
Watts; production manager, Keith Cutler; technical
manager, Gordon Carter; chief announcer, Don
McDougall.
URS stalwarts trying  to look  informal
Page Eighty-eight . PUBLICATIONS John Tom Scott
Scott leads junior journalists .
Progress was the keynote in the Publications
Board this year.
After fourteen years of semi-weekly publication,
The Ubyssey finally decided that it might as well act
up to its position as official organ of the third
largest student body in Canada, and burst out in
three issues a week.
In addition, The Ubyssey joined the British United
Press service, thus providing the students with last-
minute news of both world events and sports, and
giving the BUP its only morning outlet in Vancouver.
Speeded   up  to  publish  60  issues  instead  of  the
usual 40 the Publications Board lost much of its informality and general rowdiness, as members found
that the new schedule called for hard work, and lots
of it.
The man behind these world-shaking changes was
dynamic John Tom Scott, editor-in-chief of the Publications Board.
Dark, fiery, JT started things up immediately after
his appointment last spring, when he announced that
the next year would see the return of the Totem.
Over the holidays he really got going in earnest,
arranging for the three issues a week, which makes
The Ubyssey third  among  Canadian  campus news-
Denis  Blunden
Mardee Dundas
Page Ninety Cal  Whitehead
Marian Ball
papers, only two others of which, the McGill Daily,
and Varsity, also a daily, are published more than
twice a week.
Besides the BUP affiliation, other innovations
were the system of dummying page make-up, and a
new stream-lined make-up on the editorial page.
One of the oldest ambitions of the Publications
Board was realized with the acquisition of a king-
size, custom-built U desk, now the pride of the
Ubyssey staff.
Editorials for three papers a week, plus keeping
an unusually boisterous staff under control, was a
a stiff assignment for any man, but JT managed to
keep the campus thinking, with caustic and constructive comment, and escaped with only a minimum of damage to his beloved pub.
Presiding over the majestic new city desk were
three very different types of journalists. Senior Editors Marion Dundas, Denis Blunden and Cal Whitehead laboured, each in his or her own way, to produce consistently high grade issues of UBC's favorite campus newspaper. Mardee used her experience
as hews manager to good effect to get her share of
stories for the Thursday paper, was the only woman
columnist on the paper, with her "last word."
Blunden, known to reporters and editors alike as
through three issues a week
Ron   Haggert,   CUP   Editor.
Luke Moyls
.Page Ninety-one "db", scorned to give more than the occasional assignment, taking what came his way each Monday
morning and writing the rest himself. Students
never knew what to expect from his "in all seriousness", which might be just that, but usually wasn't.
Third man on the desk was Cal Whitehead, a mere
sophomore. Despite his lack of experience Cal managed to hold his end up with papers which improved
steadily as the year progressed. Although not primarily a columnist he occasionally got something off
his chest with "people and things".
The Ubyssey survived for part of the year without
the services of a News Editor, but shortly after
Christmas, when senior editors were finding increasing difficulty in keeping campus coverage co-ordinated, Marian Ball was promoted from CUP to take
over the post. Succeeding her on the Canadian University beat was freshman Ron Haggart, who also
produced the occasional column.
The sports department was the home of Luke
Moyls, the busiest man on the campus. Besides editing three sport pages a week and writing most of
his own stories, he produced thrice weekly his "The
Gospel, according to Luke Moyls", was senior basketball manager, wrote sports for the News Herald,
and tried to hold on to a first class average in Maths
and Physics. As a sideline he also produced the
Totem sports section.
Assisting him with the sports were Associate Editor Laurie Dyer and sport reporters Shelagh Wheeler, Fred Crombie, Cy Appleby and Fred Morrow.
Working in conjunction with the senior editors
were associates Bruce Bewell, Nancy Macdonald, Bill
Stewart, Ron Haggart, Don Stainsby and Helen
Worth, and assistants Tom Preston, Edith Angove,
Rosemary Hodgins, Jean MacFarlane, Harry Castil-
loux, Mac Brockman, John MacBride and Harry
Allen.
Occasional   columns   came   from   Don   Stainsby,
Scott  and Morris,  in  conference.
Macdonald  and  Stainsby  deliver  the   Ubyssey.
to give U. B. C most complete
Ready,  aim, fire!
Our busy Sports dept.
Page Ninety-two Greg Miller, Bruce Bewell, and, at the beginning of
the year, John Green.
Staff cartoonist was Buzz Walker, and Pub Secretary, Bette Anderson.
In the Totem Office, reduced in size to make room
for the new city desk, confusion reigned from the beginning of the year until the end. Sophomore editor
John Green, who tackled the job with no yearbook
experience whatever, spent the entire year trying to
find out what the score was, and trying to get some
work out of his photographers.
The Totem returned to campus, bigger than ever,
after an absence due to war shortages of three years,
and found no one on the staff who had ever seen a
Totem put out, let alone worked on one. Bugbears
known to yearbook editors since time immemorial
were all new to the Totem staff, but despite this han-
Dark, fiery Scott gives orders.
dicap they managed to squeeze under the wire with
the biggest and the most widely circulated Totem in
the history of the University.
Green, blessed with an extremely light course,
spent most of his waking hours pounding a typewriter in the pub, or dashing madly around between
the print shop and the engravers, trying to eliminate
bugs which were continually cropping up. Slightly
mad to start with, only a perverted sense of humour
kept him from becoming a raving lunatic before the
term was over.
First lieutenant on the Totem staff was associate
editor Bill Stewart. Another sophomore, he rose
with Green from the lowly depths of an assistant editorship on The Ubyssey. Together they arranged
for photographs, wrote and edited copy, persecuted
laggard reporters, and made life miserable for the
news coverage in campus history
Look at the camera.
Mardee passes it on.
Page Ninety-three John Green
Biggest Totem ever produced . .
engraving company staff. Despite a heavy pre-med
course, Stewart managed to spend most of his afternoons sorting pictures and checking page proofs.
As is usual with a college yearbook it was the
pictures which really told the story. Number one
man behind the lens this year was Art Jones, who
took most of the pictures for the book, and in addition had the unpleasant task of juggling film quotas
and all too scarce flash bulbs.
Art and his Speed Graphic were easily two of
the best-known personalities on the campus as they
attended all dances, games and pep-meets and man
aged to be on hand whenever anything was happening. Art also did the photographic tasks for The
Ubyssey.
A godsend to the overworked photography staff
was Cecil Yip, who wandered into the pub one day
to buy a Totem and ended up by becoming the
Totem's number two photographer. With his $300
Lieca he shot more than 500 pictures in three weeks
of February to clear away most of the sports and
war effort sections.
Other photographers who worked throughout the
year were  scienceman  Stewe Bowell,  returned  man
Bill Stewart
Pat  Worthington
\
Page Ninety-four Art Jones
Fred Grover
Brian Jackson
Bob Steiner, sport photographers Brian Jackson and
Fred Grover, and Fred Maurer, who was responsible
for most of the class scrap.
So hot did the pace become in the early spring
that the photographers were unable to develop and
print their pictures as fast as they were taking them
and this work had to be done commercially.
Most of the work of making arrangements for photographs fell to photography secretary Pat Worthington, who also handled the taking of individual
photos in the fall. Pat spent so much time on the
phone that his left ear almost disappeared into his
head.
This year saw the introduction in the Totem of a
new section, attempting to trace the activities of UBC
boys, both grads and undergrads overseas. Compiling this information was the job of Nancy Macdonald, the pub's only triple threat editor, who edited
. . . by inexperienced help
Cecil Yip
Bob   Steiner
Fred Maurer
Steve Bowell
. Page  Ninety-five Deane   Sherman
Jean MacFarlane
the directory, was an associate on The Ubyssey, and
did a large part of the work on the Totem. She also
handled, without assistance, the job of distributing
Ubysseys around the campus.
Assisting her in obtaining pictures for the Honour
Roll section, and covering work on sections dealing
with the nurses in the Totem, was Frances Turnbull.
Sports was technically under the supervision of
Luke Moyls, but as he had so little time to devote to
it most of the work was delegated to Pat Worthington. Luke did come through, however, after The
Ubyssey cut down to one issue a week in March, and
did most of the layouts for the section.
Other members of the staff were Jean MacFarlane,
who handled the grad write-ups and the name index;
Jane Seymour, who shattered tradition, precedent,
and established practice by always turning her assignments in on time; Bruce Bewell, who handled
Engineering write-ups; Eleanor Bryant, who looked
after the Aggies; Helen Worth, Don Stainsby and
Harry Allen.
This year the Totem did without a business manager, as ads were sold by a commercial concern. The
sales campaign was capably handled by Deane Sherman, who did his difficult job with extreme ease.
Owing to an increased enrolment, and an apparent surplus of money on the campus, no extensive
drive was necessary to sell the book although the
pub did put on a hilarious pep meet early in the
term.
Sherman handles sales . . .
Totie puffs with pride at '45 Totem . . .  Part of the Totem staff, obviously posing.
Page Ninety-six . Besides the Totem and The Ubyssey the Publications Board is the home of two little publications,
both regarded as rather a nuisance by pubsters—the
Student Directory and the Tillicum.
The Tillicum is a concise little booklet issued to
all freshmen at the beginning of the initiation week,
at the same time as they buy their regalias. It contains all the information necessary for the frosh to
really get acquainted with their campus, information
which no amount of orientation programs could give
them.
Within its covers are included outlines of the organization of all campus clubs, and explanation of the
machinery of student government, a copy of the
code of the Alma Mater Society, and the words to
UBC's songs and yells.
This year the Tillicum had a scientific flavour, as
Bruce Bewell, who was also responsible for the
Science issue of The Ubyssey, and who holds the
title of Pub Engineer, took over from Grahame
Thompson who joined the army.
Under the guiding hand of "bb" the Tillicum came
out bigger than in previous years, with a little more
of everything, especially pictures, songs, and Totie
cuts.
Bruce's one assistant was Anna White, who also
left the Pub for the army at Christmas, after serving
as associate editor on the Tuesday paper.
The Student Directory, which solves the problem
of phoning Varsity friends who are boarding, or
whose phones are in their parents' names, was this
year mainly the work of Nancy Macdonald.
Easily the most uninteresting job on the Pub, the
Bruce Bewell
. . . Tillicum solves freshman problems
1
Bewell at work.
Jane Seymour
. . . Page Ninety-seven directory is just one mass of routine typing, checking, rechecking, and complaints. The book was late
this year, mainly because of the greatly increased
number of students and the delay in receiving registration cards, hitting the campus about the middle
of November. Contrary to the procedure last year,
a nominal fee was charged.
Associate editor was Janet Kerr, with assistants
Betty Brooks, Tom Preston, Jean MacFarlane and
Ross Henderson.
Thanks are given as usual this year to Harold
Kent of Cleland-Kent Engraving Co. and Charlie
Phillips, of Ward and Phillips, and the men at both
Nancy Macdonald
companies, whose skilled workmanship not only
made the Totem possible, but kept it to a high standard of technical excellence, and to Morris Belkin,
Dave, Don, and Elinor at the Point Grey News
Gazette, for their work on The Ubyssey.
Directory serves one and all .
Giving out the Totem pictures.
Page Ninety-eight . . , Green ponders . . . Sports desk in action . . . Luke lights one for Dave .  . . Her Scienceman Lover .  .  . Patience, it's
wonderful .  .  .  The fiery Phi Delta, light cigarettes here     . . . Even Editors must eat . . . Cal and Dave in a serious
mood . . . Conference . . . Boring, isn't it? . . . How about that galley . . . Going steady . . . City desk at work . . .
Also associate editors . . . Caught snapping . . . Next time remember the deadline . . . Jones, Green and family.
Page Ninety-nine  ir WAR EFFORT *  • Lt.-Col. G. M. Shrum
Military instructors and officers .
Students in the three services at UBC this year
got a taste of what the peace will mean for them.
Although the end of the war in Europe is only just
in sight, and the end of that in Japan seems still
years away, the machinery to reconvert the University services to a peacetime basis is already in
motion.
The first step was the passing by the Joint Services
Board, which decides policy in connection with all
university services, of a ruling which allowed all
cadets with two years' training in the service concerned, and two camps, to take training on a reduced
basis, with only 60 hours' work a year instead of
the previously required 110 hours.
This ruling affected, at first, only the COTC, since
neither the UNTD nor the UAS had been in existence for two years.
After Christmas, however, the commanders of
Varsity units were advised that the phrase "in the
unit concerned" had been removed from the ruling.
This meant that many of the Navy boys who had
had previous service in the COTC were now eligible
for reduced training, and since they had already
done more than 60 hours during the fall they were
given the opportunity to discontinue training altogether during the rest of the year.
During the Christmas holidays, word was received
from   air   force   headquarters   in   Ottawa   that   the
Lt. Commander Macllroy
Major Topping
Page One Hundred and Two Fit. Lt.  W. Ure, Sqdn. Ldr. J. A. Harris, Fit. Lt. Duff
Lieut. Nash
teach students military discipline
University Air Squadrons were to be disbanded,
and shortly after returning to Varsity the air force
boys turned in their uniforms, received half a year's
pay, and reported to the COTC.
Keeping the training functioning smoothly despite
the many changes was Lt.-Col. Gordon M. Shrum,
commanding officer of the COTC and director of
military training on the campus. It was his job to
keep the activities of the campus services co-ordinated, and to assume responsibility for all the activities of the students soldiers and sailors.
Under the leadership of Lt. Comm. (S.B.I H. M.
Macllroy, RCNVR, the University Naval Training
Division on the campus worked hard to complete
the   extensive   training   syllabus   laid   down   for   it
by naval headquarters, despite loss of time owing to
the street car strike.
The year was highlighted by two big events, the
uniform Navy Dance in the Brock March 17, and
the inspection of the unit by Commodore Brock,
Commanding Officer Naval Divisions, on March 21.
The dance was a great success, with over one hundred couples, including several of the instructors
from HMCS Discovery, and music by the Discovery
dance band.
The unit performed creditably at the inspection
also, and received the sincere commendation of the
commodore for their excellent work. The guard of
honor, resplendent in belts and gaiters, was especially praised.
Major Bonner
Captain Osborne
Captain   Walmsley
Page One Hundred and Three CPO   Ross
Instructor   and  acting  rank.
Instructors Carter and Haley
three services on campus compete .
The UNTD this year was made up of some 70
old hands from last year, and a slightly greater number of new arrivals. They were divided into two
companies, with the men of the Monday night division all parading together as part of A company.
A company men continued training where they
left off last year with a more advanced course, while
B company started at the bottom. Most of the students were enrolled as ordinary seamen, but the
mechanical and electrical engineers enlisted as
stokers.
The training was under the direction of Lieut.
Nash, from HMCS Discovery, a veteran of last year's
training staff. Assisting him were WO Bennet, CPO
Ross, and several petty officers, leading hands, and
able seamen, all from Discovery.
Doing the routine work in the UNTD office at the
beginning of the year was Stoker F. Rustad, who
was later replaced by O/S Simpson.
Work covered by  the student sailors  during the
year included semaphore, flashing, bends and
hitches, boatwork, types of ships, naval law, navigation, naval strategy and tactics, compass and helm,
naval traditions and history, and a great variety ol
other nautical subjects, along with the routine
marching and rifle drill.
Training was taken both on the campus and at
Discovery. A much appreciated improvement over
last year was the use of Navy trucks to take the students down to the ship on Saturday afternoons.
A considerable number of UNTD ratings went
active shortly after Christmas, for various reasons,
and many more signed up to leave at the completion of the term if the Navy would take them.
This year's training in the UBC Contingent of the
COTC took on new interest with the addition of
courses in motor transport and advanced weapon
training.
Three new organizations were set up in the form
of Pioneer, Signals and Carrier Platoons.
Sgt. Morrison
CSM Armour
CSM  Goodwin
CSM  Coles
Paee One Hundred and Four . . . M
^^■^          J^^^l     H \*  Jrmw
7
'           'it'
RQMS McChord and Leavy's pants.
Corporal  Buell
. . . for best morale, greatest efficiency
Under the able guidance of the battle-tried and
experienced hand of Chief Training Officer Major
Bob Bonner, a graduate of only four years ago, and
Captain Osborne, the training covered most branches
of small arms training as well as the regular smart-
ening-up routine of parade ground drill.
The Freshman class was outfitted and in uniform
in record time this year after drawing their equipment from the newly renovated "Q.M. Stores," sys
tematically run by Capt. Currie and RQMS McChord, and later by RQMS Glenn.
The training staff of "Ack-I's" under Sgt.-Major
Jack Coles included such notables as CSM "Goody"
Goodland, CSM C. P. Armour, and the newest addition, Sgt. "Junior" Morrison, recently of the Sicilian
Campaign.
The Orderly room had its usual problems to contend with; certainly not the least of which were leave
It's all so new to me.
Page One Hundred and Five The COTC marches . . . And stands . . . Take a message . .   . At the Sergeants dance . . . Sergeants' mess birthday cake
. . . Who's that civilian? . . . Drummer Cohen . . . Rifles and men in barbed wire . . . Learning to drive a Bren carrier
Sigmn.  Affleck.
Page One Hundred and Six Capt. Bonner at ease . . . Give me a boost . . . By the right, Dress! . . . Navy bigwigs . . . Signalmen at work . . . COTC ape
man . . . Barbed wire can be a problem . . . Two views of a flame thrower . . . Up and over . . . More Signalmen, flashing . . .
Out of a crawl box, alive . . . Captain   Walmsley gets a salute.
Page One Hundred and Seven
/ Plane clothes men.
They've clipped our wings.
U. A. S. men learn airmanship drill...
applications and AWOL's. Adjutant Capt. S. E.
Walmsley headed the staff which added a note of
femininity this year in the person of comely CWAC
Cpl. Buell. CSM Irving and Sgt. Piper answered
the unending stream of requests and questions which
daily pour over the busiest counter in the armouries.
Head man in the Corps, RSM Jim Phelps continually pleaded with his CSM's for faster roll calls,
cleaner web belts, smarter sergeants, fall-ins, and
dismissals.
Several changes in the uniform worn by the unit
were put into effect, generally adding to the "Esprit
de Corps."    These included discontinuing the wear
ing of the conspicuous white cap and shoulder
flashes by all ranks, trading the former khaki COTC
badges for the smart new blue and gold models worn
above the Canada badges, and lastly, the wearing by
instructors of "Those Things of Beauty," the polished
and blankoed web belts.
Basic training was started anew in January with
the formation of "H" company composed entirely of
lecture-hardened men of the disbanded UAS.
Led by Sqdn.-Ldr. J. A. Harris, the University Air
Squadron on the campus started out in the fall where
it left off last year with courses in navigation,
meteorology,  signals,  airmanship,   aircraft   recogni-
Head table, Air Force banquet.
Page One Hundred and Eight Stand at ease . . . By the right, dress . . . Tuck in your stomach, chum . . . Ready to blow the fall in ... B company at
attention . . .  Who's that photographer? . . . Watching the boys fall in . . . Acting parade commander . . . The "crusher"
and acting ranks . . . Always out of line . . . A couple of sourpusses.
Page One Hundred and Nine The COTC stands easy . . . Time out . . . High kicker . . . driving a carrier . . . His ancestry coming out . . . Whitehead
commands . . . Hello, is that you, Myrt? . . . Cpl. Buell at ease . . . RSM Phelps . . . Signallers in action . . . What goes in
must come out. . . Just privates.
Page One Hundred and Ten . . Women's   Red   Cross   Corps   drills   again.
That's our girl!
.      •      .
Smart Red Cross Corps marches
tion, first aid, and allied subjejcts.
The unit lost many of its boys to the active air
force over the holidays, but was joined by an approximately equal number of new arrivals, and plans
for training until the end of the year were already
formulated.
After Christmas, however, word was received that
the unit was to disband, and, after a farewell banquet attended by officers from all services, the boys
were turned over to the tender mercies of the COTC
There they got new khaki uniforms to replace their
snappy air force blue ones, and with their own non-
coms, translated to army ranks, soon became full-
fledged men of the COTC
■
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■                 m
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V*       ■
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Patsy Cunningham
UBC blood donor gives his all.
Page One Hundred and Eleven \tk \ VMktti
Patsy Cunningham, Ted English, Mary Frances Trumbull, Ivy Pronger, Mary Dolmage,
Sidney Flavelle, Doc Morton, Bill Watts, Don. Brown, Gordon Bertram, Elinor Haggart,
Ron Haggart, Herb Capozzi, Les Wong
WA C sponsors blood drive. ISS week
..
Under the capable leadership of Commandant J.
Hallamore and Adjutant Nora Neilson, the Red
Cross Corps finished another successful year.
First year girls in the Corps did their war work
here on the campus, First Aid being one of the most
popular courses with knitting and sewing coming
next.
Second year girls were delegated to far more interesting and varied work. Many went down each
week to the Blood Donors Clinic. Others visited the
convalescents at Union College and other hospitals
or did social service work at the Alexandra Neighborhood House.
Besides their various war work duties, the girls in
the Red Cross Corps did a certain number of hours
drill each week and as a result have turned out one
of the smartest looking military groups on the
campus.
At the end of this year the War Aid Council,
under chairman Ted Chambers, was able to send to
the Red Cross some $7500 as the result of student
effort at UBC. The bulk of the sum was made up of
the profits of the Red Cross Ball and the Fall Ball,
together with money raised by the Women's Undergraduate Society and the voluntary waiving of caution money receipts.
The successful management of International Student Service Week funds was another responsibility
of the Council.
The magnificent support of the War Aid Council
Getting Navy Week off to a good start.
Dr. MacKenzie accepts  War Loan certificate.
Page One Hundred and Twelve War worker
•What she got?"
Sew a fine seam . . . Knits to you . . . Happy in her work.
while women work voluntarily
by the student body serves as one more illustration of
the excellence of the University's war effort.
UBC co-eds still have their sleeves rolled up as the
third year of self-imposed, compulsory war program
is completed. Realizing that a healthy body is of
primary importance for efficiency, war work A,
compulsory for everyone, consisted in one hour a
week of physical education. Archery, volleyball,
grass hockey, badminton and tennis were sports
chosen by co-eds. A "Keep Fit" program provided
more specialized gym work. Students taking the
teachers training course found folk dancing especially helpful. The basic folk dances of every country were taught, as well as ballroom dancing.
More serious war work came under the heading
of war work B. One hour a week was spent in Red
Cross knitting and sewing. Many preferred as an
alternative to take specialized courses. War Time
Foods, War Time Clothing, Typing, Community
Service, Home Nursing, and First Aid, were the
courses offered.
The C.R.C.C. was formed to provide a group of
uniformed and disciplined, women to assist in the
war effort and to be prepared for war emergencies.
UBC with many other universities across the Dominion has a university detachment. Dr. Sylvia Thrupp
and Dr. Joyce Hallamore played a large part in
organizing the detachment.
As a result of basic training the fifty co-ed corps
members have acquired a military swing. Thirty
members who completed their basic training last
year have been assisting at Gordon House, the Blood
Donors Clinic and the Annex of the Point Grey Military Hospital. The new members took courses in
Home Nursing and First Aid to complete their basic
training, as well as their three hours weekly of
service.
Under their enthusiastic leader, Barbara Greene,
the extra compulsory activities of WUS have provided fun as well as funds for the Red Cross. These
included a WUS fashion show, and three tea dances.
An Old Clothes .Drive for V Bomb Victims wound
up with a tea dance. Admission was one article of
clothing or ten cents.
Page One Hundred and Thirteen
/  •   ATHLETICS   •
•
^H                               ^^^^         ^H ^^^f <■  |3^|
wyy l            •^b
\
LWmm\    mmmmmT       A/Mmmj Maury Van. Vliet
and Miss Moore has been Women's Physical Educa-
cation Director since 1936.
Although Maury is a football coach at heart since
he majored in this sport in his college days, he concentrated his coaching abilities on basketball and
track this year and produced champions in both fields.
The Thunderbird basketball team took both the City
and Provincial Championships while the crosscountry team again captured the Pacific Coast Crosscountry Championship.
However, Mr. Van Vliet's ambitions really lie with
his physical education and intramural programs. He
again took charge of the COTC physical education
program which kept the gym filled most of the time.
As a result, there was little time for indoor intramurals and girls' sports. But the men's intramurals
were again successful with keen competition throughout the year. The girls' athletic program also thrived
under the direction of Miss Moore.
With four instructresses, Mrs. Roper, Helen Matheson, Lois Reid and Ada McLaren, the girls' program
Athletic leaders keep sports alive . .
Athletics at UBC enjoyed one of the most successful wartime seasons this year, with basketball and
English rugby leading in university sport circles.
Great credit for this year's success is due to UBC's
leaders in athletics.
Maury Van Vliet and Miss Moore have done much
for sports on this campus, and the 1944-45 session
was no exception for them. Mr. Van Vliet is in his
tenth year as Director of Physical Education at UBC
included classes in archery, badminton, folk dancing,
nursing, recreation leadership, keep fit, playground
games and basketball.
Besides directing this program and a full-scale
intramural schedule, Miss Moore also supervised the
girls' extra-mural sports, of which grass hockey rose
to considerable prominence this year. Basketball and
archery also enjoyed successful seasons.
Controlling body in men's sports is the Men's Ath-
Men's Athletic Directorate—Maury Van Vliet, Bud McLeod, Dr. Gunning, George Rush,
Dr. Dickson and Jack McKercher.
Page One Hundred and Sixteen letic Directorate. All teams are under its direct
supervision, and the Directorate is in turn responsible
to the Students' Council.
Chairman of the M.A.D. this year was George Rush,
president of the Men's Athletic Association. Two
faculty members, Dr. Dickson and Dr. Gunning, were
on the board, as well as Maury Van Vliet, Director of
Physical Education. Jack McKercher, who acted as
secretary, and Bud McLeod were the two student
representatives.
Dissatisfied with the present athletic setup at UBC,
the M.A.D. set up a special committee to investigate
conditions both on this campus and on others of comparable size. The committee also looked into the
treasurer's files to investigate the financial situation
with regard to sports.
The committee began work early in January and
published their findings in a 12-page report in March.
Briefly,. their recommendations included a reconstitu-
tion of the M.A.D. for improved representation, and
a separate fund for athletics which would be admin-
Gertrude M. Moore
and prepare for postwar period
istered by the M.A.D.
The special committee included George Rush,
M.A.D. chairman; Maury Van Vliet, Dr. Dickson,
Jack McKercher, Bruce Yorke and Luke Moyls,
sports editor of the Ubyssey.
Another important group in UBC's athletics is the
Awards Committee. This body has the difficult task
of deciding which athletes have been most outstanding and have contributed most to any one team dur
ing the year.
The committee was composed of Dr. Dickson, Dr.
Gunning, Maury Van Vliet, Herb Smith and Ole
Bakken.
The Men's Big Block Club was of great service to
campus sports this year. The main function of the
club is to provide willing helpers for organizing and
promoting athletic activities at UBC. Big Block
sweaters   also   indicate   the   ushers  at most sports
Women's Athletic Directorate—Catherine Deas, Ada McLaren, Mary Ann Norton,
Miss G. Moore, Lois Reid.
Page One Hundred and Seventeen Men's Big Block Club—Art Stilwell, Ole Bakken, Gerry Lock hart, George Rush, Sandy Robertson, Ron Weber, Herb Smith,
Pat Campbell, Howie Shadwell, Ken McPherson, John  Wheeler, Jack McKercher and John Hicks
Big Block Club still serves sport . . .
events.
The club held its seventh annual Homecoming
Luncheon in the Brock Hall to welcome graduate Big
Block members to Homecoming. The club is composed of all students who have received the major
athletic award, the block letters "BC", in any sport
either as a player or as a senior manager.
This year's executive consisted of Maury Van
Vliet, honorary president; Herb Smith, president;
and Ole Bakken, vice-president.
In girls' sports, the Women's Athletic Association
is very fortunate in having Miss Moore as director of
the women's athletic activities.     Introducing classes
Men's   Awards   Committee—Jack   McKercher,   Ole   Bakken,
Dr. Todd, George Rush, Maury Van Vliet and Herb Smith
Page One Hundred and Eighteen Women's Big Block Club—Betty Walton, Doreen Parks, Helen Matheson, Irene Pierce,   Joanie Stevens,   Lois Reid,
Greene,  Audrey McKim,  Dorothy Payson, Mary Ann Norton
Barb
which are both useful and enjoyable to university
coeds, Miss Moore has become a popular leader of
girls' athletics.
The old sport of archery is more than a pastime
with Miss Moore. She has shown such enthusiasm
and has proven such a capable coach that interest in
this sport reached a new high this year.
The Women's Athletic Directorate has direct control and administration of all women's athletics on
the campus.   It acts in an advisory capacity and is in
turn responsible to the Students' Council.
This year's Directorate was composed of Dean
Mawdsley, Dr. Hallamore, Miss Moore, and student
members Lois Reid, president of the Women's Athletic Association; Kay Deas, Ada McLarin and Mary
Ann Norton.
On a parallel with the men's setup, the women also
have an Awards Committee. The group included
Dean Mawdsley, Miss Moore, Lois Reid, Irene Pierce,
Ada McLarin and Mary Ann Norton.
Revision Committee
-Maury  Van  Vliet, Jack McKercher, George Rush, Bruce Yorke,
Dr.  Dickson.    Missing—Luke Moyls
Page One Hundred and Nineteen UBC Thunderbirds—Maury Van Vliet, Luke Moyls, Bud MacLeod, Art Stilwell, Ron
Weber, Ed Ryan, Sandy Robertson, Ole Bakken, Ken Thomas, Pat McGeer,
Reg Clarkson, Gardy Gardom
Varsity Thunderbirds roll on .
Managers Gardy Gardom and Luke Moyls
Battling for the sports spodight on the UBC
campus this year were a pair of championship Thun-
derbird squads, one on the basketball courts and the
other on the rugby field.
The Thunderbird basketballers enjoyed their most
successful season since the 1941 "Wonder Team"
went through to the Canadian Championship. Because of studies, this year's squad stopped after taking
the Vancouver and the Provincial Tides.
Highlight of the year was the Oregon series on
December 18 and 19 when the mighty 'Birds entertained the powerful University of Oregon Webfoots
in a two-game exhibition in the UBC Gym.
Although they lost both games, 55-51 and 63-59,
the Blue and Gold firmly established themselves as
Pacific Coast Conference material as they were
barely nosed out by the Oregon Ducks who went on
to win the Coast Conference title this spring.
Another highlight was their New Year's tour into
Washington. Travelling to Seattle, Bremerton and
Spokane, the students came out with an even split in
four games.
In their first game, at Seattle, Alpine Dairy, Northwest A.A.U. champions for the past three years,
handed them a 46-23 trouncing in the Civic Auditorium, but the 'Birds made up for that loss by defeating the Bremerton Navy Yard Rockets, 45-35, the
following night.
The Blue and Gold quintet suffered its worst defeat
of the season at the hands of the National Service
Champions, Fort Lewis, in the opening game, 90-43.
Gail Bishop, All-American star, tallied 46 points in
that tilt.
7
Page One Hundred and Twenty Ron Weber
Pat McGeer
Ken Thomas
to City and Provincial titles
But the Spokane fans took to the Thunderbirds in
the New Year's Day finale as the Canadian team displayed championship form in trouncing Fort George
Wright, 67-35.
The team opened up their season in great form as
they travelled to Victoria to eke out a 36-35 victory
over Pat Bay's former Dominion Champions, the
Gremlins.
Although the Flyers won the return game at Varsity by a 67-65 score on December 4th, the Thunderbirds established their superiority over Pat Bay
when they notched a 29-17 count in their half of the
Prisoners-of-War All-Star contest on March 7.
In the Vancouver and District League, the 'Birds
walked away with the tide, losing only two games in
their schedule of 16, one to Lauries Pie-Rates immediately after the Oregon series, and another to Higbies in the spring.
They scared Higbies out of the playoffs with a
58-18 win in the first semi-final game, then went on
to win three straight games from Lauries in the Vancouver and B.C. finals, finishing off with one of
their most decisive triumphs, 65-41.
Star of the Thunderbird lineup was Sandy Robertson, who again led the league scoring with 194 points
in 15 games. During the Varsity season he piled up
a total of 455 points in 31 games.
Art Stilwell and Ron Weber were the dependable
guards, Ole Bakken, Ed Ryan and Robertson took
turns at the pivot spot, while Pat McGeer and Reg
Clarkson filled the forward spots. Bud McLeod and
Ken Thomas substituted as guards.
Bruce Yorke and Art Johnson also started with the
Thunderbirds, but declined the spot of glory to coach
the younger Freshmen on the UBC Chiefs. Gordy
Sykes, another Thunderbird, retired from basketball
early in November due to pressure of work.
Maury Van Vliet looked after the Senior A coaching duties and was assisted by Senior Manager Luke
Moyls and Thunderbird manager Gardy Gardom.
Ole Bakken
Sandy Robertson
Ed Ryan
Thomas   checks   Art  Stilwell.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-one- Porky Andrews of Pat Bay pops another basket as the Gremlins take a 67-65 victory  over the  Thunderbirds.    At  the left
are Sandy Robertson, Art Stilwell and Doug Lee.   Number 10 is Ed Ryan.
Bakken tips in rebound despite Anderson's foul.
Sandy  almost  loses   his   balance.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-two . ^11
Tiny Ron Weber gets by his check with a jump . . . Oregon's Bob Hamilton looks vicious . . .
Weber peers up through the hoop . . . Dick Wilkins and Ken Hays were just two of the big
Webfoots.
. . Page One Hundred and Twenty-three t Jt.a
NtmAm.
TV-- •
t/5C Chiefs—Laurie Dyer  (Mgr.); Jack Cowan, Fred Bossons, Herb Capozzi, Bruce
Yorke, Art Johnson (coach); Ian Blake, Jerry Stevenson, Bob Haas, Lome Swanson
and Bill Fenn
UBC's Inter A Chiefs go big time .
Varsity's entry into the Intermediate A Basketball
League had to work overtime this year, and if fate
had not been so cruel, the UBC Chiefs might have
come up with the Inter A crown.
At the beginning of the year, a group of boys with
basketball on the brain banded together and formed
the most spirited team in hoopla circles, the UBC
Chiefs.
Bruce Yorke was the leader who first took the boys
in hand, and the Chiefs were in fine shape by the
time the season opened on the night of Homecoming.
The squad was an Intermediate A team, but they
ran into their first problem when it was discovered
that there were only two teams in this division, them
selves and Higbies, a commercial team coached by
Ted Milton.
However, Maury Van Vliet saw the Chiefs in action
at one of their practices, and later he voiced his hopes
that the Freshman squad might see action in Senior
A company. Since there were only two senior quintets, the Chiefs did just that when they and Higbies
entered the higher bracket.
The Frosh outfit had plenty of good material including two of last year's Inter A championship Arrow team. Gerry Stevenson and Fred Bossons proved
their worth to the Tribe as outstanding players during
the season.
Herb Capozzi
Bob Haas
Bruce Yorke
Page One Hundred and Twenty-four . . Ian Blake
Jack Cowan
Lome Swanson
Filling the centre spot was big Herb Capozzi, former pivotman with the Vancouver College crew which
was runner-up to Arrows in the previous year. Herb
won the highest honor of the league when he was
presented with the Most Valuable Player trophy. In
UBC's final tilt, he tied the Varsity scoring record of
26 points.
First string forwards were Bob Haas, who started
off the season as though he was going to break all
scoring records, and Gerry Stevenson, the former
Arrow star.
Fred Bossons played guard along with Bruce
Yorke, the man who virtually moulded the team together. Bruce did an admirable job as playing coach
throughout the first half of the season before he asked
Art Johnson to take over the coaching duties in
January.
Besides these stalwarts, the team also boasted a pair
of valuable substitutes, Lome Swanson and Bill Fenn.
After Christmas, the Blue and Gold team was
strengthened by the addition of three returned Air
Force boys. They were Bill McDowell, Ian Blake
and Jack Cowan, all of whom saw action in the Minor
Leagues last year. Manager Laurie Dyer finishes off
the roster of 12 men.
In the Christmas holidays the Chiefs travelled into
the Interior and won all three of their games. Then
the team returned and setded down to a stiff season
under their new coach, Art Johnson. Art worked
untiringly for the squad and almost succeeded in finishing the year with a championship club.
The Spring schedule found them falling into third
spot behind a rising Laurie outfit which finished
three wins ahead of them in final standings.
All in all, it was a great season for the Chiefs in
spite of their heart-breaking playoffs.
but lose out in two playdowns
Jerry  Stevenson
Fred Bossons
Bill Fenn
. . . Page One Hundred and Twenty-five Ole Bakken and Gene Sivertson jump for the tip-off as the W. T.C.-UBC battle opens.    Gene tallied 15 points, but the 'Birds
blasted the  Vikings, 72-56.
Strongman Capozzi
Siamese twins, Swanson and Bossons
Page One Hundred and Twenty-six Bossons runs around the end after tossing in a setup at King Ed Gym.
Yorke and his scoop shot.
Yorke and Stevenson jump.
. . Page One Hundred and Twenty-seven m\          m\m\      l^kh.
mm*    ^g-               ^V JP
-J                   ,    /                              mm^~
j                         -—■» —— .^jj
*
Ralston goes through after a line-out.
Rugger teams surge to victory .
UBC's English rugby teams astounded local rugger
enthusiasts as they went through their most outstanding season and captured all four of the major championships of the Province.
For the first time in UBC's history, the rugger
squads took all the silverware, including the Miller
Cup, the Tisdall Trophy, the Rounsefel Cup and the
prized McKechnie Cup.
In the pre-Christmas season, the University entered
two teams in the Vancouver Rugby Football League
to make up a four-team roster composed of Varsity,
UBC, Ex-Britannia and Vancouver Rowing Club.
The Varsity fifteen went through the schedule without suffering a single defeat, although they played to
a draw on two occasions, to walk off with the Miller
Cup, first of their long string of prizes. The other
squad, UBC, did not fare as well as the first team,
mainly because of injuries to their lineup.
Top—Jack Armour, Earl Butterworth
Centre—Cam  Coady, Bob  Croll
Bottom—Geoff Hill,  Steve Inglis
Bob Lawson
Tom McCusker
Page One Hundred and Twenty-eight . . f^
-jJN^h*"^^
Al Jones
Scott  Kerr
When the players resumed their rugby activities
after the Christmas holidays, they entered the same
league again to compete for the Tisdall Trophy. Besides the previously mentioned four squads, Ex-Byng
also entered a crew which was made up mostly of
Lord Byng high school players.
Again the Varsity squad remained unbeaten as they
went on to add the Tisdall Trophy to their collection. The UBC squad fared much better in this loop
as they ended in a second-place tie with Ex-Britaunia.
The impregnable Varsity lineup included Bob I31W-
so, Scott Kerr, Al Jones, Joe Pegues, Earl Butter-
worth, Cam Coady, Johnny Hicks and Bill Wallace as
forwards; and Johnny Wheeler, Ted Taylor, Jack McKercher, Bob Croll, Tom McCusker, Jack Armour
and Jim Hughes formed the backfield.
The individual scoring leaders in the Miller and
Tisdall Cup races were fullback Jim Hughes, with 16
points to his credit; wing three-quarter Tom McCusker with five tries for a total of 15, and UBC's kick-
Top—Jack McKercher, Gene Patterson
Centre—Joe Pegues, Bill Wallace
Bottom- Johnny Wheeler, Johnny Owen
Bob Lawson stops Frank Askew's kick the hard way  as the Vancouver Reps try to get past Varsity's line.
. . . Page One Hundred and Twenty-nine Don Atherton
Jim Kinghorn
Bob   Marshall
Len Mitten
Dave  Morgan
Maury   Moyls
Keith MacDonald
Bob  Ross
Jack   Wallis
Jones gets rough with a Vancouver Rep.
Page One Hundred and Thirty •    .
Thunderbird Don Ralston runs into Rep Lloyd Williams.
ing expert, Harry Kabush, with 14 big counters.
The crowning achievement of the season came in
Victoria when the Varsity Thunderbirds stopped the
Victoria Crimson Tide, 9 to 6, to win the famed McKechnie Cup, symbol of rugger supremacy in the
Province, for the first time since 1937.
Freshman star, Bob Croll, was the hero of the battle as he ran 50 yards to score the winning points
with only two minutes left in the game. Tom Mc-
Cusker and Keith MacDonald scored Varsity's two
other tries.
The Thunderbirds won all four of their games in
the McKechnie Cup competition, and except for the
close tilt on the Island, they weren't seriously threatened throughout the season.
In the first game of the series, Dan Doswell's
"wonder team" trampled the Crimson Tide with a
14-0 shutout at Varsity Stadium. Croll scored twice
and Maury Moyls and Tom McCusker chalked up
the other points. Jim Hughes completed the scoring
with a convert.
The followed the decisive victory over the Vancouver Reps, who had a powerful lineup this year. Coming from behind, the Students pounded out a 16-9
triumps as they went wild in the second half. Croll
led the scoring with a try and a convert.
The Thunderbirds were slow in getting started
when they met the Reps again in the final game of the
season, but again they came from behind and romped
to a 17-6 victory over the Vancouver fifteen.
Don Barton
Bill King
John Hicks
Doug   Knott
John   Olliver
Cam   Layard
■Harry Kabush
Laurie  Baker
. Page One Hundred and  Thirty-one A thrilling football scene.
Jack McKercher
Jack Armour, a Canadian football player at heart,
displayed tremendous drive in this battle as he went
over the line twice. Keith MacDonald, Tom McCus-
ker and Johnny Hicks also tallied while Harry Kabush
converted one.
While the mighty 'Birds were running away with
the McKechnie Cup, the UBC Intermediates split a
two-game series with two Victoria College teams. The
Blue and Gold dropped the first one, 7 to 3, in the
Capital City, but came back with a 4-3 triumph in
the final tilt.
To top off the season, the Varsity squad swamped
the Victoria Naval College outfit, 24 to 11, to complete their collection of silverware with the addition
of the Rounsefel Cup. Croll again starred for Varsity as he scored three tries and a convert.
Although the Thunderbirds' lineup changed  many
times during the season, their regular starting lineup
included forwards Bob Lawson, Dave Morgan, A/
Jones, Harry Kabush, Keith MacDonald, Joe Pegues,
Gerry Lockhart and Bill Wallace. The star backfield
had Gerry Jenvey, Maury Moyls, Jack McKercher,
Bob Croll, Len Mitten, Tom McCusker, and Jim
Hughes. Substitutes were Cam Coady and Don
Ralston.
Captains of the teams were Jack McKercher for
both Varsity and the Thunderbirds, and Harry Kabush for UBC. Much praise is due to this year's
coach, Dan Doswell, former mentor of the Victoria
Reps. He was capably assisted by Senior Manager
Geoff Hill and the veteran McKercher. Geoff's
brother, Ernie, looked after the managerial duties
for UBC.
Page  One Hundred  and  Thirty-two Varsity moves back on defence as Coquitlam roundballers attack.
UBC soccer squads thrive again
The University of British Columbia entered two
teams in the Vancouver and District Soccer League:
the Senior team, known as the Varsity Eleven, with
Don Petrie as captain; and the second club known
as UBC consisting of freshmen and a few stand-bys,
with Bob Robinson as captain.
Varsity's line-up included Emil Tautorus and
"Buck Benny", who began as Varsity's full-backs, but
after two months of fine play, left the University.
Don Petrie, captain of the Varsity Club, held the
position as a brilliant centre-half, coming to Varsity
from St. Saviours of the Coast League. Don is considered the best centre-half in the Vancouver V & D
League.
Herb Smith ably tended goal for Varsity, this
marking his fifth year with the team. Herbie is
ranked as one of the foremost goalies in the V & D
League.
Fred Hole started out the season at centre-forward,
but after Emil Tautorus left, Fred returned to his old
position as full-back. While at centre-forward, Fred
was Varsity's chief goal-getter.
Pat Campbell is playing his third season with the
Varsity team at inside right.
At Christmas the  Varsity team was  bolstered by
Top—Russ Bagan, Pat  Campbell
Centre—Roy   Corrigan,   George   Gamble
Bottom—Fred Hole, Bill King
Page One Hundred and Thirty-three Hedley Rowell
Herb  Smith
Don Yip
Top—Harry Bell-Irving,  Gil  Blair, Dave Comparelli.
Boo torn—Alex Cowie,  Hal Daykin,  Chuck  Dowding.
It's three against one,   but here goes  nothing.
Page  One Hundred and Thirty-four . . . Varsity XI gets oranges at half time while the coach bellows.
BUI McKay
Don  Petrie
three service men who added much to team power and
play: Dave Bremner, Dale Mathers and Bill MacKay.
The UBC eleven lineup included: Wilson, Gil Blair,
Con Miller, Bob Robinson, Gord Smetanuk, Hec Ros-
setti, Maury Isenor, Hal Daykin, Reg Murfitt, Harry
Bell-Lrving, Alex Cowie, Ken Medland, Alex Jones,
Chuck Dowding, Murray Wiggins, Pete Runkle and
Norm Pickles.
As managers of the soccer club Bill King was
senior manager, and Dave Comparelli as associate, deserve much praise in their notable success with the
teams. The faculty of the University was represented
by Dr. Todd.
Ken Medland, Con Miller
Norm   Pickles,   Bob   Robinson
Hec Rosetti, Bob Wilson
. Page   One  Hundred  and  Thirty-five UBC Thunderbees—Bob Estey (Mgr.); Pete McGeer, Ingie Edwards, Bud Huyck, Ches Pedersen; Jim Bryant, Vic Vaughan,
Bill Nelson and Dave King.
Thunderbees lose out in finals . . •
Somewhat overshadowed this year by the Intermediate A Frosh squad going over their heads into
Senior A company, the Varsity Senior B hoopers, the
"Thunderbees," still managed to play some excellent
basketball, and completed a fairly successful season.
Coach Vic Pinchin did an excellent job of moulding the few players available into a smooth working
team, capable of upholding the high standards set
by other varsity Senior B teams in former years.
The team got off to a good start by whipping North
Shore and Stacys in their first two games, but their
win streak was snapped when Higbies gave them a
taste of what was to come when they handed the UBC
boys a close defeat in their third game.
Although the students were in fine form throughout
the finals they were definitely outclassed by the rival
outfit.
In the first game the Higbie quintet completely
stopped Varsity's McGeer, who was held to a single
point, while McDonaugh proved his worth by garnering a total of 10 points. Final score of the game was
34-28.
McGeer came back with seven points in the second
game to lead the students in a determined comeback.
They started off well with a six-point lead at the
quarter time mark, and a two-point lead at the half,
but in the last half of the game the Higbie zone defence started to click and the students' long shots became decidedly inaccurate, with the result that Higbies won, 37-32.
After Christmas the team received a much needed
boost in the manpower brackets with the addition of
six-foot Ches Pederson as an extra pivot man.
The play throughout the season continued in much
the same way, with the Varsity team demonstrating a
definite superiority over North Shore and Stacys, but
losing consistendy to the Higbie squad.   This did not
Page One Hundred and Thirty-six Jerry Stevenson
Fred   Bossons
BUI Fenn
spoil the sport, however, as some extremely close
games were played.
In the playoffs the Thunderbees romped through
the North Shore squad in two straight games, and
went on to cop the semi-final from Stacys by lopsided scores.
The Varsity team now met the Higbie squad, who
were considerably improved by the addition of ex-
senior league player, Earl McDonaugh.
The Thunderbees started like champions in the
third tilt, piling up an eight-point lead in the first
quarter. As usual they faded as the going got tougher,
however, and by three-quarter time their lead was
down tp one slim point.
In the last quarter the teams traded basket for basket in some of the best Senior B play of the season,
but Earl McDonaugh again proved his value to the
Higbie crew by sinking a free shot with seconds to go
to give them the game and championship with a one-
point edge in a 39-38 score.
Hero of the game for Varsity was "Wild Bill"
Hooson, with a 12-point total.
Worthy of special note was Bill Hooson, who
not only contributed more than his share of points,
but kept the games lively with his consistent clowning.
Other members of the team were: Vic Vaughan,
Dave King, Ches Pederson, Ted Huyck, Ingy Edwards,
Bill Nelson, Reg Racine, Jim Bryant and Jack Climie.
Players and spectators mix it up in the Ole Bakken-Pop Pay incident of the Pat Bay game.    That's Bakken's shoulder in the
middle and Sandy Robertson standing above with Gremlins  Irwin Stout and Ian McKeachie to the right.
Page One Hundred and Thirty-seven Daynard Welsh and Dave Griffiths
UBC Thunderbugs—Pete McGeer  (Coach);  Daynard Welsh, Chuck Wright, Dave
Griffiths, Cliff Henderson; Jack Hough, Bill McLeod, Gardy Lade, Dave Rea
and Doug Davidson.
'Bugs cop Memorial Cup
One of this year's basketball cups came to UBC
from the Inter B division of the league. The Thunderbugs finished off a very successful season in second place and although they could not win the Inter
B cup, they did the next best thing by bringing home
the Memorial Cup offered in an after-season schedule
amongst the teams not involved in the finals.
The squad started off the season in great style
taking two games from Higbies, who later ended the
season in first place.
Their good luck did not hold throughout the season, however, as the Varsity boys dropped several
encounters during the league play to end up behind
Higbies in the second spot.
The students received a rude shock in the semifinals, when the lowly Stacy quintet unloosed a surprising stretch drive, to swamp the Thunderbugs in
two straight encounters. Fortunately for the UBC
squad the season did not end with the series playoff,
and they were given a chance to redeem themselves.
The Memorial Cup was a different story, however,
Page One Hundred and Thirty-eight Gordy Lade
Doug Davidson
with the Blue and Gold quintet walking all over the
fighting Irish from Vancouver College in two straight
games in the final round.
Pete McGeer Avas the coach of the team in the
first year of Inter B ball for a Varsity squad. The
boys played great ball under his care throughout the
year and Varsity fans were justly proud of the squad.
The team was made up of Dave Rea, Gordie Lade,
Dave Griffiths, Chuck Wright, Cliff Henderson, Bill
McLeod, Daynard Welsh, Doug Davidson. Jack
Hough was the playing manager and although every
one filled his position well, Cliff Henderson and Doug
Davidson played great ball every game.
Jack Hough and Dave Rea
Chuck   Wright
Page One Hundred and Thirty-nine Taddy Knapp, Mary Ann Norton, Marj Watt, Sheila Weir, Louise Erwin,
Jean MacKinnon, Marie Somers, Jenny Rodenchuck, Jackie Sherman
Caging co-eds color maple courts . .
UBC entered two girls' teams in the cagette league
this year a Senior B team, and an Intermediate A
team.
The Seniors, coached by John Pryor, were fairly
successful in their league games and showed much
improved form at the end of the season. Captain and
manager Audrey McKim, playmaker Marge Watt,
veteran guard Helen Matheson, and freshette Marg
McGillivray were the outstanding players of the team.
The quintet finished off their season by a trip to Victoria where they went down 39-26 under a beating
from Victoria Uniteds.
The   Intermediate   team,   which   was   coached   by
senior Marge Watt and captained by Mary Ann Norton, was composed mostly of inexperienced freshettes
and did not have a very successful season as far as
games went, but were known throughout the city for
enthusiasm and good sportsmanship. Taddy Knapp
and Marie Summers formed the backbone of this
team. Marie substituted in the Seniors' Victoria game
as centre and came out high scorer.
As all the players except Helen Matheson will be
back on the courts next year, Varsity should field
more successful teams profiting by the experience
gained this year and led on by their undying
enthusiasm.
Fran AntUle dribbles . . . Audrey McKim shoots . . . Tough shot, but 13'* lucky.
Page One Hundred and Forty . . . Shades of Aginrourt, UBC's martial coeds.
•      •      .
Luckless males dodge arrows
The archery on the campus this year, although no
inter-university tournaments were held 4 suffered no
loss in enthusiasm shown by the coeds taking part.
These female counterparts of Robin Hood took
their archery once a week, instead of the "keep fit"
classes required of all physically fit coeds. They
could be seen almost any fine afternoon practising
their shots on the lawn just west of the Gym.
There were two tournaments held during the term,
one in the fall, and one in the spring, in which all the
women taking archery took part. There were handicaps allowed in order to equalize the competitors'
chances of making a high score.
Miss Moore corrects for poise.
William. Tell .  . . me who these girls are . . . I'll split the apple
Page One Hundred and Forty-one Ping pong champs rest.
U. B. C. runners score second triumph
Highlight of the year in the minor sports circles
was the rewinning of the Pacific Northwest Crosscountry Championship by UBC's cross-country team.
Earning a total of 27 points, the seven-man crew
easily defeated the Washington State College and
University of Washington stalwarts who gained second
and third places respectively.
It was the third annual cross-country meet for Spokane, the contest being sponsored by the Spokane
Athletic Round Table.
Ken McPherson, top-notch long distance runner at
UBC, repeated his performance of the previous year
by pulling down second spot again. The race was
won by Bob Lynn of Eastern Washington State
Teachers' College.
Running in a solid block until the final stretch,
UBC's seven-man team placed in the sixth, seventh,
eighth, ninth, tenth and twelfth spots. Cam Coady
led this group, followed by Bud McLeod, Bill Wood,
Harry Thompson, Don McKenzie and Gil Blair.
Cross  country team practises.
McPherson crosses the tape in front.
Page One Hundred and Forty-two Pubsters write story of massacre while council fumes.
.      .
Ice Hockey revived at U.B.C.
Much credit for the victory is due to Coach Maury
Van Vliet who trained the team and coached them on
to win their second straight victory for UBC. The
record shows well for the Blue and Gold, placing its
runners among the best on the continent.
Among the other minor sports were ice hockey and
badminton. Ice hockey made an attempt to regain
popularity at UBC this year as Ted Taylor, son of the
well-known Fred "Cyclone" Taylor, re-formed the
Ice Hockey Club and took over the Exhibition Forum
Intramural badminton champs pose for the photographer.
. . . Page One Hundred and Forty-three McGregor-Eadie  bowls  and Powell bats  to  bring  back memories  of summer   cricket   season.
every   Sunday   night   for   practices   and   exhibition
games.
The Badminton Club boasted a good-sized membership this year, the shuttlecock enthusiasts spend
ing many enjoyable nights in the UBC Gym during
the winter season.
Again this year, the University produced a well-
organized intramurall program which included all the
minor sports of volleyball, badminton, table tennis,
basketball, touch football, Softball and track.
Besides this, the Intramural League took over the
Y.M.C.A. swimming pool for one night in January
to stage their annual aquatic tournament. The
Kappa Sigma team took top honors this year.
All sports considered, it was a great year all-round
for both the major and minor sports and their
respective participants.
Carol Lewis, Audrey McKim, Marjory MacGillivray,   Colleen Brandon,   Fran Antille,
Helen Matheson, Yvonne French, Delphine Segur, Marg Watt
Page One Hundred and Forty-four Pudney Lines One Up While Watts and Henderson Look Critical
. . . Golfers plan big future
The Golf Club of the University of B.C., the only
Canadian College golf club which is able to continue
their matches all the year around, flourished this term,
with the largest membership for several years.
The number of active members rose to over thirty
this year and there was a greater competitive spirit
than has been shown for a long time, according to
the president of the club, Bill Watts.
There were other tournaments, such as the one with
the girls' club in the late fall, and then the climax of
the golfing year at U.B.C, which is the big tournament
in the Spring.
All the matches held under the auspices of the club
are handicap matches because of the very unequal
abilities of the players, and in this way they are made
much more interesting and fairer for all.
The faculty have a separate club under the presidency of Dr. Jennings, and they hold competitive
tournaments with the students at various times through
the year.
In pre-war years the team always looked forward
to a trip down to the States, sometimes as far as Los
Angeles. The club this year has similar ideas for the
next year's team, and hopes that some of the old
matches with the members of city clubs will be revived.
The president of the club this year was Bill Watts,
the secretary-manager, Pete Pudney.
Watch Pudney paste this one.
Page One Hundred and Forty-five Marg Hodgson, Ann Norton, Marg Watt,
Lorna     Lang,     Irene     Berto,     Helen
Matheson, Joan Stevens, Doreen Parks,
Jenny  Rodenchuck,   Ev   Wright,
Audrey Thomson, Irene Pearce
Stick wielders have successful season
"Action shots" of grass hockey squad.
Page One Hundred and Forty-six . . .
This past season has been one of the most successful
in its history for the U.B.C. women's grass hockey team.
The finals of the Lower Mainland Women's Grass
Hockey League have not yet been played at press
time, but the Varsity Seniors and the powerful Ex-
Kits team will battle it out for the cup within a couple
of weeks. Varsity's chances are not considered to be
very good, but the girls may surprise yet.
The Junior team, Composed mainly of Freshettes,
who are playing in the same league as the Seniors,
have made an exceptionally fine showing and are holding down fourth place. Marie Somers is the captain
of this energetic junior bunch.
Both teams have been coached by former hockey
player, Helen Matheson, who has done an excellent
job with the good material available.
From a very fine collection of individual players,
Doreen Parks, right wing, stands out as one of the
stars of the year. It is due to Doreen that the U.B.C.
team have come out where they have in the league.
Other outstanding players on the team include: Marge
Watt, Freshette Award winner, and center-forward of
last year's team; Barbara Greene, right inner; Jennie
Rodenchuck, left halfback; and Margaret Hodgson,
manager of the team.
This is the first year during the war that the girls
have had many of their first team return. Chris  Tripp, Norm Denkman, John Frazee, Allan Freeze,   Chuck Wright, Ross Kerr, Harry Castilloux, Pete Graham,
Grant   Larkin
Rowers splash to hollow victories
Rowing, considered to be one of the most exacting
sports in the world, had a good following at U.B.C.
this year with over twenty scullers turning out for
training.
The regular schedule includes a two-hour workout
every Tuesday and Sunday. Accelerated training for
the Junior Varsity crew resulted in a four-day-a-week
bout with the "muddy Fraser".
All repair and maintenance work is done by members of the club. This season a new stove was installed
and one of the two nine-man shells has been scraped
Club Executive are: Norm Denkman, president and
coach; John Frazee, vice-president; Dave Morgan,
secretary-treasurer; Harry Castillou, manager and
Tuesday crew captain; Al Freeze, Sunday crew captain, and Edo Morozzoco, house manager.
The Junior Varsity Crew include: Norm Denkman,
Chuck Wright, Earl Butterworth, Dave Morgan, Chris
Tripp, Bill Ross, John Frazee, Harry Castillou, Al
Freeze and Ross Kerr.
Disturbing the peace on the banks of the Fraser at an ungodly hour Sunday morning.
. . . Page One Hundred and Forty-seven
/'
/ Bigger and Better Ski Club
Varsity Ski Club went in for a gala year during the
1944-45 season and with a total membership of 105
members, they followed the Outdoor Club's lead to
expand. The Varsity skiers went the Outdoor Clubbers
one better as they obtained a new cabin on Hollyburn
Ridge.
The Club held its own ski tournament on February
18 on Dam Mountain, and a freshman, Bill Howard,
copped top honors. Arnie Teasdale placed second, and
Walt Roots and Jerry Lockhart followed in the third
and fourth positions.
Varsity skiers also did well in many of the Viskie
and other local tournaments which were held on the
North Shore Slopes during the season.
Outdoor Club climbs mountains . . .
Varsity's Outdoor Club enjoyed one of its most
active seasons in U.B.C. history during 1944 and 1945.
With an over-capacity membership of 70, the Club
has maintained a year-round program.
A great number of new members were welcomed
into V.O.C ranks in the fall, and the Club added a
room to its cabin on Grouse. Seventy-four climbers
made the fall trip to the Lions. With favorable weather,
23 persons successfully scaled the west head. Other
hikes included Crown, Camel and Goat Mountains.,
The Outdoor Club instituted a climbing school during the season, and under the capable coaching of
Fred Roots, members learned the thrill of rock-work
on the cliffs of Flint and Feather Mountains.
A ski-mountaineering trip during the Christmas
holidays has become an annual event for the V.O.C,
and this year the scene was shifted from Garibaldi
Park to farther fields.
In spite of a light year for snow, the cabin bulged
with V.O.C. members every week-end.
The executive of the Outdoor Club includes: Harvey
Parliament, president; Lulla Ireland, vice-president;
Fred Roots, secretary-treasurer; Bill Nicolson, mar-
shall; and Joan Stevens, archivist.
Page One Hundred and Forty-eight 1. Ski meet on. Hollyburn. 2. Tantalus from Garibaldi. 3. Peak of Tantalus. 4. On the trail to
Garibaldi, 5. Crevasse on Garibaldi Glacier. 6. Lesson one — climbing school. 7. Camp on
Garibaldi,    ft. On top of West Lion.   9. "Black Tusk".    10 One reason for mountain climbing.    11.
V.O.C. Cabin.    12. "Land's End".
. . Page One. Hundred and Forty-nine  UNDERGRADUATES   *
i Sidney Flavelle,  Terry Julian, Anne  Brown
Combined Executive does big job .
Arts Juniors and Seniors combined this year to
elect to their executive: Prof. A. Maslow as honorary
president; Gordy Campbell as president; Terry Julian as treasurer; Anne Brown as secretary; Sidney
Flavelle as vice-president, and Doug Clarke as
marshal.
Sidney Flavelle took over as president when Gordon Campbell left Varsity at Christmas.
Setting the standard for the whole university,
these two classes helped to make such events as
Homecoming, Fall Ball, ISS Week, and the Red
Cross Ball all successes.
On the Students' Council, third and fourth year
were represented by Junior Member Allan Ainsworth, LSE President Gordy Bertram, WUS  Presi
dent Barbara Greene, and WAA President Lois Reid.
Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey J. T. Scott acted as
ex-officio member on the Council, and kept it and
the campus in touch with each other through the
varsity paper.
Mussoc President Elinor Haggart was the moving
spirit behind the successful presentation of the
"Gondoliers," which included in the cast Alice Ston-
house and Irene Kennedy. Ted English filled the
leading executive position in the Players' Club.
Inter-Fraternity Council President Don Newson
and Pan-Hellenic President Mary Francis Trumbull
co-ordinated fraternity and sorority efforts together
and produced the most successful Red Cross Ball to
date.
Aggies All
Bryant And Bashful Bunny
Page One Hundred and Fifty-two ARTS    '45
ADUTT, PETER S.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English and History;   Musical  Society
AFFLECK, EDWARD L.—Vancouver
Honours   in   Chemistry;   Players   Club
AIREY, FRANCES M.—Vancouver
Honours   in   Bacteriology;
Alpha Omicron Pi;   Ski Club
ALMAS,   GABRIEL— Vancouver
Maj.,   Chemistry,   Min.,   Mathematics
ANDERSON,   ELIZABETH   M.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Sociology,  Min.,  Psychology;   Alpha  Omicron   Pi
APPLEBY, LYON H. T.—Vancouver
Maj., Zoology, Min., Chemistry
ARMSTRONG,  KENNETH  S.—Vancouver
Honours in Mathematics;  Delta Upsilon
ASHTON,  HARRY  E.—Vancouver
Honours in  Chemistry
ATTREE, RICHARD  W. A.—Queen's Bay
Honours in Chemistry;  Musical Society
AUBREY, JUNE L.—Vancouver
Maj., English and History; Phrateres, Outdoor Club,
BARRACLOUGH, W.  EDWARD -Nanaimo
Maj., Zoology, Min.,  Biology and Botany;
Biological  Discussion  Club;   Badminton
BAUMBRAUGH,   EDNA   D.—Vernon
Maj.,   English,  Min.,   History
BEHNSEN, THELMA A.—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology,  Min., Philosophy and  English
BERTRAM,  GORDON  W.—Vancouver
Honours  in  Economics;   Sigma  Tau  Chi;
President of LSE, Letters  Club, Economics  Qub
BLOCH, INEZ— Vancouver
Maj., Bacteriology, Min., Zoology and Chemistry
BLOOM, MARTHA M.—Sointula
Maj.,   English   and   Psychology;   Ubyssey
BOOTHBY, HORTENSE J.—Mission City
Maj.,  Chemistry,  Min., Physics
BOYD,  ALAN  W.—Vancouver
Honours  in  Chemistry;. Mathematics  Club
BROWN, EDWARD G.—Vancouver
Maj.,   English,   Min.,   Philosophy,   Economics
BURNETT,   BRUCE  K.—New   Westminster
Maj.,  Zoology;   Beta  Theta  Pi
CALAM, A.  MARGARET—New   Westminster
Honours in Bacteriology
CAMPBELL,  GORDON—Medicine  Hat,  Alberta
Honours in Sociology;  Beta Kappa Pi;   Glee Qub
CAMPBELL, NORA V.—Vancouver
Teachers Training;  Varsity Christian Fellowship
CARLISLE,  SHEILA  J.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Psych.,   Min.,   Sociol.;   Phrateres,   Psych.
Club,  Soc.  Prob.   Qub;   Swimming,   Skiing
CHATWIN,  MARY  K.—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology, Min., Sociology; Alpha Gamma Delta;
Phrateres,  Student  Christian  Movement;   Secretary of WUS
CHERNIAVSKY, JOHN  R.—Vancouver
Maj., English, Min., Greek; Tennis, Golf, Cricket
CHRISTIE, HUGH G.—Vancouver
Maj., Sociology, Min., Economics
CHURCH, JOHN  S.—Victoria
Honours  in  History;   Historical  Society
Page One Hundred and Fifty-three ARTS   '45
CLARK, DOUGLAS P.—Vancouver
Honours  in  History;   Historical  Society
CLEMENT, C. JAMES—Kelowna
Theology;   1st  Vice-President of Parliamentary Forum
CLINE,   RICHARD   E.    Vancouver
Maj.,   Hist.,   Min.,   French;   Swim.,   Basketball
COADY,  CAMPBELL  ].—Vancouver
Maj.,   Bacteriology,   Min.,  Zoology;
Phi   Kappa   Pi;   Football,   Rugby,   Track
COLCLOUGH, JOHN R— Vancouver
Maj., Chemistry
COLE, KATHLEEN  M.—Hollyburn
Maj.,   Biology  and   Mathematics;   Musical   Society
CRAIG, MARIE I.   New Westminster
Social Service
CROLL, MARGARET F.—Vancouver
Hon. Math.;   Alpha Delta Pi;  Out. Club
DALRYMPLE, SUZANNE I.—Vancouver
Maj., French  and  English,  Min., History
DOYLE, IRENE V.—Trail
Maj.,   Math,   and   Physics;   Psych.   Club;   Badminton
EDWARDS,   BETH   E.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Chem.,  Eng.    Phrat.;   V'ball,  Baseball
EMBREE,  WILLIAM  H.—Kamloops
Hon. Chem.;  Mus. Soc.;  Bad., T. Tennis
ENGLISH, H. EDWARD—Victoria
Hon.  Econ.;  Beta Theta Pi;  Players Club
Pari.  Forum;   Golf,  Badminton;   President  Players  Club
EVANS, ELIZABETH—Roberts Creek
Maj., Economics and English;  Glee Club
Treasurer   of   Students   Christian   Movement
FALK, WILLIAM—Vancouver
Hon.  Zool.;   Monro  Pre-Med  Club;   Golf,  Ten.
FARRELL,   KATHLEEN   W.— Vancouver
Maj., Econ., Min., Hist.; Kappa Kappa Gam.
FERGUSON, WALTER H.—Ladysmith
Maj., Geography, Min., History;  Badminton
FISCHER, JOAN G.—Vancouver
Maj., Psych and Phil.;  Alpha Phi, Delta Sigma  Pi;
Phrateres;   Badminton
GALLIE, NORMAN P.—Rossland
Maj., Mathematics and Physics
GORDY, JOHN—Kimberley
Honours in Chemistry
GREENE, BARBARA H.—Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Min., English;  Alpha Gamma Delta
GREIG, M. NINA—Victoria
Maj.,  English  and  Psychology
GURVITZ,   MARCIA   R.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Bac,  Min.,  Chemistry
HAMILTON,  J.  KELIN -Vancouver
Maj.,   Chem.,  Zool.;   Monro   Pre-Med   Club
HATTER, JAMES—Lake  Cowichan
Honours  in  Zoology;   President  of  Biol.  Discussions
HILLIER, CHESLEY R.— Vancouver
Honours in Chemistry;  Phi Kappa Sigma;
Ski Club;  Bowling, Skiing
HODGSON,  MARGARET A.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Bac, Zool.;  Alpha  Delta  Pi;   Out.  Club
HOOD,   MARJORIE   H.—Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Phil.;  Alpha Phi;
Phrateres,  Executive of Phrateres
■Tough  experiment.
Time out for coffee.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-four . ARTS    '45
HUCKERBY,   FANNIE   M.—Kennedy,  Saskatchewan
Maj., History, Min., Geography
HUYCK, EDWARD B.—Ottawa, Ontario
Maj.,   Philosophy,  Min.,  Sociology
INCH, BEATRICE E.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English,  Min.,  History;
Alpha   Gamma   Delta;   Grass   Hockey
IRELAND,   ALDYTHE   M.—Armstrong
Maj.,   Eng.,   French;   Outdoor   Club;
Skiing,   Swimming
IRWIN, WINNIFRED  M.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English  and  History;   Musical  Society
JOHNSEN,  HANS  P.  E.—Rossland
Maj.,  History,  Min.,  English
JONES, MYRTLE M.—Cranbrook
Maj.,   Psychology,  Min.,  Philosophy
JONES,  NETTA—Victoria
Maj., English, Min., History
JULIAN, TERENCE S.—New Westminster
Maj., History, Min., English;  Phi Gamma Delta;
Treasurer of Arts Undergraduate Society
KANWISCHER,   FREDERICK—Vancouver
Maj., Zoology,  Min., Bac;  Varsity Christian Fel.
KAZUN,  WALTER  ^.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Zool.,  Min.,  Chemistry;   Monro  Pre-Med
KEEVES, MOIRA M.—Port Alberni
Maj.,   Mathematics   and   Geography
KENDALL,  MARIE  J.-Vancouver
Maj.,  Bacteriology and Chemistry;   Outdoor Club
KENNEDY, IRENE M.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English,  Min.,  French;   Musical  Society
KENNY,  DOUGLAS— Victoria
Maj.,  Psychology
KETCHEN, KIETH S.—Vancouver
Honours  in Zoology;   Track
K1NNAIRD,  ELLEN  A.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Psychology,   Min.,   Sociology
KIRKPATRICK, SHEILA W.—Vancouver
Social  Service;   Alpha  Delta  Pi
KURTH,  BURTON   0.— Vancouver
Honours in Eng. and Hist.;  Letters Club,
History  Society,  President  of  Letters  Qub
LAWRENCE,  BLAIR  G.— Vancouver
Maj., Zoology, Min., Psychology
LEES,  SYLVIA  A.—Vancouver
Maj.,   English,   Min.,  History
LEITH,  ANNA  R.—Vancouver
Honours in Bacteriology;  Menorah Society
LIDDELL, RUTH B.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Eng.,   Min.,   Phil.,   Psych.;   Badminton
LIVINGSTON,   GERTRUDE   H.— Vancouver
Maj.,  Eng.  and  Hist.;   Gamma  Phi  Beta
LOTZKAR, EVA— Vancouver
Maj., Bacteriology, Min., Zoology
LOWTHER, ROY A.—Britannia Beach
Honours  in  Psychology and  Philosophy;   Social
Problems Club, S.C.M.,  Ubyssey
LYONS, NANCY-LOU—Powell River
Maj.,  Eng.;   Alpha  Omicron  Pi;   Mus.  Society
MAGEE, WILLIAM II.—New Westminster
Honours   in   English   and   History
Relaxing at a frat formal.
Sciencemen  perhaps?
Page One Hundred and Fifty-five ARTS   '45
MANSON, MARION H.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English;   Gamma  Phi  Beta
MANSON, NICOL B.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Geography,  Min.,  Mathematics
MAUNSELL,   CHARLES   D.—Victoria
Honours  in  Mathematics  and  Physics
MAYO,  ELEANOR G.—Vancouver
Honours  in   Math,  and  Physics
MERRY, MARGARET G.—Victoria
Maj., Zoology, Min.,  Bacteriology;
Outdoor Club, Monro Pre-Med Club, Phrateres
MITCHELL,  JAMES  G— Vancouver
Honours  in  English;   Letters  Club
MORAN, JOHN W.—Vancouver
Maj., Econ., Math.; Kappa Sigma; PI. Club; Golf
McBAY,   ROBERT   R.—Vancouver
Maj.,   English   and   History;    Swimming
McCABE, M. MARGARET— Vancouver
Maj., Chem.;  Alpha Omicron Pi;  Monro Pre-Med Qub
McGHEE, MARGARET G.—Port Alice
Maj., Psych., Min., Soc. and Phil.;  Delta Gamma
McGREGOR,  GEORGE  A.—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology; Golf
MacKENZIE,  J.  CONRAD— Vancouver
Maj., Zool., Min., Chem.; Alpha Delta Phi;
Newman;   Track
McLAREN, ADA L.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Zool.,  Min.,  Biol.,  Bot.;   Psych.   Club,  Phrateres,
Intra-Murals,  4th  year  Manager  of  Intra-Murals
MacLEOD, MARGARET H.—Vancouver
Maj., Eng., Min.,  Psych.;   Gamma Phi;   Mus.  Society
MacLEOD,  P.  ARNOLD—Vancouver
Maj.,  Eng...  Min.,  Hist,  and  Philosophy
McPHERSON.  BARBARA—PWouver
Maj., French;   German
McPHERSON, HUGH J.—Vancouver
Maj., History,  Min., English
NALOS,  ERIKA   M.—Vancouver
Honours in  Latin  and  English;   Musical  Society
NEY,  PHYLLIS  W—Vancouver
Maj.,  Chem.,  Min.,  Bacteriology;   Phrateres
NICKERSON, ARA  S.-Vancouver
Maj.,   Eng.   and   Hist.,   Min.,   Philosophy
NORRIS,  MARY  F.—Vancouver
Maj., Bacteriology
O'NEILL, JOHN J.—Kimberley
Maj.,   Chemistry,   Min.,   Zoology
ORE,  ELIZABETH J.—Port Alice
Maj.,   Math,   and   Eng.;   Psychology  Qub
OSTLE,   BERNARD—Vancouver
Honours   in   Math.;   Phi   Kappa   Sigma;
Mathematics Club;  Badminton, Tennis
PALMER,  RUSSELL— Vancouver
Maj.,  Zoology,  Min.,  Chemistry;   Zeta  Psi
PARKER, DOUGLAS G.—New Westminster
Honours  in  Psychology  and  Philosophy
PEARCE, IRENE  S.—New  Westminster
Social   Service;   Outdoor   Club;   Grass   Hockey
PILMER,  MARGARET—Victoria
Maj.,   Economics
Death to the interloper!
PhUosophical   Discussion?
Page One Hundred and Fifty-six ARTS    '45
PITTS, HARRY— Vancouver
Maj., Zoology, Min., Psychology;  Phi Delta Theta
PRIDHAM, JEAN  C—Creston
Maj.,  French,   English;   Students   Christian   Movement
PRITCHARD,  PHYLLIS   E.—Victoria
Maj.,   Bacteriology   and  Zoology.
PRONGER,  IVY  R.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Fr.,   Eng.;   Alpha   Gamma   Delta;
Phrateres,  Soc.  Ser.,  Phrateres  Chairman
QUAN, MARY— Vancouver
Honours in English;  Chinese Students Club, Letters Club;
Badminton; Chinese Stu. Qub Pres., Sec.-Treas Letters Club
QUEBEC,  MONA  B.  G.—Vancouver
Maj., Eng., Min., Phil., French;  Alpha Gamma Delta
RICHARDSON, S. LEEDS—Port Alice
■ Maj.,  History,  Min.,  English
ROBINSON,   JOYCE   M.—Mt.   Lehman
Maj.,   Chem.,   Physics;   Outdoor   Club
ROBINSON, ROBERT J.—New  Westminster
Maj., Math., Min., Physics;  Physics Club;  Soccer
RODGERS,  M.  JOAN—Vancouver
Maj.,  Bacteriology  and  Chemistry;   Delta  Gamma
SCHWABE,   MIRIAM   F.—Victoria
Maj.,  Econ.,  Min.,  Eng.;   Gamma  Phi;   Skiing
SCOTT, JOHN  T.—Vancouver
Maj., Phil., Min„ Psych.; Phi Delta Theta
Editor-in-Chief  of  Publications  Board
SHORT, JOHN  W.—Vancouver
Honours  in  Economics;   Kappa  Sigma;   Newman  Club
SMELLIE, ELSIE L.—Vancouver
Honours  in  French
SMITH,  BARBARA A.—Victoria
Kappa  Alpha   Theta;   Swimming,   Tennis
SMITH,  P.  ANNE— Vancouver
Maj., Psych.;  Gamma Phi Beta
STALEY, RUTH M.—Calgary, Alberta
Maj., English, Min., Psych.;   Psych.  Club, Mus.  Society
STAMATIS, D.  PATRICIA— Vancouver
Maj.,  Psych., Min.,  Eng;   Alpha  Omicron  Pi
STEWART,  ANNE  M.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Psych   and   English;   Gamma   Phi   Beta
STEWART,  ROSEMARY  G.—England
Honours  in  Economics;   Letters Club,
Econ.  Club, IRAC
STONHOUSE, ALICE H.—Vancouver
Maj., Eng., Hist., Min., Phil.; Alpha Gamma Delta;
Mus.   Soc,   Varsity   Christian   Fellowship,   Phrateres
STRAIGHT,  BYRON  W.—Vancouver
Honours in Math.;   Phi Gamma Delta
SUTHERLAND,   HERBERT   W.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Physics,  Min.,  Math.;   Physics  Society
SUTTON,   DOUGLAS   M.—Vancouver
Maj.,   Econ.,   Min.,  German;   Radio   Soc.
THOMAS, WALLACE ].—Vancouver
Maj.,  Chemistry,  Min.,  Psychology
THOMPSON, WILLIAM B.—Vancouver
Honours  in   Mathematics  and  Physics
TIERNEY,  LETITIA  M.—Vancouver
Maj.,   History,   Economics;    Newman   Club
TRUMBULL, MARY FRANCES— Vancouver
Maj.,   English,   Min.,   Economics;
Kappa Kappa  Gamma
Panton's Pooches
A Young Man's Fancy
Page One Hundred and Fifty-seven ARTS   '45
TUFTS, AILEEN  M.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English,  History,  Min.,  Philosophy;   Delta  Gamma
VAN  de  PUTTE,  L.—Alder grove
Maj.,  English,  Math;   Alpha  Omicron  Pi;   Mus.  Soc.
VAN  GOKDER, C. JULIA— Vancouver
Maj.,  Eng.,  Phil.,  Min.,  Soc;   Phrateres
President   of   Phrateres,   Letters   Club
VINCENT,  VIVIAN  A.   Chilcotin
Maj.,   Psych.,   Min.,   Soc;   Psych.   Qub,
International   Relations   Qub,   Ubyssey
WAINWRIGHT, JOHN W.-Canoe
Honours  in  Chemistry;   Musical   Society
WALLACE, WILLIAM }.—Vancouver
Honours in  Chemistry;   Chemistry  Society
WALTHER, GARTH h.—Victoria
Maj.,   Biology   and   Zoology
WALTON,  M.  ELIZABETH—Bralorne
Maj., Hist., Eng.;  Alpha Phi;  Basketball
WATSON, CAROL R.— Victoria
Maj., English and Physics
WEEKS, DONALD }.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English and  History;   Newman  Club
WENER,  ROBERT  A.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Zoology,   Min.,   Chemistry
WHITE,  ELEANOR  J.—Vancouver
Maj.,  English,  Min.,  Economics;
Gamma Phi Beta
WHITE,  LOIS A.—Vancouver
Maj., English, Min.,  Economics;   Gamma  Phi  Beta
WHITE, RUTH I..—Vancouver
Honours   in   French;   Alpha   Omicron   Pi;   Phrateres
WHITTEMORE,   THOMAS   E.  -Victoria
Honours   Math.,   Physics;   Math.   Club,
Physics   Club,   President   Math.   Ciuu
WILLIAMS,  W.  JAMES— Vancouver
Maj.,  Chem.,  Phys.;   S.C.M.,  Chem.  Soc.
WILSON,  MARGARET  M.- Vancouver
Maj.,  Zoology,  Min.,  Biology;   Mus.   Society,  Phrateres
WITHLER, FREDERICK C—Boston Bar
Honours   in  Zoology;   Biol.   Discussions  Club
WOOD, JUANITA E.—Vancouver
Honours  in   Bacteriology
WYATT,  GERARD  R.—Victoria
Honours in Zoology
YARD, W.  EDWARD—Vancouver
Honours  in  Philosophy  and  Sociology
YEASTING,  ALICE  M.— Vancouver
Maj.,   Economics,   Min.,   English
YIP, CECIL E.—Vancouver
Maj., Physics,  Min.,  Math.;   Chi.  Stu.  Club
Math.  Club,  Physics Club,  Radio  Society
REID, LOIS C—Vancouver
Red  Cross  Corp.,  V.C.F.,  Pres.  WAA
BEALE, MARG. F.— Vancouver
Maj., English, History; Kappa Alpha Theta
MUSFELT, IOLA W.—Vancouver
Honours in Zool.;  Alpha Omicron Pi;  Biol. Dis. Club
BENNET,  ANNE—Vancouver
Maj.,  Psychology;   Alpha  Gamma  Delta
McLEISH, SHEILA  A.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Economics;   Alpha Gamma Delta
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Do You Take Chem. Too?
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Page One Hundred and Fifty-eight ARTS    '46
AINSWORTH, ALLAN H.
AJELLO, ERIC A.
ANDERSON, K. JOYCE
AXFORD, PATRICIA J.
BALDWIN, WILLIAM F. G.
BALL, MARIAN
BARTHOLOMEW, M. YVONNE
BARTON, GEORGE M.
BEECH, EMMA L.
BEGERT, H. KENDALL
BELTON, NANCY K.
BIRMINGHAM,  W.  P.
BISHOP, FRANCIS L.
BLUNDEN, C. M. DENIS
BORDEN, JANE L.
BORGERSON,  M.  PATRICIA
BRINE, RALPH H.
BROCKMAN, A.  MacKENZIE
BROWN, E. ANN
BROWN, MARTIN L.
BRYER, EDITH M.
BUCHANAN, AUDREY J.
BULGER, T. D. CLEMENT
BULLEN,  CHARLES F.
BUNKER, JACQUELINE L.
CALDER, SHEILA H.
CAMPBELL, ANNETTE  V.  L.
CANTY, J. LESLIE
Street   car  strike  hits  the  "cafj
Tickets,  please.
. . Page One Hundred and Fifty-nine ARTS    '46
CARRE, HILARY M.
CARROTHERS, ALFRED W. R.
CARTER,  PHILIP  A.
CHENOWETH,  PATRICIA   M.
CHU, DODD Q.
CLARKE,  JOAN  L.
CLERKSON, ALICE
COLQUHOUNJ.  LENORE
COPP, MARION E.
CREASE, AUDREY  A.
CULTER,  BARBARA  A.
DALAWRAK,  ELSIE   E.
DARLING, JOHN  G.
DAVY, I. SHEILA
DeBECK, BETSY ANNE
DeBECK, MYRA E.
DEWDNEY, PAMELA R.
DONE, DOROTHY M.
DUNDAS,  MARION  I.
EDMONDS,  MILDRED
EWING, FRANCES M.
FERGUSON, MARION A.
FLAVELLE,  SIDNEY  S.
GARRARD, M.  B. AUDREY
FRANCIS,  M.  DAVID
CILLIS, JOHN G.
GRANT,  PHYLLIS  F.
HAMILTON, JOAN M.
Whats   cooking?
Photog   Grover  smiles.
Page One Hundred and Sixty . ARTS    '46
HARDY, RUTH E.
HARMAN, JOYCE A.
HARRIS, BETTY H.
HARRIS, M. JULIENNE
HENDERSON, BARBARA M.
HENDERSON, CLARENCE R.
HENDERSON, J. NEIL
HICKEY, GORDON R.
HICKS, ROGER B.
HOLMS, DONALD L.
HULFORD, EDWARD J.
JARDINE, JUDITH
JOHNSON, CAROLINE L.
JONES, ARTHUR F.
JONES, ELVET  G.
KATZNELSON, EDITH
KEAST, RUSSELL R.
KENNEDY, JOHN S.
KILLAS, KOSTA J.
KING, E. ILENE N.
KLOPP, THOMAS A.
LANG, FRANK A.
LAZAREFF, ANNE E.
LEE, ROSEMARY
LINDOW, MAXINE L.
LOWRIE, DAVID A.
MAH, EVA
MANZER,  NOBEL  R.
All This Because Of 4% Cents
Page One Hundred and Sixty-one ARTS    '46
MARGACH, JOHN A.
MARTIN, MURIEL E.
MARTINSON, MURIEL E.
MATHESON,  BETTY  JANE
MORESBY, WILLIAM J.
MORRIS, PHILIP A.
MORTON, KENNETH S.
MOYLS, F. DAVID
MURPHY, J. BARNEY
McDONALD, ISABEL G.
McCONNELL, JOHN A.
McDOUGALL, DONALD N.
MacEWEN, JOHN A.
MACFARLANE, ALLAN A. J.
McINTOSH, PHYLLIS J.
MacLAREN,  NANCY  A.
McLENNAN, H. ANN
McLEOD, DOREEN L.
McLEOD, HUGH N.
McMARTIN, DONALD C.
McNaughton, Robert h. f-
nager, dorothy d.
nichols, dorothy i.
nielson, alfreda m.
nickells, robert g.
norton, mary a. j.
noble, john g.
oben, dorothy j.
aft.AA'    '*mTXm^m\    ^E^HHL.^
ll mmmm       J - H
Remember The Strike?
and  Thumbing
Page One Hundred and Sixty-two ARTS    '46
OLLIVER, JOHN F.
OZEROFF, MICHAEL J.
PALLAS, ETHEL
PARKER,  MARGARET  J.
PEDLOW, KENNETH D.
PETERSON, NANCY F.
PHILLIPS, JACQUELYN N.
PIDERMAN, RENE  J.
PITMAN, NANCY M. A.
PROWD, LAWRENCE W.
PUDNEY, PETER H.
REID, JUNE  C.
RIPLEY, MARY E.
ROBERTSON, JAMES H.
ROBSON,  MARITA H.
ROSS, A.  ELIZABETH
ROSS, WINONA P.
ROTHSTEIN, MORTON
ROULSTON, ALINE M.
RUMSEY, JANE S.
SAGER, S. MURRAY
SANFORD, MALCHIA
SAUNDERS, MARYBETH
SAVARD, DAISY J. I.
SCHULZ, GODFREY
SCOTT, ROY
SHIELDS, LORNA M.
SIEMENS, ABRAHAM W.
Wood And Turko Compete
Can't Even Carry His Own Books
Page  One  Hundred and Sixty-three ARTS    '46
SILVER, LORNA M.
SIMPSON,  CARL
SINCLAIR, JEAN G.
SINCLAIR, JEAN L.
SKIPSEY, J. LESLIE
SMART, CATHERINE J.
SMITH, DOROTHY B.'
STACEY, IRIS
STACEY, MAY
STAMATIS, JOHN T.
STANDEVEN, RITA D.
STEWART, ROSS
STOKES, JOHN W.
STONE, DOROTHY I.
STOWE, NORMA M.
STRACHAN, JESSIE
SYRETT, JOHN H.
THOMAS, BLODWEN
THOMPSON, ANITA J.
"    THOMPSON,  S.   ELIZABETH
TOURTELOTTE, ALICE R.
TRYON, MURIEL J.
TUFTELAND, JACK W.
TURNBRIDGE,  MARJORIE  A
URQUHART, DOREEN B.
VANTREIGHT, ELSIE E.
VEEBERG, RUTH E.
WALDEN,  PHYLLIS  S.
_.
Buzz Mugs
Through These Portals
Page One Hundred and Sixty-four . , ARTS    '46
WATT, NANCY W.
WATTS, WILLIAM B.
WEBER, RONALD J.
WHITE,  P.  BRIDGET
WHITE, PATRICK C. T.
WHITE, ROY
WOOD, ROBIN L.
WOODLAND,  ARTHUR   G.
WOODWARD, FAITH M.
WORTH, HELEN C.
WRAGG, LAURENCE E.
YOUNG,  DIANA R.
HEBB, MARION C.
NAY, MARJORIE A.
Heavenly   daze   .   .   .   We   don't   like
photogs   .   .   .  Happy  little  threesome
.   .   .   Waiting for  a  street  car  .   .   .
What's the joke?  . . . Six dogs.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-five 1,
1
■   !
t
1
5             1
Campus strangers one year and superior sophomores the next year . . . that is the class of Arts '47.
Proud of their new found maturity, Arts '47 has
moved into the hallowed ranks of UBC undergrads,
and have done their share in all fields, scholastic,
athletic, cultural and executive.
On the sports front the sophomores outdid themselves with Ken McPherson leading the UBC crosscountry team on to its second straight victory in
Spokane.    Ed Ryan, Ron Weber and Reg Clarkson
all hit the high spots with the Thunderbirds, while
Keith MacDonald and Gerry Jenvy showed up well
with the rugby team. Co-eds also held up their end
on the athletic field.
Our own Totem claimed the services of three
sophomores, chief of whom was John Green, who
edited the year book, with the addition of only a
few grey hairs. Bill Stewart, associate editor, gave
Green capable assistance with his strong right arm,
while Nancy Macdonald simply assisted.
For the executive of WUS, second-year women
chose Mary Dolmage to represent them, while Audrey Jutte acted as their vice-president.
Ray Perrault managed to fill the position of publicity agent and versatile character actor with the
University Radio Society.
On the Ubyssey staff, Cal Whitehead capably
moulded reporters of the Saturday edition into
shape, while aforementioned Totem editors gave assistance on their respective issues. Staff cartoonist
Buzz Walker added not a little to the humor of the
campus paper.
Lovely Dale Coughlin ably represented second
year at the Fall Ball, in November . . . and spring
saw second year walk off with the honors when Sally
Panton was chosen Queen of the Red Cross Ball.
Arts '47 class executive consisted of: Honorary
president, Prof. G. G. Sedgewick; president, Keith
MacDonald; vice-president, George Hamilton; treasurer, Sylvia Dyson; and secretary, Nancy Macdonald.
Arts '47 has successful year .
George Hamilton, Nancy Macdonald
Page One Hundred and Sixty-six . . . ARTS   '47
ANDERSON,  CATHRINE
AMY, ROZEL J.
AHO, AARO E.
ADKIN, EDMOND Y.
ADAMS, GERALDINE G.
ANDERSON,  GEORGE  C.
ANDERSON, P. JOANNE
ANDREWS,   DOROTHY-ANN
APPLEBY,   CYRIL  A.
ATHERTON,   DONALD   L.
BAMPTON, DIANA L.
BAMPTON,  VIRGINIA F.
BARCLAY-ROSS,   L.   MIGNON
BARTLET,   ALEXANDER   W.
BAXTER, ANNE  H.
BELL,  G.  MARY
BENNETT, RAY N.
BERTO, IRENE  M.
BLAIR,   GORDON   H.
BLAIS, M. ANDREE
BLOWER, THOMAS J. H.
BLUNDELL,   HEATHER
BOOTH,   ELIZABETH   A.
BOULTBEE, H. PATRICIA
BOWELL, NANCY  E.
BRADSHAW,  MARGARET  W".
BROOKS, ALLAN C.
BROOKS,  ELIZABETH   E.
BROUGH, ROSEMARY J.
BROWN,  BETTY B.
BROWN, DONALD G.
BRUSSET, HENRY L.
BUCKNALL, M. A. JOY
BUNTING, I. JOAN G.
BURRITT,  ELEANOR  E.
Surely the Dean knows what it is.
Co-ed   models   for   the   WUS   Fashion
show.
. Page One Hundred and Sixty-seven ARTS   '47
BYRNES, L.  MARGUERITE
CARMICHAEL, ROBERT M.
CASTER, GARNET H.
CASTILLOU, HARRY G.
CHANG, JONE
CHOW,  RICHARD  H.     .
CHRISTIE,  ROBERT  L.
CLARK, MARY E.
CLARKSON, REGINALD L.
CLEARIHUE,  JOYCE  G.
CLIMIE, JOHN H.
COGHILL, JOY D.
COLLINS, JUNE V. V.
COOLS,  ADRIENNE  E.
CORBOULD,  SHIRLEY   M.
COUGHLAN, ELIZABETH D.
CRAIG, MARGARET H.
CRAPKO, ONYSIA
CROOK, LOIS" M.
CROWE,  DOROTHY  M.
CURRIE, IAN H.
DAIN, DORIS M. R.
DePENCIER, EDITH  M.
DOLMAGE, MARY E.
DONEGANI, JOYCE  A.  P.
DOWNMAN, LORNA M. S.
DRIVER, MARGARET W. J.
EASTMAN, JAMES H.
EPSTEIN, ROCHELLE
EWERT, KATHERINE  E.
FARR, ROBIN M.
FLEISHMAN,  RUTH  E.
FOERSTER,  DARRYL  K.
FORD, MARGARET J.
FOWLER, CHARLES S.
Who's under the hat?
Calf Society.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-eight . . . ARTS   '47
FRASER, LESLIE J.
FROST, J. S. CALVIN
FUOCO, JOHN  R.
GOODWIN,   GWENDOLINE
GRAHAM,  ANNE  E.
GRANDBERG, INGRID H.
GRANHOLD, ELLA M.
GRAVES, NANCY M.
GREEN,  JOANNA  E.
GREEN, JOHN W.
GRITTEN, RICHARD A.
GROVER, FREDERICK W.
HAGGART, ELINOR G.
HARFORD, IAN M.
HARKNESS, ALAN C.
HARRADINE, SYLVIA F.
HAWKENS, LUCILL
HAYES, EAN
HENDERSON, JAMES  S.
HILL, FREDERICK R. L
HILL,  GEOFFREY W.
HILL, SHIRLEY I.
HILLIER, FRANCES  C.
HOLBROOK DOUGLAS R.
HOLMAN, T. DAVID
HOLT, MARGARET  C.
HUDSON, JESSIE M.
JAMES,  E.   ROSEMARY
JAMES, FRANCES E.
JAMIESON, DONALD W.
JEFFERY, MARY-LOU E.
JOHNSTON,  FLORENCE  E.
JONES,  BARBARA  M.
JONES, STANLEY C.
JUTTE,   AUDREY   D.
Aren't  we  pretty?
But I can't see anything.
. Page One Hundred and Sixty-nine KANWISCHER, WILLIAM
KELLY, JAMES
KELSBERG,  BARBARA  J.
KERR, JANET  M.
KITSON, JOHN  A.
LAIRD, DAPHNE E.
LAZZARIN, JOHN A.
LEE,  SYBIL
LEE, W.  C.  HENRY
LIDDELL,  CONSTANCE  A.
LIEMEN, HELEN  L.
LIPSON, PEGGY
LORD,  M.  HELEN
LOTZKAR, HELEN
LOUCKS, JOHN  E.
LOUIE, HELEN
MANN,  BARBARA
LOUIS,  RUTH
LYMBERY,  ALICE  R.
MARGESON, ROSS D.
MANNING, VALERIE
MARTIN, DEIRDRE
MARTIN, RUTH  E.
MAYNE,  PATRICIA   E.
MEHLING, AGNES E.
MELDRUM, DONNA G.
MILLER, LEONARD G.
MILLS,  RUTH  C.
MITCHNER,   MORTON
MORRIS, YVETTE M.
MURFITT, REGINALD F.
MURRAY, JOHN S.
MURRAY,  K.   ISOBEL
MURRAY, MOLLIE M. C.
MYLETT,  PATRICK  V.
Commerce   B.T.O.'s.
Careful,   Mr.   Chancellor!
Page One Hundred and Seventy . ARTS   '47
MacBRIDE, F. JOHN
McCALLUM, MARY F.
. McCUSKER, THOMAS
MacDONALD, DONALD A.
MacDONALD,  DOUGLAS  K.
McDONALD, M. FRANCES
MACDONALD, NANCY K.
McDONALD,  ROMA  F.
McDougall, edna m.
MacFARLANE, V. JEAN
MacGILLIVRAY, H. M.
MacGILLIVRAY,  MARJORIE  G.
McGLASHAN, PAMELA D.
McGregor, jessie g.
mcgregor-eadie, peter
MacKENZIE, HUGH A.
MacLEOD, A.  SHIRLEY
McPHERSON, KENNETH F.
NEWMAN, RUSSELL G.
NICHOLSON, KATHERINE M.
NIEUDORP, JOHN L.
NORDAN, HAROLD C.
NORTHROP, DAVID  N.
OUROM, LORRAINE I.
OUTERBRIDGE,  HENRIETTE
PANTON, SALLY A. M.
PARNUM, RUTH B.
PATON,  GORDON  MacG.
PAUL, FRANK
PAULIK, WILMAR
PELTZ, KONRAD J.
PERRAULT,  RAYMOND  J.
PHELAN,  MARY  E.
PILKINGTON,  LAWRENCE
PLENDERLEITH,  E.   MAVIS
A zoology lab.
Better   than   lectures.
Page One Hundred and Seventy-one ARTS   '47
mW    £?S*.Kl W^
%KwkffiH
fcCr/i
POWELL,  PAULINE  H.
RAMPONE,  ALFRED   J.
REED, T. GORDON
REID, AGNES
REID,   DIANNE   E.
RENNIE, JEAN M.
RITCHIE, GORDON J.
ROBERTS,  GWENDOLYN  E.
ROBERTSHAW, M. ARTHUR
RODENCHUK,  JENNY
ROSE, MARGARET A.
ROSEN, LINDA C.
ROSS, ROBERT D.
RUNNALLS, M. JEAN
SALTER, PATRICIA M.
SANDERSON, JOY E.
SCOTT, GEORGE D.
SEGUR, DELPHINE C.
SENAY, CHARLES M.
SEYMOUR,  JANE  D.
SHEPHERD, ETHEL B.
SIDDOO, JAGDIS
SIDDOO, SARJIT K.
SLADE,  G.  RAYMOND
SMITH,  DONALD  A.
SMITH, MALCOLM B.
SMITH, THOMAS F.
STEELE, MARJORIE
STEINER, IRENE R.
STEWART, WILLIAM D.
SUTHERLAND, DOUGLAS D.
THOMAS, ETHEL B.
THOMASSON, AVERILLA  K.
THOMSON,  W.  AUDREY
TWIZELL, BARBARA M.
At  the  Commerce party.
,   where's   the   Discipline
Committee?
Page One Hundred and Seventy-two ARTS   '47
VLAG, ANN MAY A.
VOSPER, CATHERINE E.
WALKER, ROBERT E.
WARD, GEORGE A. H.
WARDLE,  M.  EUNICE
WATT, MARJORIE
WEBSTER, DAVID J.
WELLS, JOHN R. H.
WHITE, JOSEPH F.
WHITEHEAD,   CALVIN  J.
WHITTAKER, WILLIAM  G.
WILKINSON, MARGARET  C.
WILLIAMS, DOROTHY E.
WINTER,  WALTER  E.
WONG, VIVIAN M.
WOODMAN, I. RAE
WORTHINGTON, ALBERT E.
WRIGHT, EVELYN M.
WRIGHT,  R.  IONE
YATES, DOUGLAS E.
YORKE, MRS. MARY-
YOUNG, ARCHIBALD D.
YOUNG, E. BERNICE
YOUNG, MARGARET  M.
SANDERSON, JOY
McDIARMID, BARBARA G.
Three Little Girls From School Are We
After The Ball
, . Page One Hundred and Seventy-three Herb  Capozzi, Dave  Rea, John Ellis
Freshman Class breaks all records .
The largest class of Freshmen ever to enter the
University invaded our peaceful campus this past
September with their placards, green goggles and
rolled-up pants . . . battled with their traditional
rivals, the Sophs . . . and quickly and completely
took their place among the undergrads of UBC.
Shortly after Freshman Week, the class of '48 held
the usual poorly attended but hectic elections, and
chose Herb Capozzi, second-year freshman, for president; Dave Rea for secretary; and John Ellis for
treasurer. Norah Clark, WUS representative, was
the only co-ed on the executive.
Freshettes Rosemary Hodgins and Harriet Hoch-
man made University history when they became the
first co-ed debaters, debating against Vic College,
with Bob Harwood and Alan Roeher.
Beverley Wilson and Dorothy Lowther were successful in the Players' Club production of "The Taming of the Shrew" . . . and co-eds Maxine McClung,
Taddy   Knapp,   Fern   Anderson   and   Joan   Denman
cheered UBC teams on to victory as Mamook yell
leaders.
In Inter-murals, the freshmen did well, especially
in the table tennis tournaments . . . Jim Bennie
placed in the singles finals against Aggie Tom
Keenlyside.
On the Ubyssey, Don Stainsby and Ron Haggart
attained prominence as associate editors, with Ron
doing double-duty as the CUP editor. Directory
assistant editors included Tom Preston and Ross
Henderson. Bruce Bowther, Laurie Dyer and
Sheilagh Wheeler filled the positions as sports
scribes.
On the sports sheet are the names of Bobby Haas
on the basketball team, Jerry Stevenson in inter-
murals, Bobby Croll on the rugby team and Pat McGeer on the Thunderbirds.
The class of '48 has already proved itself a real
asset to the University. If first performances are
any indication of things to come, 1948 should be a
big year at UBC.
Hell, 8:09!!
Julian And Moyls Incite Riot In Arts 100
Page One Hundred and Seventy-four ARTS   '48
AHRENS, ROBERT H.
AISH, JANE A.
ALEXANDER, ARTHUR W.
ANDERSON, DONALD McL.
ANDERSON, FERN R.
APPLEBY, KENNETH G.
ARCHECK, LILLIAN D.
ARGYLE, CATHERINE M.
ARMYTAGE, MARGARET E.
AUSTIN, SHIRLEY E. M.
AVELING, MADELINE B.
BAKER, ROWENA M.
BAKONY, C. STELLA
BALDWIN, R. GEORGE
BAMFORD, GWENDOLYN J. E.
BARKER, H. TERENCE
BARNES, G. REGINALD
BARRACLOUGH, LILA P.
BARTON, HOWARD S.
BASSETT, BEVERLEY A.
BAXTER, JOHN S.
BAYLES, THEODORE M.
BAYNE, M. JOAN
BAYNES, SHIRLEY L.
BEATTIE, KENNETH J.
BECKER, RUTH R.
BENNETT, F. A. BARRIE
BENNETT, ROBERT W.
BERARDINO, MELIA A.
BERG, MARGARET B.
BEST, HELEN L.
BORRIE, HARRY R.
BOYLE, MARION A.
BROOKS, DIANA E.
BROTHERTON, JEAN V.
BROWN, HAROLD R.
BRUMMITT, WILLIAM M.
BRYANT.CHARLIE W.
BRYDON, LOYD
BUCHANAN, JEAN I.       .
BULMAN, LOLA M.
BURKE, RUTH E.
BURNELL, JOAN C.
BURNS, HELEN M.
BYERS, DOROTHY J.
CALDER, RACHEL E.
CAMPBELL, JEANNETTE B.
CAMPBELL, JOHN A.
What big eyes you have!
He forgot  to  bow.
Page One Hundred and Seventy-five ARTS   '48
CAPLETTE, M. ELIZABETH
CARMICHAEL, KATHLEEN D.
CARTWRIGHT, THOMAS A.
CAWLEY, MARGERY M.
CHALLIS, THOMAS W.
CHALMERS, BEVERLEY R.
CHAMBERS, MARY L.
CHARNLEY, ELIZABETH M.
CHERNOV, EVA T.
CHISHOLM, ANITA G.
CHITTY, AUDREY M.
CHIZ, PETER
CHOWN, NANCY L.
CHRISTIAN,  C. JOAN
CHRISTIAN, PATRICIA  M.
CLARKE, JOYCE G.
CLARKE, 0. NORA J.
CLERKSON, DOROTHY B.
COADY, MARY MARGARET
COLLISON,  JOCELYN  M.
COLLUM, JACK A. L.
COMELY-COMBE,  MONICA
COOK, KATHARINE
COOK, RICHARD  M.
CORBITT,  CHARLOTTE W.
CORFIELD, SHEELAGH M.
CORNISH, MARY A.
COTTER, BARBARA J.
COTTON, M. JOAN
COWAN,  PATRICIA
COWLEY, ROY D.
COX, F. V. BEVERLY
COX, J. ROBERT G.
CROMBIE, FRED J.
CROWE, SANFORD J.
CUMMING, MARION S.
CUTHBERT,  BETTY  J.
CUTHILL, LEONARD D. J.
DALY, M. WILLIAM
DAMER, WARREN R.
DeBECK, FREDERICK A.
DeBOU, R. ALAN
DENMAN, F. JOAN
DENNETT, ERNEST W.
DOBIE,  ROBERT W.
1I0UGANS, ROY A.
DUNBAR, JOHN W.
DYER, LAWRENCE N.
Line up for Totem pictures.
Pose! ! !
Page One Hundred and Seventy-six . . ARTS   '48
EDWARDS, J. EDA
EDWARDS, JOHN S.
EDWARDS,  SUSAN J.
EFFORD, ROBERT J.
ELART, ALICE J.
ELDER, GORDON W.
ELLIOTT, DONALD R.
ELLIS, JOHN F.
ELLISON, KENNETH V.
ERICKSON, TURE  C.
EWART,  E.  MAY
EYRES, R. JOY
FEARN, D. RODNEY
FERGUSON,   JOANNE   S.
FEAST, JOAN E. C.
FEDEROFF, LUDMILLA
FENN, WILLIAM E.
FINLAYSON,   ALEXANDER   J.
FLUMERFELT,  BRUCE R.
FORSYTH, WILLIAM M.
FRASER, B. ELAINE
FRANKOVITCH,   C.   JERROLD
FRASER, G. JOAN
FRASER, J. DOUGLAS
FRASER,  ROBERT  M.
FREEZE,  G.  ALLEN
GALT, T. DOUGLAS
GAMEY, MARGARET D.
GAUBE,  DOREEN
GAVA, JUNE P. E.
GEHL, ARTHUR J.
GERTZ,  LENA
GIBSON,  H.  DOUGLAS
GIEGERICH, MARGARET A.
GILLIES, MARY LOUISE
GORDON,  GRISELDA  M.  J.
GRAHAM, PETER
GRAY, WILLIAM M.
GREEN, MARY C.
GREENAWAY, JEAN  E.
GREYELL, VELMA F.
GROLL, SHIRLIE N.
GRUNLUND, BARBRO E.
GRUNLUND, JEAN  M.
HAAS,   ROBERT   L.
HADWEN, COLLEEN V.
HAGGART,  RONALD  B.
HALL, BEVERLEY E.
V    .
"SF!
BO
■
H
4  :
i».
Just Before The Battle Mother .
Disinterested .
Page One Hundred and Seventy-seven ARTS   '48
HALL, JEAN E.
HAMILTON, LEILA M.
HARWOOD, ROBERT S.
HATCH, WILLIAM R.
HAXTON, PHYLLIS
HEAPS, PHILIP A.
HEARD, FRANCES H.
HENDERSON, ROSS McG.
HERN, M. JANE
HERTIG, LUCIENNE B.
HILL, ERNEST  C.
HILL, RAYMOND C.
HODGINS, ROSEMARY E.
HOLLANDS, KEITH G.
HOLTBY, L. GWYNN C.
HOMAN, FRANCES M. L.
HORNE, BETTY-JEAN
HOSKINS,  MARCELLA  R.
HOUGH, JOHN D.
HUDSON, GRACE B.
HUNTER, LAWRENCE P.
HYDE, IAN G. W.
IRISH, RUTH I.
IRWIN, L.  BEATRICE
JAMES, DOROTHY C.
JARMAN, BEATRICE L.
JEFFERY, ARTHUR W.
JONES, MARGARET H.
JOSEPHSON, HELMER W.
KELLER, LLOYD B.
KENNY, EDITH W.
KER, J. ROSS
KERR, A. SCOTT
KERR, JOAN I.
KILTY, MARY-TERESA
KING, MALCOLM G.
KINGHORN, JAMES M.
KINGSLEY, MARY I.
KNAPP, KATHERINE
LAIRD, DOUGLAS A.
LAWRENCE, CHARLES C.
LAWRENCE, JAMES A.
LAWRENCE, M. GEORGENE
LEES, HELEN M.
LEITERMAN,  DOUGLAS  S.
LEWIS, CAROL ANN
LEWIS, F. NANCY
LISTER, WILLIAM G.
Roll Boys Roll
Some Pass In While Others Pass Out
Page One Hundred and Seventy-eight . ARTS   '48
LOCKHART, ALAN D.
LOCKWOOD, FRANK
LOWTHER, BRUCE A.
LOWTHER, DOROTHY E.
LUM, G. MUN
LYE, ROBERT G.
MADDIN, I. BERYL
MARKEN, GEORGE A.
MARSHALL,  ROBERT  E.
MATHERS, JOHN L.
MATTHEW, FRANCES L.
MEE, JOHN A.
MEHLING, FRANK R.
MELDRUM, RONALD  M.
MICHIE, GEORGIA C.
MILAN,  BETTY  E.
MIRONOFF,  VICTOR  B.
MITCHELL,  ESTHER  R.
MITCHELL, H. PATIENCE
MITCHELL, JOAN  B.
MOON,   DIANA   E.
MOORE, COLLEEN J.
MOORE, JOAN I.
MORRIS, GWENDOLYN E.
MORTISON, MARGARET E. N.
MOTHERWELL, ELIZABETH
MUIR, ROBERT A.
McALPINE, MARY
McARTHUR, THOMAS C.
MacCARTHY,  JESSIE  G.
McCLOY, ALISTAIR F.
McCLUNG,  P.  MAXINE
McCORD, CLIVE D.
McCULLOCH, JAMES P.
McDIARMID, MARY E.
MacDONALD,  A.   DAVID
MACDONALD, JERRY A.
McDOUGALL,   MARY-JANE
McFARLANE, JUNE E.
McGregor, iona m.
macindoe, grace m.
macindoe, helen j.
mckenzie, margaret e.
MacKINNON, JEAN B.
McLAREN, ILLA  E.
McLELLAN,  DOUGLAS
MacLEAN,  SHIRLEY C.
McLELLAN, MARNEY J.
Must Be Something Free
He Got Away
Page One Hundred and Seventy-nine ARTS   '48
MacLEOD, JOAN C.
McLEOD, MARILYN J.
MacLEOD, WILLIAM D.
MacLEOD, WINONA L.
McLOUGHLIN,  KATHLEEN  F.
MacMILLAN, LOIS A.
McRAE, ALMA E.
McTAGGART, RALPH L.
McTURK, HELEN G.
NELLES, GORDON  B.
NEVILLE, RALPH J.
NEWSON,  KATHERINE  L.
NICHOLS, JACQUELINE B.
NIGHTINGALE, FRANK H.
NORDALE,  JOANN
NORDLUND, LLOYD H.
NORRIS, FLORA C.
OHARA,  RICHARD N.
OLIVER, C. EDWARD
O'NEILL, EILEEN M.
OUTRAM, DONALD N.
OZOL, NELDA
PADDON, BETTY L.
PATTERSON,  EUGENE  B.
PEACOCK, M. DOREEN
PEARSON, EMMA S.
PEGUES, JOSIAH J.
PENDLETON, SUSANNE K.
PENN, MURIEL B.
PERKS, RONALD  L.
PERRY,  HAZEL  E.
PLANT, GEORGE E.
PONSFORD, ADA M.
POOLE, WILLIAM H.
POPE, M. DOREEN
POPE,   STEPHEN   H.
PRESTON, THOMAS B.
PYE, M. A. ELEANOR
QUAN, DICK
RANDALL, ROBERT McG.
RATHIE, JOY
REA, DAVID T.
-REID, DOROTHY M.
RICE, RONALD G.
RICHARDSON,  PAUL W.
RIETCHEL,   HELEN   E.
ROBINSON, DAVID D. S.
ROBINSON, JACQUELYN R.
The Brock In January
Caught With His Pants Down
Page One Hundred and Eighty ARTS   '48
ROGERS, MARY E. M.
ROOTS, J. WALTER
ROSS, MARGARET J.
ROWLEDGE, J. JAMES
RUNKLE, PETER
RYAN, RUTH C.
SAINAS, MARY
SAPP, ROBERT E.
SAUDER,  WILLIAM L.
SCHJELDERUP, HASSEL C.
SCRIVEN, PAMELA M.
SEARLE, MARION E.
SELKIRK, ROBERT B.
SHAW, LOIS E.
SHEARMAN,  JACQUELINE
SIMPSON, MARGUERITE G.
SINCLAIR, KENNETH I.
SMETANUK, W.  GORDON
SMITH, HELEN A.
SMITH,   HELEN-MARY
SMITH, JAMES E.
SMITH,  JEANETTE
SOMERS, D. MARIE
SOON, Q. Y. ISABEL
SPALL, CLARA J.
SPENCER, HERBERT W.
SPRAGGE, DONALD  L.
STAF, BERNICE G.
STAINSBY,  DONALD  0.
STEDMAN,  SHIRLEY-RUTH
STEVENSON, GERALD H.
STEWART, CATHERINE A.
STOCKS, DAPHNE I.
STRINGER, A. ROY
STUART, ROY A.
SWEENEY, W. ALAN
TALBOT, COLLEEN A.
TALBOT, M. KATHLEEN T.
TASSIE, PETER
TAYLOR, JOAN R.
TAYLOR, SHIRLEY I.
TAYLOR, WILLIAM L.
TEMOIN, MAURICE D.
TERNAN, M. JANE
THIBAUDEAU, MURIEL T.
THOM,  H.  GILBERT
THOMPSON, BEN
THOMPSON, G. H.  PRESTON
«MtmjM
\W *" J"**   nti ~   '~~'"T^M*
,.     ...h. ■-■—«;
ttmti. KUMStjiM*
^H
■4        *<1        v
Feeturing Frosh
You Can't Blame A Man For
Trying
Page One Hundred and Eighty-one ARTS   '48
TIEDJE, PATRICIA A.
TINDLE, PHILLIP A.
TRATCH, ERNEST P.
TURNER,   PATRICIA   A.
WALLACE, STUART H.
WALLACE, WILLIAM H.
WATSON, JEANNIE A.
WATSON,   KENNETH
WATTS,  NATALIE   J.
WEBB, W.  PHILIP
WEBSTER, DAVID
WEIR, C. SHEILA
WELCH,  HERBERT  C.
WELTE, MARION E.
WESTINGHOUSE,  MARGARET  V.
WHARTON,  AGNES
WHEELER,  SHELAGH  J.
WHITNEY, JOAN E.
WHITNEY,  RAYMOND  B.
WILCOX, EDIE A.
WILLCOX, JEANNE M.
WILLIAMS,  BARRY  H.
WILLIAMSON, GERALD
WILKINS, RUTH E. A.
WILSON, BEVERLEY
WILSON,   CATHERINE  A.
WILSON,  JUNE  M.
WILSON,  ROBERT  J.
WONG, ELSIE
WILSON, ROBERT  M.
WONG,  JOHN
WOODS, EARL B.
WOODS, LESLIE V.
WOODWARD, SHIRLEY A.
WRIGHT, ALMA M.
YELF,   KATHLEEN   E.
YUILL, LOIS A.
ZACKS,   WILLIAM
ZAHAR,  FRANKLIN  A.
ZARRY, ETNA V.
ZITKO, HENRY
Overburdened   Varsity   student.    Looking for someone?
Going  steady.
Page One Hundred and Eighty-two This year has seen the rise of the Commercemen
from the status of a club in LSE to that of a full-
fledged Undergraduate Society of Alma Mater
Society.
Commercemen have always taken an active part
in student government, with at least two or three of
their number on council, and this year's class is no
exception. It lays claim to Helen Morgan, council
secretary; Ken Creighton, treasurer; and Les
Raphael, MUS president; as members of the faculty.
In the field of sports Commerce has Ole Bakken,
star centre of one of the best basketball teams in
UBC's history, and Jack McKercher, captain of the
Varsity English Rugby team.
Other notables are Jim Wilson, president of the
Parliamentary Forum, and a delegate to the inter-
university conference last year, and Stuart Porteus,
also a conference speaker, and a McGoun Cup debater this year.
The Commerce Undergraduate Society has been
second to none in participation in Varsity's war
effort. Among their more prominent representatives
in this field are: Ted Chambers, head of the War
Aid Council, who is responsible for the co-ordination
of all work in this direction; Pat Cunningham, who
handled the financial arrangements for the Red Cross
Stuart Porteus
Commerce becomes Undergrad Society
Ball; and Brian Burke, who, as head of the employment bureau, directs students into jobs where they
can be of most use to the country.
George Pierson, second year Commerce, was
elected president, this fall, of the Canadian Returned
Men's Association, a body which includes all veterans of the present war who are now attending the
University.
The executive of Commerce '45 consisted of: Stuart Porteus, president; Pat Cunningham, vice-president; Les Wong, treasurer; and Helen Duncan,
secretary.
Garry Miller, Pat Cunningham, Les Wong, Harry Bell-Irving
and George Pierson
. . . Page One Hundred and Eighty-three COMMERCE   '45
AITKEN, EVELYN M.—Victoria
ALEXANDER, D. ROBERT—Vancouver
ALLISON,  GEORGE  W.—Hollyburn
Musical   Society,   Varsity   Band
AQUA, HARRY— Vancouver
Commerce   and   Forestry
BENNET, CYRIL J.—Abbotsford
Arts  and   Commerce
BLACK,  NORMAN  J.—Vancouver
Phi  Gamma  Delta;   Badminton;
Assistant  in  Book  Exchange
BROOKS, MILES G.—New Westminster
Skiing
BURKE, BRIAN E.—Victoria
Commerce   and   Economics;   Players'   Club;
Director  of  Employment  Bureau
CAMERMAN,   MARGARET—Vancouver
CHAMBERS, EDWARD J. S.—Vancouver
Arts and Commerce;  Beta Theta Pi;  Parliamentary Forum;
Golf, Tennis, Table Tennis;
Treasurer of  Parliamentary Forum
COTTER, H. B. CHESTER—Victoria
Psi  Upsilon;   Varsity  Dance  Band
COYLE, PATRICIA— Vancouver
Arts   and   Commerce;   Alpha   Phi
CREIGHTON, KENNETH D.—Vancouver
Arts and  Commerce;   Maj.,  Economics;   Psi  Upsilon;
Economics   Club,  Treasurer   of  AMS;   Rowing
GLENESK, ALFRED H.—Vancouver
Varsity  Christian  Fellowship
GUY, BEVERLY E.—Vancouver
Alpha Omicron Pi;
Commerce   Club,   Phrateres;   Badminton
HARDY, GORDON P.—Vancouver
Commerce and Forestry
HOLE,  LEONARD—Vancouver
Arts and Commerce; Commerce Club; Tennis
JOHNSON,  GEORGE A.—Vancouver
Zeta Psi;   Book  Exchange Manager
KORSH, STANFORD—Vancouver
Commerce and Forestry;  Zeta  Beta Tau;
Forestry Club, Commerce Club;  Badminton
MARHULL, ALLEN— Vancouver
MATHESON, WILLIAM D.—Britannia Beach
Kappa Sigma; Badminton Club;
Basketball,   Badminton
Carry your books?    We'll carry our own.
Page One Hundred and Eighty-four COMMERCE   '45
MORGAN, HELEN E.—Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta;  Pan-Hellenic Council, Secretary of AMS
MORGAN,  MARGARET  E.—Vancouver
Alpha Omicron Pi
MORRITT,  HARRY  H.—Vancouver
McCARTER, WILLIAM K,   Victoria
Phi Delta Theta;  Golf, Swimming
McDONALD, L. MARION—New Westminster
Alpha Gamma Delta;  Law Society
McKERCHER,  R.  JOHN—New  Westminster
Commerce   and   Forestry;   Rugby
PAULIN, M. ELIZABETH—Vancouver
Delta Gamma
PAYSON, DOROTHY B.—Vancouver
Phrateres, Commerce Club; Grass Hockey
PORTEUS, STUART— Vancouver
Kappa Sigma; President CUS;  Pari. Forum
PRIOR, DENNIS C.—New Westminster
Commerce and Forestry; Psi Upsilon; Forestry Club
RENWICK, F. ELIZABETH- Vancouver
Outdoor Club
SMITH,  MARJORIE  C.  L.—Vancouver
Alpha  Omicron  Pi;   Letters  Club;
Economics   Society;   Badminton
STILL, JOHN T.—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma; Commerce Club; Softball
WALDRON, B. HARRY—New Westminster
Commerce and Forestry
WILLS, M. EILEEN— Victoria
WILSON, JAMES R.—Vancouver
Parliamentary Forum
WONG, LESLIE G. J.—Vancouver
Treasurer of CUS
YORKE, GREGORY B.—Vancouver
Students Christian Movement; Basketball, Golf;
President of Students Christian Movement
HAYWARD, GILBERT J.—Kamloops
Kappa Sigma
Alt  dressed  up.
Better  than  lectures.
Page  One Hundred and Eighty-five COMMERCE   '46
BAKKEN, OLE
BENNET, MARGARET K.
BERTRAND, MRS. JEAN F.
BLACK, RUNA A.
BLAIR, OLIVE M.
BOND, WILLIAM E.
BROWN, JAMES R.
CLARKE, JOYCE M.
CRAWFORD, WILLIAM M.
DAY, M. JUNE
DENNIS, MELVIN W.
DUNCAN,   HELEN   J.
FORBES, JACK A.
GILLEY,  GORDON  R.
GUIMONT, MARGARET M.
HAMMERSLEY,  DONALD  W.
JONES, R. BRUCE
LETT, JOSEPH W.
MILLER, R. S. GARRY
MORRIS, ROBERT A.
O'BRIEN, WILLIAM J.
PEACOCK, ROBERT C.
SMITH, ARTHUR B.
THOMPSON,  ROSS  S.
WILSON, NANCY M.
ZAHAR,  EDWARD
JOHNSTON, R. F.
Eat at Joe's.
12:30 in the "caf.'
Page One Hundred and Eighty-six . COMMERCE    '47
ABBOTT, ARNOLD T.
ALLEN, HARRY J.
ARGUE, JAMES H.
BELYEA, A.  DOUGLAS
BITZ, MARIE
BODIE, ROBERT T.
CARNSEW, VALERIE I.
CHRISTOPHER, CHARLOTTE
CHU, JENNIE
CRIBB, JOHN M.
d'EASUM, BEVERLY J.
ELLIS, D.  CATHERINE
ESTEY, ROBERT M.
FLEMING, JOHN B.
FREUDIGER, RONALD
GARDOM, GARDY B.
GOODMAN, JUANITA V.
HODGSON, ELIZABETH J.
HOLT, D. MARGUERITE
KERSEY, W. GORDON
MARSHALL, WARREN E.
MILL, RONALD McD.
MUNN, ANNE C.
MacASKILL,  BARBARA  J.
McCONNELL, THOMAS W.
McCUBBIN, WILLIAM D.
MacDOUGALL, JOHN F. F.
McLEISH, GLENNA G.
Always These  Women
Hairless Joe And Friends
. Page One Hundred and Eighty-seven COMMERCE   '47
McMULLIN, DALLAS G.
PEIRSON, GEORGE F.
PENSON, NORMAN H.
PRATT, F. JOAN
QUICK,  BEVERLEY  C.
ROBINSON, NORMAN A.
SCOTT,  MARGARET  C.
SIGALET, HAROLD J.
SWITZER, WILLIAM
VARCOE, JOHN B.
VAUGHAN,  MARGARET  E.
WILSON, ERIC P.
WOODMAN, MABEL E.
WRIGHT, MARGARET I.
YORKSTON, DOREEN M.
COHEN, JACK
Aren't we having fun? . . . Publicity agents
kibitzes . . . Miss UBC
Our campus scenery
Campus life.
Page One Hundred and Eighty-eight . After five arduous years of lectures and labs, the
one hundred and five members of Science '45 are
preparing to leave UBC to take their places in the
industries and armed forces of Canada. In the past
the graduating class in Applied Science has gone out
to the mines, the engineering firms, and the construction camps. Now the majority will enter the
army or the navy as technical officers.
Notable in the ranks of the engineers was Dick
Bibbs, AMS president. In spite of a heavy course
in Chemical Engineering, Bibbs not only filled the
office efficiently, but also maintained an active interest in the Parliamentary Forum and the Players'
Club.
John Powell, another Chemical Engineer, and
past president of the Players' Club, also did his
share towards proving that Sciencemen have as
much cultural activity as anyone else.
Closely associated with the graduating class are
the men of Science '46. Although still one year
from graduation the fourth-year men are closely
associated with the seniors through the various engineering clubs. In these clubs the fourth and fifth-
year men meet and discuss problems peculiar to their
own field. In this way an esprit de corps is built
up, and "fourth" and "fifth" give way to "chemicals," "mets," or "miners."
The engineers have their star athletes, too. The
most prominent being Sandy Robertson, captain of
the Thunderbirds basketball team and a baseball
pitcher of renown.
Roy Morton
The executive this year was: President, Roy Morton; Dawson Club, Bob Olsen; Engineering Institute
of Canada, Harold Graves; American Institute of
Chemical Engineering, John Powell; American Institute of Electrical Engineering, Harry Ellis; American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Jim Bryant;
athletic representative, Gordon Ellis; Science '47,
Ted Kirkpatrick;  Science '48, Ron Grantham.
Sciencemen headed for armed forces..
y""C0
Chuck Moore, Don Wales, Bus Ellis
Page  One  Hundred  and  eighty-nine SCIENCE   '45
BIBBS, RICHARD M.—Vancouver
Zeta Psi;  Players Club,
American Institute of  Chemical  Engineering,
Parliamentary   Forum,   President   of   AMS
BRANDON, GEORGE F.—Vancouver
CLARKE, WILLIAM D.—Victoria
CLIFTON, EVERARD  H.—Britannia Beach
COCHRANE,  JAMES  A.—New   Westminster
Sigma   Phi   Delta;   Amer.  Inst,  of   Chem.   Engineering
COLEOPY,  NORMAN   Hollyburn
American   Institute   of   Chemical   Engineering,
Rugby;   President  of Film  Society
COOKE, NORMAN  E.—Vancouver
American Institute of Chem. Eng., Rugby
DAWSON, JOHN A.—Huntingdon
American  Institute  of  Chemical   Engineering
DUNELL, BASIL A.—New Westminster
Swimming,  Tennis
GRIFFITHS, DONALD F.—Monte Lake
Phi  Kappa  Pi
HOWIE, HENRY  J.—Cloverdale
Sigma Phi Delta;  Amer. Inst. Chem. Eng.
Basketball,   Softball
LEITH, JAMES A.—Kimberley
POWELL, JOHN R. P.—Vancouver
Zeta Psi;  Players' Qub,
President  of  American  Institute  of  Chem.  Eng.
ROBINSON,  DONALD   B.—Oliver
American   Institute   of   Chemical   Engineering
RUCK, WILLIAM—Oliver
American  Institute  of  Chem.  Eng.
SCEATS, HUBERT  B.—Victoria
Phi Gamma Delta;  Tennis, Rowing
SEXSMITH,  RODERIC  F.—Vancouver
STEELE, IAN  McL.—Vancouver
Delta Upsilon
YIP, CHUCK W.—Vancouver
YOUNGER, ANDREW H.—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi;
American Institute of Chem.  Eng.;  Golf, Softball
ANDERSON, J. DOUGLAS— Vancouver
BINNIE,   ROBERT   F.—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi
BUNNELL, FRANK R.—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta
CALDERHEAD, GORDON A.—Calgary, Alberta
Beta Theta  Pi;   Intra-Murals
CONFORTIN,   JOHN   C.—Squamish
DENNISON,   JAMES   A.—Vancouver
Engineers Play With G2 Blocks
Powell Concentrating, Dunell
Kibitzing
Page One Hundred and Ninety . . . SCIENCE   '45
EYRE, ALAN M.—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi
FRASER, D. ARTHUR—Calgary, Alberta
Newman   Club
GRAVES, HAROLD  B. R.—Vancouver
EIC
GRIMBLE, WILF G.—Vancouver
HICKS, JOHN B.—Vancouver
English Rugby, Track
HOLE,  FREDERICK  R.—Vancouver
Soccer
KENT,   C.  JOSEPH— Vancouver
KER,   WALTER   A.—Vancouver
Sigma  Phi  Delta
LEFEAUX, STUART S.—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta;  Social Problems Qub
Tennis, Skiing, Cross-Country, Varsity Dance Band
SCOTT, WILLIAM  B.—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta;  Golf
STAMFORD, GORDON W.—Victoria
Student   Co-op  Association;   Skiing,  Tennis
TURLEY, FRANCIS  E.—Nanaimo
WIGEN, SIDNEY 0.—Wynndel
Chess Club, Student Co-op Association
BEST, GEORGE C—Victoria
American   Institute   of   Electrical   Engineering;
Tennis,   Swimming,  Table  Tennis
CREELMAN, ELLIOTT A.—Port Alberni
Sigma Phi Delta
GREGORY, EDWARD S.—Vancouver
Kappa  Sigma;   Outdoor  Club;   Tennis,  Skiing
GUICHON,  LLOYD  J.—QuUchena
HANEY, DANIEL F.—Revelstoke
Sigma Phi Delta;  Newman Club, Musical Soc.
HEALEY, ALBERT ].—New  Westminster
HETHERINGTON, JOHN  D.—Vancouver
Delta Upsilon;  Parliamentary Forum;
Honorary LSE;   Basketball
ISHERWOOD, SIDNEY D.—Honey
American   Institute   of  Electrical   Engineering
LaBELLE, EUGENE P.—Vancouver
LAM,   MATHIAS-Vancouver
LeBUS, GEORGE H.—Victoria
American   Institute  of  Elec   Eng.;   Swimming
LOUIE, JOHN—Vancouver
American   Institute   of   Electrical   Engineering
LYTLE,  DENNIS  D.—Vancouver
MOHR, FRANK A.—Wistaria
W^'"~^
^^mm^
JLi
%
m   4
\ 1
r^jJ
1 v-f^
Sugar?
Pipe This Machine
Page  One Hundred and Ninety-one SCIENCE   '45
MOORE, DONALD C—Kamloops
NEWBURY,  EDWARD  W.—Nanaimo
PIERCY, EARLE W.—Courtenay
Beta Theta Pi
ROOS,  ALBERT  W.—Kamloops
Am.   Institute   of   Electrical   Engineering
ROPER, AUSTIN J.—Lethbridge, Alberta
Beta Theta Pi;
Sec-Treas.   of  American  Institute  of   Elec   Engineering
TARRANT,  EDMUND  H.—Vancouver
WALKER, WILLIAM  M.—Vancouver
Am.  Inst,  of  Elec   Eng;   Badminton
WOODCROFT, JOHN—Victoria
Beta  Theta   Pi;   Badminton,  Golf;
Librarian of Am. Inst, of Elec. Eng.
FLADER,  SAMUEL— Vancouver
Zeta Beta Tau
KNOWLES, ROBERT A.—Vancouver
McCARDELL, WILLIAM  H.—Vancouver
JONES,  ALEXANDER   G.—Victoria
Rugby
PARLIAMENT, J.  HARVEY— Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta;
President of Outdoor Club, Dawson  Club
ROOTS, E. FREDERICK— Vancouver
Secretary-Treasurer   of   Outdoor   Club,
Vice-President   of   Dawson   Club;   Skiing
SHARP, WILLIAM McM.—Vancouver
Secretary-Treasurer   of   Dawson   Club
BARRY, FRANK W.—Ocean Falls
American  Society  of  Mechanical  Engineering
BLUMENHAUER,  GEORGE   H.—Enderby
Delta  Upsilon
BRYANT, JAMES L.—Ocean Falls
Kappa Sigma;  Basketball;
President  of  American  Society of  Mech.  Eng.
COCHRAN,  EDWARD—Barriere
DOYLE, JAMES  P.—Vancouver
FINNIE,   J.   DOUGLAS— Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta
FRANCIS, FRANK M.—Vancouver
Kappa   Sigma;   American   Society  of   Mechanical   Engineering
GALBRAITH, D. EWEN— Vancouver
Phi  Gamma Delta
GRONLUND,  MAX D. -Vancouver
HATTE, ROSS— Vancouver
Just To Be Different
Page One Hundred and Ninety-two SCIENCE   '45
KELLS,  OWEN  C—Vancouver
Phi Kappa  Pi;   Skiing, Sailing
LAWLEY,  GORDON  E.—Eburne
LLOYD,  GEORGE  A.—Vancouver
Sigma  Phi  Delta;   Secretary-Treasurer  of
American  Society  of  Mech.   Eng.
LONG, JOSEPH  D.—Vancouver
MAYBANK, HERBERT A. G.—Olds, Alberta
Public Speaking Club
McADAM, JAMES C—Vancouver
Sigma  Phi  Delta
MacKAY,  WALLACE  1.—Vancouver
Beta Theta  Pi;
American   Society   of   Mech.   Engineering
NELSON, JAMES T.—Vancouver
American Society of Mechanical  Engineering
ORSKOG, ARTHUR G.—Vancouver
American   Society  of   Mechanical -Engineering
SMITH,  HERBERT  S.—Vancouver
Kappa   Sigma;   Soccer
TAYLOR, LEONARD H.—Vancouver
Skiing
WANNOP,  LEONARD  G.—Vancouver
WILLIAMS, THOMAS  G.—Vancouver
Kappa  Sigma
WILLIS, C. NORMAN— Victoria
Sigma Phi Delta;
American   Society   of   Mech.   Engineering
WOO,  JOHN   S.—Vancouver
Chinese  Student  Club
BARER, RALPH D.—Vancouver
Zeta Beta Tau;   Menorah Society
BERRYMAN, DAVID J.—Oliver
Student  Co-op  Association
CARVER, ROBERT R.—Vancouver
Sigma  Phi Delta
MORTON, ROY E.—Wells
Beta  Theta  Pi,  Sigma  Tau  Chi;   Dawson  Club,
President of Engineers'  Undergraduate  Society
MacKINNON, DONALD F.—Cadomin, Alberta
OLSON, ERIC R.—Hope
Beta Theta  Pi;   President  of  Dawson  Club
SERAPHIM,  ANDREW  F.—Clayburn
Sigma Phi  Delta;   Dawson  Club
Track,   Skiing
Smith  cleans  up.
Little   man—big   machine.
Easy!
Page One Hundred and Ninety-three SCIENCE    '46
ANDERSEN, ALBERT A. I.
DOWDING, W. CHARLES
FORDYCE,   DAVID   B.
JOSEPHSON, GILBERT M.
MOORE, WILLIAM J. M.
STEWART, DONALD  L.
UNDERWOOD,  ELDIN  S.
WELTON, R. JOHN H.
WOOD, NORMAN M.
DIMOCK, ARTHUR C.
ELLIS, GORDON McL.
GALLAHER, ERNEST E.
GOLCMAN, ROBERT
JOHNSON, LEONARD C.
KOLBEINS, HENRY
O'NEIL, WILLIAM J.
ROBERTSON,  E.  ALISTA1R
BROE, KENNETH  L.
HAMMERSLAG,   JULIUS
KENNY, WILFRID E.
LINDENFELD, PETER
SANSUM, JOHN D.
WIGHT, LAWRENCE E.
LLOYD,  WILLIAM  E.
Chemicals
and Civils
Page One Hundred and Ninety-four SCIENCE   '46
CAMPBELL, DOUGLAS D.
HODGSON,  ALEXANDER  G.
BIRD, JOHN Mel.
BURGESS, JOHN  A.
CHUTTER,   PAUL  W.
CROCKER,  CHARLES  B.
GEORGE,  STANLEY  E.
JOHANNSON,  EDGAR F.
LATIMER, NORMAN H.
LeBRUN, JULIUS  A.
LEWIS, L. ALLEN
MITTEN,  LEONARD  A.
MORRISS, HARRY F.
NEWSON,  DONALD  A.
PARKINSON, GEOFFREY V.
RHODES, ERNEST S.
SCOTT, DONALD
SKENE, ALEXANDER W.
STEVENS, DONALD R.
TAPAY,  HAROLD   M.
WALLER, ARNOLD  B.
WARRENDER, A. CAMPBELL
BEWELL, BRUCE  E.
HANSEN, HARRIS T.
HILTON, H. BRIAN
RUTQUIST, FRED E.
Microscopic  View
He's Got The Lips For It Too
Page One Hundred and Ninety-five Ted Kirkpatrick, Gord. Genge, Norm Denkman
Science '47 works among coke bottles
Finishing their third year towards the degree of
Bachelor of Applied Science, the men of Science '47
have passed the half way mark in the undergraduate
careers.
They are acutely conscious of Canada's need for
trained technicians and are preparing themselves to
play their part in the war effort and the reconstruction to follow.
Every noon-hour the boys gather in the drafting
room, always claiming they have work to do and
always leaving the tee-square and drafting board
untouched. Here, surrounded by empty coke bottles and pin-up girls, the redshirts plan most of their
spare time activities which range from organized
discussion groups to snake parades.
This same pride of their faculty brought third
year forth in numbers for both the Science blood
donor drive in November and the War Aid Council
drive in January. Any worthwhile drive found the
third year working hard for the University.
Another episode where Science '47 showed their
initiative was in the purchase of the famous Science
sweaters.
Chafing at the inability of the AMS to obtain the
distinctive red sweaters dear to the hearts of all engineers, the class executive went out on their own resources and completed a deal which resulted in
Science '47 getting their faculty identification before
their seniors.
Ted Kirkpatrick, president of Science '47 for the
second year, ran the business of the class smoothly
and efficiently. A valued member of the Engineers
Undergraduate Society, Kirkpatrick took an active
part in the organization of the blood donor drive
and Navy Week. In the elections, results of which
are not available at press time, he ran for Junior
member of AMS.
Executive of Science '47 this year was: Prof. H.
M. Mcllroy, honorary president; Ted Kirkpatrick.
president; Norman Denkman, secretary; and Gordon Genge, athletic representative.
Page One Hundred and Ninety-six . SCIENCE   '47
ALLAN, JOHN D.
ANDREW, FREDERICK J.
BATEMAN, WILLIAM A.
BEGUIN, ANDRE C.
BERSON, MORRIS J.
BORTOLIN, LINDO G.
BROWN, ROBERT W.
ADAMS, ROBERT G.
BRUCE, JOHN G.
BURGESS, HAROLD N.
CAINS, RICHARD W.
CALVER, GEORGE L.
CARTER, A. GORDON
COOK, ROBERT E.
COOPER, ERNEST E.
COX, ROBERT A.
DENKMAN, NORMAN H.
DOUGLAS, COLIN M.
FENN, RAYMOND A.
GALLON, ALAN V.
GENGE, GORDON M.
GILL, LAWRENCE
GILL, WILLIAM D.
HARRIS, IAN W. E.
HAYES, JOHN
HAZLEWOOD, DAVID A.
HERRING, PHILIP S.
HOOLEY, ROY F.
Gooderham, Griffiths and Powell Siphon Bibbs For
Red Cross
Rutquist Dishes It Out
Page One Hundred and Ninety-seven SCIENCE   '47
horne, edgar b.
hughes, roger c.
hunter, stanley j.
jack, peter s.
james, rodney a. n.
john, john g.
kirkpatrick, edward t.
kirkpatrick, guy c.
layard, camville p.
lee, james w.
levelton, bruce ii.
lister, robert w.
lockhart, gerald p.
miller, wallace b.
McCarthy, albert
macdonald, roderick m.
McFEELY, CAMERON J.
MacKAY, JAMES  W.
McLEAN, FRASER A.
McLELLAN, JACK W.
McLENNAN, JOHN R. B.
NAYLOR, THOMAS K.
NELSON, J. WILLIAM
NEWMARCH, THOS. F. R.
PEARSON, LAWRENCE 0.
PEDERSEN, CHESTER H.
RACINE, REJEAN W.
RALSTON, GORDON  B.
Ay-yi-yi, Dolores
We Know, Don't We?
Page One Hundred and Ninety-eight . . SCIENCE   '47
REAVILLE,  ERIC T.
SEPPALA, KEIJO, H. W.
SEYER,  FRANK H.
SHADBOLT,  DOUGLAS
SHERMAN, DEANE D.
SPEERS, EDWARD A.
SLINGSBY, JOHN C.
STILWELL,   M.   ARTHUR
STOKES, H. ALDRED C.
STROUD, ROSS C.
THOMSON, STANLEY C.
WHEELER, JOHN  0.
WHITE, ALAN M.
WIDMEYER, WALTER D.
WOODS, ERIC J. H.
Bibbs Sweeps Into Office
Obviously Bored With It All
. Page  One Hundred and Ninety-nine Edward Lambe, Ron Grantham, Dave Lawson
Science '48 don their red sweaters . . .
Fresh from the ranks of a nameless faculty, the
class of Science '48 worked all year to erase the
memory of the time they spent as freshmen before
donning the red sweaters that set off the Engineers
as the elite of the campus.
They strove so valiantly that the hardened upper-
classman, while openly deploring the wild actions of
the youngsters, went on record as saying that the
new class was doing fine.
The men of Science '48 found themselves in a new
world when they entered the Faculty of Applied
Science. Replacing the almost void timetable of
their freshman year they found a schedule filled to
overflowing with lectures and labs. They discovered
that the famous 60% entrance requirement was but
a slight indication of the rocky road ahead.
Something novel in engineering classes were the
two   girls,   Margaret   Stokkeland   and   Lorna   Lang,
who are registered in 2nd year Applied Science. Although the boys found it difficult lo reconcile themselves to the sight of a curly head bent over a drafting board, they girls were soon accepted as full-
fledged members of Science '48. Margaret attended
the Science Banquet wearing a Science red beret.
Science '48 took an active interest in extra-curricular activities. Every pep meet found them occupying
the front rows. They also kept their end up by producing skits on occasion. Ron Grantham, class
president, was also president of the Mamooks and
Al Bluechel was president of the UBC Thunderbird
Ski Club. Several members found time to work on
the stage crew of the Musical Society.
The executive of Science '48 this year was: Professor Finlay, honorary president; Ron Grantham,
president; Ed Lamb, secretary; and Bob Lawson,
athletic representative.
Page Two Hundred SCIENCE   '48
ADAMS, WILLIAM S.
ALLMAN, ARTHUR W.
ANDREWS, JOHN H. M.
BABB, A. LESLIE
BARRASS, CYRIL W.
BARRON, JOHN M.
BARRON, WILLIAM  A.
BARTON,   DONALD   C.
BAUDER,  E.  MARSHALL
BLUECHEL, ALLAN J.
BREDT, MALCOLM D.
BRODIE, MALCOLM N.
BRUCE, JAMES R. D.
CARPENTER, DONALD M.
CHERNIAVSKY, PETER
COLLEN, WILLIAM D.
DARLING, PETER A.
DAVEY, GRANT M.
DENLUCK, N. ROBERT
DENNYS, RONALD G.
DOBIE, THOMAS T.
DUFF, PHILLIP A.
DUFFUS, H. JOHN
EDWARDS, BRIAN H.
EDWARDS, INGLIS  W.
EDWARDS, ROBIN W.
ELIA, NICK
ENG, THOMAS S.
Shocking!!
The Science '47 Rocket
Page Two Hundred and One SCIENCE   '48
FLETCHER, ALAN G.
GORDON, ROBERT N.
GRANTHAM,  RONALD  D.
GRAY,  DUNCAN   S.
CRAY, WALTER J.
GULLEY, LAURENCE  M.
HANSEN, H. DAVID
HARBELL, JOSEPH  L.
HARRISON, ROLAND S.
HIRTLE, J. GORDON
HOGAN, LEWIS F.
HOLMAN, M. NEIL
HOLMES, DAVID  C.
HOLMGREN, ERIC J.
HOPKINS, CHARLES N.
HOWES,  WILLIAM   S.
HUDAK, NICHOLAS
JEFFERY, C. BARRIE
KELLER,  JOHN   R.
KELLY, JAMES
KERR, J. S. STEVENSON
KOLBERG, JOSEPH
KRMPOTICH,   MICHAEL   E.
LAAKSO, OLIVER A.
LANG, LORNA
LAMBE,  EDWARD   B.   D.
LEITH, WILLIAM C.
LEWIS,  DAVID   K.
McGeer In His Element . . . It's Cold Up Here
Page Two Hundred and Two SCI ENCE   '48
LYONS, E. HUGH
MAR, JACK B.
MAXWELL, JAMES S.
MITCHELL,   JAMES   A.   W.
MURDOCH, JOHN E.
McCROSSAN, ROBERT G.
McKAY, GEORGE F.
MacLEOD,  DONALD  M.
McRAE,  RODERICK  K.
OLSON, PHILIP E.
PERRAULT, ROBERT II.
PETERSON, EARL R.
PHARE,  G.  ROWLAND
PHILLIPS,   RANDOLPH   D.
PILLMAN, RAYMOND A.
POLLOCK, WILLIAM 0.
PRIOR, CHARLES A.
REID, JOHN D.
ROBERTSON,  PHILIP  W.
ROBERTSON,   ROBERT  W.
ROBINSON, MALCOLM  C.
ROCKSON,  PAUL
RODDICK, JAMES A.
SCHOENING, M. ALLAN
SCOTT, JAMES S.
STOKKELAND,  MARGARET  C.
TAIT, DAVID  II.
TAYLOR, CHESTER  C.
WALLIS, JOHN H.
WIGGINS,  MURRAY M.
WILLCOX, J. ALLAN
WILTSHIRE,  EDWARD
WINTER, WALLACE II.
WOODWARD,  FRANK  A.
YOUNG, WILLIAM  H.
Griffiths Put Cochrane Away WhUe
Coleopy Watches
Hey, What's Coming Off Here?
Page Two Hundred and Three Nursing '46 in a formal pose.
Nurses Exec, ends successful year .
This year the Nurses' Undergraduate Society
marks yet another successful round of activities on
the campus. N.U.S. serves not only to direct the
activities of the nurses at the University but also to
keep them in touch with those training at the
hospital.
The graduates include both Public Health and
Teaching and Supervision. There are eight B.A.Sc.
degrees and thirty-four certificate students in the
class. Their time is taken up chiefly with their concentrated course.    Public Health consists of a short
period of lectures followed by a period of field work.
This field work takes them to various clinics and institutions both in the city and out. Classes for
Teaching and Supervision of Nurses are held both at
the General Hospital and at the University.
Those students taking second year Nursing will
enter the General Hospital next September and will
continue on for three years until they receive their
Registered Nurse Certificates. It is only after they
receive their R.N. that they return to University to
complete the course.
Page Two Hundred and Four . . . Canada, short of trained agriculturists, looks to
the graduates in Agriculture this year, Aggie '45,
for help in the successful waging of a total war.
For, in spite of the war, our nation must eat. Behind every man at the front are the munitions workers, and behind the munitions workers there are still
more men in the fields.
They have drawn on their own initiative more, by
doing away with the traditional Arts-Aggie Ball, replacing it with an informal of their own, in which
they do not need to feel so completely overwhelmed
Peggy Burton,  Wilson Stewart
Aggies vital to total war effort .
because of the smallness of their faculty. Co-ed students turned out in fair numbers this year. From
the many eligible the Aggies made a difficult choice
to put up their candidate for queenship of the newly-
founded Fall Ball.
Naturally enough, with the fullness of their
courses, and heavy war work schedule, they found it
hard to put up any outstanding stars in campus
sports, but George Rush, formerly a star rugby
player, headed the Men's Athletic Association.
Aggies, too, are all engaged in some form of war
work. The men are in either the COTC or the
UNTD, the women take their part in various forms
of Red Cross work. The faculty turned out in large
numbers to give their blood in January and
February.
Several Aggies who have returned from the wars
have enrolled in the special short courses which
UBC offered for the first time this year. This number is expected to increase in the war-years to come.
The executive of Aggie '45 consisted of: Wilson
Stewart, president;  and Peggy Burton, secretary.
In the women's common room . . . Ah, ah, don't talk with your mouth full . . . Aggie coats at sunset.
, Page Two Hundred and Seven AGG I E   '45
AXEN,  GEORGE  C.—Brackendale
Animal   Hus.;   Outdoor  Club,  Jun.  Can.  Soc.   Tech.   Agric.
Vice-Pres. Agric.  Undergraduate  Soc, Sec.  of Jr.  CSTA
BURTON,  MARGARET  0.—Vancouver
Dairy Bacteriology;  Gamma Phi  Beta
COOK, FRED D.—Smithers
Agron.;   Pres.  Jr.  Can.  Soc.  Tech.  Agric.
DENBY, LYALL G.—Victoria
Horticulture
FARROW, JOHN V.—New Westminster
Animal   Husbandry
President of Agriculture Undergraduate Society
FLEMING,  ORMOND  W.—Vancouver
Dairy  Bacteriology;   Phi  Delta Theta
HUTCHINSON, MARIE— Vancouver
Agronomy;   Delta Gamma, Players Club
KING, J.  DAVID -Vancouver
Agric.    Com.;   Kappa   Sigma;   Basketball
LOURIE, HELENE— Vancouver
Dairy Bacteriology
MASTERS,  L.   KMA\—Victoria
Animal Husbandry
MENZIES, VERNON H.—Vancouver
Dairying;   Phi Kappa Pi;   Ski  Club
English   Rugger
NEILSON, JAMES A. S.—Vancouver
Dairy  Bacteriology
OLLIVER, MURIEL A.    Vancouver
Horticulture;   Init.   Chair.  Phrateres
STEWART, WILSON  B.—Vancouver
Agronomy
STILL, CONSTANCE  L.—Vancouver
Horticulture;   Delta   Gamma
TERRACE, JAMES  T.  W.—Vancouver
Dairy  Bacteriology;   Phi  Kappa  Sigma
WILKINSON, BARCLAY  R.- Vancouver
Horticulture;   Golf,  Skiing,  Sailing
WILLIS,  THOMAS  G. -Keremeos
Animal   Husbandry;   Delta  Upsilon;   J.C.S.T.A.
YOUNG, VICTOR M.—Vancouver
Horticulture;   Phi  Kappa  Sigma
KEENLYSIDE,   THOMAS   R.—Vancouver
Agronomy;   Beta Theta  Pi
MILLER, IAN McK.—Vancouver
Dairying;  Beta Theta Pi
McLEOD, MELVILLE C—Vancouver
Animal  Husbandry;   Kappa  Sigma;   Basketball
Cross Country, MAD  Representative
RUSH,  GEORGE   E.—Vancouver
Agronomy;   Beta  Theta  Pi:   English   Rugby;
President  MAA
ASH, A. BRUCE
McLEAN, ALASTA1R
WRIGHT, NORMAN S.
Careful,   now.
Watch   that   technique.
Page Two Hundred and Eight Like all classes in Agriculture, Aggie '46 took
extra units of work during the last year, work which
is not needed for their degrees but which will equip
them for war research.
Working together in most of their classes, in their
labs, in the barns, and in field work, the students
have built up an esprit de corps which is outstanding among UBC's faculties—and UBC is noted for
faculty spirit.
Third-year Aggies combined with the other classes
of their faculty to put over the annual Aggie Barn
Halcyone Webb, Gordon Bell
Aggie '46 keeps up faculty tradition
Dance, the highlight of the Aggies' social calendar.
Many of them were present at the Fall Ball, and the
Snow Frolic, and they did their bit for the Red Cross
when it came to volunteering to give donations of
blood.
Aggie '46 students combined with the rest of the
faculty in lending their support to the Junior
C.S.T.A. Members of the class were present when
the association visited Fraser Farms during the fall.
■Like everyone else at UBC, Aggie '46 had to cope
with  classes  and  labs,  mid-terms  and  finals,  many
army and navy parades and various other forms of
war work. The pressure of this curricular and
extra-curricular work did not prevent them from taking part in athletics, however. Among those who
found time for extra-mural work was Kenny Devlin, who played for the UBC hockey team.
To co-ordinate the many and diverse activities,
the Agriculture class of 1946 chose a lively and energetic executive: Gordon Bell was elected president
of the class, and Halcyone Webb filled the position
of secretary.
Working In The Lab
Just One More
. . . Page Two Hundred and Nine AGGI E   '46
BLAIR,  DAVID  J.
CARSON,   DOUGLAS   J.
DEAS, CATHERINE P.
HEWITT,  RUTH  L.
MOWATT, J. GRAHAM
McKINNON, NEIL C.
NILAN, ROBERT A.
RIPLEY, THOMAS A. F.
STEVENS, JOAN M.
Page Two Hundred and Ten Second year Agriculture, a conglomeration of urban
and rural students, have, even in a brief two years,
added much to upholding the aims and traditions of
their faculty.
Even the women are now seeing a definite future
in the various fields of Animal Husbandry, as evidenced Margaret Mackay who is majoring in this
subject.
Aggie 47 lost their president, Don Campbell, one
of Aggie's brilliant scholarship winners, at Christmas,
Jackie Stephenson, Margaret Mackay
Aggie '47 proves to be a sporting year
when our boy went to work for George. The president
for the second term, Margaret Mackay, is one of the
most active in the social and business problems connected with Agricultural functions. Jackie Stephenson, secretary for the second year executive, is one of
the few students in her year headed for a career of
dairying.
Aggie 47 students have learned the true meaning
of our University's motto "Tuum Est". Not only have
they given their best, both academically and extracur-
ricularly for their faculty, but they have taken considerable part in university activities in general.
Second year women, including sports representative
for WUS, Margaret Mackay, and Jackie Stephenson
are the backbone of Aggie women Intramurals. Only
a minority of the women are concerned with other
campus clubs.
Aggies' future in sports is assured by second year
men such as: E. M. Butterworth, prominent in rugby,
swimming, and the Moyls boys in both rugby and
hockey.
And then there are the Leavy brothers—the tall
dark boys who serve as bouncers at every class party.
Aggie 47 has made a good showing in the last two
years. It is hoped that the next two will be as good
or better.
Beauty And The Burette
Looking For Artsmen?
Mix It Well
Page Two Hundred and Eleven AGGIE   '47
BAYFIELD, JOHN T.
BUCHANAN,  SHEILA  C.
BUTTERWORTH, EARL McK.
GREGORY,  KENNETH  F.
LAMBERT,  NONA C.
LARKIN,   GRANT   B.
LEAVY, JOHN A.
LEAVY, LEO F.
MANERY, H. RONALD
MAURER, ALFRED R.
MOYLS, CHARLES M.
MOYLS, W. JOSEPH
MacKAY, MARGARET C.
SMITH, DERWARD
MacLEOD, DOROTHY M.
STEPHENSON, L. J.
WAKELY, WALTER J.
WEBB, HALCYONE
Page  Two Hundred and Twelve This year's freshman class in Agriculture, a large
and varied group, has taken on efficiently and
earnestly the duties and responsibilities of university
life.
Under the able first-year president, Ian Greenwood, and secretary, Mrs. Joan Graham, the freshman class has become familiarized with the problems and traditions of university life. In particular,
the traditions of the Agricultural faculty have been
impressed upon them.
Already proving their worth in  university sports
Joan Graham, Ian Greenwood
First year learns Aggie traditions
life are Douglas Knott, who is headed for a shining
future in rugby, and G. Blair, who may some day
be one of our top-ranking track stars.
One of the most versatile of the first-year men is
Ron Vincent who combines his work in the Varsity
String Orchestra with excellent amateur figure
skating.
Frosh were first initiated into the history and possible future of the Agricultural faculty at the Aggie
Fall Banquet. Traditionally, the freshman class provided the necessary humorous touch in the form of
a skit.
The majority of first-year men are working towards careers as our country's future scientific
farmers. A small percentage of the men and most
of the women plan to become much needed technical workers, laboratory technicians and research
workers.
It's all yours, Aggie '48. You have the traditions
of the Aggie faculty to keep up and the future of
Agricultural industry in our province to build to
bigger and better heights.
Either  Very Early Or  Very Late
Mooooove It Over!
Page Two Hundred and Thirteen AGGIE   '48
BAXTER, BERNICE M.
DAVIDSON, KENNETH  E.
DIXON, JOAN I.
GEE, W. KUEY
GIBSON, DAVID
GOODMAN, C. ERIC
GRAHAM, PHILIP D.
GREENWOOD, IAN F,
HADLAND, RICHARD E.
HEAL, GEOFFREY H. G.
HOLLOWAY,   ELAINE  P.
IRWIN, E. LOUISE
JONES, NORMAN O.
KING, JOYCE V.
SPICER, VIVIEN A. M.
TAYLOR, JAMES W.
THORSTEINSON, JAMES E.
TONNING, EILA M.
WALLICK, NANCY
Four Up
Culture
Page Two Hundred and Fourteen . "Pantin for Panton" during the Red Cross Ball Queen campaign . . . Members of some club or other . . . Jean MacFarlane
poses .. . . Let's pass over this one and look the other way (hmmnn) . . . Another queen candidate . . . Phyllis Ney, Queen
candidate . . . Herb Capozzi is proud of his "Yea Arts" button . . . pre-exam slump . . . George Rush and Luke Moyls shoot
the breeze . . . Green Roomers try to escape. . . Show this man to the obstacle course.
. Page Two Hundred and Fifteen There are four of them in the picture.
Home Ec girls learn art ofhomemaking
Under the guidance of Miss Dorothy P. Lefebvre
as acting head of the department, 117 girls partook
of the varied courses offered by the Department of
Home Economics this year.
Assisting Miss Lefebvre are associate professors
Miss Stella Beil, Miss Charlotte S. Black and Miss
Nina Morley.
Although this is only the second year of its existence, the department already has completed courses
for years' credit and expects to grant the degree of
Bachelor of Home Economics next year.
Among the great variety of courses that the girls
may choose that will help them in their later life,
there are: Dietetics, The Theory and Practice of
Cooking; House Management; Art Appreciation;
Dress Design; Hand Sewing; or House Decoration,
as well as many others.
Although the department has not the standing of
a faculty as yet, there is a Home Economics Club
registered in the LSE of the University, to which all
members of the Home Economics department belong.
Housekeeping's changed since Grandma's time.
Add three drops arsenic.
Page Two Hundred and Sixteen . . HOME ECONOMICS
COHEN, ANNETTE
CURNOW,  T.   BERNICE
FORBES, MARY A.
FROSTRUP,   EILSHA
HAMMOND,  MARY  E.
JOHNSON,  MAXINE
KATAINEN, VIOLET O.
MACKENZIE,   A.   ISABEL
PARKS,   DOREEN   M.
ROGERS, M. ELAINE
WEBER,   MARJORIE   E.
WHITE,  LESLIE   A.   H.
GULLOCH,   MUR1AL
ALLMAN,  MARY   B.
ANDERSON, EVELYN  M.
BERRY, HELEN E.
BRODY,  FLORENCE  V.
BROWN,  PATRICIA  R.
CHRISTIE,  MARGARET  S.
DAVIDS, A.  DOREEN
DUNLOP,   AUDREY   M.
DYSON,  SYLVEA
EDDY,  GERALDINE  M.
FRITH, MARGARET A.
GADBOIS, LORRAINE M.
GAFF, BERYL A.
CEORGE, B.  CATHERINE
GRAHAM, MARGERY A.
HAVES,  DOROTHY  W.
HILL,  SHIRLEY J.
HOREN, ANITA  E.
IRVING,  LORNA  E.   ■
KENDALL,  FREDDA  J.
Intruiging Isn't It
Stewing Over Exams, Perhaps?
Page Two Hundred and Seventeen HOME ECONOMICS
KING, KATHLEEN F.
LAKE, YVONNE M.
LEACH,  SHIRLEY A.
LOWES,   H.   ANN
MEHAN,  BETTY-LOUISE
MJOS, LILLIAN
MacGILLIVRAY,  VERDA  L.
McKENZIE, JEAN B.
McLEAN,  LOUISE  L.
McRAE, MILDRED  D.
NATION, ELIZABETH J.
PAYNE, TERESA E.
RATHLEF, ELIZABETH I.
RUSSELL,  ETHEL  M.
SIMPSON, A. BARBARA
SISCOE, MRS. MARGARET C.
SYMONDS, ANN P.
VOSS,  HELEN  L.
WALTON, VIVIAN M.
WILSON, H. ROSEMARY
WILSON,  IRENE
WILSON, LORNA M.
WILSON, M. JEAN
BIGSBY, E. JEAN
BISHOP, DORIS M.
BLUECHEL, JUNE E.
BONE, MARGARET M.
CAMPBELL,  MARION   E.
CHALMERS, RUTH E.
CHRISTIE, EILEEN A.
COTTERALL, GERTRUDE A.
COULTER, MAUREEN A.
DYRNDAHL, LILLIAN C.
ELLIS, BEVERLEY G.
Target For Tonight
'tween Lectures On A Rainy Afternoon
Page Two Hundred and Eighteen HOME ECONOMICS
FAGAN, MARY S.
GREENFIELD, MARGARET E.
HARRISON, M. BERNICE
HASKINS, WENDY L.  J.
HEPBURN,  PHYLLIS  R.
HOLLINGUM,  BETTY B.
HOPKINS, M. ISABEL
HOPKINS, MURIEL A.
KLUSENDORF, EDITH M.
LAIRD,  E.  ANNE
LOUT1T,, KATHLEEN A.
MILLER, MARILYN E.
MONTGOMERY, MARY M.
McKILLOP, MARGARET J.
McKINLEY, F. EVA J.
MacQUEEN, M. JEAN
McTAVISH, SHIRLEY A.
PARK, JOAN E.
PERRY, JOAN B.
ROANTREE, FRANCES J.
SINCLAIR, FRANCES B.
SMILLIE, ELSIE R.
SUTHERLAND, ELIZABETH M.
TECHY, MARGARET T.
TEMPLE, ELVIRA M. R.
THORPE, JACQUELINE D.
TURNER, BLANCHE M.
WALLING, EVELYN J.
WRIGHT, E. MARION
ZINK, NORMAN M.
Do UBC Coeds StUl Waddle, Doc?
Snowball Really Gets Around
. Page Two Hundred and Nineteen MISCELLANEOUS
BUCHANAN, JAMES E.—Arts Post Grad.
COOPER,   W.  CHARLES—Arts Post  Grad.
FISHER,  DEAN  H.—Arts Post  Grad.
FORSTER, JOHN H.—Arts Post Grad.
IVEY,  DONALD  G.-Arts Post  Grad.
JOHNSTON, ARTHUR C.—Arts Post Grad.
McGEER,  JAMES  PETER—Arts Post  Grad.
TAYLOR, EDWARD R.—Arts Post Grad.
BENNETT, REGINALD  B.—Applied Science Post Grad.
HOPPER,  D.  ALAN— Applied Science  Post  Grad.
TIEDJE,  J.   L.—Applied  Science  Post   Grad.
BELL,  BARBARA—Ath  Year Arts
CHAMBERS, TED—Ath Year Commerce
COULTER, SHIRLEY—Ath Year Commerce
CUNNINGHAM,   PATRICIA-4tA   Year  Commerce
HUNTER, J. J.—Ath  Year Commerce
LAKE, JUNE--Ath  Year Commerce
LOUIE, E.—Ath Year Arts
MUTTART, M.—Ath Year Arts
RAPHAEL,  LESLIE—Ath  Year Arts
WALDY, R. A.—Ath Year Commerce
WILLSON, JAMES—Ath Year Commerce
WINCH,   ERIC—Ath   Year   Commerce
Aggie With Centrifuge
The Heat's On, Or, At The Crucible
Moment
Page Two Hundred and Twenty MISCELLANEOUS
AULD, JEAN T.—First Year Arts
VICTOR,  MURICE—First  Year Arts
McCARTY,  WILLIAM—First  Year Arts
CAMPBELL, A. G.—5th Year Mechanical Engineering
DYNSKY,  PETER-^\th  Year Mining Engineering
BEAL, EVAN S.—3rd Year Applied Science
HOLMGREN,  ERIC—2nd Year Applied Science
GREEN, CHARLES A.—Teachers Training
MORESBY,  BARBARA—Teachers  Training
PAULSEN,  EDMOND  J.  A.—Teachers  Training
CAMPBELL,  MRS.  JOYCE—Teaching  &  Supervision
GRIFFIN, PAULINE M.—Teaching & Supervision
MADDEN, MARGARET M.—Teaching & Supervision
MERRITT,  HAZEL  J.—Teaching  & Supervision
MacDONALD,  G.   LENORA—Teaching  & Supervision
PURVES, LAVONNE B.—Teaching & Supervision
ATKINS, ELEANOR—Social Service
CHRISTIE, JEAN—Social Service
GARRETT,  DOROTHY  E.—Social Service
HAASON, 'W.—Social Service
MARSHALL, KAY—Social Service
HODGE, MURIEL— Social Service
k mm
Uncanny Isn't It
Students Look To The Future
. . . Page Two Hundred and Twenty-one' Making a quick recovery.
Theologs move out of colleges . .
Affiliated with the University are two theological
colleges, the Union College of British Columbia and
the Anglican Theological College of British Columbia. The former is headed by Rev. J. G. Brown,
M.A., D.D.; the latter by Rev. H. R. Trumpour,
M.A., B.D., D.D.
The setting of these colleges is but a stone's throw
from the University itself. From their location on
Marine Drive one can observe the north shore mountains looking down upon Vancouver's harbor entrance.
The Anglican  College offers courses in Theology
leading to the diploma of Licentiate in Theology and
the degrees of B.D. and D.D.
Union College represents the successful amalgamation of three distinct theological colleges. They
were: Columbia College, which was founded in 1893
under the sponsorship of the Methodist Church; the
Presbyterian College, founded in 1908; and the Congregational College, founded in 1914.
The amalgamation took place in 1927.
Although attendance at both colleges has been
gready reduced since the outbreak of war, they are
carrying on.
The Union College has added to its lecturing staff
Returned men play ping-pong
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-two .
Theologs make the best in over-crowded quarters
to make room for war veterans
this year Professor Basil Mathews, formerly of the
Boston School of Theology, who at one time worked
for the British Ministry of Information.
The activities of the Anglican College have been
very much reduced, but they still hold their important oratorical contest.
Today one can see coming from the direction of
the colleges ajittjjtady stream of men dressed in the
light blue suite of military convalescents.
The colleges have turned over their facilities to
the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps for the
benefit of convalescing army men.
At  Union  College  more  than  80 percent  of the
space is being utilized. One hundred and twenty
beds have been set up in the classrooms and in the
one residence, while the students have been confined
to the east wing for their lectures.
The army occupies virtually all of the space at the
Anglican College.
The soldiers who are hospitalized at the colleges
were invited by the Alma Mater Society to the various meetings and pass features held on the campus
at noon hours. The Red Cross Corps, Phrateres,
and the WUS have taken it upon themselves to visit
the boys. They provide magazines, play games with
the men, and write their letters for them.
Theologs hard at work.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-three  ORGANIZATIONS   • K. Broe, D. Newson, Eldin Underwood
IFC supports war charities
The Inter- Fraternity Council is the executive
elected from the twelve fraternities on the campus
to formulate and carry out the policies of the
fraternities in respect to the rest of the campus
organizations and their activities. The council is
composed of two members from each of the fraternities. IFC conducted its business this year much the
same as in previous years.
The IFC as usual supported vigorously the many
campus drives to raise money for the various war
charities, and the council combined with the Pan-
Hellenic Association from the sororities, and the War
Aid Council to make a huge success of the annual
Greek Letter Society Red Cross Ball at the
Commodore.
The council itself did not make any drastic
changes in its policy or its rushing rules but at press
time there were definite signs that a revision of the
IFC constitution would be made before the holidays.
In the spring the annual Greek Letter Society
song fest was held with all the fraternities and sororities supporting it to the best of their ability.
The IFC executive this year was composed of the
following members: Don Newson, president; Eldin
Underwood, vice-president; and Ken Broe, secretary-
treasurer.
/.    Allen,   A.   Jones,   J.    T.   Scott,   F.    Carrothers,   T.   Julian, A. Beguin, J. Burgess, B.  Ostle, B. Gillies, M. Burrows,
E.  Underwood, J.  Woodcrojt,   W.  Hacking, H.  Parliament, R. Hughes, G. Lloyd, T. Willis, R. Binnie, R. Brine, D. Newson,
K. Broe, F.  Francis
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-six . AINSWORTH, ALAN
ALLAN, JOHN
BAKKEN, OLE
BERTRAM, GORDON
BEWELL, BRUCE
BIBBS, DICK
CHAMBERS, TED
CLARK, DOUG
CREIGHTON, KEN
HETHERINGTON, JACK
JOHNSON, ART
KIRKPATRICK,  TED
MORTON, ROY
NILAN, BOB
PEIRSON, GEORGE
RUSH, GEORGE
SCOTT, J. T.
WILSON, JIM
YORKE, BRUCE
Sigma Tau Chi is an honourary fraternity, the members of which are chosen from all sections of the undergraduate body in recognition of their service and leadership
in the extra-curricular activities at the University.
The purpose of the fraternity is to foster a better understanding among the leaders of student organizations oi
the aims and ideals of the other undergraduate organizations of the University. In this regard the fraternity promotes discussion among the leaders of student organizations. They discuss the many problems which arise in
such organizations in their relations with other groups or
with the AMS. By this means they hope to prevent much
friction which arises between the various sections of the
undergraduate body because of misunderstanding or lack of
knowledge.
Sigma Tau Chi
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-seven BALDWIN, BILL
BRINE, R. H.
CARTER, P. H.
FLEMING, J. B.
GILLIE, GORD
KELLER, J. R.
GROVER, FRED
KENNEDY, J. S.
KIRKPATRICK, A. G.
MacKENZIE, J. C.
SEYER, F. II.
WHITE, RAY
Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Delta Phi was founded at Hamilton College,
Ohio, in 1832, and Phi Epsilon was installed at UBC in
1926.
Colours of the fraternity are emerald green and white,
the flower a lily-of-the-valley.
President of Phi Epsilon this year was Ralph Brine.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-eight . AINSWORTH, ALAN
ARGUE, JIM
BINNIE,  BOB
BLUECHEL, AL
BURNETT, BRUCE
CANTY, LES
CALDERHEAD, GORDON
CHAMBERS, TED
CHUTTER,  PAUL
EDWARDS, BRIAN
ENGLISH, TED
EYRE, ALAN
FARR, ROBIN
FOERSTER, DARRYL
GRANTHAM, RON
GILL, WILLIAM
HAZLEWOOD, DAVE
HIRTLE, GORDON
KEENLYSIDE, TOM
MacKAY,  JIM
LYONS, HUGH
MacKAY, WALLY
McGregor, george
morton, ken
morton, roy
MOWATT, GRAHAM
MILLAR, IAN
OLSON, BOB
OLSON, PHIL
PIERCY, EARLE
ROPER, AUSTIN
ROBINSON, MAL
RUSH, GEORGE
SAGER,  MURRAY
STEWART,  WILLIAM
WHITE, PATRICK
WOODCROFT, JOHN
WOODS, ERIC
YOUNGER, ANDY
Beta Theta Pi was founded at Miami University, Ohio,
in 1839.    Gamma Omicron was installed at UBC in 1936.
The colours of the fraternity are light shades of pink
and blue, and the flower is a rose.
President   of   Gamma   Omicron   this   year   was   Bob
Binnie.
Beta Theta Pi
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-nine ALLEN, JOHN
BELL, RALPH
BLUMENAUER,  GEORGE  H.
BROE, KENNETH L.
BUCHANAN, JIM
BULLEN, CHARLIE
DAVEY,  GRANT
DENKMAN, NORMAN H.
EMBREE, BILL
FENN, RAYMOND A.
FORBES, JACK
FORDYCE, DAVE
HANSEN, HARRIS
HETHERINGTON, JACK D.
JOHNSON, ART
JOSEPHSON, GIL
McKINNON, NEIL
McLEAN, ALISTER
MILLER, GARRY
NELSON, BILL
NILAN, BOB
WILLIS, THOMAS G.
PEACOCK, BOB C.
SMITH, ARTHUR B.
WINTER, WALTER
STEELE, IAN M.
Delta Upsilon
£   SI
Delta Upsilon was founded at Williams College in 1834.
The UBC chapter was installed in 1935.
The colours of the fraternity are old gold and sapphire blue, the pin is a monogram of the Greek letters.
President   of   the   UBC   chapter this year was Jack
Hetherington.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty ALMAS, G.
BAKKEN, 0.
BRYANT, J.
BUTTERWORTH, E.
CLIMIE, J.
FRANCIS, F.
GEORGE, S.
GREGORY, E.
HARDY, G.
HAYWARD, G.
HOOSON, W.
KELLY, J.
KING, J. D.
McLEOD, M.
MATHESON, W.
MORAN, J.
MOORE, W.
MOYLS, J.
MOYLS, M.
PEDERSEN,   C.
PORTEUS, S.
ROBERTSON, E.
SHORT, J.
SKENE, A.
SMITH, H.
STILWELL, A.
WARRENDER, C.
WILLIAMS, T.
Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of Virginia in 1869, and the UBC chapter was installed in 1941,
making it the youngest of UBC's fraternities.
The colours are emerald green and white, the flower
a lily-of-the-valley.
The president of the UBC chapter this year was Frank
Francis.
Kappa Sigma
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-one BODIE, BOB
CRAWFORD, BILL
CROCKER,  CHARLIE
ESTEY, BOB
FLEMING, ORMIE
GARDOM, GARDY
HOGAN, LEW
JONES, ART
JONES, STAN
LEWIS, AL
LOTT, JOE
MacCARTER, BILL
McCUSKER, TOM
NEWSON, DON
PITTS, HARRY
SCOTT, J. T.
TAYLOR, TED
WALKER, BUZZ
WEBER, RON
WIGHT, LARRY
Phi Delta Theta
Phi Delta Theta was founded in 1848, at Miami University, Ohio, and the UBC chapter was installed in 1930.
The colours of the fraternity are argent and azure, the
flower a white carnation.
President of UBC Alpha this year was J. T. Scott.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-two . . . ABBOTT, TOM
BLACK, NORM
CAIRNS, DICK
CAMPBELL, DAN
GALBRAITH, EWEN
JULIAN, TERRY
LOCKHART, JERRY
MacDONALD, DON
MacPHERSON, KEN
MacLEOD, DON
PEDLOW, KEN
RIPLEY,  HUGH
SCEATS, HUGH
SMITH, DON
SMITH,  BRUCE
WHITTAKER, BILL
YOUNG,  ARCHIE
YATES, DOUG
Phi Gamma Delta was founded at Washington and
Jefferson College in 1848. The UBC chapter, Pi Gamma,
was installed in 1929.
The fraternity colour is royal purple, and the flower
is a purple clematis.
Phi Gamma Delta
A
<$.r.A.
. . Page Two Hundred and Thirty-three GORDY, JOHN
HAMMERSLEY,  DON
HILLIER, CHUCK
LATIMER, NORM
OSTLE, BERNIE
O'BRIEN, BILL
PUDNEY, PETE
STILL, JACK
TERRACE, JIM
YOUNG, VIC
Phi Kappa Sigma
Phi Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of
Pennsylvania in 1850, and the UBC chapter was installed
in 1936.
The fraternity colours are gold and black, and jewelry
is prohibited on the pin.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-four . . COTTER, CHESTER
CREIGHTON, KEN
FORRESTER, JOHN
HUGHES, ROGER
JOHNSTON, ARNOLD
JOHNSTON, ROY
KIRBY, GORDON
KILLAS, KOSTER
PEARSON, LARRY
STAMATIS, JOHN
TUFTELAND, JACK
Psi Upsilon was founded in 1833 at Union College,
New York. The UBC chapter, Zeta Zeta, was installed in
1935.
The colours are garnet and gold.
President of Zeta Zeta this year was Alex MacKenzie.
Psi Upsilon
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-five BATEMAN, BILL
BEWELL, BRUCE
BOWELL, STEVE
BUNNELL, FRANK
CARVER, BOB
COCHRANE, JIM
CREELMAN, ELLIOT
ELLIS, HARRY
FINNIE, DOUG
HANEY, FRANK
HEAL, GORDON
HORTON, BILL
HOWIE, HANK
KER, BOB
LEFEAUX, STU
LLOYD, GEORGE
MEARNS, AL
MONTADOR, JOHN
MOORE, CHARLIE
McADAM,  CLIFF
McGINN, ALEX
NICHOLSON, BILL
OLSEN, NORMAN
PARLIAMENT, HARVEY
PERRIS, GEORGE
RUTQUIST, FRED
SCOTT, TOM
SCOTT, BRUCE
SERAPHIM, ANDREW
SERAPHIM,  BOB
SHARP, BILL
TUKHAM, FRED
WILLIS, NORMAN
Sigma Phi Delta
Sigma Phi Delta was founded at the University of
Southern California, in 1926, by the combination of two
societies.
It is an international professional engineering fraternity and government is by supreme council under a grand
president.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-six . . BARER, RALPH
BERSON, MORRIS
FLADER, SAM
KOLBERG, JOE
KORSCH, STAN
RAPHAEL, LES
ROTHSTEIN, MORT
ZACKS, BILL
Zeta Beta Tau
Zeta. Beta Tau was founded in 1898, at City College
in New York, and the small local fraternity of Alpha Chi
received the charter and joined the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity
in 1941.
The colours of the fraternity are blue and white.
The president of the UBC chapter this year was Les
Raphael.
. Page Two Hundred and Thirty-seven BIBBS, DICK
BELYEA, DOUG
CLARK, DOUG
HILL, FRED
MANZER, NOBEL
MITTEN, LEN
MARGACH, JACK
MILLER,  HUGH
McFEELY, CAM
PALMER, RUSS
POWELL, JOHN
PROWD, LAWRENCE
PEIRSON, GEORGE
UNDERWOOD, ELDIN
WELLS, JACK
Zeta Psi
Zeta Psi was founded at New York University in 1847,
and Sigma Epsilon chapter was installed at UBC in 1926.
The fraternity colour is white and the flower is a white
carnation.
President of Sigma Epsilon this year was Dick Bibbs.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-eight APPLEBY, LYON
BEGUIN, ANDRE
BURGESS, HAL
BURGESS, JACK
BRUCE, JACK
COADY, CAM
GILLIS, JACK
GRIFFITHS, DON
KELLS, OWEN
LARKIN, GRANT
MacDONALD, KEITH
MacNAUGHTON, BOB
MENZIES, BUNNY
OLIVER, JOHN
TIEDJE, HANK
Phi Kappa Pi was founded in 1913, at the Universities
jf Toronto and McGill. Alpha Iota was installed at UBC
in 1924.
Fraternity colours are blue and gold.
President of Alpha Iota this year was Jack Burgess.
Phi Kappa Pi
. . Page Two Hundred and Thirty-nine This smUing group of coeds comprises the hardworking Pan-Hell. Council.
Pan-Hell completes a busy year .
The Pan-Hellenic Council, composed of two members from each sorority, is the organization through
which pass the affairs of the Greek Letter Sororities.
As a representative group, it has, on a smaller scale,
much  the  same  task  as  the  Students'   Council.
Perhaps its greatest concern is that of planning
and supervising rushing. On such matters discipline
is rigid. The breaking of rushing regulations is considered a serious offence and is dealt with severely.
The Pan-Hellenic Council has endeavoured to keep
rushing strictly "above board" and every sorority
must act in accordance with the constitution which
it, as a member, has approved.
The Pan-Hellenic Council was responsible for the
organization of the Red Cross Ball. Under Chairman Mary Francis Trumbull, sororities and fraternities worked together to put over the major social
event of the year. The sale of admission and raffle
tickets, the formation of the chorus, the decorations
and costumes, the orchestra, and the pep-meet, were
all responsibilities of committees of Pan-Hell.
The executive of the Pan-Hellenic Council this
year consisted of: President, Mary Francis Trumbull; vice-president, Barbara MacPherson; secretary,
Audrey Buchanan;  treasurer, Catherine Smart.
Mary Frances Trumbull, Audrey Buchanan
Page Two Hundred and Forty BEHNSEN, THELMA
CHATWIN, MARY
CUNNINGHAM, PAT
FISCHER, JOAN
GREENE, BARBARA
HAGGART, ELINOR
IRELAND, LULLA
JOHNSON, MAXINE
MORGAN, HELEN
MacLAREN, ADA
MACPHERSON,  BARBARA
NALOS, ERIKA
QUAN, MARY
STEWART, ROSEMARY
VAN GORDER, JULIE
"Leadership, service and co-operation" led the women's honourary sorority, Delta Sigma Pi, through its second year on the UBC campus. Under president Lulla Ireland, honourary president Dean D. Mawdsley, and the
executive, consisting of vice-president Mary Quan, secretary-treasurer Joan Fischer and historian Elinor Haggart,
the sorority carried on its activities as a discussion group
and women's society under the Women's Undergraduate
Society. The founder of the sorority last year was Mary
Mulvin who was WUS president the year before. Under
the executive and the Faculty Advisory Council, consisting
of Dr. Isabel Maclnnes and Dr. Joyce Hallamore, the
sorority lived up to its aforesaid motto and kept the "torch
of scholarship" on their pins burning.
Delta Sigma Pi
Page  Two  Hundred and  Forty-one trw
BAMPTON, DIANA
BAMPTON, VIRGINIA
BEECH, EMMA
BLOCH, INEZ
BREADON, MARY
COLLINS, JUNE
COLQUHOUN, LENORE
CROLL, MARGARET
DAVY, SHEILA
FERGUSON,  JEAN
GARRARD, AUDREY
HODGSON, BETTY
HODGSON, MARGARET
KELSBERG, BARBARA
KIRKPATRICK, SHEILA
McDONALD, ISABEL
MJOS, LILLIAN
MORRIS, YVETTE
NICHOLSON, KATHERINE
RENNIE, JEAN
RODENCHUK, JENNY
SMART,  CATHERINE
THOMPSON, ANITA
URQUHART, DOREEN
VEEBERG, RUTH
WATSON, WAVERLIE
Alpha Delta Pi
Alpha Delta Pi was founded at Wesleyan College,
Georgia, in 1851. Beta Kappa was installed at UBC in
1931. The colours are pale blue and white, the flower is
a single purple violet.
President of Beta Kappa this year was Marg. Croll.
Page Two Hundred and Forty-two ADAMS, GERRY
BENNETT, ANNE
BARTHOLOMEW,  YVONNE
CARNSEW, VALERIE
CHATWIN, MARY
CULTER, MARY
DALAWRAK,  ELSIE
DUNCAN, HELEN
DUNDAS, MARDEE
ELLIS, CATHERINE
GREENE, BARBARA
INCH, BEA
MATHESON, BETTY-JANE
McLEISH, GLENNA
McLEISH, SHEILA
MUNN, ANNE
MORESBY, BARBARA
NICHOLLS, DEE
PRONGER, IVY
QUEBEC, MONA
REID, DIANNE
REID, JUNE
RENWICK, BETH   '
ROSS,  ELIZABETH
SALTER, PAT
SANDERSON, JOY
STANDEVEN, RITA
STEELE,  MARJORIE
STONEHOUSE, ALICE
WEBER, MARJORIE
WHITE, LESLIE
Alpha Gamma Delta was founded at Syracuse University, New York, in 1904. Delta Zeta was installed at UBC
in 1930. The colours are rose, buff and green, the flowers
red and buff roses.
President of Delta Zeta this year was Marion
McDonald.
Alpha Gamma Delta
. . . Page Two Hundred and Forty-three ANDERSON, BETTE
AIREY, FRANCES
BITZ, MARIE
DALRYMPLE, SUZANNE
GOODMAN,  JUANITA
GUIMONT,  MARCARET
GUY, BEVERLY
KERR, HELEN
LYONS, NANCY
MEHAN, BETTY LOU
McCABE, MARGARET
PLENDERLEITH, MAVIS
PUTTE, MADELINE van de
SMITH, MARJORIE
STACEY, IRIS
STACEY, MAY
STAMATIS, PATRICIA
WHITE, RUTH
WRIGHT, EVELYN
Alpha Omicron Pi
Alpha Omicron Phi was founded at Barnard College,
New York. Beta Kappa was installed at UBC in 1931.
Colours are cardinal and white, the flower a red rose.
President of Beta Kappa this year was Mandy Van de
Putte.
Page Two Hundred and Forty-four . . .
\ ANDERSON, JOYCE
AXFORD, PAT
BAXTER, BERNICE
BEHNSEN, THELMA
BLAIR, OLIVER
BORGERSON, PAT
BUCKNALL, JOY
COYLE, PAT
d'EASUM, BEV
FISCHER, JOAN
FORBES, LOUISE
HAMILTON, JOAN
HOOD, MARG
LANG, LORNA
LORD, HELEN
MacFARLANE, JEAN
McDONALD, ROMA
OUTERBRIDGE,  HETTIE
dePENCIER, EDITH MARY
PITMAN, NANCY
STEVENS, JOAN -
TURNBULL, FRANCES
WALTON, BETTY
WOODMAN, MABEL
m
m/j^
Alpha Phi was founded at Syracuse University, New
York, in 1872. Beta Theta was installed in 1928. The
colours are silver gray and bordeaux, the flowers a forget-
me-not and a lily-of-the-valley.
President of Beta Theta this year was Thelma Behnsen.
Alpha Phi
Page  Two  Hundred  and Forty-five BROWN, ANNE
CLARK, ESTHER
DeBECK,   MYLEEN
DEWDNEY, PAMELA
GRANT, PHYLLIS
HARRIS, BETTY
HARRIS, JULIENNE
HUTCHINSON, MARIE
JONES, BARBARA
McGEE, MARGARET
PARKER, MARGARET
PAULIN, ELIZABETH
RODGERS, JOAN
STILL, CONNIE
THOMPSON, BETTY
Delta Gamma
Delta Gamma was founded at Lewis School, Mississippi, in 1874. Alpha Phi was installed at UBC in 1928.
The colours are pink, blue and bronze, the flower a cream-
coloured rose.
President of Alpha Phi this year was Boo Hutchings.
Page Two Hundred and Forty-six ANDREWS, DOROTHY ANN
BELTON, NANCY
BLAIS, ANDREE
BROWN, PADDY
BRYER^  EDITH
BUCHANAN, AUDREY
BURTON, PEGGY
COUGHLAN, DALE
d'EASUM, EDLIN
DOLMAGE, MARY
DONEGANI, JOY
FLAVELLE, SIDNEY
GOLOS, VIVIAN
IRVING, LORNA
LAIRD, DAPHNE
LAKE, JUNE
LAMBERT, NONA
LEACH,  SHIRLEY
LIVINGSTON,   TRUDY
MacASKILL, BARBARA
MacGILLIVRAY, VERDA
MacLEOD, DOROTHY
MacLEOD, MARGARET
MANNING, VALERIE
MANSON,  MARION
MARTIN, DIERDRE
MARTIN, MURIEL
MORGAN, HELEN
PRATT, JOAN
ROBSON, MARITA
SCHWABE, MIRIAM
SHIELDS, LORNA
SINCLAIR, JEAN
SMITH, ANN
STEWART, ANNE
SYMONDS, ANN
TWIZELL, BARBARA
WHITE, JEAN
WHITE LOISE
WILLIAMS,  DOROTHY
MU
Gamma Phi Beta
Gamma Phi Beta was founded at Syracuse University,
New York, in 1874. Alpha Lambda was installed at UBC
in 1928. The colours are fawn and seal brown, the flower
a carnation.
President of Alpha Lambda this year was Ann Stewart.
Page Two Hundred and Forty-seven ANDERSON, JOAN
BALL, MARIAN
BEALE, MARGIE
CREASE, AUDREY
FROSTRUP, ELISHA
GRAHAM, ANNE
HAGGART,  ELINOR
HAMMOND, MARY
HAYES, DOROTHY
HOLT, PEGGY
JORDAN, PATSY
McDIARMID,   BARBARA
McINTOSH, PHYLLIS
MacKENZIE, ISABEL
MACPHERSON, BARBARA
RIPLEY, MARY
ROGERS,  ELAINE
SMITH, BARBARA
STAFFORD, CORA MAY
WALTON, VIVIAN
WILLS, EILEEN
WILSON, LORNA
YOUNG, DIANA
Kappa Alpha Theta
Kappa Alpha Theta was founded at DePaw, Indiana,
in 1870. Beta Upsilon was installed at UBC in 1930. The
colours are black and gold, the flower a black and gold
pansy. President of Kappa Alpha Theta this year was Babs
MacPherson.
Page Two Hundred and Forty-eight . BELL, BARBARA
BENNETT, MARGARET
BLACK, RUNA
BOULTBEE,  PAT
BOWELL,- NANCY
CAMPBELL, ANNETTE
CHENOWETH, PAT
CLARKE, JOAN
COPP, MARNY
CUNNINGHAM, PAT
FARRELL, BILLIE
HEBB, BOOTY
JOHNSON,  MAXINE
KING, CASEY
LEE, ROSEMARY
McDONALD,  FRANKIE
McGLASHAN, PAM
McLENNEN, ANN
NATION, LIB.
PANTON, SALLY
PARNUM, RUTH
PHELAN, MARY
ROSE, MARY ANN
RUSSELL, TOPSY
SMITH, DOROTHY
TRUMBULL, MARY FRANCES
VANTREIGHT, ELSIE
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Kappa Kappa Gamma was founded at Monmouth College, Illinois, in 1870. Gamma Upsilon was installed at
UBC in 1929. The colours are dark and light blue, the
flower a fleur-de-lys.
President of Gamma Upsilon this year was Pat
Cunningham.
. . Page  Two  Hundred  and  Forty-nine ARCHEK, LILLIAN
BAKER, RENEE
BECKER, RUTH
.BRODY, FLORENCE
CAMMERMAN, MARGARET
CHERNOV, EVA
COHEN, ANNETTE
DAVIDS, DOREEN
EPSTEIN,  ROCHELLE
HOREN, NICKY
KATZNELSON, EDITH
LIPSON, PEGGY
LOTZKAR,  EVA
NAGAR, DOROTHY
STEINER,  IRENE
Sigma Iota Pi
Sigma Iota Pi is a new sorority to the campus this year.
It has been recognized by the Alma Mater Society and sanctioned by Pan-Hellenic Association. Their colours are
orange, black, green, their flower the tiger lily, and their
symbol a palm tree.
Page Two Hundred and Fifty Ada McLaren, Nancy McLaren, Ivy Pronger, Marjorie Hood, Sheila Carlisle,
Julie Van Gorder, Ruth  White, Nancy Pitman, Phyllis Ney
... Phrateres, Famous for Friendliness
The Theta chapter of Phrateres at the University
of British Columbia has lived up to the Phraterian
motto of "famous for friendliness", in all its activities. The UBC chapter is the only branch of this
organization, which embraces most of the universities
in the western United States, to be set up in Canada
so far.
The chapter is organized along the same general
lines as a sorority, but is open for membership to all
women attending university. Girls in first year are
especially welcome, and most Freshettes join each
year. Many Phraterians retain their membership in
the organization throughout their full four years at
Varsity. Every effort is made by the Phrateres to
welcome new co-eds upon their arrival on the campus
and to make them feel as much at home as possible.
During Freshman initiation week, at the beginning
of the fall term, the upper class women arrange a
number of firesides at various members' homes
where newcomers mingle with older members to eat,
play records, knit, and simply chat. Also on the initiation program is the annual university church
service, which is held at one of the downtown churches
and which all Freshettes are invited to attend with
their Phratere "big sisters." These functions aid the
Freshettes   in   becoming   acquainted  with  others   of
their number from different parts of the city or province, to meet the women in senior years, and to learn
something of the ins and outs of campus life.
Phrateres is by far the largest organization on the
campus, including half the female population of the
University, and because of its size it is divided into
a number of sub-chapters, each of which has its own
president and executive, and holds its own separate
dances, meetings, and activities. The activities of the
organization as a whole are integrated by the presidents of the sub-chapters who meet every two weeks
to keep things running smoothly. The sub-chapters
do have a large degree of independence in their
actions, however.
An inter-chapter competition is carried on throughout the year, with the most outstanding chapter being
presented with a small silver cup at the conclusion
of the year. The girl in each chapter who has the
highest scholastic standing in the exams receives a
sterling silver identification bracelet with her name
inscribed on it, to wear for half a year.
As has been the custom with all Varsity women's
organizations for the past five years, Phrateres have
spent much of their time this year with various
phases of war work. Drives for used magazines,
quilting bees, knitting and sewing for the Red Cross,
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-one May Chambers, Sue Pendleton, Teddy  Watts, Helen Burns, Pat  Mayne,    Teddy   Knapp,   Marilyn   Miller,   Agnes  Mehling,
Elsie  Smellie,  Margaret  Driver,  Betty  Jean  Home,  Margaret Jones, Terry Payne, Beverly Bassett, Stella Bakony,
Joan Denman, Phyllis Hepburn
and many other activities contributing to the war
effort are undertaken by the sub-chapters. Interest
in this work is heightened by the fact that the chapter
with the best record is awarded points towards the
winning of the Phrateres' cup.
With the arrival of the wounded men at Union and
Anglican Colleges, members of Phrateres arranged to
visit the veterans at the hospitals twice a week. Under
the leadership of Maxine Lindow, girls were chosen
from the various chapters to attend the weekly dance
held in Anglican College. The Eta chapter made
scrapbooks of stories and cartoons which they thought
would appeal to the men, and would relieve the hours
of boredom.
At   Christmas  time,   money   was   donated   to   the
Strathcona   Day   Nursery.    Lambda chapter bought
Marguerite Burns, Helen Kites, Peggy Burns, Evelyn  Walling, Jean MacFarlane, Ann Vlag, Mary Montgomery, Joan Burnett,
Alice Elart, Joan Perry, Jane Hern, Agnes Pappajohn, Charlotte  Corbette, Marion  Wright
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-two Marg Bone, Eve Chernov, Joan Park, H. M. Smith, Irene Steiner, Kay MacLaughlin, Marcella Hoskins, Gert Cotterall, Cash
Wilson, Betty Paddon, Jean Auld, Joyce Clarke, Frances Matthews,   Betty  Cuthbert,   Gerry  Eddy,  Cathy  Stewart, Marney
McLellan, Mary  Wilson, Marg Merry, Ruth Becker, Joan Kerr, Muriel Penn, Beverley Hall, Alma  Wright
Christmas gifts for the children of the Columbia Coast
Missions, while other chapters aided the crippled
children's hospital. Following the success of the
scrapbooks for the returned men, picture books were
made and sent to the coast missions and the children's
hospital. A service dance was held, and a tea was
served by Alpha chapter in aid of the prisoners of
This year, a new and improved system of voting
was inaugurated. In former years, only a few members of the All Phrateres Executive were voted into
office. Those girls who were defeated in the elections took the positions which were still open. By
the new plan, not only was a whole slate voted on, but
the elections were held in January instead of the
usual March.    This  move was  made to  enable the
Shirley Woodward, Pat Drope, Peggy Holt, Patsy Jordan, Peggy Vaughan, Diana Bampton, Marguerite Butters, Shirley MacLean,
Milla   Fedorojf,   Bette   Hodgson,   Helen   Trethaway,   Virginia  Bampton,  Glenna McLeish,  Dianne  Reid,  Beverly  Chalmers,
Eda Edwards, Helen McTurk, Jeanette Smith
. Page Two Hundred and Fifty-three June Aubrey, Audrey Jutte, Peggy Aveling,
Evelyn Anderson, Jessie Hudson, Shirley Hill, Meg Wright, Jessie MacCarthy,
Peggy McKenzie
new executive to get some' idea of their jobs, while
some experienced aid was still available. During the
spring term, the incoming officers worked in conjunction with the present ones, and were duly installed
into their new offices at the initiation ceremony.
The highlight of a Phraterian's social calendar Was
the Waltz Time Formal, held in Brock Hall the first
week in November.   The dance held all the glamour
that any feminine heart could desire. This year's
impressive candledight initiation ceremony filled two
purposes: it served as the formal induction of the
new members, and as the installation of next year's
executive. To supplement hard study and sober war-
work the sub-chapters of Phrateres planned a number of parties. Tramp parties, mixers, theatre parties,
roller skating, ice skating, and bowling parties kept
Winifred Grant, Georgene Lawrence, Maxine Lindow, Auril Thomasson, Peggy Pepper, Betsy Ann Debeck, Betty Motherwell,
Nancy Wilson, Helen Voss, Marion Boyle, Ruth WUkins, Margaret Ford,   Margaret Berg,   Agnes  Wharton,   Babs  Henderson
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-four Kay Nicholson, Edie WUcox, Irene WUson, Shirley Baynes, J eon   Bawin,   Mignonne   Barclay-Ross,   Marion   Hugh,   Nancy
Macdonald, Collen  Hadwen, Elizabeth Sutherland, Jeanne  Watson,   Margaret   Techy,   Blanche   Turner,   Rosemary  Brought
Phraterians gay and friendly. In co-operation with
WUS, Phrateres sponsored the Cupid Capers, also
held in the Brock in March.
The executive this year consisted of: Honorary
president, Dean Dorothy Mawdsley; honorary vice-
president, Dr. Joyce Hallamore; president, Julie Van-
Gorder; vice-president, Nancy Pitman; corresponding
secretary, Ruth White; recording secretary, Phyllis
Ney; treasurer, Marjorie Hood; sub-chapter chairman, Sheila Carlyle; publicity chairman, Ada Mac-
Laren;   social  service chairman,   Ivy  Pronger;   and
membership and initiation chairman, Billy Oliver.
Sub-chapter presidents were: Alpha, Marita Robson; Beta, Audrey Jutte; Gamma, Yvette Morris;
Delta, Ruth Hardy; Epsilon, Maxine Lindow; Eta,
Irene Steiner; Zeta, Pat Mayne; Kappa, Betty Scott;
Lambda, Nancy Macdonald; Omicron, Peggy Holt;
and Sigma, Waverley Watson.
The Phrateres summer camp, which is held during
the week immediately following exams, is usually one
in which all the members recuperate from their university worries.
. . Page  Two Hundred and Fifty-five Forestry Club
Bob  Knowles,  Guy Cawley, Harry Castillou, Stan  Korsch,
Jim Phelps, Sammy Flader
. Physics Society
Promoting interest in forestry, and acting as an
employment bureau, kept the Forestry Club busy this
year. One of the main interests of the club is to
provide summer work for the forestry students. They
also keep the graduates informed as to what goes on
in forestry at UBC.
The high point of their work this year was the
presentation of a brief to the Sloan Commission in
January. This brief, which was compiled largely
through the efforts of the club, urged the establishment of a Faculty of Forestry with a degree of
Bachelor of the Science of Forestry at the University.
Officers this year were: President, Bob Knowles;
secretary, Stan Korsch; treasurer, Jack McKercher;
head of special committee, Harry Castillou.
The Physics Society meets twice monthly to hear
and discuss papers for the benefit of all students interested in physics. Before Christmas the staff of
the physics department and other outstanding speakers in the field of physics present papers. After
Christmas students present papers and a prize is
awarded to the undergraduate who presents the best
paper.
The last meeting of the year is usually held at the
home of Dr. G. M. Shrum, Head of the Physics Department. At this meeting a graduate presents a
paper on his research work for his Master's Degree.
The executive of the club this year is: President,
Don Ivey; secretary-treasurer, W. B. Thompson;
vice-president, L. V. Holroyd.
Don Ivey, Bill Thompson, Louis Holroyd
. . . Mathematics Club
Bill Thompson, Eleanor Mayo, Tom Whittemore
The Mathematics Club, formed of mathematically-
minded students on the campus, has as its aims the
stimulation of interest in the various branches of
this subject. The members of the club gave addresses in the special branches of maths in which
they themselves are interested.
The club invites guest speakers to give lectures on
mathematical topics, at several of the meetings during the year. Among these lecturers were Dr. Mas-
low, associate professor of psychology, and Dr. Murdoch of the maths department.
The membership of the club is of necessity limited
and students must have taken, or be taking Math 10,
or its equivalent. The meetings were held every two
weeks at the members' homes.
The executive of the club this year consisted of:
Tom Whittemore, president; Bill Thompson, vice-
president; Eleanor Mayo, secretary.
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-six Founded to bring the students and members of
the staff of the geology department closer together,
the G. M. Dawson Club has since expanded to include students of mining and metallurgy. In addition to weekly noon-hour meetings at which members give informal talks, the club also holds monthly
evening meetings addressed by prominent geologists.
This gives the students an opportunity to meet members of the profession.
Each year the club attends the Annual Western
Meeting of the Canadian Institute of Mining and
Metallurgy, of which it is a student branch, and
makes a field trip to a mine or some other operation.
The executive consists of: Honorary president,
Prof. C. 0. Swanson; president, Bob Olsen; vice-
president, Fred Roots; secretary-treasurer, Bill
Sharp;  fourth year representative, Harris Hansen.
Dawson Club
Fred Roots, Bob Olsen, Harris Hansen, Bill Sharp
The Newman Club, its membership composed of
students of the Roman Catholic faith, aims for the
friendly association of all Catholic students on a religious, intellectual and social basis. The agenda of
the club during the year included Communion breakfasts, socials with the alumni group, roller skating
parties, and discussions on current religious topics
at the informal meetings at various homes throughout the year.
The club started something new this year when
they held a Mardi Gras with colorful costumes and
all the settings at the Masonic Hall in February, and
made it a great success.
The executive of the club consisted of the following members: Bill O'Brien, president; Marg Gui-
mont, Aline Ralston, Don Weeks, Ursula Stead, Jack
and Leo Leavy and Jack O'Neill.
Newman Club
Aline  Ralston,  Don   Weeks,  Marg  Guimont,   Ursula  Stead,
Bill  O'Brian, Jack Leavy,  Leo  Leavy, Jack O'Neill
The Chinese Club has a membership which includes all the Chinese students on the campus. It
was formed to bring them together for discussion
groups,  social evenings, and  entertainment.
Their activities during the year included meetings
with speeches by various prominent persons, followed by open forum discussions.
To introduce the Chinese freshman to the activity
of campus life, the executive arranged a Frosh reception. They also organized a Christmas party and a
very successful hike up the mountain.
This   year   the   executive   is  made up   of:   Mary
Quan,    president;     Gilbert    Wong, vice-president;
Vivian Wong, secretary; Dick Chow, treasurer; and
Joseph Kent, social convener.
. . Chinese Students Club
Vivian   Wong,   Mary   Quan,   Dirk   Chow,  Joseph   Kent,
Gilbert   Wong
. . . Page  Two  Hundred and Fifty-seven . . Varsity Christian Fellowship
Li la Shields, Jean Oben, Wilbur Sutherland, Jessie Strachan,
Jean  Brotherton, Jim Martin, Godfrey Shultz, Les Babb,
Hilary Carre
The Varsity Christian Fellowship has grown considerably since the year 1925, when it made its first
appearance on the campus. Over fifty students
have been actively connected with the group in the
past year, and many more have attended the different club functions and the varied programs
offered.
The group is affiliated with similar bodies
throughout the world under the name Inter-Varsity
Christian Fellowship, an inter-denominational organization.
This year's executive was: Wilbur Sutherland,
president; Jessie Strachan, vice-president; Jean
Oben, corresponding secretary; Godfrey Schultz,
missionary secretary; Les Babb, membership secretary; Lila Shields, treasurer; Hillary Carre, advertising manager; Jim Martin, science representative;
Jim Brotherton, junior member.
. Home Economics Club
Catherine   George,   Maxine   Johnson,   Jean   McKenzie,
Joan Park
The Home Economics Club, formed only one year
ago, was organized in conjunction with the introduction of a Home Economics course at UBC.
Realizing that the course was new, and wishing to
know more about the possibilities of this field, the
students felt that they would enjoy discussions relative to the careers they wished to follow. Their
hopes became realized as a result of the resourceful
energy of Miss Dorothy Lefebvre, Associate Professor, and Acting Head of the Department.
For their bi-monthly meetings in the Arts building
the executive was fortunate in procuring a number
of guest speakers. Particularly interesting were the
addresses given on dietetics and interior decorating.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Maxine Johnson; vice-president, Jean McKenzie;
secretary, Catherine George.
Historical Society
Pat  While, Doug Clark, Pam Mitchell
Although the Historical Society numbers only 14,
and although the membership of the club is limited
to third and fourth-year students, the club has been
extremely active during the past year.
The purpose of the club is the study and discussion of historical problems. The members at each
meeting present a paper or report on some vital question concerning history, after which they hold an
open discussion of the topic.
At the end of the year a banquet is held at which
some prominent speaker addresses the club, or a
paper is read by one of the members.
The executive for last year consisted of: Doug
Clark, president; Pat White, vice-president; and
Pam Mitchell, secretary.
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-eight The Monro Pre-Medical Club enjoyed an extremely active year, with a membership of over two
hundred. Twenty-five surgical and obstetrical films
were shown at regular semi-monthly meetings
throughout the year. Groups composed of first and
second-year students made trips to local hospitals to
observe operations; groups composed of third and
fourth-year students also made two operation trips
and three trips to observe autopsies.
Two surveys were made by the president of the
club. One dealt with pre-medical requirements for
Canadian Medical Schools with the result that a
recommended pre-medical course could be outlined.
The second survey dealt with the possibility of B.C.
students being admitted to Medical schools.
The executive was: Allan Macfarlane, president;
Robert Wener, vice-president; and Jean Gray,
secretary.
. . . Monro Pre-Med. Club
F
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1
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1 mL^M
Bob Wener, Al Macfarlane, Jean Gray
Jewish students and Jewish returned men attending this university make up the membership of the
Menorah Society. Its aims are cultural in scope,
and discussions on pertinent questions and problems pertaining to the struggle throughout the world
for the principles of racial and religious tolerance
form the basis for the activities of the society.
Many guest speakers were heard during the year
and various topics of interest to the members as a
whole were brought up. The meetings were held
informally as group discussions at private homes
during the year.
The executive of the society this year consisted of
the following members: Trev Glucksman, president;
Robert Wener, vice-president; Marcia Gurvitz, secretary; Irene Steiner, treasurer; Aaron Zivot,
freshman representative.
. . . Menorah Society
Bob   Wener,  Trevor Glucksman,  Irene Steiner,  Aaron Zivot.
The Jazz Society was formed early this year to
popularize jazz on the campus as an art form of
music. At present the club has about 75 members,
all of them enthusiasts.
Their activities include a weekly record session
and a jam session, again with records, at one of the
members' homes. At their weekly jam sessions the
members study the work of leading jazz musicians.
The biggest activity of the year was the presentation in the auditorium of a live, improvised jam
session, with the assistance of the Deep River Boys,
and leading city jazz musicians.
The executive of the club is: Roy Lowther, president; Jack Cohen, vice-president; Ross Strand, secretary; Mona Quebec, librarian-treasurer; and John
Short, publicity director.
. . . Jazz Club
Ross Stroud, Jack  Cohen, Mona Quebec, John Short,
Roy Lowther
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-nine Psychology Club
June  Aubrey,  Sheila  Carlisle,  Bob   Wener,  Jean  Pridham
Psychology is a quickly growing field of science,
the importance of which is becoming greater as new
discoveries are made. This ever-expanding field is
studied by the members of the Psychology Club.
Field trips to Essondale and Gordon House, and
lectures by well-known persons such as Doctor Lin-
denfeld of Vienna, are only part of the activities engaged in by the Psychology Club whose aim is to
promote an interest in extra-curricular Psychology.
Perhaps the most interesting feature is the annual
visit to a spiritualistic session and subsequent exposure. This is not only interesting, but also practical and highly amusing.
President this year was Jean Pridham. Other
members of the executive were: Bob Wener, Sheila
Carlisle, and June Aubrey.
. . . Women's Public Speaking Club
Elizabeth  Evans,  Mary  Lou  Jefferys,  Lois  Crook
The Women's Public Speaking Club is for the
benefit of those students wishing to gain poise and
experience when speaking before an audience.
Its members, desiring a sounder knowledge of the
fundamentals of speech making, followed the outline
of a public speaking course offered by the University Extension Department. They gained practice by
delivering short prepared speeches to the club
members.
During the second term panel discussions were
held. Each of these was led by four major speakers who expressed their opinions and encouraged
the others lo join in the general discussion.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Elizabeth Evans; vice-president, Lois Crook; secretary,
Mary-Lou Jeffrey.
Letters Club
Mary  Quan, Burton  Kurth
Dedicated to the pursuit of the benefits to be obtained from the study of literature, the Letters Club
is the oldest of the many discussion clubs on the
campus. Membership is limited to 24 upperclass
men and women with a common, keen interest in
all things literary.
The club meets fortnightly to hear papers read by
students on various aspects of literature, ancient
and modern. Upon the conclusion of the student's
remarks the meeting is turned over to an informal
criticism both of the paper read and of the field of
literature which it encompassed.
Once each year an "Original Contributions Night"
is held, when members bring forth short stories,
poems, and plays, of their own, for criticism.
This year's executive was Burton Kurth, president;   and Mary Quan,  secretary-treasurer.
Page Two Hundred and Sixty Organized on the UBC campus in 1938, the
student chapter of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers follows a definite program of instruction in practical engineering and public speaking at
its weekly meetings.
The society makes frequent field trips to local factories, this year visiting British Wire Ropes, Heaps
Engineering, and Vivian  Diesel.
The need of trained mechanical engineers who are
not only competent in their profession but also
trained in public speaking makes this club of prime
importance.,
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
president, Prof. W. 0. Richmond; president, Jim
Bryant; vice-president, Ross Hatte; secretary-treasurer, George Lloyd; librarian, Doug Finnie; program directors, Len Wannop and Don Stevens.
American Society of Mech. Engineers
Jim Bryant, Ross Hatte, George Lloyd
The French Club is made up of students who are
interested in furthering the study and understanding
of the French language and culture on the campus.
The members, who are divided fairly evenly
between the two sexes, meet once a month at noon
hour, to hold discussions on French ways of life.
All conversation at the meeting is carried on in
French. The group also plans putting on skits in
French for club members.
The club takes the place of two separate organizations, La Canadienne and La Cercle Francais,
which were formerly active on the campus.
The executive this year was made up of: Rohan
Peele, president; Aline Robertson, vice-president;
and Blanche Clayton, secretary.
. . . French Club
Aline  Ralston,  Rohan  Peele,  Blanche  Clayton
Economics are of vital importance in our quickly
changing world of today, and they are discussed and
studied by the Economics Society. The aim of this
society is to promote an interest in current economic
problems not discussed in class, and it is carried out
by the reading of papers on the field of economics,
followed by discussions. The problems discussed
are mainly of civic or provincial interest and provide a greater understanding of the business of our
land. Two guest speakers, President Norman MacKenzie and Bill Mercer, both specialists in their
field, appeared before the society this year.
President this year was Rosemary Stewart. Other
members of the executive were: Fred Carrothers,
Marjorie Smith, and Stewart Porteus.
. . . Economics Society
Fred   Carrothers,   Marjorie   Smith,   Rosemary   Stewart,
Stuart  Porteus
Page  Two  Hundred  and  Sixty-one' . . Engineers' Christian Fellowship
Ted Kirkpatrick, Jim Martin, Bob Cox, Les Babb,
Rowland Phare,  Gordon  Wolfram, Jack McLellan
The Engineers' Christian Fellowship, affiliated
with the Varsity Christian Union, is primarily concerned with furthering the Christian way of life.
Organized for the benefit of Engineers, the club
discusses religious problems particular to men following that profession. It is felt that they will encounter difficulties quite different from those at
other types of work.
Religion is dealt with from a strictly personal
point of view. An effort is made to draw the students closer to their religion. Prayer meetings are
held on the request of the members.
During the course of the year a number of firesides were held. Particularly enjoyed was an evening of music held in conjunction with the Varsity
Christian Union.
Student Christian Movement
^H   ^B& ^H
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1 1
Jean Pridham, Harry Penny, Marnie Tunbridge, Kay Halpin,
Bruce  Yorke, Jim   Williams, Julie  Van  Gorder,  Beth  Evans
The Student Christian Movement studies the life
of Christ from a scientific point of view. Treating
the Bible as a text, the members discuss the social
implications of Christ's teachings: how Christianity
affects a people's thinking and values; its relationship with philosophy, psychology, history, and
economics.
Desiring a well-rounded knowledge of current
events and trends, the students invited a large number of guest speakers. Among these were Dr. McKenzie, whose subject was power politics, and Mr:
Elmore Philpott, who spoke on Fascism.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Bruce Yorke; vice-president, Jim Williams; second
vice-president, Jean Pridham; secretaries, Marnie
Tunbridge, Julie Van Gorder; camp director, Kay
Halpin;  member-at-large, Rosemary Stewart.
American Institute of Electrical
Engineers
Harry Ellis, John  Woodcroft, Austin Roper, John Sansum,
Mickey Bodnar
Featuring films, informal talks by members, and
addresses by notable guest speakers, the American
Institute of Electrical Engineers aims to give students experience in the presentation and discussion
of technical papers as well as introduce them to
some subjects not included in the curriculum.
Guest speakers this year included Dr. G. G. Sedgwick who spoke on the importance of public speaking to the engineer, and the general manager of the
B. C Electric, who told ot-the type of work an engineer may expect on graduation.
The Institute also made a field trip to the transmitter of CBR on Lulu Island.
This year's executive consisted of: Staff advisor,
Prof. W. B. Coulthard; president, Harry Ellis; secretary-treasurer, Austin Roper; fourth year president,
John Sansum;  fourth year treasurer, Miles Bodnar.
Page Two Hundred and Sixty-two Meeting every week, the American Institute of
Chemical Engineers aims to give its members experience in presenting and discussing technical
papers and to foster interest in the development of
the profession of chemical engineering. At the
meetings students present papers and lead discussions. Book prizes are awarded to the authors of
the best papers of the year. Prominent chemical
engineers appear as guest speakers.
As the A.I.Ch.E. issues charters t o universities
with high standards only, the members are jusdy
proud of their organization. It is the only student
branch in Canada.
The executive for 1944-45 was: Honorary president, Mike Stusiak; president, John Powell; vice-
president, Mickey Burrows; recording secretary-
treasurer, George Perris; corresponding secretary,
Jim Leith; librarian, Basil Dunell.
The Junior Canadian Society of Technical Agriculturists was founded by Agriculture students in
the fall of 1940. It was the first club of its kind
in Canada.
The purpose of the club is to promote co-operation between students and faculty in the field of
agriculture. It keeps in contact with technically
trained men in all fields of the profession.
The club consists mainly of senior students, who
meet to discuss technical subjects, each student
drawing up a paper on some chosen topic during the
year.
New projects and methods of production, and conservation of materials, are being discussed with a
view to the post-war period.
The executive this year was: Ted Cook, president;
Neil McKinnon, vice-president; George Axen, secretary-treasurer;  and Dave Blair, curator.
. . . American Institute of Chemical
Engineers
Dr. Seyer, John Powell, Jim Leith, Mickey Burrows,
George Perris, BasU Dunell
. Junior Canadian Society of Technical
Agriculturists
Ted Cook, George Axen
The U.B.C. Film Society, the first of its kind in
Canada, was formed with the intention of learning to
handle movie projection equipment.
Organized primarily for instruction, the club
meets regularly to discuss technical improvements
and other new developments in film presentation.
Following the trends and gathering information, the
president gives the members what instruction they
need.
Working in close co-operation with the University
Extension Department, the Film Society has shown
many films varying in subject from those on foreign
languages to COTC training.
The Film Society provides operators for projection machines off the campus.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Norm Coleopy; secretary, Alan White; honorary
president, Dr. D. 0. Evans.
U.B.C. Film Society
Alan White, Dr. Evans, Norm Coleopy
. . Page  Two Hundred and Sixty-three Glider Club ^e Glider Club, an innovation on the campus this
year, was immediately popular with the students, as
soon as their plans for building and flying gliders
were made known.
At the time of going to press the club has one
glider under construction, and plans for many future
ones. There are also seven members of the club
working with the Vancouver Glider Club building
another glider of a different type.
The club plans to have their glider in the air this
summer, and they also hope to have a meet with the
Vancouver Glider Club.
The glider is of the Northrop Primary construction and has a wing span of thirty-four feet, with a
fuselage of seventeen feet,
The executive this year consisted of the following:
Frank Woodward, president; Bill Adams, secretary-
treasurer; George McLeod, production manager.
.  . Biology Discussions Club The   Biological   Discussions   Club,   organized   to
promote confidence in speaking and to stimulate in-
* -,        • • ;     terest and enthusiasm among students in the field of
biological sciences, this year consisted of twenty
active members including graduates and undergraduates as well as several honorary members
Spot-lighting each meeting was a paper presented
by some volunteer undergraduate or guest speaker
from which valuable and interesting discussions
arose. The undergraduate speaker for the fall
semester was Gerard R. Wyatt who spoke on "The
Outbreak of the Blackheaded Budworm on the Coast
of British Columbia." First guest speaker of the
semester was Dr. M. Y. Williams, geological paleontologist, speaking on "Extinct Forms."
Once a year a meeting is devoted to "Observation
„    „ .,,. , „        T    ,   _ ,,..,.. Night" when each member gives a brief account of
Ur. Griffiths, James Hatte, L. de Grace, Iola Musfeldt, . "
Gerry Wyatt an interesting situation he observed.
Social Problems Club ^e Social Problems Club was reorganized at the
beginning of the year on a non-partisan basis. The
constitution and program were revised with objects
of more active members and of more study.
The main activity of the SPC this year has been
in its discussion groups and study groups in order
to develop in students a better understanding of
social problems.
Large public meetings have been held at which
well-known speakers have been presented, including
N. A. M. MacKenzie, Elmore Philpott, Peter Sturs-
berg, Solon Low and the Secretary of State for
Canada, Hon. Norman McLarty.
Membership in the Social Problems Club is open
to all students. The officers for 1944-45 were:
President, Don Brown; vice-president, Jack MacDonald;    secretary-treasurer,   Jacqueline   Batt;   pro-
Jack  MacDonald,  Don   Brown,   Ed  Lambe,  Jacqueline  Bait,      Sram   director>  Ed  Lambe;   publicity   director,   Ruth
Ruth Irish Irish.
Page Two Hundred and Sixty-four Co-op communication system.
Fellowship and low cost of living
Co-operation is the keynote of the 55 resident
members of the University Students' Co-operative
Association. Incorporated under the Societies Act
in 1939 the organization now operates three residences for men and one for women.
Aiming to supply comfortable board and pleasant
surroundings at a reasonable rate the Co-op has succeeded so well that some members have lived in the
residences all  year round  since joining.
While most of the members admit that they were
first attracted to the Co-op by a board rate considerably lower than the prevailing scale, they soon discovered that the most outstanding feature is the feeling of good fellowship that exists between co-opers.
Eating, sleeping, and working together the residents learn the value of tolerance and co-operation.
The boys place any of their possessions at the disposal of the rest of the house, be it a collar button,
text-book, or last year's campus map.
Administration of the residences is simple. With
the exception of the evening meal, which is prepared by the house-mother, all work is done by the
members. Each student has some daily job which
seldom takes more than half an hour.   The jobs are
mainly routine housework, such has washing dishes,
peeling vegetables and chopping wood.
Although originally the jobs were rotated at the
end of each month, most members prefer to find a
job that fits their time-table and keep it. They feel
that they can achieve greater efficiency in that way.
Each house also has an executive consisting of a
house-manager, treasurer, and purchasing agent who
keep things running smoothly.
In order that the members of the various houses
may get to know each other better exchange suppers
are held every week with each house sending repre-
sntatives to each of the other houses. Exchange
night's also feature outside guests such as President
MacKenzie and Registrar C. B. Wood.
Other activities this year included two parties
organized in conjunction with downtown co-ops and
two inter-house ping pong tournaments.
In former years the Co-op has had little trouble
in obtaining houses to operate as residences, but
since the housing shortage developed the association
has been compelled to turn away almost two-thirds
of the applicants each year because there is no room.
However, the Co-op is now buying one house and is
making all possible efforts to acquire others.
. . . Page Two  Hundred and Sixty-five attract students to Co-ops . . .
Girls watch the birdie
Oh, give me a home . . . An appreciative audience . . . Wragg and etchings . . . So I said to him,
I said . . . Who goes there . . . Clean-up campaign.
Page Two Hundred and Sixty-six . At least it isn't poker . . . Girl co-opers relax . . . How about Saturday night . . . Could be homework . . . Stoking up . . .
Many mouths to feed . . .  Complete recreational facilities  . .   .  Cooking facUities,  too  .  .  . Music appreciation .  .  .  This
could be a jitterbug . . . She'll make someone a fine wife.
. . . forerunners of student residences
. . . Page Two Hundred and Sixty-seven <3ltt (JHemortaw
ARVID REKSTEN
Scence '46, Electrical Engineering.
The death of Avrid Reksten in December, 1944,
meant the loss of one of the most liked and versatile members of Science '46. A keen athlete, he
was active in track, skiing, mountaineering, and
ice hockey, and was a member of the Outdoor Club.
Reksten was also a prominent musician on the
campus, playing his clatinet in the Musical Society
Orchestra and the Varsity Band, as well as being
president of the latter. With all his extra-curricular
activities, he consistently maintained a high scholastic standing, and was holder of the W. M. Swan
Memorial Bursary.
Reksten was affiliated with the Kappa Sigma
Fraternity.
Page  Two Hundred and Sixty-eight 1945
IDrERTISUfi
• Page Two Hundred and Seventy . . , The University Book Store
The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium Building, was established for the convenience
of the Students and has effected a considerable saving to the Students in time and money. It is prepared
to supply all Text Books required for the various
courses offered in the University, also such articles
as Note Books, Loose-Leaf Sheets, Fountain Pens,
Drawing Paper and Instruments.
Index . . .
Abbott, Tom   187, 233
Adams, G. G.   167
Adam, Jean  205,    51,   53
Adams, Bill   262, 201
Adams, Robert    197
Adams, Gerry . 243
Adkin, Edmond _____   167
Adutt, Peter    153
Affleck, Edward   153
Aho,   Emil 167,   83
Ahrens,   Robert      175
Ainsworth,   Allan   	
152,   48,   49, 159, 227, 229
Airey, Frances ._ „153, 244
Aish, Jane   175
Aitken, Evelyn    184
Ajello, Eric __ 88, 159,   56
Alexander, Arthur _.  175
Alexander,  Bob     184
Allan, John 197, 226, 227
Allen, Harry 187, 230,    94
Allison, G. W 184,   80,   79
Allman,  Arthur      201
Allman,   Mary     217
Almas,  Gabriel   153, 231
Amy,  Rozel     167
Andersen,   Albert  194
Anderson, Betty  .... 93, 153, 243
Anderson,   Cathie   167,    83
Anderson,  Donald . 175
Anderson,   Evelyn 217, 253
Anderson,   El	
Anderson,   Fern    175, 174
Anderson,   Joan   .... 79, 248,   69
Anderson,   Joyce    159, 245
Anderson,   J.   D _ 190
Andrews,   Dorothy-Ann     247
Andrew,   Fred      197
Andrews,   John     201
Angove, Edith     92
Appleby   Cy        92
Appleby, Ken    175
Appleby,   Lyon    ...153, 239
Aqua, Harry    184
Archeck,  Lillian     175, 250
Argue, Jim ....187,   76,   77, 229
Argyle, Catherine    175
Armour,   Jack     128
Armstrong, Den   _. 153
Armytage,   Margaret    175
Ashton,   Harry     153
Atherton, Donald    130
Atkins,  Dolly  222
Attree,  Dick     __ 153
Aubrey,  June 258, 153, 253
Auld, Jean ._  222, 253
Austin, Shirley        175
Aveling,   Peggy    „_.„„ 253
Aveling, Madeline 175
Axen,  George 208, 261
Axford, Pat .... 80,   79, 159, 245
Babb,  Les   ___.250, 256, 201
Baker, Margaret  205,   53
Baker,   Laurie   131
Baker,   Rowena     175
Baker,  Renee    250
Bakken, Ole   186, 183, 227
 137, 231, 118, 122
Bakony,   Stella     175, 252
Baldwin, Norah     63
Bagan,  Russ    133
Baldwin, George   175,   77
Baldwin,  Bill        159, 228
Ball,   Marian     159, 248,   91
Bamford,   Gwen   175
Bampton,   Diana      167, 242, 253
Bampton,  Virginia 167, 242, 253
Barber,   Eugene    205
Barclay-Ross,   Mignon . 167, 255
Barer,  Ralph    193, 237
Barnes, Reginald  _  175
Barker, Terrance  ...  175
Barraclough,  Edward    153
Barraclough,   Lila    ____  175
Barron,   John     . 291
Barry,   Frank   _____  192
Bartholomew,   Yvonne    159, 243
Bartlet,   Alex      167
Barton,   Don     201, 131
Barton, Howard      175
Barton,   George     159
Bassett,   Beverley     175, 252
Bateman,  Bill    197, 236
Batt,  Jackie    262
Bauder, Marshall    201
Baxter,   Anne     167
Baxter,   Bernice     214, 248
Baxter, John  175
Bayfield, John    212
Bayles,   Ted  175
Bayne,   Joan   „  .... 175
Baynes,  Shirley _. 175, 255
Baumbrough,  Edna   _  153
Beal,   Evan    _ 153
Beale,   Margaret  ._.__ 158, 248
Beattie,  Kenneth      175
Becker,  Ruth  .  175, 250, 253
Beech,  Emma     159, 242
Begert,  Kendall    _   73, 159
Beguin,  Andre  .... 197, 226, 230
Page Two Hundred and Seventy-one THE STORE OF IITRODUCTIOIS...
Vancouver women know the fashions at Willards
are the acme of styling.   What will lead tomorrow
is displayed at Willard's today   Willards is
"the Store of Introductions".
Barrass,  Cyril      201
Behnsen,  Thelma. 153, 241, 245
Bell,   Barbara     220, 249
Bell, Gordon   209
Bell, Mary G   167
Bell, Mary A   205
Bell-Irving,  Harry   134
Belton, Nancy  .... 159, 247
Belyea,  Doug    187,   85, 138
Bennett, Anne L.   157, 245
Bennett, Barrie , .___.- 175
Bennett, Cyril _  — 184
Bennett, Margaret 186, 249
Bennett, Ray  167
Bennett,  Reg  	
Bennett, Robert   _ 175
Bennie,  James    174
Beardino, Melia  _  175
Berson, Morris        197,   84, 237
Best, Helen   175
Bertram,   Gordon. 152,   48, 112
    71,   70, 153,   50, 227
Bertrand, Mrs. Jean   186
Berry, Helen  _. 217
Berryman,  David  _ _  193
Berto,  Irene       167
Best, George    _.___.. 191
Bewell, Bruce ...... 195,   96,   98
_ _...,    227, 236,   92,   93
Bibbs, Richard  	
    190, 189,   46, 227, 238
Bigsby, Jean    218
Binnie, Robert  .... 190, 226, 229
Bird, John   195
Binmingham, W.    159
Bishop,  Doris   218
Bishop,   Frank      159
Bitz,  M.     187, 244
Black,  Norman   184, 233
Black, Runa _  186, 249
Blair,   David     210
Blair, G. ....    213, 134
Blair, Gordon „ 167
Blair,   Olive    __ 187, 186, 244
Blais, Andree    167, 246,   68
Blake,  Ian   _  126, 125
Bloch, Inez   153, 242
Bloom, Martha   153
Blower, T. J. H   167
Bluechel, Al  ....,_ 200, 201, 229
Blnechel,  June   __._ 218
Blumenhauer,  —     192, 230
Blundell,  Heather    167
Blunden,  Denis  159,   90
Bodie, Bob  187, 232
Bodnar,  Michael      260
Bolton, Nancy    207
Bond,  William   „._     186
Bone,   Margaret     218, 253
Borden,  Jane    159
Booth by,   Hortense   „   153
Booth,  Betty     167
Borgeson,  Pat    159, 245
Borrie,   Bob        175
Bortolin,   Lindo  197
Bossons,   Fred 121, 137,125, 127
Boultbee,  Pat   167, 219
Bowell,   Nancy     167, 219
Bowell, Stephen ~ 236,   94,   95
Boyd, Alan   153
Boyle,   Marion     175, 251
Bradshaw   Margret     167
Brandon,   Coleen    _.   80, 205
Breadon,  Mary  .___„ 205, 242
Bredt,  Mac    „ 201
Brine, Ralph   159, 226, 228
Brockman,   Arthur 159,   92
Brody, Florence   .  217
Broe, Kenneth    194, 226
Brodie,   Malcolm     201,230
Brooks, Alan    167
Brooks,   Diana     _ 175
Brooks,   Betty      167,   98
Brooks,   Miles     _ 184
Brotherton,   Jean   ....      175, 256
Brough, Rosemary  167, 255
Brown,   Anne 152, 153, 246,   52
Brown,   Betty   167
Brown, Donald .... 167, 112,   50
Rrown, Ed  , 153
Brown, Hal     175
Brown, James   __. 186
Brown, Paddy .._ 217, 247
Brown,  Martin   _     159
Brown, Margaret     205
Brown, Robert   .  197
Bruce, Jack    197
Bruce,  James  ...  201
Brummitt,  William     175
Brussett, Henry    167
Bryant,   Charles    175
Bryant, Eleanor      96
Bryant, Jim  	
    259, 192, 189, 231, 136
Brydon,   Loyd   ,  175,   88
Bryer,   Edith    _ 159, 247
Buchanan,   Audrey   	
    159, 247, 240,   51
Buchanan,   James    220, 230
Buchanan, Jean    175
Buchanan,   Sheila     212
Bucknall, Joy    167, 2^5
Bulger,  Thomas   „ „     159
Bullen,   Chas.   _   159, 230
Bulman,  Lola    ■ 175
Bunker,  Jackie    „ . 159
Bunnell, Frank   _ 190, 236
Bunting, Joan         167
Burgess, Jack  195, 226, 239
Burgess,  Harold    192, 239
Burke,   Brian	
.__     184,   84,   85,   87, 183
Bruke,  Ruth      175
Bnrnell,   Joan   ._.- „ 175, 252
Burnett, Bruce   153, 227
Burns, Helen  175, 252
Burnt t, Eleanor    167
Burrows,   Mickey   ........   261, 226
Pave Two Hundred and Seventy-two Best Wishes to the
Graduating Students and
Boys Entering Armed Services
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STUDENTS ENJOY BANKING
AT THE
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ESTABLISHED   1817
"A Million Depositors Use Our Banking Service"
West Point Grey Branch—10th and Sasamat
E.  J.  SCHIEDEL,   Manager
COMPLIMENTS  OF
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648 Granville St.
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Whether ior Home or Business Office Our
Stationery and Printing Departments will
serve you in many ways.
GEHRKE'S LTD.
566 Seymour
PAc. 0171
SWEET SIXTH LTD.
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear
Five  Stores  for Your Convenience
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Vancouver
Page Two Hundred and Seventy-three NO FORM OF TRAINING RETURNS THE INITIAL INVESTMENT AS QUICKLY
AS EFFICIENT BUSINESS EDUCATION
10^-
College of Business
Students at this High Standard College
enjoy all the advantages
Progressive Methods
Refined Environment
NORMAN E. CARTER
President
# Fine Equipment
# Experienced Staff
Modern Courses Specially Designed to Prepare You for a
Profitable Position in a Minimum of Time
# Secretarial • Stenographic • Accounting
• Comptometer • Dictaphone
Commence Your Course at our Summer School
Credit Foncier Building
850 West Hastings
PAcific 0327
Burton, Peggy  188, 207
Butler, Gene    205
Butters,  Marguerite _... 205, 253
Butterworth,    Earl 212, 231, 128
Byers, Dorothy   175
Byrnes,   Marguerite     168
Cairns, R. W   197, 233
Calam, A. Margaret   153
Calder, Rachel  E  175, 153
Calder, Shiela H   159
Calver,  George L _ 197
Camerman,   M.     184, 250
Campbell,  Annette  L... 159, 249
Campbell, Dan    233
Campbell,   Douglas     195, 175
Campbell,   Gordon     152, 122
Campbell, Jeanette    175
Campbell, John A _ 175
Campbell, Margaret .... 206, 205
Campbell,  Marion     218
Campbell, Nora V  153
Campbell,   Pat     118, 133
Canty, J. Leslie   159, 229
Caplette, M. Elizabeth   178
Capozzi, Herb 	
_„.„    63, 174, 112, 124
Carlisle,   Sheila   	
 _  258, 153, 251, 255
Carmichael,  Kay ,  175
Carmichael, Robert  . 168
Carnsew,   Valerie     187, 243
Carpenter, D.     201
Carre, Hilary _.„. 175, 256, 160
Carrothers,  Fred  	
    175, 259, 160, 226
Carson, D. J.   210
Caster,  Garnet     168
Carter,  Gordon    197,188
Carter, Philip    175, 160, 228
Cartwright,  Tom    175
Carver,   Robert     193, 236
Castillou, Harry  	
   254, 168, 149,   92
Caulderhead,  Gordon... 190, 221
Cawley,  Margery   175
Cawley, Guy   254
Chalmers,   Beverly     175, 253
Chalmers,  Ruth    218
Chambers, E. J  184, 229
Chambers, Mary    175, 252
Chambers, Ted 	
  63, 183, 220, 112, 227
Chang, Jone  _ 168
Chang,  Wilma r  205
Charnley,   Elizabeth     175
Chatwin, Mary— 153, 241, 243
Chenoweth, Patricia __ 160, 249
Cherniavsky,   P.    201, 153
Chernov,   Eva  ...... 175, 250, 253
Chisholm,   Anita   175
Chitty, Audrey  175
Chiz,   Peter,     175
Chow,  Richard   .    ,. 255, 168
Chown,  Nancy __ 175
Christian, Joan   175
Christian, Patricia   175
Christie,  Hugh     153
Christie,   Robert   163
Christie, Jean   222
Christie,   Margaret     217
Christopher,   Charlotte    187
Chu,   Dodd     160
Chu,   Jennie     187
Church,  John     153
Chutter, Paul   195, 229
Clark,   Mary      80
Clark,  Doug.. 256,   71, 138, 154
Clark, Bill     63
Clark,  Esther     246
Clarke,   Doug 152,   71, 227,   50
Clarke, Joyce G.   175
Clarke,   Mary     168
Clarke,   Joan   .  160, 163, 249
Clarke, Joyce  M.   186, 253
Clarke, Nora   175, 173,   51
Clarke, William    190
Clarkson,   Reg     168, 120
Clayton,  Blanche   259
Clearihue,  Joyce     168
Clement,  Jim     84,   85, 154
Clerkson, Alice       160
Clerkson, Dorothy 175
Clifton, Everard _ 190
Climie,  John     168, 231
Cline,  Richard   .  _ 154
Coady,   Cam   154, 128, 239
Coady, Mary 175
Cochran, Edward    192
Cochrane,  James 190
Coghill,  Joy  168
Cohen, Annette .. 217, 250
Cohen, Jack    188, 257, 110
Colclough, John   154
Cole, Kathleen    154
Coleopy, Norman    261, 190
Collen,  William    201
Collins,   June         168
Collinson, Jocelyn    175
Coll urn,   Jack      175
Colquhoun, Noni      160
Comley-Combe, Monica   175
Comparelli, David   137
Confortin, John    _ 190
Cook, Ted __   261
Cook,   Katherine   _   175
Cook,  Richard     175
Cook,   Robert     197
Cool, Adrienne   168
Cooke,   Norm     190
Cooper, Charles   220
Cooper, Ernie   197
Copp,   Marny     160, 249
Corrigan, Ray _.  133
Corbitt, Charlotte  175, 252
Corbould, Shirley  168
Corfield,   Sheelagh   ..._  175
Cornish,  Mary „... 175
Cotter,   Barbara  175
Pave Two Hundred and Seventy-jour Compliments of
DAN McLEAN
Motor Co. Ltd.
B.C.
Distributors of
NASH
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Good Health is Vital to
Success in Life
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WOODWARD'S
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You can save money on all the new Fashions
for   Campus   and  Social  Activities   from   the
complete selection at Woodward's.
Misses' Fashions — Floor 2
Men's Fashions—Main Floor
COMPLIMENTS OF
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. . Page Tivo hundred and Seventy-five COURAGE■
"HAPPY," it has been said by a distinguished man, "is he who can leave college
with an unreproaching conscience and an
unsullied heart." I don't know; he sounds
to me like a sloppy, watery sort of fellow;
happy, perhaps, but if there be real blood
in him impossible. Be not disheartened by
ideals of perfection which can be achieved
only by those who run away. Nature, that
'thrifty goddess', never gave you the 'smallest scruple of her excellence' for that ....
Courage is the thing.    All goes if courage
goes. What says our glorious Johnson of
courage: "Unless a man has that virtue he
has no security for preserving any other."
We should thank our Creator three times
daily for courage instead of for our bread,
which, if we work, is surely the one thing
we have a right to claim of Him. This courage is greater even than gardens 'when the
z've is cool.' Pray for it. "Who rises from
prayer a better man, his prayer is
answered."
We quote from Sir James Barrie's famous speech to the students of St. Andrew's University,
Edinburgh, with the hope that it may prove equally as inspiring to the graduating students of the
University of British Columbia.   Our very best wishes for  your  future   success   and   good   luck.
THE   VANCOUVER   DAILY   PROVINCE
Cotter, H.   B.   C. .. _..
    184,   77,   72, 235
Cotterall,  Gert    253
Cotton,  Jean    175
Coughlan, Elizabeth .... 163, 247
Coughlin, Dale      63
Christie, Eileen    218
Coulter,  Shirley     220
Cowan, Pat   175
Cowan,   Jack   ...._  121, 125
Cowie,  Alex     134
Cowley,  Roy     175
Cotterall,   Gertrude  218
Cox,   Robert     197
Cox,  Beverly    175
Cox, Bob  175
Coyle,  Pat  184, 245
Craig, Marie     153
Craig, Margaret   168
Crapko,   Anaysia     168
Crawford,   William   .... 186, 232
Creelman,   Eliott  191, 236
Creighton,    Ken... 184,   59, 183
      46,   47,   59, 227, 235
Cribb,   John     187
Crocker, Charles    159, 232
Croll, Margaret _.___._ 154, 242
Croll,  Robert    174, 128
Crook,   Lois    _ 168, 258
Crombie,   Fred    175
Coulter, Maureen    218
Crowe,   Dorie    _     163
Crowe,   Sanford   175
Culter, Barbara   163, 243
Cumming, Marian     175
Curnouw,   Bernice   ...... 217, 220
Cunningham,   Pat   	
     183, 241, 111, 112,   54
Currie, Ian       68
Cuthbert,  Betty   175, 153
Cuthill,   Len   _   175
Culter,   Keith         88
Dain,  Doris     168
Dalawvak,   Elsie     160, 243
Dalrymple,  Sue   154, 244
Daly,   Bill       175
Darner,   Warren      175
Darling,   John     160
Darling,   Peter     201
Davey, Grant   201, 230
Davids,  Doreen   ...... 217, 215
Davidson,   Douglas     139
Davidson,  Kenneth      214
Davy,   Sheila     160, 242
Dawson,   John     190
Day,  June  186
Daykin,   Hank   ....   34,   85,   84
Deas,  Kay     210, 107
d'Easum,    Edlin.... 187, 247, 205
d'Easum,   Beverly     245
DeBeck,   Fred  175
DeBeck,    Myleen.. 160, 246, 254
DeBou, Alan   175
Denkman,  Norman  ..._—..__
     197, 196, 1.7, 230
Denluck,  Robert      201
DeBeck, Betsy Ann   160
Denman,   Joan   .... 175, 174, 252
Dennett,   Melvin     186
Dennison,  James     190
Dennys,  Ronald      201
De Pencier, Edith ...... 168, 245
Devlin,  Ken     206
Dewdney,  Deedee   160, 246
Dimock,   Arthur      194
Dixon,   Joan     214
Dobie,   Bob  175
Dobbin,   Mary     168
Dobie,   Thomas  201
Dolmage, Mary   247, 112
Donigani,  Joy    168, 247
Douglas, Collin  197
Dougans,   Roy     175
Dowding, W. C  194, 134
Downman, Lorna   168
Doyle,   Irene     154
Driver,   Pat     163
Drope,  Pat    253
Dyrndahl,   Lillian     218
Duff,   Phillip   __  . 201
Duffus,  John       76,   77, 201
Dunbar,   Jack     175
Duncan,   Helen   	
....186,   87,   54,   51, 183, 243
Dundas,  Mardee... 160, 243,   90
Dunell, Basil  .  __ 261, 190
Dunlop,   Audrey     217
Dyer, Lawrence   174, 175,   92
Dyson,  Sylvea    217,   63
Eastman, James    168
Eddy,   Gerry      253
Edmonds,  Mimi    160
Edwards,  Beth  ...  154
Edwards,  Eda  1.  177, 253
Edwards,  Inglis     201, 236
Edwards, Robin    201
Edwards,  John      177
Edwards,  Susan     177
Efford,   Bob    __.._  177
Elart,  Alice    177, 252
Elder, Gordon   177
Elia, Nick   201
Elliott, Donald   177
Ellis,   Beverly     218
Ellis, Catherine   187, 243
Ellis,   Harry.. 260, 292, 283, 236
Ellis, Bus       52
Ellis,   John     177
Ellis, Gordon   194, 189
Ellison, Ken     177
Embree,   Bill     154, 230
Eng,   Thomas     201
English,   Ted   — 	
_..152, 154, 112,   76, 229,   50
Epstein,   Rochille     168, 250
Erickson, Turec    177
Estey,  Bob  187, 136
Page Two Hundred and Seventy-six . . THE CAF...
STILL BOASTS THE SAME INFORMALITY
.... although the Brock Memorial Building
Lunch Room is getting some of its business. Eat in
either place, depending on the mood you're in ... .
but don't forget to patronize Campus Merchants.
Your undergrad idiosyncracies will be understood
and overlooked.
Evans,   Beth    260, 258, 154
Ewart,  Elizabeth     177
Ewart, Kay  _..__..„  168
Eyre, Alan    191, 229
Ewing,  Frances    _ 160
Eyres,   Joy     177
Fagan,  Mary    219,   76    77
Falk,   William      154
Farr, Robin   168, 229
Farrell,  Kathleen     154, 249
Farrow,  John 268, 249,   63,   51
Fawcus, Geoff ._     83
Fearn, Rodnay ..._.  177
Federoff, Milla  177, 253
Feast, Joan    177
Fenn,  Ray  ..,.  197, 270
Fenn,  William   	
     127, 121, 137, 125
Ferguson, Jean      205, 242
Ferguson,   Joanne   177
Ferguson, Marion  „...       160
Ferguson, Walter      86, 154
Finnie,  Douglas _
  192, 236, 154, 241, 245
Finlyason,  Alex      177
Fischer,  Joan   .  154, 241, 245
Fischer, Dean „  220
Flader,   Samuel _ 254, 192, 237
Flavelle, Sidney   152
.160,   74, 247, 112,   51,   52
Fleishman,  Ruth    „ 168
Fleming,   John       187, 228
Fleming, Ormand     .     208, 232
Fletcher,   Alan     202
Flumerfelt,  Bruce 177
Foerster,   Darryl    „_ 168, 229
Forbes,  Jack  185,230
Forbes,  Margaret   _. 205, 245
Forbes,   Mary   217
Ford, Margaret 168, 254
Fordyce,  David    194, 230
Forrester,   John     235
Forster,  John      220
Forsyth,  William    177
Fowler,  Charles    168
Francis,  David      160
Francis, Frank .... 192, 226, 231
Frankovitch, Jerrold    177
Fraser,   Elaine  177
Fraser, D.  A.   191
Fraser,   John      177
Fraser, Leslie   169
Fraser,  Robert        „ 177
Frazee,   John    _.__.. 147
Freeze, Allen   177, 147
Freudiger,   Ronald     187
Frith,  Margaret    217
Frost,  J.  S.  C.    „_ 169
Frostrup,  Eilsha   217, 248
Fuoco,  John       . _  169
Gadbois,  Lorraine 217
Gaff,  Beryl     217
Galbraith,   Ewen        233
Galbraith, John       142
Gallaher,  E.   E.
Gallie, Norman
191
154
Garrard,   Audrey   _  160, 242
Garrett,  Dorothy      222
Gardom, G. B. .... 187, 120, 232
Gait,  Thomas     177
Gamble,   George  133
Gamey,   Margaret     177
Gaube, Doreen  „..__..  177
Gava,  June   177
Gee, Kuey  214
Gehl,   Arthur       177
Genge,   Gordie     197, 195
George, Catherine   217, 256
George,   Stanley     195, 231
Gertz, Lena    177
Gibson, Doug     177
Gibson,   Margaret  214
Giegerich, Peggy  177
Gill,   Lawrence     197
Gill,   William     197, 229
Gilley,   Gordon     186, 228
Gillies,  MaryLon     177
Gillis,  Jack    160, 239
Glenesk,  A.  H   184
Glucksman,  Trevor    257
Golos,  Vivian   	
    83, 205, 247,   53
Goodman, Eric _ 214
Goodman, Juanita   187, 244
Goodwin,   Gwendoline     169
Gordon,  Grieselda   177
Gordon,  Robert     202
Gordy,   John     154, 234
Golcman,  Robert     194
Graham, Joan   213
Graham,   Anne      159, 248
Graham, Marge  217
Graham, Peter 177, 147
Graham,  Philip 214
Granberg, Ingrid 169
Granhold,  Ella      169
Grant,  Phyllis    160, 245
Grant,  Winnie  254
Grantham, Ronald _ _.
    202, 189, 200,   83, 229
Gray,   Jean      257
Gray,   Duncan     202
Gray,  Walter      202
Gray,   William      177
Graves,  Harold   _.. 191, 189
Graves,  Nancy      169
Green, Charles    202
Green,  John.. 169,    99,    93,   94
Green, Joanna  169
Green,  Mary    177
Greenaway,  Jean  .   177
Greene,   Barbara  152,   63,
146, 154, 241,   51, 243,   43
Greenfield, Marg    219
Greenhorn,  Doreen    205
Greenwood,  Ian    213
Gregory,   Ted    181, 231
Gregory,  Kenneth   _      212
Page Two Hundred and Seventy-seven Distinctive Character
Portraits
*
Illustrative Photography
Additional Portrait Reprints oi U.B.C. Student
Photos at Special Prices — Order Promptly
Phone PAcific 1928
560 Granville Street
Vancouver, B. C.
MJUa\ Mfaa£to+n^>
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA CALGARY
Booking and presenting the
world's   greatest   theatrical
attractions throughout the
West.
Greig, Nina   154
Greyell,   Velma 177
Griffiths,  Donald    190, 239
Griffin,  Pauline    222
Grigg,   Naome       87
Gritten,  Rechard    169
Groll,  Shirlie    177
Gronlund,   Max     192
Grover,   Fred     169, 228,   95
Grunlund,   Barb.     177
Grunlund, Jeannie   177
Guichon, Lloyd   191
Guimont, Margaret	
    185, 255, 244
Gulley,  Laurence    202
Gulloch, Ennis   205
Golloch, Muriel    217
Gurvitz, Marcia    154
Guy  Beverly   _. 184 244
Haas, Robert   174, 177, 121
Hacking,  William    226
Hadland, Richard    214
Hadwen,   Colleen    177, 255
Haggart, Ronald  	
    177, 174, 112,   91,   92
Hall, Beverly   177 ,253
Hall, Jean   178
Hall, Ernie      83
Halpin, Kay     260
Hamilton,  Joan  ______ 160, 245
Hamilton, George 63, 166
Hamilton,  Kelvin   155, 154
Hamilton,  Leila   178
Hammerslag,  Julius     194
Hammersley,   Donald.... 186, 234
Hammond, Mary    217
Haney,  D.  F.    191, 236
Hansen, Harris .... 255, 195, 230
Hansen, Henry   202
Harbell,  Joseph  202
Hardy, G. P  184, 231
Hardy,  Ruth    161, 255
Harford, Ian    169
Harkness,  Alan    169
Harman, Joyce   161'
Harradine,  Sylvia     169
Harris, Betty   _. 161, 246
Harris, Ian    197
Harris,  Julienne    161, 246
Harrison,   Bernice     219
Harrison,   Roland    ... 202
Harwood, Bob 	
    178, 174,   85,   84
Haskins,   Jean     219
Hatch,  William     178
Hatte,   Ross    259, 192
Hatter, Jim   154
Hawkens,   Lucill     169
Haxton,  Phyllis    178
Hayes, Ean   169
Hayes,  John    197
Hayward, G. _  231
Hazelwood, David   197, 229
Hayes, Dorothy 217, 248
Haggart, Elinor   152, 169
.... 80,   71,   79, 241, 248, 112
Heal, Douglas   236
Heal,   Geoff  _ 214
Healey,  Albert   191
Heaps,  Philip   178
Heard, Francis   178
Hebb, Marion    165, 249
Hele,  Violet    206
Henderson, Barbara   161, 249
Henderson, Cliff   161, 138
Henderson, Neil   161
Henderson, Ross .. 178, 174,   98
Henderson, James   169
Hepburn,   Pryllis     219, 252
Hern, Jane   178, 252
Hetherington,  Jack  	
 191, 227, 230
Herring,  Phil    197
Hertig, Lucienne   178
Hewitt,  Ruth 210
Hicks,  John    191, 118, 131
Hicks,  Roger    161
Hilton,  Brian    195
Hill,  Ernie       178
Hill,   Fred    169, 13f
Hill, Ray   178
Hill,   Geoffrey     128
Hill, Shirley    254
Hillier," Chuck     154, 234
Hillier,  Frances     169,   8?
Hirtle,   James     202, 227
Hochman, Harriet   174,   85
Hodge, Muriel    222
Hodges, June    20r
Hodgeson, Bette .. 187, 242, 253
Hodgins, Rosemary 	
    178, 184,   50,   92
Hodgson, Alex    195
Hodgson,  Margaret   154, 242
Hogan,  Lewis    202, 232
Holbrook, Doug   169
Hole, Fred   191, 133
Hole,  Len    184
Holands,   Keith     178
Hollingum,   Betty     178
Holman, Dave  	
    169,   80,   81,   79
Holmes, Dave    202
Holms,  Donald    161,   84
Holloway,   Elaine     214
Holroyd,   Louis     254
Holt,   Margaret    _.. 165
Holt, Peggy 	
  187,   63, 248, 253, 255
Holtby,   Gwynn     178
Homan,  Fran     178
Hood,  Marjorie '
    154, 251, 245, 255
Hooley,   Roy   197
Hooson,   Bill     222, 231
Hopkins,  Isabel    219
Hopkins,   Muriel      219
Hopkins,   Newt     202
Hopper,  Alan     220
Horen,   Anita      217, 250
Home,   Betty  Jean  .... 178, 252
Home,  Edgar    196
Horton,  Bill    236
Hoskins, Marcella    178
Page Two Hundred and Seventy-eight Students. . .
For your entertainment and convenience ....
wherever you may live, there is an Odeon suburban
theatre nearby.
Get the Odeon Habit . . . Enjoy the Parade of Hits at
Your Favorite Odeon Theatre . . . USE YOUR
STUDENT PASS FOR REDUCED RATE.
VOGUE
BEACON
PLAZA
PARADISE
ODEON THEATRES OF CANADA LTD.
Hough, Jack   _ 178, 139
Howes,   Bill   _  148
Howie, Hank   _._ 190, 236
Huckerby, Fannie — - 155
Hudak,  Nicholas  _. 202
Hudson, Grace  _ 178
Hudson,  Jessie   _ _... 169, 253
Hugh,   Marian   _____ 255
Hughes,   James     226
Hughes,  Roger  198, 235
Hulford,   John    ,  161
Hunter,   Larry      178
Hunter,  Stan    170, 220
Hutchinson, Marie   208
Huyck,   Edward     155, 136
Hyde,  Ian   _ - 178
Inch, Bea    155, 243
Ingles,  Stephan    128
Ireland,   Lulla   .... 241, 155, 148
Irish, Ruth   178, 262
Irving, Lorna  212, 247
Irwin,   Louise     214
Irwin,   Winnie   .... 155,   80,   79
Irwin,   Beatrice   178
Isherwood,   Sidney     191
Isenor,   Maury      135
Ivey, Don   254, 230
Jack,   Peter      . 198
Jackson,  Brian      95
James,   Dorothy   _„.__.  178
James,   Rosemary    . 169
James,   Frances    169
James,   Rodney      198
Jamieson,  Donald    169
Jardine,   Judith     161
Jarman,   Bea       178
Jeffery, Art    _ 178
Jeffery,  Barrie       202
Jeffery,   Mary-Lou 169, 253,   83
Jenvey,  Gerald        .... 132
John,  Gilbert     _ 198
Johannson,   Edgar  _ ._ 195
Johnsen,  Hans ■ _._ .  155
Johnson, Caroline   161,    76
Johnson,   George      184
Johnson,   Leonard       194
Johnson,  Maxine	
217, 256,   63, 241, 249,   51
Johnson,   Robert     186
Johnston, Flo    169
Johnston,   Roy      235
Johnston,  Art  _.... 220, 227, 230
Johnston, Arnold  _  235
Jones,  Art  _           99,   73
_ 74, 161, 226, 232,   94,   95
Jones,   Alexander    192, 129, 135
Jones,  Babs        169, 246
Jones,  Myrtle      155
Jones,  Norman   214
Jones,   Bruce   186
Jones,   Stanley     169, 232
Jordan, Patricia - 205, 248, 253
Josephson, Gilbert   194, 230
Josephson,   Helmer   178
Julian, Terry  	
     152, 155, 226, 233, 152
Jutte, Audrey .  169, 253, 255
Kabush,   Harry     „  131
Kanwischer,   F.    _.   155
Kanwischer, W.  .__ __ 170
Katainen,   Violet   _  .. 217
Katznelson, Edith 161, 250
Kazun,  Walter     155
Keast,   Russ      161
Keenlyside, Tom R.  	
   174, 208, 229
Keevs,  Moira  E   155
Keller, Lloyd    178, 228
Keller, John  R  202
Kells,   Owen  193, 239
Kelly,   James   ...... 170, 231, 202
Kelsberg,  Barbara   .  170, 242
Kendall,   Freda     217
Kendall,   Marie  155
Kennedy,  John   S.    .... 161, 228
Kennedy,  Fanny  A  206
Kennedy, Irene _ __. 155, 152
Kenny,    Edith   _.   220
Kenny,  Douglas .   155
Kenny,  Wilfred  194
Kent,  Joseph    255, 191
Ker, Bob  236
Ker,   Walter       191
Ker, J. Ross   147
Kerr, A. Scott    129
Kerr,  Helen  J  205, 244_
Kerr, Joan I  253
Kerr, Janet  M     98, 170
Kerr,  J.  S.   202
Kersey, W. G. ___  187,   86
Ketchen,   Keith     .  155
King,   Bill   __  131, 133
King, David J  231, 136
King,   Joyce   214
King, Kathleen        218, 249,    50
King,   Eileen      _._ 161
Kinghorn, J. M. _    130
Kinnaird,   E.       155
Kirby,  Gordon    235
Kirkpatrick, Ted   _ 	
 :.....   260, 19, 189, 193, 227
Kirkpatrick,  Guy    198, 228
Kirkpatrick,   Sheila   .... 155, 242
Kites, Helen    _. 252
Kitson,  John  A.      170
Klopp,   Thomas  161
Klusendore,   Edith   219
Knapp,  Taddy _    174
Knott,  Douglas  ....        213, 131
Knowles,  Bob     192, 254
Kolbeins, Henry . .  194
Kolberg,  Joe     202, 237
Korsch,   Stanford. 254, 284, 237
Kosta  Killas  161, 235
Krmpotich,   Michael     202
Kurth,   Burton   .... 258,   71, 155
Laak,   Olive  202
LaBelle,   Philip     191
Pa«e Two Hundred and Seventy-nine :\'. V'::..-/i'-V'   ■■'
V     L   ...UttW"
.TJ^$S ■■«£ JSIHS^^ dh
Lade,  Gordon   139
Laird, Daphne   170, 247
Laird, Douglas   178
Laird,  Anne    219
Lake,   Yvonne      218
Lake, June   247, 178
Lam, Milton   191
Lambe,   Ed        262, 202, 200
Lambert,  Nona     212, 247
Lang, Frank  161
Lang, Lorna    202, 200, 245
Larkin, Grant   212, 139, 149
Latimer, Norman   195
Lawrence, Check   178
Lawrence, James   178, 254
Lawrence, Georgene .... 178, 254
Lawley,   Gordon  193
Lawson, Robert  200
Lawrence, Blair    155
Lazzarin,   Flavia      206
Lazzarin,  John     170
Lasareff, Anna   161
Leach,   Shirley     195, 247
Leavy,   Jack     255,    72, 212
Leavy,   Leo     255,    72,   212
LeBrun, Julius   195
LeBus,  George   191
Lee,   Harry      170
Lee, Jone     161, 249
Lee, Rosemary   170
Lee,  Helen    178
Lee,  Sylvia      155
Lefeaux,   Stuart     191, 236
Leiterman,  Doug _. 178
Leith,  Anna     155
Leith,  Jim .  261, 190
Leith, William     202
Lett, J.  W.      186
Lewis,    Allen      195, 252
Lewis, Carol    „  178
Lewis, David    202
Lewis,  Nancy    178
Liddell,   Connie      170
Liddell, Ruth          155
Liemen,  Helen     170,   80
Lindenfeld, Peter       71, 194
Lindow, Maxine  161
Lindsay, Harold     86
Lipsett, Fred      76
Lipson, Peggy   170, 250
Lister,   Bill     178
Livingston,   Gertrude ... 155, 247
Lloyd,   William     194
Lloyd, George  	
    259, 193, 226, 236
Lockhart, A. D.   179, 148
Long,  Joseph      193
Lord,  Muriel    170, 245
Lott,   Bill   232
Lotzkar,  Eva       155, 250
Lotzkar,   Helen     170
Loucks,  Jack     170
Louie,   John     191
Louis,   Ruth       150
Lourie,   Helene   208
Loutit,   Ann     219
Lowes,   Ann      218
Lowrie,   David   161
Lowther,   Bruce   _ 179, li3
Lowther,   Roy      155, 257
Lowther, Dorothy    179, 183,    77
Louie, E  220
Lam,  Milton  179
Lye,  Bob    179
Lymbery,  Alice     170
Lyons,   Hugh      203
Lyons,   Nancy-Lou     155, 244
Lytle,  Dennis     141
McAdam,   Cliff     236
McAlpine, Mary .    179
McArthur,  Thomas    179
MacAskill,   Barb     187, 247
McBay,   Bob     156
MacBride,   John  171,    92
McCabe, Margaret   244
McCallum,  Mary  „  171
McCarter, W. K  222, 232
MacCarthy,   Jessie 179, 254
McCloy,   Alistair    179
McClnng,  Maxine     179
McConnell,   John     162
McConnell,  Tom     187
McCord,  Clive    179
McCrossan,  Robert    _ 203
McCubbin,  Bill    187-
McCulloch, James  179
McCusker, Thomas	
      171, 252, 128
McDiarmid,   Barbara ... 173, 248
McDiarmid,  Mary    _ 179
MacDonald, Keith 	
    171, 166, 130, 139
MacDonald, D. A. C.   171
MacDonald, Donald .... 179, 232
McDonald,   Isabel 162, 222, 242
Macdonald, Jerry    179
McDonald,  Marion    185
Macdonald, Nancy 	
  171, 166,   99, 255,   92
McDonald,  Roma    171, 245
McDonald,  Frances   .... 171, 249
McDougall,  Donald  .... 162,   88
McDougall,   Edna     171
McDougall,   John    187
McDougall,   Mary     179
McFarlane, Allan   162, 257
McFarlane,  June    179
McFarlane,  Jean   	
171, 245, 252,   98,   92,   96
McFeely,  Cam  238
Page Two Hundred and Eighty Greatfame   VALVES
JENKINS
The difficult and exacting requirements of war have proven
over and over again the sterling excellence of Jenkins Valves.
Canadian industries of all types praise their unexcelled per
formance under all conditions of operation.
The JENKINS ENGINEER is at your service for consultation.
Your distributor is well stocked with JENKINS VALVES of all
kinds.
JENKINS BROS. LIMITED
617- St. Remi Street. Montreal
Branches:  Toronto.  Winnipeg.  Vancouver  and   6  Great  Queen  St.
Kingsway. London W.C.2, Eng.
JENKINS VALVES „
For every industrial,  engineering,  marine and power    2~*~33
plant   service . . . in   Bronze,   Iron,   Cast   Steel   and
i   Corrosion-Resisting Alloys.
Page  Two   Hundred  and  Eighty-one YOU MAY DO BETTER
WITH
KEYSTONE
BRAND
Looseleaf Sheets
and Binders
Choose Keystone Brand for all
your class and study work
Smith Davidson & Wright
Limited
VANCOUVER — VICTORIA — EDMONTON
CALGARY
"Joe Blakes
?5
When an Australian soldier is low in spirits
he refers to his complaint as "the Joe Blakes".
A frequent cause of "Joes" is lack of cash when
needed. To avoid this malady make a practice
of setting aside part of your monthly income
regularly, in a  savings account at the bank.
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
McGeer,   Pat   	
     120, 121, 250, 174
McGeer,  Pete    ,...„ 220, 138
McGhee,  Margaret    246
McGillivray,  Verda  _.. 218, 247
McGillivray,  Marjorie     171
MacGillivray,   H.   M  171
McGlashan,   Pam    171, 259
McGinn,   Alex     236
McGregor,   Iona      179
McGregor,   Jessie     171
McGregor-Eadie, Peter 	
     171,   77, 144
McGregor,   George     156, 229
Macindoe,   Grace     179,   83
Macindoe,  Helen    179
Mcintosh,   Phyllis   .  162, 248
MacKay,  Jim    229
McKay,  George    203
McKay,   Margaret     211, 212
McKay, Wallace   193, 229
McKenzie,   Jean     256, 218
McKenzie,  Isabel.. 217,   73, 248
MacKenzie,  Conrad  156, 228
McKenzie,    Margaret  174, 254
McKercher,   John     185
183, 118, 119, 120, 136, 116
McKillop,  Margaret   219
McKim,   Audrey     ~ 119
McKinley,   Eva     219
McKinley,   Mary     206
McLeod,   Marilyn       180
MacLeod,   Melville  	
    231, 116, 120
MacKinnon,   Don     193
MacKinnon,  Jean    179
McKinnon, Mrs. F. E  206
MacKinnon,   Neil    210, 230
McLaren,  Ada  	
    156, 241, 251, 143
MacLaren, Nancy   162, 251
McLaren, D.  E  179, 255, 117
McLean,   Alister      230
McLean-Bell,   Janet  205
McLean,   Louise     218
McLean,   Mary   E  206
McLeish,   Sheila  158
MacLean, Shirley   179, 253
McLeish,   Glenna. 187, 243, 253
McLellan,   Doug     179
MacLeod,   Dorothy    212
MacLeod, Don    203
MacLeod,   Margaret     156
Macleod,   Philip      156
McLellan,   Marnie   ...... 179, 253
McLellan,  Dave      81
McLellan,   Jack       260
McLellan,   Robert. 80,   81,   79
McLennan,  Ann     162, 249
MacLeod,   Shirley    171
McLeod,   Doreen     162
MacLeod,   Dorothy  .  212, 247
McLeod,  Hugh    162,   85
McLeod,   Joan     _ 179
MacLeod, Margaret   247
MacLeod, Bill   180, 138
MacLeod,   Winona     180
McLoughlin,   Kay     180
McMartin,   Don     162
MacLough,   Kay     253
MacMillan,   Lois    180
McMullan,   Dallas     188
McNaughton,  Bob     162, 139
McPherson,    Barbara... 241, 248
McPherson,  Hugh    156
McPherson,   Ken   	
  _..   171, 233, 118, 142
MacQueen,  Jean    219
McRae, Alma _„_„  180
McRae, Mildred   218
McRae, Rod  203
McTaggart, Ralph 180
McTavish,   Shirley        _ 219
McTurk, Helen  __ 180, 253
Madden,   Margaret      222
Mardin,   Beryl     179
Magee,   James   _.   155
Mah,   Eva      161
Manery,   Ronald     212
Mann,   Barbara     170
Manning,  Valerie    170, 247
Manson,  Marion    156, 247
Manson,  Nicol      156
Manzer,  Nobel   161
Mar,   Jack            203
Marano,   Lianam   _  206
Margach,  James        .._ 163, 238
Margeson,  Ross  170
Marhull,   Allen      184
Marshall,   Bob    1  130
Marken,  George   179
Marshall,  Kay    222
Marshall,   Bob     179
Martin,   Deirdre     170, 241
Martin,  Jim   _.... 260, 256
Martin,   Muriel     162, 247
Martin,  Ruth     170
Martinson, Muriel    162
Masters, Laurence _ 208
Mathers,   Jack  ;  179
Matheson,   Betty Jane.. 162, 243
Matheson,   Bill 184, 231
Matthew,  Fran     179, 253
Maunsell,  Charles   156
Maurer,   Fred     219,   95
Maxwell,   James    _  203
Maybank,   Herbert _ 193
Mayne,  Pat    170, 252
Mayo,   Eleanor    156, 254
Medland,   Ken    ._ 135
Mee,   John     179
Mehan,   Betty      218, 244
Mehling,  Agnes   __  170, 252
Mehling,  Frank    _. 179
Meldrum,   Donna     170
Meldrum,   Robert    .   179
Menzies, V. H  208, 239
Merritt,   Hazel   ___. _.__ 222
Merry,   Margaret     156, 253
Mitchie,  Georgia   179
Milan,  Betty  ..  179
Millar,   Con     135
Miller,   Garry     186, 230
Miller,   Greg. 71,   82,   77,   93
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Miller,  Hugh     238
Miller,   Ian    208, 229
Miller,   Leonard     170
Miller,   Marilyn   ____ 219, 252
Miller,  Robert    ..__      186
Mills,   Ruth  170
Mironoff, Vic  „  175
Mitchell,   Esther  _ 179
Mitchell,   Hannah 179
Mitchell, James  158
Mitchell, James  W. __ 203
Mitchell, Joan . 179
Mitchell,   Pam    256
Mitchener,   Morton _. 170
Mitten, Leonard _ 195, 130, 238
Mj'oa,  Lillian 218, 242
Mohr,   Frank     .192
Montgomery,   Mary   ._  252
Montgomery,   Nancy ...   205
Moon,  Diana  ._   179
Moore,   Charles   ___.„   52
Moore,   (Eileen    .  179
Moore, Donald         192
Moore,   Joan     179
Moore,   Bill     194, 231
Moran,  John  ___  156, 231
Morseby,   Barbara    222, 243
Morgan, David 130
Morgan, Helen __  „.
 __....   183,   47, 241, 245
Morgan,   Margaret  185
Morris,   Gwen             179
Morris,  Philip  .___ _..„_ 162
Morris, Robert _   186
Morris, Yvette  170, 242
Morriss, Harry    195
Morritt, Harry __..„  185
Morriw, Fred __ . 92
Mortison, Peggy __  179
Morton, Kenneth    162, 229
Morton, Roy  ... -. 63, 189
193,   64, 227, 229,   52,   50
Mottart,   M.   _ _  220
Motherwell,   Elizabeth    254
Mowatt,   Graham     _	
.-■     73, 210, 229,   50
Moyls,  Joe       _. 231
Moyls, Luke    162,   99, 120,   91
Moyls, Charles   _ 212, 231, 130
Moyles,   Joseph _. 212
Muir,   Bob       179
Munn, Ann ;  .__ 243
Murdoch,  John _„ 203
Murdoch,   Madeline     206
Muffitt, Reg ____ _.. 170
Murphey,  Barney  - _ 162
Murphey,  John  170
Murray,   Isabel        170
Mustelt,  Iola  150
Mylett,   Patrick  ...._.„  170
Nager, Diane    162, 250
Nalos,   Erika   „._  241
Nay,   Marjorie           165
Nation,  Llbby     218, 249
Neilson,   James     208
Nelles,   Gordon — _. 180
Nelson,   Bill    230, 136
Nicholson,  Katherine    —
_   ____   171, 242, 255
Nicholson,  Bill  .  148, 236
Nickells,  Bob  _ __. 162
Nelson,  James   __  193
Newbury, E. W.    192
Newman, Gerald  _ „    77
Newman,   Russ    171
Newson,  Don ....   	
        152, 195, 226, 252
Newson, Kay „   180
Neville,  Ralph   _ _ 180
Ney, Phyllis   156, 251,   60
Nichols,   Dee   _ „   243
Nichols,   Dorothy      . 162
Nichols,  Jackie   180
Nickerson,  Ara      156
Nielson,   Alfreda    162
Niewdorp,  John     171,   77
Nightingale,   Frann         180
Nilan,   Bob     210, 230, 227
*?oble,  John  162
Nordale, Joann  _.   180
Nnrrlan,   Harold      _ 171
Nordlund,   Lloyd   _ _ .. 180
Norris,   Flora   „  __   180
Norris,   Mary
 - 156
Northrop,  David   .
171
Norton, Mary Ann
	
	
                 	
162,
119. 117
O'Brian,   Bill  	
255,
186, 234
O'Brian,  William
162, 256
Oben, Jean
  186
Odynsky,   Peter  .
222
O'Hara,   Dick   ...._..
  180
Oliver,  Edward   _.
  180
Oliver,   Billie   	
208
Olliver, John 	
     131
Olson, Bob _ 255,
193,
229, 239
Olson, Philip ._	
203, 220
Olson, Norm 	
.... . 236
O'Neill, Jack
156, 25j
O'Neil,   William.   .
...   . 194
O'Neil,   Eileen   J_
..__.. 180
Ore.   Elizabeth  	
\
  156
Orskog,   Arthur
	
_  193
Orion, Tony  	
.....   87
Ourom, Lorraine^^
...  ... 171
Ostle,   Bernie   	
156,
234, 226
Oulerbridge,   Hetti
.	
171, 245
Ontram,   Donlad
      180
Ozol.   Nelda   	
180
Paddon,   Betty   __
	
180, 253
Pallas,   Ethel   .. ...
    163
Palmer,   Russel   .
156, 236
Panton, Sally   63,
171,
249,   67
Pappajon,  Agnes
  252
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Park,  Joan   .„_._ 256, 219, 253
Parkinson,   Geoff      196
Parker,   Douglas      156
Parker,   Margaret       2^6
Parker,   Peggy 163
Parks,   Doreen   217
Parliament,   Harvey     ...
 .    192, 148, 236, 226
Parnum,  Ruth   63, 171, 249
Paton,  Gordon    171
Patterson,   Gene   ...  180, 129
Paul,   Frank     171
Paulik,   Wilmar     171
Paulin, Betty   185, 246
Paulsen,   Edmond    222
Payne, Terry  252, 218
Payson, Dorothy  ..  185, 119
Peacock, Mary   — 180
Peacock,  Bob     186, 230
Pearce, Irene     - 156
Pearson,  Emma    180
Pearson,   Larry     235
Pedersen,   Chester     231, 136
Pedlow, Ken  _  163, 235
Peele,  Rohan    259
Pegues,  Joe    180, 129
Peirson, George   _ 188
Pendleton,  Sue  180, 252
Penn,   Muriel    _ 180, 253
Penny,  Harold   .    260
Perks,   Ronald     — 180
Perrault,  Ray    171
Perrault,   Robert   _   203
Perris,   George    264, 236
Perry,  Hazel .  180
Perry,  Joan    219, 252
Peterson,   Earl    205
Peterson,   Nancy  163
Phare,  Rowland  203, 260
Phelps,   James      254
Phelan,   Mary      171, 249
Phillips,   Randolph     203
Phillips,  Jackie          163
Pierce,   Irene  _ .119
Pierson,  George  	
    183,   86, 227, 238
Piederman, R. J.    163
Pickles,  Norman     135
Pillman,   Ray   203
Pillman,  Ray   _   203
Pilmer,   Margaret     ... 157
Plenderleith, E. M.  .     171, 244
Pilkington,   Lawrence    .. ....   171
Pitman,   Nancy   	
    163, 245, 251, 255
Plant,   George      180
Pitts,  Harry     157,   63, 232
Pollock, Bill    203
Poole, William  _ „.. 180
Pope, Doreen  180
Pope, Steve  180
Porteus,   Stuart     185
259, 63, 183, 84, 231, 54
Poulton,  Sid   —   86
Powell, John 	
   261, 190, 189, 238
Powell,  Pauline  _._ 172
Pratt,  Joan    172
Preston, T.  B  180, 174, 192
Pridham,  Jean  .... 157, 269, 258
Prior,  Dennis    185
Prior, Check   203
Pritchard,  Phyllis    157
Prowd, Larry _  163, 238
Pronger, Ivy    157, 243, 251, 112
Pudney,   Peter   .... 163, 145, 234
Purslow, P. A.  _.._ 206
Pye, Eleanor _.___.„ . 180
Purves,  Lavonne     222
Rae,   Dave    139, 138
Ralston,   Aline     255, 259
Rampone, Alfred    172
Randall,  Bob      180
Raphael, Les . _.-. ..     63
183, 220,   85,   47, 257,   50
Rathlef,  Lisbeth          218
Rathie, Joy      180
Reaville,   Eric         180, 174
• Reed,   Thomas     172
Reid,  Agnes    _ _ 172
Reid,   Dianne     _ 172, 243, 253
Reid,   Dorothy   ._...., 180
Reid,  John  _ _. 203
Reid,  June        _ 163, 243
Reid,   Lois     __
     152,   49, 158, 119, 117
Rennie,  Jean    172, 242
Renwich,   Beth  185, 243
Rhodes,   Ernest      195
Rice,  Ron     180
Richardson,   Paul     180
Ries,    Marguerite     206
Ritchel,  Helen     180
Ripley,   Mary     163, 248
Ripley, Drew   210, 233
Ritchie,   Gordon     210, 233
Roantree,   Fran    219
Roberts, Gwen ._  „ 172
Robertshaw,  Arthur     172
Robertson,   Bob    „.. 203
Robertson,   Philip      203
Robertson,   Sandy   .   194
139, 118, 120, 122, 137, 121
Robinson, Robert    157, 135
Robinson,  Dave    180
Robinson,  Donald   __     190
Robinson,  Jackie     180,   63
Robinson, Joyce    157
Robinson, Kay      206
Robinson,   Malcolm   .... 203, 229
Robinson, M   247
Rockson,   Paul 203
Roddick, James ...   203
Rodenchuck,  Jenny   .    172, 242
Rodgers,   Joan   ..__.._.. 157, 241
Rogers,   Elaine     217, 248
Roeher, Alan    74,   85
Rogers,  Mary     180
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Rogers,   Gwen     206
Rollo,  Gertrude     206
Roos,   Albert     192
Roots,  Fred  ..'.  181, 248
Roots, Walt ._. 181, 148
Roper,   Austin   .... 260, 142, 229
Rose, Mary Ann    249
Rose,  Peggy      172
Rosen,  Linda      172
Rosetti,  H.    135
Ross,   Elizabeth    243
Ross,   Margaret     181
Ross, Robert   130
Rothstein, Mort    237
Rowell,   Hedley _  134
Rowledge,   Jim   181
Runnalls,   Jean     172
Ruck, Bill _   190
Runkle,   Peter     181
Russell,   Ethel     218
Rush,   George     208
43, 227, 229, 119, 118, 116
Russell, Topsy    249
Rutquist,   Fred     195, 236
Ryan,  Ed     120, 121
Ryan,   Ruth      181
Sager,   Murray      152, 229
Sainas,   Mary     181
Salter,   Pat  172, 243
Sanderson,  Joy     172, 243
Sanford,  Malchia    163,   83
Sansum,  John      260, 194
Sapp, Bob   181
Sauder, William   181
Saunders,  Marybeth    163
Savard, Daisy     163
Sceats,  Hubie     190, 233
Schjelderup,  Hassel    181
Schoening,   Allen     203
Schulz,   Godfrey   _   163
Schwabe,    Miriam     157
Scott, Donald   _.. 195
Scott, George    172
Scott,  John _.   93,    92, 152
157,   68, 122, 227, 232, 290
Scott,   Peggy  188
Scott, Roy     163
Scott,   Tom  _    236
Searle,  Marion   181
Segar, Delphine    _ 144
Seraphim, Andrew    236
Seraphim,  Robert  ...  236
Selkirk, Bob    181
Seymour, Jane       97
Seyer, F. H.    228
Shadwell, Howard 118
Sharp,  Bill    _ 236
Shaw,  Lois  .  181
Shearman, Jackie  _ 181, 140
Sherman, Deane    96
Shields,  Lorna     163, 247
Short,  John    231, 157
Siemens, Abe    163
Sigalet, H. J.    188
Silver,  Lorna     164
Simson,   Carl     164
Simpson,  Keith        81
Simpson, Marg
Sinclaire, Jean
181
164
Sinclaire, Jean L., ....   164, 247
. Sinclaire,  Ken    _ 181
Skene,   Alec     231
Skipsey,   Leslie     164
Smart,   Kay   164, 242
Smellie,  Elsie     157, 252
Smellie,   Ruth   ._  206
Smetanuk, Bill  _  181
Smith,  Anne    157, 247
Smith, Barbara    248, 157
Smith,   Arthur    230
Smith,  Bruce     233
Smith, Dennis      86
Smith, Don A    233
Smith,   Dorothy     164, 248
Smith,   Helen    181
Smith,   Herb       .. 231, 134, 118
Smith, Helen  M     181, 253
Smith,  James     181
Smith,   Jeanette       . 181, 253
Smith, Marjorie       181
Some_s,   Marie        181, 140
Soon,  Isobel        181
Sorenson, Marie   .    53
Spall, Clara   _... 181
Spencer, Bill        181
Spicer,   Vivien     _ 214
Spragge,  Don  .  181
Stacey, May    154, 244
Stacey, Iris  244, 164
Staf, Bunny    181
Stafford,  Cora   248
Stainsby,  Don     181,   94
Staley,  Ruth         . 157
Stamatis, Pat       157, 244
Stamatis,  John     164, 235
Stamford,  Gordon    _ 191
Standeven, Pete _ 164, 243,   76
Stead, Ursula .    255
Stedman,  Shirley  Ruth       181
Steele, Ian   _. 190, 230
Steele,   Margaret     172, 243
Steiner, Irene _ 	
   257, 172, 250, 253
Steiner,  Robert     —   95
Stephenson,   Jackie     211, 212
Stevens,   Don  195
Stevenson, Joan _
63, 210, 148, 245, 119,   51
Stevenson,  Gerald _ 	
181, 174, 124, 137, 125, 127
Stewart,   Ann     157, 247
Stewart,   Catherine   .... 181, 253
Stewart,   Don     194
Stewart, Margaret  	
Stewart,   M.   Francis      206
Stewart,  Rosemary   	
_    259,   71, 241,   50
Stewart, Ross __.  164
Stewart, Bill  	
     172, 229,   92,   93,   91
Stewart,  Wassy  .. 208,   72, 207
Still,   Connie   .   208, 346
Still,  John  185, 234
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Page  Two  Hundred  and Eighty-six . . Stillwell,   Art	
     199, 231, 118, 120, 122
Stocks,   Daphne    181
Stokes, Al     199
Stokes, John   164
Stokkland,  Margaret.... 203, 200
Stone,   Dorothy     164
Stonhouse,  Alice    152, .157, 243
Stowe,  Norma     164,    80
Strachan,  Jessie     164, 256
Straight,   Byron 157
Stringer,  Arthur     181
Stroud,  Ross    257, 199
Sturat, Roy    181
Sutherland,   Doug     172
Sutherland,   Elizabeth     219, 255
Sutherland,  Wilber  _.. 157, 256
Sutton, Douglas   157
Swanson,  Lome     124, 125
Sweeney,  Allan    181
Switzer,  William    188
Symonds, Ann   218, 247
Syrett,  John     164
Tait, David    203
Talbot,  Colleen     181
Tapay,  Harold      — 195
Tarrant,   Edmund 192
Tassie,   Peter     181
Taylor,   Bill      181
Taylor,   Chester     203
Taylor,   Edward  .. 214, 220, 232
Taylor, Joan    181
Taylor, Len    193
Techy,   Margaret     219, 255
Temoin,   Maurice     181
Temple,   Elvira     219
Ternan,   Mary      181
Terrace,  James 208, 234
Tessman, Fred    86
Thibaudeau, Tibby     181
Thorn,  Gil  . 181
Thomas,   Blodwan   164
Thomas,  Ethel 172
Thomas,   John     157
Thomas,  Mah 	
Thomas,  Wallace   158
Tiedje, Frank    239
Thomasson,   Averil     172
Thompson,  Anita.. 164, 242,   68
Thompson,   Ben    181
Thompson,   Betty     164, 246
Thompson,  William    254, 157
Thompson, Ken   120, 121
Thompson,   George     181
Thompson,   Ross    _____ 186
Thompson,   William    158
Thomson,  Audrey _ 172
Thomson, Stan . 199
Thorpe, Jackie  . . 219
Thorsteinson,  James       214
Tiedse, J. L.   220
Tieje,  Pat      182
Tierney,  Letitia    157
Tindle,  Phil     182
Tomlinson.  Tommy       88
Tonning,   Toni    ...  214
Torrance,  Ethel    205
Tourtellotte, Alice   164
Tratch, Ernie   182
Trevle,  Blanche    _ 306
Traer,   Dolores       63, 205
Tredaway, Willifred   206
Tretheway,  Helen     205
Trip,  Chris    147
Trumbull,  Mary F  157, 249
112,   67,   68, 240,   51,   54
Tryon, Muriel „ 164
Turkham, Fred ...__ . 236
Tufts,  Aileen    158
Tuftland,   ack     164, 235
Tunbzridge,  Marnie  .... 164, 260
Turley,   Frank     _ 191
Turnbull,   Frances     245,   96
Turner,   Blanche     219, 255
Turner,  Patsy    182
Twizell,   Barbara     172, 247
Udall, Dorothy   206
Underwood,   Eldin 194, 226, 238
Urquhart, Doreen   164, 242
Van de Putte, Madeline  .... 158
Van Gorder, Julie   	
 _ 158, 260, 241, 251, 255
Vantreight,   Elsie        164, 249
Varcoe,  John     188
Vaughn,   Margaret     253
Vaughan,  Victor     136
eeburg,   Ruth     164, 242
Velde,  Mabel    206
Victor,   Maurey     222
Vincent,   Vivian    158
Vincent, Ronald   213
Vlag,  Ann    ... 175, 252
Vosper,  Kay    173
Voss,  Helen     208, 218, 254
Wales, Don     52
Wallace,  Stuart    182
Wallis,   Jack     203
Wallace,  William    182, 129
Wakely,  Walter    158
Waldron,   Harry   	
Walker,   Bob   ...... 172, 232,   93
Walroy,  Art     220
Walker,  William    192
Wallick,   Nancy      214
Walling,   Evelyn     219, 252
Wallis,   Jack     130
Wallace,  W.  J   158
Waller,   Arnold      158
Walther,   Gath      156
Walton,   Elizabeth   .  158, 245
Wannop,  Leonard   . 193
Ward,   George ... 173
Wardle,  Eunice  .   173
Warrender,   Cam     195, 231
Wasylkow,  Wassy      81
Watson, Carol   158
Watson,   Jeanne       .   ..  132, 255
Watson,   Ken     182
Watson,   Waverlie   .  205, 242
Watt,   Marge  173
Watt,  Nancy  165,    81
Watts,   Natalie   .   182, 252
Watts, Bill .. 165,   88, 145, 112
Wayles, Eden   _.... 206
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Page Two Hundred and Eighty-eight Webb, Halcyone   209, 212
Webster,  Dave     182
Webster, David J  173
Westinghouse,   Margaret     182
Weber,   Marj  212
Weeks,   Donald    _.. 158, 255
Webb, Phil  _.„.„  182
Welte,  Marion   _.. 182
Welsh,   Daynard    138
Weir, Sheila   .. 182
Weber,   Ron   _   123
Welsh,   Herb      _._..__ 182
Welton,   Richard     194
Wener,   Bob    158, 258, 257
Wells, John _.    173, 238
Wharton,  Agnes    _. 182,   75
Wheeler, John        199, 118,   92
Wheeler,  Sheila  ..  _.    182
White,   Anna   .  „   96
White,   Alan     261, 191
White,   Biddy    165
White,   Jean   247
White,  Eleanor    153, 205
White,   Joe     173
White, Leslie  217, 243
White, Loise   247
White,   Pate     165, 256, 229
White,  Roy    165, 228
White,   Ruth     165, 228
Whitehead,   Cal       99, 173
Whitney,  Joan   .   182
Whitney,   Ray      182
Whittemore, Tom    158, 254
Whittaker,   Bill     173
Midmeyer, Walt    191
Wiggen,  Stanley     191
Wiggins,   Murray     203
Wight, Larry    194, 252
Wilcox, Eddie  182, 255
Wilkins, Ruth   182, 254
Wilkinson,   Barclay     208
Wilkinson,   Peggy     173
Willcox,   Allan     j 203
Willcox, Jean    182
Williams,  Barry   182
Williams,  Dorothy    172, 247
Williams, James   158, 260
Williams, Mildred   206
Williams,  Tom    193, 231
Williamson,  Gerry  182,   77
Willis, Marjorie   206
Willis, Thomas   226, 230
Williscroft,  Iris    206
Willis, Norman    193, 236
Wills, Eileen    185, 248
Wilson,  Beverley    182, 174,   77
Wilson,   Bob _.. 182, 135
Wilson,  Cash   182, 253
Wilson,  Eric      188
Wilson,   Irene    __ 218, 255
Wilson,   Jim   _  .... .„ 218
185, 220,   85,   84, 227,   50
Wilson, Jean   218
Wilson,   June       182
Wilson,   Mary      253
Wilson, Lorna     218, 248
Wilson, Mae ..._. „ _ 205
Wilson,   Margaret     158
Wilson,   Nancy     186, 254
Wilson,   R.  182
Wilson, Rosemary   218
Wiltshire,   Tom   ...._  202
Winch,   Eric   220
Winter,  Wallace %L 203, 230
Winter,   Walter     173
Withler,   Fred      158
Wittaker,   Bill    233
Wolfram,   Gordon   260
Wolerton,   Janet     .._ 206
Wong,   Elsie     182
Wong,  Gilbert      255
Wong,   John  182,   63
Wong,   Leslie   ...... 183, 112,    51
Wong, Vivian   255, 173
Woo, John     193
Wood.  Jnanita    _... 158
Wood, Norman    194
Wood.   Fobin   ... _ _ 165
Woods,   Eric          229, 199
Woodcroft,  John    	
„_    260, 192, 226, 229
Woodland,   Art     „.„. 165
Woodman,   Rae   _  173
Woodman, Mabel    188, 245,   72
Woods, Earl        182
Woods, Les   182
Woodward,  Raith     165
Woodward,   Frank   __.. 203, 262
Woodward,   Shirley   .... 182, 253
Worth,   Helen     165,    92
Worthington, Pat   173,   94
Wragg, Laurence   165
Wright,  Alma    182, 253
Wright, Chuck .... 147, 139, 138
Wright,   Marion      219, 152
Wright,   Ev     173, 244
Wright, lone   173
Wright, Margaret   188, 254
Wyatt,   Gerrard     158
Yard, Ted    158
Yates, Doug   173, 233
Yeasting,  Alice     158
Yelf,  Kay     182
Yip,  Cecil    155,   94,   85
Yip, Chuck   190
Yip,  Don    134
Yorke,   Bruce     127
185, 260, 227, 119, 134,   50
Yorke, Mary   173
Yorkston,  Doreen      188
Young, Archibald   173, 233
Young,  Bernice    173
Young, Diana    165, 248
Youns, Mraaaret   173
Young,  William    203
Young,  Victor     208, 234
Younger,  Andy   190, 229
Yuill,   Lois  __ 182
Zacks,  William    182, 237
Zahar,   Ed     186
Zahar, F. A.   182
Zarry,  Etna     182
Zink,   Norma     219
Zitko, Henry  ..._ _ 182
Zivot, Aaron  . „ 257
K-yfteetii
LttaA.
To the Grads of '45
• We have served you during your
Varsity years.
• May we continue to serve you in
your Business and Professional
years that will follow your
graduation.
"PRINTING FOR  EVERY PURPOSE"
Anderson Printing Co.
LIMITED
PAc. 5838
455 Hamilton St Vancouver, B. C.
Compliments of
GORDON FARRELL
. Page Two Hundred and Eighty-nine A GOOD IDEA STAYS GOOD!
In 1938-39 the TOTEM in its present form and size was created by
Cleland-Kent—which was a good idea. It portrayed the life and
activities on the U.B.C. campus in the only permanent record
made. In this year 1945, the Totem returns to the campus after
being discontinued for two years, because of wartime difficulties in production. Once again, life of the University year is
recorded by word and picture for all time. It was a good idea in
1939, it is a good idea today, and we at Cleland-Kent are proud
of the part we have played in the production of the 1945 Totem.
ENGRAVING COMPANY   LIMITED
534 CAMBIE STREET • VANCOUVER
Page Two Hundred and Ninety To The Student Body ....
Our Congratulations and
Best Wishes
BELL & MITCHELL LTD.
541 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
DeLuxe Bowling Centre
MArine 9940   Hastings at Homer   PAcific 0956
Home of the
U.B.C. SORORITIES' BOWLING LEAGUE
We Cater to Rushing  Parties
WITH COMPLIMENTS OF
Georgia  Pharmacy Limited
777 W..Georgia St.
Leslie G. Henderson, Oc.P. '06
Captain Gibb G. Henderson, B.fl., B.A.Sc., U.B.C. '33
EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY
LOOSELEAF BOOKS
SLIDE RULES, FOUNTAIN PENS
SCALES, DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
CLARKE 8 STUART
COMPANY LTD.
Stationers.  Printers.  Bookbinders
550 Seymour Vancouver, B. C.
FREDERICK GOERTZ
LTD.
CERTIFIED INSTRUMENT MAKERS
Specialists in the Repair of
Instruments for Engineers, Aviators,
Surveyors and Navigators
All Work Guaranteed
569 Howe St., Vancouver MArine 3822
COMPLIMENTS OF
Canada Permanent Trust Co.
H. E. BOND, Manager
432 Richards Street Vancouver, B.C.
This  Fast - Moving Age
calls for modern vision—sharp, alert, unhandicapped.
Your optical prescription affords your eyes this necessary
measure of seeinq comfort. Our services are designed to
meet the prescribed needs in the finished eye wear, by
styling and fitting to your individual requirements.
Just remember — for your convenience — two offices.
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL
CO. LTD.
424 VANCOUVER BLOCK vANCO-vr_t BLOCX
413 MEDICAL DENTAL BLDG. Established   1924
Exclusive Opticians lo the Eye-Physician ior Twenty Years
OUTFITTERS TO ..
HUNTSMEN - FISHERMEN  -  SURVEYORS
PROSPECTORS - LOGGERS - MINERS
Down Sleeping Robes - Silk Tents - Pack Boards
Waterproof Clothing - Mackinaws • Venetian
Blinds - Awnings - Window Shades - Garden
and  Camp Furniture   -   Flags   -   Pennants,  etc.
Jones
43 West Hastings St
TENT AND
AWNING
Limited
Vancouver, B.C.
Dickson Importing Co. Ltd.
BLENDERS AND PACKERS OF
DICKSON BLOSSOM TEA
COMPLIMENTS OF
Alcock, Downing & Wright
Wholesale  Plumbing and Heating  Supplies
896 Cambie St Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
SHEARS 8 CO. LTD.
FAir. 2202
PRINTERS
Vancouver
2218 Main St
. . Page  Two  Hundred  and Ninety-one Always in the Lead for the
Best in Entertainment!
During 1944 you saw many memorable motion
pictures; 1945 promises even more. You will see
them   all   with   everything   for   your  comfort   al
FAMOUS PLAYERS
- - - THEATRES - - -
CAPITOL — ORPHEUM
STRAND — DOMINION
There is No Substitute for
QUALITY
ARTONA STUDIO
833 Granville St.
Phone MArine 3932
Film Is Scarce, Use It Wisely . . .
USE KODAK FILM
These days make every snapshot count. Use
good judgment in the pictures you take; use a
film that's always dependable—Kodak Film.
When it comes to photo finishing, leave your
films with us. We make the most of every
snapshot.
EASTflMI
Photographic
Materials
LTD.
610 Granville St
VANCOUVER. B.C.
Invest in
VICTORY BONDS
Feel Fresh
DRINK
ORANGE CRUSH
"Canada's Most Famous Orange Drink"
Page Two Hundred and Ninety-two Apologia . . .
No one knows better than the staff who produced this book how many omissions and errors
it contains.
For the mistakes which escaped the critical
gaze of our proofreaders, and for those which time
did not allow us to correct, the editor and staff of
the 1945 Totem offer their most sincere apologies.   PRINTED    BY
WARD   &    PHILLIPS    LIMITED
VANCOUVER,   B.C.

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