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The Totem 1939 1939

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r~3*~'* *—^ra i*/C PUBLISHED    BY    THE    ALMA    MATER    SOCIETY »&** u#
OF  THE   UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA The Province of
British Columbia is
still young, the Dominion of Canada,
as a Federal Unit, is
still younger. Yet
a mere century and
a half have seen
this country of ours
develop from a
meaningless expanse of unproductive territory to be
what it is today. That dauntless courage, keen initiative, desire to shoulder responsibility, eagerness to
co-operate, those qualities of manhood which meant
so much in laying the foundations of this nation are
no longer our first and only thought and desire. To
recapture the spirit of those days is our duty as citizens.   Our University is already the proud possessor
of an enviable past. Its future must not be jeopardized
by our weaknesses, nor by our apathy.
In these pages we have attempted to recall to your
minds some of the pageantry and romance of the
history of this Province. Our purpose is two-fold.
It is to show our appreciation of those who poured
their energies into making a history for us to pride,
and to inspire further effort on our part to guarantee
at least as great a future for British Columbia.
We feel that this University can play a major role in
the next years to come. Just as engineers have
thrown graceful bridges across once dangerous gaps,
so can our University be the link between the present
and the future of this Province.
If we expect our University to expand, we must
demonstrate even more emphatically that we are both
able and eager to return that which we received from
the University to the Province that itself gave to us
the opportunity to attend a University. DEDICRTIOn To the people of the Province of British
Columbia, in the hope that the very near future
will demonstrate more strongly than ever
before, not only the practical value of this
growing University to the Province, but also
the necessity of public commendation and
support to assure, in turn, the success of the
institution, this book is respectfully dedicated. y,:.c
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undergraduates of our University.   Some
r University life, others are in the final
fving us.   But, to one and all,  I wish
;a that you are attending a University
-not only now, but in future years,
^tes have made a name, not only for
University.   It is up to our graduates
and as the years roll along to increase
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of a University which  lead to your
ou have, so the argument would lead
have an exceptionally fine body of
ff.   To this I agree,
nder a  handicap since we started—
temporary  site,  overcrowded  at our
s lead to a serious, though not fatal,
ains.    But  it  is a  healthy symptom,
plain of, if our numbers were dimin-
g it would mean just one thing, that
our repuianun was Tailing off.    So  I  claim our growing pains
mean a continued success.
Our graduates have a duty to perform in moulding public opinion
in favor of the University. This is important. The time will come
when our graduates in the Province will be numbered by thousands and their influence will then be felt even as far as Victoria.
When that day comes we will be given the buildings with their
accommodation, which this project is entitled to.
So, when you are graduates, please remember that your duty to
the University has only begun. Your love for your Alma Mater
should never die. It is up to you to see that it does not die
through starvation. I will leave that thought with you and bid
you Godspeed and a happy ending to your various ambitions.
DR.  R. E. McKECHNIE.   Once again i
the hope tha
men and wo
training in s
tion of the p
a solution.
To provide (such guidance, indeed, has been the University's
main purpose^ the conscious law of its beii ce its estab
lishment. The same principle is to be seen at work in whatever
is retained in the scheme of studies from year to year and in
whatever is modified in the light of new knowledge, whether
such modification is a widening of range or an intensified pursuit
of an existing activity.
As the servant of the Province the University welcomes criticism
in every field. It would, however, be but an unprofitable servant,
not alone to the Province but to Truth herself, should it fail to
relate such criticism to the needs and resources of the community
as a whole.
But in truth there is little necessity for anything in the nature
of a justification. The sympathetic interest shown by the people
of British Columbia, their generous aid and co-operation, their
increasing tendency to look to the University as a centre of
important and dynamic action, all reveal how much the University, without being "provincial" in any way, is of the very essence
of British Columbia.
L S. KLINCK. 5££m
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"  sSr-li;  Serene and almost majestic stands the University
Library, offering a challenge to those with inquiring
minds, and even to those without the 'time' to seek! If a building has beauty, we can take it; if it has none,
we can make it! This photograph shows none other
than   the   obviously   semi-permanent  Arts   Building. The past year has seen the human
race still indulging here and there
in the pleasantries of war, still
giving play to that primary emotion, hate. In the Japanese
Gardens on the Campus of the
University stands this mute tribute to a great pacifist, and a
tolerant statesman, Inazo Nitobe,
Does this monument offer any
hope in a neurotic world, or will
the Engineering Buildings in the
background perchance be forced
to house students training, not to
construct, but to destroy? The greatest danger in this life
of ours is to fall inextricably into
a rut, to grow to love routine. A
certain preventative is relaxation
in sufficient quantity to free the
mind, and to unburden the soul.
Excursions into realms of carefree
conversation in the Cafeteria, or
a visit to the many entertainments in the Auditorium can
accomplish much in releasing one
from worries sown by those in
such dens as the Administration
Building. Just move from right
to left above! 'Looking upward every day', without a doubt. One
day it hopes to be an integral part of the Engineering
Building.    As yet it is the over-heated Power House. A star gazer, too, by its looks, with, perhaps, a
slightly more intelligent demeanour than that of its
neighbour on the opposing page.    Here-in is Science. An important policy to adopt
when young is to retain an open
mind, to take the wider view of
things, and to compose them as
a unit in one's imagination. Pictured here are the Agriculture
Building, the Arts Building, and
a portion of the Administration
Building, three separate worlds
that combine to form an intellectual Empire, which is governed
by the rulers of the last! . . .
We'd rather see an Empire built
of lasting stone than watch it
crack and rot so soon. .•'■ Jf,
And if the turmoil of this life
should prey too hungrily upon
your minds, or if the soothing
calm of nature beckons you, then
visit this our Campus. In five
and twenty paces you can be "far
from the madding crowd," alone
with your thoughts, fresh air,
damp stubble, and cows. But
always will the frontiers of
knowledge call you back, for
there, against the sky, is our
bustling, scenting Science Building—with future certain, being
strongly built of haughty stone. &&&
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UMNER
AMPAIGN CARSON McGUIRE       MORRIS BELKIN DORWIN  BAIRD KEMP EDMONDS JOHN BIRD
PAUL   PAINE
At a hectic meeting of the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia on January 26, 1938, a Campaign Committee was created, following the announcement of the Board
of Governors that University fees would be increased by $25.00,
and that enrollment would be restricted by the enforcement of
the policy of limitation. On October 5, 1938, at another meeting
of the Society, the Campaign Committee received instructions
from the students to continue their efforts to obtain reduction
of fees, and to further the publicizing of the University in the
Province. This continuation of the policy adopted at the beginning of 1938 proved the students, in spite of the partial success
of their Committee during the summer, to be adamant in their
refusal to willingly accept even a part of the Board of Governors'
dictations.
The summer months formed a time of anxious activity for
the Campaign Committee. Briefs were prepared upon two chief
subjects, a "Ten-Year Building Plan," and a revision of timetables,—the latter to obviate the difficulties of over-crowding,
and representations were made to the Government of British
Columbia for a reduction of fees and abolition of the limitation
of registration.
As yet the "Ten-year Plan" has received the admiration of all
who have read it, but its submission has resulted in no action.
The revision of timetables prepared by the Committee has
received similar compliments, but it, too, has resulted in nothing
more than a weak and ineffective compromise. The representations to the Government were more successful. Limitation of
registration was finally removed after one polite suggestion,
and later by a direct demand, had been made by the Cabinet to
the Board of Governors of this institution. Reduction of fees
was refused, a refusal not joyfully accepted by the students.
But the government was genuinely interested in the situation
at the University, and during the Session at the end of 1938,
it voted a sum of $350,000 for the purposes of erecting a Building at the University. It is proposed tentatively to use the new
building for a Public Health and Preventive Medicine Department, and possibly for other laboratory purposes. During the
same session of the Legislative Assembly the University grant
from the Government was increased by $25,000, a sum equal
to half the increased revenue from the raised fees.
At the time of writing, prospects for the early construction of
the Students' Union Building appear to be optimistic. Financial
aid is now available from the Board of Governors to the extent
of $25,000, a sum that facilitates "laying the corner stone,"
perhaps, in the Spring.
Prophesy is dangerous. Let us say, merely, the future looks
bright.
DAVID CAREY
EDWARD DISHER
MALCOLM BROWN       ROBERT SMITH
MILTON OWEN      KENNETH   BECKETT Cra.'gflower School—erected 1858.
Photo   by courtesy Kenneth McAllister,  Victoria.
OUR      UNIVERSITY
&M
The life story of the University of British Columbia
has its beginning far back in the early pioneer
history of the province. The intrepid home-makers
who built British Columbia—who beat back her
wilderness, grubbed at her minerals, and sowed
success in her fertile valleys—had more than mere
dogged courage. Those who took their stand side
by side on the western outposts of civilization were
possessed of an indomitable optimism, an optimism
born of an ability to reflect upon the future with
supreme confidence. That foresight, that pioneer
vision, has made British Columbia what she is today.
With that same vision, bolstered and given purpose
by the germ of Old World culture which had been
transplanted west of the rugged Rockies, early
British Columbians did not lose sight of the need
for educating the generations to come. As early
as 1877, when the white population of the province
—Osborne Durkin
barely exceeded 25,000, Superintendent of Education John Jessop declared that a university was
absolutely necessary if the youna men and women
of British Columbia were to be "fully prepared for
the various avocations of youth . . ."
It was not until twenty-one years later, however,
that the initial step was taken. In 1898 the high
schools of Vancouver and Victoria were affiliated
with McGill University, a move which was furthered
by the establishment, in 1906, of the McGill
University College of British Columbia. This
arrangement, which lasted from 1907 until 1915,
enabled students to pursue studies in Arts and
Applied Science for credit at McGill.
In the meantime, progress was being made towards
the foundation of a Provincial university. The
University of British Columbia was established and
incorporated by the University Act of 1908, and
Point Grey was chosen as the site of its campus.
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»t.w: Mr. F. L. Carter-Cotton was elected Chancellor in
1912, and a year later Dr. F. F. Wesbrook, brilliant
Canadian Dean of Medicine at the University of
Minnesota, was appointed president of the new
institution. It was with justifiable satisfaction
that the land at Point Grey was cleared, and work
finally began on the Science Building.
But the lethal influence of War put a stop to
operations at Point Grey in 1914. The demands
of war, however, are not the demands of youth, and
the need of housing ambitious students was imperative. On September 30th, 1915, having chosen
the Fairview property of the General Hospital as a
temporary location, the University of British
Columbia opened its door's as an independent
institution.
Despite many handicaps, the infant University
managed to struggle through the war years. Then,
just before the Armistice, Dr. Wesbrook died. He
was succeeded by Dr. L. S. Klinck, the first Dean
of Agriculture. A short time later the University
lost its first Chancellor, Mr. Carter-Cotton, and
Dr. R. E. McKechnie was appointed in his place.
University Science Building—erected 1920.
By 1922 the Fairview "shacks" had become utterly
inadequate for the now rapidly growing University,
and a publicity campaign organized by the exasperated students finally caused the government, as
the student paper expressed it, to "see the Point."
Construction of the Science Building was resumed
in 1923, and two years later the Point Grey buildings
were ready for occupation.
Enrollment at the University has increased at an
alarming rate since 1925, and the last three years
have seen over 2000 students occupying space
originally designed to house not more than 1500.
Again the students are complaining of overcrowding, and again a campaign for more accommodation is in progress.
The University of British Columbia is a lasting
monument to the foresight of the early pioneers
of this province. But the students of 1938-39 are
also looking to the future; pioneer blood still flows
in their veins. They will continue to carry the
torch of progress which is their heritage, and they
will pass it on from year to year, that the vision of
their fathers may reach fruition.
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^^~ 1938.     1.     HITLER.       AUSTRIAN ANSCHLUSS.
2. ANGLO-ITALIAN PACT SIGNED.
3. MUNICH PEACE CONFERENCE SAVES CRISIS.
4. BRAZILIAN FASCIST RIOTS AND REBELLION
PREMIER'S PALACE ATTACKED.
5. UNEMPLOYED SIT-DOWN STRIKE  IN THE VANCOUVER   POST   OFFICE—BATON   AT  WORK.
6. SINO-JAPANESE  WAR   SMASHES  ON—TO   RUIN.
7. $1,000,000 C.P.R. PIER D FIRE.
8. UNITED STATES, GREAT BRITAIN, AND CANADA
SIGN RECIPROCAL TRADE TREATY.
9. LION'S GATE BRIDGE OPENED.
10.     GREAT    BRITAIN    SPEEDS    REARMAMENT    PROGRAM TO RECORD PACE.
1939. 11. LORD TWEEDSMUIR, GOVERNOR - GENERAL OF
CANADA RECEIVES LL.D. DEGREE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
12. GOLDEN GATE EXPOSITION OPENED.
13. ITINERARY   OF   KING   GEORGE   VI   AND   QUEEN
ELIZABETH  IN CANADA ANNOUNCED.
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■\v HOMECOMING
The age of a university might be deduced, in a
general way, from the amount of ivy on its buildings
and the spread of its campus. Or it might be
computed, with slightly less accuracy, by noting
the age and number of its graduate students. As
a school adds buildings and years, so does its body
of alumni increase in size and age. At last there
comes a time when the grads are so many, and so
middle-aged, and so successful, that they can get
together and decide to endow their alma mater.
Endowments mean more buildings, buildings mean
more alums, alums mean more endowments.    And
—Osborne Durkin
so an ever-increasing circle is described, with the
university as a  center.
The graduate-endowment-graduate circle of which
the University of British Columbia is the focal point
still has a very small radius. It was obvious, at
this year's Homecoming Celebration, that our university has yet to face the most difficult years of
its adolescence. There were very few gray heads
among the "old boys," and very few offers of new
buildings—although a hint of approaching baldness
was noted here and there with satisfaction. It was
gratifying,  as well,   to note  the  enthusiasm with
Page Twenty-eight which the greatest number of graduates ever to
return to the campus revisited the scenes of their
undergraduate victories and defeats.
Led by Alum president Milt Owen, (Arts '34), and
adhering to the schedule laid out by Junior Member
Evan apRoberts, (Sc. '41), the grads started their
weekend of celebrating at the Alumni Dinner on
Friday, October 21 st. When they had paid sufficient
attention to the quality food and the quantity
speeches, the celebrants joined their undergrad
brothers — and the Thunderbirds — at a Homecoming Rally in the Crystal Ballroom. Here, under
the influence of soft music and beautiful coeds,
degrees and things were forgotten until far into
the night.     (1:00 a.m.)
Next day was Saturday—football  day—and  after
a   Big   Block   reunion   luncheon   in   the   cafeteria,
grads, undergrads, and others smashed their way
into the crowded stadium to watch the Thunder-
birds down Saskatchewan 2-1 in a deciding Hardy
Cup battle. Then, in smooth but rapid succession,
came the tea dance in the Gym, a Dinner in the
caf, a theatre program in which Player's Club and
Film Society cooperated efficiently, and finally—
to the grad's satisfaction—the Varsity-Graduates
basketball game in which the students came out
on the short end of a 44-20 score.
It was a great weekend, for all concerned. And
although the grads left no new buildings to mark
their epochal Homecoming, they did prove that
their Alma Mater occupies an important niche in
Alum memory. The ultimate importance of that
niche remains to be seen . . .
Page Twenty-nine VICTORIA
Hemmed in by an international boundary to the
south and a wall of mountains to the east, the
University of British Columbia finds intercollegiate
competition a matter of some difficulty. The
annual Victoria Invasion, therefore, makes an
opportunity to give loud and memorable expression
to "that intangible thing, College Spirit."
This year's chapter of the Invasion was no exception. When the "Princess Norah" slipped under
the Lion's Gate Bridge on the morning of February
4th, she carried—besides a cameraman who had
failed to leave the boat in time—three hundred
hilarious students, a number of athletes, and the
Varsity Band.
The crowd entertained itself on the way over with
scr-ool songs and yells, and at Victoria the boat
was met by a large body of Capitalites who
herded the Invaders into busses and escorted them
to McDonald Park, scene of the McKechnie Cup
Rugby clash. Here both Victoria Rep and the Park
goalposts went down before the enthusiastic attack
of Varsity's team and its followers. Victory was
celebrated in the traditional manner by a tea dance
at the Empress Hotel, after which students retired
to various parts of Victoria and environs for dinner.
In the evening, a hard-playing student quintet
was taken handily by the more experienced Domino
basketeers. Although feeling ran high in the
packed gymnasium, officials were happy to note the
absence of physical demonstration among the
spectators!
Dancing was the main attraction on the return trip,
and when the "Norah" finally nosed into her berth
at 4:00 a.m. in a driving snowstorm, the students
were too exhausted to care!
Need we say more?—Nt Look for yoursel's!
1939 fctTQpssn £0.
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Thence he
his travels at a pol  ANGLICAN
COLLEGE
T. Bailey
T.  D.  Somerville
W. F. DeBeck
REV. H. R. TRUMPOUR
The freshman conflagration was a failure. The wood, like the
freshmen, was too green to burn; but it has since kept the flame
on our Common Room hearth burning brightly. We are a body
of men living together, in something of a community life, each
contributing to a variety of activities, with free interchange of
opinions, gradually getting to know one another and to understand people of different ideas and with different backgrounds.
We are indeed a priveleged group on the Campus, and look forward to the day when the college system will be universally
established on this fair promontory.
This year, in the realm of athletics, we have become very ambitious, in that we have joined as a body the Intra-Mural programme, and at the time of writing we are in second place. Our
perennial rival, Union College, will undoubtedly be defeated in
both the coming soccer matches and track meet.
The Oratorical Contest was extraordinarily well attended; all
the entries were of a high standard. A Revue was produced at
the College "At Home" at the end of January.
We take this opportunity of welcoming as our Dean of Residence,
the Rev. W. C. Gemmill, who has had a long and rich experience
as a missionary in Japan. He is a graduate of Trinity College,
Toronto.
Page Thirty-four UNION
COLLEGE
Standing:   Norah Hughes, Callum Thompson, Ted Nichols, George Lowe
Sitting:   J. Millard Alexander, David Martin, Harry Morrow
The Session just passed has been at once a busy and an enjoyable
one for Faculty and Students alike. We were privileged to have
at our opening exercises as Guest Speaker Dr. A. J. William
Myers, who was with us for the greater part of the Fall Term.
Another Academic treat was our winter school, at which we
renewed our friendship with Dr. Hudson Ballard. The Robertson
Memorial lectures were this year given by Dr. Endicott.
Socially, our year began with a reception for the University
Students, given by the Faculty, Students, and the Women's
Educational Auxiliary.
We have held our Rivals to a draw on the football field, but we
are anticipating even greater things with the coming of spring,
and the Track Meet promises to be well worth attending.
REV. J. G. BROWN
Page Thirty-five Page Thirty-six Victoria College is one good reason for the fine
calibre of the University of B. C.'s graduating
class. Victoria College is proud that the students
who have come from her halls have made
the fine records for themselves on the mainland,
which testify to the worth of our island's tributary
contribution to the stream of culture flowing from
Point Grey.
Campus organizations provide the back-bone
of college life. The Literary Arts Society met frequently and with profit during the year for discussions which were presided over by student
speakers for the most part. Miss Ruth Humphries
of the staff spoke on "South Africa" where she had
been on leave of absence. The Players' Club brought
their collective thespian efforts to bear on a lively
comedy of college life, "Spring Dance." As directed
by Miss Vivienne Coombe, it was readily seen
why the New York run of the play had been successful. "Hypnotism" and "The Romance of Research"
were the topics concerning the Science Club in it's
pre-Xmas meetings, the former topic being dealt
with by the Principal, Prof. Elliot, and the latter
by Dr. Anderson. The Hon. Mr. Asselstine and
Dr. Cowan of government service, also honoured
the club with their words. The International Relations Society heard of international problems
discussed by two European travellers, Mr. Turley
and Mr. Denny. Dr. Peebles addressed the club
on "Health Insurance," and delegates were dispatched to the I.R.S. conference in Seattle. Visiting
officials of the Student Christian Movement
throughout Canada addressed the local unit during
the term. An academic year without its quota of
social events would be soup without seasoning. The
social season at the college was well seasoned this
year, offering a very palatable "tour de force." The
freshettes began it by accepting a tea given them
by the sophomores; the freshmen retaliated, and
rounded off the term by giving a dance for the
sophomores. Between these enjoyable relaxations
the parents of students received just recognition at
a reception given by the faculty. A Christmas
dance took the place of the usual Fall Varsity Ball,
and the spring Co-ed Ball gave unaccustomed
female escorts an opportunity to repay bashful male
escortees the favours due the most persistent
suitors. The Varsity Invasion was a welcome and
cataclysmic spring highlight. Warriors of the College received crests for team membership, at a
banquet which preceded a dance.
Believing in the worth of having a "sound
mind in a sound body," athletics were given their
just portion of attention at the College this year.
Both men's and women's basketball teams remained
favourites throughout the year. The rugby team,
although handicapped by numerous injuries, managed a second-place berth at half-season, losing
but one game and tying two. The shuttle-shooters
flourished, and the leading player, one Tony Staples,
reached the semi-finals of the Island Open Singles
and won in the mixed doubles. Grass hockey was
revived after a lapse of some years and progressed
admirably.
Page Thirty-seven '0   * A
Summer Silhouette by the
"Dolphin."
Prof. Lemuel Robertson
and Mrs. Matheson, jest
at dinner aboard the
"Prince Robert."
Mrs. D'Arcy and Dean
Matheson of Queen's,
prepare to feast.
Banquet scene in final
Act of Summer School-—
the evening cruise held
aboard the SS. Prince
Robert.
Page Thirty-eight 1
L           '
■
W'}
k/^ 1
' 1
ijt
^^^^^^f
s   W4
["% u^^l
r     fl
Summer School of the Theatre
Last summer, the University Extension Department inaugurated a School of the Theatre. The
six week's course was under the inspiring direction of Miss Ellen Van Volkenburg, who is prominent in both England and the United States.
She was ably assisted by Miss Dorothy Somerset
of the Extension Department. There were classes
in acting, directing, mime, voice production,
make-up, stage craft and costuming.
The students—about fifty in number—had as
their goal the production of Euripides' noble play,
"The Trojan Women." They attended classes
in the mornings and rehearsed in the afternoons.
The unusual and beautiful production reflected
most favourably the work of the Summer Theatre; and at the conclusion of the course, the
teachers and students felt that they had shared
a stimulating and memorable experience.
Scenes from "Trojan Women"
PROFESSOR LEMUEL ROBERTSON
Director of Summer School
MISS ELLEN VAN VOLKENBURG
Director of Summer School of the Theatre
Page Thirty-nine W0M
In contact with several hundred groups, all organized for adult study—scattered through Greater
Vancouver, the Fraser Valley, the Cariboo, Okanagan and the Kootenays, Vancouver Island and up
the coast—the Department of University Extension
is steadily increasing the scope of the university's
service to British Columbia. Short courses, directed study courses, extension lectures, evening classes, library and visual instruction service, are chief
elements in the department's program of adult
education.
A new and significant feature of its work is the
touring farm and craft instruction unit, organized
under the Dominion-Provincial Youth Training
Plan. Dormitory schools, resembling the Scandinavian folk-schools in method and function, bring
young people together from a thirty-mile radiius to
DR. GORDON SHRUM
Director of the Department of
University Extension
the various teaching centres for two weeks of intensive study.
The teaching staff of five includes three U.B.C.
graduates in Agriculture: Mr. Kenneth Caple,
M.S.A. 1927, in charge; Miss Kay Milligan, M.S.A.
1936, dairying and animal husbandry; and Arthur
Renney, B.S.A. 1936, agronomy.
A second travelling school is the 3 to 5-day Drama
course conducted by Miss Dorothy Somerset, former
director for the Players' Club. She has given the
course at Abbotsford, Courtenay, Ashcroft, Vernon,
Summerland, Grand Forks, Trail, Creston and Kim-
berley.
A number of study groups, organized for thoroughgoing discussion of a variety of subjects, are registered with the department, making use of its
study   outlines   and   reference   library.      Outlines
Page Forty ALEXANDER MACKENZIE
MISS DOROTHY SOMERSET
Assistant in Dramatics
LEONARD CHADWIN
Assistant in Radio and Visual
Instruction
have been prepared in B. C. History, Practical
Psychology, Modern Literature, History of the
Theatre, and Economics and Public Affairs.
Extension lectures, as in the past, are given by
members of the U.B.C. teaching faculty. Last year,
there were 190 lectures given in the province, with
an estimated total attendance of 12,831.
The department's Evening Classes at Vancouver
furnish a wide coverage of Six distinct topics: English Composition, Playwriting, Modern Literature,
Botany, Poultry, and Amateur Gardening. Classes
meet at the University and at the Normal School.
In the last week of January, a short course on the
organization of Co-operatives was held at Vancouver for B. C. coast fishermen. This course, carrying the work of Extension into a new field, was
arranged  in co-operation with the  Dominion  De
partment of Fisheries. It was directed by Rev.
Nelson McDonald, of St. Francis Xavier University.
For Summer Session, 1939, the department has
tentatively planned three interesting courses. The
Summer School of the Theatre will emphasize methods in play production, with special training for
directors of amateur groups. Mr. and Mrs. Burton
James of Seattle, whose work is recognized across
the continent, are visiting instructors. They have
been active in founding and directing the Repertory
Playhouse, Civic Theatre of Seattle, the Federal
Theatre, and the Washington State Theatre.
A Homemakers' Course, including special work in
handicrafts and home economics, is a new feature
this summer. Also new is the course of instruction
in Use and Appreciation of Motion Pictures, a
critical approach to an industry and art of greatest importance today.
Page Forty-one 4T*   \i
Barely twenty years after Alexander Mackenzie's courageous trip across the
continent, another Nor'wester, Simon Fraser, completed a daring descent of
the treacherous rapids and gorges of the river which today bears this famous
trader's  name. Accompanied  by  a  John  Stuart,  Jules  Quesnel,  nineteen
voyageurs and two Italians, Fraser made the trip in the summer of 1813.
The difficulties of the voyage were tremendous.    Upon numerous occasions
his canoes were damaged or wrecked, and frequently he and his valiant party
faced starvation.   Added to these discouraging factors was the hostility of the
CSSIPfndians which finally forced the intrepid Fraser to turn back before he
actually reached the Pacific Ocean proper.
W£5£F- '^' .l»'r*oi~Jm*..
\
Pt^-~:-  o
^r AM to write a filler to
extend from my picture there
to the bottom of the page
yonder. And it must epitomize the wisdom of your
College years. In this task
I am comforted by the limitation of space and by the
knowledge that current literature of this sort is rarely
read. Thus reassured, I
boldly begin.
Observations to determine
the height of a certain peak
in the Himalayas were recorded, but it was three
years before the computations were made. Then it
was revealed that the peak,
which had been observed,
was the highest mountain in
the world, Mount Everest.
College days are observing
and recording days and are
to be followed by computations. There is this difference, however, that the
"heights" measured in units
of achievement, depend not
only upon the data of the
observations but more particularly upon the use made
of them and the methods
employed in their computation.
D. BUCHANAN,
Dean
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
Page Forty-four n
m/H
N saying "bon voyage"
to the Class of 1939, I may be
permitted to observe that the
primary function of a university is the training of men and
women, who by means of their
education will become eligible
for leadership. The knowledge
employed in the day's work is
only part of the larger intellectual equipment that is required by those who would
provide the community with
ideas and give direction to
specified forms of public
activity.
You are graduating from a
university that has an enviable
record of achievement. Graduates of U.B.C. are occupying
positions of trust and responsibility in every walk of life.
You will, I am sure, follow in
the footsteps of the leaders
who have traversed these halls
in former days.
J. N. FINLAYSON.:
Dean
FACULTY   OF   APPLIED   SCIENCE
Page Forty-five M
Y message to you, the
nineteenth graduating class
in Agriculture, is to be a
simple one.
I am asking nothing of
you to-day, to-morrow, or
next month, but I am asking
that on the first anniversary
of your graduation, on the
second and third and many
more succeeding anniversaries, you take stock of yourselves.
I am very much concerned
in your future income, your
standard of living and your
worldly success, but I am
concerned much more with
yourselves. On the occasion
of the anniversaries, what
will an examination of yourselves disclose? What are
your likes and dislikes? Have
you found joy in your work?
Are you mentally alert? Is
your mental equipment modern, or has it become worn?
Is your thinking capacity
equal to that of the days of
your graduation, or has it
tended to diminish? Take
stock of yourselves mentally
and morally. Be accurate
in your inventory.
If on your balance sheet
is then found a substantial
credit, I shall feel that the
efforts to build a worthy
character have not been in
vain.
F. M. CLEMENT,
Dean
FACULTY    OF    AGRICULTURE
Page Forty-six D
W
ean o
f
omen
0
" N the farewell word
especially to the women
members of the graduating
class for which the Totem
extends the opportunity,
may I remind you of the
statement of President Eliot
of Harvard which, perhaps,
at some time, I have quoted
in the hearing of many of
you—"The fruit of education is not knowledge and
learning, but a love of
knowledge and a capacity
for learning." As you go
out from the University you
will realize, I am sure, that
the value of your education
should be measured not by
the number of facts you
know, but rather by the use
you make of the facts at
your command and your
capacity for acquiring and
placing in their proper relation all the facts necessary
for the forming of correct
judgments. A college education should develop in
women initiative and
independence without ruth-
lessness; an objective,
impersonal point of view
without cynicism or hardness; a freedom from sentimentality without the loss
of sensitiveness. It is my
sincere wish that these and
other qualities may make
you leaders of thought and
action.
MARY L. BOLLERT,
Dean
Page Forty-seven G. G. MOE
Agronomy.
H. M. KING
Animal Husbandry.
WA
ANDREW   H.   HUTCHINSON
Botany.
ROBERT H.  CLARK
Chemistry.
JOHN NORISON FINLAYSON
Civil  Engineering.
LEMUEL  ROBERTSON
Classics.
BLYTHE EAGLES
Dairying
HENRY  F.  ANGUS
Economics,  Political Science,
Commerce and Sociology.
Page Forty-eight G. G. SEDGEWICK
English.
F. MALCOLM  KNAPP
Forestry.
M. Y. WILLIAMS
Geology and Geography.
W. N. SAGE
History.
F. M. CLEMENT
Horticulture.
JOHN  RIDINGTON
Library.
DANIEL BUCHANAN
Mathematics.
HECTOR  JOHN   MacLEOD
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.
Page Forty-nine J. M. TURNBULL
Mining and Metallurgy.
DAVID OWEN EVANS
Modern Languages.
C. E. DOLMAN
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine,
and Nursing and Health.
H. T. J. COLEMAN
Philosophy and Psychology.
GORDON   MERRITT  SHRUM
Physics, and University Extension.
E. A. LLOYD
Poultry Husbandry.
C. McLEAN FRASER
Zoology.
Page Fifty Department of Agronomy
P. A. BOVING, Cand. Ph., Cand. Agr.
D. G. LAIRD, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D.
ALEXANDER J. WOOD, M.S.A.
Department   of  Animal   Husbandry
STANLEY N. WOOD, B.S.A., D.V.M.
J. G. JERVIS, V.S., B.V.Sc.
Department of  Bacteriology and
Preventative Medicine
D. C. B. DUFF, M.A., Ph.D.
HOWARD J. HORN, M.A.
MISS UNA BLIGH, M.A.
GORDON B. MATHIAS, B.A.
Department of Botany
FRANK DICKSON, B.A., Ph.D.
JOHN DAVIDSON, F.L.S., F.B.S.E.
JOHN ALLARDYCE, M.A., Ph.D.
MISS E. MIRIAM R. ASHTON, B.Sc,
M.A.
MISS NORAH HUGHES, M.A.
MISS CHARLOTTE DILL, B.A.
J. D. MENZIES, B.S.A.
MISS HELEN M. FARLEY, M.S.A.
BRAHAM GRIFFITH, M.A., M.F.
JOHN F. DAVIDSON, B.A.
W. GORDON FIELDS, B.A.
C. DAWSON MOODIE, B.S.A.
JOHN C. SCHOLEFIELD. B.S.A.
W. CLARKE WILKIN, B.A.
HAROLD MENZIES, B.A.
Department of Chemistry
E. H. ARCHIBALD, B.Sc, A.M., Ph.D.,
F.R.S.E.&C.
W. F. SEYER, B.A., M.Sc, Ph.D.
M. J. MARSHALL, M.Sc, Ph.D.
J. ALLEN HARRIS, M.A., Ph.D.
MISS FRANCES WRIGHT, M.A.
FRANCIS COOK, B.A.
J. H. FISHER, M.A.
KENNETH A. WEST, B.A.
J. A. SPRAGGE, B.A.
ARTHUR M. EASTHAM, B.A.
C. B. SHIPTON, B.A.
THOMAS NIVEN. B.A.
HERMAN NEMETZ, M.A.Sc
ROBIN N.  SMITH,  B.A.
Department of Civil Engineering
F. A. WILKIN, B.A.Sc.
ALLAN H. FINLAY, B.A.Sc, M.S. in
C.E.
A. LIGHTHALL, B.Sc.
EDWARD S. PRETIOUS, B.A.Sc.
ARCHIE PEEBLES, B.A.Sc, B.A.
H. P. McARTHUR, B.A.Sc.
J. B. ALEXANDER, M.Sc.
Department of Classics
O. J. TODD, Ph.D.
PATRICK C. F. GUTHRIE, B.A.
MISS JEAN M. AULD, B.A.
GEOFFREY B. RIDDEHOUGH, B.A.
Department of Dairying
MISS OLGA OKULITCH, M.A.
ALEXANDER J. WOOD, M.S.A.
Department    of    Economics,    Political
Science,   Commerce  and   Sociology
G. F. DRUMMOND, M.A.
J. FRIEND DAY, B.A., M.A.
C. W. TOPPING, B.A., S.T.D., A.M.,
Ph.D.
W.   IVOR   JENNINGS,   M.A.,   LL.B.,
LL.D.
FREDERICK FIELD, C.A.
F. K. COLLINS, B.A., LL.B.
JAMES A. GIBSON, B.A., B.A., B.Litt.
C. N. BRENNAN, B. Com..
VICTOR L. DRYER, B.A.
MRS. DORIS E. LAZENBY, M.A.
D. A. LEWIS, B.Com.
Department of Education
DANIEL   BUCHANAN,   M.A.,   Ph.D.,
LLD., F.R.S.C.
WILLIAM   G.   BLACK,   B.A.,   M.A.,
Ph.D.
C.   B.  WOOD, A.M.
Department of English
W. L. MacDONALD, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
FREDERICK G. C. WOOD, BA, A.M.
THORLEIF    LARSEN,    M. A.,    B. A.,
F.R.S.C.
IRA DILWORTH, B.A., A.M.
MISS M. L BOLLERT, M.A., A.M.
HUNTER CAMPBELL LEWIS, M.A.
MISS    DOROTHY    BLAKEY,    M. A.,
M.A., Ph.D.
T. ROY HALL, B.A.
MISS HELEN McARRAN, B.A.
MISS NORAH M. SIBLEY, B.A.
Department of Forestry
F. MALCOLM KNAPP, B.S.E., M.S.F.
BRAHAM G.  GRIFFITH,  M.A., M.F.
A. B. RECKNAGEL, B.A., M.F.
R. M. BROWN, B.Sc.F.
J. H. JENKINS, B.A.Sc.
WILLIAM BYERS
L B. DIXON
MARC W. GORMELY
Department of Geology and Geography
S. J. SCHOFIELD, M.A., B.Sc, Ph.D.,
F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C.
CLARENCE OTTO SWANSON, M.A.Sc,. Ph.D.
H. V. WARREN, B.A., B.A.Sc. B.Sc,
D.Phil., Assoc. Inst.M.M.
GORDON DAVIS, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
E. P. DAVIS, B.A.
W. H. WHITE, B.A.Sc.
Department of History
F. H. SOWARD, B.A., B.Litt.
A. C. COOKE, B.A., M.A.
MISS SYLVIA THRUPP, M.A., Ph.D.,
F.R.Hist.S.
ROBERT MacKENZIE, B.A.
ARTHUR J. WIRICK, B.A.
Department of Horticulture
A. F. BARSS, A.B., B.S. in Agr., M.S.,
Ph.D.
G. F HARRIS, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D.
FRANK E. BUCK, B.S.A.
Department of Mathematics
F S. NOWLAN, B.A., A.M., Ph.D.
RALPH HULL, M.A., Ph.D.
L RICHARDSON, B.Sc.
WALTER H. GAGE, M.A.
FREDERICK J. BRAND, B.A., B.Sc.
MISS MAY L. BARCLAY, M.A.
JOSEPH  L.  KADZIELAWA, M.A.
WILLIAM H. SIMONS, M.A.
NORMAN S. FREE, B.A.
E. deLANCY ROGERS, B.A.
ROBIN N. SMITH, B.A.
JOHN W. S. FLEURY, B.A.
ALAN  B.  STANIFORTH,  B.A.Sc.
BERNARD F. DESHAW,  B.A.Sc.
MISS PHYLLIS SHAW, B.A.
MISS ELSPETH LINTOTT, B.A.
Department of Mechanical Engineering
and Electrical
F. W.  VERNON,   B.Sc,   Eng.,   L.Sch.,
A.M.I.Mech.E., A.F.R.A.S.
S. C. MORGAN, B.S., M.Sc, M.Sc.
W. B. COULTHARD, B.Sc, M.A.I.E.E.,
A.M.I.E.E.
JOHN   F.   BELL,   O.B.E.,   R.N.,   Eng.
Capt., M.E.I.C.
W O. RICHMOND, B.A.Sc, M.S.
H.  M.  MclLROY,  M.Sc
H. P. ARCHIBALD, B.A.Sc.
WILLIAM W. PULLINGER, B.A.Sc.
DANIEL W. THOMSON, B.A.Sc.
Department of Mining and Metallurgy
GEORGE A. GILLIES, M.Sc.
FRANK A. FORWARD, B.A.Sc.
W. B. BISHOP
Department of Modern Languages
A. F. B. CLARK, B.A., Ph.D., Officier
d'Academie
MISS ISABEL MaclNNES, M.A., Ph.D.
MISS JANET T. GREIGG, B.A., M.A.,
Officier d'Academie
MISS    DOROTHY    DALLAS,    M. A.,
Docteur de  I'Universite de Paris
MISS WESSIE TIPPING, M.A., Docteur
de I'Universite de Paris
MISS   JOYCE   HALLAMORE,   M. A.,
Ph.D.
W. T. E. KENNETT, B.A., M.A.
MME. D.  DARLINGTON
MRS. ALICE ROYS, A.M.
MLLE. M. C. S. deCOURVILLE
Department   of   Nursing   and   Health
MISS MABEL F.  GRAY,  R.N.,  Cert.
P.H.N.
MISS   MARGARET   E.    KERR,   R.N.,
B.A.Sc, M.A.
MISS  FYVIE YOUNG,  R.N.,  B.A.Sc,
M.A.
Departmentt   of   Philosophy   and
Psychology
J. A. IRVING, B.A., M.A., B.A., M.A.
JOSEPH E. MORSH, B.A., Ph.D.
FRANK WILSON,  B.Sc, M.A.
MRS. MABEL McCONNELL, B.A.
MISS  H.  MADELEINE VANCE,  B.A.
Department of Physics
A. E. HENNINGS, M.A., Ph.D.
OSCAR  E.  ANDERSON, M.A.,   Ph.D.
A. M. ROOKER, B.A., Ph.D.
GEORGE MOSSOP, M.A.
MORRIS BLOOM, M.A.
WALTER M. BARSS, B.A.
WILLIAM   ENGLISH,   B.A.
JOSEPH KADZIELAWA, M.A.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
JACOB BIELY, M.S.A., M.S.
Department of Zoology
G. J. SPENCER, B.S.A., M.S.
MRS. GERTRUDE M. WATNEY, M.A.,
Ph.D.
J.   LAURENCE  McHUGH,   M.A.
WILLIAM CAMERON, B.A.
DANIEL QUAYLE, B.A.
MISS JOSEPHINE F.  L.  HART, M.A.
Ph.D.
KENNETH   JACOB,   B.A.Sc,   M.A.
Page Fifty-one Dr. T. C. Hebb joined the staff of the
University of British Columbia in August,
1916, as Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics. In July, 1918, he
was appointed Associate Professor and
Acting Head of the Department, a post
he held until he became Professor and
Head of the Department in 1920.
Dr. Hebb died on August 13th, 1938.
We wish to respectfully dedicate these
two pages in memory of him, a scholar,
gentleman, and friend.
Page Fifty-two DR. T. C. HEBB
in m
e m o v m a
Page Fifty-three At the time when the fur trade was still in stages
of rapid growth, and when trading posts were being
established in numerous parts of the Great West,
Fort Camosun, later renamed Fort Victoria, was
erected on the South Coast of Vancouver Island in
1843. It was allegedly built in anticipation of the
Oregon Boundary being fixed at the forty-ninth
parallel, and within five years it became one of the
chief ports for the old "fur brigades." nunn hirter society
1 /i CARSON McGUIRE
President
The Students' Council for the session 1938-39 may well be proud
of its achievements and general record. Under the leadership of
Carson McGuire the Council pursued a conservative and effective
policy throughout the entire year, culminating its "activities" with
the final financing of the Brock Memorial Building for which the
student body sacrificed another $10,000.
The President of the Council has made a name for himself during
the past difficult years that will long be remembered, but his unimpeachable record is given separately in the Hall of Fame. Suffice
to say here that he inspired the Students' Council with his unfailing optimism and indefatigable energy. Few men have the keen
perception and love of detail as has Carson. They are qualities
well suited to the leader of the Alma Mater Society.
Few students who have observed the workings of their Council
could have failed to notice, too, the skill with which the Treasurer,
re-elected from last year's Council, handled the coffers this year.
It is a very cunning human being that can inveigle our Chancellor
of the Exchequer, Bob Smith, into participating in any scheme that
lacks secure financial foundation.
The athletic departments of the Alma Mater Society were handled
with aplomb by Rann Mathison and Peggy MacLeod. The most
radical change in the realm of sport was the new Athletic Directorate introduced by the Men's Athletic Representative, the hero of
the basketball floor, Rann himself.
The Literary and Scientific Executive functioned most successfully
under the guidance of the suave and red-tied Struan Robertson.
The most notable feature of this executive's activities was the
increased budget. Several clubs, previously without funds, were
enabled to expand and develop through the newly granted sums of
money. An apparently insignificant "brain-child" of Struan's this
year was the allocation of notice-board space to individual clubs,
TOP ROW:   GERTRUDE PITMAN, ROBERT C.  R.  SMITH
SECOND ROW:   JEAN STORDY, JACK DAVIS
THIRD ROW:   RANN MATTHISON, MARGARET MacLEOD
BOTTOM ROW:   STRUAN T. ROBERTSON, EVAN apROBERTS
Page Fifty-six The Council Meets
a step which has removed the confused and inartistic
display of muddled advertisements on the walls of
our glorious halls.
The Presidents of the Men's and Women's Undergraduate Societies, Jack Davis and Jean Stordy respectively, dealt a sweeping and effective blow to
the erstwhile muddled social calendar of the
Campus. Conflict between social functions has
been made impossible by the new system, and at the
same time University functions have been restricted
to certain days of the week, a move that will doubtless meet with the approval of the great public.
The Secretary of the Students' Council, Gertrude
Pitman, was not elected until the Fall term, owing
to the fact that the Secretary elected last Spring
entered into the bonds of holy matrimony. But
"Gertie", as she is affectionately called, took on
her duties with rare vigour, and has been a superlative "taker and reader of minutes", not to mention her masterful abilities as a "writer of letters."
Last, but by no means least, of the Council rostrum
is the Junior Member, Evan apRoberts. As the
director of the Home-coming week-end in the Fall
term Evan excelled himself. The week-end was by
far the most ambitious and the most successful ever
staged on this Campus. Much credit and many
salutations are due the Junior Member. No less remarkable was the Victoria Invasion which was also
in the hands of Evan.
saw the pass system money divided more evenly
over athletic, social and cultural events. The student body was enabled to hear Gordon Manley, talented Vancouver pianist, to watch the Hollywood
Marionette Theatre, and to hear the Nelson Sisters'
Canadian Trio by means of the resourceful Pass
System, which presented the artists as "extra"
features.
And so the year has passed. Another Council has
occupied office, fulfilled its promises, pursued its
policies. As in other years the students are satisfied, but the degree of satisfaction appears this
year to be a little different. The Campus public
is most satisfied!
The general policy of the Council as a whole is to
be commended. The Pass System has for two years
of existence proved its worth repeatedly.   This year
Page Fifty-seven JACK DAVIS
The Men's Undergraduate Executive has continued to
direct the social activities of the Alma Mater Society,
vocational guidance talks, and the maintenance of
Campus discipline.
Through the efforts of this executive a permanent
calendar of social events has been introduced which will
eliminate many of the difficulties that have faced the
undergraduate organizations of previous years.
Vocational Guidance lectures have been introduced in
Arts and continued in Applied Science and Agriculture.
The Freshmen initiation passed by this year without much
damage to property, although both the Frosh and the
Sciencemen have been the source of many headaches!
Since the Fall the Men's Big Block Club has been reorganized under the M.U.E. to assist in conducting initiations and to police elections and general meetings.
This executive has introduced a new procedure for class
elections that will eliminate to a great extent the evils
of "railroading" in the larger Arts and Science classes.
Darrell Braidwood
Alf. Allen
Jack Gray
Page Fifty-eight JEAN STORDY
Betty Bolduc
Barbara Hall
Janet Fleck
The initial activity of the Women's Undergraduate Society for the year was the sponsoring of information
booths for Freshettes.
Early in the term the Senior-Freshette tea and supper
were held. At the latter function the time-honoured
custom which requires the newcomers to attire themselves as children was observed, and fitting penalties
were meted out to delinquents.
Later the Society sponsored a series of teas to give out-
of-town students the opportunity to become acquainted
with their fellow-students.
Other W.U.S. activities included the Hi-Jinx, the only
major university activity restricted to women. The
Co-ed Ball, held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Hotel
Vancouver was the climax to a most successful year.
Page Fifty-nine James Ferris
Frank Turner
Byron Straight
This year the Arts Men's Undergraduate Executive performed with great success
in both social and service projects on the campus.
The Arts-Aggie Ball, always one of the major functions of the year, again established
a record for both attendance and enjoyment. The Ball was held at the Commodore Cabaret and was made outstanding by the clever use as decorations of
dolls dressed to represent members of the Faculty.
In the field of service, the Executive brought to the campus a series of outstanding
speakers in a group of vocational guidance programmes.
The Executive was: president, Darrell Braidwood; vice-president, James Ferris;
secretary, Frank Turner;  treasurer,  Byron Straight.
Alf. Allen
F. R. Jones
J. Cameron King
Rex Parker
With the usual application of Brain and Brawn, the Sciencemen of 1938-39 upheld
the traditions of Science leadership in Campus life.
The notorious S.M.U.S. Pep Meetings, bolstered by Wilf Williams and his Swing-
sters, were up to the  usual  noisy,  nasty standard.
The old red and white sweater again served as a "Friend or Artsman" password
for the  Engineers.
An added feature in the attractive social calendar was the Engineers' Smoker.
Strictly a stag affair, it provided an opportunity for students and faculty to meet
informally early in the Fall term.
The Annual Banquet was featured by a ninety per cent, turnout at the Commodore Cabaret, while the Combined Science Informal, held at the Alma Academy,
was a whirling success.
The Science Fourth Dimension Ball was bigger and better than ever. The Commodore Cabaret was turned into an "Einstein's Paradise" with calculus, algebra,
geometry, and trigonometry displayed in the most surprising places. A ten-foot
slide-rule served as a novel  dance  indicator.
The Engineers were well represented in all branches of sport, and were among the
leaders in the  Intramural Competitions.
Page Sixty Jack Gray
Len Zink
D. Dougans
The session '38-'39 was marked by a larger number of students registered in the
Faculty of Agriculture, with the increased enrollment especially evident in the Freshmen
Class. Increased attendance has meant increased support for the Undergrad activities.
The Fall Banquet, held in the Commodore Cabaret on October 13th, received the largest
attendance yet recorded at an Aggie banquet. Following the banquet, preparations
were begun for the annual Faculty Formal Ball, held in co-operation with the Arts
Faculty, the Arts-Aggie Ball. Held in the Commodore on November 17th, it proved
to be an outstanding event in the university social calendar.
At the end of the fall term, Aggies voted to introduce an Aggie sweater to the
campus and in the spring many of them were seen wearing these distinctive sweaters.
Spring term activities began with the introduction of a Public Speaking course, sponsored by Sigma Tau Fraternity, and many students took part in the course. A very
important event of February was the Aggie Barn Dance which was held in the Marine
Drive Golf Club.   The rest is history.
The annual trip to Agassiz Experimental Farm with the Whole Faculty being transported via two Pacific Stage streamliners, followed by the Annual Spring Banquet
in the Cafe, rounded out the year's activities.
Pauline  McMartin
Florence Jackson
Pauline Banford
Another successful year marked by participation in all forms of Campus activity is
the term-end boast of the department of Nursing and Public Health.
Led by President Pauline McMartin and an active executive, the nurses list a full
quota of engagements through both the Autumn and the Spring terms.
First term activities included a tea at the General Hospital, attended by the undergraduates and faculty of the department, a Fireside, and participation in the Ice
Carnival.
The Nurses' Ball held in the Aztec Ballroom of the Hotel Georgia on January 19,
proved to be one of the highlights of the social calendar. In the field of sport the
Nurses held their own with other classes, a full intramural turnout in nearly every
branch of inter-class activity being another boast of the Nurses, while one member,
Ora Wright, plays for the Senior Girls' Hockey Team.
Odetta Hicks
Mi-
e/?
Doris Pepper
a/?
Page Sixty-one ^*>^
About 1840 the first missionaries under Father Demers courageously penetrated British Columbia, baptizing numerous Indians and working up a
great religious fervour amongst them. By 1859 there were eleven missionaries of various denominations at work in the colonies of British Columbia
and Vancouver Island, among whom the Hudson's Bay Company chaplains
were not the least energetic of those giving religious and educational training.
But the missionary work gradually became educational in its nature, and in
1858 the first schoolhouse was constructed at Craigflower, where today the
original building may be seen. -!$1*
' Eileen Carter considers farm life.
Jack Gray, Aggie President, muses on milk, Music, and his maiden.
They are watching the floor show.
President Klinck, Dean Bollert and Dean Buchanan have a merry chat.
Cicely Holmes and John Garrett found this an opportunity to get into the
Totem!
President of the Alma Mater Society, Carson McGuire, in a relaxed moment.
Page Sixty-four ART. CLARKE
MARION REID
AUDREY  CHOWNE
JACK McLAREN
The hoary seniors of Arts '39 have seen strange
things come and go on their campus. They were
born in the fall of '35 under the Brynelson government, and their baby days knew the first fruits of
the university spirit engendered by one and one-
half hour noon periods. They wore swaddling
clothes which were green gob caps, were the first
to suffer under the invention of green nail polish,
and they were not allowed to duck any one in the
lily pond. They made their debut at the last of the
long and noble line of Lester Court Frosh Receptions, before the vast quantities of gate-smashing
high school children caused the party to overflow
into the Palomar.
Their first year knew the Union Building Campaign,
the development of the Student Co-operatives; their
freshmen party was sacrificed to the necessity of
money raising. They knew the horrors of plague
when Mumps and Measles emptied every fourth
lecture chair in February and early March. With
the catch-words "There ain't no flies on Elmer",
their first president, Elmer Jones, was elected to
office. Elmer has since held the positions of President of both the Munro Pre-Medical Club and the
Biological Discussions Club, and is still a member
of Arts '39.
Their second year knew the paying off of the last
of the Gymnasium Bonds and the Building of a
Stadium, as well as the authorizing of a loan for
the Union Building. They saw the first Government Building grant in years when the inimitable
John Gould's council persuaded Victoria to pay the
interest on Stadium bonds. This year realized the
inauguration of an Extension program and the beginning of the Film Society. As sophomores they
watched their U.B.C.'s basketball team walk over
the continent and bring back the Canadian Championship. This year a much quieter election voted
Bob Smith as president. Bob has since held up the
glory of '39 by holding the "A" office of A.M.S.
treasurer for two years. The sophomore party at
the Commodore is remembered by Bob Lyons'
popular little ditty, "Everybody Kiss Their Partner."
And came the third year, and they were upper-
classmen and took "advanced courses" and cjnose
their majors.
ARTS '39
They enjoyed the pass system and watched rugby
in their own stadium. They knew the thrill of seeing Howie McPhee make a hundred yard dash for
a touchdown. They rose in anger when their fees
were raised and they contributed two dollars each
to the Campaign funds. They heard and talked
overcrowding all year long. They listened every
Friday night to Varsity Time, they welcomed the
first home-coming for many years, and they all
invaded Victoria riotously. They spent long weeks
preparing for Open House, and did without the
platinum electrodes and agate crucible that the
visitors stole that day. They first heard of plans
for a Preventive Medicine Building.
Finally they found that six of the nine members
of the newly elected council were Arts '39 members. Bob Smith was treasurer, Jean Stordy,
W.U.S., Rann Matthison, M.A.A., Peggy McLeod,
W.A.A., Struan Robertson, L.S.E., and Carson McGuire was A.M.S. president.
Their Junior Prom was so well attended that it had
to move to the Crystal Ballroom, where Marion
Reid was crowned "queen."
And now it is the final year and the '39 class members hope to graduate in May. Besides studying
very hard to make up for the past three years, they
have elected Gertrude Pitman as secretary, reformed class elections; invaded Victoria more effectively
than last year; reformed the eligibility rules; and
now as the year is closing they see the Union
Building, about to be born and they have hope of a
government building program.
Page Sixty-five JANET L. AITKEN—Vancouver
French, English
I   JOHN G. ALDOUS—Victoria
Botany and Chemistry; Outdoor Club;
Biological Discussion Club
RAYMOND V. ANDEREGG—Victoria
Economics, Government
Law Society;  Parliamentary Forum;
Political Discussion Club
MARGARET C. ARMSTRONG—Vancouver
English and French;
Le Cercle Francais; Golf Club
I   WALTER R. ASHFORD—Vancouver
Chemistry   Honours
D.   BAKHUYS-ROOZEBOOM—Vancouver
English,   History
RUTH E. BARSS—Vancouver
English and French; Le Cercle Francais;
S.C.M.; German Club; Musical Society;
Phrateres.
I   HILARY D. BAST IN—Victoria
Botany, Zoology
ROBERT E. BELL—Ladner, B.C.
Physics, Mathematics Honours
Mathematics  Club;   Physical  Society
ERNEST L. BISHOP—Victoria
Philosophy, Psychology Honours
S.C.M.;  Political Discussion Club
I   ROBERT J. BOROUGHS—Vancouver
History Honours
Pres.  Newman Club
OTTILIE G. BOYD—Victoria
Biology Honours
Biological  Discussion Club;  Grass  Hockey
BRUCE A. BROWN—Grand Forks, B.C.
History, English
I DOROTHY L.  BROWN—Vancouver
Psychology, Sociology
Psychology Club; S.C.M.;  Phrateres
JOANNE V. BROWN—Vancouver
French,  German
Players' Club; German Club; Kappa Alpha Theta
EILEEN F. BURKE-
-Vancouver
French,  English
HERBERT C. BURKE—Vancouver
Zoology, Biology
Manager   1937  Canadian  Football  Team
Beta Theta Pi
JOYCE N. CALHOUN—Tappen, B.C.
English and History; Cosmopolitan Club;
Phrateres
CATHERINE A. B. CARR—Vancouver
English and French; Newman Club;
Le Cercle Francais; Musical Society;
Phrateres
ANNE E. CARTER—Vancouver
English and History
President Players' Club; Grass Hockey
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Page Sixty-six E
»<"nTE»T|Sj
EVELYN M. C. CARTER—Victoria
Mathematics,  English
Alpha Gamma Delta
CLARA E. CARTMELL—Chilliwack, B.C.
French, Mathematics
Le Cercle Francais
AUDREY M. CHOWNE—Vancouver
Sociology,  Psychology
Badminton  Club;   Grass  Hockey
Delta Gamma
PATRICIA M. CHUTTER- Vancouver
English, History
Phrateres
JESSIE DAY—Vancouver
French  ,Latin
La  Canadienne;   Phrateres;   S.C.M.
VENIE DEAN—Vancouver
English, History
Phrateres; Alpha Omicron Pi
MARGARET DEAS—Vancouver
Chenrstry, Botany, Physics
Biology Discussion; Badminton I
Phrateres
EVA L. DI MOCK—Smithers, B.C.
Chemistry, Bacteriology
Chemistry Club;   Badminton Club
ALBERT J.  DUCKLOW—Vancouver
Mathematics, Physics
Beta Theta Pi
HAZEL M. DUNBAR—Vancouver
Psychology, Sociology
Psychology Club;  S.C.M.
JEAN DUNCAN—West Vancouver, B.C.
English, French
Phrateres;  Le Cercle Francais
Alpha Omicron Pi
MARY G. EACRETT—Mission City, B.C.
French, English
Le Cercle Francais; Alpha Gamma Delta
HELEN M. EASTHAM—Vancouver
French  Honours
Alpha Delta Pi
W. IVY ELLIS—Vancouver
French, English
ALEX N. FERGUSON—Ladysmith, B.C.
Zoology,  Botany
Biological Discussion Club;  B.C.T.F.
Rowing Club
BYRON  L. FERGUSON—Vancouver
English Honours
Letters Club
HERBERT E. FISHER—Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
JEAN FITCH—Vancouver
Geology, Botany
S.C.M.; Musical Society
MILDRED S. FLOOK—Vancouver
History,  English
Alpha Omicron Pi
DOUGLAS A. FORD—Vancouver
English,   Philosophy
Musical  Society
Psi   Upsilon MARY D. FREED-
-Vancouver
Latin, French Honours
Le Cercle Francais
CERTRUDE  L.  FREELAND—Vancouver
Psychology,  History
JOHN  S.  GARRETT—Victoria,  B.C.
Government, Mathematics
Totem Editor; Ubyssey; Players' Club
Phi Delta Theta
ALICE J. GAVIN-
-Vancouver
Economics,  Psychology
Alpha Delta Pi
WARREN L. GODSON—Victoria, B.C.
Chemistry  Honours
Chemistry Society;  Film Society
VERNON R. GRASSIE —Duncan, B.C.
Chemistry   Honours
PHI HP F. GRIFFIN    -Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
Chemistry Club; C.O.T.C; Phi Delta Theta
BEATRICE K. GUYETT—Victoria, Australia
English, French
La Canadienne;  I.R.C.
BARBARA McC. HALL,—Vancouver
English,  History
W.U.S. Executive
Kappa   Alpha   Theta
IRIS G.  HARRIS—Vancouver
French, English
La Canadienne; German Club; V.C.U.
KATHLEEN E. S. HARRIS—Vancouver
English,  History
Historical  Society;  B.C.T.F.
LOIS M. HARRIS—Victoria, B.C.
English, History
Phrateres; Senior A. Basketball
G. NOEL HARRISON—Vancouver
Economics, English
English  Rugby Club;   Phi   Kappa  Pi
BEATRICE E. HEALEY—New Westminster, B.C.
French, English
S.C.M.
ROGNVALD D. HEDDLE—Victoria, B.C.
Chemistry Honours
Psi   Upsilon
ROBERT W. HENDERSON—Courtenay, B.C.
English, French
S.C.M.
EIKO HENMI—Victoria, B. C.
English, Psychology
Japanese Students' Club
JOHN  R.  HIND—Vancouver
English and Philosophy
Historical   Society
Political  Discussion Club
CICELY E. F. HOLMES—Victoria, B.C.
Players' Club
Alpha Delta Pi
DAVID J. HUNDEN—Cumberland, B.C.
Senior B Basketball
B.C.T.F.
■gjjlfuum
Si
Page Sixty-eight MORGAN JENKINS—New Westminster, B.C.
French, Mathematics
C.S.A.; S.C.M.
LILLIAN H. JOHANSON—Vancouver
Chemistry, Mathematics
Senior B Basketball; Archery; Chemistry Society
Alpha  Omicron  Pi
AMURI   R. JOHNSON—Vancouver
English,  History
Gamma Phi Beta; I.R.C.
D.   KATHLEEN JOHNSTON—Nanaimo,  B.C.
Mathematics,   Biology
DORIS E. KEMP
ELMER A. JONES—Vancouver
Zoology,  Chemistry
Pre-Med.  Club;   Biological  Discussion  Club
Phi  Delta Theta
English, French
La Canadienne; Alpha Gamma Delta
JEAN S. KINNAIRD—Vancouver
French, Mathematics
DOROTHY KINNEY -Vancouver
History, English
ALFRED J. KITCHEN-   Vancouver
Psychology, Sociology
S.C.M.;  Psychology Club; Cosmopolitan Club
ROBERT D. KNOX  -Kelowna, B.C.
English,  History
English  Rugby Club; Alpha Delta  Phi
MARJORIE LEAN—Vancouver
Zooloqy, Chemistry
Grass  Hockey;  Archery
B. LUCILE LETHAM—Vancouver
French, German
German Club; Le Cercle Francais; Phrateres
RUTH LEUNG—Victoria, B. C.
English, French
Phrateres;   Cosmopolitan   Club;
dents' Club
Chinese   Stu-
MARGARET L. LIGHTHEART—Vancouver
English, History
Riding Club;  Kappa Alpha Theta
ARTHUR E. LOCK—New Westminster, B. C.
Biology, Chemistry
C.O.T.C.
FRANCES M. LOFTUS—Vancouver
French, English
Le Cercle Francais
CHAK F. LUI—Vancouver
Economics, Government
Chinese Students' Club
GEOFFREY DeF. MACK IE    Vernon, B. C.
English, History
English Rugby Club; Alpha Delta Phil
DAVID MANDERS—Vancouver
Mathematics, Physics Honours
Pres. Mathematics Club;  Physical Society
J. KELSO MARSHALL—Vancouver
Physics, Mathematics Honours
Mathematics Club; Physical Society DAVID D. MARTIN—Vancouver
English,  Philosophy
Union College Executive
JACK R. MEREDITH—Vancouver
Economics,  Government
EFFIE K. MORRIS-
FRANCES G. MONTGOMERY—Vancouver
English, Psychology
S.C.M.;   Phrateres;   Cosmopolitan  Club
-Nelson, B. C.
Economics, Psychology
ROMAN MOSTAR—Vancouver
Economics, Psychology
ARCHIE M. MACAULAY—Vancouver
History Honours
HENRY JOHN McCABE—Victoria,  B. C.
Mathematics Honours
Mathematics Club;   Newman  Club;  Musical  Society
ANNA S. McCANN—Vancouver
English, Chemistry
Phrateres; Musical Society
JOHN A. McCARTER—Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
Phi Kappa Pi.; Chemistry Society
LOIS S. McEWEN-
-Vancouver
English, Psychology
Alpha  Gamma   Delta
J. CARSON McGUIRE—Salmon Arm, B. C.
Honours,   Psychology,   Biology
Pres. Alma Mater Society Student Campaign
Committee; Canadian Football;  Beta Theta Pi.
JANET  McKELLAR—Vancouver
Bacteriology Honours
KATHLEEN D, MacKENZIE—Vancouver
History, English
MARGARET J. MacKENZ IE-
English, French
New Westminster, B. C.
New Westminster, B.C.
ELIZABETH A. McKINNON
History,  English
ROSS M   McLAGAN—Vancouver
Chemistry, Mathematics
Rugby Club
JOHN A. McLAREN—Vancouver
Zoology, Chemistry
Monro Pre-Med.  Club;   Rowing  Club;   Basketball Club
MARGARET I. MacLEOD—Vancouver
English
Badminton; Kappa Kappa Gamma
Pres. Women's Athletic Association
RICHARD B. MACMILLAN—Victoria
Chemistry Honours
C.O.T.C.
FRANCIS E. McNAIR—Vancouver
Biology, Chemistry
Page Seventy JEAN E. McRAE—Vancouver
History, English
Kappa Kappa Gamma
DONALD E. McTAGGART—Vancouver
History,  English
MYRNE B. NEVISON—Vancouver
History, English
Grass  Hockey;   Big   Block;   Ubyssey;   Alpha  Gamma
Delta
T. D. NEWTON—Vancouver
Mathematics,  Physics Honours
Mathematics Club; Physical Society
WILLIAM J. NICKERSON—Vancouver
History, Psychology
Players Club
ELIZABETH NOR IE—Cowichan Station, B. C.
English, Latin
Grass Hockey;   Players Club
J.  FRANK PATCH—Vancouver
English,  Philosophy
Musical Society
JAMES M. PEPPER—Victoria, B. C.
Chemistry Honours
Chemistry Society;  Film Society
THOMAS P. PEPPER—Victoria, B. C.
Mathematics, Physics Honours
Physics Society; Mathematics Club
MAURICE F. PERKINS—Vancouver
Economics Honours
HELEN W.  PIERCY—Vancouver
History, French
GERTRUDE PITMAN—Prince George, B. C.
Bacteriology, Zoology
Secretary Students' Council, Alphi Phi.
JOSEPH F. PLASKETT— New Westminster, B. C.
History Honours
ROBERT V. POOLE—Vancouver
Biology, Chemistry
BERNARD REED—Vancouver
Economics, Political Science Honours
Pres. Law Society; Political Discussion Club;
Parliamentary Forum.
ROBERT F. ROBERTSON—Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
C.O.T.C;  Big Block Club; Chemistry Society;
Phi  Kappa Pi.
STRUAN T. ROBERTSON—Victoria, B. C.I
Economics Honours
Pres.   Literary   and   Scientific   Executive;
Varsity Time Director 37-38; Psi Upsilon
MARY RYAN-
-Vernon, B. C.
Biology and Chemistry
NANCY SADLER- -Vancouver
Psychology, Sociology
Delta Gamma
GENEVIEVE L. SAUNDERS—Port Alberni, B. C.
English, French JANET L. SELDON—Vancouver
English,  Psychology
Kappa Kappa Gamma
EDITH J. SELLENS—Vancouver
English, History
Kappa Alpha Theta
ALEXANDER C SHARP—Vancouver
Government and  Economics
Law Society; Political Discussions Club;
Golf Club; International Relations
Club
WILLIAM M. SIBLEY—Vancouver
Philosophy,  Psychology Honours
S.C.M.; Psychology Club
DAVID B. SMITH—Nelson, B. C.
Chemistry Honours
Publications;  Chemistry Society;  Outdoor Club
M. LORNE SMITH—Sardis, B. C.
Chemistry, Bacteriology
Badminton;  Chemistry Society
MILTON A. STEWART—Mission City, B. C.
Chemistry
EDWARD G. STROYAN—Vancouver
Mathematics  and   Physics
ISABEL M. SULLIVAN—Victoria, B.C.
English,  History.
International  Relations Club.
Alpha Gamma Delta.
NEIL A. SWAINSON—Victoria, B.C.
History Honours.
International Relations Club.
PHYLLIS E. TOSHACK—Drumheller, Alta.
English,  History.
Alpha Delta Pi.
M. FERNE TROUT—Vancouver
Zoology, Bacteriology.
CLORIA E   TRUSWELL—Kelowna, B.C.
Economics, Government.
DAVID B. WADDELL—Victoria, B.C.
Botany, Entomology.
Badminton Club.
Outdoor Club.
EDITH M. WHITEFORD—Nicola, B.C.
Latin, French.
Kappa Alpha Theta.
REGINALD A. WILSON     New Westminster, B.C.
Philosophy Honours.
ARTHUR B. WRIGHT—Vancouver
Mathematics, Physics.
BARBARA BEARCE—Nanaimo, B.C.
English,  History.
Golf; Gamma Phi Beta.
JOHN HEISLER—Vancouver
History Honours; Grass Hockey
(See Page 74!!)
MARGARET McLELLAN —Vancouver
English, French
Alpha Gamma Delta
(See Page 74!!)
Page Seventy-two DAVID H. ARMITAGE—Creston, B.C.
History, English.
S.C.M.; Outdoor Club.
D. L. BARRETT- LEN NARD—Vancouver
Economics, English.
Players' Club.
Alpha Delta Phi.
RODNEY BEAVAN—Burnaby, B.C.
Economics,  Political, Science.
C.O.T.C.
ANNE M. BEDNER—Vancouver
Bacteriology, Chemistry.
Monro Pre-Medical Club.
MORRIS J. BELKIN—Vancouver
English, Economics.
Parliamentary  Forum;  Law Society.
Political Discussions Club.
ELINOR  M.  BOSSY—Vancouver
History,  English.
Alpha Delta Pi.
ALISON M. BRAND—Vancouver
Psychology,  Sociology.
Kappa Alpha Theta.
STELLA M. BRIDGMAN—Vancouver
English, History.
Alpha Omicron Pi.
Women's Debating Club.
M. JOY CAMERON—Vancouver
English, History.
Phrateres;  Alpha Delta Pi.
FREDERICK  H. CLARK—New Westminster,  B.C.
Mathematics,  Economics
MIRIAM  E.  COSENS—Vancouver
English,  History
Panhellenic Exec; Delta Gamma; Players'
Club
DOROTHY P. CUMMINGS—Vancouver
English,  Economics, Mathematics
Editor-in-chief Publications; Alpha Phi
T.  GRAHAM DARLING—Vancouver
Honours in Economics and Political Science
Rowing Club; Players' Club; Zeta Psi
LLOYD F.  DETWILLER—Vancouver
Economics  Honours.
Big Block Club; Basketball; Delta Upsilon.
MARGARET A. EVANS—Vancouver
Zoology,  Bacteriology
Woman's   Big   Block;   Monro   Pre-Medical;
Gamma Phi Beta; Sect'y Woman's Athletic Asso.
MARION C. FIELD—New Westminster, B. C.   I
Mathematics and Latin
Alpha Delta Pi
R. EDWARD FLOWER—Cranbrook, B. C.
Physics, Mathematics Honours
Mathematics Club; Physical Society
FAITH GRIGSBY-
-Vancouver
English Honours
MARCEL J. GUIGET—Vancouver
Geology, Chemistry
Ice  Hockey;   Canadian  Football;  G.M.   Dawson
Club
ROBERT M. HAYMAN—Kelowna, B.C.
Government, Economics
Rowing Club;  Players' Club Zeta Psi JOHN P. HEISLER—Vancouver
History Honours
Grass Hockey
ALBERT E. HENDERSON—Vancouver
English, History
CHARLES H. HOWATSON—Vancouver
Geology Honours
Soccer Club; G. M. Dawson Club
E. N. WINGETT IRISH—Hollyburn, B. C.
Geology and Mathematics
Soccer Club; G. M. Dawson Club
FRANCES P. JONES—Vancouver
English,   Psychology
Delta Gamma
KATHLEEN B. KEENLYSIDE   -Vancouver
French, German
PATRICIA M, KENMUIR- -Vancouver
Sociology,  Psychology
GEORGE P. KIDD—Vancouver
History Honours
SHIRLEY E. LYNN—Vancouver
History,  English
International  Relations Club.
Gamma Phi  Beta.
H. REGINALD MILLEY—-Vancouver
Mathematics Honours
Mathematics Club;  Physical Society
SHAW MIZUHARA—Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
ALAN S. MacDONALD—Vancouver
Chemistry,  Bacteriology
ROBERT L. McDOUGALL    North Vancouver, B.C.
Honours Economics, Political Science, English
Players' Club; Letters Club; Phi Delta Theta
JAMES D. MACFARLANE—Victoria
Psychology, History
Ubyssey
DONALD W. MaclVER—Vancouver
History,  English
Phi Kappa Sigma
MARGARET E. McLELLAN—Vancouver
English, French
Alpha Gamma Delta
HOWARD McL. McPHEE—Vancouver
Psychology, Mathematics
ELLEN E. PURVES—Victoria
English,   French
HAROLD G. RAPHAEL—Vancouver
Mathematics, Chemistry
ADAM REID—Newton, B. C.
Zoology, Chemistry
Film Society;  Musical Society.
Phi Kappa Sigma.
Page Seventy-four MARION REID—Vancouver
Chemistry, Biology, Monro Pre-Medical Club
Kappa Kappa Gamma
HAROLD ROME—Vancouver
Economics,  English
Political  Discussions Club;
Parliamentary Forum; Menorah
International  Relations Club.
Kappa Theta Rho
NORMAN L. ROTHSTEIN—Vancouver
Economics, English.
Kappa Theta  Pho.
ALFRED H. SHEPHERD—Vancouver
Psychology, Economics.
ROBERT E. SIMPSON—Vancouver
Zoology, Chemistry.
ANNETTE SMITH—Vancouver
English,  Economics.
V. DELLE SMITH—Vancouver
English,  History.
Alpha  Gamma  Delta.
JEAN C. STORDY-
ALAN  B. STAPLES—Kelowna, B.C.
Geology Honours.
-Vancouver
Economics,  English.
President W.U.S.
Gamma Phi Beta.
ARNOLD L.  SWANSON—Vancouver
Zoology, Bacteriology.
Phi  Kappa Sigma.
MARIAN S. VANCE—Vancouver
English,  History.
Kappa Alpha Theta.
PHYLLIS A. WALES—Vancouver
English, History.
Alpha Gamma Delta.
E. JEAN WEST—Vancouver
English, History.
Golf Club; Alpha Delta Pi.
MARION J. YOUNGER—Nelson, B.C.
English,  Mathematics.
JULIUS B. WHELLAMS—Kaslo, B.C.
History, Economics.
SAMUEL ROTHSTEIN—Vancouver
French, English.
A. L. MARTIN—New Westminster, B.C.
Mathematics, Chemistry.
FRANK B. CLARK—Port Moody, B.C.
Government, Economics.
Law Society.
Basketball;   Intramurals.
CLARENCE FULTON—Vernon, B.C.
Bacteriology Honours.
Psi Upsilon.
M. L. BROWN—Vancouver
History,  Economics.
Campaign Committee; Psi Upsilon.
English Rugby; C.O.T.C.
Treas.,  Monro  Pre-Medical  Club. East meets West as Struan  Robertson,
lohnson Pao, and ye Totem editor become
Mencius,  Westerner  and  Confucius
The Quad in a Mess—
twice
Cramped Co-eds en route to Victoria
Prof. Orchard "Goes to Town"
From the Library
By the Library
To the Library
Snow   'tween   lectures—Iris   watches
closely.   Whose are they?
Rolling Home !
Yes,  it's  a   U.B.C.  Student!
Winter Worries—
Wheels of Wealth VIRGINIA BIRMINGHAM—Vancouver
President Panhellenic Association
Kappa Kappa Gamma.
DAVID C. CARTER—Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi.
ARTHUR C. CLARK   -Vancouver
J. BROOKS COSTELLO—Vancouver
D. GORDON CRUICKSHANK—Vancouver
G. DUDLEY DARLING—Vancouver
Players' Club; Phi Delta Theta.
ROBERT J. H. DAVIDSON  -Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi.
J. DONALD—Vancouver
JOHN  H.  DOUGHTY—Trail, B.C.
ERMAN H. FIORILLO—Fernie, B.C.
SHEILA M. GIBBS—Victoria, B.C.
Economics,  English   (double degree).
Phrateres.
Film Society.
Musical Society.
ARNOLD GOLDBERG—Vancouver
Kappa Theta Rho
JOHN W. GREEN—Victoria, B.C.
Commerce Honours. STUART JAGGER    Vancouver
WM. A. LAIDLAW -West Summerland, B.C.
Beta Theta Pi.
GORDON H. McCULLOUGH—Vancouver
Delta Upsilon.
JEAN W. McFAYDEN—Vancouver
Economics.
Phrateres; Film Society.
GEORGE S. SHEPHERD—North Vancouver, B.C.
Economics,  Mathematics   (double degree) .
I.R.C; Law Society.
BETTY D. SKALING—Vancouver
RALPH A. SMITH—Vancouver
ROBERT C. R. SMITH   -Vancouver
Mathematics, English   (double degree) .
Treasurer Students' Council;  Law Society.
English Rugby Club; Phi Delta Theta.
EDWARD M.  SPARKES—Vancouver
JAS. W. THOMPSON- Moose Jaw, Sask.
Economics (double degree).
FRANK E. TURNER—Vancouver
(double degree).
Ubyssey; Senior A. Basketball.
Sect'y A.M.U.S.; Pres. Big Block Club.
MARGARET A. WESTLAKE—Taber, Alta.
Musical Society.
Film Society.
I.R.C; Phrateres.
Page Seventy-eight ALEX CHARTERS      JEAN MacLAURIN
ALAN CROLL
ENA CLARKE
BETTY LESLIE
EDUCATION
'39
The Education Class for the session
1938-1939 has been organized under the
following executive: Honorary President, C.
B. Wood; President, Alex Charters; Secretary, Elizabeth Houston; Treasurer, Don
Munro; Social Convenor, Elizabeth Leslie;
Women's Athletics, Ena Clarke; Men's
Athletics, Alan Croll; Reporter, Jean Mac-
Laurin.
First of the social activities arranged by
these representatives was an excursion to
Boundary Bay on October 15. Education-
alites gathered there for badminton, roller
skating, and barbecue at the summer home
of June Porter. On November 7 the class
joined with  the  B.C.T.F.  in sponsoring an
informal dance at the Alma Academy. The
party was honoured with the patronage of
Dean and Mrs. Daniel Buchanan as with
the presence of faculty members C. B.
Wood, Dr. and Mrs. W. G. Black, and Dr.
and Mrs. J. E. Morsh.
Grouse Mountain skiing and hiking brought
the class together for an outdoors day on
January 28. At a dinner tentatively scheduled for March 3 the class hopes to be
honoured with the presence of Dr. G. M.
Weir, Minister of Education. The dinner
will be followed by an informal evening at
the home of Florence Cruise.
A series of evening discussions on teachers'
problems in rural communities are being
held at class members' homes. The first
of these groups met at the home of Norah
Sibley with Mr. Hall of the Vancouver Normal School as guest speaker.
A badminton night and a hockey meet
under tlhe direction of Dr. W. G. Black are
planned. Other sports activities include a
girls 'team in intramurals and games between the rival gym teams of Blackhouse
and Woodhouse.
Page Seventy-nine JACK CAMPBELL
STANLEY WESTON
AGRICULTURE
'39
DR.  BARSS
And another year rolls on, leaving behind it twenty-five recent graduates in
agriculture, who must now find their place in the world.
Although this is close to being the largest graduating class in the history of
the Faculty of Agriculture nevertheless we cannot boast of having many sons
of the soil with us for only two of our members are from farm houses. To
add more to our cultural background we have the addition of eight former
Arts students who will also graduate this year.
Among "those present" are Douglas Taylor and Bob Twiss, both of whom
were members of the University's championship judging team. As well, we
have the versatile president of the Agricultural Undergraduate Society,
namely Jack Gray, who in his spare time handles the publicity for the
Musical Society.
Honorary President of the class is Dr. Barss. Class President was Jack
Campbell; Treasurer, Stan Weston.
Page Eighty FRANCIS K. BERRY—Vancouver
Poultry
REGINALD   H.   BROWN—Barkerville,   B.C.
Dairying
JOHN R. CAMPBELL—Vancouver
Dairying
President  of  Class
Basketball
LLOYD  EASLER—Vancouver
Soils and Agronomy
Weight Lifting Club
JOHN L. GRAY—Vancouver
Aggie Economics
Pres. Aggie Undergad.
W. ODETTA HICKS—Agassiz, B. C.
Soil Bacteriology
Alpha  Phi
Secretary Aggie  Undergrad.
-North Vancouver
CAMERON  INKSTER-
Poultry
JAMES V. JORDAN—Trail
Agronomy
B.
ROBERT H. KING—Vancouver
Dairying  and Chemistry
Phi Delta Theta
Ubyssey
HOWARD W.  LAWRENCE—New Westminste
Horticulture
GAVIN H.  MOUAT—Vancouver
Animal   Husbandry
Grass Hockey Club
JAMES B. SAUNDERS—Victoria, B.C.
Agronomy
Outdoor Club
JOSEPHINE M. STANIFORTH—Vancouver
Horticulture
WILFRED D. STOCKVIS—Vancouve
Soil and Plant Nutritioi
Delta  Upsilon
English Rugby
DOUGLAS K. TAYLOR—Vancouver
Agronomy
Beta Theta Pi
Basketball
Aggie Sports Rep.
ROBERT D.  TWISS—Vancouver
— Animal  Husbandry
Beta Theta Pi
Big   Block  Club
STANLEY  WESTON—Vancouver
Soils and Bacteriology
Rowing   Club
Outdoor Club
SAMUEL WOLFE-
-Vaneouver
Dairying
Kappa  Theta   Rho
Track Club
HOWARD W. YIP—Vancouver
Horticulture
Society .   \.
_     17a-
r
n	
#3£
fe «
►cenes
from  the  Fourth  Dimensional  Ball
— Identification   would   be   neither    possible nor practical LAURENCE GARVIE
WHEELER GOVIER
BOB McELHANNEY
As another year rolls around again, we find ourselves members of the
Science graduating class. Starting out as an energetic class of 140
members, each year has seen our ranks depleted more and more until
now only 77 men have aspirations of obtaining at the end of this year
that long-sought-for honour—an Applied Science Degree.
The class of '39 has maintained throughout the years, a good scholastic
standing with men like "Electrical" Lawrence Garvie and "Mechanical" Roy Phillips sharing the honours.
The class has been well represented on the various University athletic
teams: 'Strat' Leggat, many times winner of a Big Block, is, this year,
captain of the McKechnie Cup Rugby Team, Dan Burnett played on
the Senior Canadian Football squad, Jack Davis represented us on the
Canadian Championship Basketball team, and many others—Maurice
Lambert, ice hockey, Wordie Hetherington and Pete Leckie-Ewing,
rowing.
In the intra-mural sports under the guidance of Bill Bacon, the class
has always been up near the top, this year copping the volley-ball
pennant.
We are especially proud of "Chemical" Jack Davis who is, this year
the choice of the University for Rhodes Scholar. Throughout his
course, Jack has obtained such honours as, President S.M.U.S. Class
Executive, twice W. G. Swan scholarship winner, Senior A basketball,
and Big Block winner. We are all certain that Jack will go a long way
in his chosen profession.
Other activities have also claimed the interest of our members: Bill
Bacon, President U.E.S., Alfie Allen, President S.M.U.S., Pat Larsen,
Past-president Players' Club, and Wilf Williams, whose ability on the
piano has kept ever alive the traditional science spirit. Looking back
at our past activities and looking ahead to what lies before us, there
is every reason to hope that the class of Applied Science '39 will go
far in the various fields of engineering.
The Class Executive: Honorary President, Major A. H. Finlay; President, Lawrence Garvie; Vice-President, Wheeler Govier; Secretary-
Treasurer, Bob McElhanney; Athletic Representative, Pete Leckie-
Ewing.
A. H. FINLAY
Page Eighty-three SIDNEY
FRED L
JOHNC
ALEXA
1LLICUT    Vancouver.
hemical Engineering
K DAVIS—Kamloops, B.C.
Chemical Engineering.
President, M.U.S., Rhodes Scholar,
Sigma Phi Delta.
1939.
GEORGE W. GOVIER—Vancouver.
Chemical  Engineering.
President,  University Chemical  Society.
Vice-President,   Science   '39.
■rlLEY—Vancouver.
Chemical Engineering.
President, Chemical Society.
GORDON KING—New Westminster, B.C.
Chemical  Engineering.
ROBERT H. LYONS—Victoria, B.C.
Chemical Engineering.
DERMOTT—Vancouver.
lemical Engineering.
University Chemical Society.
Sigma Phi Delta.
PH F. PATTERSON—Ocean Falls, B.C.
Chemical Engineering.
EDWIN W. ROWBOTHAM—Lakehill, B.C.
Chemical  Engineering.
CHARLB    • I^EBSTER—Kaslo, B.C.
Chemical Engineering
N T. WILKINSON—Kamloops, B.C.
Chemical  Engineering.
ROLAND S. WILSON—New Westminster, B.C.
Chemical Engineering.
DAVID    . BONALDSON—New Westminster, B.C.
vil Engineering.
HPWOOD D. FORD—New Westminster, B.C.
Civil Engineering.
JACK S. KENNEDY—Vancouver.
Civil  Engineering.
Zeta Psi.
J. CAMMr>«KING—New Westminster, B.C.
vil Engineering.
Treasurer, S.M.U.S.
MAS A. G. BEECH I NG—Victoria, B.C.
Electrical Engineering.
JOHN E. BREEZE—Vancouver
Electrical  Engineering.
President, A.I.E.E.
OULSON—Vancouver.
Electrical  Engineering.
GRAHAM B. ERLEBACH—Vancouver.
Electrical   Engineering.
Page Eighty-four
III PHILIP J. FARMER—West Vancouver.
Electrical Engineering.
OSCAR R. FULTON—Prince Rupert, B.C.
Electrical Engineering.
Outdoor Club.
W. LAWRENCE GARVIE—New Westminst
Electrical Engineering.
President, Science '39.
Vice-President, U.E.S.
ROBERT C. GORDON—Edmonton, Alta.
Electrical Engineering,
Outdoor Club.
CARL E. HAND—Vancouver.
Electrical Engineering.
C.O.T.C.
GEORGE E. HARRISON—Victoria, B.C.
Electrical   Engineering.
W.   L.   HETHERINGTON—Vancouver
Electrical Engineering.
Secretary,  Rowing Club.
W. ERNEST HUGHES-GAMES—Kelowna, B.C.
Electrical  Engineering.
FRANK B. JONES—Victoria, B.C.
Electrical Engineering.
Secretary, Outdoor Club.
C.O.T.C.
M. PATRICK LARSEN—Vancouver.
Electrical Engineering.
'37-'38  President,  Players' Club.
Alpha Delta Phi.
PAUL R. LAYARD—Ganges, B.C.
Electrical Engineering.
C.O.T.C.
ROBERT A. MORRIS—North Vancouver.
Electrical Engineering.
Cricket Club.
GORDON E. McDOWELL—Nelson, B.C.
Electrical Engineering.
ARTHUR L SUTTON—Vancouver.
Electrical  Engineering.
Secretary, A.I.E.E.
PAUL R. BRUN—Vancouver.
Forest Engineering.
CHESTER P. LYONS—Penticton, B.C.
Forest Engineering.
Tumbling.
GEORGE W. MINNS—Vancouver.
Forest Engineering.
President, Forest Club
Sigma Phi Delta.
ALFRED R. ALLEN—Vancouver,
Geological   Engineering.
President, S.M.U.S.
Sigma Phi Delta.
WILLIAM R. BACON—Vancouver.
Geological Engineering.
President, University Engineering Society.
Sigma Phi Delta.	
ROBERT G.  CROSBY—Vancouver.
Geological Engineering.
Alpha Delta Phi.
JOHN LAMB—Vancouver.
Geological Engineering.
Secretary, G. M. Dawson Club. BERTRl
ROY A
RENE
P. H.
HUGH
ROBER
JOHN
NESBITT—Vancouver.
Geological   Engineering.
WILFRID O. WILLIAMS—Vancouver.
Geological Engineering.
Science Orchestra.
ALLAN R. B. McDOUGAL—North Vancouver.
Mechanical Engineering.
Outdoor Club.
IPS—Vancouver.
Mechanical   Engineering.
Chairman, A.S.M.E.
HARLES H. SHORTLEY-LUTTRELL-
Mechanical   Engineering.
Sigma Phi Delta.
-Vancouver.
DONALD A. STEWART—Britannia Beach, B.C.
Mechanical Engineering.
Secretary-Treasurer, A.S.M.E.
Outdoor Club.
DIN—Vancouver.
Mechanical Engineering.
PERCY A. ADAMS—Vancouver.
Metallurgical Engineering.
HAROLD H. KIPP—Kamloops, B.C.
Metallurgical   Engineering.
ECKIE-EWING—Victoria,B.C.
Metallurgical Engineering.
Rugby.
Zeta Psi.
/ILLIAM E.  PARKER—Vancouver.
Metallurgical Engineering.
LEONARD ALLAN—Vancouver.
Mining  Engineering.
AMMERSLEY—Victoria, B.C.
Mining Engineering.
Outdoor Club.
FRANK R. R. JONES—Victoria, B.C.
Mining Engineering.
President, Outdoor Club.
Vice-President, S.M.U.S.
W. STRATHEARN LEGGATT—Vancouver.
Mining  Engineering.
McKechnie  Cup Rugby.
Big Block Club.
Alpha Delta Phi.
cELHANNEY—Vancouver.
Mining Engineering.
President, G. M. Dawson Club.
Secretary-Treasurer, Science  '39.
Delta  Upsilon.
ERT F. OHLSON—Turner Valley, Alta.
Mining  Engineering.
Chairman Lutheran Society.
C.O.T.C.
RALPH SKINNER—Usk, B.C.
Mining Engineering.
Outdoor  Club.
WART—Vancouver.
Mining Engineering.
Alpha Delta Phi. '
SIDNEY E. WILSON—Vancouver.
Mining  Engineering.
JOHN W. YOUNG—Vancouver.
Mining  Engineering. MISS M. GRAY
MARNIE MILLAR
PAULINE  McMARTIN
DORIS   PEPPER
FLORENCE JACKSON
LESLIE MONTGOMERY
GERTRUDE PIERSON
FERN TROUT
PAULINE McDIARMID
So you don't know who the public health girls are? TSK AND
TSK. Well you see it's this way. There are 22 this year.
We are a heterogeneous and cosmopolitan collection of
young women. Our common heritage is that we are all
registered nurses. Some have post graduate experience,
others have come right from the hospital. Of the latter
group, 8 have already had part of their university work and
hope to graduate this year with their BA. Sc. degree. Two of
this group are B.A.'s.
Now that you know who we are, it will surprise you to know
how hard we work. Our activities are many and varied. The
course gives us a short concentrated period of lectures and
more lectures (we give them) and get them before we are
through. These are followed by a period of field work (even
though we aren't first cousins to the Aggies). No indeed,
our field work has to do with soil of a different nature.    We
P. M. A. CAPELLE
CAROLINE HENDERSON
FLORENCE I. JACKSON
MARTHA M. JOHN
ELIZABETH D. LEHMAN
P. K. McMARTIN
HELEN M. TRANT
BEVERLEY E. WILSON
NURSING
GRADS
Page Eighty-seven NORA J. CHIPPERFIELD
RUTH C. COCHRANE
VIOLA C. DAVIES
MARION A. GAMSBY
MARGARET A. GOBLE
DOREEN L. JAMIESON
A. ELIZABETH JENKENS
SHIRLEY  H.   JOHNSON
DOROTHY M. LADNER
JEAN C. McKAY
WINNIFRED  P.  McLEAN
DORIS   B.   PEPPER
JEAN M. WALKER
IDA B. WILLIS
LEORA  R.  WRIGHT
go to such centres as Qualicum, Coombs, Saanich, Cowichan,
Abbotsford, Mission, Essondale and Chilliwack, where for a
week or so we observe the lecture material in action. In
short, lectures and field work are so designed as to make us
Public Health Conscious. Our P.H.C. is further enhanced by
shots in the arm (Toxoid you know).
However, the highlight of the fall season was the week at
Essondale,  where  we  graced   the   Female  Chronic   Building.
Words cannot express, nor is it within the power of the
imagination to feel again the dread hardness of those
beds. In spite of the beds and many wierd and wonderful
sounds, particularly at 5.00 a.m. each morning, we did manage to sleep. None the less we appreciated and took ad-
vantgae of the unique opportunities for learning here presented to us.
Page Eighty-eight Perchance an anecdote or two will not be amiss here. Mtss
P. McMartin was seen swinging a mean axe in a frantic effort
to broaden her education, increase her circulation and keep
the home fires burning. Another of our members was surprised to learn that you didn't pasteurize milk by putting the
cows in a pasture. Again imagine our amazement and consternation when one very able instructor said "now who can
tell me how many cows a stomach has?" Though not tin-
canners, we made an excursion to the American Can Co., and
spent an instructive but noisy afternoon there. We also visited
the deaf and blind school, Girls Industrial School, Guernsey
Dairy, and the Institution for the Blind. Altogether, we've
had a busy, interesting, and happy year. To all who have contributed to it, the class extends its appreciation.
Now we've finished, I doubt if you know any more about us
than before—It's a case of "Do you do, or do you don't?".
MARGARET BARTON
MARION A. BELLIS
RUTH CORBOULD
JOANNE M. DAEM
NOREEN  EWART
MARGARET H. HAY
KATHLEEN B. MERRITT
ISABEL L. MUNGEN
PAULINE McDIARMID
VIVIEN PONTIFEX
VELMA SIMPSON
MARY G. WADE
C. ELEANOR WHITEHEAD
YASUKO YAMAZAKI BASIL HA
CALLUA
REV. El
W. F. GILBERT
EY
DAVID MARTIN
MPSON
YOSHIO ONO
A. O. MORRISON
T. DAVID SOMERVILLE
THEOLOG GRADS
"When one makes a mistake, it is without doubt, best to admit it
readily." Thus spake my mother to me when I was an infant. Now
I am compelled to put her philosophy into practice. This page was
one of those that managed to escape my scrutinous look when proofreading, and lo! there has been a blunder made.
No distinguishing marks enable the reader to tell which of the above
good folk are in attendance at which of the two Theological Colleges.
But now, if any read thus far, it shall be made clear. The four students
constituting the top two rows of pictures are Grads of Union College,
and those three students of the last two rows are Grads of Anglican
College.
In hope that this satisfies the most punctilious soul, I remain yours
terribly sincerely,
THE TOTEM EDITOR.  jBfc
s, the young ttdottish emigrant, who worked his
he Hudson's B» Company, is typical of the early
1851 he wa]fappointed governor of Vancouver
quarters at Fort Victoria administered the affairs
eh ability that he was commissioned as governor of
is sworn into office at Fort Langley, which served
y until the site of New Westminster was chosen by  JACK DAVIS
RHODESSCHOLAR
n
j T is difficult to express congratulations to the man who
each year wins the coveted
Rhodes Scholarship in B.C., for
one never feels that what one
may put on paper will "quite
fill the bill." This year the
scholarship was awarded to a
very popular Scienceman, Jack
Davis.
Jack's record reads like the
veritable story book, with success upon success to his credit.
Coming from the Interior of
the Province, he at once won
the hearts of his classmates,
and consequently held the office of President of his Class
until he was elected to Council,
as President of M.U.S. He has
twice won the Swan Memorial
Bursary for students in Applied
Science, and he was a member
of the Varsity Basketball team
which won the Canadian championship.
Besides all these qualifications
Jack himself is 'the real thing.'
The Totem says "All the best
at Oxford."
Page Ninety-four <7
/HE Totem Editor felt
that the Hall of Fame would
not be complete without featuring the realms of research
in some way. But is was
found to be a difficult task
to choose one individual
from all those engaged in
research on the Campus. Finally
after deep thought and lengthy
consultations we have chosen
Dr. C. McLean Fraser, Head of
the Department of Zoology.
Dr. Fraser when interviewed
was not pleased at the thought
of being singled out, and modestly suggested that there were
many others doing research on
the Campus who could be put
in the Totem. But he finally
gave in.
His chief work deals with
those marine forms known as
Hydroids, which abound on the
Pacific Coast, and now he has
combined papers, and collection notes, both older and more
recent, to form a sizeable book,
with some 44 plates of at least
500 drawings.
Sponsored by the National Research Council of Canada the
book, "Hydroids of the Pacific
Coast of Canada and the United States," is "an attempt to
aive a brief description, with
figures, of every hydroid species known to occur along the
Pacific Coast. . . ."
Dr. C. McLEAN FRASER
RESEARCH
Page Ninety-five CARSON McGUIRE
CAMPAIGN
%
HE last two years have
made history for the University
of British Columbia, for never
before have the students of the
University come to occupy such
a powerful position in the general affairs of the institution.
Much credit for the success of
the student undertakings during the last year is due Carson
McGuire, President of the
Alma Mater Society.
Carson first came to the University in 1926 27, but in the
next year went to Normal
School. He taught during 1928,
1929, and then from 1929
to 1934 he was principal of
Quesnel School. He finally returned to the University in
1937-38, and was elected
President in the Spring of 1938.
This year he is taking a double
honors course in Psychology
and Biology.
The first of Carson's achievements came in connection with
his work on the Student Campaign Committee. He looks
upon the Committee as a body
whose duty it is to conduct a
long term policy to obtain public support and more particularly to negotiate with the Government of the Province, and
our own Board of Governors, in
matters concerning the general
welfare of the University and
the Student Body. Carson went
to work shortly after the creation of the Campaign Committee and prepared a brief on the
time-tables at this institution.
The brief was a survey of actual
conditions at the University,
asking re-arrangement of timetables, revision of courses, the
accommodation of students,
and    of    University    finances.
—Continued on Page 248
Page  Ninety-six /I
new feature in the
"Totem" this year, perhaps to
be carried on every year, is the
sport editor's choice for the
outstanding male and female
athlete.
After long deliberation, Alex.
Lucas was chosen as the male
athlete who had contributed
most to Varsity athletics while
he has been at the University.
Alex, is a star basketballer as
well as a leading performer in
track and field in such events
as the dashes, quarter mile,
high jump, shot-putt and discus. He has won his award in
track every year he has been
out here, and in basketball
last year, and should repeat
in both sports this year.
"Luke" is a Phi Kappa Sigma
and is in his senior year. He is
well known to everyone for his
great sportsmanship, and ever-
happy attitude. Not at all
lacking in a sense of humour,
he has a quip to make for any
occasion, always improving the
morale of any team on which
he plays.
ATHLETE
Page Ninety-seven RUTH WILSON
ATHLETE
<1
O T E M Sport Editor's
choice for the outstanding
woman athlete of the University this year is Ruth Wilson
of Arts '41 and Alpha Gamma
Delta Sorority.
Ruth has been chosen for her
ability as an all-round performer in several athletics,
rather than as a star in any
one game, although she qualifies in this respect also.
A winner of the Women's
major block letter award, she
has starred in basketball for
the two years she has been
attending the University. This
year she was captain and the
league-leading scorer. Ruth
also excels at grass hockey,
but has not had time to play
regularly for the Varsity team.
She is better known to Vancouver people perhaps as a
golfer and tennis, champion.
In golf she "shoots" in the low
eighties, and as a tennis player
she once held the City Junior
championship.
In softball, Miss Wilson is a
very proficient catcher, having
played in the Senior leagues in
Vancouver for several years.
And, to make the picture complete, Ruth is as expert in the
water as on land, being a
swimmer of no mean ability.
Modest as can be, Ruth's records must be pried out of her,
and her sportsmanlike attitude
in everything indicates again
her long contact with athletics.
Page Ninety-eight J
4
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MARGARET H. ALEXANDER
BARBARA L. AVIS
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PAULINE E. BANFORD
EDGAR  BARTON
HAZEL-JEAN  BEJ
VERNA BIRMINGHAM
VERNA M. BLOCH
ANNETTA McT. BOYD
ELEANOR G.  BOY
DARRELL T
THOS. L. C. BRANSON
FREDERICK   W.   BRASON
MOIRA C. BREMNE
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W. NORMAN BURGESS
CONSTANCE I. BUSBY
W. KENNETH BUTCHAl
A   3WOOD
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M. ELIZABETH    LTTERS
JOHN C. CAMPBELL
ANNE E. CARROLL
ESME C. CAYDZI
DENNIS M
Ml
ICHILL Ill
SIDNEY H. CLARK
A B. CLARKE
ELEANOR M. CLARKE
JOSEPH S. COCHRANE
WILLIAM W. (COLLEDGE
ADRIENNE E. COLLINS
ROSEMARY R. COLLINS
JOYCE E. COOPER
!NE DESBRISAY
UOD J. DEVLIN
MARGARET DICKINSON
ORMOND W. DIER
HAROLD F .DIXON
N E. C.  DORCHESTER
ETHEL M. EATON
VIOLET O. FERGUSON
MARGAfcBT iM.   FINDLAY
MA|?ION k. FLEMING
ERIC MacG. R. FLESHER
D. W. R.  FORRESTER
EMILY
M. JUN
fRASER
IS A. FREEMAN
VIRGINIA GALLOWAY
JOSEPH A. GARDNER
OW
GE   RGE E. GLASS
Pagg One Hundred and Six KENNETH G. GL
ON GRAY
E. MELVILLE GREYELL
ALAN S. GWYN
HELEN M. E. HANN
W. S. PAT
KATHERINE B. HEWITT
MARY HEYER
ALBERT R. HICKS
K   N
MONA D. HUNTER
SHEILAH D. HUTCHINSON
DOROTHY C. HUTT
AL
FLORENCE T JAMIESON
IRENE M. JENKINS
ANN H. JEREMY
CARL
HIDAKA
INGLIS
P.  JOHNSON
E. LORRAINE JOHNSTON
JEAN E. JOHNSTON
PATRICK C. KEA L
JOSEPHINE C KENNEDY
A. WILLIAM D. KNOX
ALEXANDER D. LANG
GUNNAR LEPSOE
.  KEEFE
Ml WILLI/
YOSHII
JOAN
RUTH I
AILEEN
EDWAR
MACK IE
DHN P. MATHESON
MARTIN M.  MATHISEN
J. GORDON MOE
MOMOSE
|TOR C. MOORE
G. ELIZABETH MOXON
MARGARET A. MURPHY
RTHUR
ISEN  McCALLEM
DOROTHY A. McCULLY
MAUREEN N. McDIARMID
:l   )NALD
BARA A. McDOUGAL
ROBERT  D. McGINN
ROBERT F. MclNTYRE
«:KINNON
!Y J. McLEOD
O. JACQUELIN MacLEOD
BIDDY McNEILL
cPHEE
MAN A. McRAE
FREDERICK   I.   NISHI
JOHNSON S. PAO
ARTHU| fl fl\UL
JEAN   E.   PEARSON
Page Cue- Hundred and Eight W'w ^
DOROTH
NORMA M. POLLOCK
LESTER J.   PRONGER
JOYCE E. RALPH
JOHN A.
BASIL T.  RICHARDS
NOEL L.  RICHARDSON
KATHLEEN   RILEY
MARGARE
WILLIAM   A.   ROBERTSON
H.   BASIL   ROBINSON
W. DONALD MacK. SA
audrIv
m. elizabeth sandall
edward w. scott
pauline i. l. scott
HILPOT
NBURY
X   RTSON
SALTER
KATHLEEN A   3ELLENS
KENNETH N. F. SHAW
DOROTHY M. SHERRATT
EVELYN  B.  SINCLAIR
MAR
EVELYN L. SMITH
ROBERT SMITH
GERTRUDE A. SNOW
HARRY
SLOAN
,PRING HATTIF4 R;. 3tAGHALL
CHRIS T. STAMATIS
DONALD D.  STEWART
ELIZABETH A. STEWART
BYRON W. STRAIGHT
ULAND R. STRAIGHT
1 ■ I
St. CLAIR G. STRONG
FLORA McK. SWAN
FREDER
tf 4 C. TAYLOR
MARGARET THOMPSON
ERIC A. TOWNSEND
NELL TRAPP
ERIC S, TURN ILL
HONOR E. VINCENT
MOIRA M.  WHITE
MARGARET E. WHITELAW
W.  PERCY WICKETT
RUTH E. WILLIAMS
THOMAS WILLIAMS
DOUGLAS H. WORTH
helen L. Wright
IRBNE M. WRIGHT
ARCHIE McA. BYERS
CECIL S. COSULICH
MAISIE
8. COWAN
LYMAN C.  DAY-SMITH
WILLIAM   R.   DOWREY
Page One Hundred and Ten HERBERT C.  HOSKINS
ALAN G. HUDSON
RICHARD  J.   JARVIS
ROBERT M. KINCADE
RENEE M. LEBLANC
ENRY   IDE
ROY J> LECKIE
W. GORDON LOGAN
ARMANDO  P.  MINICHIELLO
WILLIAM F. McLELLAI
JOHN R. QUIGG
DONALD R. RAND
DAVID J. ROBERTSON
GRACE L. SCOTT
FREDERI   K  D
JOHN  E.   STARK
JOHN  H. STEVENSON
ALLAN G. SWEETNAM
JOHN C
ROBERT A. WILSON
WILLIAM A. G. CALDER
M. LOIS CAMPBELL
H.   KEARY DeBECK
WINIFRED J. McBRIDE
MILTON   NAROD
HAROLD C.  POOLE
JEAN M, PRATT G. SEDGEWICK
JOE PEARCE
DOROTHY HIRD
KAY EVANS
In reviewing the activities of the Sophomore Class 1938,39, it seems
that athletics must be classed as the outstanding feature of this
period.
In Basketball, we have Doug. Gross, and Brud Matheson on the Senior
A team; the Thunderbirds owe much of their success to John Farina,
Aubrey Gray and Bill McGhee, and the English Rugby boast of Jim
Harmer, Tommy Robson, Rangit Mattu, Ernie Teagle and Fred Billings.
A newcomer to the campus, Lionel Fournier, astounded us with his
abilities on the track. In golf, Billy Charlton was champion of the
U.B.C. team.
Respecting the Co-eds, Betty Muir, who is a most important player on
the Grass Hockey team, was the only representative from Varsity to
be chosen for the Vancouver Rep. Team to go to California last fall.
Ora Wright, Gerry Armstrong and Hortense Warne are also prominent
in this sport.
In the Senior A Basketball, Ruth Wilson, Mona Asselstine, Jean
Thompson and Nancy Martin do much for the Varsity team. Ruth
Wilson, Valerie Gardiner, Gerry Armstrong and Betty Muir play an
active part in our Volley Ball activities. Ruth Seldon and Barbara
Shannon are two star players of the Badminton Club.
The following members of Arts '41 take very important parts in their
respective societies. In the Players' Club there are: John Glen,
Jacqueline Kloepfer, Barbara Griffin, Ursula Rhodes and Margaret
Sage. In the Musical Society, Ruth Hutchinson is the vice-president
and Barbara Logan is a member. Mimi Schofield writes on the
Ubyssey.
This year we have the honour of having Dr. Sedgewick for honourary
president of our class. Class president is Joe Pearce, vice-president,
Dorothy Hird; secretary, Kay Evans; treasurer, Betty Bolduc; women's
athletic representative, Betty Muir; men's athletic representative,
Dave Ritchie and L. S. E. representative, Stanley Durkin.
BETTY BOLDUC
STANLEY   DURKIN
DAVE RITCHIE
BETTY MUIR
Page One  Hundred and Twelve CARMEN  PLANTA
ANSON  McKIM
Looking about us we see a greatly changed group of students. New
faces are everywhere in evidence and the herd of timid freshmen of
1937 has given place to a husky crowd of Sophomores who are, as one
professor stated, "one of the best Agricultural classes."
Our ranks have been swelled by many Artsmen, who, realizing the*
error of their ways, have become "men of the soil." Numerous freshmen from Victoria and the Senior Matric classes of the Province have
also joined our class, making it one of the largest in the Faculty of
Agriculture.
We are fortunate in having as honorary president, genial Prof. P. A.
Boving. Anson McKim is the 1938-39 president and is ably assisted
by a fellow member of the original 1941 class, Carmen Planta in the
role of secretary-treasurer.
Members of Aggie '41 have been active in all phases of campus
activity, from the smallest club to the major sports. Len Zink,
registered in the Sophomore class, was the high-point man in judging
dairy cattle at Portland, where he defeated students from all major
universities of the North Western States.
At our Fall Field Day students in Aggie '41 won their share of the
prizes and should do well in the contests on the Agassiz field trip.
Many members of our class also take active interest in the Agricultural Discussion Club, Public Speaking classes, the various banquets
of the year, and of course in our Annual Barn Dance, which this year
promises to be bigger and better than ever.
In the field of sports our class is well represented by Todd Tremblay,
letter-man on the rugby team, and Bill Hodgson of Canadian football,
our chief stars. The Aggie, basketball team contains three members
of '41, and at present is favoured in the intramural race.
Aggies, have always been noted for theii>spirit and we believe that we
are no exception. With our new sweaters and class pins we are in an
even better position to uphold the,honour of the class of Agriculture
AGRICULTURE
PROF. P. A. BOVING
Page One Hundred and Thirteen R. E. ALLEN
DOUGLAS ARCHIBALD
EDITH G. ARMSTRONG
MONA E. ASSELSTINE
GEORGE McK. AVERY
"iZABETH McN. BADGER
ARCHIBALD C BAIN
ELIZABETH M.  BALFOUR
ENID D. BALL
IkLFRED C. BALLARD
MARGERY L. BARNETT
PHYLLIS L. M. BARTLETT
MARY L. BEALE
kRY BEATON
LEYS M. BEAUMONT
GORDON BESSETTE
JOHN M. BEZER
PATRICIA G. BIBBS
VAL BJARNASON
BETTY D.  BOLDUC
N. BRACHER
VICTORIA J. BROWN
NANCY L BRUCE
C. W. BRYCE
DONALD C BUCKLAND
GRACE E. BUNNELL
MARGARET A. BURGESS
JAMES G. CAMERON
WILLIAM
fAMPBELL
Page One Hundred and Fourteen NANCY CARR
JOYCE G. CARTER
WILLIAM J. CHARLTON
ELSIE CHEW
ROBERT M. CLARK
CHUMMER B. CLARKE
TERESA J. COADY
BRYAN C. COLWELL
DONALD W. COLWELL
THEODORA COMBOLOS
EVELYN M. COOLS
STANLEY S. COPP
JOHN A. CRAWFORD
FRANCIS D. L. CROFTON
GRACE I. CUTHBERT
ROSE F. DAEM
DOROTHY M. DANIELS
E.  DASHWOOD-JONES
ACTON F. DAUNT
JOHN A. DAVIS
GUNHILD H. DELLERT
ROBERT J. DENT
JAMES McE. EBERTS
RUTH M. DEVLIN
JACK J. DIETHER
WILLIAM G. DIXON
GERALDINE P. DOCKER
DOUGLAS R. DORRELL
AILEEN DOUGAN
ALISTAIR J. DRYSDALE Ill
A. DUNKLEY
ILIZABETH   DUNLOP
D. OSBORNE DURKIN
L. STANLEY DURKIN
BRUCE E. EMERSON
KATHLEEN  E.  EVANS
ETHEL FAIRBANK
CONSTANCE M.   FAIRLEIGH
ALFRED J. O. FARINA
DONALD N   FERGUSSON
GORDON  FILMER-BENNETT
JOHN F. FILTEAU
JEAN K. FINLAYSON
NEIL M. FLEISHMAN
JOHNSON K. FLETCHER
RAYMOND  E.   FOSTER
PATRICIA C. FRASER
JAMES L. FRAZEE
ELEANOR   I.   FRENCH
E. ISOBEL FROST
RUPERT FULTON
MARJORIE L. GALBRAITH
ESTHER L. GALPIN
VALERIE GARDINER
PATRICIA M. GATHERCOLE
SHEILA GILLIS
0. M. MARIE GILMORE
JOHN E. GLEN
HUGH W. GORDON
ELSIE A. GRANT
MARION W. GRIFFITHS
■ ■■Ummmmmmmmmmmmmmm^m^mmm-
X-
Page One Hundred and Sixteen KATHERINE U. HALL
R. HANSLOW
ETHEL HARRIS
JOHN A. HARROWER
ERNEST C.  HARVEY
JOAN HASLAM
0. C.
IC
IAUGER
DOROTHY I. HAWKINS
BEN C. HERD
PHILIP S. HERRING
GORDON B. HEWITl
E. RUTH HEYER
JEAN McC HILL
DOROTHY M. HIRD
FRANCES E: HUMFREY
FLORENCE M. HURNDALL
G. RUTH HUTCHINSON
GEORGE T. HUTCHISON
MARY I. HYSLOP
MARJORIE H. JACK
ROY V. JACKSON
KIYOSHI   KATO
DONALD P. KERR
GEORGE H. KIRBY
JACQUELINE KLOEPFER
ANPHEN LAM
JANET W- LOCK
BARBARA LOGAN
HAROLD D. LUMSDEN
.EDWARD L. MARGETTS
WILL
MARR DOREEN B. MARTIN
NANCIE  B.   MARTIN
PETER S. MATHEWSON
RANJITS. MATTU
MOLLY MEIGHEN
ALBERT M. MENZIES
L. JACQUES S. METFORD
RUTH W. MILLAR
DONALD B. MOODY
A. R. MONAHAN
JOYCE K. MORRIS
MARGARET C. MORRIS
ROBERT J. D. MORRIS
ELIZABETH A. MUIR
R. N. MURRAY
DOROTHY McCAMMON
FRANCES A. McCLEAN
BEVERLY G. McCORKELL
DEREK H. A. MacDERMOT
AacDONALD
I leslie m. Mcdonald
margaret h. macdonald
thomas a. Mcdowell
:EWEN
WILLIAM P. T. McGHEE
DONALD A. C. McGILL
J. K. McINTOSH
GEORGE E. McKEE
VERNA C. MacKENZIE
Page One Hundred and Eighteen ELAINE K. McKINNOI
DONALD A. McLEAN
ELLIS L. McLEOD
JOHN M. McLEOD
JOHN N. McLEOD
GLADYS E. M<iM|CHAEL
rod McMillan
ANGUS MacPHEE
PETER J. McTAVISH
ANDREW  | NASH
GERTRUDE L. NELSON
THELMA A. NELSON
EILEEN M. NEWBY
ALVA E
MARY F. NORRIS
HELEN L. NOWLAN
H. J. HERBERT OLDFIELD
WILLIAM § BORNE
JOSEPH M. PEARCE
FRANK H. PENDLETON
MURRAY K. PICKARD
EUNICE F. PICKERING
ANNA M. PROVEN
J. E. PURSLOW
INES J. RADER
AUDREY M. REIFEL
URSULA RHODES
DAVID MacD. RITCHIE
LLOYD G. ROSS
F. MARGARITSAGE MARY L
E SCHOFIELD
HAZEL D. SCOTT
RUTH P. SCOTT
RUTH McL. SELDON
BARBARA SHANNON
KATHLEEN SKAE
LOUISE McM. SKINNER
EILEEN F. SMALLWOOD
InANCY MacK. SMITH
NORMAN B. SMITH
ADRIENNE R. SOUTH IN
ISABEL G. STOTT
lHELEN M. STRAITH
LUCY JANE SULLIVAN
HIROSHI TAKEDA
Y. TAMUR/
M  ELIZABETH THOMAS
JEAN I. THOMSON
VIVIAN D. THOMSON
DOUGLAS TODD
J. EDWARD L. UNDERHILL
MARJORIE V. USHER
C. WM. VAN HOUTEN
BRITA H. VESTERBACK
JANET C. WALKER
VIDA M. WARDEN
SATORU WATANABE
WILLIAM E. WATSON
FRANCES E. WEBB
Page One Hundred and Twenty CHARLES C. WELDON
JOSEPHINE W. WELDON
MONA S. WESTBY
DOROTHY WESTLAKE
BARBARA M. WHITE I
DOUGLAS M. WILSON
RICHARD A. WILSON
RUTH P. WILSON
PIERRE M. WOLFE
MARGARET A. WORTHING
ELIZABETH L. WORTHINGTON
SETSU YAMAOKA
THOMAS McL. YOUNG
FREDERICK L. BILLINGS
JOHN H. BYERS
EDMUND T. COX
PATRICIA C. CUMMING
ROBERT G. DONEGANI
AUBREY K. J. GRAY
NEIL T. GRAY
WILLIAM  R.  HODGSON!
JAMES E
G. PHILIP J. PARISH
CARMEN PLANTA
PAMELA M.  RUNKLE
ARTHUR G. SAKAMOTO
R. ROD WAINWRIGHT
ERNEST  P.  WEST
GERALD E. WHITE
LEONARD A. ZINK Left to right—Sleeping after lab. and library. Smiling thru'. Farm to
books to lab! Anne Carter, Doreen Martin and Biddy McNeil pose charmingly—don't you think? Banquetting,   surveying,    operating, experimenting, relaxing,   bearding
pepping—anything for Science,. CHARLES LIGHTHALL
J.   C.   McLAREN
J. DOUGLAS PATRICK
JAMES  USSHER
SCIENCE '40
JOHN NORISON FINLAYS
Under the guidance of Dean Finlayson, the class honorary president,
and the class executive, Science '40, has now completed its fourth
year at the University. The scholarship of the class ranges all the
way from zero to infinity, the most brilliant members of the class
being in Civil Engineering. Incidentally the civils are honored by
the company of Salomon Stamer, a gentleman from Poland. Stamer
has shown a remarkable aptitude for the English language, having
learnt even "Mr. Noah" in the short time of five months that he has
been here.
Athletics are another of Science '40's strong points. The Governor's
Cup was won by this class for two consecutive years and there is every
indication that it will be won again. Some of the more famous
athletes of this class are: Bud Burden, S.M.U.S. athletic representative and former U. B. C. track manager and very hot on the track
himself; Angie Provenzano, Canadian Football and Hockey; Jimmie
Ussher, Hockey, and an endless list of rowers, skiers, ruggers and
geologists.
Allan Dixon, Forest Engineer, is the only member of the class to take
an interest in the fine arts. He has a tenor voice and sings for the
Musical Society.
There is an odd spirit of competition among the Chemicals this
year, probably due to the fact that there are 23 of them and only
room for about 15 in fifth year, next year.    So—what will happen?
It has been forecasted that the Civils of this class will be holding
down $10,000 per year jobs with the two Canadian railroads in the
near future. Some of them, however, would rather be with the Coca
Cola Co., if their taste for that refreshment is any indication.
Not much is seen or heard of the Mechanicals or Electricals so it is
presumed that they are tackling tough courses that require intensive
study.
With the aid of J. Cameron King, Gordon "Pinky" King, both of
Science '39 and the Coca Cola Co., the class put on a super-colossal
pep meet on a strictly moral theme at a recent S. M. U. S. meeting.
science '40 Executive: Honorary President: Dean J. N. Finlayson;
^resident: Charles H. Lighthall; Vice-President: John McLean; Secre-
tary-treasuicec.:rt*D.oj4gJas^ Patrick;   Athletic   Representative:   James
Page One Hundred and Twenty-four CHARLES B. ARCHIBALD
3. BELL
WILLIAM A. CRAIGHEAD
W. CLARE HEIM
J. HOWARD KEMPER
CEC
L G. KILLAM
JOHN D. LESLIE
ROBERT A. LOWE
ROY W.  F. MOREL
JAMES D.  PATRICK
JAMES W. USSHER
MELVILLE B. HANSEN
CHARLES H.  LIGHTHAI
DONALD G.
NTOSH
WILLIAM WARREN
MARINO FRARESSO
JOHN  B.  ARMSTRONG
IAN
HENRY M.  POGUE
STEPHEN  P.   BURDEN
HARVEY CARRUTHERS
JOHN  K|
ALAN D. K. LAIRD
HAROLD J. MORRIS
GORDON F. PEARCE
JOHN
CAMERON
cA
EADIE
JOHN C. McLEAN
FREDERICK G. PEARCE
JOHN D. RUNKLE
RAYMOND R. TAYLOR
vAc NTOSH GLADSTONE E. RYAN        WILLIAM BRAIDWOOD RON RENSHAW
CHARLES PARKER
aA
Science '41  has this year one of the largest third year classes ever
handled by the University, yet the class has come through the year
with no b^poken windows or broken furniture.
The intramurals have not been^as successful this year due to. an over
abundance of work, but through perseverance on the part of Ron
Renshaw, the class stands 5th out of 10, and has an excellent chance
of copping the basketball and rugby titles.
Our Athletic Rep., Ron Renshaw, has done such a fine job on the
intra-murals that he is now trying to arrange a volley-ball series with
the Co-eds. A few such affairs have been held and they (the games)
proved so successful that the boys want them to be included in the
course.
Among the other sports on the campus there shine forth Evan
apRoberts and "Bink" Drummond as Canadian football stars; Dave
Maw in English Rugby; Allan Wallace, English Rugby, and many more
playing minor roles. M^^
Carter Hanbury comes in for mention as the most ardent amateur
photographer in the University, and official "Totem" photographer.
"Bus" Ryan, who must be mentioned, is the PtSxy of Science '41.
Also he is a member in good standing of the Pep Club and conducts
Science and Arts pep meets with equal nonchalance and ease.
>
The remai
members of the executive
secretary-treasurer of
'Chuck" Parker, vice-
and Bill' Briadwood,
Page One Hundred and Twenty-six CAMERON B. H. ANDERSON
WILLIAM F. P. ANGLEY
G. EVAN apROBERTS
WILLIAM BRAIDWOOD
JOSEPH S. BROADBENT
ALAN S. DRUMMOND
ROY C. DURKIN
DENNIS W. L. FAtRBAIRN
JAMES M. FIELDS
S. TERENCE FITZPATRICK
WILLIAM H. GROSS
ARTHUR R. T HAILEY
JOHN C.  HANBURY
STANLEY L. HARRIS
WILLIAM R. HUNT
FRASER JAMIESON
HERBERT H. KELLAND
W. ALLAN KER
WILLIAM J.  LYNOTT
D
D H. MAW WALTER J. MOODIE
Robert d. McAllister
JOHN P. McARTHUR
HOWARD N. McKIM
JOSEPH NAYLOR
CHARLES B. NEWMARCH
WALTER J. N CHOLS
OSCAR F. ORR
CHARLES W. PARKER
L. PATRICK PATIENCE
OWEN F. PICKELL
JOHN W. PRICE
ARTHUR C. RAE
JOHN M. ROBERTS
GLADSTONE E. RYAN
L. NORWOOD SARLES
ALAN R. SMITH
DAVID H. L. THOMAS
WILLIAM WALLACE
DONALD P. WYNESS
Page One Hundred and Twenty-eight DR. HAROLD SMITH
CHARLES   NASH
J. N. STEWART
R.   B.   PARSONS
At about the time of the Xmas exams, there suddenly appeared on
the campus a number of what appeared to be walking fire-hydrants.
It proved to be the Class of Science '42 decked out in flaming red
sweaters, the sweaters that used to characterize the true Scienceman.
The revival of these sweaters may mean the revival of the old science
spirit. This display of color on the campus was due largely to the
efforts of Charlie Nash, the chief executive of the class. Charlie is
the prime mover and organizer for the class. Under his guidance all
class functions have enjoyed great success.
Dr. Harold Smith was elected honorary president of the class. Norm
Stewart was elected secretary and according to him this office also
appears to be honorary. Brian Parsons was Athletic Rep and he has
arranged meets with other classes.
The major contest of the season was the rugby game between Science
'42 and Science '41. Science '41 had the incentive of improving their
geology marks so managed to squeeze out a win.
Outstanding men in sport are "Doc" Miller who plays Senior A Basketball; Fred Joplin, of the Thunderbird Football team; Dennis Leong,
first-string soccer player, and Vaughn Mosher who is president of the
Swimming Club.
The now famous English 3 course inflicted on Sciencemen for the
first time this year was received with dubious response. The results,
however, seem to have been favourable.
One outstanding feature of Science '42 is the only true Science
woman on the campus, Norma King. She wears the science sweater,
carries the slide rule, spends half her time in the drafting room and
in general upholds-all the customs and traditions of the science faculty.
SCIENCE '42
Page One Hundred and Twenty-nine HARRY R.
BELL
J. HOWARD BENNETT
REGINALD B. BENNETT
NORMAN C. BRUCE
STUART D.
CAVERS
ELLIOTT A.  CREELMAN
JOHN D. CREIGHTON
C. C. CUNNINGHAM
THURB D.
CUSHING
KENNETH R. G. DAVIES
M. KEITH DOUGLASS
GEORGE C. DURHAM
albert|h|
ELLIOTT
JOHN L. GLOVER
BRUCE F. HARVEY
0. JOHN HAYLES
GORDON R.
hIlchey
D| ALAN   HOPPER
GEORGE R. A. HOWEY
A. FREDERICK JOPLIN
HAJIME K
AGETSU
E
. JACKLIN KERMODE
W. GORDON KERSEY
DENNIS T S. LOENG
HUGHIE LIVINGSTONE
Page One Hundred and Thirty CHARLES F. LONG
HUGH A. MANN
RODNEY MORRIS
VAUGHN L. MOSHER
DONALD E. McLEOD
CHARLES W. NASH
WILLIAM M. OUIMETTE
ROBERT B. PARSONS
ROBERT A. POTKINS
J. MALCOLM ROXBURGH
DALE L. RUMBALL
WILLIAM McM. SHARP
STANLEY W. SHELDON
ERIC L. SMITH
E. L. SOUTH
WILLIAM E. J. STEELE
J. NORMAN STEWART
SABURO TAKAHASHI
SEMON G. TATER
HUGH J. TAYLOR
VICTOR THORSON
RALPH W. TULLY
ARTHUR W. TURNBULL
ERNEST N. WALTON
CHARLES E. T. WHITE
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY?
. . . please turn over! DAVID GREY—Arts '42
lj. G. JEFFRIES—Arts '42
DOUGLAS JESSUP—Arts  '42
RALPH LIGHTHEART—Arts '42
ALICE MATHER—Arts '42
|a.  R. MONOHAN—Arts '42
JOHN McCUTCHEON—Arts '42
WM. W. McKELVEY—Arts '42
JOHN MACDONALD—Arts '42
R. NEWITT—Arts'42
DAVID NICHOLS    Arts '42
SHIRLEY WISMER—Arts '42
M. W. AN   US—Arts '41
KATHLEEN DARLING—Arts '41
JAMES FERRIS—Arts '41
VICTOR FREEMAN—Arts '41
ELSIE McLEAN—Arts '41
GEORGE SCHUTHE    Arts '41
OWEN  SHEFFIELD—Arts '41
ALEC URQUHART-    Arts '41—Alpha Delta Phi
—Commerce '41
| PHYLLIS BARTLETT—Arts '40
H. T. DAUNT—Arts '40
MORRIS DUNCAN—Arts '40
HUGH LYTTLETON—Arts '40
■ ALAN McDONALD—Arts '40
I MARY STUART MclNNES—Arts '40
DON  PYLE—Arts '40
JACK RUSH—Arts '40
WM. TOLMIE—Arts '40
F. J. RITA—Commerce '40
IRENE EEDY—Arts '39
Ubyssey
Page One Hundred and Thirty-two C. D. KENNEDY—Arts '39
N.  T.  RENWICK—Arts '3.9
PAUL VOLPE—Arts '39
GEORGE  WILSON—Arts   '39
WALTER ROBERTSON—Commerce '39
ROBERT BENTLEY—Aggie '42
LYNN SULLY—Aggie '42, Phi Kappa Pi
DOUGLAS DOUGANS—Aggie '40
G. I. MORRISON—Aggie '39
J. T. McCAY
G.  L. CURWEN—Sc.  '42
DAVID GRAHAM—Sc. '42
ROBERT FARMER—Sc. '42
R.  C.  MILLER—Sc.   '42
FRANK NANSON—Sc. '42
ROBERT TAIT—Sc. '42
W. S. JACKSON—Sc. '42
W. E. MILLS—Sc. '41
PAT CUSTANCE—Sc.  '39
J. H. D. BARRETT—Sc. '39
A. G. LARSON—Sc. '39
C. H. MACDONALD—Sc. '39
JOYCE CRAIG—Social Service, 3rd Year
MARION FOSTER—Social Service
M.  E.  MOSS—Social  Service
DOROTHEA TOMPKINS—Social Service
M.   FRITH—Hospital  Nurses
E. K. Mc.CANN—Hospital Nurses
G.  PIERSON—Hospital  Nurses
H.   SAUNDERS—Hospital   Nurses
E. M. WALTERS—Hospital Nurses ARTS   '42   EXECUTIVE
George Stamatis
Doreen Ryan
Clarence Mann Michael McGuire
Donald Livingston
Me
ry-Ann Tea;
t ' mf^   ^&
. _         i
sj^i
Ammt  ,              1         \ The Freshman class this year was smaller than in
preceding years but what it lacked in numbers was
made up in spirit and enthusiasm.
The initiation period was a colorful spectacle with
green nails and dunce hats in abundance. For the
girls, the women of the upper classes held a big-
little sister party. For the boys, the traditional
Frosh-Soph bonfire was revived with the freshman
showing their superiority amid over-ripe fruit,
gasoline and sophomore clothing. The initiation
period ended with the doffing of the green at the
Frosh Reception.
With Jack Davis as chairman an attempt was made
to hold the Frosh elections. Upon the announcement of the results of the election, amid cries of
"Unfair", the newly elected appeared locked in two
waste paper baskets minus his pants.
An election by secret ballot took place later with
George Stamatis elected as president, when the
following officers were elected:
Honorary class president—Walter Gage; Vice-
President, Doreen Ryan; Secretary, Clarence Mann;
Treasurer, Michael McGuire; Women's Athletics,
Mary Anne Teagle; Men's Athletics, Don Livingston.
The Frosh Frolic climaxed the freshman year. The
party took place at the Palomar to the strains of
Trevor Page's Orchestra. JAMES C ADAM
|   DOUGLAS W. ALEXANDER
DAPHNE L. ALLEN
BLAIR W.   ANDERSON
KIMIMICHI ARA1
JUNE C. ARMOUR
ALICE R. ASHFORD
FRANCES E. ASHWORTH
FRANCIS G. ASKEW
|  MARY F. ATKIN
PHYLLIS W   ATKINS
KATHLEEN AUGUSTINE
MARGARET L. AVIS
ARVID H. W. BACKMAN
JOHN   H.   BALDWIN
MARGARET L. BALL
DONALD K.  BANNERMAN
EDWARD J.  BARRIE
GORDON D. BELL
ROY G. BELL
EDWARD BENSON
| FRANCIS E. BERTRAM
ARTHUR J. BINGHAM
ARTHUR C.  BIRD
DOROTHY A. BLOCH
BETTY BOALE
NANCY BOLTON
THOMAS M. BOLTON
ROBERT W. BONNER
J. V.  BORELLI
KENNETH
JAMES   L.   BOWIE
ELLEN L. BROWN
3WN
J. ROSS BROWN ELL
JAMES  B.   BUCHANAN
BEVERLY  J.   ANNANDALE
Page One Hundred and Thirty-six JOHN A. C. BUCKLAND
M. MINTA BULGIN
SHERIDAN  BURCHELL
JOHN   S.   D.   BURNES
FAYE I. BURN HAM
EMMA I. BUTLER
GERALDINE M   CADE
D. IAN CAMERON
JAMES McG. CAMPBELL
MARY   I.   CAMPBELL
JEAN  CAMPBELL
JOHN J.  CARSON
EILEEN V.  CARTER
EVELYN E. CARTER
PATRICIA  CAREY
WILLIAM J. CAULFIELD
F. H.  B. CHARLESWORTH
CHARLES J. CHRISTOPHERSON
GEORGE CLAYDON
ALVIN B. CLEMENS
J. CLEMENT
PATRICK M. CLERY
JEAN  E.  CLUGSTON
THOMAS  L.  COLLINS
CONSTANCE R. COOK
JULIA CORMACK
PAUL T.  COTE
ROBERT P. COWAN
JANE E. COX
HELEN C. CRIBB
M. JEAN CROLL
MARGARET A. CROWE
MARGARET CUNNINGHAM
JEAN  L. CUSHING
W. J.  CUTHBERT
DENISE DARLING ROBERT A. DAVIDSON
GRETA B. DAWE
JEAN R. DAWSON
WALLACE E.  DEAR
JOHN DeLEEN
ALICE B. DIMOCK
FRANCES   R.   DOOLEY
JACK  N.   DORER
AUDRAY S. DUTCHER
JOHN H.  EDWARDS
KENNETH  A.   ELDRIDGE
DAVID W.  ELLIS
DOROTHY I. ELLIS
JESSLYN P. ELLIS
PHYLLIS  B.   ELLIS
W.  DOUGLAS ELSDON
EARL T. ENGilSH
DONALD C. EVANS
MARGARET EVANS
WILFORD G. EVANS
G. KENNETH EWING
MARGARET L. EWING
WILLIAM C. FERGUSON
GORDON M. FIERHELL€R
MARGUERITE L. FINCH
ANNA RUTH FINLAYSON
E. NOREEN FLUMERFELT
A. GLEN FORRESTER
MARGARET E.  FOSTER
AMY H.  FOTHERGILL
FRANCES  M.   FOWLER
FRANK S.  FOYSTON
G. BRIAN R. FRASER ,
ARNOLD FRASER
MARGERY V.  FRY
ROBERT  G.   GALL
Page One Hundred and Thirty-eight W. M. GARDINER
ALAN GARDNER
NORMAN A. GILL
MICHAEL
HAROLD M. GRAHAM
AUBREY GRAY
JOHN  S.  GRAY
D. RODNEY GRIERSON
EDWARD GROSS
GLORIA  J.   GUSOLA
AMY  L.  HACKNEY
MARGAR
H. KENNETH HALL
DOROTHY H. HAMILTON
M. JOAN HAMILTON
PAUL
GERRY HARKLEY
JOHN B. HARRISON
PEGGY   M.   HASSAL
ELIZABETH   HEBB
DOREEN HENDERSON
MARION S. HICKENBOTHAM
MARGARET HOWIESON
PHYLLIS E. C. HUGHES
HARRY I. HUNTER
ALAN   HURST
EDWIN HURST
JAMES   B.   HUTCHINSON
YOSHIO HYODO
DOUGLAS A. JAMES
W. ANDREW JENKINS
JERVIS
WALLACE M. JOHNSTON
W. G. FINLAY JOHNSTON
AUDREY L. JONES
DOROTHY
JUKES WILLIAM KAPAK
KENNETH L.  KEITH
CORNELIUS W.  KELLER
MARGARET I. L. KELLER
WANDA KENNY
DONALD J.  KERMODE
NICK J. KILLAS
STANLEY KILLICK
ALICE KJOS
LEONARD S. KORSCH
ANC IE KOSHEVOY
EUGENE  P.   LaBELLE
HELEN E. M. LAKIE
MARGARET R.  LARGE
BETSEY   B.   LAVELL
FRANK LEIGH-SPENCER
DORIS C. LENNIE
MARGARET L. LENNIE
WILLAM   K.   LINDSAY
DONALD A. LIVINGSTON
TERENCE LORD
HAROLD LOW
GERALD A.  LUNN
DONALD F.  H.  LYLE
A. PATRICIA MALONE
CLARENCE W. J. MANN
JOHN M. R. MARGESON
ALDO   MARZOCCO
ERNEST MASON
CLAUDIA V. MATHESON
PAUL  R.   MATHEWS
BEVERLY R. MATTHEW
JAMES T. MELVIN
THOMAS W. MEREDITH
LENORA F. MILLERD
A. SHEILA MOFFATT
Page One Hundred and Forty MARGARET MOLLARD
MARCELLA E. MOODIE
WILLIAM A. MOORE
BETTY H. MORTON
VICTOR G. MOTHERWELL
AMY C. MOYLS
LORNE R. MULLET
MAE MUNRO
MARION E. MURPHY
W. JAMES MURRAY
MARY E. McBRIDE
W. EDWARD McBRIDE
S. LORNE McBURNEY
NORMA R. McCALLUM
ELIZABETH M. McCORMICK
BETTY M. McDIARMID
julia macdonald
olive e. Mcdonald
dorothy m. mcdonnell
florence i. mceachern
MARJORIE E. MacGREGOR
MICHAEL K. McGUIRE
AUDREY  M.   Mac I NTOSH
JEAN   McKAY
JEAN MacK. McKEE
EFFIE M. MACKENZIE
JOHN A. McK INLAY
DONALD McKINNON
MURIEL McLAGEN
WILFRED R. McLAUCHLAN
CHARLES A.  MacLEAN
JANET M. G. McLEAN-BELL
R. RAYMOND McLEOD
M. PATRICIA McMAHON
MARY J. McMORRIS
douglas c. Mcpherson ALEXANDER B. MacQUARRIE
mae McQueen
J.   R.  NANSON
KINGSLEY C. NEIL
NORA NEILSON
PHYLLIS R. NICOLSON
GEORGE NISHIOKA
ROY H. NOSE
MORRIS NOVIKOFF
(elford L. NUNDAL
JOHN W. OASTLER
ARTHUR OBOKATA
ARNOLD OBLAND
E. ROBERT OLSON
JOAN   M.   PAINTER
RUSSELL E. PALMER
J. HARVEY PARLIAMENT
SHIRLEY L.  PARNUM
RACHEL  M.   PAUL
ROBERT  L.   PAYNE
LORNE G. PERRY
L.  GWENDOLINE  PETER
MARY   E.   PHILLIPS
EARLE
IERC
RUTH  PICKIN
IERCY
DUNCAN  L.   PITMAN
B.  DONALD POTTS
D. JEAN PROWSE
K. ALAN RACEY
AGNES D. RESTON
K.   ESTELLE  ROBINSON
RUTH  M.   ROBINSON
ALEXANDER H. ROME
I        FLORENCE V.  ROWELL
BETH   RUTHERFORD
RAYMOND   H.   RUTTER
Page One Hundred and Forty-two DOREEN RYAN
JOHN G. RYAN
IAN   H.   SCHIEDEL
PATRICIA R. SCOTT
ROBERT G. H. SHEWAN
K. S. SHIMOTAKAHARA
CHRISTINA C.  SINCLAIR
GEORGE E. SLEATH
ALEXANDER F. SMITH
BARBARA E. SMITH
FRANK   F.    SMITH
RUSSELL P. SNYDER
IRENE I. SOMERS
M.  JOAN  SPARROW
DOROTHY M.  STAMATIS
GEORGE  STAMATIS
IRENE S. STBEVES
RITA L. STEEVES
HAROLD C.  E.  STEWART
PRISCILLA E. STEWART
JAMES C. STINSON
JOHN M. STOPHERD
DONALD   D.   STURDY
MICHAEL STUSIAK
EDWARD A. B. SUTTON
DENIS  L  SWAN
MAXWELL  P.  SWEENY
MINORU TABATA
YOSHITO TAKAHASHI
KIMIKO TAKIMOTO
HAROLD E. TANNER
MARGARET L. TAYLOR
ERNEST E. TEAGLE
MARY ANN TEAGLE
G. PHIL THOMAS
J. P. WALLACE THOMAS JOAN C. THOMPSON
JOAN M. THOMPSON
DOROTHY   THOMSON
LORRAINE THOMSON
GEORGE A. TOWNSEND
IRENE TROUP
NORMAN   G.   TUDDENHAM
MARY TWISS
ELIZABETH  R.  UGLOW
DAVID VANDT
MARY   J.   VENINI
E. KENNETH VERNON
BILLIE WALLACE
JEAN F. WALLIS
BERYL  E.   WARRACK
EDITH  F. WARREN
JAMES D. WATTS
MILDRED F. WATTS
EVA  WEBB
JOSEPH  D. WEED
HARRY S. WEINER
MARGARET WELDON
RONALD  J.   WHITE
F. CAMPBELL WILLIAMS
THOMAS G. WILLIS
ROSS WILSON
SUSAN  M.  WILSON
GERALD R. WOOD
KATHLEEN M. WOOD
JUANITA WOOD
HELEN M.   E.  WRIGHT
ORA WRIGHT
WALTER E. L. WUEST
R. S. JOY YATES
MARGARET ST. J.  YORSTON
ALASTAIR YOUNG
Page One Hundred and Forty-four THOMAS W. A. LONG
Born  September 7,   1917
Died   October   29,    1938
'Standeth  God within   the shadow,
Keeping watch above  His own."
—Lowell
JAMES KELLER
Born   June   26,    1918
Died October 4,   1938
"Those whom the Gods love die young."
in m
e m © ■• ■ One of
Noyember
railway
British GoJ
railway was
the line knc
a simple
in the history of British Columbia was
on-fh~at day the Canadian Pacific transcontinental
^fr'was^the fulfillment of the promise made to
entered into Confederation.   The last spike on
aldTA^Tmith  (Lord Strathcona)  at a point on
ontrary to popular opinion the spike was
n^peO'T-gSKPone being used. The spike was driven and
in a fewifffnu es the trairTpassed over the new-laid rail and sped on
TO Port' Moody . . . and the Pacific.
its Photo by Carter Hanbury. CICELY  HOLMES
JACQUELINE KLOEPFER
The Players' Club is growing up. After 24 years of activity the
members of the club have taken the choice of plays for both Christmas and Spring production into their own hands. The reading of 60
odd plays is done by the Play reading committee and executive.
The result at Christmas was very satisfactory. "One Evening at
Nero's", "300th Performance", "Judge Lynch", and "Goodnight
Please."
Credit must be given also to John Quigg, who as Stage manager
designed and executed exceptionally effective sets for all four plays
and for the Spring play.
The play reading committee has branched into a dramalogue group
under the convenorship of Pat Keatly and gave public readings of
plays written for the Club prize in the fall term and, once the Spring
play was chosen and cast, the readings were planned to continue.
After a few half-hearted attempts by a few individual members at
radio work over Varsity time, Lorraine Johnston was put in charge
of radio auditions for all members for the weekly drama under the
re-organized "U.B.C. Presents ..."
PROF. W. H. GAGE
SIDNEY  RISK
Page One Hundred and Forty-eight "Goodnight   Please"
"300th   Performance"
"The Curtain Rises" by Benjamin M. Kaye, Spring
play choice, was also discovered by the Executive
in discussion with Mr. Gage and the Director,
Sidney  Risk.
The cast was Cicely  Holmes,  Anne Carter, John
Glen, Jim Frazee, Dacre Barrett-Lennard, and Tom
McDowel
Again the Club plans its unique feature Tour. The
tour is planned to extend throughout the province
and to include the upper country and Vancouver
Island.
The executive for the year was:
Anne Carter  President
William Nickerson  Vice-President
Dacre  Barrett-Lennard ___  Treasurer
Cicely Holmes  Secretary
Dudley Darling    Business Manager
John Quigg  Stage Managsr
Committee Lorraine   Johnston   and
Jacqueline  Kloepfer
Sidney Risk Explains Model Stage
Stage Crew Bill Johnson and
Jim Fields in the Fly Gallery
The Green Room
Roy Jackson Paints
Dave Morrow Makes-up
Jack  Dorchester
Love on the Stage
Page One Hundred and Forty-nine RUTH HUTCHINSON
OWEN SHEFFIELD
The actors' hearts are doing calisthenics in their bodies; their breath
comes fast. Five minutes to first curtain—the house lights grow
dim, black out and the orchestra begins to play the overture. Two
minutes to first curtain—one minute— The curtain rises slowly
and they are alone—alone before a sea of faces, of strange criticising
eyes.    The show is on!
Swiftly act follows act and the show goes smoothly on. Then, at
last, amid the applause of the first-nighters, the curtain falls on the
opening performance of Victor Herbert's "Serenade", the Musical
Society's ninth operetta in ten years.
The most ambitious and perhaps most successful production of 23
years of musical activities on the campus, "Serenade" climaxed
months of rehearsals and hard work by members of the Society,
capably directed by Frank Patch, President again this year, and his
executive.
DR. W. L. MACDONALD
PROF. W. H. GAGE
Page One Hundred and Fifty ».-* •** -•'.
The social aspect of the society was emphasized this
year more than ever before, and the annual formal
dance in the Peter Pan Ballroom to welcome new
members, was followed by several informal parties
and banquets. Following an old tradition, the
Society celebrated the success of another operetta
by a happy party after the final performance.
Mr. C. H. Williams was again musical director of
the Society, Mr. E. V. Young, dramatic director,
and Mr. Walter Gage, assistant dramatic director.
The executive for 1938-39 included: Honorary
President, Dr. W. L. MacDonald; Honorary Vice-
President, Prof. W. H. Gage; President, Frank
Patch; Vice-President, Ruth Hutchinson; Secretary, Constance Busby; Production Manager, Honor
Vincent;  and  Business  Manager,  Owen  Sheffield.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-one AUDITORIUM
Publicity by the written and spoken word, pep meetings . . . these typify
the Auditorium. The people in view are Doug. Ford, singing; Pres. L. S.
Klinck, gowning; Hugh Robson, pianoing; Georgia Day, singing; Basil Robinson
and Prof. Orchard, first nighting; Fred Thoneman, laughing; and Hon. Dr.
R. J. Manion, spsaking. 'TIME AND TIDE WAIT FOR NO MAN" Victor   Freeman      Verna McKenzie Rod Poisson
Bob   Thompson
Van   Perry
Janet Walker
Page One Hundred and Fifty-four In concluding this, the second year of campus broadcasting,
the retiring members and staff of Varsity Time can look
back over their contribution to student radio with genuine
pride and satisfaction.
Under the guiding hand of Program Director Osborne Durkin, Varsity Time shook off the atmosphere of stigma attached to it by critical students and rapidly won for itself
a name as one of the most important and active clubs on
the campus. Fighting against the indifference of a potential audience and a lack of adequate space and equipment,
Ozzy and his directors forced their programs to be heard
and approved of by students and non-campus listeners.
Outstanding move of the year was made early in the spring
term, when the old style half hour programs were discarded
in favour of two separate ones each week. The club itself
was reorganized, as well, and became known as the University Radio Society. Next year the Radio Society will control
all student broadcasts of every kind.
Radney Poisson made a name for himself as director of
"U.B.C. Presents . . ." the Sunday afternoon drama feature
over CJOR. Radio News Editor Van Perry and his team-mate
Basil Robinson made Friday night's "News On the Campus"
a very entertaining fifteen minutes with their rapid-fire
description of sport and general news. Van also directed
publicity for the group.
Among members who got very little publicity for the excellent work they contributed are Bob Thomson, Vic Freeman, and Ian Cameron. Bob's dramatic scripts were the
highlights of programs before Xmas; Vic, as Chief Announcer, was busy every noon-hour auditioning would-be
talent; and Chief Technician Ian Cameron built up and
made very good use of a large library of sound effects.
Verna McKenzie took minutes and wrote letters faithfully
throughout the year, and Janet Walker, as librarian, was
kept busy filing and caring for scripts. Harry Campbell,
Dick Jarvis, Jack Randle, and Louis Monasch were active
assistants to the directorial staff; other outstanding contributors to the Society included Pauline Scott, Virginia
Galloway, Pat Keatley, Irene Steeves, Jim Frazee, and Bob
McDougall.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-five DICK   JARVIS
ALICE MATHER
HONOR VINCENT
ADAM REID
FILM
SOCIETY
This year the Film Society has completed its third year of activity on the
University campus. Organized for the purpose of bringing a better class of
film entertainment to the student body and of developing a greater intellectual
interest in motion pictures, it has been successful in attaining its object.
Using the 16 mm. projector that was presented to the University by the
Graduating class of 1938, the Society brought renowned films from France,
Germany, England, Czechoslovakia, Russia and the United States. Among the
most noteworthy of these were Madame Bovary, an adaptation from Flaubert's
novel; Slalom, a rhythmic picture unique in its silent skiing sequences; its
sequel Ski Chase; Janosik, the story of a Czechoslovakian Robin Hood; The
Wedding of Palo (Lapland); Across Africa and Yellow Cruise, two documentary
films of high calibre. Accompanying these features were short subjects, among
them a group illustrating the different sections of a symphony orchestra. Several
of a technical nature were also included.
The Society undertook the publication of a bi-monthly magazine, Films on
Parade, which attempted to present reviews of the better films then showing in
the city. It was edited by Dick Jarvis, with the assistance of Ann Jeremy and
Irene Eedy. Roy Jackson was responsible for publication and distribution.
The Metropolitan Opera House broadcasts were reproduced in the Auditorium
under the auspices of the Society. Work on the Documentary film was continued with the view of completing it in 1940.
The executive for the season of  1938-39 was:  President,  Dick Jarvis;  Vice-
president, Alice Mather; Secretary, Honor Vincent; Treasurer, Adam Reid.
In holding the conviction that life has meaning and values and in presenting
Christ as the way of realizing the fullness of this life ,the Student Christian
Movement bears an important witness on the campus.
Study groups this year have dealt with such widely different subjects as "Psychology and Life," "Contemporary Leadership," "Life of Jesus," "Old and
New Testaments," "Social Adjustment," "Co-operatives," and "Social Reconstruction."
Attendance in the groups has been higher than ever before with a total registration exceeding two hundred. Monthly firesides, weekly vesper services,
"Student Sunday' in Vancouver Churches, and numerous social events were
also part of the S. C. M. program. In addition to this, assistance has been
given to such university projects as "National Scholarships" and "Far-Eastern
Relief."
Three  camps were held  during  the year,  a  weekend  retreat  in  October and
February and a full week at Gambier island following the April exams.
The "Living Creeds" experimental group which  is composed of Catholic and
Protestant students has had a most successful year.
The Student Christian Movement's 1938-39 executive compromised the following: Dr. L. S. Klinck, Hon. President; Mr. A. E. Jukes, Chairman of the
Advisory Board; R H. Tillman, General Secretary; Bob Henderson, President;
Frances Montgomery, Ernest Bishop, Sheila Hutchinson, Stan Bailey, Charlie
Richmond, Jack Ewen, Hazel Dunbar and Jack Mercer, executive members.
BOB   HENDERSON
FRANCES MONTGOMERY
ERNEST BISHOP
SHEILA  HUTCHINSON
STANLEY BAILEY
HAZEL DUNBAR
STUDENTS*
CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
Page One Hundred and Fifty-six Harold  Rome and  Alex MacDonald
—half   the   "Big   Four."
Betty  Blakely Darrell Braidwood
"I came to University to —polished,  unruffled,
be better than other
people."
Prof.   J.   Friend   Day
—Critic par excellence
The Parliamentary Forum started this session with a heavy program facing it, and a startling slogan—"This is the Forum's Greatest Year."
As events soon proved, the Forum's year was great, and its program
well carried out.
Thanks to the efforts of President Belkin, the Vancouver Debating League
was initiated. Embracing eight organizations, including the Forum, it
has promoted debating enthusiasm throughout the city. During the
session, the Forum debated such clubs as the Young Liberals, the
Knights of Columbus, and the Junior Board of Trade.
Starring in these forensic contests were such big guns of the Forum as
Paul Volpe, Darrell Braidwood, Don McGill, Bob Hayman, Harold Rome
and Alex Macdonald. The Forum did not come out first, but it landed
very near the top.
In September, Alex Macdonald and Harold Rome met the touring Australians, Hugh Robson and Fred Thoneman, who were victorious in an exciting debate, and a novelty Negro team from Lemoyne College, Tenn.
talked and joked Bob Hayman and Morris Belkin out of a victory in
November.
In January, the Forum put forth its Big Four: Harold Rome, Alex Macdonald, Struan Robertson, and Morris Belkin. The occasion was the
McGoun Cup Contest. Rome and Macdonald went to Winnipeg, and
carried off the honors. Robertson and Belkin stayed at home to meet
Alberta; they lost the debate, but not the sympathy of the audience,
The Cup now goes from U.B.C. to Saskatchewan.
February saw Belkin and Robertson packing bags to go to California.
At Palto Alto, they lost, but they had the upper hand in a symposium at
Berkeley. The Forum hopes these trips to the sunny Orange State will
be a regular activity in the future.
Another victory of the session was that of Paul Volpe and Frank Wiggs
over a man-woman duo from the University of California, in January.
The laurels were a surprise package, but the Forum team did an excellent
job of verbal charging.
•
PROF. J. FRIEND DAY
MORRIS BELKIlN
ALEX MacDONALD
DONALD McTAGGART
DONALD McGILL
HAROLD ROME
Page One Hundred and Fifty-seven BACK ROW:  Elaine McKinnon, Anne Underhill,  Bill Johnson,   Duncan   Pitman,   Paul  Nicholson,  George  Glass,   John
Deleen,  Jim  McCullough,   Aileen  McKinnon.
SITTING:  Robert Morris,  Bob Murray,  Frank  Hills,  Harold Graham, Carl Johnson,  Bill  Kaypak, Mel  Oughton.
ARTHUR W. DELAMONT
GEORGE GLASS
BOB MURRAY
OSBORNE DURKIN
AILEEN McKINNON
DONALD COLWELL
Owing to the ability of its active organizer and president, Osborne
Durkin, and under the capable baton of that world-famous conductor,
Mr. Arthur W. Delamont, the University Band was successfully established
on the campus this year.
From the time of its first appearance at the Homecoming Pep Meet on
October 22nd, the Band played faithfully every Saturday afternoon for
Canadian Football games. According to a certain professor of Psychology,
the Band helped, more than once, in putting across a winning touchdown. And it undoubtedly increased attendance at the Stadium.
During the spring term the Band cooperated with the Mamooks in
putting over Pep Meetings, and Friday nights found Mr. Delamont and
the boys out at the Forum, adding their martial airs to the cacophony
of ringing skates and clashing hockey sticks.
As a matter of fact, the Band was a very worthwhile adjunct to the
athletic set-up all year. On the Victoria invasion the boys were worked
overtime, and it was here that the Band did its first real bit of exhibition marching. All indications are that the Band did much to revive
the waning "school spirit" of apathetic students.
Plans for next season include new uniforms, noon-hour concerts, a complete library of music, and the addition of many new members. Bandsmen
who return in the fall will be wearing blue sweaters and block letters
awarded for their service this year, and it is hoped that freshmen will
find this added incentive to join the Band.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-eight THE LAW SOCIETY IN ACTION
LAW     SOCIETY
The Law Society, one of the most active clubs on the campus, has completed its first
year in a very successful manner. It was organized in March, 1938, by a group of undergraduates who felt the vital need to provide some pre-legal training and association, in the
absence of a law faculty, for those intending to enter the legal profession.
During the year, the policy was adopted of inviting foremost lawyers in the various fields
of the profession, to address the members. Those invited up to the end of January were:
R. H. Tupper, R. L. Maitland, K.C., Dr. Ivor Jennings, D. E. McTaggart, M. Grossman;
in addition to several younger members of the bar.
Another portion of the educational training consisted of the members participating themselves in intra-society debates, and in the presentation of short addresses on various legal
topics. Those participating in the debates were: D. McGill and R. Smith on "Abolition of
Privy Council appeals"; and M. Davis and A. Delany on "Lawyers and Politics."
In the Mock Trial held in November, plaintiff was Donald McGill; defendant, Elmer Jones
Counsel for plaintiff were: Alexander Sharp and Morris Belkin; Counsel for defense were:
Bernard Reed and Paul Volpe. An eight-man jury rendered in favour of the defendant.
Mr. R. H. Tupper, presided as judge.
The membership of the Society, which is limited to upper year students, consists of
twenty-eight members. The honorary president is R. H. Tupper. The executive consists
of Bernard Reed, president, Robert C. Smith, vice-president, Donald McTaggart, secretary,
Darrell Braidwood, education-director.
BERNARD REED
BOB SMITH
DON   McTAGGART DARRELL BRAIDWOOD
Page One Hundred and Fifty-nine 0
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Hail
jL*_
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. >£.-.-•:     ~ . -
The C.O.T.C. at Victoria
The University of B. C. Contingent of the Canadian Officers
Training Corps passed through a very successful period during
the season 1938-39. The enrolment has increased slightly and
greater efficiency and smartness has been gained by all the
ranks, in drill, musketry, and in all technical courses.
Musketry practice was carried on every Sunday before Christmas at Blair Range, North Vancouver, and some very fine scares
were recorded. The Inter-University Competition was fired
during November. During the spring term practice has been
carried on in the Miniature Range in the Arts Building every
noon hour, using the .22 calibre match rifle.
During the Christmas holidays 55 members of the unit went
over to Work Point Barracks, Esquimalt, B. C, for training.
The unit was commanded again this year by Colonel G. M.
Shrum and he lent his enthusiastic support to all Corps activities. The Medical Officer, Major Lamont, also took a great
interest in the unit this year. Q.M.S.I. Smith of the P.P.C.L.I.
is still with us, and it is due to his never failing energy that
the Corps enjoys the success it does.
The Corps lost one of its most enthusiastic members this year
in the death of Corporal J. C. Keller. He was very keen in all
his duties and was greatly interested in rifle shooting.
During the year two Commissions were granted—R.S.M. Locke
and C.Q.M.S. Robertson becoming Second Lieutenants. Second
Lieutenants Holland, Hand, Griffin, and Jones were granted
the rank of Lieutenant. Other officers are Lieutenants Layard,
Morley, Dickie, and attached officers Lieut. Ohlson, Second
Lieuts. Roberts, Kamoff-Nicolfsky and Clarke.
COLONEL G. M. SHRUM
Page One Hundred and Sixty Scenes—On Parade, On the Range, In the Trench, At Victoria-
and top right, note Q.M.S.I. Smith of the P.P.C.LI.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-ona BACK: Hugh Livingstone, Arthur Rae, Kenneth Burnham,   Gladstone Ryan, Roy Durkin, Pat Keatley, Norman Tudding-
ham, John McCarley, Dale Rumble.
FRONT:   Frank Proud, Allan Hamilton, Robert Kincaid,  (secretary), Kenneth Shaw   (president),  Russell Palmer, Robert
Gaul.
Here are the men behind the Pep Meets, the oracles of
the cafeteria, the lads of the megaphone and white sweater
—Mamooks.
Energetic mainstay of the Club, Ken Shaw led the Mamooks
through the turmoil of Home-coming week-end and the
Victoria Invasion, the year's two major successes. Aided
by Vice-prexy Pat Keatley and Secretary, Bob Kincade,
they presented the 12 star-studded Pep Meets featuring
the town's smoothest orchestras, including sweet swingster
Mart Kenny.
"Service" is the Club motto. Daily the Mamooks paint
and distribute all the signs on the campus, give Caf. announcements, and have men on tap for anything from
ticket selling and grandstand ushering to yell leading and
decorating.
B;g innovation this year was the re-organization of the
Club. Formerly known as the Pepsters, the new name
Mamooks was chosen as being the Indian word for "helper,"
or "right hand man." The Indian motif is being carried
out fully. Insignia is the Varsitv Thunderbird in brilliant
colour, Club officers are known by the Squamish equivalent, and Club mascots are to be two totem poles carved
and painted by Chief Mathias, Capilano.
The Greeks are co-operating. This year for the first time
every fraternity on the campus has a member in the
Mamooks. These are: G. Ryan, H. Livinqstone, H. Robertson, D. Rumble, A. Rae, D. McLean, R. Durkin. This new
status has greatly enlarged the scope of the Club's services,
and plus the favourable press comments, plus the sizzling
enthusiasm of the members themselves, it assures us that
'38-'39 has been the biggest year yet for the Mamooks.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-two The American Institute of Electrical Engineers
The U. B. C. Branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers was introduced
on the Campus in the fall of 1930. The main object of the branch is to enable students
to gain experience in the presentation and discussion of technical papers. As enrolled
students of the Institute, members may attend meetings of the Vancouver Section as well.
Membership in the Student Branch is limited to students in fourth and fifth years of
Electrical Engineering. Generally, speakers are students, although at several meetings each
year the group is addressed by Engineers from the several large electrical firms in the city.
Frequently these addresses are illustrated by moving pictures or slides. Once a year
the Student Branch holds a joint meeting with the Vancouver Section in the Auditorium of
the Medical & Dental Building, all papers being presented by students.
To date this session, the group has visited the C. B. R. transmitter on Lulu Island, the
Dominion Government Wireless Station at Steveston, the B. C. Electric Mercury Arc Rectifying Station on 41st Avenue and Dunbar Street, the Ford Assembly Plant, and the B. C.
Electric Steam Plant.    Other trips are planned.
Chairman of the group is Mr. J. E. Breeze, Vice-Chairman is R. L. Duke, Secretary-
Treasurer is A. L. Sutton, while M. Fraresso is Junior Member.
The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
This is a new society, having been formed in the spring of 1938, with the aim of giving
its members an increased knowledge of practical engineering and of public speaking as
well as to promote social activities. Membership is limited to students registered in or
definitely intending to register in Mechanical Engineering.
The executive for the year consisted of: Professor Vernon, Honorary Chairman; Roy
A. Phillips, Chairman; Harold Morris, Vice-Chairman; Donald A. Stewart. Sec'y-Treasurer.
Two field trips have been held to date, including the Ford Assembly Plant in Burnaby
and the Vivian Engine Works. The Club enjoyed speeches by Mr. Walter Lind, and Mr.
Thomas, both of the Canadian General Electric Co. Ltd., and of Dr. MacLeod, head of the
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.
From among the talks given by the students themselves, the Honorary Chairman is
intending to select two suitable papers for presentation at the Northwest Convention of
the student   branches to be held at Corvallis in March.
The Biological Discussion Club
This year was one of the best in the history of the club both in numbers and in enthusiasm.
The first meeting of the year was held at the home of Dr. C. McLean Fraser where a social
evening was enjoyed. The other meetings, held at the homes of members of the club and
faculty, were addressed by various students.
These talks included "Ticks in B. C," by Colin Curtis, and "Dialectical Materialism
in Biological Research," by Gordon Gray. The final meeting of the Autumn term was Biological Observations night in which all the members of the club took part.
The spring term was also very interesting in respect to meetings. The addresses
included "Plague" by John Poole, "Bird Landing and Migrating Flight" by Don Buckland.
Another feature of this term was the Annual  Symposium.
Membership in this club is confined to students of the upper years who are interested
in the'Biological sciences. The executive of the club was as follows: Hon. President, Dr.
McLean Fraser; President, Elmer A. Jones; Vice President, Marion Bucker; Secretary-
treasurer, Ottilie Boyd, and Curator, Harold Dickson.
La Canadienne
"La Canadienne" is one of two clubs on the campus whose object is to promote a
knowledge of French speech and customs.
Graduation forced the club to start virtually from scratch last September, but an influx of
eager, new membeijf.has helped make the year a very successful one.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-four First organized in 1924 at the University of California, Phrateres
has founded chapters in Pacific Coast universities from New
Mexico to Canada. Theta was founded at the University of British
Columbia in 1935 by Clare M. Brown.
The purpose of Phrateres is to extend a spirit of good-will and
friendliness to all women students on the campus. There are over
two hundred initiated members on the campus as well as the
Alumnae Association. The chapter is divided into six sub-chapters,
each with its own executive to carry on its work.
All-Phrateres programme for the year included the annual initiation ceremony and banquet, the annual dance, the roller-skating
party, the Faculty tea, and a variety of smaller parties sponsored
by the sub-chapters. Philanthropic work consisted of a number
of hampers at Christmas, and throughout the term.
Each year the sub-chapters compete for the challenge cup, donated
by Clare Brown, points being given for Phrateres intramurals,
academic standings and attendance at meetings.
Dean M. L. Bollert is honorary president. Officers for this year:
Biddy McNeill, President; Sheilah Hutchinson, Vice-President;
Catherine Carr, Recording Secretary; Jean McFayden, Treasurer;
Betty Thomas, Corresponding Secretary; Adrienne Collins, Publicity; Molly Field, Historian.
DEAN M. L. BOLLERT
Page One Hundred and Sixty-three Among the speakers we have had the pleasure of hearing  have been Miss E.  Hauston,
Miss L. Greig, Dr. Aish and Miss S. Boyles.
Prospects    in    store   for   the   spring    include a French playlet, "Les Deux Timides," put
on in conjunction with "Le Cercle Francais,"    and a gala   closing banquet   for the end of
March.
"La  Canadienne"  greatly appreciates  the    friendly   guidance   extended    to    it    by    the
Honorary-President, Dr. Dallas.    The executive for the year was: Doris Kemp, President;
Elizabeth   Birnie,   Vice-President;   Jean   Johnston, Treasurer;  Sam  Rothstein, Secretary.
Le Cercle Francais
This is one organization which will warrant close observation. Continued progress
similar to that of the last year or two will put "Le Cercle Francais" on top in the L.S.E.
Programmes ranged from talks on art, music (thanks to genial Dr. Clarke), evening of
songs by Mrs. Black, chats on Parisian life by Dr. Dangelzer and Miss Boyles, to games
and songs by the members and the production of a comedy, "Les Deux Timides," with
"La Canadienne." The Dolphin with this last, a really climactic closing to a successful
year.
Specially must be mentioned the organization of a musical group, and the visit of
M. Gallat, the French consul, who captivated everyone with his truly French charm.
In fact, overwhelming enthusiasm on all sides, with one regretful note — Dr. Tipping,
our charming and popular Honorary President, leaves this year. Tout bonheur! Dr. Tipping—you have given the club inspiration and aspirations it will never forget. Au revoir!
The executive for this year was: Honorary President, Dr. Tipping; President, Mary
G. Eacrett; Vice President, Mavis Eastham; Secretary, Eileen Burke; Treasurer, Margaret J.
MacKenzie.
The Chemistry Society
The minute book dates back to 1916. The first membership of eighteen has grown
with the university. The membership has to be necessarily restricted to only those students taking at least third year chemistry. The aim of this society is to promote and
encourage interest in topics of scientific nature among the students. This year we also
emphasized the standing invitation to the professors of Chemistry to attend our closed
meetings, in order that the members might meet, in an informal manner, men in the
chemical professions.
Speakers at the open meetings in the past year have so far included Dr. Warren of
the Geology Department, Mr. C. A. Hedreen, head of the Research Department in the
Canadian Fisheries Company, Mr. W. H. Hill of the Food and Drug Division, Department
of National Health.
Well-attended closed meetings were addressed by John MacDermot, Carol Menchions,
Philip Griffin, Marvin Darrack, Ralph Patterson, Alec McCarter, Charlie Brewer, Dr.
Archibald.
Executive for the year consisted of: Hon. President, Dr. Archibald; President, Wheeler
Govier;  Vice-President and Treasurer,  Ken Shaw; Secretary, Eva Dimock.
The Chinese Students' Club
The Chinese Students' Club is organized to promote friendly and closer relations among
Chinese students and to foster international good-will among the various campus organizations.
The social highlights of the year included a Frosh Reception, a New Year's Party, a Reunion
Banquet and a Graduation Banquet.
Working in conjunction with the Vancouver Chinese Youth Association, the club assisted in
the presentation of a broadcast over one of the local stations in January.
We were very privileged this year to have as our first speaker, Dr. Grant Lathe, national
secretary of the Canadian Students' Assembly. For this occasion the club sponsored an open
meeting to which all Chinese youths of the city were invited.
The executive for the academic year 1938-1939 is as follows:
President, Chak F. Lui; Vice-president, Frank Chin; Secretary, Ruth Leung; Treasurer,
Howard Yip; Social Convenor, Sun Yip.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-five Cosmopolitan Club
The Cosmopolitan Club is unique in itself in the fact that practically all the nationalities
on the Campus are represented in its membership.
The  purpose  of  this organization   is  to  bring   together  these  different  people  in  order
that they may become better acquainted with each other.
Club  membership  is open  to any  student desirous  of  furthering  better  understanding
between  the students of different nationalities.
Meetings  are  held  Sunday afternoons once every  month  at which  speakers are  invited
to talk on some of the more interesting and important aspects of their native culture.
Some of the prominent speakers this year have been  Rev.   Ivan Wong,  Chinese Pastor,
Rabbi Cass, and Mr. F. Tornroos, Consul for Finland.
The executive for the year was: Honorary President, Dr. C. W. Topping;  President, Ted
Nichols; Vice-President, Kunio Hidaka; Secretary, Yoshio Hyodo; Treasurer, Pit Desjardins.
G. M. Dawson Society
The purpose of this club is to study problems in geology, mining and metallurgy. Membership qualifications require a student member to have taken two geology subjects and one
summer's practical work, or four courses in geology. This year's activities included meetings where the guest speakers were technical men with experience in these professions.
Two meetings, however, were given over to the club members when interesting papers were
given and moving pictures shown. Also a very successful banquet was held at the end of
the year. ;
The executive for 1938-1939 was: President, R. G. McElhanney; Vice-President, W. O. Williams;   Secretary-Treasurer,  J.   Lamb;   and   Honorary President, Prof. J. M. Turnbull.
The Forest Club
The object of this club is to familiarize its members with the problems confronting
the practicing Forester and Logger. Fourth and Fifth year students only have been eligible
for membership in the past, with associate membership for students in the lower years.
With changes in the Forestry curriculum, eligibility has now been extended to include
Arts and Commerce students intending to go into Forestry.
Guest speakers for this session have included such prominent men as Mr. G. Ternon,
now Assistant District Forester at Vancouver and one time Varsity rugby star, and Mr. R.
V. Stewart, Secretary of the B. C. Loggers Association. Official films were also shown of
the British Lumber Delegation's trip through B. C.
The most important business carried on this session has been the efforts of the Executive to bring about an affiliation between all the Student Forest Clubs of Canada and
the Canadian Society of Forest Engineers. The Forest Clubs of the University of Toronto
and the University of New Brunswick expressed interest in the plan and a petition has
been sent to the Canadian Society of Forest  Engineers asking for affiliation.
The 1938-39 executive was as follows: Honorary President, B. G. Griffith, M.A.,
M.F.; President, G. W. Minns; Vice-President, H. M. Pogue; Secretary, J. P. Custance;
and Treasurer, A. H. Dixon.
lerman
Club
There were between twenty-five and thirty members at each of the meetings of the
German Club held every second week. German games are played and German Lieder
sung. A part of each programme is devoted to more informative subjects—usually an
illustrated  lecture on  some phase  of German life or culture.
Doctor Maclnnes is Honorary President, and Doctor Hallamore the Honorary Vice-
President. Members on the executive are: President, Joanne Brown; Vice-President, Lu-
cile Letham, and Secretary-Treasurer, Jack Rush.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-six The   Historical  Society
The Historical Society is composed of twenty upper year students either honoring or
especially interested in history.
The programme this year consisted of papers given by fourth year members on Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Jugo Slavia, and Rumania. In addition panel discussions were
held during the fall term on Canadian Foreign Policy and on Federal-Provincial Relationships; and during the spring term on Labour under the New Deal, and on the Situation
in Central  Europe.
The executive consisted of: Honorary President, Dr. W. N. Sage; President, Norman
Beattie;  Vice-President,  Elizabeth A.  Stewart, and Secretary-Treasurer, Bob Boroughs.
International  Relations  Club
The aim of this society is to promote among the undergraduates an informal study of international affairs. It's membership is open to registered students who have a complete first
year standing of at least second class honours.
Dr. W. I. Jenings inaugurated the year's programme with a survey of the members of the
British House of Commons. Rabbi Cass addressed the club upon the Jewish problem in
Palestine. Professor J. B. Irving spoke on his stay in England, and Professor F. H. Soward
concluded the fall term by telling of his recent trip to Australia and the Commonwealth
Conference.
Dr. Crumb opened the spring term with his "Machiavelli Returns," and Herr Alphonse Oeterle
gave a report on "Education, Socialism and Economics in Nazi Germany."
The executive for the year was:
Honorary President, F. H. Soward; President, Don G. Pyle; Vice-President, Don Sage; Secretary, Kathleen Riley; and Treasurer, Elizabeth Stewart.
The  Japanese  Students' Club
Originally formed as a social-educational organization the Japanese Students' Club
had as its primary objects the promotion of higher learning, unity and goodwill among its
members, and better understanding with Canadian students of other racial origins.
At an informal games-and-dance party at the Harmony Hall, Japanese-Canadian freshmen and freshettes were initiated into the club. In an attempt to bridge the gap between
the members and their purely Japanese-speaking parents a parent-student social gathering
was held in the fall. As a means of creating interest in public speaking the J. S. C. in
February  sponsored  an  oratorical   contest  for  Japanese-Canadian   High   School   Students.
The executive headed by Kenji Kitamura retains the enthusiastic support of 52 members in carrying out this ambitious program. Other faithful members of the executive are,
Eiko Henmi, Vice-President; Yoshiko Momose, Secretary; Kazuhiko Oyama, Corresponding Secretary; Henry Ide, Treasurer; Kiyosh i Kato and Luke Tanabe, Social Convenors;
Roy Shinobu, Freshman Representative.
The Letters Club
Founded in 1918, the Letters Club is the oldest discussion club on the campus. The
Club is by no means intended solely for the benefit of English Honours students but welcomes members from all departments of the University. The only qualification a member needs is a lively interest in literature and a desire to express it.
The Club membership is limited to twenty full members and four associate members
(twelve men and twelve women) from the third and fourth years. At the meetings, held
every two weeks, the fourth year members present written papers which are afterwards
discussed by the whole club. The year's papers are then bound and presented to the
Library where they are available for general use in the Art Room. At one meeting during
the term members submit original  contributions in prose and poetry.
The Club has been exceedingly fortunate in having Mr. Larsen for its Honorary President.
This   year's    executive    is:     Robert apRoberts,   President;   Marion  Vance,  Secretary,  and
William Sibley, Archivist.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-seven The  Mathematics  Club
The Mathematics Club aims to stimulate interest in the general field of Mathematics.
Membership is limited to twenty-five undergraduates, taking at least one of the honour
courses each.
Meetings are held bi-monthly at the homes of Faculty and club members. The speakers
have been Dr. Nowlan, Dr. Hall, Mr. Brand, and Mr. Free. As an innovation this year there
is a competition for the best paper.
Executive members are as follows: Hon. President, Dean Buchanan; Hon. Vice Presidents, Dr. F. S. Nowlan, Dr. R. Hull, Dr. Fisher, Mr. Richardson, Mr. Gage, Mr. Brand;
President,  D.  Manders; Vice  President, Miss  M. Murphy; Secretary-Treasurer, T. Pepper'
Monro Pre-Medical Club
The Monro Pre-Medical Club, founded in memory of Dr. Alexander Stewart Monro, by
whose will the University is to receive $80,000.00 for medical research, will have completed
six years of activity in the spring of 1939. At the first dinner meeting in October, a committee was appointed to do three things:
To aid club members in selection of courses to cover the requirements of the school in which
they intend to study;
To study and consolidate the pre-medical requirements of all Canadian Universities in co-operation with a similar faculty committee;
To investigate the possibility of establishment of the two pre-clinical years of medicine at
U.B.C. by revision of existing courses and addition of certain others.
The first two goals were reached. In connection with the third, the major project of the
club, it was found that with the revision of the courses in histology, embryology, biochemistry, physiology and the addition of a course in anatomy, the first two years of medicine
could be established at this university.
The club also held meetings throughout the year which were addressed by outstanding
medical men. Sir Frederick Banting also spoke at the University under the auspices of the
Pre-Medical Club. i
Other activities of the club  included  a survey of the Vancouver General  Hospital, and a
Health Week Campaign during the week February 6th to 1 1th, inclusive.
The executive members are:
President, John McLaren;   Vice-President, Joe  Pearce;   Secretary-Treasurer,  Marion  Reid.
The  Newman  Club
The aim of this club is to bring together all Catholic students, who automatically become members on registration, on a threefold basis namely religious, intellectual, and
social.
This year the club became affiliated with the Newman Club Federation whose headquarters are at the University of Pennsylvania. Delegates were sent to the annual conference of the Northwest Province of the Federation held at the University of Washington,
Dec. 27-30. Following the precedence of last year the Living Creeds Group was convened
in conjunction with the Student Christian Movement. On February 2 a dinner was held
at Deutschland Cafe, and on February 29 a sfmposium, Flaming Youth, was enacted by
several of the members.
The executive of the last year were: Honorary President, Mr. J. M. Candy (on the death
of Mrs. Le Fevre); Chaplain, Father William Enright, C.S.R.; President, Bob Boroughs; Vice
President, Catherine Carr; Recording Secretary Brookes Costello; Corresponding Secretary,
Nancy Carr; Treasurer, Charlie Nash; Junior Committee, Des Morin, Molly Glen and Betty
Hughes.
The Physical Society
The  object  of   the   Physical   Society   is  to  provide   for   its   members   the  opportunity  to
give,  hear and discuss papers on  subjects of interest to students in Physics.
Membership   is   automatic   for   Honor  Students   in   Physics   and   open   to   Junior,   Senior
and Graduate Physics students.
Speakers during the year included Dr. C. D. Ellis of King's College, London, Dr. H. D.
Smith, Gordon Retallack, T. D. Newton, Dr. K. C. Mann, D. Manders --nd W. N. English.
Dr. G. M. Shrum is Honorary President. Honorary Vice President is Dr. A. M. Crooked-
President, W. M. Barss; Vice President, J. G.   Retallack, and R. E. Bell, Secretary Treasurer.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-eight Political  Discussions  Club
The object of the Political Discussions Club is to provide a democratic forum for the discussion of all phases of political matters.
The Honourable Mr. Speaker, Darrell Braidwood, had his work cut out to maintain order
when members became excited over matters of debate. The Secretary, Mr. Frank R. Wiggs,
often tried to mimic "Hansard" during a lively debate when some half dozen orators chose
to speak simultaneously.
Amongst the more active members were Mr. Donald McGill, leading the die-hard philosophers and his opponent, Mr. Bernard Reed, leading the "middle of the road" adherents. Mr.
Harold Rome and Mr. Ernest Bishop were responsible for introducing many of the progressive motions. \
The Club was fortunate to be able to present several   outstanding   speakers   to   the   student
body.    Amongst these speakers was Dr. R. J.  Manion, Leader of the Loyal Opposition of
His Majesty in the House of Commons.
The Executive for 1938-1939 consisted of:
Honourary President,  Professor  Ivor Jennings of the London School of Economics.
Speaker, Darrell  Braidwood.   Secretary, Frank R. Wiggs.   Treasurer, Miss Gloria Trusswell.
Faction Leaders, R. Semple, Donald McGill, Bernard Reed, Harold Rome and Paul Volpe.
The Psychology Club
The Psychology Club has a membership of some thirty active and interested members.
Its aim is to discuss psychological topics of primary interest. Membership demands only
an  elementary  course   in   psychology
For the first time this year the club is represented on the major L.S.E. Many interesting
speakers were enjoyed during the year, such as Mrs. Morsh on "Infant Testing"
and Rev. Hobden who spoke on "After the Penitentiary, What?" The latter spoke at one
of the open meetings at which everyone is welcome. A banquet at the Deutschland late
in January added a social interest.
The officers for the year are: Dr. J. E. Morsh, Official Critic of Psychology; Mr. Irving,
Official Critic of Philosophy; Mr. Bill Sibley, President; Miss Betty McKinnon, Vice President; Miss Hazel Dunbar, Corresponding Secretary; Mr. Frank McNair, Recording Secretary Treasurer; Miss Emily Fraser, Publicity Manager.
The University Branch, B. C Teachers' Federation
The aim of the University Branch of the B. C. T. F. is to bring together in a social and
professional organization members of the education class and those teachers who have
returned to the University. Members of this branch enjoy all the privileges possessed by
other local, affiliated organizations of the province.
Speakers this year have been: Mr. Charlesworth, Mr. MacCorkindale, Mrs. Dalmage,
Mrs. Halberg, Captain Barrie, Professor Soward, Professor Jennings, and Rabbi Cass
Executive: Honorary President, Professor Ira Dilworth; President, Stan Bailey; Vice
President, Lome Kersey; Secretary Treasurer, Doris Turnbull; Committee Members Elspeth
Lintott, Adam Reid.
Varsity Christian Union
The V.C.U. is an inter-denominational group of students whose aim it is to provide a
focus for Christian fellowship and to make a declaration of a personal faith in Christ as a
living Saviour.
The group has social activities which take the form of firesides, dinners, and a fall and
spring week-end conference in conjunction with the University of Washington and other
Pacific Coast colleges. The group took part in services in six churches. The scope of these
activities have been greatly increased by financial assistance of the Alma Mater Society.
The theme of the fall programme included a series, "What Can a University Student
Believe," under the leadership of Rev. W. Ellis, M.A., B.D., and Mr. J. Forrester, B.A.
The executive for this year: Robert D. McAllister, President; Marian J. Younger, Vice
President; Mary Beaton, Secretary; David W. Ellis, Treasurer; Greta fijce, Publicity. '
Page One Hundred and Sixty-nine As the Catiboo district became more heavily
populated/ and as the transcontinental railway
began to take shape, the possibilities of British
■"-*-—*■»-*- -•-*—^ $«ade soon-appeared to be
trade Had give* the ishippi
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Money Granted for
i       Memorial
DOROTHY CUMMINGS
Editor-in-Chief of the Publications Board
Few people realize that during the session 1938-39
some forty issues of the official bi-weekly newspaper of the Alma Mater Society, the Ubyssey, appeared on the Campus. Fewer people realize that
the publication of the Ubyssey entails a vast amount
of simply incredible work, generally carried on in
one or both of two places, the "Pub" Office, or the
printer's establishment—which is called "Press."
It would require a book to inform the innocent of
all the activities of the various departments of the
paper, but the most important thing is to toss the
odd bouquet about.
Under the direction of Dorothy Cummings, Editor-
in-Chief, the Ubyssey enjoyed a sparkling year,
carefully sending down to posterity those whom
Fate chose to initiate schemes and campaigns on
the Campus.
Senior editors, Irene Eedy and Jack Mair, wrestled
with the annual problems of page set-ups and type
faces, overset and underset, late copy, rushed
cuts . . . and the result you have seen, forty issues
all on schedule.
Sport Editor, Ormond Dier, led his staff through a
most successful session of unintelligible wordage, ORMOND DIER
IRENE EEDY
JACK MAIR
which was printed twice a week on the back of the
Ubyssey. But  it  is   significant  that  the Sport
page dialect is becoming easier to read since it
ceased to include the more difficult Arabic terms.
Basil Robinson was a skillful Associate editor.
Associate editors were Rosemary Collins and Lester
Pronger, and Ted Underhill who was Associate after
Christmas, and the Assistant editors included:
Osborne Durkin, Florence Hurndall, Helen Hann,
Joan Thompson, and Bill Backman, with Lionel Salt,
Jim Harmer, Austin Frith, and Charles Craig assisting the Sport Department.
The head of the other department on the Ubyssey,
the Canadian Universities Press, was James Macfarlane, who made an excellent name for himself
and the paper with his numerous dispatches to the
other Universities. Joyce Cooper, Van Perry and
Ann Jeremy performed admirably as C.U.P. assistants.
The Reportorial staff was large and enthusiastic,
giving very active support to their Chief, Dorothy.
There is one way to describe the year of the Ubyssey,
a way which includes the traditional Pub functions
(brawls and teas), the customary pub noise, mess
(old bottles and broken china a specialty) ... a
merrily successful session.
MYRNE   NEVISON,   BASIL   ROBINSON,   ROSEMARY   COLLINS,
and LESTER PRONGER   Associate
JIM MACFARLANE   Communicates T0TEI11
JOHN GARRETT,  Editor
Working in an atmosphrere of London fog generated by the Victoria-British vowels of Editor Johnnie
Garrett, the 1939 Totem staff made good their promise to bring this book to the campus in "plenty
of time." Mr. Garrett, with the characteristic
tenacity of his race, gave orders, set dead-lines,
wrote captions and stories, supervised compilation,
and, when it was all over, did a considerable amount
of back-slapping. You now have the result before
your eyes—and you'll agree that this Totem is the
best yet. Incidentally, if you're wondering, Johnnie
managed to get through in his academic work.
Don't ask us how he did it. . .
A college annual is nothing without pictures—and
the Totem would be nothing without Carter Hanbury. Carter was undoubtedly the most unconcerned
man on the staff—about everything except chiselling dance tickets. This veteran campus photographer is the only person we ever saw who could
hang a camera around his neck and still look good
Page One Hundred and Seventy-four OSBORNE DURKIN
LEE   STRAIGHT
HARRY CAMPBELL
in dress clothes. But a pocketful of flash bulbs
has its disadvantages ... or has it?
Osborne ("Ozzy") Durkin, Associate Editor, caused
Johnnie a lot of sleepless nights. Ozzy had a nasty
way of avoiding—or ignoring—deadlines, and finished his Totem work only when he could no longer
stand the insults of printers, engravers, and Garrett.
He did his best work in writing features and training the boss to drink Coke.
In charge of the elaborate Sport section was the
very stable Lee Straight, Sport Editor of other years.
His chief delight apeared to be causing complete
confusion in the editor's mind by keeping the various piles of Sport "copy" a secret, until shortly after
each deadline. But his work was always complete,
and the proof of his pudding is in the Athletics
Section. His energetic assistant was Stanley Durkin, brother to the stalwart Osborne.
The mountains of written material for all ye clubbes
CARTER HANBURY
Page One Hundred and Seventy-five JOHN  STARK
GEORGE  AVERY
and societies were cared for by Harry Campbell, also
a member of the Totem Staff from other eras. He
was assisted by many beautiful Freshettes, such as
Pat Carey and Dorothy Stamatis, who performed
nobly amongst lists of names in addition to the
above work.
The editor must mention Helen Hann, Virginia
Galloway, George Kirby, John Carson and Cicely
Holmes for their respective parts in the production
of the book, and must thank them most heartily.
Amen.
Possibly the greatest innovation in the realms of the
Totem, excluding the book and its immediate
affairs, was the re-organization of the department
of Totem Finances.    Appointed as Minister of Fin
ance was genial Jack Stark who gurgled his way to
new records with dollars and cents.
His Editor having placed him in front of the largest
budget of all time, Jack proceeded to sell pages of
advertising and thousands of books. He induced
George Avery to assist with the Sales Department,
and together they appear to have been successful.
The advertising, sold this year by students, reaped
a harvest of well nigh a thousand dollars, whilst
the sales ascended to a similar four figure mark.
The results of the year's financial activity, although
not devoid of heart-aches and headaches, was most
encouraging, and a wad of congratulations is due to
both these business men.
JOHN   CARSON STAN DURKIN        VIRGINIA GALLOWAY    CICELY HOLMES GEORGE   KIRBY   DOROTHY   STAMATIS
Page Ons Hundred and Seventy-six STUDENTS'
HANDBOOK
THE UNIVERSITY OF
MITISH  COLUMBIA
lfe«CCVtu.LC
STUDENT
DIRECTORY
tow *mmaa.
jutrr w&W
U B C
1638-1930
t
The  results of her efforts
HELEN  HANN
Confucius, sage of the Orient, implied that innovation was a sin, but the Publications Board and
Students' Council collaborated last year and finally
decided to break with the past,—to produce a
Students' Handbook and, in addition, a Student
Directory.
Great was the enthusiasm and great the joy of the
students when the Directory was published, for it
and it alone, was the innovation.
The Handbook was as complete this year as in past
years, and doubtless it assisted many Freshmen in
the days of their Campus infancy.
But the Handbook became the treasured possession
of all and sundry. It supplied addresses and telephone numbers to those who were in search of
"dates", and it proved to be of unending value to
Managers of teams; in fact it is now invaluable.
But the phone numbers are all out of date now
that the new Telephone Directory is out. Another
one must be published next year. That is certain.
But who will be responsible for it, for so few people
are prepared to undertake the work entailed in its
publication?   We shall see.
And that is where the Editor for this year, Helen
Hann, comes in. She did a splendid job this year,
and did not hesitate to plunge headlong into the
vast work of the two books. The students thank
Helen.
Page One Hundred and Seventy-seven Lester,   Len   and  Jack  at  "Press"
Shooting  "copy"  for the Totem
Relaxation   in  the  Pub Office—Joan, Van.  and Jack
Pubsters congregate
Ron  Jackson  drawing  for  the  Totem
The Ubyssey becomes  lead
Page One Hundred and Seventy-eight Dorothy   Cummings   feeds
Irene  Eedy
Harry Campbell . . . plus lunch
Jack   Mair   editorializes
Lee Straight at work
Pub   resorts   to   dice   at
Pub-Council basketball
game
Harold Kent, Totem engraver,   muses  with
Ozzy Durkin
THE PUB
Page One Hundred and Seventy-nine ■ *wti^
\m®&s®i ^.
In 1889 the government of Lord Salisbury gave to the Canadian Pacific a ten-
year contract for the carriage of mails to Hong Kong. Various stipulations
were laid down as to the time required for the trip from Atlantic to Hong
Kong. Consequently T. G. Shaughnessy and Henry Beatty went to England
where they ordered three twin-screw steamships, the Empress of Japan, the
Empress of India, and the Empress of China, from the Naval Construction
and Armaments Company of Barrow. Within a few years the great "white
ships of the Pacific" were in regular service, providing the C.P.R. with a very
substantial source of revenue when railways were in severe financial straits,
and, more important, linking British Columbia with the rapidly developing
trade of the Orient. ATH LET
<-5te~
<£
~m ^ Men's
Athletic
Directorate
CARSON   McGUIRE
RANN  MATTHISON
MAURICE VAN VLIET
DR. G. M. SHRUM
ARTHUR   CLARK
DR.   FRANK  DICKSON
JOHN  PEARSON
In its first year after installation, the Men's
Athletic Directorate has shown a clear improvement over the old Men's Athletic Association.
Rather than being composed of students in the
Association with two faculty members sitting on
the executive, this new directorate is more balanced,
composed of more capable men, and above all, is
more representative of the Alma Mater Society.
It is composed of the following: President of Men's
Athletics, Rann Matthison; President of the Alma
Mater Society, Carson McGuire; Director of Physi
cal Education, Maurice Van Vliet; Faculty Representatives, Dr. Gordon Shrum and Dr. Frank Dickson; Student Representatives, Arthur Clark and
John Pearson.
The Men's Athletic Executive, although still in
existence, sits only in an advisory capacity, and is
in charge of meetings of the Association. Along
with President Matthison and Vice-President Pearson the executive consists of: Secretary, Dick Dowrey and Honorary Presidents, Dean F. M. Clement
and Professor F. Brand.
MEN'S    ATHLETIC    EXECUTIVE
DEAN F. M. CLEMENT       PROF. F. BRAND
RANN MATTHISON
JOHN  PEARSON
DICK DOWREY
Page One Hundred and Eighty-two PEGGY MacLEOD
PAMELA RUNKLE
NELL TRAPP
MARGARET EVANS
President of the Executive this year was Peggy MacLeod, under whose able guidance women's athletics had its usual very successful year. First
Vice-President and in charge of Intra-murals for
the second year in succession was Pamela Runkle;
second vice-president was Nell Trapp; secretary-
treasurer was Margaret Evans.
Representatives of the various women's athletic
clubs were as follows: Janet Fleck, Badminton;
Rosemarie Collins, Basketball; Marjorie Lean, Grass
Hockey; Valerie Gardiner, Swimming.
Class representatives were: Joanne Brown, Arts
'39; Nell Trapp, Arts '40; Betty Muir, Arts '41;
Mary Ann Teagle, Arts '42. Honorary President
was again Mrs. Boving.
WOMEN'S
ATHLETIC
EXECUTIVE
Page One Hundred and Eighty-three MISS MOORE
MAURICE VAN VLIET
Director Maurice Van Vliet has had continued success with his gigantic
Intramural program in spite of the severe handicap of the short, hour-long
noons. i
"Maury" has progressed even farther this year in adding English rugby to
inter-class activities, and with Miss Moore, in adding mixed volleyball to
the list of competitions.
In spite of his pressing work handling the coaching duties of the football,
basketball and track teams, along with his regular classes in the gymnasium,
Mr. Van Vliet has been hard at work on a compulsory physical education
course for first and second year men, and there is every chance that he will
be successful in this latest of his long list of accomplishments.
Miss Moore is, as ever, one of the big helps in all Intra-mural activities. She
continues to do an admirable job of promoting the women's half of the interclass competitions. It was also her excellent coaching that was responsible
for the Archery Team coming second in all-Canada competition.
Then, too, through Miss Moore's co-operation, several hours of badminton
a week are afforded the men, who hitherto had only one hour a week of this
popular pastime.
"St5**"
Page One Hundred and Eighty-four PROF. F. M. KNAPP
JOE RITA
MAURICE  VAN   VLIET
FRANK TURNER
HOWARD McPHEE
RANN MATTHISON
Men's Awards  Committee
The Awards Committee, under the supervision of
the Athletic Directorate, is entrusted with the task
of making awards to those individuals whose performance during the year in athletics has been
considered outstanding.
There has been a major change in the committee
this year, having, instead of the captains from each
major sport as the personel, the following members:
Frank Turner, President of the Big Block Club;
Howard McPhee and Joe Rita, representatives from
the Big Block Club; Rann Matthison, President of
Men's Athletics; Maurice Van Vliet, Director of
Physical Education; Dr. A. A. Hutchinson and F.
M. Knapp, Faculty representatives.
Women's Awards Committee
Continuing the system of awards tried out for the
first time last year, a point system depending on points
awarded for service as well as for ability, the Awards
Committee is composed of eight students and one
Faculty representative.
They are as follows: Betty Fleck, President of the Big
Block Club; Peggy MacLeod, Pamela Runkle and
Margaret Evans, Women's Athletic Executive; Rose-
marie Collins, basketball; Marjorie Lean, grass hockey;
Janet Fleck, badminton; Valerie Gardiner, swimming;
Miss Moore, Physical Education  Instructor.
MISS   MOORE
PAMELA   RUNKLE
MARJORIE LEAN
BETTY FLECK
MARGARET EVANS
JANET FLECK
PEGGY MacLEOD
ROSEMARY COLLINS
VALERIE GARDINER
Page One Hundred and Eighty-five BACK:  John Pearson, Alan Croll, Jack Davis, Carson McGuire,  Donald  Mclvor,  Todd  Tremblay,  Aubrey Gray.
MIDDLE: Strathcarn  Leggat     Harry Lumsden, Gil Morrison, Shaw Mizuhara,  Harold Poole,  Robert Robertson,   Brian
Martin, Ward DeBeck, Erman Fiorillo, Tom Williams, Bryon Straight.
FRONT:  Edward McPhee, Leland Straight, Norman Free, Stephen  Burden, William  Calder,  Maurice Van Vliet,  Frank
Turner,  Rann Matthison, Joseph Rita,  Richard Clarke, Alexander Charters, McKenzie Matheson, James Harmer.
MEN'S BIG BLOCK CLUB
The Men's Big Block Club made a decided effort to do something
worthwhile on the campus this year, as well as to provide an opportunity for graduate members to have a get-together at Homecoming, last fall.
Although always a campus service club, the Big Blockers tried to
help a tittle more than they have in the past, by policing auditorium functions and games in the stadium.
The Banquet held by the Club for the alumni at Home-coming
was one of the big affairs of the week-end, and was such a success
that it will be held every year in future.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary Presidents, Maurice
Van Vliet, Col. Letson and Professor Meekison; President, Frank
Turner; Vice-President, Joe Rita; Secretary, Harry Lumsden.
FRANK   TURNER
JOE RITA
HARRY   LUMSDEN
Page One Hundred and Eighty-six BACK:  Betty Muir,  Margaret  Evans,  Peggy MacLeod, Ann   Carter,   Hortense   Warne,   Marjorie   Lean,   Ruth   Seldon,
Pamela Runkle, Elisabeth Norie.
FRONT: Myrne Nevison, Ruth Wilson, Lois McEwen, Betty Fleck,  Pauline Scott, Adrienne Collins, Sheila Wilson.
WOMEN'S BIG BLOCK CLUB
This year the Women's Big Block Club has tried to regain its old
stand as a service organization such as the Men's Club. Aside
from selling peanuts, etc. at games to aid in the Brock Memorial
fund, the girls looked after programs and ushering, especially at
Home-coming. One bridge party was held this year, the proceeds
of this also going to the Union Building Fund.
The executive were: Mrs. Boving, Honorary President; Betty Fleck,
President; Pauline Scott, Secretary.
MRS. BOVING
BETTY FLECK
PAULINE   SCOTT
Page One Hundred and Eighty-seven -->*««_
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BILL CALDER
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Vars
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ty vs.
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SCORES
Miller Cup  (Won)
U.B.C 23 - 6
Grads 48 - 0
New Westminster 35 - 6
Meralomas  17 - 6
West Vancouver 69 - 0
North Shore  16-3
Rowing Club  3 - 4
Grads  19 - 0
West Vancouver 32 - 0
North Shore 1 1 - 3
Rowing Club 8 - 3
Meralomas 3 - 10
U.B.C 30 - 3
New Westminster 16 - 0
McKechnie Cup  (Lost)
Varsity vs. Vancouver 5 -
Varsity vs. Victoria 1 1 -
Varsity vs. Victoria 16
Varsity vs. Vancouver 5
14
26
-6
-8
Under the capable instruction and guidance of Mr.
A. B. Carey and Dr. Harry Warren, rugby on the
campus rose to new and greater heights during the
1938-39 season than ever before attained. Two
first and two second division teams competed under
blue and gold colors marking a new high for University entries in the local Rugby Union.
The Varsity side, captained by Strat Leggat saw
the return of regulars John Bird, Todd Tremblay, Ted
and Howie McPhee, to the backfield. Ernie Teagle
did yeoman service in pre-Christmas encounters.
The half position was hotly contested all season
between Sandy Lang and "Bas" Robinson. Both
players deserve honorable mention for their excellent sportsmanship and outstanding performances.
Of the forwards, Tom Robson, Jerry Mason, Noel
Harrison, Ranji Mattu, and Scrum Captain, Jim
Harmer were the most consistent performers of the
old guard. Definite acquisitions to this department this year were Vic Moore of Victoria. Al
Gardner, former Shawnigan Lake player, and Henry
Stradiotti of the Canadian Football squad. Norm
Stewart showed up well after a late start.
Injuries, the bug bear of every coach, were especi-
JIM  HARMER
AL GARDNER
STRAT  LEGGAT
RANJI MATTU
SANDY LANG
WILSON  COLLEDGE
TOM ROBSON
BASIL ROBINSON
HARRY  LUMSDEN
NOEL HARRISON
TED   McPHEE
JOHN BURD
ANDY JENKINS
HOWIE McPHEE
ERNEST TEAGLE
VICTOR  MOORE
TODD  TREMBLAY
WADDIE ROBERTSON
Page One Hundred and Eighty-nine /12>
3l
i3
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9
DON PYLE
BERT HOSKINS
FRED   BILLINGS
FRED TAYLOR
BOB SMITH
ORME HALL
IAN RICHARDS
GEOF.   MACK IE
WILF. STOKVIS
PHILIP GRIFFIN
GEORGE  SCHUTHE
FRASER SHEPHERD
U.   B
A. B. CAREY
GEORGE LANE
Page One Hundred and Ninety E
IN       \J
I S H
SCORES
(Miller Cup)
U.B.C. vs. Varsity 6 - 26
U.B.C. vs. New Westminster 3 - 19
U.B.C. vs. West Vancouver 17 - 8
U.B.C. vs. Rowing Club 14 - 26
U.B.C. vs. Grads 32- 14
U.B.C. vs. Meralomas 5-18
U.B.C. vs. North Shore 9 - 6
U.B.C. vs. New Westminster 8 - 5
U.B.C. vs. Grads 6 - 6
U.B.C. vs. Meralomas  4 - 21
U.B.C. vs. North Shore 14 - 12
U.B.C. vs. Victoria College 8 - 3
U.B.C. vs. Varsity 3 - 30
U.B.C. vs. West Vancouver 17 - 12
ally prevalent this year rendering practically every
member hors de combat for one or more games.
Most unfortunate in this respect were three-quarters, Bill Colledge and Harry Lumsden.
Creditable substitutional performances on the first
team were turned in by U.B.C. players Andy Jenkins,
Chuck Long, Evann Davies, Al Urquhart, Fred Billings and Allan Wallace. Waddie Robertson has
made so many appearances for the Varsity side that
he may be classed as a regular.
The university's second entry in the first division
was called the U.B.C. team and, besides making an
excellent showing as a unit, many of their stars
shone for the Varsity squad.
The team was skippered by Bob Smith who directed
his men from the wing position. Veterans Geof.
Mackie, Wilf Stockvis and Bert Hoskins returned
to their old spots in the backfeld. George Schuthe,
Doug Wilson, Don Pvle and Fraser Shepherd showed
up well among the forwards.
Several brilliant freshmen presage well for Varsity's
rugger feature; outstanding were: Ian Richards,
Ormie Hall, Evann Davies, Fred Taylor. MAURICE VAN VLIE
GIL   MORRISON
OSCAR ORR
DON   MaclVER
JOHN FARINA CANA
ALL
Varsity Canadian football has hit its highest year since
1929. In intercollegiate competition with Alberta
and Saskatchewan, the Blue and Gold triumphed in
every game, defeating Alberta once and Saskatchewan
three times to take the Hardy Trophy with ease. Two
games were played with Saskatchewan at our homecoming and one at their home-coming in Saskatoon.
And on the same trip to the prairies, the Thunder-
birds tangled with Alberta at Edmonton.
In "Big Four" competition, Varsity didn't do quite so
well, losing one game to North Shore and defeating
them once to lose the Lipton Cup by a very unfavourable point system. This was the only defeat the
Collegians suffered all season, having won ten of their
eleven games.
The largest factor to account for the string of victories
was found in the coaching staff of Maurice Van Vliet,
Head Coach; Neil Watson, Line Coach; Fred Bolton
and Bill Morrow, assistants.
Most of the players were veterans of previous years'
play, another reason for the team's success. In fact,
only two freshmen made the team this year.
Starring in the backfield were: Evan apRoberts, Tom
Williams, Aub. Grey, Fred Joplin, Graham Finlay and
"Bink" Drummond. Most reliable lineman were:
Lee Straight, Fred Smith, Carson McGuire, Brian Martin, Henry Stradiotti, Dick Dowrey and Johnny Pearson, kicking star.
Seniior manager was Gil Morrison, the busiest man on
the team.
.EE STRAIGHT
)ICK DOWREY
FRED JOPLIN
BILL McGHEE
JOHN  PEARSON
GRAHAM  FINLAY
BILL   HODGSON
DAN   BURNETT
'BINK"   DRUMMOND
FRED   SMITH
EVAN   apROBERTS
MILT ANGUS
CARSON McGUIRE
TOMMY WILLIAMS
NORMAN   RENWICK
BRIAN  MARTIN
AUB  GRAY
JACK   TUCKER
Page One  Hundred and  Ninety-three RANN  MATTHISON
BRUD   MATHESON
BYRON  STRAIGHT
DON   LIVINGSTON
FRANK TURNER
ALEX LUCAS
DOUG GROSS
DICK MILLER
DOUGLAS ALEXANDER
WALLY  JOHNSTON
MAURICE VAN VLIET
ALEX CHARTERS
Page One Hundred and Ninety-four Varsity Senior basketballers had a none too successful season this year, failing to get into the playoffs for the first time in four years. They tied for
third place in the Inter-City League standing, played off with Munro Fur for the right to play Westerns in the semi-final, and lost in the sudden-death
game.
The basketeers continued their series of exhibition
tilts again this season in a barnstorming tour right
after the Christmas holidays and in several home
tilts all during the spring season. This year's complete schedule was the largest ever undertaken and
may be the reason for the several losses they suffered.
On their tour they dropped three of their four
games, but fared better at home, winning about
half of their inter-collegiate battles. Teams they
met were: Seattle College, University of Mexico,
Albany, Willamette, Pacific Lutheran, Harlem
Globe Trotters, Western Washington, St. Martins
and Dominoes.
Coach Maurice Van Vliet was faced with quite a
task in building his team this year, with only five
players returning from last year, and few good
rookies to choose from. Doug Alexander and Don
Livingston were two of the rookies who made good
from Vancouver. Wally Johnson from Chilliwack
and Dick Miller from Victoria complete the list
of rookies who had to carry much of the responsibility after Doug Gross and Ted Pallas were lost to
the team at Christmas.
The team should have a very good year next year,
losing only two players, Captain Rann Matthison
and Frank Turner in this spring's graduation list.
With all the Rookies back and regulars "By."
Straight, Alex. Lucas, Brud Matheson and Doug.
Gross returning for at least one more year, things
look to be on the upswing again.
Senior manager this year was Alex. Charters, fulfilling the usual superhuman expectations that are
loaded on all senior managers in the various sports.
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Page One Hundred and Ninety-five  \   V.
K
Usually, by the time that the "Totem" goes to press,
there have been one or two track meets held,
either on this campus or with colleges down south.
However, U.B.C. is following American universities
this year in holding the track season as the last
athletic program of the year.
There will be five track meets this year; three home
and two away. On March 1 8, the season starts off
with a competition with the high school all-stars
as a warm-up meet. March 25 was supposed to be
a meet with College of Puget Sound, who have been
having ho.me-and-home competitions with U.B.C.
for years, but cancelled the meet this year because
of a program already too extensive for their team.
Instead, an old rivalry will be revived between the
Freshmen and the Varsity.
Varsity will really buckle down to work on April 1,
when they travel to Seattle to compete with the
Washington University Freshman team. On April
5, a strong Idaho squad will invade our local campus
for the first time, and closing the program, a small
team will be sent to Seattle to take part in the
Northwest  Inercollegiate Relays meet in Seattle.
Varsity promises to have a strong team this year
again, with Howard McPhee, Ted Scott, Ward De-
Beck, Alex. Lucas, Jim McCammon and Evan apRoberts all back to fight for the Alma Mater. Just
as strong as this group of veterans is the crop of
freshman stars such as: Campbell Williams, Lionel
Fournier, Doug. Alexander and Lewis Robinson.
The team is coached this year again by Maurice Van
Vliet. The energetic Senior Manager is Sammy
Wolfe.
CAMPBELL WILLIAMS
TED   SCOTT
EVAN   apROBERTS
TOMMY WILLIAMS
JIM   MacMURRAY
BUD BURDEN
HOWIE  McPHEE
DOUG.  ALEXANDER
HENRY DeBECK
ALEX LUCAS
JIM BROWN
BOB KINCADE
WARD   DeBECK
ALAN  HURST
SAMMY WOLFE
Page One Hundred and Ninety-seven BACK:  Charles Hitchins, Wendell  McLaren, Spencer Wallace,   John   Affleck,   Dennis   Leong,   Jack   Rush,   Alan   Croll,
Dick Clark.
FRONT: Wingett Irish, Charles Howatson, Rod McMillan, Shaw Mizuhara, Fred Sasaki, Douglas Todd, Ben Herd.
SENIOR SOCCER
This year the Senior soccer eleven started what is hoped to be a climb out of the doldrums, displaying a form unknown to campus teams for several years.
As is customary, the team is entered in the Vancouver and District League in the first division
(this year including the Seattle All-Stars). Of eleven games already played (there are seven more
to play); two were won, three drawn, and six lost. With all due luck a respectable standing is
assured.    Entries will also be made in the Province and Imperial Cup-ties this year.
The home game with Seattle requires a visit to the Puget Sound city on March twelfth. Exhibition games were played with King George High School, Chilliwacks, and Pro-Recs of the Wednesday League.
Once described as a fifteen-minute team, the Thunderbirds are now a "going concern" throughout every game. Already able to command the majority of play in most games, the team needs
but a little more experience to snap up its goal-scoring chances.
Special mention must be made of the two freshman halves, Fred Sasaki and Spencer Wallace.
These two, with Jack Rush as pivot, comprise the toughest half line in the league. Singled out
also for commendation are Dennis Leong, the cat-like custodian of the goal, and John Affleck,
the galloping right back.    Then, too, there is Doug. Todd, the ball-control wizard.
Great credit is due to the ceaseless vigil of Gen2ral Headquarters—Dick Clark, manager; Charlie
Hitchins, coach; Dr. 0. J. Todd, faculty representative.
Page One Hundred and Ninety-eight ROWING
CLUB
BACK: George Duneli, Robert Mclntyre, Francis Crofton, Lloyd
Wilson, Charles Nash, Robert Hayman, Richard Montgomery,
Francis Bertram.
MIDDLE: Marino Fraresso, Pat Keatley, Graham Darling, Robert
Pierce, Ken Keath.
FRONT:  Andrew Nash,  Eric  Flesher,  Hugh Ellis.
The Rowing Club got away to a good start this season
with a brand new clubhouse down on the Fraser.
There are showers, a workshop, and racks for the shells.
Equipment includes two "battleship" eights, a doubles,
a coach boat with outboard motor, and the pride and joy
of the oarsmen, the sleek new eight-oared shell bought
with funds raised by Club members.
President was Graham Darling, Vice-President, Bill
Lynott, assisted by the executive: Hetherington, Pearce,
Hayman, Lyttleton, and Flesher. Faculty coaches were:
Professor G. Brand, Dr. Ure, and Professor Creighton.
Crews worked out regularly on the river from September
right through to April, in spite of some dirty weather in
January. Senior crew was: Pearce, Hayman, C. Nash,
Mclntyre, Patrick, Wilson, Lynott, Flesher. The Second Crew: Crofton, Keatley, Kerr, Keith, Fraresso, S.
Nash, Motherwell, Montgomery, J. Mcintosh, D. Mcintosh.
Plans were laid for a race with the James Bay Club in
Victoria as part of the invasion, and although this did
not go through it is hoped that the race will be held in
the Spring.
Spring Plans include a trip to Victoria and a three-way
regatta with V.R.C. and Washington in April.
Page Two Hundred BACK:  Jim  Harmer,  Maurice  Lambert,  Jim  Ussher,  Angelo   Provenzano,   Charles   Guiguet,   Edward   Benson,   Marcel
Guiguet.
FRONT: Austin Frith, Jack MacArthur, Ormond Dier, Jack Moxon, Norman Gill, William Kapak.
ICE  HOCKEY
The Ice Hockey Club continued on it's meteoric rise to prominence and popularity by achieving recognition as one of the major sports on the campus by participating in the Vancouver Senior Hockey
League and engaging in four intercollegiate games during the past season.
The record of the club includes victories over all local senior clubs, and two wins over the University of Washington Huskies. The team did not enjoy the same success against the University of
Gonzaga Bulldogs, losing twice;  10-3 and 2-0.
The inclusion of some games on the pass system did much to encourage student support, and
it is hoped that this practice will continue in future years.
Much credit is due to managers Morris Belkin and Erman Fiorillo for their efforts in promoting
the game. The former was obliged to resign late in the season due to the pressure of other
activities, and was replaced by player Maurice Lambert. The executive consisted of James Ussher,
president, and Orme Dier, vice-president. Outstanding performers were Ed Benson in goal; Jim
Harmer at defence; and Marcel Guiguet and Orme Dier as forwards.
Page One Hundred and Ninety-nine BACK:  John Bird, Frank Turner, Ted Madely,  Basil  Robinson,   Dave   Ellis.
FRONT: Ted Strongitharm, Bob Morris, David Carey,  Ed. Barton, Jack Rush.
CRICKET
A new form of athletics was introduced at this University in the spring and summer of  1938
when a small livewire band of enthusiasts formed the first cricket club ever to wear the Blue
and Gold.
During this spring and summer, the U.B.C. cricket club will swing into its second season with
a short but worthy list of achievements behind it.
Organized in March 1938, under the guiding influence of Dr. Harry Warren, by Basil Robinson
and Dave Carey, then president of the Alma Mater Society and now Rhodes Scholar for B. C,
the ambitious little club lost no time in applying for membership in the First Division of the
B. C. Mainland League. After a considerable amount of discussion,  the application  for entry
was accepted, and further plans had to be made for the actual formation of the team.
First captain of the organization was the same Dave Carey, who contributed his outstanding
services up to the time he left for Oxford in late August.   Carey led the club in batting with
the splendid average of 73.8, and was followed next by Basil Robinson with 46.7.
Honorary President was Doctor Warren, Treasurer, Jack Rush; Secretary, Ed Barton; and League
Delegate Basil Robinson.
Although the nucleus of the club was composed of undergraduates, a loophole was left for
graduates and faculty members to take part.   This a few of them did, and on some occasions
proved the salvation of the Varsity side.
The team finished in third place in a seven-team league, and also competed  in the  race for
the Fyfe-Smith shield although in this latter series they did not meet with such success.
For the coming year, plans have yet to be completed but a definite entry form has been sent
to the First Division of the Mainland League, and tentative negotiations have been made with
the local Wednesday League.
Page Two Hundred and One Back:  Lois McEwen, Fay Burnhaim, Jean Thompson, Nancy Martin, Alice Kjos.
FRONT:   Rosemarie Collins,  Lois Harris,  Ruth Wilson, Adrienne Collins, Mona Asselstine.
SENIOR "A" BASKETBALL
This year, under the inspirational guidance of coach "Tony" Osborne, a handful of enthusiastic
mellon-tossers evolved into a classy basketball squad.
But this transformation came too late; when their last chance for a play-off berth had passed
them by, the Senior A women's team amazed their public by coming through with a brace of spectacular league wins, their first in two years! This bit of history saw Cunningham, and last year's
champion Cloverleafs, bow down in defeat to the lowly co-eds.
The girls have done some globe-trotting too. Sardis, Mission, and Chilliwack have all been visited
and vanquished in due course. Climaxing this medley of short trips, the students invaded Port
Alberni, challenging the team there, and what is more, winning this encounter.
High-scorer of the Women's Cagette League was the Varsity ace, Captain Ruth Wilson. Ruth
piled up 85 points, leading the runner-up by just four markers. Other co-eds in the "Big Fifteen"
were Faye Burnham, Alice Kjos, and Jean Thomson.
As most of the team are frosh and sophs, there promises to be a fine nucleus for next year's outfit.
The Varsity team's outstanding characteristic is their unbounded enthusiasm inspite of defeat after
defeat; absolutely undaunted by unbroken successions of losses, the co-eds always came back for
more and were in there fighting all the time.
Members of the wonder team are: Ruth Wilson, guard; Nancy Martin, centre; Lois McEwen, forward; Lois Harris, forward; Faye Burnham, guard; Alice Kjos, forward; Adie Collins, forward;
ean Thomson, centre; Mona Asselstine, guard; Betty Cole, guard; Rose Collins, manager.
Page Two Hundred and Two BACK:  Sheila Wilson, Patricia Carey, Anne Carter, Elisabeth Norie, Marjorie Lean, Betty Muir.
FRONT:  Hortense Warne,  Edith Armstrong, Myrne Nevison, Betty Cole, Pauline Scott.
"U.B.C." GRASS HOCKEY
Never before has the U.B.C. team met with the success it has had this year. Intact from last year
but for two players, the team began the present season with great optimism. Competing with
eight other teams in the Lower Mainland League, the girls, ably captained by Myrne Nevison,
emerged at Christmas in second place, four points behind General America. Until then, only
two teams had been able to defeat the Co-eds.
After Christmas the team remained in second place, not having lost a game this spring up until
the time this article went to press. We expect to be in the final against General America, the
traditional league winners with whom we managed to play to a draw in Spring competition. However, the students, improving each week, have an excellent chance of winning both the Lower
Mainland and  Inter-City trophies.
On this year's Victoria  Invasion, our team was narrowly defeated, 2-1 by the Victoria Ladies.   The
Co-eds have high hopes of winning a return en gagement later in the season on their own field.
The superior coaching of Mr. White  has  introduced a fast, quick-passing, close-checking game
which has certainly brought results.
Page Two Hundred and Three Page Two Hundred and Four MINOR SPORTS
Page Two Hundred and Five 9 O
©   ©
SECOND
DIVISION
ENGLISH
RUGBY
Byron Straight, Jack Wyard,  Demetrie,  Elefthery, Andrew Roddan, Jack Townsend,
TOP   ROW:  Bob   Payne,   Dave   Maw,   Pete   Leckie-Ewing,   George   Schuthe,   Moir  McLagen,
George Lane, Doug. Wilson, Ted. Strongithorn, King Neil.
BOTTOM   ROW:  Fred  Smith,   Dave Morrow,  Wilf Calnan,  John   Runkle,  Art  Physick,   Neil
Gray, Jack MacArthur.     INSET:   Ralph Tulley, J.  C.  McLean.
The third team this year has been a team of transients . With a few steady, hard-working
performers as the nucleus, the team has been mostly composed of different players every game.
Numbered among the squad's losses by promotion to the "U.B.C." side are John Runkle,
George Lane and Malcolm Brown.
The backbone of the team is to be found in such faithful players as Scrum Captain Wilf
Calnan, Captain Dave Morrow, scrum half Hamish Robertson and scrummer Jack Moore.
Ted Strongitharm, Moir McLagan and Neil Gray turned in creditable preformances throughout the season. Two players, Dave Maw and Art Physick, were forced into retirement through
injuries.
The team is one of the University's two teams entered in the second division. Manager was
Bob Payne.
The idea of a Frosh team is new this year and has been very successful, the team being composed entirely of Freshmen.
The team, entered in the second division, slipped up in two games in the first half schedule,
consequently losing it. However the team came back strong in the after Chr.istmas schedule
and at time of going to press are considered a "cinch" for second half honours. They will
play off with Marpole for Second Division League championship.
Outstanding for the squad this year were Bingham, Grey, Pyle and Clement in the scrum, and
Askew, Neil, Physick, Wood and Williamson among the backs.
The team had no coach before Christmas, but after the holidays, Mr. Stan Farquharson took
over coaching duties and is the reason for the tremendous improvement in the team. He
has been helped by Dr. Harry Warren.    Manager of the team was Jim Stinson.
//
"FROSH
ENGLISH
RUGBY
BACK:  Michael McGure, Murray Pickard, Norman Bushel, Donald Johnston, Jack Baldwin,
Gordon Wallace, Walter Whitman.
FRONT: Gerald Wood, Frank Askew, Kenneth Williamson, Gordon Pyle, Morris Physick,
William Sloan, Robert Vance.
Page Two Hundred and Six SENIOR "B"
BASKETBALL
BACK: Albert Menzies, David Hunden,
Edward Barton, Alan Hopper,
Harry Nikaido.
FRONT: James Bardsley, Bill Charlton, Arthur Clark, Arthur
Barton, Stewart McMorran.
Under the more than able coaching of Jim Bardsley, the Senior "B" basketball team has
managed to do a little better this year than last. Having played for Varsity for years, and
now a member of the Canadian Champion Westerns, coach Bardsley has been able to drum
a few of the fundamentals into our outfit that have carried Varsity teams so far in past years.
In six games played up until now in the season, the "B's" have won two, and lost four. The
quintet must win four of the five games in order to get into the play-offs.
High scorer for the season was Art Barton, who with Al  Menzies and Art Monohan,  played
a few exhibition games with the senior "A" squad.
The   manager  for   this  year
Stewart McMorran.
is   probably   the   "goingest"   concern   hereabouts,   hard-working
The men's intermediate "A" basketball squad is composed entirely of freshmen this year, a
change that has not hindered the team's performance in the least. These young basketballers
have created something of a record this season by getting into the play-offs, very unusual
accomplishment for the University minor teams.
The "Frosh" dropped only one of their league games, making the city finals, but dropping two
games straight to Shores Jewellers, for the championship.
The squad played five exhibition games this season in Haney, Sardis, Blaine, Chilliwack and
Mission, winning all of them.    Out of 13 games played, 10 were won.
Coached by senior basketballer "By" Straight, several good players were developed, among
them: Elefthery, Rees, Stewart, Roddan and Ryan.
Ill
\U
FROSH'
BASKETBALL
Byron   Straight,   Jack   Wyard,   Demetrie   Elefthery,   Andrew   Moddan,   Jack   Townsend,
Alastair Young, Morris Physick, Brud Matheson.
Page Two Hundred and Seven M
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GOLF
William Charlton, Roy Leckie, Stanley
Durkin,  Jack Stark,  Peter Vickers.
This year the Golf Club is one of the largest minor sport organizations on the campus, being
compose'd of 60 members.    President is Roy Leckie and manager-secretary is Mansfield Beach.
Only one tournament has been played so far;  the  University Championship,  which was won
last fall by Bill Charlton, who defeated Roy Leckie in the final.
In March and April, teams from Washington, Gonzaga, College of Puget Sound, Pacific Lutheran,
Reed College, Bellingham Normal and possibly Oregon State and Washington State will come
to Vancouver to play matches with U.B.C.
Right after Spring exams a five or six man team will make a tour of these southern colleges
for return matches.
This year's team promises to be one of^the best for years.    Four members of last year's team,
Bill Charlton, Stan Durkin, Jack Stark and  Pete Vickers, are back at school  along  with  two
members of the 1937 team, Mansfield Beach and Roy Leckie.
GRASS
HOCKEY
For two years the Grass Hockey Club has been in the "Doldrums." But this year, because
of the driving enthusiasm of Captain Archie Macaulay, aided by a rather more enthusiastic
bunch of stick-wielders, Varsity has at last hit play-off form.
The team this year is composed of three Sciencemen, three Aggie, Five Artsmen and one
teacher as fine a representation of Varsity men as you will see anywhere, all playing for the
love of the game.
Gavin Mouat, the veteran of the team, travelled to Victoria with the Vancouver "Rep" team,
and three or four of the boys will be making the trip to the World's Fair with the "Rep" team
to play both at San Francisco and Los Angeles.
This has been a very good year and next year promises to be even better with the added interest in men's grass hockey on the campus.    President of the Club this year was Jack Byers.
BACK:  Archie   Macaulay,   George   Hutchison,   Harold   Fargey,   Jack   Byers,   Gavin   Mouat,
Dr. Black.
FRONT:  William   Parker,   Richard   Foley,  George   Kidd,   John   Heisler,   Allan   Lennox,   Ian
Cameron, Gordon Thompson.
Page Two Hundred and Eight JUNIOR
CANADIAN
FOOTBALL
BACK: Donald Ferguson, Austin
Frith, Garth Wade, Rex Porter,
Lionel Fournier, Earl English,
Levs Beaumont, Chris Stamatis, Hugh Livingstone, Archie
Byers.
FRONT: Lynn Sully, Waldo Clarke,
Alan Smith, Paul Cote, Kelvin Fleming, Owen Pickell,
Jack  Filteau.
The Junior Grid Squad went through a very satisfactory season under the capable guidance
of Coach Fred Bolton. The team produced much promising material for the Senior team,
several of the players proving their worth by making good with the seniors near the end of
the season.
The boys got away to a rather slow start, mostly because of inexperience, but with daily practices the team showed great improvement, climaxing a tough season by upsetting the slick
Cougars to the tune of 1 1 -0. Even the champion Meralomas had to come from behind to
beat us 15-9.
Starring all season were Jack Tucker, Bill McGhee, Don McLeod and Austin Frith, all of whom
made the Senior outfit later in the year. Our hard-working and very able manager was Don
Ferguson.  Assistant Coach, Bill Morrow.
Because of a  shortage of  players,  it wasn't  until  spring  that  the  Junior soccer  team  really
started to function.   The need for such a team  to feed the Senior outfit was felt by coach
Charles  Hitchins and  manager  Dick Clark, and  it was  through  their  combined  efforts  that
the Juniors came into existence again.
It has turned out to be a very well balanced team as a whole and  is making quite a name
for itself in the local G.V.A.A. League.
In one of their first encounters the team blanked the Douglas Park aggregation  in the first
round for the  Black Trophy.    In  the semi-final  they bowled over  the strong  Normal  school
team, and at the time of going to press, the final has yet to be contested.
The team has few individual stars, but is to be congraulated for  its fine showing with such
a small turnout.
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JUNIOR
SOCCER
BACK:  Yoshi   Hyodo,  Wendell  McLarnin,  Dennis  Leong,   David  Hunden,   Donald  Stewart,
Harry Nikaido, Charles Hitchins.
FRONT:  Perry Hooper, Jack Logan, Armando Minichiello, Charles Howatson, Jack Rush.
Page Two Hundred and Nine SKIING
Several years ago a ski club was organized to try to promote skiing among students by providing accommodation on one of the north shore mountains. This method later proved financially impracticable, because of the fact that skiers were already established in cabins of their
own on any one of the three mountains.
Another club was then constituted in place of the old one with a view to providing accommodation for competitions only. Any member of the Alma Mater Society who is eligible for an
amateur card in the Canadian Amateur Ski Association is automatically a member of the U.B.C.
Ski Club.
In the past two years, U.B.C. ski teams have entered competitions at Grouse, Hollyburn, Mt.
Baker, Spokane and Mt. Ranier. This year the Ski Club, with the help of the Alma Mater
Society, the Vancouver Ski Zone, and the Hollyburn Ski Promotion Committee, entertained
about forty skiers from four or five American Universities in the Northwestern Intercollegiate
Ski Union championships which were held at Hollyburn on February 24th and 25th.
President and Secretary this year are Harvey Pogue and Paul Cook, respectively.
TUMBLING
LEFT:  James Lowe, Willard Matheson, Chester Lyons.
CENTRE:  James Lowe, Chester Lyons, Willard Matheson.
RIGHT: James Lowe, Willard Matheson, Chester Lyons.
This class, one of the regular classes held in the gymnasium under the tutelage of Maurice
Van Vliet, is probably one of the most successful. Fairly-popular with the students, its main
aim is to give them the opportunity to master the fine arts of tumbling and balance acts,
with all the safety apparatus to be had. In fact, it is practically impossible for one to hurt
himself acquiring this art.
There have been two teams of three men each, who have put on various exhibitions in the
past two years, but one especially is deserving of recognition for work in this respect; the
team of: James Lowe, Ches. Lyons and Bill Matheson. Spending several hours a week in the
gymnasium, they have done wonders for themselves as well as for the University to show what
can be picked up in a student's spare time around the gymnasium. The accompanying photographs are of these three men in three of their many stunts.
Page Two Hundred and Ten BOXING
BACK:  Chester Lyons, Richard White.
THIRD: George Minns, Joe Gregory,
Daniel  Greene,  Clare  Heim,
David    Rivers,    Donald    McKinnon, Ian Schiedel.
SECOND:  David   Bone,   Jack   Tucker,
Austin   Frith,   Ronald   Mc-
Eachern,   William   Johnson,
Douglas      Patrick,      Owen
Picked.
FRONT:  Alexander   Smith,   Ian   McDiarmid, Ralph Smith, Frances   Barchard,   Brian   Parsons,
John      Pindermiss,      Saburo
Takahashi, Gordon  Dickie.
The boxing and wrestling classes are two more of Instructor Van Vliet's popular hours in the
gymnasium. Solely for the purpose of giving the students an opportunity to take a little more
than casual exercise without the rigorous training of team athletics, as well as to train them
in the "manly arts of self defence", these classes grow larger every year.
The boxing especially is proving so popular, that this university is going to follow the example
set by other colleges and enter teams in a limited way in intercollegiate competition. The
boxers will probably form a club next year and pick men to represent the local university in
each of the weight classes in whatever glove-tourneys they can enter.
With fifty men turning out regularly, some of them expsrienced boxers before attending this
seat of learning, it is thought by many that a very strong team of leather-pushers can be
formed. Then, too, many more students would turn out to try to make the team on hearing
of the competitions. With these possibilities, there is every chance of success in this venture,
should it be made next year.
WRESTLING
BACK:   Ralph  Smith,  Owen  Pickell,  Melvin  Zirul,  Geoffrey Marples.
FRONT:  Bayard  Iverson, Chester Lyons, Cyril Bromley.
■ S
Page Two Hundred and Eleven INTRAMURALS
Intramurals or inter-class competition received quite a set-back this year in
the shortening of the lunch period from an hour and a half to one short hour.
In spite of the difficulty for students to eat, play in the various competitions
and have a shower all in this short time, the 'murals went on almost as
successfully as ever in attendance and much more in enthusiasm.
Under the guidance of Physical Instructors Van Vliet and Moore several new
events were put on the program this year, the most popular proving to be
the inter-class rugby championship, a revival of an old rivalry.
The program has not been completed at time of going to press, but chances
for taking the championship have narrowed down to six classes. In order
of present standing they are Arts '39, Anglican College, Agriculture, Science
'40, Arts '42 and Science '39.
Much of the credit for these classes winning in the competitions goes to their
athletic  representatives.    For  the  respective classes  mentioned  above  the
representatives are:
Ward  DeBeck,  Douglas Taylor,  James  Ussher,  Don  Livingston,  and  Peter
Leckie-Ewing.
In Women's Intra-murals, Arts '40 are leading and Arts '42, the freshettes,
are second. Nell Trapp is leader of the winners and Mary Ann Teagle runs
the Frosh.
Next to rugby the most popular events are basketball and all the track events
such as the Mall Race, Mall Dash and Arts '20 relay race.
In previous years the instructors have been helped very much by different
students, but this year the care of the Intra-murals has been entirely in the
hands of our hard working and very genial instructors of physical education.
Page Two Hundred and Twelve BADMINTON
"B" TEAM
Back: Janet Fleck, David Waddell,
Alex. MacDonald, Peggy MacLeod, Jackie MacLeod.
FRONT:  Michael  McGuire, Ruth Seldon, John Mcintosh.
The University Badminton Club entered a new season with a strong and enthusiastic executive
under the leadership of President Dave Maw. The problem of arranging the teams was undertaken by Janet Fleck, the Vice-President. Others on the executive were Audrey Chowne,
Secretary; Donald McGill, Treasurer; Jackie MacLeod and Norm. Renwick, Tournament Committee; and Bob Moore, Curator.
Teams were entered in the Vancouver and District "B" and "C" Leagues. Comprising the "B"
team were Margaret and Jacquelin MacLeod, Janet Fleck, Ruth Seldon, David Waddell, Michael
McGuire, Tom Branson, and Alex. McDonald.
The "C" team was made up of Jackie Ellis, Mary Atkin, Geraldine Armstrong, Margaret Ball,
John Mcintosh, Noel Bracher, David Maw and Jack Edwards.
Matches were played with the Hill Club, New Westminster, Quilchena, Pacific and Vancouver
Clubs, meeting each one twice. An American Tournament was held at the beginning of the
season and the club championships took place near the close of the year.
The club championships are open to the whole university, outsiders being required to pay a
slight fee to cover costs of shuttle-cocks. In spite of this open championship, almost invariably
the individual champions come from the club itself each year.
BADMINTON
"C" TEAM
BACK:  Noel Bracher, Jack Edwards, David Maw, John Mcintosh, Jackie MacLeod.
FRONT: Mary Atkin, "Jackie" Ellis, Geraldine Armstrong.
Page Two Hundred and Thirteen SWIMMING
CLUB
BACK: Eugene Machell, Victor Carson, James Darby, Thomas
McLaughlin.
FRONT:  Valarie     Gardiner,     Vaughn
Mosher,  Noreen  Flumerfelt.
The U.B.C. Swimming Club experienced a very successful year in  1938-39, again under the
direction of the well known coach, Percy Norman.   Swimming practices are held twice a week
at the Crystal Pool and are attended by good turnouts.
At the time of going to press, two meets are being arranged, one with one of the neighboring
Universities, depending on the date, and the other with the Vancouver Swimming Club.
As in past years the club is handicapped by lack of popularity support, and funds for proper
training facilities.   However, since the rising interest in intercollegiate competition, all athletics
have taken an upswing, and it is hoped that the Swimming Club will be one of the clubs to
achieve major recognition.
The   executive   for   the   year   is   composed   of:   President,   Vaughn   Mosher;   Vice-President,
Valerie Gardiner; Secretary-Treasurer, Betty Cole.
A tremendous improvement was found in the Archery team this year, improving from next-to-
last in the previous year to second this year in intercollegiate competition, held with the following colleges: Margaret Eaton School, McGill, McDonald Hall (two teams), Ontario Ladies'
College, Queen's, Western Ontario, Alma College, and McMaster, in order of placing in the meet.
U.B.C. was second in the meet with 1267 points to the winners, Margaret Eaton School's 1707
points. Marjorie Lean was high scorer on the Varsity team. Second by one point among all
the contestants of the meet was Jean Meredith a former member of U.B.C, now attending
Margaret Eaton School, and a prodigy of Varsity coach, Miss Moore. This is only Varsity's
second year of competition, and by the improvement so far, the team should be hard to beat
next year.
ARCHERY
Hortense Warne,  Betty Cole,  Hilda  McLean,  Emily  Fraser,  Lillian Johansen, Jean  Pratt,
Marjorie Lean.
Page Two Hundred and Fourteen iir\il
SENIOR "B'
BASKETBALL
BACK: Elizabth Long, Enid McMurt-
rie, Lillian Johansen, Mae McQueen, Effie MacKenzie, Margaret Weldon, Virginia  Poole.
FRONT: Feme Trout, Valerie Gardiner, Grace Cuthbert, Florence Rowell, Betty Cole.
True to tradition, this year's Senior "B" team held firmly to the cellar position in the league,
winning  one  game  in  the  pre-Christmas  schedule,  but disdaining  to  repeat  this  breach  of
etiquette in the second term.
However they enjoyed thoroughly the practices and games and learned a great deal from their
enthusiastic   coach,    Virginia    Poole,    an    ex-Varsity   Senior   star.       The    most    remarkable
thing about this team was the enthusiasm that ran right through the season.   The turnout for
the squad was one of the largest on record and many fine players were developed for future
Senior "A" material.
The team visited Chilliwack and played a home game with them a little later.   Exchange games
at Haney and Sardis were also played.
Outstanding  for the  team were  Grace  Cuthbert,  Lillian Johansen,   Betty Cole  and  Margaret
Weldon.   The very able and willing manager was Joanne Brown.
The   "Varsity"   or   second   team   is  entered   in   the   same   league   as   the   "U.B.C."   eleven,
the Lower Mainland League.   Although they haven't been successful  in winning many laurels
this year, the "Varsity" contains many fine players, serving as a source from    which to draw
players for the first team.
With barely enough girls turning out for a team,  the squad was  kept organized by Captain
Elizabeth Mclnnes, who, on one occasion led them to a near victory over the "U.B.C." eleven
in  league play.   The majority of the games were  lost, but at times,  these same  under-dogs
managed to pull off some very close battles.
The full team consists of: Peggy Crowe, Betty Henderson, Elspeth Munro, Betty McCormick,
Elisabeth Maclnnes, Wanda Kenny, Audrey Chowne, Pat Carey, Mary Ann Teagle, Viola Davies,
Joan Thompson, and Jean Croll.
VARSITY
GRASS
HOCKEY
BACK:  Elisabeth  Maclnnes,  Mary Ann Teagle, Mae McQueen,   Betty McCormick.
FRONT:  Audrey Chowne, Elspeth Munro, Peggy Crow, Wanda Kenny.
Page Two Hundred and Fifteen This year  the club has been breaking all  records for mass attendance at meetings, on trips and parties and up
at the cabin.   As many as fifty members might have been  seen,  on  a  Sunday,   in   the  early  part of  the  year,
working around the cabin.   Wood was cut, a drying  room built and many club improvements were made in spite
of limited funds.
The fall  trip to  Porteau  Beach at Thanksgiving was  the largest boat trip in the history of the club.   Forty-eight
made the hike to Deeks Lake and there broke up into climbing parties.     Half a  dozen of the more experienced
climbers reach      the peak of Mt. Brunswick; of the remainder, half went up Deeks peak and the rest went down
to the beach.
Roller skating and dancing provided the fun for the Party in November.    The only trouble was that the evening
was too short and no one wanted to go home.   The Halloween party at the cabin was quite a success. Members
are advised to read  the log book, which contains the stories of many amusing incidents, such as the time when
Rosie tried to use the cabin for a funeral pyre.
All spring the cabin has been crowded at weekends with   enthusiastic,   if  unprofessional,   skiers.    They  are  all
looking  forward  to  the  rest of  the  term with  its  remaining skiing opportunities at home or at Mt. Baker, and
to the Spring trip in April.
A selection from the club log gives us this gem of mountain verse. "Here's to our Aggie
She climbs up a craggy
And skids down on her fanny
Just like an old nanny."
OUTDOORS
CLUB History frequently refers to the past, but the year
1939 saw history in the making when Trans-Canada
Airlines inaugurated overnight schedules from British  Columbia to Toronto, Ottawa, and Montreal,
carrying passengers, airmail, and air express    Pro
led in1etters^3j000 miles wide, for the
incorpOra^d&QJy inv.the.middle of 1937.
more than eighteen months the fledgling
has become a sky giant.   While it opens up no new territory, the T.C.A. links Canada physically as it
has never been linked before—15 hours from Vancouver, British Columbia, to Montreal, Quebec.
This summer the Imperial Airways' trans-Atlai
service, connecting with the Canadian airline, will
bring England and British Columbia-less^hari 48
hours apart. B. C. can never again be calledW—
"remote outpost of Empire."
" ' 1WW!
"N Inter-Fraternity Council Executive
HARVEY CARROTHERS
Phi Kappa Pi
President
WILLIAM  McLELLAN
Phi Delta Theta
Vice-President
DOUGLAS FORD
Psi  Upsilon
Secretary
Page Two Hundred and Twenty Pan-Hellenic Association Executive
VIRGINIA BIRMINGHAM
Kappa Kappa Gamma
President
MIRIAM COSENS
Delta  Gamma
Secretary
DEAN M. L. BOLLERT
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-one Alpha Delta Phi
D. C. CARTER
R. D. KNOX
W. S. LEGGAT
R. G. CROSBY
M. P. LARSEN
G. E. RYAN
J. W. STEWART
J. I. BIRD
D. J. MORROW
A. W. KNOX
J.  M. CRAWFORD
D. L BARRETT-LENNARD
G. F. MACKIE
J. L. FRAZEE
W. W. COLLEGE
P. J. McTAVISH
R. F. SMITH
W. K. BUTCHART
F. H. TAYLOR
E.  J.   BARRIE
BILL GARDNER
CHARLES McLEAN
GERRY WOOD
JACK BALDWIN
MICHAEL McGUIRE
john Mcdonald
john McCutcheon
murray pickard
kenneth hall
douglas Mcpherson
wally thomas
PAT  CLERY
BOB TAIT
The Alpha Delta Phi was founded at Hamilton College,
Clinton, Ohio, in 1832. There are twenty-six active chapters. The British Columbia Phi Epsilon Chapter was installed
in 1926.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-two Beta Theta Pi
CARSON McGUIRE
W. R. HODGSON
D.  P. WYNESS
H. BURKE
H. LIVINGSTONE
R. W. MOREL
R. H. DAVIDSON
W. A. LAIDLAW
D. N. FERGUSON
J.  M.  FIELDS
H. J. MORRIS
R. MORRIS
L. A. ZINK
R. F. MclNTYRE
D. K. TAYLOR
W. DIXON
A. DUCKLOW
H.   POOLE
R.  TWISS
J. HARMER
H. McKIM
J. STOREY
W. P. T. McGHEE
J. H. STEVENSON
FRED JOPLIN
KENNETH  KEITH
ROBERT SHEWAN
KEL FLEMING
ROSS WILSON
PAUL COTE
AUSTEN FRITH
DOUGLAS JAMES
Beta Theta Pi was founded at Miami University, Oxford,
Ohio, on August 1 0, 1 839. There are 89 chapters. Gamma
Omicron was installed in  1936.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-three .$> V&
w
Delta Upsilon
edmund dashwood-jones
lloyd detwiller
budd devlin
frederick field
douglas harkness
harold d. lumsden
m. h. a. lyttleton
Gordon h. McCullough
IAN H. McDIARMID
Leslie m. Mcdonald
ROBERT McELHANNEY
NORMAN McRAE
W. LLOYD MARR
FRANK MITCHELL
FRAMPTON  PRICE
ARTHUR G. RICHARDSON
NOEL L. RICHARDSON
WALTER J. ROBERTSON
LLOYD G. ROSS
ALAN R. SMITH
RALPH A. SMITH
ALAN STAPLES
WILFRED D. STOKVIS
ST. CLAIR G. STRONG
WILLIAM T. TOLMIE
JACK N. TUCKER
P. RODERICK WAINWRIGHT
RICHARD A. WILSON
DARRELL BRAIDWOOD
DONALD McGILL
EARL ENGLISH
DONALD   LYLE
DALE RUMBALL
THOMAS WILLIS
Delta Upsilon was founded at Williams College, New Jersey,
on November 4, 1834. There are 61 chapters. The British
Columbia Chapter was installed  in   1935.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-four Kappa Theta Rho
HAROLD ROME
NORMAN  ROTHSTEIN
LESTER SUGARMAN
MAX MOSS
MILTON  NAROD
ARNOLD GOLDBERG
SAM WOLFE
KENNETH  KAHN
DAVID VANDT
L   KORSCH
P. SNIDER
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-five Phi Delta Theta
PHILIP GRIFFIN
ROBERT C. R. SMITH
ROBERT McDOUGALL
ROBERT A. LOWE
GORDON PEARCE
JOSEPH PEARCE
WILLIAM McLELLAN
ELMER A. JONES
DONALD E. McLEOD
GEORGE AVERY
GRANT DONEGANI
DAVID RITCHIE
RANN MATTHISON
HERBERT HOSKINS
ERNEST A. ALEXANDER
A. M. MATHESON
JOHN S. GARRETT
WILLIAM WALLACE
J. MATHESON
DUDLEY DARLING
JOHN RUNKLE
W. LYNOTT
H. GRAY
R.   DENT
T. ROBSON
J. FERRIS
A.   ROBERTSON
ROBERT  KING
THOMAS MEREDITH
JOHN CARSON
JACK McKINLAY
DOUGLAS ALEXANDER
JAMES STINSON
PAUL GRIFFIN
EDWARD McBRIDE
ALAN  GARDNER
LORNE McBURNEY
RODNEY GRIERSON
JOHN CLEMENT
Phi Delta Theta was founded at Miami University, Oxford,
Ohio, in 1848. There are at present 105 active chapter.
British Columbia Alpha Chapter was installed in 1930.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-six A
<£>.r.A.
CLUiJAll)   A
Phi G
amma
Deli
DOUG GROSS
FRED PEARCE
RAY TAYLOR
OSCAR   ORR
LEE STRAIGHT
FRED SMITH
JIM USSHER
DOUG MOTTLEY
TOM WILLIAMS
STAN HARRIS
BILL CHARLTON
ERNIE   WEST
TODD TREMBLAY
FRANK CLARK
FRANK   PENDLETON
BYRON STRAIGHT
JOE NAYLOR
RALPH LIGHTHEART
DOUG   MARKHAM
KING   NEIL
CLARENCE MANN
DOUGLAS MALONEY
DONALD   LIVINGSTON
DONALD COLWELL
ORME HALL
WALLY JOHNSTON
BILL LINDSAY
AL. MENZIES
GRAHAM FINLAY
Phi Gamma Delta was founded in 1848 at Washington and
Jefferson University in Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania. There
are   73   active   chapters.    Pi   Gamma   was   installed   in   1929.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-seven Phi Kappa Pi
ARTHUR RAE
BILL CALDER
SANDY LANG
NOEL HARRISON
BOB ROBERTSON
DENNIS FAIRBAIRN
IAN CAMERON
HARVEY CARRUTHERS
TERRY FITZPATRICK
FRASER JAMIESON
JACK McARTHUR
CLEVE CUNNINGHAM
ALAN WALLACE
W. R. FORRESTER
FRED BILLINGS
ALEC McCARTER
pierre wolfe
george schuthe
jack roberts
basil robinson
charles long
bob bergklint
colin Mcdonald
david gray
walter nichols
roland new1tt
evan davies
ian richards
GEORGE LANE
ORME DIER
Phi Kappa Pi was founded at McGill University, Montreal,
Quebec, in 1913. There are six active chapters. Alpha lota
Chapter was installed in 1924.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-eight Phi Kappa Sigma
MILT ANGUS
CLAIR WILSON
F. W. BRASON
ADAM REID
JOE RITA
ARNOLD SWANSON
ALEX LUCAS
GIL MORRISON
MORRIS DUNCAN
FRETH EDMONDS
DON MclVER
LESTER PRONGER
ARCHIE BYERS
JOHN FARINA
NEIL GREY
DANNY BURNETT
ART MONAHAN
ROY LECKIE
STANLEY L. COPP
WALDO CLARKE
DON McLEAN
BILL SHARPE
NORMAN RENWICK
BILL BRAIDWOOD
WILLIAM CAMPBELL
JIM WATTS
TOM CRONE
AUBREY GRAY
HAROLD DALE
Phi Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of Pennsylvania, Hershey, Pennsylvania, in 1850. There are 39
active chapters.   Alpha Omega was installed in  1936.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-nine f(mm
Psi Upsilon
MALCOLM BROWN
STUART JAGGER
WILLIAM R. DOWREY III.
JOHN PEARSON
JOHN E. STARK
DOUGLAS FORD
RICHARD MONTGOMERY
CHRISTOPHER STAMATIS
RAYMOND RUTTER
ROBERT L. PAYNE
WALTER J.  MOODIE
LEYS M.   BEAUMONT
DEREK H. A. MacDERMOT
ALLAN G. SWEETNAM
ERNEST E. TEAGLE
JAMES L. DARBY
W. DONALD McR. SAGE
ROGNVALD HEDDLE"
DAVID JAMES ROBERTSON
STRUAN T. ROBERTSON
JOHN A. DAVIS
DAVID GRAHAM
EDWARD MARGETTS
CLARENCE O. FULTON
GERALD WHITE
ALAN S. DRUMMOND
JOHN B. ARMSTRONG
DOUGLAS JESSUP
GEORGE STAMATIS
CAMPBELL KENMUIR
DAVID NICHOLS
The Psi Upsilon fraternity was founded at Union College,
Schenectady New York, on November 24, 1833. There are
27 active chapters. Zeta Zeta Chapter was installed on
October 19, 1935.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty Sigma Phi Delta
JOHN G. MacDERMOT
ROY C. DURKIN
C.  H.  LIGHTHALL
A. R. ALLEN
W. A. KER
W. R. BACON
J. D. PATRICK
J. D. BELL
C. B. ARCHIBALD
G. W. MINNS
D. G. McINTOSH
J. S. McINTOSH
J. D. CREIGHTON
H. M. POGUE
C. H. S. LUTTRELL
W. WARREN
W. A. CRAIGHEAD
W. C. HEIM
M. HANSEN
J. A. M. GUNN
J. DAVIS
H. N. CLIFF
R. C. PARKER
W. R. HUNT
H. H. KELLAND
A. E. ELLIOTT
E. CREELMAN
H. BENNETT
A. J. DRYSDALE
CHARLES PARKER
VICTOR THORSON
BLAIR ANDERSON
VAUGHAN MOSHER
ROBERT HALEY
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-one Zeta Psi
CARTER HANBURY
JACK KENNEDY
PETER LECKIE-EWING
GRAHAM DARLING
ALEX MacDONALD
JACK WHITTLE
EVAN apROBERTS
TOM BRANSON
PETER MATHEWSON
HUGH MANN
BOB   HAYMAN
KEITH   EADIE
BRUCE EMERSON
NORM STEWART
JACK CAMPBELL
MICHAEL CHURCHILL
GORDON DOUGLAS
JACK McLEOD
DOUGLAS WORTH
VICTOR MOTHERWELL
HAROLD DIXON
ERIC TURNILL
JACK DORCHESTER
ALAN HUDSON
DOC MILLER
BUD KILLAM
DOUGLAS WILSON
ALFRED TORNROOS
JIM EBERTS
JIM McKAY
JACK MARGESON
Zeta Psi was founded at New York University in 1847.
There are 29 active chapters. Sigma Epsilon Chapter was
installed in 1925.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-two Alpha Delta Pi
ELINOR BOSSY
JOY CAMERON
DOROTHY   DANIELS
MAVIS  EASTHAM
ETHEL EATON
MOLLY FIELD
ALICE GAVIN
CICELY  HOLMES
FRANCES HUMPHREY
FLORENCE JACKSON
FLORENCE JAMIESON
IRENE JENKINS
LORRAINE JOHNSTON
RENEE LEBLANC
BETTY LEHMAN
ELIZABETH STEWART
GERTRUDE SNOW
HELEN STRAITH
ORA WRIGHT
MARJORIE FINDLAY
JANET WALKER
JEAN WEST
PHYLLIS  TOSHACK
Alpha Delta Pi was founded in 1851, and at present has 55
active chapters. Beta Kappa was installed on the U.B.C.
campus on February 7, 1931.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-three Alpha Gamma Delta
BIDDY McNEILL
DOROTHY McCULLY
BARBARA AVIS
LOIS McEWEN
FLORENCE BAIN
MARGARET McLELLAN
HELEN HANN
MARY  EACRETT
PHYLLIS WAYLES
ISABEL SULLIVAN
EVE CARTER
BEVERLY WILSON
myrne nevison
ruth Mcdonald
doris kemp
delle smith
RUTH DEVLIN
JO WELDON
ESME CAYDZIEN
HELEN  NOWLAN
HELENE DEBRISAY
BETTY FLECK
ELAINE   ROBERTSON
ADRIENNE SOUTHIN
FRANCES McLEAN
PAULINE McMARTIN
ELEANOR CLARK
ELSIE GRANT
ISABEL STOTT
RUTH WILSON
MARGARET WORTHING
Alpha   Gamma   Delta   was   founded   in   1904,   and   has  45
chapters.    Delta  Zeta was installed at  U.B.C.   in   1930.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-four Alpha Omicron Pi
STELLA BRIDGEMAN
JOYCE COOPER
ANN JEREMY
CLYMENE DICKIE
JOAN MacARTHUR
MARGARET FINDLAY
VENIE  BEAM
BEA BALL
PRISCILLA BOYD
JUNE GEROW
GLADYS McMICHAEL
LILLIAN JOHANSEN
MILDRED FLOOK
Alpha Omicron Pi was founded in  1 897, and has 48 active
chapters.   Beta Kappa was installed at U.B.C. in 1932.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-five Alpha Phi
GERTRUDE PITMAN
ODETTA  HICKS
JOYCE CRAIG
CLAIRE  ST.   JOHN
DOROTHY CUMMINGS
DORIS PRATT
NORMA POLLOCK
HAZEL JEAN BESCOBY
JEAN PEARSON
BARBARA  McDOUGAL
JOHNINA MACAU LY
AUDREY SALTER
MARION GRIFFITHS
PATRICIA BIBBS
NANCY SMITH
MARGARET   SAGE
KATHLEEN MacKENZIE
RUTH HUTCHINSON
CONSTANCE FAIRLEIGH
Alpha Phi was founded in 1 872, and has 36 chapters.   Beta
Theta was installed at U.B.C. in 1929.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-six Delta Gamma
MIRIAM COSENS
MAUREEN McDIARMID
MARY HEYER
SHEILA WILSON
ELIZABETH BUTTERS
AUDREY CHOWNE
NANCY SADLER
MARGUERITE  HARKNESS
DOROTHY HUTTON
ELIZABETH DUNLOP
RUTH HEYER
FRANCES JONES
MARY NORR1S
MARY McLEOD
MARGARET   MORRIS
Delta Gamma was founded in  1 874, and there are 49 chapters.   Alpha Phi Chapter was installed at U.B.C.  in   1928.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-seven 9 9 LS
** *t *
j
Gamma Phi Beta
BARBARA BEARCE
JEAN STORDY
MARGARET EVANS
ANNIE JOHNSON
SHIRLEY LYNN
BETTY MOXON
MARGARET ALEXANDER
DOROTHY  SHERRATT
KATHERINE HEWITT
MARION   SLOAN
SHEILA GILLIS
DOROTHY HIRD
JOAN HILL
MARGY BARNETT
MARJORIE GALBRAITH
RUTH SCOTT
BETTY WORTHINGTON
BARBARA WHITE
MARGARET BURGESS
PAMELA RUNKLE
MOIRA WHITE
BARBARA LOGAN
Gamma  Phi  Beta was founded in   1874, and has 49 active
chapters.   Alpha Lambda was installed at U.B.C.  in   1928.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty- Eight Kappa Alpha Theta
JOANNE BROWN
BEVERLY McCORKELL
MARGARET LIGHTHEART
EDITH SELLENS
KAY SELLENS
EDITH WHITEFORD
POLLY
BRAND
MO IRA BREMMER
BARBARA HALL
MONA HUNTER
MARION VANCE
FRIEDA  FIELDS
CAROL STEWART
MARY BEALE
ESTHER GALPIN
LUCY JANE SULLIVAN
NANCY MARTIN
MONA
WESTBY
KAY   SKAE
RAY ADAMSON
ELINOR BOYD
MOLLY MEIGHEN
Kppa Alpha Theta was founded in 1 870, and has 63 active
chapters. Beta Upsilon Chapter was installed at U.B.C. in
1930.
9 %ly 9.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-nine I   K,
*§m NP
appa ixappa vjamma
JACQUELINE MacLEOD
MARGARET I. MacLEOD
HELEN TRANT
JEAN  McRAE
MARGARET WHITELAW
HELEN WRIGHT
VERNA BIRMINGHAM
VIRGINIA BIRMINGHAM
JANET SELDON
NELL TRAPP
MARIAN REID
EVELYN SMITH
ANNE CARTER
BETTY BOLDUC
KAREN HALL
HAZEL SCOTT
BARBARA SHANNON
RUTH SELDON
FRANCES WEBB
AUDREY   REIFEL
DOREEN MARTIN
ELLIS MacLEOD
ELIZABETH BALFOUR
JANET FLECK
JACQUELINE KLOEPFER
Kappa   Kappa  Gamma  was  founded   in   1870,  and  has  72
chapters.   Gamma Upsilon was installed at U.B.C in  1929.
Page Two Hundred and Forty (Wft We should like to take this opportunity to point out
to the readers of this Totem that quality and quantity
in the year book "business" unfortunately represent
increased costs. The large cost of this annual has
been partly carried by the generosity of the advertisers
in this section. We suggest that readers take an interest in the advertisements, and more particularly
that they show their appreciation of the advertisers'
assistance by patronizing the establishments and products publicized in the pages to follow.
Page Two Hundred and Forty-two TO TH€ CLASS OF139
•iSEX"
hi lnni
mi I inn
I
Another academic ye draws to its close.
Soon from the portals of U.B.C. will emerge
a group possessing better than the average
in « d u c 7 r i n and training. A group facing
the opportunity to exert widespread influence on the ce, the nation—even the
world at large, W^mmmk>JtSSA
The Class of '39 will resolve itself into
individuals who iri turn will join new groups
in varied lines of endeavor. Thus the
influence of Alma Mater is felt in ever-
widening circles. May she always contribute
to the progress and happiness of mankind.
i »   •   m**M
li*>
Jjjrtriijtotft 0a{i dompan^.
INCORPORATED    2?°   MAY   1670. HOME GAS
, M.A. * B.Sc *
"You Can
Buy No
Better!"
With flying colors HOME GAS has passed all
tests demanded by modern motorists. That's
why it is chosen by so many U.B.C. students.
They know, too, that HOME GAS is a B. C.
Product—made for B. C. use by the Independent 100%  B. C. Company.
Home Oil Distributors Ltd., Vancouver, B.C.
* Master of Acceleration
* Better — Safer — Cheaper (in the long run)
NABOB
IRRADIATED'
COFFEE
The Only Irradiated Coffee
in Canada
KELLY, DOUGLAS & CO. LTD.
Vancouver, B.  C.
Photo  by Courtesy  R.C.A.F.
This just had to be in the book!
Page Two Hundred and Forty-four WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY OF PARTICIPATING IN THE PRODUCTION OF THE 1939 "TOTEM". FOR MANY
YEARS THE FIRM OF WARD & PHILLIPS LIMITED HAS PRODUCED
PRINTING OF FINE QUALITY, SPECIALIZING IN PLANNING
ADVERTISING LITERATURE FROM THE "IDEA TO THE MAILBAG."
WARD   &   PHILLIPS   LIMITED  •   PRINTERS
318   HOMER  STREET O SE ymour  2364 O VANCOUVER,  CANADA
FLOW SHEET OF JENKINS VALVES
75  YEARS  EXPERIENCE
CONSTANT ENGINEERING AND MECHANICAL RESEARCH
HIGH GRADE RAW MATERIALS—BRONZE, IRON AND ALLOYS
ONE   OF THE MOST MODERN  FOUNDRIES
SPECIAL MACHINERY —CLOSE INSPECTION
QUALITY VALVES FOR PRACTICALLY EVERY SERVICE
Jenkins \folyes
h the   Diamond
BRONZ E   •   IRON
MADE IN   CANADA  BY JENKINS   BROS.  LIMITED,  MONTREAL
Page Two Hundred and Forty-five STATIONERY
LOOSE LEAF SUPPLIES
DRAWING  INSTRUMENTS
SLIDE RULES — SCALE RULES
FOUNTAIN PENS
Let Us Do Your Printing
for your
Fraternity and Sorority Organizations
The Clarke & Stuart
Co. Limited
STATIONERS AND PRINTERS
550 Seymour St. Vancouver, B. C.
When You Graduate
A
BIRKS
CHALLENGER WATCH
Will start you off into the business world
with  precision  and will   be your first
companion in the "March of Time"
Goldsmiths
Silversmiths
BIRKS
Diamond
Merchants
OFFICIAL FRATERNITY JEWELLERS
When You Need A Fountain Pen
See The
ESTERBROOK
RUGGED
DEPENDABLE
ATTRACTIVE
With   eighteen   different   points—there   is
one to suit every hand.
See  them at your  Local   Stationers
Canadian   Distributors
The Brown Brothers Ltd.
Toronto
Canada
From the Old to the New
Page Two Hundred and Forty-six THIS     PHOTOGRAPH     BY     CLELAND-KENT COMPLIMENTS OF
Capilano Brewing Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Marshall -Wells
(B.C.) Limited
Manufacturers - Distributors - Importers
WHOLESALE HARDWARE
Congratulates the Student Body upon
the high standard of the 1939
Totem and wishes it
success in 1939.
HALL OF FAME—McGUIRE
[Continued from Page 96)
His second "chef d'oeuvre" was a memorandum,
which was a survey of actual buildings needed during the next decade, including departmental requirements and costs, and a study of growth in
registration and potential income.
Next came the nicknamed "Ten Year Plan," which
can be described as a suggestion whereby the
money for the proposed additional buildings could
be provided from a fund set up by a $10 increase
in fees in place of the present $25 increase, supplemented by a dollar for dollar grant by the Provincial government. The fund would be expected to
reach the million dollar mark in the ten years. But
the entire plan was dependent upon completely unrestricted registration.
Carson's final plan for financing the Brock Memorial Union Building was probably his most success-
Page Two Hundred and Forty-eight PosiilaiU
FOR THE TOTEM
Made by
Ike Hdrma Studio-
833 GRANVILLE ST.
THE
BEST
N
MODERN
PHOTOGRAPHY
ful piece of work. His idea of the $25,000 grant
from the Board of Governors, to be paid at $2,500
a year for ten years, was not received optimistically
by the Brock Memorial Committee, or the Board of
Governors, or the Provincial Government. Yet the
scheme was passed at various Council and Committee Meetings, apparently almost in spite of the
respective members, and lo! the Brock Memorial
Building is financed.
It sounds trite, but we tender the proverbial orchids
to Carson McGuire.
LIVING
SOUND
The days of indifferent radio
sound reproduction went when
Northern Electric introduced their
new MIRROPHONIC models.
MIRROPHONIC embodies the
most modern developments in
accoustical science, and gives you
the   true   reproduction   of   the
original.
*   *   *
The new MIRROPHONIC radios
are  on   display   at   your dealer's.
A PRODUCT OF
Northern (5| Electric
COMPANY     *mW     LIMITED
Page Two Hundred and Forty-nine Professor Gage
Is quite a sage,
When it comes
To sums
And figures,
But the rigours
Of Varsity life,
And constant Freshman strife
Are sufficient to drive
Any "teacher" alive
To a state of coma or daze.
Then, you'll find,
He'll go out of his mind,
And happily play with a craze.
TO REACH YOUR GOAL
Every graduate when he
leaves University has an objective he would like to
reach. No matter what he
decides his life work will be,
regular Savings deposits of
even small amounts, accumulating at compound interest, lead step by step to
security and to the attainment of his goal.
THE
ROYAL    BANK
OF      CANADA
To all University Graduates, we wish
Success In All Your
Endeavours
To those entering the AGRICULTURAL
FIELD: Remember Liming is a Vital Factor
for SUCCESS. Use Pacific Agricultural
Hydrated Lime —Pure and immediately
effective, with Maximum Crop Yields.
Those entering  INDUSTRIAL AND CONSTRUCTION  FIELDS:  Pacific  Lime  Com
pany has successfully served all  these  industries and others for over 22 years.
Therefore  Be  Specific:  Demand  "Pacific"
The LIME Tested by TIME.
Pacific Lime Co.
LIMITED
Pacific Bldg., Vancouver, B.C. SE ymour 9505
Manufacturing   all   types   of   High   Grade   LIME
Ask  us  for  pamphlets  or  any  information
Products Sold at:
All Building, Feed & Garden Supply Dealers
Page Two Hundred and Fifty "EFFICIENT   BUSINESS   TRAINING   PAYS   DIVIDENDS   ALL   THROUGH   LIFE"
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
The New Type, High Standard College for those who
appreciate superior efficiency and modern methods
Students of  this  progressive  College, find  that  they  master  the
courses more thoroughly and in much less time because we have
—The Latest Methods
—The Latest Office Machines
—And More Teachers in proportion to Students than is customary.
SHORTHAND SIMPLIFIED
The New Willis System of Shorthand is so much simpler and
speedier than the old systems that students save both time and expense,
and have a much more satisfactory system for practical use because
they can read their notes with greater ease and accuracy.
(We still teach Pitman to those who desire it, or who began it elsewhere and wish
to profit by our advanced methods and modern facilities) .
We teach Bookkeeping as actually practiced in business—the
practical way.   No time is wasted.
We give the Complete Dictaphone Course as prepared by the
Dictaphone Company. Special Comptometer Course as arranged by the
Comptometer Company.
University  graduates and students are specially  invited  to visit  this  High  Grade
College   to   inspect  our   Up-to-the-minute   Facilities  for  Successful   Business  Training.
STEPHEN T. WILLIS
President
INDIVIDUAL   INSTRUCTION
OPEN ALL YEAR
ENTER ANY TIME
NIGHT SCHOOL
MONDAY AND THURSDAY
EVENINGS
"It is better to have attended Willis College than to wish you had."
Ask  for the Catalogue
College of Business
(Accredited  Member American  Association of Commercial Colleges!
Credit Fonder Building 850 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-one Th
University Book Store
The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium Building, was established for the convenience
of the students, and has effected a considerable saving
to the students in time and money. It is prepared to
supply all the text books required for the various
courses offered in the University, also such articles as
note books, loose-leaf sheets, fountain pens, drawing
paper and instruments.
APOLOGIA
And now that the end is near, now that the work of
producing this book is well nigh completed, we
breathe a sigh of relief. But first we have certain
small duties to perform, tasks that give us slight
pangs of discomfort. We must explain a few dis-
crepencies in the book, apologize for errors noticed,
and give information that has been unfortunately
omitted.
ESTABLISHED 1908
Do not look upon our service as an expense
but as an investment
SWAN BROS. LTD.
EXPERT CLEANERS and DYERS
Head Office and Plant:
1 2th Ave. and Kingsway FA irmont 6200
Branch  Office:
537  Richards St. SE ymour 6200
The first shock that staggered our feeble selves was
a sudden realization during the early stages of the
book that the name of the donor of the excellent
airview of the Campus on the Campus title page was
not in our possession. To us this generous friend
is unknown. Alas, therefore, his name cannot be
printed, the person himself not thanked as he most
certainly should be. But to Mr. Incognito we offer
our many thanks, for his picture was perfect.
For the pictures of and about Victoria College, once
ASSAY, INDUSTRIAL and
EDUCATIONAL
LABORATORY SUPPLIES
CHEMICALS
CAVE & COMPANY
Limited
567 Hornby Street Vancouver, B. C.
Page  Two   Hundred and  Fifty-two Mode/ui. HuAin&U . .
Complete
Secretarial
and
Book-keeping
Courses
Individual
Attention
Pitman
Shorthand
Gregg
Shorthand
Stenotypy
Special
Summer
Courses
for
University
Students
Including
Speedwriting
the
Natural
Shorthand
Easy to
Learn
Indispensable
to
University
Students
for
Lecture
Note Taking
PITMAN    BUSINESS    COLLEGE     LTD.
Telephone BA yview 8824
Granville at- Broadway—Vancouver, B. C.
Eveline A. C. Richards, President
again we express our thanks to a person or persons
unknown. The pictures used were stolen from the
College by ourselves at dead of afternoon from a
very sanctified room of the old College. Thanks
very much. We trust you did not miss them too
much!
An explanatory note should be inserted concerning
the picture of the Proposed Brock Memorial Building which appears on the Alma Mater Society Title
page.   This picture was taken from a drawing made
DIETHERS
LTD.
SAND  AND  GRAVEL
TRUE MIX CONCRETE
BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
COAL
Granville Island Vancouver, B. C.
Phone SE ymour 6761
several years ago, and is not in any way definite,
nor exact. It was intended to symbolize the activities of our Students' Council, and to herald a great
future for the Student Body of this University.
When we arrive at the sections of portraits, there
are bound to be errors. We have noticed a few,
but we are equally certain to have missed some.
We have been compelled to keep strictly to our
new system of deadlines for photographs in this
(Continued on  Page 258)
Always Remember . . .
You get the best results with
KEYSTONE
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Made in Vancouver by
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Wholesale  Stationers and  Paper  Dealers
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
Page Two  Hundred  and  Fifty-three Compliments of
The Empire
Stevedoring Co.
Limited
355 Burrard St.
W. M.  CRAWFORD,
Managing-Director.
Vancouver, B. C.
Qualis  Homo  Vadet?
(WHAT MANNER OF MAN
GOES THERE?)
On the Campus—In the Classroom
Or in the Everyday World
You are Judged by Your
APPEARANCE-
FLATTER IT AT KIRK'S
FEATURING:
Drape Suits in Stripes,  Herringbones and
Diagonals
Sport  Coats  in  High Tone Tweeds
Sport  Trousers—Gabardines—Cords—Tropicals
MADE-TO-MEASURE  CLOTHES
For  Men  and Women
301  West Hastings St.
NOW
while you are at college, and in future
years when you are in business or professional life, you will find a connection
with Canada's pioneer bank of real value
to you.
BANK   OF   MONTREAL
Established  1817
"A   bank lohere small accounts are welcome"
15   Branches  in Vancouver and  District
Columbia Paper Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE PAPER MERCHANTS
Manufacturers of "Columbia" Quality
Scribblers and Exercise Books
VANCOUVER, B. C.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Captain  Vancouver—romantic  figure  in   B.  C.  history,
and the  inspiration
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-four COMPLIMENTS OF
American  Can Co.
Ltd.
535 Railway
Vancouver, B. C.
Turpin Bros. Ltd.
655 GRANVILLE ST.
Specialists   in   Men's   Higher  Grade   Suits,
Overcoats and Haberdashery
•
English   Overcoats
Hand Tailored Suits
Imported   Haberdashery
f/tf&u«zjw^^7h>/^l-
You can do it too in Jantzen Sportswear.
Rugged, he-mannish sweaters for men (sold
under the "Universal" trade mark), smart,
practical knitted suits and sweaters for the
ladies and just wait till you see the new Glamour
Fabric swim suits for this season. They'll
really do things to your figure. These fine
products are all made by a 100% B. C. firm
making jobs for young B. C. men and women.
Jantzen   Knitting   Mills   of  Canada   Ltd.
Vancouver, Canada
Canadian Industries
Limited
Operating the Following Divisions
"Cellophane"
Plastics
General    Chemicals
Organic   Chemicals
Salt
"Dominion"
Amunition
Explosives
"Fabrikoid"
Paint   and   Varnish
Fertilizer
For this, the Vancouver City Hall?
Architectural Woodwork
Sash and Doors
HARDWOOD   SPECIALISTS
•
SIGURDSON MILLWORK CO.
LTD.
1275  West  Sixth   Ave.
Vancouver,  B. C.
Sigurdson  Reputation  is a  Guarantee of
Woodwork Satisfaction
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-five Compliments of
Canadian  Broadcasting
Corporation
CBR
'The Voice of British Columbia at
Vancouver"
Best Wishes
To the Student Body of U.B.C.
for Success in
19 3 9
McLennan, McFeely &
Prior, Ltd.
VANCOUVER—VICTORIA-   NEW WESTMINSTER
British   Columbia's   Pioneer   Hardware   Supply   House
Established  1859
PIONEER LAUNDRY & DRY
CLEANERS LIMITED
"A Complete Laundry and Dry-Cleaning
Service"
SE ymour 8334
Licensed SANITONE Dry Cleaner
Today's
Thrills
even
more fun
Tomorrow
In sports and all events of college days there is action
a-plenty. Movies of these activities will thrill you
now, in later years they'll be priceless. Yet movies
you make yourself are so easy, so economical with
a Cine-Kodak. We'd like an opportunity to explain
and show you samples. Prices start at only $37.50.
Keeping a "still" picture record of your everyday
doings with a Kodak is fun as well. Kodaks are
simple to use and inexpensive too—prices from $5 up.
Eastman
PHOTOGRAPHIC
MATERIALS
Ltd.
610 Granville Street
*~=h*. tAole evAo u/awt/Ae. 4et£
JAMS — JELLIES
MARMALADE
MINCEMEAT
JELLY POWDER — PUDDINGS
SPICES — EXTRACTS
PEANUT BUTTER
PICKLES — VINEGAR — HONEY
BAKING
POWDER
TEA
COFFEE
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-six Athletic Club
An Amateur Organization, formed to promote the Highest Standards in Good
Clean Sport in Vancouver.
CHAMPIONS.... 1938
Vancouver Senior Amateur Baseball League
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-seven C P.
FOSTER 6- CO.
LIMITED
Commercial Stationers and Printers
Mathematical and Surveying  Instruments
592 Seymour Street            Vancouver, B. C.
569 Howe St.
New and guaranteed used
instruments and supplies
for the Mining and Engineering Professions
Binoculars, Microscopes,
Aneroids and Precision
Instruments of all Kinds
A   Useful  Instrument Makes  a
Practical Gift
Frederick Goertz
Limited
Instrument Makers
Vancouver, B. C. Sey.  1877
Gordon & Belyea
LIMITED
Wholesale Hardware and
Ship Chandlery
101  POWELL STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Compliments of
Office Specialty Mfg. Co.
Limited
Home Office and Factories:
NEWMARKET, Canada
"Filing Systems and Office
Equipment"
536 Howe Street SE ymour 2403
VANCOUVER, B. C.
(Continued from Page 253)
section, and in consequence there may appear to be
omissions. What photographs are not in their respective panels may, perhaps, be found in the Too
Late To Classify pages (pages 132 and 133), and
if they are not here, they are not in the book.
Two mistakes have been noticed, which we mention here. W. H. Gross of Science '42 has been represented by Doug. Gross ... an error! and a stud
ent by the name of Leong has been called Loeng.
Silly isn't it!
On the class page of Science '41 two cartoons have
been printed in colour. We trust that they belong
to this page.    If not they still look good, don't they!
On the Players.' Club page we discovered only too
late that Dudley Darling, enthusiastic Business
Manager of the Club, had been omitted from the
executive layout.     Bad luck, Dudley, for you un-
COMPLIMENTS OF
The Canadian Salt Herring Co.
217 Dunlevy St. Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
GEORGE SPARLING
929  Granville St.
Vancouver,  B.  C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
BLOEDEL, STEWART & WELCH Ltd.
COMPLIMENTS OF
KAGETSU & COMPANY
355 Princess St.
Vancouver, B. C.
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-eight ^T
THE, GOVERNMENT OF
THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Education
Summer School
of
Education
VICTORIA
and
VANCOUVER
Write for bulletin to
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Provincial  Normal  School
Victoria
doubtedly should have been there. But perhaps
being mentioned here will make up for it.
In the Minor Clubs section, which includes more
this year than ever before, a few Clubs have been
missed out. The Women's Public Speaking Club,
the Agricultural Discussion Club and the Technocracy Society are not to be found therein. There
are many reasons to account for their absence, the
chief of which, according to the Clubs editor, being that the write-ups were handed in late.    Besides
Best Wishes to the "TOTEM'
from
D. Gestetner
(CANADA)
LIMITED
Manufacturers   of   the  World's   Premier
Duplicating Machines, Stencils, Inks and
Fine Duplicating Papers
660 Seymour Street Phone SE ymour 5880
this there was no more room, and that was that!
The only other thing to mention is the deplorable
fact that Pat Carey's picture is not on the Totem
page. Pat did sterling work, but her photograph
did not get into the assistants' panel. Many regrets.
We are now going to shut up, for we may have
said too much already. Hope you like the book as
much as we have enjoyed working on it. And now
to the Library!!
Your  Nearest  Bank   Is
THE CANADIAN BANK OF
COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branch
A general banking business is transacted
and accounts of the Faculty and Students
of the University are invited.
Bankers to the Alma Mater Society
C. R. MYERS, Manager
COMPLIMENTS OF
TERMINAL CITY IRON WORKS
Hydrant and Valve Manufacturers
1949 Franklin St. Vancouver,  B. C.
SIDNEY BAKER
Picture   Framing
Artistic   Framing  at  Moderate   Prices
510 Hornby St. (near Pender) Phone SE y. 4150
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-nine The Willson Stationery
COMPANY LIMITED
Complete  Office Outfitters
STATIONERS   —   PRINTERS
British Columbia Agents for
"Ditto" Systems    —    Postage Meters
Ediphone  Voice  Writing   Machines
Elliott Addressing Equipment
Allen  Calculators — Speed-o-Print  Duplicators
830 West Pender Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
STANLEY PARK SHIPYARD LTD.
1969 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B. C.
TRinity  4702 Nights—Highland   1403-L
LA ngara 0380-F
COMPLIMENTS OF
SEAPORT CROWN FISH CO. LTD.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Carfer-Halls-Aldinger Ltd
670 Taylor Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Congratulations, Class of 1939
McKEEH & WILSON LTD.
Established  1894
Office & Wharf: Telephones:
Foot of Heatley Ave., Day—HI ghland 0046
Vancouver, Canada Night—BA yview 0077
All Classes of Towing and Lighterage
COMPLIMENTS OF
MRS. D. SLOAN
Mount Pleasant  Undertaking Co.
Limited
306 East 1 1 th Avenue
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Alberta Lumber
Company
Limited
790 W. 6th Ave.
Vancouver,   B.  C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
SABA BROTHERS LIMITED
622
Granville St.                                    Vancouver, B.
C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Progressive Engineering
Works Ltd.
Pattern
Makers,  Founders,
and   Blacksmiths
Machinists
360 West   1st
Ave.
Vancouver,  B.  C
We had a fearful time keeping up with her!     It is on the
North Side of blissful Stanley Park
Two Hundred and Sixty COMPLIMENTS OF
Northern Electric Co. Limited
150 Robson Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
MRS. JOHN HENDRY
3851   Pine Crescent
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Alcock, Downing fir Wright, Limited
896 Cambie Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Coast Breweries Limited
1040 Hamilton Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Ca
nada Dry Ginger
1060 Hamilton
Vancouver, B
Ale Limited
Street
C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Bogardus, Wickens Limited
1000 Homer Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
POWELL LUMBER CO.
1355 Powell St.
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
VIC fir VAN LIMITED
300
Alexander St.                               Vancouver,
B.
C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
G.
w.
H.
STEARMAN,
ESQ.
3694 West 4th Ave
Vancouver, B.
c
COMPLIMENTS OF
WHITE DISTRIBUTORS LIMITED
1275 Seymour St.
Vancouver, B. C.
You'll  Enjoy
ORANGE CRUSH
Made Daily from Fresh Oranges
THE ORANGE  CRUSH   CO.   LTD.
3675
West 4th Ave.                          Vancouver,
B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Dr. W. Prowd
1081   Burrard Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Brown
Brothers and Co.
Limited
FLORISTS
665 Granville Street
COMPLIMENTS OF
Auto Parts Limited
1 105 Granville Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS
OF
Dominion
Laundry  fir
Limited
Dry
Cleaners
5 West 4th Avenue
Vancouver, B.
c
COMPLIMENTS OF
Dickson Importing Co. Limited
1 57 West Cordova Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Compliments of a Friend
COMPLIMENTS OF
G. A. DAVIDSON
Two Hundred and Sixty-one Compliments of
Dan McLean
Motor Co. Ltd.
Distributor of
NASH
From $1198 Up—Delivered Vancouver
1148 Georgia W.
SE ymour 4393
Call At—
THE DANCE NOVELTY
BUREAU
570 Granville St.  (Upstairs)        SEy. 1860
Vancouver,  B. C.
For Your Next Sorority or Fraternity Dance
BALLOONS . . . HATS . . . NOISEMAKERS
Wholesale   prices   to   clubs—send   for  our  price   list.
We also supply for private parties
BELL-IRVING'S
EUROPEAN CHOICE TOUR
Starts £C*7A.OO EndS
July  6 ^9 i ** August 27
Seeing
Canada, United States, London
and
Scotland or Wales  and   Lakes or Scandinavia  or the
Riviera  or  Italy or Switzerland or  Germany,  Austria
and France.
Mrs. John Montgomery,  Hostess
A wonderful Travel Opportunity by
BELL-IRVING TRAVEL LTD. c738 Hast  W
SE ymour   6321
COMPLIMENTS
OF
Boeing Aircraft
of Canada
1927 West Georgi
a Street
Vancouver, B.
C.
Mitchell Printing
& Publishing Co. Limited
More and More in Printing the Trend is to
"Mitchell Printing"
PHONE SEY. 4484
1037 W.  Pender St. Vancouver,  B.  C.
The gateway to the Pacific Ocean roads lies at the foot of
University Hill—here's the Empress leaving home.
Two Hundred and Sixty-two You buy a Car but you invest in an
AUSTIN
FRED DEELEY
Limited
B. C.  Distributors British Austin Cars
Phone Bayview 3544
901   West Broadway Vancouver,  B. C.
H. Sickelmore
FLORIST
'Flowers in the Modern Manner"
2633 Granville Street
BAyview 2172
710 W. Hastings St.
SE ymour 0677
Lance Bissett
BOSTITCH WIRE STITCHING
STAPLING AND TACKING MACHINES
For every purpose.
509 Richards Street TR inity 5935
Vancouver, B.C.
LIVESTOCK
Public marketing assures true values
to the producer
Consign  your  live stock to
BAIRD & CO. LTD.
Live Stock Commission Merchants
Foot of Fraser St. Vancouver,  B.  C.
Phone FR aser 0308
100  per cent  B. C. owned and  operated
COMPLIMENTS OF
TWENTY- MINUTE AUTO
LAUNDRY
1044 W. Hastings Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
G.
G.
HEATHER & CO. LTD.
Furriers
Remodelling  Our  Specialty
1026 Granville St.                          Phone TR inity
5119
COMPLIMENTS OF
PIERRE PARIS
Health Shoes for All at Pierre Paris
51   West Hastings St. Vancouver, B.  C.
And   here's   a   staunch   C.P.R.   booster!
COMPLIMENTS OF
Export Logging
Co. Lii
mi ted
736 Granvill
; Street
Vancouver,
B. C.
Two Hundred and Sixty-three COMPLIMENTS OF
Davis-White Co. Lim
ited
31 1   Water Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Campbell & Grill Limited
1 238  Seymour Street
Vancouver, B. C.
H. J. SWENGEL
Representing
BURROUGHS ADDING MACHINE CO. OF CAN. LTD.
Sun Building 500 Beatty
OFFICE MACHINERY
COMPLIMENTS OF
NELSON LAUNDRY LIMITED
2300 Cambie St. Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
CENTRAL CREAMERIES   LIMITED
325 Railway Ave.
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
FRASEA FARMS LTD.
Famous Grauer Herds
Fresh Milk and Cream
Phone  LA ngara  0332
COMPLIMENTS OF
CHRISTIE'S LIMITED
Quality Shoes for the Family
Hand-made Ski and Hiking Boots
620 W. Hastings St. Vancouver, B. C-
COMPLIMENTS OF
S. SASAKI
725 Pacific Bldg. Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
DR. E.
GALLANT
435
Rogers Building
Vancouver,
B.
C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Burrard Texaco Service
Station
745 Burrard St.                                       Vancouver, B.
c.
COMPLIMENTS OF
BARR & ANDERSON LTD.
1060
Homer St.                                    Vancouver,
B.
C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
J. M. Dent & Sons (Canada) Ltd.
Publishers
1300 Robson St. Vancouver,  B.  C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Cascade Laundry & Dry Cleaners
Ltd.
Licensed Sanitone Dry Cleaners
The Beauty Treatment for Clothes
5 West 4th Ave.                                       FA irmont
1294
COMPLIMENTS OF
DARLINGTON, HASKINS & CO. Ltd
Designers and Contractors for
Tiles, Marble, Terrazzo,
Structural   Glass
2144 Granville St. Vancouver,  B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
CROSS & CO.'S
Dry Ginger Ale and Whistle
38 East 4th Ave. FA irmont 1173
The
359
COMPLIMENTS OF
Daley Heating and Sheet Metal
Works
last  Broadway                          -   Vancouver,  B.  C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
CLARENCE DARLING, Esq.
640 W.  Hastings St. Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
CANADA ROOF PRODUCTS LTD.
Manufacturers of
Roofs, Floors, Walls, etc.
10th  at Arbutus Vancouver,  B.  C.
Two Hundred and Sixty-four Compliments of
NUNN & THOMPSON Lid.
2559 Cambie Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
CALHOUN'S
"Smile" JlaU
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Congratulations to the 7939 Graduating Class
Commodore Cabaret
COMPLIMENTS OF
BEGG MOTOR CO. LTD.
COMPLIMENTS OF
PACIFIC ENGINEERS LIMITED
COMPLIMENTS OF
The Canada Permanent Trust Co.
432 Richards Street
Vancouver,  B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
FORMER GRADUATES
COMPLIMENTS OF
DUNSMUIR ELECTRIC CO.
Owning and Operating
Radio   and   Television   Engineers
Evans   McKenzie   Radio   Electric
Earle Dunsmuir, Manager Phone BA yview 8941
3065  West   Broadway Vancouver,   B.  C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
STUART CAMERON & CO.
355  Burrard St.
Vancouver,  B.  C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
BOWELL-McDONALD LIMITED
615 Burrard St.                                     Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
ESQUIRE MEN'S APPAREL
Men's  Furnishings    —    Sports Wear
Agents for Tip Top Tailors
Imported Specialties
2664  Granville St. Vancouver,  B.  C.
Two Hundred and Sixty-six u
Steamships   Ltd.
nion  oteamsnips
Offer an  Unrivalled  Series of
SUMMER VACATION TRIPS
From One Day to Six Days
From $1.00 to $45.00
Between May 1st and Sept. 30th.
Illustrated Folders and Information at City Office,
793 Granville Street, Phone Seymour 9331; or Union
Pier, foot Carrall Street; Phone Trinity 1321.
1889 -Fifty  Years  of   Friendly   Service—1939
BaKeastf
Shortening
The Economical
Perfect Shortening
SPECIAL   FORMS
for University Drainage System
were   designed   and   built   by
CANADIAN WOOD PIPE & TANKS
Limited
Vancouver,   B.C.
Established 1904
Phone   Trinity   2760
The Lions Gate Cartage Co.
FURNITURE and PIANO MOVING
EXPRESS   and   BAGGAGE
J. E. Luton, Mgr.
1310 Burrard Street Vancouver, B.  C.
SWEET  SIXTEEN   LIMITED
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear
Three   Stores   for   Your   Convenience
137 W. Hastings    —    927 Granville St.    —    2542 Main St.
PAY — AS — YOU — WEAR
If this
Totem
has been
success
help
us
by buying
it
immediately
and
if
you have
friends,
or parents,
or
something,
show
the book
to them ...
CAMPUS LEADERS
ARE DRESSED BY
LEE
Quality clothes
from $30
E. A. LEE
623 Howe Street
Two Hundred and Sixty-five Quality Ice Cream
Made with Rich Jersey Cream
Borland Ice Cream Co.
Limited
1520 West 6th Ave. BA yview 1524
"We   Treat  Your  Clothes  White"
We Specialize in
High  Class Dry Cleaning
Dress and Sport Clothing
Phone BA yview 0841
Third at Pine
You Will Enjoy
Blue Ribbon
COFFEE
it has real flavor
Roasted and  Packed in Vancouver
BLUE  RIBBON  LIMITED
P^UtiUta
We have served your Alma Mater during
your college years.
May we take this opportunity to wish you,
the graduates of 1939, success in your business and professional careers. May we
again serve you.
Anderson Printing Co.
Limited
SE ymour 3400
455 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B. C.
Two Hundred and Sixty-seven Whether for Home or Business Office
Our Stationary and Printing Departments will serve you in many ways
GEHRKES LTD.
566 Seymour Street
Trinity  1311
FL
ASSOCIATED
B
rain am
irawn:
!
'        FAIR. 1000    \\
Rich
safe
CLEAN
Milk
For sparkling  energy,
For study and sport,
Be   sure   to   drink   a   daily
quart—
of ASSOCIATED MILK
VisJt   our   new   Dairy——the
finest in all  Canada
Associated Dairies Ltd.
FA irmont 1000
De Barre Beauty Parlor and
Barber Shop
Olive   Turley
Enjoy the Best in Permanent Waves
Special Attention Given to Every
Texture of Hair
Creators   of   Exclusive   Permanents
EXPERT  BARBER   IN  ATTENDANCE
4212 Dunbar at 26th Ave. Bay.  5606
COMPLIMENTS OF
VICTOR W. ODLUM
2530   Pt.  Grey   Road
Vancouver,  B. C
COMPLIMENTS OF
McDonell Metal Manufacturing Co.
231   Industrial Ave.
Vancouver, B. C
COMPLIMENTS OF
Dr.
R.
LLEWELLYN DOUGLAS
470  W.
Hastings  St.                         Vancouver,   B.
c.
Insurance and Finance
Special Finance Plan at 5% Simple Interest
and Small   Finance Fee
BELL, MITCHELL LTD.
541   West   Georgia   St.
Trinity   1391
IT'S AN EDUCATION
In  Modern Merchandising Methods
NO INTEREST or
CARRYING CHARGES
On  Pianos —  Radios and
Musical Instruments
When Purchased on Easy Terms
LEWIS
1044 Granville St.
PIANO  HOUSE
LIMITED
Vancouver, B. C.
HARRY  KEITH
Authorized Distributor
Standard Oil Products
Open All Night
"GENERAL"
TIRES BATTERIES
Broadway at Alma
BA yview 0074
B. C/s Largest Exclusive
Fur House
NEW YORK FUR
COMPANY  LIMITED
Georgia at Howe SE ymour 7355
Two Hundred and Sixty-eight BUY  "B.C.  PRODUCTS"
"It's the Smart Thing to do!"
It's smart from several angles.
It's smart Economics. Buy the B.C. Product and you support Home Industry,
give Employment to our own people, restore them to the Pay-roll and to their
rightful place in our Economic Life.
It's smart Psychology. Support the Home Producer, and he will respond with
an ever-widening range of goods "Made in B. C."
It's smart Buying. In Price and Quality, the B.C. Product compares extremely
well with the imported article.
So we say TUUM EST.   It is up to you.
*
DEPARTMENT      OF      TRADE      AND    INDUSTRY
Parliament Buildings
VICTORIA, B.C.
E. G. ROWEBOTTOM
Deputy Minister
HON. W. J. ASSELSTINE
Minister
The
House
of
Fine Cameras
CONTAX
LEICA
EXAKTA
ZEISS IKON
ROLLEIFLEX
KODAK
B. C. Distributors for Bell & Howell
Silent and Sound-film Movie Equipment
DUNNE & RUNDLE
LIMITED
531 Granville St. TR inity 5788-9
The secret of the attraction of
a good looking girl, lies not so
much in what nature gave her,
but in what she has done to
accentuate   her   best   features!
Phone TR inity 2040
for   a   FREE   consultation   with
Mme. Clou
CLOU
HAIRDRESSING SALON
812 Robson St.   (Upstairs)
TR inity   2040
Two Hundred and Sixty-nine DUfFUS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
High Standards Make Competent
Graduates
Special Summer Courses
Individual Attention
SEYMOUR  and  PENDER
Day and  Night
COMPLIMENTS OF
WRIGLEY
PRINTING
CO.
LTD.
576 Seymour St.
Phone
SE ymour 3747
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
JAMES BAXTER
CHIMNEY SWEEPING
925 Granville St. Phone: TR inity 0200
Vancouver, B. C.
Sports Goods
are Good Goods
at 1020
It matters not what sport you follow
or what games you play—1020 is a
Complete Sports Shop with everything . . .
. . . and in quality ... at a moderate
ccut.
Have a look at 7939's New Tennis
Style
LISLE  FRHSER
SPORTING GOODS
1020
Branch   at  719   Pender   St.   West
GRANVILLE
STREET
COMPLIMENTS OF
J. L. WILSON-GOODE
British Trade Commissioner
RESTMORE MANUFACTURING
CO. LIMITED
1000   Parker   Street
Vancouver,  B.  C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
SENATOR J. W. de B. FARRIS
Northern Construction Co. and
J. W. Stewart Ltd.
736 Granville Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Two Hundred and Seventy J-Laitky.
In building an annual it is astounding how much detailed and specialized information one is required to obtain. Facts must be at the
foundation of so many stories; facts actually constitute many of the
written material in the book.
For this type of information we should like to acknowledge first the
assistance of President Klinck's Office. We feel that we must have
finally become a nuisance, but always we were given everything we
needed.
We acknowledge the help of Dr. Kaye Lamb of the Provincial Archives,
and of Major Matthews of the Vancouver City Archives, through
whose efforts photographs and documents were made available for
our use.
And lastly may we express our thanks to the Vancouver Daily
Province for the use of News Photos for the feature page, "The Year."
In several cases other of the Province photographs were given to us,
and it is impossible to tell how much they were appreciated.
COMPLIMENTS OF
PETER PAN BALLROOM
1636 West Broadway Phone: BA yview 1721
Vancouver, B.  C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
A. Ramsay fir Son Co. of B. C.
Limited
WHOLESALE   PAINT
1062  Homer St.
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
SITKA SPRUCE LUMBER CO.
LTD.
1   West First Avenue
Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
ASSOCIATED NATUROPATHIC
INSTITUTES LTD.
1173   West  Broadway
Vancouver, B. C.
Two Hundred and Seventy-one 9«de#,
EX LIBRIS     1
TITLE PAGE      2
FOREWORD  5
DEDI CAT ION     7
CHANCELLOR McKECHNIE'S MESSAGE  8
PRESIDENT KLINCK'S MESSAGE  11
THE CAMPUS   12
SUMMER CAMPAIGN     23
OUR UNIVERSITY   24
THE YEAR    26
HOMECOMI NG     28
VICTORIA INVASION   30
COLLEGES   32
Anglican College   -   34
Union College   35
Victoria College   36
Summer School      38
University Extension   40
FACULTY    42
Deans' Messages     44
Faculty Heads   48
Faculty List   51
Dr. Hebb: In Memoriam  52
ALMA MATER SOC IETY  54
Students' Council   56
Undergraduate Executives   58
GRADUATES   62
Arts '39   65
Commerce '39   77
Education  '39    79
Aggie '39    80
Science '39  83
Nursing '39  ,    87
Theolog Grads   ^0 !)*tde*.
HALL OF FAME       92
UNDERGRADUATES ____     100
Aggie '40    104
Arts '40     103
Arts '41   112
Aggie '41       113
Science  '40       124
Science  '41       126
Science '42   129
Too Late to Classify  132
Freshmen     1 34
In Memoriam, James Keller, Thomas Long   145
ACTIVITIES    146
Major Clubs     148
Minor Clubs   164
PUBLICATIONS       _  170
The  Ubyssey           172
The Totem     174
The Handbook      177
ATHLETICS     „ 1 80
Athletic Directorates and Executives   182
English Rugby   -  1 88
Canadian  Football       192
Basketball       194
Track       196
Other Major Sports        198
Minor Sports       204
Outdoors Club      216
THE GREEKS     -   218
ROUND TOWN     241 Printed by
WARD & PHILLIPS LIMITED
Vancouver,  B.C.

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