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The Totem 1954 1954

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   EDITOR:  WENDY SUTTON THE
TOTEM
19     5     4
PUBLISHED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
BY THE PUBLICATIONS BOARD OF THE
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
CANADA  DEDICATED
TO THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA WHO, WITHIN THEIR COLLEGE WORLD,
ARE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN THE MEANING
OF CITIZENSHIP AND THE IMPORTANCE OF LEARNING.
WE URGE THEM TO SO USE THEIR OPPORTUNITIES HERE
THAT, THOUGH SPECIFIC KNOWLEDGE MAY FADE
THESE FUNDAMENTAL VALUES WILL ENDURE. N
T
ADMINISTRATION
Page Sixteen
GRADUATES
Page Twenty-eight
CAMPUS LIFE
Page Sixty-four
ATHLETICS
Page Seventy-two N
FINE ARTS
Page Ninety-eight
ORGANIZATIONS
Page One Hundred Twelve
FACULTIES
Page One Hundred Sixty-two
ADVERTISING
Page Two Hundred Forty T
HIS YEAR Vancouver pl< s    E     ire
and Commonwealth Games.  N n       pr senta-
tives from all parts of the B tin    on
the University of British QoJ t        m ete in
these  games.   The  emph«
Games  have   a  deeper
isis  will  be on  sports  but the
>urpose  than  this — their  true object is to strengthen Empire ties and to broaden un
standing.   Congregating on our campus in early August
will be competitors from Australia to Pakistan and from
Scotland  to  Jamaica.    Even  before  the  advent  of
Games,  students  at our college  have  been  enabledl
their sports, studies and social activities, to act as the unofficial delegates of their respective countries. This
university is, in its broad field of student activity, a microcosm of the British Empire and of the world. During regular
session our student residences are, in essence, international
communities   in   themselves.    This   summer   will   see   the continuance of this aspect in the creation of the "Empire
Village" on the site of this campus. In the month of July,
one thousand athletes will gather in Vancouver and will
live and train within the environs of our university. The
length of their sojourn will be short; but, living in such intimate association, they will gain respect for eacr
and for the countries which they represent. The tflsmo-
politan life of this university, within the regular school year,
is an even broader basis for developing understanding
among individuals and among nations.  In our daily College life, students introduce to the campus their varie
cultures through the medium of clubs and org,
This university campus is an international stage
drama from every nationality is enacted. Our* i
is the focal point for the products of internatiqw from American jazz to Slavonic concert music and from
Italian films to Greek tragedy. In our library we see
exhibits and displays of various ethnic arts, ranging from
traditional East Indian art to the sculptural forms of modern
artists.   Here too, books reveal to us the various nations from the dawn of their histories to their contemporary
stages of development. In our classes and labs, we draw
on the accumlated achievements of minds of every race
and come to realize that the search for knowledge
transcends the narrow confines of nationality.  \.
ADMINISTRATION The President
Speaks
President MacKenzie s Message
to the Graduates of 1954
«TVOFB«'^*COLUMB,A
jjic.-*--—"
March 5th.  X**-
an opport-nXty of
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m again X am gXad to ha ^ ^
° „d good "Xshes to the
meeting9 and s
^tending g^ee „lttl
3& g— - ?£  £ years that yo« --
^^^astX-XatXnge^Xen--
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ft have enjoy
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tove spent on **• ioprovements ^
Ve 8tlX      vices «e render and.
^ve and the service ^^ lt
«»»**•      BwUl^etl,e"      to an institution
«- Pa89e8' * - —*~ " *""\Z one is ^ T
wbich is »l flnd them
-uM ";;"■—• * ~ Tin-. - »-
,„ .1X1 -- *"  • „,.t t„  K*»- "* " ^ „!„..!
lf ,ou are to a^rficulties wXH a
t0 ** ' that these very diffXc student9
X nope. *-ever.  «- ^ y0tt have ie^ ^
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llve happy and cr
\, A. H. MacKen*io-
18 Board Of
Governors
UNDER the capable guidance and supervision of
Chancellor Sherwood Lett, the University Board
of Governors tackled the perennial problems which
crop up during the academic year. The two dollar fee
increase was the biggest headache for the twelve man
Board, but they managed to collect from the already
hard pressed students without too much difficulty.
The Board met the last Monday in every month
during the Fall and Spring Sessions and attempted to
iron out many of the problems which faced it during
the calendar year. Included in the duties and responsibilities of the Board are the care and enlargement of
the Buildings and Grounds. At the Spring General
Meeting the students voted, in principle, to render
financial support as the circumstances permitted
towards the roofing of the British Empire Games
Swimming Pool. If this offer is received favorably by
the Board the pool will be housed by the spring of
1955.
The average student can see for himself that his
interests and finances are well protected by the
close concentration placed on them by the Board of
Governors.
Chancellor Sherwood Lett, Chairman ot the Board of
Governors, recently was re-elected to head the 12-man
body. Chancellor Lett has more than proven himself
worthy of the distinction that the University has proffered
him as he has been the first President of the Student
Body, President of the Alumni Association, and a member
of the Senate and the Board of Governors before he
was elected Chancellor.
Seated at the Round Table at the Board of Governors' monthly meeting are Mrs. Helen Harver, Mr. G. H. Cunningham, Mr. R. H.
Neelands, Mr. J. M. Buchanan. The Honorable Mr. Justice J. M. Coady, Chancellor Sherwood Lett, President N. A. M. MacKenzie.
His Honor Judge A. E. Lord, His Honor Judge J. B. Clearihue, Mr. D. J. Baldwin, Mr. K. P. Caple. Absent from the meeting was
Mr. W. J. Murray. Faculty Administration
Walter Gage, Dean of Men, listened patiently to students' problems and ironed out their difficulties regarding courses and credit.
Geoff Andrew received a promotion this past year and is now
Dean Andrew, Assistant to the President.
Dean Dorothy Mawdsley
handled all activities concerning women. This included everything from housing in the Dorms to the
Honorary Presidency of all
women's clubs.
Miss Marjorie Leeming, Assistant Dean of Women, aided
her superior in every way
possible and gained the respect of all students on campus, men and women alike.
Being an active sportswoman
herself, Miss Leeming put
much of her scare time into
Women's Athletics.
20 Alums Big Force On Campus
Alumni President, Dudley Darling, chats with Executive
Director Frank Turner about Annual Scholarships.
Piled-up  notices   prove   that  Alumni  Association   is  thriving  as
Marion Smith and assistant cope with work.
BARRAGED by pamphlets, newsletters and notices,
the Alumni Association carried out the year under
the efficient directorship of Frank Turner. As usual
the secretaries were practically ploughed under by the
many and varied duties they had to perform. The work
and concern about the Alum's interest in their own
association paid off as was indicated by the miraculous
turnout at the Annual Winter Banquet. Students on
campus rarely stop to think about the group which
occupies the office in the North end of Brock Hall.
Perhaps their interest will be revived when they join
the ranks of the illustrious Alums who preceded them.
AMS Keeps Campus Happy
IN at ten; out at five" was the supposed motto of
the AMS Office staff, but rarely were they able
to put their theory into practice. "All work and little
credit" would have been a better theme to go by, for
it was extremely infrequent that the staff was able to
perform the required duties and go home for a well
deserved rest. Numerous times during the year Mr.
Maunsell and his cohorts worked themselves into a
frenzy of mild panic when they felt that the students
were counting on them to present, as complete, material
which had been handed to them only partially finished.
Aided by Treasurer Goldsmith, Mr. Maunsell doled
out everything from the new AMS cards to ballots
for the Spring elections. What the students would do
without this efficient and compatable machine, nobody
knows. It is to be hoped that they will never have to
find out.
21
AMS Office Staff worked diligently to keep students happy.
Rarely disheartened when the books didn't balance, Mr. Maunsell kept students and AMS Treasurer hopping. L. to R.: Mavis
Murray, Pat Brook, Shirley Fryer, Mr. Maunsell. Student Council
Runs Campus
Smoothly
LIKE many a public body, this year's Student Council
was comparatively unknown to the electorate. So
unknown, as a matter of fact, that a Ubyssey survey
showed less than half of UBC's 5400 students knew
who the council president was. But such obscurity
didn't bother chief Ivan Feltham and his 12-man crew
who ploughed their way through a successful year of
student governing.
Quiet and efficient, President Feltham kept the council out of deep water throughout the eight:month race,
busily mediating for engineers and Ubyssey staffers,
soft-soaping council critics, and, finally, winning the
Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University.
Student Alma Mater President, Ivan Feltham, took over
Council duties with confidence. His cohorts were overwhelmed by his capabilities.
Councillors listen intently as Feltham outlines precedure for the Spring General Meeting. Clockwise are: Ann Cooper, Howie Beck, Al
Goldsmith, Pete Lusztig, Mike Nuttal, Marilyn Russell, Bill St. John, Jim McNish, Al Fotheringham, Nan Adamson, Johann Stoyva,
Dick Underhill.
22 Hero of the year was lanky Bill St. John serving his
second term in the position of Public Relations Officer.
His aim was to get UBC a "good name" amongst the
downtownsters, and he never stopped trying. Biggest
job was handling the well-run blood drive which netted
UBC a record number of pint-sized bottles of blood.
Quick and sure, Treasurer Allan Goldsmith balanced
and juggled the Alma Mater books until everything
turned out the right way, with the maximum going to
the most. His biggest moment was presenting a new-
budget which included a proposed two-dollar fee increase. Without the fee increase, he said, students and
clubs would be sunk. Students, not wanting to be
sunk, voted in his budget.
Vice-president Dick "Undy" Underhill engineered the
installation of the College Shop while big Jim McNish,
also a scholarship winner, re-formed the Discipline
Committee.
Biggest job for troubles is Coordinator of Student
Activities, but calm Mike Nuttall slipped through this
year with a minimum of noon-hour clashes, much to
the dismay of Ubyssey editorial writers who were howling that there was not enough to howl about.
Red-haired Ann Cooper performed the duties of
Secretary, while fellow redhead Nan Adamson presi-
dented Women's Undergraduate Society. Lively Marilyn Russell, Women's Athletic Directorate president,
did a good job on the Council, but an even better one
on the basketball floor when council played Publications Board.
Dick Underhill, better known to students as "Undy",
headed many committees efficiently. Tact was his motto;
it seemed to pay off.
Genial Howie Beck, first member at large, handled
Homecoming, while late and last Ken O'Shea, who
substituted for resigned second member at large Bob
Gillis, joked his way through meetings and ballot-
counted his way through the spring AMS elections.
Treasurer Goldsmith moved into office after having been '53 Totem Editor,
and handled the responsible position with ease.
Ann Cooper was kept busy getting minutes ready
for  the councillors  before  the next meeting.
23 Undergraduate Societies
Chairman Jim McNish ponders while committee members eat their lunches.
Open door indicates thai
there are more members still
to come. Those pictured arc:
Jim McNish, Shirley Engel-
land, Joyce Thompson, Irene
McCallum, Mary Jean Pearson, Ernie Hucalac, Alf Spenser, Pete Peters, Roy Daniels,
and Ted MacDonald.
USC Plods On
HEADED by Engineering student
Jim McNish, the Undergraduate Societies Committee plowed
its merry way through another successful, if uneventful, year. Duties
of this unassuming body were carried  out  efficiently  by various  fac
ulty representatives, who didn't
have much else to do except sit and
munch their lunches at the regular
Monday meetings. However, now
the committee has finally found its
feet it will undoubtedly be of great
benefit to students in future years.
WUS Redeems Its Position
UNLIKE most years, the Women's Undergraduate
Society, guided by its efficient and energetic
president, Nan Adamson, started off with a bang and
continued to perform its duties quickly and ably
throughout the year. As usual all the committees were
headed by the enthusiastic minimum, whose interest,
astoundingly, didn't seem to dwindle as time went on.
Among the many accomplishments Miss Adamson
has to her credit is the Mildred Brock room, which was
completely re-vamped in the fall. She worked tirelessly
to get the room finished in time for the conferences
which are always held in the Brock, and all will agree
that a better job could never have come about.
The Big-Little Sister Banquet, which in past years
has consistently gone well into the hole, made money.
This was the supreme shock of the year to the Executive, who expected the usual lethargic crowd to be
dragged out by their Upperclassmen Big Sisters who
felt that they should do "their bit" for the all-female
society.
Bouquets are in order for this group who have made
sure that their representative will be well received at
Council and Undergraduate Society meetings.
Looking over President Nan Adamson's shoulder as she sees if
the books are balanced are the rest of the executive, Janie Shrum,
Vice-President; Diane Driscoll, Secretary and President-elect, and
Fran Liptrot, Treasurer. The girls have just completed an inspection of the remodeled Mildred Brock Room and judging from
their pleased expressions they found it satisfactory.
24
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I MensAthletic
Council
CONTROL and direction of all men's athletics at
UBC was given to the Men's Athletic Council
(MAC) and the Men's Athletic Directorate (MAD) by
the Ostrum Plan, formulated in 1950 to improve
campus athletics.
Men's Athletic Directorate has a teat for the senior
manager of every sport and pep organization, the
Ubyssey Sports editor, the co-ordinator of athletics, an
appointed secretary and the student-elected president,
Peter Lusztig, for this year.
Dr. A. W. Matthews, senate representative, is chairman of the Men's Athletic Council. Faculty delegates
are professor W. Heslop and Dr. H. Warren. Alumni
representative is Mr. Grant Donegani; Mr. R. F.
Osborne is delegate from the school of physical education. Student representatives include: Ivan Feltham,
AMS president; Allan Goldsmith, treasurer; Pete
Lusztig, MAD president; William Hutchinson, secretary; Bus Phillips, coordinator.
Seated around the table are the Men's Athletic Committee. This
group makes all the policy decisions as regards the eligibility
rulings of all male students on the campus. Left to right:
Ivan Feltham, Peter Lusztig, Bill Hutchinson, Mr. R. Osborne,
Dr. A. W. Matthews, Mr. Bus Phillips, Mr. W. Heslop, Allan
Goldsmith, Dr. H. Warren.
MAC makes policy decisions, allots budgets in proportion to the importance and activity of the various
athletic clubs under its control and acts as a liaison
group between students and administration on athletic
matters.
Women's Athletic Directorate
ENERGETIC Marilyn Russell picked up a big job
for her Women's Athletic Directorate this year.
The Evergreen Collegiate Student Association asked
UBC women's sports heads to "create and organize"
women's sports events between Evergreen colleges.
"Basketball Play Days" was the result. Six U.S. colleges,
including U. of Washington, Western, Puget Sound and
Central Washingon, played three games each, in the
first women's Evergreen exhibition tourney this
February.
Revised eligibility rules for women playing on university first teams were introduced by WAD this year.
Until this year, women were required to fulfil same requirements as men. Main change: frosh can play if
they keep up marks.
Besides this new work, the directorate, formed of
team managers and led by president Russell, vice-president Loretta Dwyer, secretary Annemarie Leuchte,
treasurer Ruth Gorwill and PRO Anne Winter, organized the usual UBC women's sports.
Bright-eyed Yvonne Legace took top honors in skiing as UBC left its mark on the Northwest Intercollegiate Ski meet, hosted by Washington State. Badminton
league in B and C positions and the Provincial championship   WAD   found   a   new   place   for   archery   as
girls began competing with downtown archery clubs.
Sports   under   WAD   direction   are:   archery,   grass
hockey, skiing, tennis, badminton, swimming, basketball and all intramurals.
The Women's Athletic Directorate meets every Thursday in the
Brock Board Room to discuss the coordination of all Women's
sports on the campus. Conducting the meeting is Marilyn Russell,
4th year Physical Education student. Left to right: Eleanor Kepper,
Jean Hood, Joy Evleigh, Ann Winter, Loretta Dwyer, Marilyn
Russell, Annemarie Leuchte, Ruth Gorwill, Yvonne Legace, Gail
McGarrigle, (President-elect), Pat Strange, and Mrs. Penny,
Athletic's Advisor.
25 LSE Met Many Problems
Johann Stoyva, President of the Literary and Scientific Executive,
scattered pamphlets around the campus to stir up indignation in the
student body. The plan backfired and Stoyva, chastened at last, settled
down to serious business.
A UNIVERSITY campus is the rightful place for a
cross section of idea, Literary and Scientific Executive president Johann Stoyva maintains. "We need
controversial speakers to stimulate thought amongst
students," he told a fellow student last October. Some
of the stimulation Stoyva and the LSE sponsored this
year:
Ron Gostick, big man in Canadian Anti-Communist
League, who appeared twice.
Editor of one of the chief Marxist publications in
the United States.
Dr. Gordon Shrum, physics head, Dr. J. B. Warren,
associate professor of physics, and Dr. J. B. Brown,
assistant professor of physics, who talked about "Can
Scientists Talk" at Columbia Bi-Centennial celebration
held here this spring.
LSE, which represents over 50 Alma Mater Clubs,
awarded for the first time this year an annual blood
trophy, in an attempt to stimulate more Arts students
to bleed.
Stoyva's executive also organized LSE on a council
basis, which enabled the Religious Councils to get together and work out mutual problems.
Clustered around President Johann
Stoyva are the L.S.E. Executive. Standing are: Gerry Hodge, Phyllis Cooper,
Colin McDiarmid. Seated: Dick Riopel
and Johann Stoyva. The LSE headquarters are no longer on the main
floor of Brock Hall but have moved
upstairs to one of the new Committee
Rooms. The group finds the confined
space a little cramping for both body
and spirit but, even so, Special Events
have fared better this year than ever
before. Erratic Stoyva calmed down
under the adequate supervision of his
cohorts and proceeded to fill the responsible position with ease and assurance.
LVii
2n Pan-Hell Directs Sororities
ONE night last March 135 girls opened their mouths
and sang. When they finished singing, it wound
up another year of Pan-Hellenic-sponsored activities.
The singing was part of the Intra-Fraternity and
Pan-Hellenic-sponsored Greek Song Fest. While keeping a sororitorical eye on UBC's sororities, Pan-Hell
also helped manage Mardi Gras, and held a big
banquet-workshop all-girl meet in the spring.
Each sorority is represented on Pan-Hell by two
delegates, who attend weekly board meetings chaired
by president Ann Bissett. Mutual problems are discussed and inter-sorority cooperation is established at
these meetings. Through Pan-Hell, sororities establish
policies and plan activities which reflect the collective
desires and wishes of the individual groups.
Pan-Hell activities included scholarships, intramural,
blood drive, bridge, bowling competitions, and Sorority-
Women's, Undergraduate Society entertainments.
This year something new was added when Pan-Hell
entertained Phrateres at a Halloween party, and the
girls from Fort and Acadia Camps after Christmas at a
St. Patrick's Day party.
Reading over Pan-Hellenic Handbook for Rushing are Wendy
Sutton, Elaine Kennedy, Ann Bissett (President), and Nancv
Underhill.
Fraternities Boosted By IFC
NEW pledges to UBC fraternities this year received
a surprise. Expecting the traditional "hazing"
from actives, the pledges got a complete turnabout.
For the first time, fraternities staged a "Help Week"
instead of "Hell Week."
Holding a small discussion before the weekly Tuesday meeting
is the Intra-Fraternity Council Executive. Left to right: Ted Coe,
Treasurer; Denny Shallman, Secretary; John Mackay, Vice-President; and Dick Vogel, President. Fraternities found the council
invaluable as a co-ordinating and controlling body for all
functions.
Kii B^KB       Bib]
Under the watching eye of Intra-Fraternity Council,
17 frats help-weeked 240 pledges. The result: much
better feeling towards fraternities; renovation of Alexander Fresh Air Camp, First United Church, and
Strathcona Day Nursery.
Another forward step taken by IFC, efficiently
directed by president Richard Vogel, was to go on
record as opposed to discriminatory clauses in fraternity constitutions.
Biggest time for the Greeks was their annual Song
Fest. Gaining popularity every year, the Fest was
moved from the personable atmosphere of Brock Half
to professional-looking Auditorium, where more people
could come to hear the Greeks sing.
Tuxedos and formals were left by the wayside when
IFC and Pan-Hellenic Society decided that Mardi Gras
should be a masquerade this year. The costume party
made such a hit that planners will probably keep it
that way in times to come. This year's ball earned
$2000 for charity.
IFC regulates rushing and also fosters intra-fraternity
contests for scholarships and athletics. The Blood
Drive is given a big boost as the competition between
the fraternities is very keen.
27 1
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GRADUATES ADAMS, Audrey Marilyn—Vancouver
ADAMS, Bonnie—Vancouver
ADAMS, Howard—Vancouver
ADAMSON, Nan—Vancouver
Pres. W.U.S.,  Eng., Anthropology, Alpha
Delta PI, Phrateres, Delta Sigma Pi
ALEXANDER, Kenneth R.—Vancouver
Psych.,   Zoology,   C.O.T.C,   P.M.U.S.
Alpha Delta Phi
ALSTON, Robin C—Vancouver
English,   Hockey XI
ANDERSEN, Richard G.—Vancouver
Zoology,  Biology Club, ski team,
Alpha Delta Phi
ANDERSON, Donald C—Calgary, Alta.
History,  Phych, Ice hockey,
Dilta Upsilon
ANDERSON, Raymond M. A.—
ANDREWS, W. Douglas—Brooks, Alta.
Geology
ANTROBUS, John S.—Prince Rupert
Psych, Phil, A.U.S. vice-pres.
ARCHER, Dorothy—Victoria
AUSTIN, Sheila—Vancouver
BAKER, Robert C—
BAKICH, Nora—
BANNO, Masakazu Par—
BARNES, Ernest R—Victoria
C.O.T.C.
BASSETT, Brian N.—Victoria
English, Biology, Dance Club
BAXTER, Margaret B.—Vancouver
BAXTER, Eileen M.—Chilliwack, B.C.
Psych., Mussoc, Psych Club
BECK, Margaret L.—Vancouver
English,  History,  Delta Gamma
BECKETT, Daniel C—North Burnaby
History,  English,  Newman Club
BELL, Robert D.—Victoria
Hist., Eng.,  Mussoc., C.O.T.C.
BELL, Richard J. M.—Vancouver
History
BIDDLE, Joan E.—Victoria
Maths.,  French
BIRKINSHAW, Beverley L.—Vancouver
Newman Club, Alpha Delta Pi
BISCHOFF, John R.—Vancouver
BISSETT, E. Ann—Vancouver
Pol. Sc, Int. St., Hist., Slavs.,
pres.  Pan-Hell,  Delta Gamma
BONIFACE,  Rosemary—Vancouver
Hist & Geog., Delta Gamma
BOON, Thelma M.—New Westminster
French, Eng., Alpha Phi
BOREYSZA, Boleslaw—Vancouver
Slav.  Studies,   I.SC.
BOWERING, W. David S.—Vancouver
Chemistry
BRINKWORTH,  Darlene  A.—Victoria
Soc, Psych.
BROWN, Joan E.—West Vancouver
History, Math.
BROWN, Sally D.—Vancouver
Geog., Slav. St, Kappa Kappa Gamma
BURTON, Alexander D. K7—
BYRNE, C. Anne.—Calgary, Alta.
Engl.,  Phych.,  Alpha Delta Pi
CABELDU, H. Annette—Sidney, V.I.
English CAMERON, Ann—Vancouver
Psychology, Kappa Kappa Gamma
CAMPBELL, Janet E.—Vancouver
Spanish,  French, Spanish Club
CANT, Isobel A.—North Vancouver
Math., Chemistry
CASPERSON, Ralph M.—Vancouver
Math.,  Physics
CATES, Suzanne A.—North Vancouver
Zoology, Engl., Sec. of Biology Club
CHRISTIE, Martin G.—Fanny Bay, V.I.
Geology,  Geography, V.O.C.
CI PRICK, William J.—Powell River
Zoology, Psychology
CLARKE, Cynthia A.—Vancouver
Soc, Ec, Badminton, Tennis
COCKBURN, Sandra M.—Vancouver
Spanish, Int. St., Alpha Omicron Pi
COLLINS,  Peter  R.—Vancouver
Franch, Spanish,  Pres. Cercle Francais
COLTIS, Madelyn—Victoria
Psych., Soc,  Newman Club,
Alpha Delta Pi
CONDER, Geraldine J.—Sooke
English, Anthropology
CONNELL, Rae E.—Vancouver
Sociology, Alpha Gamma Delta
COOK, George—Vancouver
History, English
COOKE, John E.—Vernon, B.C.
Botany
CORRIGAN, Robert 0.—Fernie, B.C.
Geography, Dance Club, Mussoc.
DAVIES, KatherineM.—Penticton, B.C.
Psych., English
DAY, William L—Vancouver
English, Filmsoc Pres.
DEBRECEN, Julie I.—
DEEBLE, Douglas H.—Kamloops, B.C.
Beta Theta Pi
DODSON, Earl D.—
DONG,  Gordon—Vancouver
Chemistry,   Dance Club
DRUMMOND, Ian M.—Vancouver
Econ., Slav., Players Club treas.
DUDLEY, J. Elizabeth  D.—Vancouver
Zoology,  English
DURANTE, Roy G.—Alberni, B.C.
EDDY, Frederick W.—Vancouver
Physics
ELLIP, Maimo—Port Hammond, B.C.
History,  Psychology
ENDICOTT, Orville R.—Creston, B.C.
History, S.C.M.
FARIS, Kenneth H.—Vancouver
Econ.,   Int  Studies,  pres. S.C.M.,
U.N., I.S.S
FARMER, Colin—Vancouver
English, Biology
FARQUHAR, Simonne P.—White Rock
Franch, English
FERGUSON, Isobelle M.—Kelowna
Economics, Spanish Club
FLETCHER, Dona  L—Vancouver
Psych., Soc, Alpha Gamma Delta
FORMAN, A. Guy—Prince Rupert, B.C.
Chemistry, Delta Kappa Epsilon
FOREST,  Doug  E.—Vancouver
Eng., Biology
FOTHERINGHAM, M. Allan—Sardis
English, Int. St.,
Editor-in-Chief, Ubyssey
FREEMAN, George C—Vancouver
History, English
FRIESEN, John—Vancouver
History, Biology
FRITH, Clive D.—Vancouver
Psych., Chem., Pre-Med Soc.
FULTON, Sidney B.—Victoria
Physics, Chemistry 4m4Ukm**M
GATES, Alan F.—Calgary, Alta.
Geology, Gym Club, V.O.C.
GILCHRIST, Alvin G. F.—Victoria
Psychology
GILL, Gerald A.—Cranbrook, B.C.
English, History, Kappa Sigma
GILL, Gurdev Singh—
GIRLING. Valerie M.—Vancouver
Geol.,   Geog.,  V.O.C,   U.N.,  Geog. Club,
Dawson Club
GODSON, Denis A.—Victoria
History,  Sociology
GOODALL, Roger G.—N. Vancouver
GORBAT, Elsie R.—Prince George, B.C.
Eng.,  Hist., Letters Club
GRANT, Elizabeth A.—Hollyburn, B.C.
English, Hist, Dance Club
GRIFFIN, Shirley Anne—Vancouver
Alpha Gamma Delta
GUGLIELMIN, Alfred A.—Trail, B.C.
Geography, Math.
HAAPALA, Roy, Vancouver
Psychology
HAERING, Rudolf R.—Kaslo, B.C.
Math.,   Physics,  pres.   Math.  Club,
Phys. Soc.
HALL, Glennys M.—Kelowna, B.C.
English, History, Alpha Delta Pi
HALL, RichardT.—Horseshoe Bay, B.C.
Physics and Math., Varsity Band
HAMILTON, Lorna E.—Trail, B.C.
English and  History
HARRIOTT, Rosalie K.—Vancouver
English
HARRIS, C. Ronald—Chapman Camp
Chemistry and Zoology
HARRIS, Charles G.—Victoria
Psychology
HARRISON, Esther—
HARTMAN, Gordon F.—Fraser Lake
Zoology, Biology Club
HECTOR, James S.—Regina, Sask.
Phychology
HEDGECOCK, Nigel E.—Vancouver
Physics
HENRION, Yvonne—Vancouver
Mathematics
HOLLOWAY, Barbara J.—Vancouver
English and Pol. Sc, Gamma Phi Beta
HOLMWOOD, Leslie W. M.—Westview
Zoology, English
HRUSHOWY, Ernest J.—Vancouver
HUNTER, Roy A.—North Vancouver
History and  Eng.,  Badminton
IVANISKO,  Henry—Vancouver
Math and Geog.,  Geography Club
JINNOUCHI, Donald M.—Vancouver
Dance Club
JOHNSON, Norman A.—Victoria
Slav. St and Economics
JOHNSON, Robert S.—New Wesrmin
Math, and Physics
JOHNSON, Walter—Kimberley,  B.C
Zoology and Chemistry
JOHNSTON, Patricia K.—Sidney, B.C.
Bacteriology
KEANE, John A.—West Kingston
English and History
KEARNS, Sheila A.—
Ins. St, R.U.S., Alpha Phi
KENNEDY, Elaine M.—Vancouver
Pol. Sc. and Soc, Newman Club,
Gamma Phi Beta
KENT, Gerald S.—Medicine Hat, Alta.
Pol. Sc, English, Ubyssey
KERR, Mary E.—Vancouver
Math, and English
KILLEEN, Gerald T.— KILLEEN, James W.—Vancouver
Eng. and Hist., Man. U.B.C. tenn s team,
chair. High School Conf. Comm.,
Newman Club, Beta Theta Pi
KING, Olive J.—Victoria
Sociology and   Psychology
KIRBY, Joan L—Victoria
French and  German
KLASSEN, Margaret—Vancouver
Zoology, Chem., Social conv. I.V.C.F.
KLASSEN, Alfred—Vancouver
Hist, and German,  German Club,
U.N. Club, Russian Club
KNIGHT, Irene M.—
KOLLE, Phyllis L—Vancouver
French and Hist., Alpha Phi
KONRAD, Daniel B.—Abbotsford, B.C.
Psych., Zool., U.C.F.,  Pre-med.
KREUTZ, John J.—Vancouver
Anthropology and   Psych.,   Newman  Club,
V.O.C.
KUIJT, Job—Trail, B.C.
Systematic Botany
LENNOX, Mary—Innisfail, Alta.
Chemistry,  I.S.C., Biology Club
LEUCHTE, Annemarie F.—W. Van.
Soc,  ski team,  mem.  chair.  V.O.C,
sec. W.A.D., vice-pres.  Big  Block,
Alpha Gamma Delta
LEVIS, Eileen H.—Vancouver
LIPTROT, Frances M.—Vancouver
English and  History, W.U.S. treas.
Alpha Delta Pi
LOK, Elizabeth P.—Vancouver
Psychology
LOEWEN, Charles B.—Vancouver
Econ., Fencing team, Economic Club
LOGAN,   Doryl   Leroy—Victoria
Hist, and Eng.,  Mussoc, S.C.M.,
Historical Soc.
MADDEN, William K.—Vancouver
Phi  Kappa Sigma
MAKOVKIN, Alexander I.—Vancouver
MARKE, Siegfried—Victoria
Economics, pres. Econ. Soc, Dance Club,
German   Club,   Circulo  Latin  Americano,
Sigma Delta Pi
MARTIN, B. Moya L—Victoria
Eng.,  Psych.  Newman Club,  Players Club
MATHEWS, Robin D.—Powell River
English, Letters Club
MATHIAS,  Harry  E—Longford,  B.C.
Hist.,  Eng.,  Parliamentary Forum
MAWHINNEY, Pamela J.—Vancouver
Hits., Slav. St.,  Kappa Kappa Gamma
MAYNE, C. E. Norah—Victoria
Psych, and Sociology
MEYAGAWA, M.—
MITAREWSK, Walter—Vancouver
McALPINE, M. A. Mayli—Vancouver
Alpha Omicron Pi
McCONNELL, Ruth—
McARTHUR, Joan V.—Vancouver
Psychology,  Economics,  Phrateres,  R.U.S.
McCARGAR, Donomoe—
Alpha D;lta Pi
MocBEY, Helen E.—Trail, B.C.
Delta Gamma
McCOLL, Diane L.Vancouver
Bacteriology, Psychology,
Gamma Phi Beta
McCURRACH, Helen I.—South Burnaby
English,   History,   R.C.A.F.,   R.U.S.,
Newman Club, Kappa Alpha Theta
McDIARMID, Colin G.—Hollyburn, B.C.
Psychology,   C.L.U.,   Psych.   Club.,
treas. L.S.E., V.O.C, S.P.C,
MacDONALD, Nora E.—
MacFARLANE, George—Holberg, V.I.
Physics
McFARLANE, Robert J.—Victoria
MclLWRAITH, Margaret—Toronto
Psychology
McINTYRE, Kenneth G—Vancouver
Zoology, Chemistry McLANE, Margaret C.—Cranbrook
English, Sociology,  I.S.C,  Dance Club
Alpha Gamma Delta
McLENNAN,  Patricia A.—Vancouver
History,  Psychology, V.O.C
Gamma Phi Beta
MacLENNAN, Darla—Victoria
English, Psych., Hist., Dance Club,
Camera Club
McVICKAR, Robert H.—N. Vancouver
English
MEACHEM, Gwendolyn S.—Trail, B.C.
History, Psychology
MEEKER,  Henry C.—Vancouver
Economics,   Psi  Upsilon
MENDOZA, Leon C—Vancouver
English and  History, Dance Club,
Suanish Club
MERCER, Barbara L.—Vancouver
Psychology, Sociology, Alpha Phi
MERNER, Jack N.—Victoria
Math.,  Physics,  Dance Club
MERRICK, Frances E.—Hollyburn, B.C.
Eng., Fr., Dance Club, Spanish Club,
Phrateres
MEYERHOFF, John W.—Vancouver
History and English
MILLER, M. Elinor—West Vancouver
Eng.  and   Hist,   R.C.A.F.,  R.U.S.,
Alpha Phi
MITCHELL, Joan E.—North Vancouver
French, German, English
MORGAN, John F.—Vancouver
Math, and Econ., Alpha Tau Omega
MORROW, Lorraine E.—Chilliwack
Bacteriology and  English
MOUNCE, Joyce A.—Cumberland, B.C.
Math, and English, pre.  Phrateres,
Newman Club
MURRAY,  Nancy J.—Vancouver
English, Delta Gamma
NACAIE, Martha—Honey,  B.C.
Biology
NAKASHIMA, Rosalie—Vancouver
Bacteriology and Chemistry
NEWSTEAD, James D. M.—Vancouver
Zoology and Psych.
NEWSTEAD, Ninito E. F.—Vancouver
NEWTON, Linnea A.—
NILSON, Verna—North Vancouver
History and English
NORDMAN,   Volmar—New  Westmin.
Economics,  Beta Theta Pi
OLIVER, Elizabeth J.—Victoria
Int. St.,  Eng., vice-pres.  Dance Club,
Badminton Club
OPECHOWSKi, Sylvia M.—Vancouver
Franch and Russ., French Club,
Players Club
PALMER, Patricia B.—Victoria
Hist,  and  Eng.,  sec. Christian Sc.
Organ.,  Filmsoc
PAPEZIK, Vladimir—Vancouver
Geology
PARKER, Edwin B.—Vancouver
Phil., News-ed., Ubyssey
PARKER, Walter S.—Toronto, Ont.
Phil, and English
PARKES,   Francis A. H.—W. Vancouver
Math, and Physics
PATCH, Gordon  Stanley—Vancouver
Psych, and Phil.
PEARSON, Donald F.—South Burnaby
English*
PEASE, Helen C.—Vancouver
Psych, and Phil., V.C.F.
PHIPPS, Jill B.—Courtnay, B.C.
English and  Hist, V.O.C.
POOLE, Kenneth A.—Vancouver
Sociology and Psych
POTTER, Ross C—Vancouver
Latin and Phil.
POUND,  Kathleen   L—Vancouver
PUGH, Robert E.—New Westminster
Physics and Math., CCF. Club
QUISTWATER, Jacques—Vancouver
Chemistry, pres. Letters Club,
Chem. Institute of Canada READ, Dale W.—Chilliwack, B.C.
Chemistry
REMESZ, Louis C—Bonnyville, Alta.
Liberal Club, Newman Club
REMPEL, Theodore A.
RENNIE, Joan-
Delta Gamma
RICHARDSON Fay A.—N. Vancouver
Psych, and Slav. St, Alpha Phi
ROBERTS, Richard H— Vancouver
Hist.,  Int St., Cricket, Grass  Hockey,
Conserv. Club,  Hist, Soc,  U.N. Club
ROBERTSON, Margaret A.—Chilliwack
English and  Hist,  Modern  Dance
ROGERS, Margaret I.—Vancouver
History and  Eng., Dance Club,
Delta Gamma
ROHLOFF, Robert J—Calgary, Alta.
Geology and Zoology
ROSEN, June A.—Vancouver
English and Psych.
ROTHERY, J. Michael—Vancouver
Spanish and French
RUDKIEWICH,  Lillian—Vancouver
Russian,  Mussoc. vice-pres. Slav. Circle
RUNDLE, Howard N.—Vancouver
Math and Physics, Math Soc,
pres., Physics Soc.
RYE, John H. B.—West Vancouver
SALTER, M. C. Margot—South Burnaby
Pol.  Sc.  and  Ec,   Phrateres,  V.O.C,
W.U.S.  R.U.S.
SAUL, Beverly J.—Vancouver
English, Alpha Phi
SAY, B. M. Jill—Vancouver
Eng. and Phil., Kappa Alpha Theta
SCATCHARD, Lawrence D.—Vancouver
SCHAFFER, Susan—Vancouver
Bacteriology, Chemistry, V.O.C,
Gamma Phi Beta
SCH06N, Walter J. P.—Tomstake, B.C.
Eng. and Hist, sec. C.C.F., Newman Club
SCHON, Carol J.—Vancouver
Biol., Slav. St., V.O.C, Gamma Phi Beta
SCOTT,  Barry A.—Vancouver
Filmsoc.
SHALMAN,  Denis C—Vancouver
Sec. I.FC, Alpha Delta Phi
SHEARER, Donald A.—
SHOBROOK, Lenora J.—Vancouver
Music, Botany, Slac Circle,
Alpha Delta Pi
SHORTHOUSE, Thomas J.—Nelson
English and Hist, pres. Players' Club
SIDOO, Torlochon S —
SIMPSON, W. Albert—New Westmin-
English and History
SMITH, E. Elizabeth—Vancouver
English and Hist., sec. of Dance Club,
R.U.S.
SMITH, Shirley—Victoria
Soc. and Geog., Kappa Alpha Theta
STANDELL, Valri M.—Vancouver
Alpha Phi
STEWART, Donald G.—Jasper, Alta.
Sociology and Economics, S.C.M.
STOBART, Rodney—Cloverdale,  B.C.
Math, and Physics
STRALENDORFF, Shirley—
Hist. & Eng., Kappa Alpha Theta
STRIDE, Terence L.—Vancouver
History and Geography,  Dance Club,
V.O.C.
SYEKLOCHA, Delfa—Vancouver
Bacteriology and Chemistry
TAIT, Barbara A.—North Vancouver
English and  History
TANAKA, Tsugio—Vancouver
Math., Physics
TAYLOR, Jean Davidson—Vancouver
Psychology,   Biology,   Pres.   A.U.S.
TENENBAUM, Sally—Vancouver
Psychology, Sociology tkettk
TETLOCK, Norma Arlene—S. Burnaby
THOMAS, Edith Claire—Victoria
English, Saciology
THOMAS, Meredith  R.—Vancouver
English,  French. Swimming,   French Club
THOMPSON, Robin—South Burnaby
Math., Physics
THORSTEINSON, K. V—Vancouver
Sociology,  Psychology, V.O.C.
THRASHER, Dorothy Ann—Vancouver
English, Sociology,  Phrateres
TIMBERLEY, Darien M.K.—Vancouver
Biology,  Botany, Botany Club,
French and Biology Clubs
TINKESS, James R.—Vancouver
Zoology, Chemistry
TORTORELLI, Ralph L—Natal, B.C.
English, History
TOWGOOD, James Gordon—
TRUNKFIELD, C. JohnVancouver
Alpha Tau Omega
TUPLING,  George  D.—Vancouver
Pre-Med.
TWA, Audrey N.—Vancouver
Math,  Physics
VALE, Lorna—Vancouver
English, Psychology, Phrateres, Alpha Phi
VAN DE BOGART, Allan—S. Burnaby
Physics
VAUGHAN, Jack Stephen—Port Moody
History, Economics, Dance Club
VERMA, Behari L—Mesachie Lake
Anthropology and Slavonics,  I.S.C.
WALKER, Roy F. P.—Vancouver
Slavonics and Geography, Newman Club
WALLEY, Donna Mae E.—Vancouver
English and Spanish, Spanish Club,
Delta Gamma
WANKLYN,  Priscilla—Montreal, Que.
WEAVER, 0. Kenneth—Natal, B.C.
English,  History, Russian, Letters Club
WELSH, Helen A.—Vancouver
Hist,  Eng., Swimming Team,
Modern Dance, Alpha Phi
WHITE,  Gordon  A.—Vancouver
Botany, V.O C
WHITE, Marilyn A.—Vancouver
High School Conf. Comm.,
Gamma Phi Beta
WHITTAKER, David N.—Youbou, VI.
Spanish Club, Dance Club
WILLFORT, Agnes L— N. Vancouver
Econ. and Hist, V.O.C, treas. I.S.S.
WILLIAMS, Douglas L—Vancouver
Geography and Int. Studies
WILSON, Richard F.—Mission, B.C.
Physics, Math., Band, Dance Club
WILSON, Walter G.—Westbonk, B.C.
Biology, Botany, Zoology
WINSKILL, Aileen A.—Ladner, B.C.
English and. History
WITHLER, I. Lewis—Boston Bar, B.C.
Zoology
WITT, Marian G.—Peachland, B.C.
WOOD, Connla T.—Victoria
Geo.  and   Ec,   Mussoc,  Ec.  Club,
Sigma Chi
WRIGHT,   Robert  L—Vancouver
ZELONKA, Anna J.—Fernie, B.C.
Math., Fr., Russ., Newman, Dance Clubs,
V.O.C.
ZILKE, Edward  R.—Chilliwack,  B.C.
Math.,   Hist,   pres.   C.C.F.   Club,
Pari Forum
aP BANCROFT, George E.—New West.
Poultry Husbandry
BEACH, Herbert H.—Trinidad, B.W.I.
BORDEN, Jane L—Langley, B. C.
Soils, Pres. W. Ag. U.S.
BRUMWELL, Charles A.—Victoria
Agricultural   Microbiology,   'Birds   Rugby,
Big Block
CHOWN, Ruth M.—Vancouver
Horticulture, Ag. U S.
COE, John E.—Penticton
Horticulture, Alpha Tau Omega
COOPER, Anna C—Vancouver
Zoology, Sec. A.M.S.
CRAIG, Donald—Chemainus
CROSS, Stanley W.—West Vancouver
CROSS, Christine H.—Vancouver
Soils, Sec. Ag. U.S.
DALLYN, Jack—Vancouver
Agronomy
DAVIES, Ronald E.—Vancouver
Poultry  Husbandry, Ag. U S., A.I.C
DAWSON, Frederick R.—Ft. St. John
Lambda Chi Alpha
DROSSOS, John G— Naramata, B. C.
DUNLOP, Lois E.—Kelowna, B. C.
Animal Husbandry
FORD, James Michael—Vancouver
Animal Husbandry, Dance Club
FORD, Richard Reeves—Vancouver
Animal Nutrition, Rugger,
Vice-pres. Ag. U.S., Alpha Delta Phi
GILLESPIE, Sheila C—Kamloops
Alpha Phi
GLASGOW, Stanley K.—Vancouver
GRUNEWALD, Gisberl—Vancouver
HANIUK, Einard S.—Lethbridge, Alta.
Agronomy
HILTON, Gerry—
HOBBS, Edwin E.—Victoria
Agronomy
HOLLANDS, Keith G.—Victoria
Animal Husbandry,
Pres. Social Problems Club
HORI, Aiko—
HOWES, T. Barton—Victoria
Animal Nutrition
JOKANOVICH, John—Vancouver
Plant Nutrition
JONES, L. T.—
KANSKY, Ladislav, Vancouver
KING, Robert L—Vancouver
Animal Husbandry
LAWSON, Lawrence L.—New West.
Agricultural Mechanics
LINNES, Audrey G.—Vancouver
Dairying-Bacteria,  Chemistry
MADHOSINGH, Clarence—
Siparia, Trinidad, B.W.I.
Plant Pathology
RAE, Ewing W.—Ottawa, Ont.
Agricultural Mechancis,
Pres. Jr. A.I.C, A.S.A.E.
RIVE. C. Elliott—Vancouver
Plant Nutrition
SADOWSKI, Joseph J.—Vancouver
Horticulture
SALMON, Ray. E.—Royal Oak, B.C.
Poultry Nutrition,  Filmsoc,  M.A.C
SONES, Robert B.—West Vancouver
\GRICULTURE Post
graduates
THORNE, John Trevor—Vancouver
TOUCHBURN, P. Sherman—Van.
Newman, Ag. U.S.C. rep.
YOUNG, L. N.—
BAILEY, Charles B. M.—Vancouver
Animal Nutrition, Beta Theta Pi
FARIS, Donald G.—Vancouver
Plant Breeding, S.C.M.
FORREST, Robert J.—Vancouver
LIGHTFOOT, Edward R.—Vancouver
Food Technology, Ag. U.S.
PEPIN, Herbert S.—Rossland, B. C.
Plant Pathology, Camera Club
Jr. A.I.C, Botany Club,  Biology Club
ROBERTS, Ben N— Vancouver
Agricultural Ec.
Architecture
BARNES, Thomas D.—Vancouver
BRONGER, John T.—Vancouver
CAPLING, Arthur J.—Smithers, B.C.
HALEY, Richard W.—New West.
Architecture Club
IREDALE, W. Randle—Vancouver
Architecture Club
JENKINS, David L—Vancouver
Lambda Chi Alpha
RENNIE, William W.—Vancouver
WEISMILLER, Derek N.—Vancouver
WETHERILL, Ewart A.—Vancouver
38 CHALK, Raymond—Victoria
V.O.C,  Pres. A.I.Ch. E.
BENSON, Robert H—Victoria
Mussoc, Pres. U.B.C. Glee Club
ENDERSBY, Stanley A.—Fruitvale
FRASER, John Allan—Vancouver
A.I.Ch. E
GALLOWAY, Leslie R.—Victoria
Pres. Sigma Phi Delta
GUTHRIE, David A.—Trail
HATCH, William R— Britannia Beach
HAYDUK, Walter—Armstrong, B. C.
JOHNSTON, Hugh A.—Victoria
Phi Gamma Delta
KIRKLAND, J. Gordon—Vancouver
MATHESON, Donald J.—
SMITH, James W.—Smithers, B. C.
ARNISON, Ronald—Vancouver
BROWN, Donald H.—Vancouver
MATHE, E. Lajos—
BUTLER, Lawrence S.—Vancouver
Civil Club
COOK, Philip T.—Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta
COVELLO, Thomas—Thorold, Ont.
Pres. Civil Eng. Club
CRAIG, Jeffrey S—Vancouver
Alpha Tau Omega
FENTON, V. Charles—Trail
Camera Club
GIRLING, Peter—Vancouver
V.O.C, Civil Eng. Club, Zsi Upsilon
GRANT, Basil B.—Vancouver
HORNSTEIN, Herbert—Vancouver
Kappa Sigma
KNOWLES, Edward E.—Vancouver
McCRAE, Allan M.—Osoyoos, B. C.
MacDONALD, Don. W.—Port Alberni
McMORRAN, Richard L—Victoria
MERCER, Albert G.—
RIDGERS, Arthur H.—Vancouver
SHAW, Donald A.—Victoria
Rugby, Big Block
HOENMANS, Paul—Vancouver
WATTS, Douglas J.—Vancouver
Civil Club, Delta Upsilon Engineering
physicists
BELL, L. Gerald—Fruitvale, B. C.
BRAHAN, John W.—Vancouver
U.B.CA.R.0.A.
BUTKOV, Eugene—
DAVIES, Norman G.—Port Hammond
H.A.M. Club, V.O.C, Photog. Club
DAY, John W. B.—Vancouver
FIORENTINO, Joseph S.—Cranbrook
MATHEWS, Stephen—Vancouver
ORR, Archibald C—Vancouver
Pres. of Eng. Physics Soc.
PAYNE, Frank Alden—N. Vancouver
Intramurals
PINSON, William E.—New West.
Newman Club
ANDERSON, John D.—Vancouver
BADIUK, Jack—Vancouver
A.S.M.E.,  E.I.C.
BOYLE, Gorden S.—Vancouver
DEAKIN, Thomas A.—Vancouver
DUFTON, William C—
VAN EXEL, Gerrit A.—Vancouver
A.S.M.E., S.A.E.,  E.I.C.
FAULDER, Geo. A.—Edmonton. Alta.
Pres. E.I.C, S.A.E., A.S.M.E.
FORREST, John A.—Vancouver
GANE, Frederick W.—Sidney, B. C.
E.I.C.
GARDNER, Donald A.—Powell River
Sec. E.I.C, Sec-treas. A.S M.E.
GORDIENKO, G.—San Jose, Costa Rico
HOTCHKISS, James—Kimberley, B. C.
Sec. S.A.E., A.S.M.E.
HUDSON, John R.—Jasper, Alta.
JACK, Donald W.—Galgary, Alta.
Chair. S.A.E., A.S.M.E., E.I.C,,
Lambda Chi Alpha
LAKE, Lancelot—Vancouver
McDONALD, Vernon—Vancouver
Alpha Tau Omega
MacKINNON, Donald D.—Vancouver
Ex. S.C.M., Sec. A.S.M.E.,  U.N.
MERCER, Edward N.—Calgary, Alta.
MIDDELVEEN, John W.—Vancouver
MILLER. Joseph—Vancouver
NEILSON, Ronald—Victoria
NIXON, George E. B.—Victoria
A.S.M.E., S.A.E.,  E.I.C.
OATES, Gordon C.—Vancouver
Track Team, Vice-Pres. A.S.M.E.
PORTER, R. Stanley—Nanaimo, B. C.
ROMMAN, Aimar—Vancouver
A.S.M.E., E.I.C.
ROUTH, Gordon L—
North Lethbridge, Alta. STANDEN, Philip A.—South Burnaby
Air Force
STEVENS, Gerald D.—Vancouver
E.I.C, A.SM.E., S.A.E.
SYLTE, Leonard H.—Vancouver
S.A.E., A.S.M.E., E.I.C, Sigma Phi Delta
WESEEN, Arwin P.—Vancouver
Dance Club, U.S.C., Sigma Phi Delta
WILLIS, Charles—Vancouver
BAILEY, Charles L—Vancouver
CARSTAIRS, David S—Vancouver
CHAPPELL, Michael S.—Vancouver
ENGELHARDT, Karl H.—Vancouver
FONSECA, Alan D.—Vancouver
FORD, Lyman D.—Bralarne, B. C.
V.O.C
FORMAN, George E.—Prince Rupert
GAENSBAUER, Herbert T.—
White Horse, Yukon Territories
GRENON, O. Joseph—Vancouver
HILDEBRAND, Percival—Aldergrove
I.R.E.
KEVILL, Paul—New Westminster
LACEY, Wallace Keith—Vancouver
Mccormick, wiinam j.—
McDONALD, W. Howard—Vancouver
Camera Club
McDORMAN, Leslie G.—Sudbury, Ont.
Lambda Chi Alpha
McLEOD. Douglas M.—Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta
McNISH, James A.—Vancouver
Chairman of U.S.C.
MIRKO, Joseph F.—Vancouver
NELMS, G. Leroy—Vancouver
Christian Science Organ pres.,
Sec.  A.I.E.E.,   I.R.E,   E.U.S.
OLLIVER, Leslie R.—Victoria
PARLEE, Victor E.—Longley Prairie
POOLE, E. Graham—Chapman Camp
Treas. A.I.E.E., I.R.E., EI.C
SAIMOTO, Mikio—Vancouver
I.R.E., A.I.E.E.
SMITH, Gordon F.—Vancouver
STEPHENS, C. H.—Vancouver
Electronics, Pub. Rep. en E.U S.
THIRD, Douglas G.—Vancouver
A.I.E.E., E.I.C.
WADE, Edwin M.—Vancouver
I.R.E.,  Lambda Chi Alpha
WALTON, Norman—Trail
Beta Theta Pi
WARD, Gordon V.—Vancouver
YEOMAN, Alan R.—Vancouver
Electrical
engineering Forestry
engineering
LYNUM, Godfrey, Terrace, B. C.
Forestry Club
MOSHER, Montague M.—
MUDIE, John A.—Grand Forks, B. C.
Forestry Club
TOFTE, Gordon—Vancouver
TREBETT, James T.—Alberni
Sec. Forestry Club
ALLEN, Terrence M.—Vancouver
DE VOOGD, Abraham C. N.—
Bukavu, Belgium Congo
Dawson Club
FULFORD, G.—
GREENWOOD, Hugh J.—
KAWASE, Yoshio—Tappen, B. C.
KYLE, Douglas H.—Vancouver
Dance Club
STROM, Norman A.—Viking, Alta.
TRIGG, C. Murray—Victoria
Intramurals, Vice-pres.   Dawson  club,
V.O.C, Tennis
CAMPBELL, D. Scott— Riondel, B. C.
HALLBAUER, Robert E— Invermere
Dawson Club
MacDONALD, A. John—Vancouver
G.  M. Dawson Club pres.
McKAY, Donald R.—
BERQUIST, Edward A.—Vancouver
Alpha Tau Omega
CRISPIN, George E.—Trail, B. C.
McKAY, John C.—Vancouver
SIMARD, J. G. Clement—Vancouver
Camera Club, Newman Club
TURBITT, Ronald F.—Vancouver
Soccer
CRESSMAN, Miriam L—
DOBBIN, Pamela E.—Westbank, B. C.
Public Health
ENGELLAND, Shirley—New West.
Pres.  N.U.S.,  Gamma Phi Beta
GILLARD, Marie J. H— Vancouver
U.S.C. Rep
HOPKINS, Jean E.—Vancouver
Clinical Supervision, Delta Gamma
HOWELL, Janet M.—Gait, Ont.
Clinical Supervision
JONES, Gwenneth—
KENNEDY, Nan— MATHEWS, Shirley J.—Vancouver
Clinical Supervision, E.U.S. Rep.,
Gamma Phi Beta
PRPICH, Verna K.—Vancouver
Clinical Supervision
ROUTLEDGE—
STEWART, Margaret C—New West.
Vice-pres.   N.U.S.,  Public  Health,
Gamma Phi Beta
WALKER, June M.—Vancouver
Treas.  N.U.S.,  Public Health
ADAM, Frederick W.—Vancouver
Marketing, Delta Kappa Epsilon
ALEXANDER, Ronald L—Vancouver
Finance, Beta Theta Pi
BALLANTYNE, D. J.—Victoria
Commerce, Agriculture
BARNESLEY, Richard J.—Vancouver
Commerce and Finance, Zeta Zsi
BATTY, L. Margaret—Valor, Sask.
Accounting, Alpha Phi
BAUER, H. G.—New Westminster
Delta Kappa Epsilon
BOOTH, Elizabeth—Agassiz, B. C.
Retailing, C.W.U.S. president,
Alpha Omicron Pi
BULMER, John P.—Calgary, Alta.
Forestry, U.N.T.D.
BUTLER, Audrey—Vancouver
Alpha Phi
CANT, Eric—Vancouver
Accounting, Phi Gamma Delta
CARPENTER, Marvin A.—Vancouver
Hockey
CLARKE, James A.—Vancouver
C.O.T.C, Psi Upsilon
COBBIN, Alexander—Vancouver
Hospital Administration, Delta Upsilon
COUTTS, A.—Vancouver
CVETKOVICH, Joseph—Vancouver
U.R.S., Delta Kappa Epsilon
DAWSON, George—Vancouver
DESBRISAY, Albert G.—Penticton
Marketing, Phi Gamma Delta
DEWIS, Geoffrey—Vancouver
Advertising, Zeta Zsi
DUCLOS, Gerald G—Vancouver
Retailing
DUNN, Alfred C—Powell River, B.C.
Retailing, Delta Kappa Epsilon
EADIE, Desmond—Vancouver
Finance, Phi Gamma Delta
EDWARDS, Jack T. L—Vancouver
Transportation and Utilities,
Delta Kappa Epsilon
ESHELMAN, Valden—Penticton
Accounting
FAST, Victor H.—Vancouver
Commerce
FEARNSIDE, Gwynneth—N. Vancouver
Retailing, Co-ordinator of Mardi Gras,
Alpha Phi
FERNE, David—Victoria
A.T.O.
FLEMING, Kenneth—Vancouver
Accounting, Sigma Chi
FLETCHER, Arthur R.—Powell River
Education, treasurer of High School
Conference Com.
Commerce GILMORE, Robert C—Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta
GRIFFITHS, John B.—Vancouver
U.N., V.O.C
GUICHON, Therese—Ladner, B. C.
Commerce and Teaching, Newman
HARRISON, John P.—Vancouver
Lambda Chi Alpha
HEIMBECKER, Grant—Calgary, Alta.
Transportation, Amateur Radio Club
HONG, Edward—Cluny, Alberta
HORNSTEI N.J.Walter—W.Vancouver
Accounting
JEROME, Kelvin K.—Vancouver
Marketing
JOFFE, Jay—Calgary, Alberta
Advertising, Zeta Beta Tau
KEMP, Ray—Vancouver
Delta Upsilon
KENT, Richard—Sorrento, B. C.
Production, Delta Kappa Epsilon
LAIRD, Donald G.—Vancouver
Accounting, Varsity Band
LAZENBY, Arthur—Vancouver
Advertising,  Radio, Radsoc, V.O.C,
Mussoc
LEAR, Howard—Vancouver
Teaching, Soccer, Band
LECOVIN, Gerald J.—Vancouver
Law, Mussoc, Zeta Beta Tau
LENEC, Alexander—Vancouver
LINDBERG, Ernest—Victoria
Marketing
LUSZTIG, Peter—Stockholm, Sweden
Swimming, Big Block, pres. M.A.D.,
Delta Upsilon
MACEY, Harold G.—Vancouver
Zsi Upsilon
MAIR, A. Ian—Vancouver
U.N.T.D., Phi Delta Theta
McCABE, Alexander K.—Vancouver
Accounting
McINTYRE, James—Vancouver
Filmsoc, Parliamentary Forum
McKAY, Kenneth R.—Victoria
Accounting, Phi Delta Theta
MacLEOD, Arthur R. K.—Vancouver
MacMILLAN, John W.—New West.
Alpha Delta Phi
MacMYNN, James G.—Midway, B. C.
Badminton, Alpha Tau Omega
NIVEN James L.—Vancouver
Alpha Tau Omega
NORRIS, Charles M—Vancouver
Zeta Zsi
O'SHEA, J. Kenneth—Victoria
Law, Newman, Psi Upsilon
PATTERSON, Colin G.—Vancouver
Marketing, Advertising Dir.
PEGG, Sidney L.—South Burnaby
PERLINGHIS, Costa—Fort Camp
Accounting and Finance
POWELL, Frank E.—Langley
Accounting, Delta Kappa Epsilon
QUAGLIA, L. A.—
RENTON, Donald N.—Vancouver
Marketing, Big Block
RESTON, John C.—Vancouver
U.N.T.D., Alpha Tau Omega
RIDLEY, Robert N.—Vancouver
Production, Alpha Delta Phi
RITCHIE, John C—Vancouver
Finance, Beta Theta Pi
ROBERTSON, Alec C—Victoria
L:iw, Phi Kappa Sigma
ROSENBERG, Kenneth—Vancouver
Accounting, Rugby, Alpha Delta Phi
44 SALTER, William—South Burnaby
Production, Delta Kappa Epsilon
SCOTT, Vernon H. K—Vancouver
Accounting,  Phi Gamma Delta
ST. JOHN, William D.—Vancouver
Rugger, P.R.O. Student Council,
Alpha Delta Phi, Sigma Tau Chi
STUART, William D.—Vancouver
American Football, Phi Delta Theta
THOMPSON, Lorimer S—Vancouver
Accounting
TINKER, Robert P.—Naramata, B.C.
Commerce and Law
TURNER, James F.—Nelson, B. C.
Retailing, Delta Kappa Epsilon
TYSON, Edward D.—Vancouver
VERCHERE, William A.—Ladysmith
Law, Newman
VEAR, Gwendolyn—Vancouver
Alpha Omicron Pi
WEATHERALL, William A.—Van.
Delta Upsilon
WEEKS, Graham G.—Vancouver
Marketing, Delta Upsilon
WONG, Ding M.—Accounting
Accounting
WRIGHT, Ronald H.—Powell River
Retailing, Phi Gamma Delta
ARMIT, I. David—Gordon Bay, Ont.
Forestry,  Forestry Club, Men's Field
Hockey Team
ARNOLDWALLINGER, David P.—
Kimberley, B.C.
P.R.O. for Forestry Club
BEUKER, E. P.—
BLAGG, N. Anthony—West Van.
Forestry, U.B.C Forestry Club
DESAULNIERS, Victor N.—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi
GILBERT, Richard D.—Longford, V. I.
Forestry Club
HOOD, Neil L.—Nelson, B. C.
Forestry
MURI, Glen—Deep Cove, B. C.
Pres. of Forestry Club
MYERS, John G—Vancouver
Business Admin., Forestry, Editor of
Forestry Annual, Beta Theta Pi
NUTTALL, Michael F.—Victoria
Men's Field Hockey, Student Council,
Forestry Club, For. U.N. Soc, Co-ord.
of Student Council
PAUL, Arthur J.—Dawson Creek
Vice-pres. of Forestry Club
SCHOLEFIELD, Arthur J.—Victoria
Forestry Club
SMITH, Kenneth T.—Vancouver
Forestry Club
STAVENS, Herbert N.—Vancouver
Forestry Club
WOOD, Robert S.—Ladysmith, B. C.
Forestry Club
FORESTRY
45 /-/OME
ECONOMICS
AMSKOLD, Ruth M.—N. Vancouver
H.E.U.S., Socred, Teaching
ANNESLEY, Patricia E.—Duncan, V. I.
I.S.C.
BANERD, Blanche B.—Vancouver
Dietetics
BIGELOW, Cynthia Ann—Vancouver
Dietetics, Newman Club, Alpha Omicron Pi
BUSHELL, Doris Evelyn—Ocean Falls
Treas. H.E.U.S.
CHU, Vivian Georgia—Vancouver
Dietetics, Chinese Varsity
CRUMB, Patricia Ruth—Vancouver
Badminton, Alpha Delta Pi
DARLING, Valerie Ann—Vancouver
Home Ec. Club, Textiles,  Delta Gamma
EYFORD, Marg ret Agnes—Vancouver
Dietetics
FRANKSEN, Eleanor P.—S. Burnaby
Dietetics, Fencing
GRANT, Joan Phyllis D.—Vancouver
Dietetics,  Intramurals, Newman,
H.E. Club, Delta Gamma
GRAYSON, Norma Jean—Moose Jaw
Teaching, Badminton, Dance
HOREL, Helen Lucille—Vancouver
Teaching,  Dietetics
JACOBSEN, Mary Ann—Squamish
Textiles,  Delta Gamma
JOHNSON, Kathleen P.—Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta
KING, Sheila Win ton—Vancouver
Sec.  H.E.U.S.
McCALLUM, Irene Ethel—New West.
Dietetics, Phrateres, Pres. H.E.U.S.
McLEOD, Patricia D—Vancouver
Teaching
MILES, E. Irene—Vancouver
Dietetics,  Delta Gamma
MILLER, Marilyn June—Vancouver
Dramatic Club, Delta Gamma
MUNRO, Catherine A.—West Van.
Dietetics,  Delta Gamma
PENDRAY, Elizabeth M.—Victoria
Teaching, Alpha Phi
PRICE, Miriam Jean—Port Peary, Ont.
SLINGER, Judith E.—West Vancouver
V.O.C, H.E.U.S., Alpha Gamma Delta
SOONG, Eleanor C.—Shanghai
Dietetics
THOMPSON, Joyce Irene—New West.
Teaching,  U.S.C.  Rep.
USHER, Margaret I.—Victoria
H.E.U.S.,  Dance Club
WARREN, Doreen A.—Calgary, Alta.
Dietetics
YURICH, Mary Elsie—New West.
Phrateres,   H.E.U.S.  Alpha Gamma Delta
45 ANFIELD, S. David—Vancouver
Kappa Sigma, Sigma Tau Chi
ARNOLD, Gordon R.—South Burnaby
BANFIELD, C. Jane—Vancouver
Pres. U.N. Club, Delta Sigma PI,
Alpha Delta Pi
BILSLAND, Allan W.—Voncouver
BLACK, Delbert Errol—North Burnaby
Pro-Con
BOUMAN, Roland J —
BRENNAN, Robert James—
BURGE, Charles Wm. M.—
Gray Creek, Kootenay Lake
Delta Kappa Epsilon
CAMPNEY, Alan F.—Vancouver
Trias. L.U.S.
CHAPMAN, George G.—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma
CHONG, David, Lytton
Liberal Club
CHRISTIE, Norma Bell—Calgary
CHRISTOPHER, Gordon A.—Vancouver
Golf Club, Zeta Psi
CLARE, Lome P.—New Westminster
Phi Gamma Delta
CLARK, Sidney George—Nanaimo
Phi Gamma Delta
CLARKE, Alfred Thos.—Vancouver
Newman
CRAIG, Wallace G.—Vancouver
DAVIES, John L—Soyward, V. I.
Socred
EDDY, Alfred James—Sault Ste. Marie
FELTHAM, Ivan Reid—Voncouver
Pres. A.M.S.,  Beta Theta Pi,
Rhodes Scholar
FERRIS, Arthur Boyd—Winnipeg
Football, Y.M.CA.
FLADER, Charles—Vancouver
Zeta Beta Tau
FRASER, John Allen—Vancouver
Pres. L.U.S., Sigma Tau Chi
GOLDEN, Myron Joseph—Voncouver
Zeta Beta Tau
GOLDSMITH, Allan—Vancouver
Treas. A.M.S., Zeta Beta Tau,
Sigma Tau Chi
GOULT, John B. Eomer—Victorio
Zeta Psi
GRAHAM, Douglas J. T— Vancouver
Tip Toppers
GUEST, Gowan Thomas—Vancouver
HAMILTON, Howord John—
HARVEY, Ronald Bruce—Pr. George
Phi Kappa Sigma
HENDERSON, D. J.—Ville St. Laurent
HILLMAN, Keith A. L—Vancouver
HOWARD-GIBBON, F. A.—
Williams Lake
HUNTER, John Wilfred—Vancouver
IVENS, John Boyd—Ladner
Mamooks, Camera Club
JUNG, Douglas—Victoria
KEFFER, James L.—Vancouver
KELLY, Terrence I.—Ladner
Newman LAVEN, David Louis—
LOWES, Peter—
LEGGATT, M. Stuart—New West.
LEVEY, Gerald S.—Trail
Zeta Beta Tau
LLOYD, Frederick A.—Salmon Arm
Pres. Liberal Club, U.N. Club, Sigma Chi
MAWHINNEY, Donald J. S.—
MACARTHUR, Joan C—Vancouver
Chairman I.S.S., V.P. L.U.S, Sec. U.N.,
Pres. Big Block, Delta Sigma Pi
MACDONALD, John A.—Vancouver
McGEER, Michael G.—Vancouver
McLELLAN, Helen Jane—
MOIR, Reg. J. S.—West Vancouver
MULHOLLAND, W. H.—Vancouver
U.B.C. 'Birds Rugby, Phi Kappa Pi
MURDOCK, JOHN F.—Vancouver
Social Credit ex.
NEEN. William A.—Vancouver
Alpha Tau Omega
PEACOCK, Joan S—West Vancouver
D'lta Gamma
PERRY, Kenneth J.—Vancouver
PYPER, Ian G.—Kamloops
Badminton, Alpha Tau Omega
SCHACHTER, Bernard, Vancouver
Zsi Upsilon
SCOTT, George E.—Vancouver
SEYMOUR, Ian R.—Vancouver
SHIER, Robert P.—Vancouver
Phi Gamma D:lta
SIER, Herbert N.—Melville, Sask.
SPEVAKOW, Roger B.—Edmonton
Sigma Alpha Mu
SWEET, David G.—Vancouver
Zeta Psi
TOY, Samuel A.—Vancouver
TRIMBLE, A. Roy—Vancouver
Social Credit,  Parliamentary Forum
WATSON, John B.—
WESTAWAY, Raymond J.—New West.
Alpha Tau Omega
WHITTOME, James L—Duncan
WITHRINGTON, Geo. P.—Vancouver
YOUNGSON, David L—Vancouver
Hillel, Sigma Alpha Mu
48 ADRIAN, John J.—Winnipeg, Man.
ANDERSON, Donald 0.—Vancouver
ARROWSMITH, Ralph C—New West.
BALLAM, C. F.—Vancouver
BECKETT, Matthew—Vancouver
BELL, William J.—Revelstoke, B. C.
Kappa Sigma
BISSONNETTE, Gerald—Terrace, B.C.
BOGGIE, Alexander—Vancouver
CAMPBELL, William W.—Vancouver
CARTER, Harold R.—Alberni, V. I.
Phi Delta Theta
CHRISTENSEN, Ralph M.—Vancouver
CLARK, Nigel H.—Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta
COX, Albert R.—Vancouver
Medical Undergrad Society
DEVITO, W. P.—
DODEK, Morton—Vancouver
DOUGLAS, M. G.—
DUDLEY, John H.—Vancouver
FOULKS, Richard G.—South Burnaby
FULLER, W. M.—Vancouver
GALE, Henry H.—Vancouver
Zsi Upsilon
GEREIN, Alfred N—Kelowna
Phi Delta Theta
GRAHAM, John M.—Longford
GUEST, Margaret M.—Vancouver
HAMILTON, John D.—Vancouver
HARDER, Fred A.—Yarrow, B. C.
V.CF.
HARTWELL, Leagh W.—Vancouver
HENNIGER, James R.—Grand Forks
HEYDON, Gordon K.—South Burnaby
Pres. of Med. Undergrad Soc.
Phi Gamma Delta
HICKS, G. F.—Vancouver
JANSCH, Theodore L—Chemainus
JANSCH, Marjorie E.—Metchosin, V.i.
JEFFRIES, Roy C—Vancouver
KNUDSEN, Albert M.—New West.
Phi Delta Theta
KRINGHAUG, Olaf—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi
LEVIS, William H.—Vancouver
MANNING, Walter L—Vancouver
MARTIN, William R. J.—Vancouver
McPHERSON, V. A.—Vancouver mmSikmOLl
MITCHELL, Thomas M.—Vancouver
MITCHELL William J—N. Vancouver
MORRISON, Kenneth J.—Port Alberni
PARKINSON, Raymond—Vancouver
PAULS, Henry—Abbotsford, B. C.
Christian Med. Society
PONTIFEX, Alexander H.—Burnaby
PURKIS, Robert S.—Vancouver
R.CA.F.
ROBIN, Edwin P.—New Westminster
ROSS, William C—Victoria
ROUTLEY, John V.—Vancouver
SCHMOK, Arthur C—Vancouver
TANNER, William H. R.—Calgary
Kappa Sigma
TAYLOR, James V—Hollyburn, B. C.
Badminton Club
THOMPSON, Basil H. M.—Vancouver
THORNTON, Norman M.—Vancouver
WARNER, D. L—Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi
WEBSTER, Harry W.—Vancouver
WOODS, John H.—Vancouver
YATES, George, Victoria
Class treasurer
Pharmacy
HPFHP
ANTOSZ, Paul Peter—Vancouver
BLAKE, Elizabeth H.—Vancouver
BRYDEN, Marjorie A. B.—S. Burnaby
COMMONS, William E.—Fernie
Newman
COOPER, Phyllis M.—Trail
Visual Arts, I.S.E.,
Pub. Director af LS.E.
CORY, Allan M.—Vancouver
Players Club, Pres. Ph. U.S.
DARLING, James R.—Victoria
DEERING, Irma K. N.—Nanaimo
Radsoc
DELMAS, Francis C—Rossland
Newman, Young Liberals,
Exec of Newman
FARRIS, Walter Henry—Vancouver
Dance Club, Camera Club
GAWIUK, Michael N.—Vancouver
GONZALES, Bruce M.—Vancouver
HAMILTON, Wm. Clair—New West. HEWER, C. Russell—Vancouver
Kappa Psi, Phi Gamma Delta
KELLEY, Dora E.—Kelowna
Mamooks, V.O.C, Newman, Alpha Delta Pi
KLASSEN, Abraham—Vancouver
Sports Rep. Ph. U.S.
LINBURG, Jack George—Vancouver
MORROW, Blake Edward—New West.
MUNSON, C—
NEIMES, Thos. G. Owen—Vancouver
Social Convener for Ph. U S.
NOEL, Ross Norman—Victoria
ROBERGE, Edmund H.—Victoria
SANCHIONI, Carlo—White River, Ont.
SHARPE, James—Vancouver
Kappa Sigma
SMITH, Cyril Bee—Vancouver
SMITH, Glen William—Grand Forks
Ph. U.S.,  Rowing Club
SPENCER, Alfred John—Nanaimo
Pharm. U.S.C. Rep.
TADMAN, B. Blooma—Vancouver
Delta Phi Epsilon
THIBAUDEAU Denis—New West.
TOMUENOVICH, Annie—Vancouver
Sec-treas.  Ph. U.S.
URQUHART William H.—New West.
WARD, Kenneth Leonard—N. Van.
WARNE, James A.—South Burnaby
Pub. Rep. for Faculty
WELLS, Charles C—South Burnaby
WHITWHAM, John W. S.—S. Burnaby
WICKMAN, Thomas—Victoria
WING, James—Kamloops
Camera Club, Filmsoc
WONG, Wing Sung Jack—Victoria
YUSKOW, Walter—Vancouver
51 COLE, Douglas E.—Kimberley
Rep. on U.S.C.
CREHAN, Patricia—Vancouver
I.H.C, I.S.C, Mamooks, W.A.D.
CROSSED, E. J.—Cranberry Lake
P.E., History, U.B.C. Jayvees
DAVIES, James W.—Vancouver
Biology
GORWILL, Ruth J.—Vancouver
Intramurals, W.A.D. treasurer, Swim Team
COVEY, Jack—Saskatoon, Sask.
KENYON, Gerald S.—Penticton, B. C.
Math., P.E., Basketball, Track,
pres. P.E.U.S.
KUSHNIR, William—Valemount, B.C.
Biology, Psych., P.E., Am. Football,
Kappa Sigma
LAWSON, Stanley—
LEVERSAGE, Ronald G.—Vancouver
Biology, P.E.
LONGSTAFF, Geo. E.—Cranberry Lake
Geog., P.E.
MATTHEWS, Elmer S.—Victoria
Biology, P.E.
McKELVIE, Roy W.—Vancouver
NYHAUG, Ernest 0.—New West.
Football, Basketball, Phi Gamma Delta
RAMSLIE, Gunner J.—Vancouver
History, P.E.
ROURKE, Harold W.—Ladysmith, B.C.
History, P.E, Basketball
RUSSELL, Marilyn—Winnipeg, Man.
Eng., Pres. of W.A.D., Basketball,
Grass Hockey
SAARINEN, Carl G.—Calgary, Alta.
Biology, Football, Phi Kappa Pi
SCLATER, Shirley B.—Vancouver
Pres. of P.E.U.S., Delta Gamma
SMITH, Michael—Vancouver
Kappa Sigma
STRANGE, Patricia M—Vancouver
Chemistry
TAYLOR, Gary—Powell River, B. C.
Basketball, Phi Delta Theta
THOMPSON, Donald R.—Vancouver
TODD, James S— Nelson, B.C.
Hockey
WHYTE, William A.—Vancouver
Baseball, Rugby, v.p. Big Block,
Kappa Sigma
WILSON, William B.—Vancouver
WINTER, E. Anne—Vancouver
Hockey, Sec-treas. P.E.U.S.
52 One of the two hundred graduates to receive his degree from
Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, is Donn Barrieau who graduated from
the Faculty of Arts and Science last fall.
Ivan Feltham, this year's AMS president and the winner of the
1954 Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford, receives his degree from
Dr. MacKenzie.
Graduates  Bid  Farewe
POMPON caps from the Sorbonne, flowing blue
robes from Oxford, Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie in
black gown embroidered with setting suns, and Chancellor Sherwood Lett in flaming UBC robes were all
included in the entourage of 200 highlighting UBC's
fall convocation in the Women's gymnasium. Two
hundred seventy-one graduating students were presented degrees at the ceremony.
Ford of Canada president Rhys. M. Sale delivered the
convocation address. He was awarded an honorary
LL.D. for his leadership in Canadian manufacturing.
Unofficial   Dean   of   B.C.   cattlemen,   Lawrence   P.
Guichon was officially made Doctor of Science for his
"noteworthy work in the province's cattle industry."
Honorary Doctor of Laws and Letters degrees were
given to Archbishop William Duke of Vancouver diocese and Percy Bengough, president of the Trades and
Labor Congress, in recognition of humanitarian service.
B.C.'s Lieutenant-Governor Clarence Wallace and
other provincial dignitaries donned their colorful
gowns and uniforms in Brock Hall before proceeding to
the gym. Friends and relatives of the graduates were
served tea in the Brock after the ceremony.
Expressions of pleasure and excitement adorn the faces of these graduates as they leave the gymnasium,
hugging their diplomas and ready to
begin a career.
53  '    :-,.„-
CAMPUS LIFE Regalic
Eagerly anticipating their first week on the
campus, Freshmen crowded the door to a new
life. As the week progressed, they added new
life to old clubs, were subjected to the horrors
of orientation, and paid the supreme price for
breaking rules. With the first bewildering
week in their past, Frosh elected Sylvia
Tremaine Frosh Queen and settled down to
the  familiar routine of lectures. Rules Enforced By Mock Trial
A POCKET Woodrow Wilson appeared on campus
this year in the unlikely guise of vice-president
of the Engineers Undergraduate society. J. R. Monte
McKay sent official greeting to Frosh from their
traditional arch-enemies, the Engineers, in the reassuring words, "No Lilypond this year." Ordinarily Engineers have orientated Frosh by throwing them into the
lily-less library pool, called Lilypond. This year revolutionary changes were made.
As usual, Frosh Orientation week was directed by the
Undergratuate Societies Committee. McKay's bombshell of unexpected pacifism was dropped at the USC
emergency meeting held on the first day of lectures.
"There will be no battle involved in this thing at
all," promised hopeful McKay. "It just doesn't make
sense—we've been lucky in the past, no one's got hurt."
Consolation for the dry Frosh Week was suggested
by Law representatives. Frosh would be humbled only
by stringent dress regulations demanding rolled-up
trousers, hitched-up skirts, beanies and identification
buttons. Offenders of regalia laws were to be charged
by Engineer peace officers and brought before Law
School justices on the Arts lawn "well away from the
front of the library."
There was nothing vindictive about the official eight
days of speeches, dances and tours making up Frosh
Week. Cairn ceremony commemorating the Great Trek
legend was again held with President N. A. M. Mac-
Sporting their company manners, Freshmen
met the faculty at Frosh reception after a week
of less dignified events. Showing their rustic
side freshettes helped with the back-straining
work of clearing rocks from the playing field.
With an eye to the future, students ordered
their Totem early to make sure they would
see their picture.
Kenzie speaking. Booths, posters, sound trucks, barkers
and even tumblers turned Arts lawn into a three-ringed
circus on this year's club day. With their sights set on
the awe-struck Frosh, upperclass slickers of thirty clubs
took a heavy toll of new members. Pagan square dancing around an outdoor campfire under the direction of
Varsity Outdoor Club proved popular. Traditional
Frosh smoker was less controversial than in other years.
Election of Frosh president was made more lively
this year by the loquacity of ex-Mageeite Philip Green-
berg who campaigned at the end of Frosh elections,
taking the election. Another Mageeite, 18-year-old
Silvia Margaret Tremaine bubbled out her appreciation of the honor as she was crowned Frosh queen
before 1,200 students in the Armourie Frosh ball. Less
loquacious, Silvia said only she was "very thrilled" as
Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie crowned and shyly bussed her.
Tradional Frosh Week events were held. "Her
Scienceman Lover" popular comedy of graduate Eric
Nicol played two nights to an Auditorium packed with
Frosh. Big-Little sister banquet was so swamped by
hungry females that the traditional spaghetti and meat
dinner had to be supplemented with beans.
On the Wednesday of Frosh week, all Freshman
violators of dress regulations were tried in Orientation
court. Engineers had taken books from charged Frosh
to insure attendance at court.
Presided over by Chief Justice John Fraser, the court
tried thirty-three violators of Frosh regalia regulations
in one hour of speedy court procedure. Only constructive tasks were given as punishment—cleaning the
Aggie barns, nosing oranges down the Main Hall, stirrup pump hosing and egg shampoos.
But the Frosh did not like being dry. Challenging
validity of the court and its decisions, 3 freshmen,
wielding stirrup pumps, attempted to break up the
proceedings. Official Engineer police, feeling there was
such a thing as being too fighting mad to be proud,
beat off the three waves of Freshmen with an unjudicial
verve. Court was resumed after one ten-minutes recess,
although Frosh still soaked Engineers in the background.
Temperance was injected into Engineer - police
defence of the court by stocky Engineer Public Relations Officer Herbert Stephens who stood on the
judges' stand and screamed, "Hey, hold it, you dirty
rats." Drenched himself, vice-president Monte McKay
warned Frosh leaders, "If we had brought out all the
engineers you never would have got near this place."
"There will be no retaliation, this year or next,"
McKay announced later, officially. "It's a bit better
than last year anyway."
57 Riding in freshly simonized convertibles, Audrey
Butler, Hoy Pountney, and Helen Donnelly, along
vith the other Homecoming Queen candidates, were
graded for the approval of the spectators at half-
time at the Homecoming football game. Cheering
-rowds fa'led to bring a win in the game for the
UBC football squad.
Thousands Thrilled By
IMPRESSIVE and praised, this year's Homecoming
Week was continually overflowing with crowds as
grads and undergrads gaped, ogled and participated
in parades, sports meetings and dances. Even captious
Ubyssey chief Allan Fotheringham gave more bouquets
than brickbats to red-haired Howard L. Beck and his
committee for arranging the week's activities. Homecoming time is the time each fall when UBC is on
display, planning dances for grads, sport contests
against grads and a downtown parade to impress
cityites.
Fifty gaudy, gay and girlie floats filled eight downtown blocks and stopped city bustle for one hour as
the annual Homecoming parade spread pro-UBC publicity from Stanley Park to Burrard and Davie. Spectators stopped daily rounds and gaped; three-digit crowds
looked and laughed from important intersections. At
Georgia and Granville one papa placed junior on his
car roof for better vision.
Double the size of 1952's float parade, this year's
was judged by newspaper quipsters Barry Mather and
Eric Nicol. Satirical Alpha Delta Phi-Delta Upsilon-
Kappa Kappa Gamma float, trailing a roofless bathtub
symbolizing the BEG pool, netted crowd-cheers and
best satisfied judges. Agriculture, Medicine, Sigma Chi-
Alpha Delta Pi, Publications Board and COTC ran-up
in the parade contest.
Unexpectedly large crowds became a problem as
1100 students and alumni sought tickets to dance and
dine in the recently waxed Armouries. Friday morning
before the Saturday dance only fifty tickets were
unsold and grads were beginning to pull strings to
get floor space. Harried Howie Beck and his Home-
comers were forced to fill Brock hall with the overflow. For half-price, late coming alumni and students
were given cokes, donuts and canned music in the
Brock. "A noble, if unsuccessful, experiment," commented Ubyssey editorial writers. Cycling down Pender Street, Marilyn White and
Rosemary Alden, dressed in baggy polka-dotted and
Frilly suits, added color to the Homecoming parade.
In the background is the Sigma Chi—Alpha Delta Pi
Indian float.
Boxes and boxes of colored kleenex had to be pushed
into place for the Pharmacy float. Cellophane covering helped to keep kleenex from sagging in the rain.
Homecoming Highlights
An extra-large crowd of dolls, 15, competed for title
of Homecoming Queen. Slender, photogenic Betty
Mowatt was selected "the girl most worth coming home
to" by past AMS presidents Dave Brousson, Al Ainsworth and Mrs. Nonie Lyon. Men's dean Walter H.
Gage tenderly crowned and thoroughly bussed Betty
at the ball, giving vicarious enjoyment to the three
thousand male undergrads he represented.
Four days of display were suffered by the 14 runners-
up for Homecoming Queen. From Wednesday to Saturday, the heirs-hopeful smiled and waved their way
through three parades, a half-time tour of the football
field, a Pep Meet, judging, and finally the ball.
Relatively large were the crowds that attended Homecoming's traditional, more exclusive reunions. Faculty
club saw Tuesday night back-slapping old boys of the
honorary fraternity, Sigma Tau Chi, dined with new
boys. Brock chairs were filled Friday as the Big Block
club banqueted.
Smiling Dean Walter H. Gage, tweedy men's dean,
entered the news again as he received a Great Trekker
award at the football game's half time. Crowds of
undergrads and grads cheered Gage, making the cairn
model also a memento of student friendliness.
In sports, UBC should have stood in bed. Footballing Thunderbirds lost 20 to 6 to Eastern Washington Savages. Crowd satisfying was the playing of UBC's
Jerry Nestman, who substituted for quarterback regular Jack Hutchinson. Hutchinson was injured in the
first quarter. Nestman, a dark horse, showed four-
horseman calibre. His tackles, catches and runs taught
spectators a medical student with only one-hour to
practice a week could frighten Savages.
Grads tackled undergrads in two matches and won
both times. In golf, the oldsters netted a healty 21-6
win, losing only one of the four matches. Big Doug
Bajus led the grads with 71. Dick Hanley and student
John Russell had Bojus worried and ended with 72
each.
Crowds of grads turned up to play the annual UBC
basketball game and take the annual victory. Bob
Osborne (34), Harry Franklin (48), Harry Kermode
(48), Sandy Robertson (48), By Straight (40) led the
grsd mob, called the youngest in history.
Ph' Delta Theta and Alpha Gamma Delta combined their efforts
to prepare the float "The Good Ship Phi" for the downtown
Homecoming parade. Wielding a monster hypo, nurses Margie
Stewart, June Walker and Shirley Engelland scared red-shirted,
green-faced Herbie Stevens. WUS candidate, Betty Mowatt,
crowned Homecoming Queen, chats with elated WUS President
Nan Adamson, boy friend Peter Grantham, and her sister.
59 Revue
FOR many years now UBC-spirited live-wires have
been dreaming of a real Varsity Revue to caricature campus life. Last year they came close to their
dream: rehearsals were called, scripts were written, but
April exams stopped the show. This year the dream
came true.
The first annual Varsity Revue, with skits, dances,
and songs, packed the Auditorium for three nights, and
was declared a "hilarious success." Star of the 12-act
Blue and Gold satire was UBC's celebrated and honored president Dr. Norman Archibald McRae MacKenzie, who "fulfilled a life-long ambition" to walk
across a stage.
Dr. MacKenzie, adorned in rolled-up jeans, a rainbow shirt, and a blue and gold beanie, brought roars
of mirth as he simulated a freshman tossing orange
peels on the stage-grass. The mirth doubled when he
danced off-stage with a comely freshette. Freshmen
partners of the eminent educator were Dean S. N. F.
Chant and UBC Librarian Neal Harlow.
The entire production was home grown and raised
by UBC students, teachers, and alumni. The 100-cast
Revue was scripted by author-radio writer Ernie Perrault and newspaper columnist Eric "Jabez" Nicol;
directed by English Department's Dorothy Somerset,
Extension Department's Philip Keatley, Music Department's John Brockington, and downtown choreographer Mara McBirney; and acted by students, five faculty members, three professional stars, and a janitor.
With Tom-Tom drums, gallons of paint, and added
effects from the chemistry department, the Revue-ers
set about to satirize and skiterize student and faculty
activiies. Totem poles, fraternities, football, the library,
and lectures were each joshed. "The idea of a Varsity
Members of the Bird Watchers Club in the Clubs' Day scene
along with The Bugs Club, Players Club and Dance Club, Radio
Society and Mussoc displayed their waves to attract Freshmen in
the scene. Cheer leader Barbara Rickson opened the Revue with
the "Hello" number. Making his theatrical debut, President
MacKenzie was the star of the show when he, along with Neil
Harlow, head librarian and Dean Chant, played the role of
Freshmen in the scene "Keep off the Grass".
50 Satirizes Campus Life
Revue," said the planners, "is to represent all phases of
campus life, to the students and to the downtowners."
Some of the funnier representations:
Educators-turned-Thespian Dr. Dorothy Mawdsley,
dean of women, and Dr. Joseph Crumb, department of
economics, who acted roles of faculty members in the
whimsical "Fun for All" skit;
Kenneth Caple, regional CBC director and UBC
governor, as "Knucklehead Noonan, and Judge Arthur
E. Lord, UBC governor and 1933's Gceat Treker, as
"Hopeless Hogon," who played in a "Think For College" scene;
Vancouver radio funny-punny man Barney Potts, who
parodied an overall-garbed Agricultural professor lecturing on poultry breeding;
Sixty-nine-year-old James Witcherley, Auditorium
janitor since it was built in 1922, who appeared with
Dr. MacKenzie in "Keep Off the Grass";
Ever-rushing fraternity and sorority students got a
satirical look at themselves in "A Word for the Greeks"
Showing what happens to unsuspecting frosh
when rushed by the numerous campus clubs,
these members of UBC's first annual Revue
crowd onto the stage for a skit depicting
UBC's annual Clubs' Day.
scene, where a timid freshette and a freshman were
introduced to the mad and busy Greek Letter Society
life of rushing, catching, and pledging. A "no-punches-
pulled chorus line provided the show with a few "hot"
numbers which had the audience undecided between
embarrassment or excitement as an emotion to register.
After it was all over, chief director Dorothy Somerset mopped her brow, then immediately set to work
composing a 45-word thank-you letter to the hundreds
of people who had hands in the production. "I would
like to acknowledge and pay tribute to the wonderful
spirit of cooperation," she wrote to The Ubyssey. She
gave a list of people to be thanked, then concluded:
"Our Blue and Gold Revue has been a heart-warming
demonstration of university spirit at its best."
Mass production in the powder room
is typified here where Thespians don
make up before going on stage for a
dance sequence in the Revue. The
make-up crew added greatly to the
success of the production.
61 Judges  Dick  Underhill,  Al  Fotheringham,  Monte  McKay,
Dick Vogel and Al Goldsmith prepare comments for print.
Pianist Marilyn White provided a soft background  for  commentator  Helen  Donnelly.
Coeds Model Fall Fashions
COMMENTARY by campus fashion expert Allan
Fotheringham and a judging panel of five prominent male students made this year's annual fashion
show something different.
Marty's College Shop in the University District and
Speiser's Furs provided the garments modelled by 25
lovely coeds at the afternoon and evening shows. Helen
Donnelly commentated at the afternoon show, while
Marilyn White played classical and semi-classical selections to provide a background for the commentary.
Male judges, Fotheringham, Dick Vogel, Monte McKay, Allan Goldsmith, and Dick Underhill concluded
that they were somewhat confused as to the crinolines,
dickies, stoles, weskits, and all the other paraphernalia
which holds a female together.
In the first picture (lower left), Lila McLennan
models a low-cut black net evening gown. Her black
formal was accented with a white fur stole, perky black
veiled hat, and black suede pumps.
Next is Marilyn McLellan in a stunning black and
white ensemble. A large black picture hat set off her
white knitted suit and zebra black and white-striped
wool coat. A black parasole and short white gloves
completed the outfit.
Juliet Grimson modelled the latest thing in fashion
—black velvet television pants with a black velvet top.
Silver mesh slippers added contrast to her outfit.
In the lower right picture, Jane Deny, wearing
authentic brown tartan slacks, yellow wool sweater, and
brown suede weskit, added a touch of sporting effect.
A wide range of outfits, including stylish taffeta
dresses, tartan suits and hats, bathing suits, nylon negligees, informal skirts and sweaters were displayed.
Eyeing a model in slacks, Dick Underhill remarked,
"Slacks still don't do for a girl what Daks do for a
man because the hip detail looks more like hip retail
to me," and later went away babbling further comments and chewing on an old Ladies Home Journal.
1
a £k %■
I
«*|, / A big kiss for a little blood, cry Nursing students as males quickly
line up to buss and bleed.
This is how to get your blood typed by a pretty nurse.
Guys, Gals Give For Globulin
LANKY, sad-eyed Public Relations Officer Bill St.
John sauntered out of AMS offices this year after
trying for two years to explain to downtowners why
students riot. "There's one consolation," thought St.
John, "blood drives were a success."
Two years ago, St. John was a man with an idea.
By organizing all Canadian campus blood drives on a
competitive basis, he argued, blood drive totals everywhere would leap and outsiders would learn students
can be mature.
"Let's beat U of Texas," cried students in 1952 as
the first intercollegiate blood drive started. It was a
battle of Titans. To win, UBC donors gave an unprecedented 4,500 pints during the whole year.
At the same time, all-Canadian contributions from
university drives leapt to 15,000 pints. "Our own percentages and university total have been climbing ever
since," smiles St. John. This year, 4,927 pints were
collected in the fall and spring drives. The fall drive
closed early as students offered blood faster than the
Red Cross could find empties.
UBC's total contribution grew to 19,440 pints after
this near-5000 pint increase. Twelve thousand have
been given since competitive spirit was developed.
UBC placed only fourth in the intercollegiate drive,
judged on a percentage basis, last year and faces stiff
competition this year from Saskatoon, New Brunswick
and Mount Allison.
Don't worry folks, he's only tired (A), and the nurses are only
giving him cokes. It is just something which seldom happens when
students give blood. Really, it doesn't hurt a bit. "We bled, how
about you," scream banners on the cars (B), which paraded
around the campus during the blood drive in an attempt to get
more bleeders.
63 Mardi Gras In New Orleans
KIDS just won't go to a costume ball," laughed
the student-in-the-quad as Intra-Fraternity Council and Pan-Hellenic Society announced Mardi Grassers
this year would have to wear fancy dress. But the
quad critics were wrong.
Tabbed "Mardi Gras in New Orleans," the two-
night fancy festive brought over 1200 revelers out to
Commodore Cabaret, netting a handsome |2,000 for
charity, and winning praise from all corners as a multicolored and many-costumed ball.
Stately, 19-year-old third-year Arts coed and Delta
Gamma candidate Janie Shrum, daughter of Physics
chief Gordon Merritt Shrum, was crowned Queen of
the Mardi Gras by previously inaugurated King Brian
Upson, Teacher Training, a Phi Delta Theta candidate, and captain of Thunderbird basketball team.
Preamble to the dance was a monster, two-hour
booster pep meet held in the Armouries, where
students swarmed in to see Upson crowned King, and
nine vivacious Queen candidates paraded in shiny
convertibles. The pep side of the Meet was provided
by the antics of Barney "Hotrod" Powers, and an "old-
fashioned foot-stomping" Dixieland jazz band.
Soon after the announcement that Mardi Gras was
fancy dress, Vancouver costume stores were deluged
with demands from costume-hungry UBC students
who were striving for originals. But, as it turned out,
the more resourceful revelers shopped no further than
their own imaginations for original get-ups. Few
turned up in the traditional cowboy and pirate outfits, but the ball was crowded with Prince Valiants,
George Washingtons, French ladies, sheiks, clowns,
gypsies, elephants, and a pack of cards.
Maybe not the most colorful, but indeed the oddest
costume   was   paraded   by  fourth-year  Artsman   Ken
"Ballin' the Jack" number by the short girls
chorus was accompanied by the belayed and
stripe-shirted male chorus. The short girls costumes were sapphire, blue, gold and chartreuse
satin. New high-heeled shoes cause blisters and
sore feet admit Diane Driscoll, Helen Donnelly
and Barb Jagger. Alpha Delta Phi members
put up decorations and later in the evening
won the award for the best fraternity decorations.
64 Finale of the Mardi Gras chorus shows
Barbara Jagger, Diane Lam, Bill Lawrence, Wendy Cox, Dave Hemphill,
Loretta Dwyer, Mayli McAlpine, Lyla
McLennan and Eleanor Kepper.
Alexander, who depicted the "Spirit of the Mardi
Gras." Wrapped in a checkered barrel and orange
pyjamas, Alexander carried 25 balloons and a bird
cage containing a tiger attacking two canaries.
Thursday night best costume winners Rosalee Glan-
ville and Bill Forbes bedecked themselves out in a la
Mau Mau terrorists' style, with black-dyed longjohns.
Ballerina Marge Hinke and clown Con Wood were
Friday night's costume winners.
Chorus lines and stage show, traditionally the best
reasons for going to see the Mardi Gras, met stiff
competition as revelers like Alexander and others
sported fantastic and variegated costumes.
The chorus lines, living up to their popular reputation, added greatly to the ball. The short girls
chorus line, equipped with gaudy gold and chartreuse
tight-slit skirts and high heels, portrayed the Shady
Ladies of the wicked past with an exuberance that
lent realism to suggestiveness. They bumped and
wiggled their way through the intoxicating number
"Way Down Yonder in New Orleans" with all the
finesse of an Earle Carrol-trained bump and grind line.
Choreographer Wendy Cox this year successfully slid
and slithered through a solo dance number.
Mardi Gras Queen, Janie Shrum, was Delta Gamma's candidate.
To advertise Janie, sorority sisters Verna Donaldson, Joan Cour-
sier and Marilou Wilson decorate one of the posts in the
cafeteria.
Doing a dream sequence, she, accomplice Bill Lawrence and the tall girls' chorus line, all made like
prancing flamingoes.
The rest of the stage show, perhaps not spectacular
but no less entertaining to the enthusiastic and cheering throng in attendance, featured, amongst others, a
male chorus line of beachcombers. The finale closed
with an appropriate "Come to the Mardi Gras."
An indication of the success of the Mardi Gras
talent is the fact that television cameras popped into
one of the pre-presentational rehearsals.
63 Hard-working members of High School Conference discuss
details with Chairman Jim Killeen, centre. Left, top to
bottom, Marilyn White, Lorna Jones, Joy Mounce, Dave
Helliwell, Tom Anthony. Right, Dave Hemphill, Art
Fletcher, Isy Wolfe, Rosemary Alden, Don Jabour, and
Shalto Hebenton.
High School students take a glance at a map of the
UBC campus before being conducted on a tour of
the University during the two-day High School Conference. The tour took the delegates through the
prominent buildings on the campus and Fort and
Acadia camps.
UBC Host To Highschoolers
ONE day last March a plane from the north winged
into Vancouver's International Airport. Out of it
stepped a trim girl from Mayo High School, Yukon
Territories. She was one of the 176 delegates representing 92 schools who attended the seventh annual
and largest ever High School Conference at UBC.
The unprecedented arrival of a delegate from so far
away as Mayo was only one highlight of the weekend
meet. After it was all over the pamphlet-burdened delegates trudged back to their homes much wiser about
university life.  Some of the life they saw:
Traditional welcoming, made by President Dr. N. A.
M. MacKenzie and Alma Mater President Ivan Feltham;
Faculty-delegate discussion group, where university
educators answered the why's and wherefore's of UBC
faculties;
Students from all parts of B.C. as well as one student from
Mayo, Y.T., registered for the 16th annual High School Conference.
Extra-curricular discussion groups for male and
female, where the what's and what'sits of campus clubs
were revealed;
Talk on "How students pay their way," by W. H.
Gage, dean of Administration and Inter-Faculty
Affairs;
A sampling of university lectures, including English
100, History 101, Geography 201, and Psychology 100.
The delegates, bright, young, and eager, were met
by conference committee member Dave Hemphill, then
billeted out to private homes in the city. After registering and speechifying at Brock Hall, highschoolers
sampled cafeteria food.
Afterwards delegates took a 34-mile jaunt around the
city, looking at British Empire Games facilities, new
Granville Bridge, and other assorted sights. The weekend in Vancouver was finalized with a dance in Brock
Hall.
Equipped with camera and name tags, conference students
attended the UBC vs. Alberta basketball game in the War
Memorial gym. Forestry students demonstrate their scale model of the Haywire Logging Co.,
complete with donkey engine and logging truck. This is just one example
of the many models which made for a lively evening.
Bob O'Shaughnessy accepts the prize won by the
second-year Applied Sciencemen for their skit in
the Engineer's Pep meet
Engineers Toast Bacchus
UBC's engineering students are not known as quiet
boys. They have a long history of antics and
capers to which they proudly point. But the biggest
caper yet happened last February when engineers
staged their thirty-fifth annual hop, stomp, and holler
ball at Commodore Cabaret.
Going mythological, the campus bad boys paid
tribute to Bacchus, god of wine, by calling their ball
the "Red Bacchanal," and by doing their most to follow Bacchus tradition. The 1200 people who jammed
the dance floor during the two-night run agreed the
Bacchanal was the best.
Plans for the party were made early in the Fall by
Engineering Undergraduate Society vice-president
Monte McKay, who soon got student started on making
display models for the event. A miniature shovel—
complete with manual controls and a supply of dirt,
constructed by Civil Engineering, copped first prize in
the display judging. A "manually-oiled" hydraulic press
made by Mechanics won second prize, while Electricians got third prize with a scale model of a 40-ton
overhead powerhouse crane.
After the celebrations, the toll: six missing serving
trays, and two missing dolls from the Nurses' display.
Fourth-year Mechanical Engineers produce coasters with their
hydraulic press model. First prize was won by the fourth-year
Civil Engineers for their model of a steam engine. All parts of
the shovel were made by hand including the molds which were
used to pour the metal pieces for the treads. The Bacchanal was
held on two nights with first and fourth-year students attending
on the first night, and the second and third-year students on the
final night.
67 Dimes - Dames - Dimes
AND then there's the three-ring circus, called March
of Dimes, Engineers stage each December on the
Main Mall to collect dimes for the Crippled Children's
Hospital. With lady wrestlers, cigar-smoking contest
and female football games, the circus takes in about
$500 each year.
Erect, soft-spoken Grant Hepburn ringmastered the
big show this year. In his first ring he staged a series of
contests to prove student mettle. Log crossing began
the show as student-volunteers played woodsmen by
walking barefoot, loaded with packboard, over logs
four feet from the ground. None won.
Engineers' Godiva band turned spectators' eyes next
to the third ring, by playing "Noise." Here physical
education Lady Wrestlers met in grim hammerlocking.
Aesthetic half-nelsoning won cheers from crowd.
Blare of "Pandemonium" caught spectators again
and turned their eyes to the ring one. Cigarette rolling
contest and cigar smoking contest brought more dimes
to ever-present engineer collectors from pleased spectators. Winning Lady Wrestler again won fame as she
out-cigar-smoked three males.
Faint strains of "Blork" called attention to the center
ring. "Alive and in captivity, genuine Brock Hall Pubsters" announced Hepburn cracking mental whip. Buy
pies and hit pubsters. Meringued were maligning pubsters until Editor Allan Fotheringham rebelled.
Fotheringham's coup d'etat began when he pumpkin-
pied the face of stagemaster Hepburn. It ended when
engineer roustabouts changed circus site to library
pool and added a new act: "The one-and-only Fotheringham being thrown in the one-and-only library pool."
Music reclaimed student attention to feature attraction, a girlie act. Husky Home Ec and Nurse girls
tangled in ring two, center of the Main Hall, during a
35-minute football game. Only one touchdown was
made, by Nurse Pat Paterson. Irene McCallum, Home
Er undergrad, received a black eye and assorted lacera-
(D) More football; No, but it is still Home Ec and Nurses, who
helped Engineers gather $550 for the hospital; (E) "Engineer for
Day," little Jimmy Middleton, rests with nurses Shirley Mathews
tleft) and Ginny Howell; (F) Over-anxious engineers give a
student the "shake-up" to see how much money he has for the
cause. Only casualty of the day was Home Ec student Irene
McCallum, who received a black eye in the football game.
tions. Robert Brady coached the Home Economists'
team; Edward Jakeman, the Nurses. Players wore full
uniform, were backed by cheerleaders.
To make up their $563 total, the largest amount
taken in any of the five Engineer March of Dimes
drives, redshirts blitzed all 8:30 classes worming money
from early birds.
Remainder of the money was collected at Dimes circus. An illustration of good work marching dimes can
do was the happy face of six-year-old Jimmy Middle-
ton, recently-released from Children's Hospital. Jimmy's
story tore heart-strings: he had to be sent to Crippled
Children's Hospital one year before with infantile paralysis. "We had little hope," Jimmy's mother told
engineers as she related how money from Canada's
National March of Dimes drive was all that made it-
possible for doctors to cure Jimmy. At the circus, Jimmy's casts were off, although he was "still a little
shaky."
All money collected in the drive went directly to
Children's Hospital. Engineers took money from then-
own   budget   for   prizes,   costumes   and   decorations.
68 Riots   of   fun   featured   Engineers'   annual
March of Dimes for Children's Hospital this
year, which drew hundreds of spectators to
Main Mall where the antics were held. (A)
Two  "lady"  wrestlers,  playing  ring  around
the  wrestling ring;   (B)   Nurses  and
Home   Ec,   fighting   the   roughest,
toughest   game   seen   for   years;   (C)
Student Bob McLean crossing a rolling log. Wr
LLOY POUNTNEY
Frosh Princess
'
BARBARA FINDLAY  '
Sweetheart of Sigma Ch
JOAN IRVINE
Totem Queen SYLVIA TREMAINE
Frosh Queen
KATHLEEN   EISENHUT
Phrateres Sweetheart
BETTY MOWATT
Homecoming Queen
JANIE SHRUM
Mardi Gras Queen  ATHLETICS "This is the way we're going
to win, boys," Thunderbird
coach Don Coryell tells his
star football players Gordy
Flemons (left), and Roger
Kronquist, while line coach
Dick Mitchell watches over
Roger's shoulder.
Football Holds The Line
ON October 30, 1951, UBC Thunderbirds won a
football game. One year and eleven months passed
with Thunderbirds trudging behind without winning
another one. Then late last September, they did it
again—Thunderbirds won another football game.
By the end of this season Thunderbirds, under a new
and personable coach, Don Coryell, former linebacker
with University of Washington Huskies and recently
named to the all-time all-star Hula Bowl team, had won
two games, lost seven, captured two conference titles,
ruined the champion Whitworth Pirates' defensive
mark in the last game of the season, and placed one
man each on each of the two all-conference teams.
In addition, the Blue and Gold squad flew to gay
and wicked Montreal to do battle with the McGill
Redmen in aid of the Canadian Paraplegic Society.
Although the game was unsuccessful as far as the Birds
were concerned (they lost), the officials of the CPS
thought differently from the monetary angle and instituted plans to make the contest an annual affair
dubbed the "Paraplegic Bowl".
UBC's upset of the season in September was their
resounding victory over the Vancouver Cubs, embryo
squad of the B.C. Lions of the professional Western
Intraprovincial Union. What started out to be an
exhibition game "to give the UBC boys some experience," as Cubs' mentor Annis Stukus put it, turned
out to be a championship-type game with both teams
fighting hard and doing their best to win, and ended
with the university squad emerging as 11-1 victors.
The Birds' other win came at the expense of the non-
conference Oregon College of Education Wolves. The
Blue and Gold squad ran over, under, and through the
hapless Wolves to win 20-6.
With Coryell, ably assisted by line coach Dick
Mitchell, at the helm, the Birds main theme of
offence was in the passing department, which saw
quarterbacks Gordie Flemons and Gerry Stewart, winner of the Dr. Gordon Burke Inspirational Award, toss
the Blue and Gold to the Conference's total yards
gained on passing and total offensive yardage titles.
Captain Bob Brady moved from the second all-con-
"Grrrrr, let's smash dem Lions," snarls Thunderbird centreman Pete Gregory as fellow linemen (left to right) Buzz Hudson, Gerry
O'Flanagan, Dudley Gerry, Bob Brady, Ernie Nyhaug, and Charlie James hunch their padded shoulders and prepare to smash the
Vancouver Lions. When the dust had settled they found they indeed had smashed the Lions, by an 11 to 1 score. It was the first
game of the season and the team's first win in two years. THUNDERBIRDS
Won
Lost
Tied
Exhibition
1
0
0
Conference
1
5
0
Magill
0
1
0
Total
2
6
0
"Ohhhhhhh boy, if I ever catch up to you," warns Number 5 as he gallops
after a fleetfooted Thunderbird player streaking for a touchdown. Number
5 caught him.
ference team guard spot he held down in 1952 to the
first team slot. Team-mate Jack Hutchinson was just
nosed out, by one point, from a halfback position on
the first team and was placed on the second squad.
Honorable mentions were given to end Charlie James
and to guard Cece "Pappy" Taylor.
Losing only three stalwarts, Bill Stuart, Ralph Martinson and Jerry Nestman through graduation, the
1954 edition of the Thunderbirds should be a much
bigger and better aggregation than that of '53, providing of course that ol' man ineligibility doesn't sneak
in through the back door.
How to make a Denver sandwich on a football field is shown in
the picture on the left. The middle of the sandwich is a visiting
player who doesn't seem too happy about the whole idea; giving
him the squeeze are two unidentified Thunderbirds. Right: Whitworth Pirates stop Thunderbirds in this tackle resembling a
wrestling match.
Smiling happily as he receives the Annual Inspirational
Award from Dr. Gordon Burke while coach Don Coryell
looks  on  is gridiron  star Gerry Stewart.
75 Birds kibitz in locker room after Alberta victory. Back row, left to right: John McLeod, Danny
Zaharko, Jeff Craig, Hek Frith, Bob Bone, Jim Carter, Buzz Hudson. Front row, left to right: Trainer
Johnny Owen, Stew Madill, Brian Upson, Coach Jack Pomfret, Herb Forward, Ernie Nyhaug, Jim
Pollock.
Basketball Bounces Back
HEROS on one side of the border; bums on the
other side—this would be an apt description of
the 1953-54 edition of the Thunderbirds. Western
Canadian inter-collegiate champs, Birds finished in a
tie for the basement of the Evergreen Conference. At
times brilliant, at other times mediocre, UBC produced a puzzling mixture of good and bad performances; were alternately heartening and disappointing.
In one of the most inspiring performances ever
produced by a UBC team, Birds looked invincible as
they crashed University of Alberta Golden Bears in
two straight games for the intercollegiate crown. Yet
earlier Jack Pomfret's crew threw away their opportunity to finish out of the Evergreen cellar for the
first time by dropping two games to winless Western
Washington. Even so, Birds scored two Evergreen
wins, a record for this school.
Birds reached their peak against the highly-touted
Golden Bears, winners of 19 of 20 games. After surprising the Alberta team 61-49 in the first game,
Thunderbirds racked up their highest point total of
the season and put forth a near-perfect performance
in whipping Bears 85-75 before 3000 fans in the
final game. Sparking UBC in that terrific series were
graduating students Geoff Craig, Danny Zaharko and
captain Brian Upson.
Three Thunderbird bigs watch for a rebound playing against
Whitworth College in the Memorial Gymnasium. Geoff Craig
leaps for an invisible rebound while Danny Zaharko (22) and
Brian Upson (12) watch on.
16 Hope and fear is expressed as John MacLeod jumps and shoots
for UBC Thunderbirds. Danny Zaharko (22) stands by to give a
helping band. The 'Birds are playing Whitworth in the Memorial
Gym.
At the crucial moment, with Washington just about to score, Ernie
Nyhaug leaps to recover the ball for UBC. Anxious look from
Brian Upson (12) shows that he is ready to join the fray.
Outstanding player over the season was 6' 5" sophomore John McLeod who topped the club in scoring
and handled much of the rebounding. Recognition
of his fine play came when he was named unanimously
to the All-Evergreen Conference team, the first time
such an honour had been given a UBC player. McLeod averaged 16 points a game for Evergreen play.
Also inconsistent were Dick Penn's Jayvee's UBC's
entry in the Vancouver Senior A league. Touted as
easy third-place finishers behind the more-experienced
Eilers and Clover Leafs, Jayvees had to win a sudden-
death play-off to cinch third place.
Standout for the Junior Varsity was ex-Bird center
Jim Carter who was second highest scorer in the
league, a feat which rated him a promotion back to
Birds at end of season.  Little  Frank Tarling was
named rookie-of-the-year for his efforts at guard.
*        #       *
Following the lead of Birds and Jayvees, the junior
Braves were a hot-and-cold team, mostly because of
changing coaches and the fact that Jayvees claimed
their outstanding players as they developed. Under
Harry Franklin and later, Bill Kushnir, Braves finished third in city junior loop.
THUNDERBIRDS
Won
Lost
Tied
Exhibition
      9
4
0
Conference
    2
10
0
Alberta
    2
0
0
Total
  13
14
0
Jayvee basketball team receives last-minute instructions
from Coach Dick Penn. Standing left to right: Ian
Geggie, Mike Fraser, Ron Friend, Jim Carter, Glen Drummond, Dave Weins, Kevin O'Connor, Al Ferguson.
Kneeling: Dan McAfee, Gordon Gimple, Dick Abbott,
Dave Horton, Frank Tarling.
77 Quenching their thirst on lemons and gathering around coach Albert
Laithewaite (wearing the hat), are members of the Thunderbirds rugby team,
who are formulating new plays at half time of a game with New Zealand
All Blacks last March.
UBC Chiefs
Points
Won  Lost Tied   ForAg'nst
Miller Cup            3     6     0   68   66
McKechnie Cup    0     2     0     0   25
World Cup            2     2     0   56   43
Exhibition              1      1     0   23   50
UBC Braves
Carmichael Cup    8      1      0 104    17
Exhibition              0      1      2     3    15
Birds Retain World Cup
ALTHOUGH Varsity Chiefs rugby team opened this
season with only two players returning from last
year's powerful backfield, coach Albert Laithwaite expected his team would have a good season. Before
season was half over, Chiefs had made a new record:
they lost their first six games, more than the total number of losses for the last ten years combined.
Chiefs were swamped by other B. C. teams in the
Miller Cup series, and then walked over by Victoria
for the McKechnie Cup play. But Laithwaite and his
crew were not discouraged.
After Christmas Bill Whyte and John Newton, the
two returnees, were given support by the return of
veterans hooker Bill Mulholland, centre Hugh Greenwood, and scrum Ralph Martinson, and right wing Jim
Boulding.
With the added power, Chiefs smeared South
Burnaby 16-0 and whipped Vindex 9-0 in Miller Cup
play, but they finally lost out to Vancouver Reps, who
went on to win the McKechnie Cup. For the second
time in ten years the McKechnie trophy left its resting
place at Varsity.
Chiefs then hiked to California for the first two
games of a total point World Cup series, losing the
first but winning the second, giving them a total point
lead of nine points. Later in the spring, the California
team visited UBC to play the remaining two games of
the series. Although each team won a game, UBC
retained the trophy by virtue of having a 13-point
advantage in the overall score of the four games.
The rugger boys took time out from league playing
to play ball with touring New Zealand All Blacks
squad, who defeated them 42-3.
An outstanding team was UBC Braves, who racked
up an impressive seven straight games, including five
shutouts, in the second division. Braves, braver than
Getting ready to play New Zealand All Blacks are these Chiefs rugby team players. Left to right: (referee George Biddle), Bill Dunbar,
Bill Whyte, Jim Boulding, Don Spenee, Bob Morford, Stew Clyne, Hugh Greenwood, John Newton, Derek Vallis, Dave Morley, Bill
Mullholland, Doug MacMillan, Pete Grantham, Skip McCarthy, Ralph Martinson, Jim MacNicol. Grab your partners and we'll all play a
game, might be what fans would think
of this mix-up between Thunderbirds
and New Zealand All Blacks rugby
teams. Dave Morley and Jim MacNicol
look concerned as team-mate Bob Morford attempts to stop New Zealand
player.
all the rest, scored 98 points against opposing teams,
while opposing teams could only manage to score eight
points against the Braves.
They met stiffer competition when they entered Provincial Cup playoffs. The mighty and undefeated Kats
beat Braves 12-0. Braves then went on to win two,
tie two.
UBC Tomahawks first played in second division,
then moved to a newly formed third division. It was a
wise move. Outclassed in second division play, Tomahawks dropped six games, tied one. In third division
play they won two, 14-0 and 6-0, tied two.
Football coach Don Coryell took over the coach-job
for Tomahawks, while many football players filled up
the rugger ranks.
"Ooops, it slipped out," cries Thunderbird rugby players
and ball appears to slip out from underneath his jersey during
a game with New Zealand All Blacks. UBC was solidly
trounced 42-3 by the team from down under.
Braves Rugby Team are, Standing, J. Bossoms (Manager), J. Owen (Trainer), F. Harvey-Smith, P.
Kinney, R. Forrester, E. Bendrots, M. Bell, B. Grandossi, J. Ward. Kneeling, A. Laithwaite
(Coach), J. Maxwell, J. Neen, J. Hunt, P. Shields, R. Kronquist, B. Story.
79 It's either a high stick or a meat cleaver in action as a Bird
steams down on the enemy goal while the goalie clutches
himself in the cold.
Hockey Weak
ON again, off again was the theme for this year's
edition of the Thunderbird Hockey squad, which
started slow, sped up, but then went down hill and
landed on the bottom with a thump.
The Birds, coached by Dick Mitchell, dropped their
first two games to Forum Indians and Kerrisdale Ker-
ries. The overtime thrillers were lost 9-8 and 6-5.
After the poor start, Mitchell, who two days before
the first game did not even know his starting line-up,
whipped his squad into shape. The training paid off
and the Birds took the next three games 7-4, 3-1, and
6-5.
At this point the Birds reached a tie for first with
powerful Kerrisdale team, who eventually won the
league and playoffs. Their high-flying was slowed down
in a 4-4 tie with New Westminster Elks, and then Ker-
ries bounced the Birds 8-4 to stop UBC's drive. From
then on the Christmas exams made themselves felt in
one way or another.
Birds lost the next four games, hampered by a lack
of practices and exam studies. The rest of the season
went half and half to the Blue and Gold boys, who
though they won the last game of the Intercity League
UBC's Husky hockey team members are, top row, left to right, Dick mitchell (coach), Bill Sherwood, Eric Lovett, Cliff Frame, Bob
Gilhooley, Dick Hawrelak, Denis Kirk, Jim MacMahon (captain), Derril Carew, Mike Giroday, and Gordon Mundle (manager);
bottom row, left to right, Rodger Stanton, Jim Todd, Howie Thomas, Morris Cunningham, Bob Geigerich, and Phil Stevens-Guille
(assistant-manager).    Not shown in the pictures are players Bob McLean, Don Anderson, and Dave Smith. Button, button, who's got the button. Tense
moment as the Thunderbird press close around
the Kerries' goal in a game that ended in a
hard-fought overtime decision for the Kerrisdale team.
^"Sl-Tj-TSiJISSSSKKj
^KKSKSS^Qgj
season, finished in last place, a few points behind the
leaders.
The mid-season slump of the team was mostly caused
by the exams, or rather the ineligibility that results.
Puck stalwarts Brian Leppard, Bob Lovett, Jim McCulloch, and Ray Ing had to drop out and the team
suffered as a result. For Ing, incidentally, it was the
first year he had ever waved a hockey stick.
Defenseman Bob Gilhooley, Okanagan League star
and former Calgary Stampeder, led the team's star
parade. The rest of the team were hard to divide into
categories—all of them were effective. The easiest way
to pick the stars is to look at the team picture and see
all of them. Goal-tending duties were shared by Don
Anderson and freshman Howie Thomas, goalie last
year for the PNE Indians.
After the Intercity League season, the Birds met the
University of Alberta Golden Bears for the Hamber
Cup, and played two games each with Denver University and Colorado College. In the Hamber games the
UBC squad ran into competition of a much higher
bracket and fell before the powerful Bears 8-1 and 8-3.
Then the Birds travelled south for what was probably the most fateful Yankee trip UBC has ever taken.
Times have changed since the once powerful Varsity
squads played the weaker American teams. The Birds
faced two universities loaded with talent, many of them
Canadian boys.
The sadly outclassed UBC'ers, minus three players,
fell before Denver U. 9-3 and 13-1 and before Colorado
College 11-0 and 15-1.
THE RECORD
Won
Lost
Tied
Vancouver Exhibition League
8
6
1
Hamber Cup Series
0
2
0
American  Exhibition Tour
0
4
0
Total
8
12
1
Who's next for the Tango? B. C. and Alberta wrestle for
position as the oufcome of the Hamber Cup match hangs
in the balance.
81 Varsity soccer team members are, Top row—Left to right: Ed Lucket (Coach), Herman Hallgrimson, Bud
Fredrickson, Ernie Kuyt, Denetrius Panaioti, Howie Lear, Ian Todd, Jack Butterfield, and Chick Siew
(Manager). Front row—Left to right: Ron Turbitt, Bruce Madeley, Bud Dobson, Dick Mathews, Borg
Sveinsson, Ken Campbell, and Gordon Rudge.
Soccer Takes Third Spot
SOCCER was somewhat of a disappointment this year
as the Varsity team began very slowly, compiling
a record of two wins, five losses and five draws before
Christmas, but came back strongly after the new year
to win five and lose only one in seven games.
With eight returning lettermen on hand, Coach Ed
Luckett expected great things from his Birds, but a
rash of early-season injuries and an impotent offense
got Varsity off to a bad start.
It was not until January that the team recovered and
began to play the brand of soccer it could. After spending the first half of the season near the bottom of the
Pacific Coast League "B" division, the Thunderbirds
moved up the league standings and ended in third
place.
Varsity strength lay in its defense with the half line
of Captain Dick Matthews, and newcomers Howie Lear
and Jack Butterfield, one of the best in years. Matthews
was the inspirational leader and a good team captain.
Lear who made the Varsity in his graduating year, was
a strong and steady defensive performer. Jack Butterfield, who is being counted on to lead the Birds in
years to come, was the trickiest player on the squad.
Bud Frederickson developed into a fine fullback this
season and partnering him was Ian Todd, a promising
freshman. In goal was Ernie Kuyt, who was hampered
by injuries throughout the year.
Varsity lettennan Ken Campbell battles for possession of the
ball, but the Dominion back seems just as determined to hang
on to it. Added impetus is given to Campbell's attack as the
Varsity squad is in scoring position on the Dominion goal.
82 Intense concentration is mirrored on the face of UBC chief forward as he
picks up a perfect pass from team-mate. Opponents of the Chiefs in his
game were members of the Pals Dairy team. Outcome of the game was
UBC on the long end of a 4-3 score.
Here's our boy Campbell again as he heads ball towards
Dominion goal. Campbell was a standout in this game
as he swarmed all over the Dominions defence, leading
his team to third position.
Forward line was unsettled all reason with Bud
Dobson, Gordie Rudge, Ken Campbell and Borg
Sveinnson, the only regulars. Bud Dobson, who once
again led the team in scoring, with Rudge accounted
for most of the goals while Sveinnson and Campbell
were the playmakers. Sveinnson and Campbell were
also good defensive players. In the last half of the season, Varsity played great soccer and convinced fans
next year will be something.
UBC chiefs had a powerful team and were almost
unbeatable in the Third division V and D league. They
lost only one league game and registered a twelve-game
undefeated streak. But because they played fewer contests than the other league teams, they missed the
championship, but with a narrow margin.
Chiefs were an evenly balanced squad with little to
choose between offense and defense. Star of the team
was Somerled MacDonald, who besides being a standout goalie had the ability to score—frequently did on
penalty kicks.
Offense had plenty of scoring punch with all the
forwards getting their share of goals but Roger Fox and
Gerry Rovers were the top marksmen.
Ready to fly into action are these UBC Chiefs soccer team. Top row—Left to right, are Rohan Gopaul
Singh, Harold Farmer, Don Fletcher, Jerry Rovers, Don Petri (Coach), Trygve Carlson, Roger Fox,
Somerlad MacDonald, and Lincoln Goberdhan (manager). Front row—Left to right, are Bob Nelson,
Bill Joughlin, Stan Campbell, John Ptucha, and Jim Merston. Not shown are players Bob Cross, and
Brian Braggs. Nearing the finish line, Doug Kilburn spurts ahead with a strong
breast stroke. Weekly practices kept swimmers in shape for meets
against local clubs and Evergreen Conference competition.
Caught in the air by Totem cameraman are two swimmers diving
into Vancouver's English Bay Crystal pool. Most UBC swimming
events and all swimming classes were held in the Crystal this year.
UBC Swimmers On Top
WHILE UBC's basketball and football teams were
losing right and left, the Varsity splash and paddle team huffed and puffed through a big year. The
huffing and puffing paid off: they won the Evergreen
Conference swimming championship.
Dripping wet but swimming fast, UBC's swim team
showered the Evergreen Conference score boards with
142 points, while stragglers Eastern Washington earned
76, Western Washington, 41.
UBC team captain and big fish of the meet was Jerry
Marik, who copped the 220 yard and 440 yard free style
races as well as being fast paddler of the free style
relay.    Aqueous   associate   Doug  Kilburn   won   three
events:  100 and 200 yard backstrokes, and 150 yard
individual medlay.
Fellow paddlers Dune Mclnnes, winner of 50 and 100
yard free styles, and Len Smith, winner of 100 and
200 yard breast strokes, helped fill out the victorious
crew. In the diving department UBC came first, second
and third, with Al Borthwick on top of the heap.
Amongst other things, UBC swim team entered exhibition matches with teams from the Pacific Coast
Conference, a step higher up the ladder than the
Evergreen. Splashing against the great Washington
State University water team, Vancouver Amateur Swim
Club, and YMCA, UBC came out on the wrong end of
the score. When they tried again
against Idaho, another PCC team
like Washington State, and
Western Washington, UBC swam
in behind Idaho, but in front of
Washington.
Plans are to move the splash
and paddlers up a step to the
Pacific Coast Conference, where
they will have big-time competition. Swimming is strictly amateur, so our boys will have no
worries.
Clicking watches tell that UBC came
third in the free style race. With the
completion of the BEG pool, varsity
swimmers will be able to train and
compete in their own backyard. Unless
the aquatic annex to the gym has a
roof, the boys may have to find a
Northwest Passage to the finish line.
84 Junior varsity rowers pull energetically at oars to insure berth on team.  Stroking,  left to  right:  Pete  Costanzo,  Tony Sharman,
Walt Mort, Dick Maze, John Earl, Art Kuhn, Iran Johnston, Ken Drummond, and acting as cox, Rod Stobart.
Rowing Crew Pulls Ahead
CREW racing, or rowing, despite, its classification as
a "minor" sport, has definitely become one of the
outstanding sports at UBC.
Thunderbird crew competes in the highest competition of any UBC team. Rowing against California and
Washington is comparable to facing Notre Dame on
the gridiron, and the Birds have more than held their
own in this league.
This spring UBC will battle the all-time American
greats, the Washington Huskies, and Oregon. In May
they make the annual trip to the Western Sprint Championships at Newport Bay, California. Then comes the
British Empire Games trials at St. Catherines, and if
all goes well, UBC will represent Canada in the British
Empire Games.
Training for a race that lasts between six and seven
minutes requires months of daily ten-mile rows, strict
diet and a tremendous appetite for punishment, for
rowing entails the toughest physical exertion of any
sport. Because of time tables, the crew have to turn out
at five in the morning for workouts.
Success of the UBC crew is due to coach Frank
Read, who takes a handful of green kids every year
and whips them into a tough, beautifully coordinated
rowing crew that can, at times, lick the pants off
some of the best competition that our land-of-the-Her-
shey-bar friends can put up.
From the luxury of the coaching launch Frank Read irons
out the wrinkles in the crew's style. Assisted by John Warren
and Trainer Don Laishley, Read has made rowing one of
UBC's major sports.
Varsity crew sculls under the direction of cox Ray Sierpina.   Stroking,  left  to  right:  Hank  Matheson,  Mike  Harris,  Glen  Smith,
Hermon  Zlovlikovitz,  Lorg West, Doug McDonald, Tom Toynbee, Bob Wilson.
^ Time out from the snow wonders of Banff is taken by Varsity ski team. Left to right: Terry Stringer,
Pat Duffy, Harvey Able, John Banfield (manager), Dick Anderson, Ron McRae, Jack Hamilton, and Rod
Caple. Although the boys skied hard and fast, they were not able to keep up with the stiff Washington
competition.
Exciting Year For Skiers
VARSITY ski team traced lines on snow slopes in
three big meets this year. Women's team sped in
an inter-collegiate meet at Pullman, Washington. Men's
team met collegiate teams in two meets, here and at
Banff.
Men's Thunderbird ski team had ups and downs.
Nastiest fall came at loss of last year's downhill and
slalom star George Merry who moved to Washington
state. Team worried too when Ted Hunt left to try
World Championship skiing in Sweden this year. New
members joined to fill out the team and Christmas
practice at Red Mountain, Rossland, brought men in
shape for meets.
UBC placed sixth in the first meet, held here and
sponsored by UBC. Harvey Abell was top man for the
university placing well in all four events. Team beat
Whitman college, another Evergreen competitor.
Sunny weather and ice greeted the team at the second
men's meet in Banff. UBC men waxed their skiis and
hit the bottom before U of Alberta and College of
Puget Sound, but could not get near the schools featuring Norwegian jumpers and cross country men. Terry
Stringer and Richard Anderson stood out in slalom
and jumping.
Women's ski team, after a brief session of training,
went to an inter-collegiate meet at Pullman Washington.
Top honors for UBC were won by Yvonne Legace
against 22 other competitors. She came through with a
two-second lead. Another UBC woman, Annemarie
Leuchte, who could not race last year because of a
broken leg, placed fifteenth. Sue Rae and Sheila Turn-
bull showed promise of future successes.
1
Fast and rough the giant slalom course at Banff challenges Varsity skier,
Terry Stringer. The men's team schussed and slalomed through two meets
this year; the first meet was here and the other at Banff. Good weather,
fast snow and plenty of skiing thrills and spills made the year worthwhile.
UBC girls' squad placed fifth in the meet, losing fourth
spot by only two-tenths seconds. Back row: Miss Marjory
Beck, Sheila Turnbull, Roy McCowan. Front row: Annemarie Leuchte, Yvonne Legace, Sue Rae.
t**l**mmr !■! i  > ' Jfcj VOCers Enjoy
Eventful Year
RUSHING up from Saturday 10:30's for a week-end
of skiing, parties of six students can be seen leaving
cars on Mount Seymour, shouldering packs and skis to
trudge 20 yards uphill to the Varsity Outdoor club's
ski cabin. Rough exterior of the huge $20,000 student-
finished cabin blends well into the background of trees.
Skis and poles everywhere around the cabin will be
noticed by the six newcomers who will drop their own
anywhere but carefully take their packs into the 70-foot
lounge of the cabin.
Greeting the new skiers will undoubtedly be club
president Pat Duffy, vice-president Wendy Sutton, secretary-treasurer Florence Tanner and membership
chairman Annemarie Leuchte. They seldom miss a
weekend.
If this is a typical spring weekend, the students will
quickly take up their skis and rush to the Mount Seymour slopes. Perhaps this is the weekend for the three-
mile steeplechase over mountain slopes. Perhaps skiers
will race this weekend. If this weekend is one of the
two fall work hikes, students will be initiated by cabin
marshal John Riddington and his assistant Frank Harvey-Smith. Hopeful members will go through a weekend of hard work: cleaning the hut and getting firewood for the winter's skiing trips.
In any case, at night, tired VOCers will dry their
toes before the cabin's gigantic fireplace.  Sitting on
"Hooley chairs" they will listen to records, discuss the
day's fun or remember other VOC events: roller skating
and ice skating parties held down on earth, this year's
long hike which took almost 100 students to the cairn
on the Lions, VOC help in the
Farmers Frolic, ski-climbing trips
to Stephens pass or Mt. Baker.
In  one  corner,  the  enthusiastic
nine-student executive will plan
this year's after-exam trip, when
club members will spend up to 20
days  in the wilderness of Garibaldi   trying  to  forget  all   they
have learned during the year.
Watching fellow club members fly down the slopes of Mt.
Seymour are Paul Stewart and Cecile Scantland, two of
Varsity Outdoor Club's hickory stick pushers.
John Ridington (left) and hb two companions, Fred Bennett
and Dick Lazenby, improvise and rhapsodize their way
through a sing song for other VOC members in their Mt.
Seymour cabin.
It was a long climb to the top of the
Lions, but these new Varsity Outdoor
Club members didn't mind a bit. They
are undergoing the traditional and
famous  VOC  initiation  ceremonies.
87 Many Races Play Hockey
Captain Bhagwant Jawanda attempts to scope the ball as the
opposing forwards rush in to prevent him. They undoubtedly
realize jawanda's skill in scoring goals.
INDIA, Britain, Holland, Sweden and
Egypt meet at UBC to play grass hockey,
proving once again that this is truly an
"Empire village." Although men's grass
hockey is considered only a minor sport by
athletic chiefs, the two teams, Thunderbird
and Varsity, participate each year in lower
mainland grass hockey league, totalling
eight teams.
Outstanding player of the 1953-54 Thunderbirds is undoubtedly big block man
Bhagwant S. Jawanda, from India. He has
played here for four years, bringing UBC
Thunderbirds goals in every game. Jawanda
not only participated in all team games, but
also coached less experienced players. Jawanda, captain of the team, is considered by
all team members to be deserving of a medal
for the work he has done in the last four
years.
Although winning few games, the two
teams contribute to one of the most important phases of campus life: playing together, students from all over the world
meet and become friends.
Girls' Grass Hockey Scores
THERE is one thing UBC does consistently well.
Each year laurels are brought to the Brock by the
women's grass hockey teams. The Varsity squad ended
undefeated this year, after three shut-out games in the
Pacific Northwest grass hockey conference in Seattle.
Its sister team, the UBC Eleven, tied its second game
but was defeated in the other two.
Grass hockey games, 22 in all, were played in the
Vancouver Women's League all this year. The Varsity-
team came through with flashing sticks. Led by team
captain Colleen Kelly the girls proved ability by winning all their league games, finishing as top team.
Less fortunate was the UBC squad, placing sixth in
the downtown league. Mrs. Mae Brown, Physical Education staffer, coached both teams.
Center forward positon of the
Varsity squad in women's grass
hockey is played by Colleen Carroll
Kelly. Joan Orton plays right ring;
Maureen Leggat center half.
Maureen Sankey plays right forward; June Taylor, left forward;
Muriel Duckworth, right half; Sandra Jabor, goalie; Charlotte Warren,
left inside; Gerry Gilmore, right inside. Elma Gavin was left half.
Goalie Amy Fowler helps teammate, Maureen Sankey, ward off offensive team by
driving the ball away from the goal. Elma
Gavin, Bessie Sainas and Colleen Kelly wait
to receive the ball. Tumblers
Active
WITH a run, skip, and jump, UBC's Gym Club
hopped, rolled, and tumbled through another
gymnastic year full of bounce. Al Gates gave fine
leadership to the club as he took over this year from
Mo Slutsky, former club prexy. This was no small
task for Al, as Mo's vibrant and enthusiastic vitality, a
keynote in the club's success in previous years, won
him an Honorary Activity award last year.
Gym Club members specialize in trampoline, rings,
high bar, parallel bars, vaulting feats and mat work.
Main competitive events are the Provincial Gymnastic
Championships and the Pacific North-West Championships. These events are usually run off in the first
two weeks of April. Last year's team in the Provincial Championships, paced by Ron Hillier, walked
away with the team championship. In The Pacific
North-West Provincial UBC did not fare so well. One
consolation was that Ron Hillier, a standout in the
competition, placed second in the individual championship race. In this meet Washington State College
came out on top of the pack.
Hohomalimali, Phy. Ed.'s annual big show which
features Phys. Ed.'s gymnastic talent, was not held this
year. But the boys still got a chance to show their
muscles and stretch their limbs before the admiring
eyes of the local campus cuties. They participated in a
mass demonstration held in the War Memorial Gymnasium, a unique and successful performance.
"I'm flying through the air with the greatest of ease, but watch
out if I bump into your knees," might be singing the nimble
lad who sails over and through the out-stretched legs of three
Phys. Ed. buddies.
Directed by Doug Whittle, hard working Phys. Ed.
instructor as well as UBC's head swim coach, the Gym
Club has had another successful year. Unlike some of
the smaller campus organizations, the Gym Club does
not receive much publicity.
Somersaulting over the box is just one activity in which campus
tumblers participate (left). The athletically-minded students
have many ups and downs, bumps and jars in their chosen
sport, like the lad (right) who bounces on a trampoline. Huffing and puffing Doug Kyle nears the finish line as he sprints
around  the track with Peter Harris close behind.
Track Team
FRESH from the accomplishments of a triumphant
spring season in which five Canadian track records
were broken, UBC track team with stars Peter Harris
and Doug Kyle, began preparing for the 1954 British
Empire Games. Coached by Bus Phillips, Athletic Coordinator, the varsity boys entered five of the local
cross-country events in which Kyle and Harris won two
each. In the North Vancouver cross-country Harris set
a new course record; Kyle also shared the record-breaking laurels by setting a new Canadian record for the
six miles, clipping 44.8 seconds from the old mark.
In Evergreen Conference competition Kyle established a new two-mile mark, improving the time by 12
seconds. Oregon intercollegiate cross-country championships saw Kyle and Harris both top the former
course record but still go down to defeat. In the
North West cross-country championships held at UBC
Washington State chopped the Allan trophy, emblematic of team supremacy, while UBC took second
spot.
The most popular track event on the campus,
annual intramural cross-country, was won by Vic
Stephens, while Team championship was won by Varsity Outdoor Club.
Thick pack of courageous entries appear for the Pacific Northwest cross-country race. UBC trackmen ran
a close second to Washington, which took home the O. B. Allan trophy at the end of the meet. Varsity-
hosted the championship, the sixth of its kind and one of the biggest events in the track year.
on Fencing Popular
ALMOST enough fencers to keep Cyrano de
Bergerac hopping belonged to UBC's fencing club
this year. From a ten-man membership in 1950, the
club has climbed steadily to its present enrolment of
95. In fact, 95 enthusiasts are too much for instructor
Paul Burkhradt who plans to enlist aid for instruction
from senior fencers next year.
Not only has the membership graph climbed, but
charts showing achievement of the club in competitions
look better each year. UBC fencers dominated the B. C.
provincial tournament and even the Pacific Northwest
tournament. The club carried home five of the nine
senior open prizes. First place in women's novice foil
was also taken by UBC fencers.
Senior UBC fencers, happy with their achievement
graph, are planning to seize the British Empire Games
market in August. If UBCers make a corner in that
highly competitive field, they will probably split stocks
and double club membership. In any case, profits so
far have encouraged fencers to declare a dividend of
thanks to club president Charles Loewen who will be
fencing in the BEG.
A few of the senior fencers are (back row) Charles Loewen,
instructor Paul Burkhardt, John Loewen, and Bruce Denyer.
Geared for action are (front row) Dave Jackson and Graham
Anderson.
Weightlifting New
UBC's musclemen tossed iron about with great
abandon to walk off with a hatful of weightlifting
titles this year.
Led by Bud Grondahl, Rae Wiggen, and Mr. Copy-
pencil of 1954, Ted Dobb, the embryo Doug Hepburns
brought home the silverware to UBC in a number of
tilts. A successful year of bicep straining was topped
off on February 26 when Bud Grondahl and Rae
Wiggen took two place awards at the B. C. Second
Division meet at the YMCA.
In an earlier match, January 15, UBC defeated
PMBA 3-2 at the Police gym. The decision hung in
the balance until Grondahl hoisted 235 lbs. over his
head to give Varsity the close decision.
One of the biggest achievements for this year's team
was its trophy record improvement over last year. Because of the long schedule last season the exams
stepped in and cut short any silverware hopes. This
year things took a turn for the better and the team,
as the record shows, brought the honors to UBC.
The weightlifters' club also expanded in 1954, entering a second-year team in the Second Division Vancouver and District League.
At the annual Physical Education show,
trophy winner Ted Dobb shows the enthusiastic audience how its done.
91 Tennis Wins
A TEAM that never says die, never loses, and never
gets much publicity is UBC's Tennis team. This
year the team won the Evergreen Conference title for
the third straight year. Host of the match was powerful
Eastern Washington College, and matches were played
at Cheney, Washington.
One of the power men for Thunderbirds was Jim
Killeen, who along with sharpster Ken Fawcus, out-
swatted Tom Bostick and Marshal Keating of CWC
for the doubles crown. Fellow Thunderbird cat-gut
swingers Dave Hemphill and Brian Bell gathered other
points for UBC.
Aiding veteran player Larry Barclay in exhibition
matches before the tourney, the team picked up four
wins and dropped one loss. UBC out-hit Seattle University, Western Washington, Pacific Lutheran, and
Western Washington again, while Portland University
beat UBC.
Tennis friends are confident UBC will walk away
with the Evergreen title again next year, making it
four times in four tries. The reason: stars Killeen,
Fawcus, and Hemphill are returning.
One of the reasons why UBC's Tennis team won the Evergreen
Conference Title again this year is player Jim Killeen, who is
preparing to wop the ball over the net.
Badminton
UBC's boys and girls Badminton Clubs bopped the
birdie around for an eventful year. The boys' club
finished up with three shiny trophies; the girls placed
a player in the Canadian Junior Championships.
Ho Hit Po, president of the boys' club, led a contingent of players to the provincial championships held
at Victoria Lawn Tennis and Badminton Club. Charlotte Warren, Lee Davenport, Norma Johnson, John
Bourke, Doug Whitworth, Ken Knoble, Tom Merideth,
Geoff Conway, Gordie Laurie, and Ho Hit Po himself,
entered the tourney. Knoble returned to UBC with the
singles championship; Merideth and Ho Hit Po carried
home the men's handicap doubles.
The girls' club swatted their way through the "B"
and "C" divisions of the Vancouver City Badminton
League, finishing closer to the top than the bottom.
Joan Van Ackeren was chosen to represent B. C. in
the Canadian Junior Championships. She reached the
semi-finals. Her companions in badminton during the
year included all-round team members like Charlotte
Warren, Norma Johnston, and Lee Davenport.
"Oh my, but that was a nice one," says pert badminton player
Lee Davenport. But companion Ho Hip Ho is not so sure: he
is still looking for the birdie.
92 Golfers Win
WHEN UBC golfers teed off on their home course
this year in local tournament play, they began
a series of games that took them through two American
states. After an 18-hole qualifying round, John Russell
came out on top defeating Max Swanson 4 and 3 in
the finals.
In the homecoming match, the alumni putted out
well ahead of the students. Starring for the "old men"
were Doug Bajus, Bob Plommer, Hans Swinton and
Dick Hanley.
On their own fairways UBC defeated Western Washington College and Seattle University but got into the
rough for one loss to the University of Portland.
Going south, Max Swanson, Dave Edgell, Charlie
Swanson, Allen Rae and Dick White defeated
Williamet College and Western Washington, tied
Seattle University and lost to University of Portland
and University of Washington.
The team drove to a win in Conference play for the
fifth straight year. Max Swanson captured the conference medal with George Barnes and Allen Rae close
behind.
Vicarious enjoyment is registered on the faces of Allen
Rae, George Barnes, and Max Swanson as John Russell
makes a perfect shot out of a bunker on the University
course.
Girls' Basketball On Top
WITH a tisket and a tasket, UBC's basketball girls
bounced the ball through another eventful season. This year there were only two teams, Thunderettes and UBC Varsity.
Neither team entered a league during the first term,
but played exhibition games every week instead. Big
moment of the season came in the spring. UBC sponsored a Girl's Basketball Playday, with teams from
Western Washington, University of Washington, Central Washington, College of Puget Sound, Victoria, and
UBC's two teams battling it out for high honors.
UBC Varsity squad got the high honors, winning all
three games it played. Thunderettes won two, lost one
to University of Washington.
Miss Marjory Beck, Physical Education instructor,
and Eleanor Whyte coached the two teams. Scoring
baskets for UBC Varsity were Glenda Morris, Gail Mc-
Garrigle, Noreen Gannon, Verna Graham, Ruth
Hogan, Margreth Jones, and Trudy Mounce, this
year's captain.
Victorious Thunderette team gather around Varsity team captain
Trudy Mounce. Top row—Left to right, are Liz McCallum, Pat Goodwin, Maureen Kennedy, Eleanor Kepper and Mary-Jo Sharp. Front row,
Barbara Hart and Irene Young.
Members of UBC Varsity Team. Top row—Left to right:
Ruth Hogan, Gail McGarrigle, Margretta Jones and Trudy
Mounce. Front row: Noreen Gannon, Verna Graham, and
Glenda Morris. Campus Takes Active
Where did it go? appears to be the questions on the faces of
these girls, as the Nurses battle it out with the Wasps in intramural basketball.
OVER 400 women undergraduates took part in the
expanded program of Women's Intramurals this
year. Seven sports, volleyball, basketball, badminton,
skiing, archery, pingpong and bowling, were entered by
teams defending the honor of their faculty, old school
or old home town.
It was ex-Jayo all the way this year. Top honors in
basketball, volleyball, archery and bowling were taken
by John Oliver grads. One hundred forty-six girls
played 36 games in the badminton playoffs. Stevie
Kent, defeating Greta Jones in the finals two games to
one, won the tournament for the physical education
second team.
Sectional round robins were held in the volleyball
tournament with the winners of each group competing
in elimination games. X-Jayo team defeated the record
entry of 29 teams by scoring out the Wasps in the
finals.
A new development planned this year was a joint
Men's-Women's Intramural skating party. Under the
direction of Mary Smart, the party was to be held in
early February. Rain stopped it.
X-Jayos topped the intramural basketball tournament this year. Hardest fought of all, the basketball
tourney saw an enlarged enrolment as 22 teams competed. Chris Symonds, an ex-Jayo, sparked organization
of the meet.
Women's intramural annual ski meet was held in
March this year, on Mount Seymour. Dark horse team,
the nuises, lead by nurse Louise Backstrom, took a
close win in the weekend's competition. Combined time
of the nurse team was 128.7 seconds for the grand
slalom.
One of the newest sports gaining popularity on campus, archery, is represented in intramural activities and
the fast-growing women's club. Butts and Bows.
In charge of referees for all games this year was June
Taylor. Miss Marjory Beck of the physical education
department acted as advisor to the intramural chiefs.
Volleyball was arranged by Kareen Wong; basketball
by Chris Symonds; skating night, Mary Smart; skiing,
Annemarie Leuchte; bowling, Stevie Kent; archery, Joy
Eveleigh.
Flying through the air with the greatest ease is
Doug McLeod, competing in the intramural pole-
vault. Doug makes it look easy but the polevault
is one of the toughest events in the competition.
Watching him closely are Phil Hume and Norm
Walton, hoping, no doubt, to pick up a few pointers on style.
94 5art In Intramurals
UNDER the direction of Dick Penn, intramurals
rolled along smoothly until the weather forced
the cancellation of the soccer competition, and the golf
matches. But this year saw the revival of the boxing
and wrestling matches which added a little cash to the
intramural coffers. Competition this season has been
very stiff and although the Alpha Delt entry is favoured
to come out on top of the pack, final standings will
not be determined until the conclusion of the track
meet and softball tourney. By March the top four
teams were Alpha Delts, Engineers, Alpha Tau Omega,
and Phi Delts.
SPORT
WINNER
INDIV. CHAMPIONS
Volleyball
Meds. A
Cross Country
VOC
Vic Stevens (Lambi Chi)
Badminton
ATO
Dennis Shalman  (Alpha Delt)
Skiing
VOC
Hiko Socko (VOC)
Table Tennis
Alpha Delt
George Parkes (Indep.)
Boxing and Wrestling
Fiji and Alpha Delt
Doug Kyle (Fiji)
Basketball
Phi Delt
A few strides ahead of Stew Madill, Johnny Evans cops the first
heat of the intramural 100-yard dash eliminations last March.
Running in third spot is Don Nolan.
Joe Giegerich seems to be getting the worst of it as he and
Charley James battle for the 155-165 pound championship in the
finals of intramural boxing. Eventual winner of the bout was
Giegerich. Happy after a big season are members of the Varsity Cricket
team. Top row, left to right, are Jawanda Bhagwant Singh,
Sam Haqque, Mike Dale (manager), Lincoln Goberdhan,
Chick Siew. Front row, left to right, are Clarence Madho
Singh, Trevor Bagot, Stan Glasgow (captain). Not shown are
Dave Hallett, Dipnarine Persad, Dick Roberts, Lloyd Edwards.
Members of the Women's Big Block Club (left to right)
Anne Marie Leuchte, Joan MacArthur, and Yvonne Legace
read over a list of newcomers to the BB club.
Cricket Team
THE fact that they had no official coach this year
did  not stop  UBC's high-flying and  big-batting
cricket team from racking up an impressive season.
With the part time help of B.C. Cricket Coach Tom
Bryerlee and such stars as bowlers Chick Siew and batting stars Rodan Gopaulzing and Stan Glasgow, this
year's team played 22 games, won seven, tied two, but
lost the rest.
Playing in a league of eight teams, UBC sneaked into
a tie for sixth place, but not before whipping the
defending league champion North Shore team, which
eventually won this year's league also.
Players and fans are more than confident they will
do better next year. The game is increasing in popularity on the campus every year, the experts say; gate
receipts at Brockton Point playgrounds have steadily
climbed for the past three or four years. But the
clincher to the prediction is the fact that several new
players are expected from Vancouver, England, and the
West Indies.
Girls Big Block
WHEN the touring New Zealand All Blacks rugby
team came to UBC this year they weren't too
overwhelmed by UBC's rugby team, which they
trampled 42-3. But members of the Women's Big
Block Club, which sponsored a reception for the team
after the game, completely charmed the All Blacks.
Composed of girls who have earned their "Big
Blocks" for outstanding athletic ability in varsity
sports, the Women's Big Block Club picked Joan C.
MacArthur for their president, who was helped by vice-
president Anne Marie Leuchte, treasurer June Taylor,
secretary Colleen Kelly, and executive Lila Scott, Jean
Hood, and Yvonne Legace.
Another event planned by the club was the annual
evening of entertainment for Big Block alumni, who
trooped back to campus during Homecoming Week.
Eleven awards were made this year by Women's Big
Block Club. Big Block winners are: Charlotte Warren
and Joan Van Ackeren (badminton); June Taylor,
Charlotte Warren, Colleen Kelly, Gerry Gilmore, and
Bessie Sainas (grass hockey); Yvonne Legace (skiing).
Joy Eveleigh won the managerial award for her work
with the archery team. Honorary awards went to Marilyn Russell, Women's Athletic Directorate president,
and Dr. N. Neilson.
96 Many Receive Block Awards
HAVE you seen any of those big handsome ushers
at any of the UBC athletic games. You have? Well,
feast your eyes girls for they are the campus heroes
known far and wide as the Big Block Club members.
Membership in the big Block Club is restricted to
those who contribute the most to varsity athletics,
either by playing on UBC squads or managing a major
sport. Trademark of the Big Block men is the black
sweater with the gold BC on  the front.  Each year
members get together and select who is to receive the
annual awards which are presented at a banquet.
Activities of the Big Block club, besides voluntary
ushering at all UBC games, include the annual freshmen smoker, which gives the fledging frosh an insight
into the delights and pitfalls of campus life. Included
in the agenda for this year was a dance and reception
for all new members of the Big Block Club, who will
continue to carry out the activities of one of UBC's
outstanding campus organizations.
SPRING ATHLETIC AWARDS-1954
AMERICAN FOOTBALL
CROSS-COUNTRY
ENGLISH RUGBY
SWIMMING
Big Blocks—Rewinners
Big Blocks—Rewinners
Big Blocks—Rewinners
Big  Blocks—Rewinners
Jim Boulding
(2)
Peter Harris
(3)
Hugh Greenwood
(3)
Al Borthwick               (3)
Bob  Brady
Gord FlGmons
(2)
(3)
Doug Kyle
(3)
Doug MacMillan
(4)
Gerry Marik                (2)
Jerry Nestman
(2)
Jim MacNicol
(2)
Big Blocks—Freshman Awards
Bill Stuart
(2)
FENCING
Ralph Martinson
(3)
Moe Cunningham
Big Blocks—New Winners
Big Blocks—Rewinners
Bob Morford
(2)
Bob Gilhooley
Peter Gregory
Charles Loewen
(3)
John Newton
(3)
Big Block—Freshman Awards
Ralph Hudson
John Hudson
Bill.Kushnir
Big Blocks—New Winners
John Loewen
Derek Vallis
Bill Whyte
(2)
(3)
Borg Sveinsson
Ralph Martinson
Big Blocks—Freshman
Awards
Big Blocks—New Winners
MANAGERIAL AWARDS
Ernie Nyhaug
Gerry Stewart
Jack Hutchinson
Peter Grantham
Big Blocks
Charlie James
John McCarthy
Stan Glasgow
BASKETBALL
Gerry O'Flanagan
Gordon Mundle
Big Blocks—Rewinners
Ross Rayment
SOCCER
John Shields
Suknanan Siew
Bob Bone
(2)
Big  Blocks—Rewinners
Bill Thiessen
Ralph Hudson
(2)
ICE HOCKEY
Bub Frederickson
(4)
John MacLeod
Ernie Nyhaug
(2)
(2)
Big Blocks—Rewinners
Dick Matthews
(2)
SPECIAL AWARDS
Brian Upson
(4)
Jim McMahon
(2)
Big Blocks—New Winners
Des Eadie
(Managerial Rewin)
Dan Zaharko
(3)
Big  Blocks—New Winners
Jack Butterfield
Big Blocks—New Winners
Don Anderson
Howard Lear
Bob Kirkland
Jeff Craig
Jim Todd
Gordon Rudge
(Special Managerial Aword)
Big Block Club members are, Front row—Left to right, J. Killeen, G. Bailey, G. Brumwell B. Whyte, S. Glasgow, B. Frederickson.
Second row: K. Fawcus, D. Kyle, J. Singh, P. Lusztig, B. Bice, B. Boulding, M. Swanson. Third row: G. Barnes, B. Brady, C. Oates, B.
Bone, D. McMillan, R. Wright, H. Matheson, B. Mulholland. Fourth row: B. Kushnir, D. Kirkland, B. Morford, £. Nyhaug,
D. Vallis, P. Harris, J. McNichol, G. Smith. .,-:--
Four?'
~nss8
g*Si
^ttffli
'■*■"'> V-
FINE ARTS "Great White Chief" Al Fotheringham lounges, absorbed in his
reading his most favorite paper, The Ubyssey. Of interest to
tourists is the only hand-painted mural of its kind in the
background.
Feature columnist Pat Carney receives some abstract advice
from Abstractionist Ab Kent. Both columnists have a large
following and regularly receive fan mail (especially Ab, who
has a way of distracting many.)
The Ubyssey
HEADLINES tell the story of a newspaper's year.
From the day modest Allan Fotheringham announced in 90-point caps COMRADE AL WINS JOB,
a new spirit, ambiguously speaking, entered the Publications office.
Editor Fotheringham had blueprints for a new publications board. Prints called for a firm foundation of
organization with an impressive superstructure of
hellery to attract new boys. Cautious obedience to
"good taste" left the Brock basement as Fotheringham
backed all his pubsters in experiments. Towering hellery structure included the inevitable boobs.
Alphabet Soup contest started off the year. Planned
partly as a parody of downtown daily contests, Alphabet Soup became serious as super-sleuth Dick Dolman
and news editor Ed Parker held it open for two extra
weeks hoping for entries. "The offices are swamped,"
wrote Dolman, idly leafing the two sparse entries.
Pubsters gaped as winner "little Georgette Grignard"
came to collect first prize, abstraction "Fugue to Seven
Sinners and Two Saints." Georgette was six feet and
thoroughly male.
Following the lead of U of Toronto's McCarthy effigy
burning, Pubsters planned a Sunday midnight effigy
cremation of Chicago's editor Bertie McCormick.
Premature-lighting and fast-burning of the effigy left
200 spectators without a climax until they converted
Pubster's "Let's burn Bertie" chant to "Let's burn
Fotheringham."
RIOT IS LATEST FIASCO pontificated over-joyed
Ubyssey as 300 engineers tussled with police following
the Engineer Smoker. Hours had been spent by managing editor Pete Sypnowich the day before figuring
some unofficial way to invite police to the Smoker.
Plans fell through as Sypnowich learned the only danc-
"Seven cases of beer" were
emptied en route during the
Homecoming Parade to the immense delight of these pubsters:
Bruce McWilliams, Ab Kent,
Murray Brisker, Al Fotheringham, Mary Lou Siems, Jerome
Angel, Ray Logie, Rosemary
Kent-Barber, and Ken Lamb.
"The Holy Mess" came third,
but the pubsters had a whale of
a time anyhow.
100 -Still AFeudirT and AFussin
ing was to be by Nurses. When police came anyway,
Ubyssey leapt up-and-down in its editorial columns
saying PUNISH THEM NOW.
When sexpert Charlie Watt wrote a feature concerning need for nylon underwear on continental tours
no one was amazed. Calm too were readers of the
story's headline NYLON PANTIES DEMANDED
BY COSMOPOLITAN PROTOCOL. But managing
editor Pete Sypnowich blew his top when he saw the
overline by ABstracting Ab Kent, BUMMING
AROUND.
Watt continued his sex-editing with stories bearing
heads like UBC SEX SUFFERS A LOW BLOW until
popular opinion slowed him down. Fotheringham put
Watt out to pasture on the Religious Council beat.
Gaunt Michael McLean Ames, ex-Vancouver Sun
reporter, presidented the strike demanding representation on the paper's five-man policy board for University Newspaper Guild, West Coast Local 108. Left
holding the pickets after boss intimidation forced most
strikers back on job were Emmel Siems, Pete Pineo
and Mike Ames, former Ubyssey stalwarts. Trio
switched locals to 107, Totem.
Ubyssey's biggest headline, 90-point caps hand set, was
run on the first day of the Engineers' Red Bacchanal.
EUS' McKAY MISSES BALL screamed the lead story,
calling McKay's disappearance "strangely reminiscent"
of Fotheringham's 1952 weekend disappearance to
Horseshoe Bay. Story slyly neglected to say that Engineer McKay, arranger of the ball, was 70 miles away
playing whist with pubster-kidnappers. Axiomatically,
60 Engineers raided Pub offices, removing three typewriters, Pub shotgun, executive editor Jerome Angel,
One infamous pubster, Bruce McWilliams, and one famous ex-
pubster, Mike Ames, carry the effigy of McCormick to the
waiting gallows.
1954-55 Editor-in-Chief Peter Sypnowich and Senior Editor Bert Gordon
compare ideas for improvements of the galley proofs. These conferences
usually take place way past the witching hour at a well-frequented place
know as the "College Printers."
News Editor Parker, Executive Editor Jerome Angel,
and Senior Editor Ray Logie confer about the day's
copy and rewrites. Making things fit is the problem under discussion by pubsters Charlie Watt, Bert Gordon, Al Fotheringham, Make-up man Duain
Ball, and Stan Beck.
reporter Bruce McWilliams and Fotheringham. "Our
best typewriters," wailed Pubsters, planning revenge.
Typewriters were returned.
Biggest outcry on campus against Ubyssey came
when editors left the Home Ec. faculty page filled only
with white space. Copy "wasn't up to Ubyssey standard." Screams of protest were countered when Student
Council said editor was sole judge of Faculty editions.
Examining the foundation of organization supporting this hellery, observers noted: new appointment of
five-man policy board to decide all issues; new arrangement of office equipment; clear division of labor between desk, under senior editor Bert Gordon, Ray
Logie, Bijl Stavdal, and news under city editor Ed
Parker; holding Friday general meetings and Tuesday
editorial meetings; development of beat system making
one reporter responsible for one organization; arranging pigeon-hole and written system of assignments;
development of a contest for high school papers.
Back of this organization was solid work by new
Pubsters: CUP editor Ken Lamb, milk-drinking
Rosemary Kent-Barber, IFC reporter Peter Krosby,
Daniels-hounding Dorothy Davis, multivoting Ian MacKenzie, cartoonist Howard Mitchell, pert Nora Rising,
doggerel-writing Sandy Ross and conscientious Rod
Smith.
Even sportside became organized this year, first
under Ron Sapera. Retiring on Unemployment Insurance, Ron threw the torch to red-haired prodigy Stanley
Beck.
The structure that Allan built stood up. Symptoms
of a healthy condition appeared as Ubyssey became more
hated and better read. Student Councillors supported
the board before irate McGoun Cuppers, gave Pub
Board power to edit detested Faculty issues, and played
basketball with Pubsters.
Not only did it stand, some people liked it. UBC
English professor Dr. William Robbins gave Pubsters
the biggest armshot. "This year the quality of your
paper has been such, especially on the editorial page,
that I must risk bewildering you by word of
praise," he wrote to Editor Fotheringham. At the
Canadian University Press conference in Toronto,
judges named Ubyssey second only to weekly Western
Ontario Gazette, the best university paper. Satisfied
Pubsters wound up a golden year by presenting
"Great White Father" Allan Fotheringham with an
engraved flask "from the illegitimate children."
Sports writers Geoff Conway, Martin Chess, and Mike
Glaspie, read their write-up of New Zealand All-Blacks.
Sports Editor Ron Sapera turns over his desk, all sports pictures, and
his Sporty typewriter to bright-eyed Stan Beck after Christmas. Question: Is the negative good?  Answer: If it was taken by John
Robertson it certainly would be a terrific shot.
Phoning about appointments is Lido Peloso, who happily surprised paper and Totem staff with his outstanding pictures.
Photographers Incorporated
PUBLICATIONS board was saved $900 and "a lot
of grief" when it switched back to student photographers after a year with a hired professional. Old-
stand-by Joe Quan, fourth-year pubster, was once
more talked into working night and day taking Totem
pix. He was aided by John Robertson and newcomer
Lido Peloso; the three together took almost all of the
3000 pictures needed to fill this year's enlarged Totem.
John Robertson worked hard for the Ubyssey, reporting each Thursday to take pix for Friday's issue.
Trainees Dick Wyman and Peter Robin caught club
pix for Totem and were slated for Ubyssey duty Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Newcomer Peloso, called "a natural" by Totemers,
spent his first year taking both Totem and Ubyssey
pix. He reported to Ubyssey on Mondays. Continual
breaks in Ubyssey schedule forced Joe Quan to step
in to take emergency shots, breaking his vow to do
only Totem work this year.
"Credit lines," giving name of photographer under
each Ubyssey pix, became a hot point of editorial
board-photographer discussions. Solution attempted
was a $1 fine payable to photographer by any senior
editor omitting the credit line. Fine totals on demand
approached $25 when the plan was abandoned.
Pix work for Publications offers new photography
and darkroom experience for any student. Darkroom
is outfitted with an Omega, D-2 enlarger. A four-by-
five Graphic camera with speed light unit is supplied.
Limited personal use of darkroom facilities is offered
to pixies.
103
From out of numerous files, Joe Quan, serving as photographer
for his fourth year, pulls the needed snap.
Pete Robin and Dick Wyman check the Photo Assignment Board
and discover enough work to keep them busy for days. Separating the different fraternities
and sororities and sorting out the
various members of the Greek
societies was the main responsibility
and headache of Ann Pentland.
"Never before has UBC had so many graduates in
one year", is the thought of Marylen Knox, as she
works over numerous pictures. Her job was interesting, and Marylen came to know many new faces
by heart.
Pensively Jacquie Trafford measures
the proportion of the pix she is holding, trying to make it fit into her
layout. This is her second year on the
Totem staff.
Totem Staff  Battles  Early
TOTEMERS stopped throwing gliders and cheered
when blonde-haired Wendy Sutton was announced
new editor at last year's Publications banquet. Sutton
faced a dubious budget, small return of staffers, chronic
photog troubles.
She solved the first problem as she led pubsters crying "Buy your Totem here" through a super campaign in the Armouries at registration. Salesmanship
convinced over 1800 students they wanted to buy copies
and permitted planning of an enlarged book.
Increased budget allowed addition to the book of
pictures of undergraduates, and with the identifying
and sorting of these, done by Editor Sutton and Ann
Roger, the first real work of the year began. The pictures, taken during the frenzy-arousing period of Registration were not the best; the only identification for
the photos were signatures scrawled in haphazard
order in a note book, causing almost a hundred of the
4300-odd pictures to be discarded.
During most of the fall, Totem office stayed quiet
and staffers, when not sorting grads or undergrads, remained in a semi-dreamy state from which they occasionally emerged to give a casual command to a photographer. Photographers themselves took an equally
casual attitude to commands.
With the beginning of the second term, editor Sutton's screams of "Layouts!" began to be heard. Just
about mid-term time workers, sparsely equipped with
few pictures and no copy, were shocked to discover
deadline was only four weeks away. First week in
March saw section editors warring over photographers
time and photographers rushing from assignment to
assignment. Second week in March—deadline was
March 15—staff forgot about lectures, worked steadily
17 hours a day.
Representative pictures of what goes on in each
faculty were the big difficulty of Faculties editor Ann
Roger. Although the only type of picture really illustrative of the work of most students seemed to be a
drowsy classroom-type shot, Ann kept yelling for better
shots and finally got them.
Jacquie Trafford's Clubs section included the widely-
varied doings of a number of organizations: the artistry of Mamooks, the pomp of Parliamentary Forum,
and the hard-to-photograph conversations of the
language clubs. Other more exclusive clubs were
looked after by Ann Pentland, Greeks editor.
Pix and information about the big names on campus—from Board of Governors to MAC—were handled
by Administration editor Janie Wright. Janie was
faced with small problems; how to photograph President N. A. M. MacKenzie's annual message when it
Totem Editor Wendy Sutton did something everyone said was
impossible. She brought the yearbook out on time for the first
time in nine years, but not without spending a large part of
her waking hours pleading, threatening, cajoling, and inciting
Totem staffers to produce their most
104 Comments to the effect that the "Pub"
was neither "fine" nor "Arty", kept
Fine Arts Editor Anlee Brickman
and other Totemers in a gay, jovial
mood.
Deadline
came creased and folded in an envelope: and large
problems; what to say about Student Council.
The ups and down of campus life—Homecoming to
Blood Drive—were put together under the direction of
Peggy Andreen. A Fine Arts section featuring literary,
musical and acting activities, was the responsibility of
Anlee Brickman.
Making sure that specific teams of athletes and
photographers met, sometimes an almost impossible
task, was one of the duties of Ron Hurst, who managed the Athletics division.
Happiest and luckiest of the section editors was
Marylen Knox, who finished most of her work in the
Grad section before Christmas.
A trio of ex-Ubysseyites — Mike Ames, Pete Pineo
and Mary Lou Siems—moved over to Totem in
February to help out, the first two to work as copy
writers, the latter to take the position of Witch-Hunter,
a combined rewrite-copy-editing job.
Ron Hurst, active in sports as well as editing sports
copy, tracked down many team captains, team members, and finally anyone who had even seen a game,
to find out the names of the participating players.
Her Campus Life section, featuring the most popular of the student activities, kept Peggy Andreen
busy for many a day checking the names of the
people in the snaps and writing them down in the
index   file.
Cheerful Ann Roger ploughed
her way through two Totem
sections this year, completing
them both by deadline.
Spring came early, and, of course, Totemers had to
celebrate its arrival. Someone thoughtfully brought Editor
Wendy a present, which proved to be exceedingly useful.
Here Janie Wright ponders over a note on Wendy's
present, a pussywillow bulletin board.
This diligent, dexterous, and downright hard-working trio
of "Picketeers", Peter Pineo, Emmel Siems, and Mike
Ames, combined their talent to do much of the copy,
rewrites, and checking for harried editors. Filmsoc Shows Own Pictures
Bill Day, President of the only debt-free club on campus, rewinds
the film used for one of the ever-popular noon-hour movies.
These noon-hour movies were just a few of the films which this
active crew projected for students.
UNPRECEDENTED in its many years of service,
the Production Department of the Film Society
this year took films of such outstanding Varsity events
as Registration Week, Frosh Day, the Blood Drive, and
major sports events.
Using their new $4000 16mm. Bell and Howell
carbon arc movie projectors, Filmsocers will produce
a documentary film and films of commercial quality
which will be used to publicize UBC throughout
B.C. and Canada.
In addition to acting as projectionists for the Film
Library of the Extension Department, Filmsoc supplied free projectionist service to all student organizations on the campus.
The Tuesday noon-hour shows and Feature Presentations proved popular again this year, and Thursday noon-hour features were added to their schedule.
Such films as "Great Expectations," "Hamlet," "Pride
and Prejudice," and "Romeo and Juliet" were presented especially for English students.
The Annual Screen Dance, where students "Danced
in the Dark" to the music of name bands, while the
image of the band was projected on a large screen,
attracted a large crowd to Brock Hall in the depth of
the worst snow storm in recent years.
Filmsoc's Annual Banquet was held at Baker's Spring
Gardens in the spring as their final affair.
Bill Day, President, was ably assisted by George
Pearson, Vice-President; Dave Manson, Treasurer;
Fred Ratushny, PRO; Len Roger, Personnel Manager;
and Gordon Isbister, Secretary.
Dave Manson, Treasurer, and Ron Doyle get the film and equipment in their proper places before the weekly start of the three
Tuesday night features.
One of the stalwarts of Filmsoc, Secretary Gordon Isbister, installs
a new carbon arc rod in one of their new $4,000 Bell and Howell
movie projectors. Radsoc Heard Over Airways
THE Radio and Television Society became an
associate member of the British Columbia Association of Broadcasters this year. Members of Radsoc
attended the BCAB Convention in February and made
the club an important member of the association.
Radsoc again produced a half-hour show each week—
"The UBC Digest" — which was carried on radio
station CKWX in Vancouver. A shorter fifteen minute
edition of the "Digest" was carried on eleven other
stations within the province, as well as in Whitehorse,
the Yukon Territories, and Ketchikan, Alaska.
To help in the producton of the "Digest," Radsoc
members built an entirely new control room called
"B" control.
Radsoc ran a varied program schedule that was
heard in Brock Hall, the Stadium, Quad, and the New
Gym. Sport events, football games in particular, were
heard over downtown stations, with Radsoc supplying
the announcers, the engineers, and the necessary
facilities.
During the spring season, URTVS assisted in the
producing of several shows for TV stations in the
Pacific Northwest. The Radio Society is looking forward to the establishment of a television station on
the campus in future years.
Once again the "Voice of UBC" was admirably
directed by President Campbell Robinson. Jim Dar
Woon was the Chief Director; Fred Rayer, Program
Manager; Ray Sewell, Business Manager; Don Fraser,
Promotion Manager; and Ross Crain, "Digest" Manager.
Al Savage, Joan Mclvor, Reg Bartosh, and Dave Harding,
Librarian, spend a few restful minutes listening to jazz and jive
records.
Active member, Don Galbraith, checks the club's extensive file
of records to ensure all is in order for use in forthcoming
programs.
Production Manager Ross Crain, in charge of the weekly show,
"UBC Digest", proves that a clear voice and good copy captivates
listeners throughout B. C. Make-up  crew  spends  a few  hectic minutes  before  the
curtain is parted to add the final touches to the cast.
By the gay look on the stars' faces, one can easily gu<
Brian Cooper, Joan Black, Bob Clarke, Joyce Rohn
Lecovin.
The stage is now set. Everything is in its place. House
light dim. Much credit goes to these boys for their
efforts: Al Anderson, electrician; Barnie O'Brien, stage
manager; Jim Futcher, lighting manager; and John Purdy.
Mussoc Holds
THE close of the 1953-54 terms marked the end of
the twenty-fifth successful season for the Musical
Society. President Bob Benson and Glee Club President
Bill Jack planned Mussoc's dances, banquets, and stage
productions.
The traditional banquet and formal were the most
outstanding social events of the fall term. The affair
was called "Dutch Dalliances" in honor of their
Spring production,  "The Red Mill."
The Glee Club, consisting of thirty enthusiastic
songsters under the professional leadership of Harry
Pryce, appeared at the Hotel Vancouver and also at
station CBU.
A Spring banquet to promote ticket sales for the
coming operetta proved to be as successful as the first.
"The Red Mill," a light musical comedy by Victor
Herbert, was the well-received presentation of Mussoc's active year. The operetta had a gay, comical
theme set among the picturesque windmills of Holland.
Such hummable tunes as "Every Day Is Ladies' Day
With Me," "In Old New York," and "Because You're t  the  plot  had  a  happy  ending.    Left  to  right:
lg   Bell,   Barbara   Desprez,   John   Chappell,   Jerry
The comedy trio of Tina, Con Kidder, and Kid Conner,
as portrayed by Barbara Desprez, John Chappell, and
Jerry Lecovin respectively, give sound advice in the
number, "Whistle It".
A mysterious tale is "The Legend of the Red Mill",
sung to an enchanted cast (and audience) by Bob
Clarke.
>ilver Jubilee
You" will long be remembered by the enthusiastic
audiences that watched the show run for five days.
The cast, led by the comedy trio of Barbara Desprez,
John Chappell, and Jerry Lecovin, included Doug
Bell, Joan Black, Bob Clarke, Brian Cooper, Barry
Dryvynsyde, Faye Fingarson, Len Hanson, Bill Jack,
and Joyce Rohrer. For the first time, the production
included several colorful dance numbers—the dancers
being strictly Varsity talent.
Mussoc gratefully acknowledges the assistance of
Grace MacDonald of the B.C. School of Dancing, who
directed the smooth dancers; Harry Pryce, of CBU,
who managed the musical numbers and the student
orchestra; and E. V. Young, who has now completed
his twenty-first year of high-calibre directing for the
Musical Society.
The crowning social event of the year for Mussoc
was the final production party, held this year at Fergusson Point Tearooms, where more than one hundred
members gathered to celebrate the close of Mussoc's
memorable twenty-fifth production.
109 ss
£&£$£
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/      i*1
ALBERT  SIMPSON  AS  SNOBBY  PRICE  PRAYS  IN  THIS  DRAMATIC  SCENE FROM  "MAJOR BARBARA"
Players'   Club   Presents
By donating a five-thousand-pound check of his munition
money, Mr. Undershaft has just bought the Salvation Army
from Major Barbara. Left to right: Elinor Johnson as Mrs.
Baines, John Whittaker as Mr. Undershaft, Barbara Schwank
as Jenny Hill, Bob Woodward as Adolphus Cousins, and Sharon
Scadding as Barbara Undershaft.
ENDING its thirty-ninth consecutive year of campus
performances, the Players club maintained its
high standards in both the Fall and Spring plays.
Under the guiding hand of Tom Shorthouse, the
President; Bob Woodward, Vice-President; Barbara
Webber, Secretary; and Ian Drummond, Treasurer;
with Ed Freeman as Stage Manager and Alice Husband as Costume Manager, this year's productions were
well-performed and well-received.
The first play that students saw this year was "Her
Scienceman Lover," a comedy by Eric Nicol that is
put on every year during Frosh Week to give Freshettes an insight into the lives and loves of Applied
Science students. The play so caught the fancy of the
audience that a repeat performance was given at noon
the following day.
The two Fall Plays, "Romeo and Juliet" and "A
Masque of Aesop," a farcical imitation of old Greek
plays, ran for three consecutive nights in November.
These two plays were rehearsed at Victory Square one
rainy Saturday to the immense delight of passersby,
because the available space at UBC was being used.
For the major Spring production, Bernard Shaw's
difficult "Major Barbara" was chosen, and performed
three nights in March. Joy Coghill was again their
director; and the main roles were finely portrayed by
Sharon Scadding, Louise de Vick, Bob Woodward, and
John Whittaker.
In this play, George Bernard Shaw vigorously attacks
the church, charity organizations, the government, and
110 A COSY CHAT IS INDULGED IN BY THESE PLAYERS IN LADY BRITTOMART'S LIVING ROOM.
Masterpieces   For   Campus
the rational element in human character. Major Barbara, portrayed by Sharon Scadding, was the Salvation
Army leader whose far-from-realistic beliefs were shattered by reality.
Last May, the Spring play, "Shadow and Substance,"
was taken on tour for one month, and enjoyed by all
viewers. This summer the actors will go on tour for the
same length of time as the people of the B.C. interior
look forward to the yearly circuit of the Varsity Players'
club.
Snobby Price, centre, has returned to the
Sally Ann shelter from the big Salvation
Army meeting where he has just been
saved. Left to right: Doris Chilcott as
Rummy Mitchins, Ron Hansen as Peter
Shirley, Barbara Schwank as Jenny Hill,
Peter Smith as Bill Walker, and Albert
Simpson as Snobby Price.
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[9*3 ORGANIZATIONS TOM SHORTHOUSE
JANE  BANFIELD
ARTHUR HUGHES
PETER HENSLOWE
IAN DRUMMOND
Five Win  LSE Awards
FIVE students received awards for outstanding actitvities from Literary and
Scientific Executive this year. This annual award is given to students who
have actively participated in clubs belonging to LSE.
Winners are Jane Banfield, Peter Henslowe, Arthur Hughes, Tom Short-
house, and Tan Drummond.
JANE BANFIELD
Jane Banfield was president of United Nations club this year, attended a
summer seminar in India last year, and was executive secretary to open house
two years ago. In between times Jane was active in many other campus
activities.
TOM SHORTHOUSE
Tom Shorthouse spent four active years in Players Club. Two years ago he
was vice-president, this year he was president. Tom appeared in all plays as
well as giving advice and help to new members. He composed music for the
play "The Mask of Aesop."
ARTHUR HUGHES
Arthur Hughes this year revived Cercle Francais, the French Club, and
signed up a large membership on club day. Arthur, who has travelled widely
in Europe, was also a member of Players Club, United Nations Club, and
International House Association.
PETER HENSLOWE
Peter Henslowe spent two years as vice-president of Parliamentary Forum,
organized countless Thursday debates, and ran public speaking classes. He
also organized the Legion Cup intramural debates, and had time to be party
whip for the campus Conservative party.
IAN DRUMMOND
Ian Drummond has just completed two years successfully managing finances
lor Players Club and making business arrangements with downtown circles.
Ian was also treasurer for Economics Society, in the RCAF squadron, and
recipient of scholarships in economics and Slavonic studies.
114 Six Receive Top Award
FOR the first time in three years as many coeds as male students received
Honorary Activities awards from the Alma Mater Society.  Three women
students and three men received the awards.
Gerry Duclos, Commerce 4, was chairman of this year's homecoming parade
and elections committee returning officer. His crowning achievement was
chairman of the Commerce banquet committee. Duclos was treasurer of the
student council one year ago, a member of the COTC, and, for the past two
years, recipient of a Hudson's Bay Company scholarship.
Des Eadie, Commerce 4, had the honor of being the first public relations
officer for Men's Athletic Directorate, in which position he managed to create
good relations with the downtown press. Eadie is a member of the Big Block
Club, and was PRO for Mardi Gras and Commerce Undergraduate Society
during this last year. In his third year Eadie was senior manager of the football
team.  He also took time out to coach a high school basketball team.
Wendy Sutton, Arts 3, did the biggest job of her university career this year,
when she edited Totem, and had it out on time. In between Totem deadlines
Miss Sutton was social chairman of Pan Hellenic association, vice-president of
Varsity Outdoor Club, a representative on WUS and WAD, and an active
member of Alpha Delta Pi. During her first two years on campus, she was
active in Radio Society, Intramurals, Dance Club, Phrateres, VOC and was a
section editor of the 1953 Totem. Next year she will be vice-president of the
Student Council and of the Pan-Hellenic executive.
Jane Banfield, Law 3, has a series of student activities behind her. For the
past year Miss Banfield has been president of United Nations club and Delta
Sigma Pi, women's honorary sorority. In her second year she was vice-president
of the student council, chairman of the flood relief fund, and UBC delegate to
the World Universities summer seminar in India.
Ken Faris, Arts 4, was this year president of the Student Christian Movement and member of World University Service. He was an active member of
Literary and Scientific Executive, United Nations Club, and Sigma Tau Chi
men's honorary fraternity. He also participated in Mamooks, Economics Club,
and was a one time vice-president of the UN club.
Joan MacArthur, Law 3, is president of Women's Big Block Club, one time
president of Women's Athletic Association, and for two years coach of the
women's basketball team. Miss MacArthur was also chairman of World
University Service committee, vice-president of the Law Undergraduate Society,
and a member of Delta Sigma Pi, women's honorary society.
GERRY DUCLOS
'•ii crsajS
A*
DES EADIE
WENDY SUTTON
JOAN   MacARTHUR
KEN  FARIS
JANE BANFIELD Sigma Tau Chi
ITX    V
Other members of the Honorary Fraternity are Danny Goldsmith,
Gerry Hodge, Bill Hutchinson, Ted Lee, Bob Loosemore, Vaughan
Lyon, Monte McKay, Jim McNish, Terry Nicholls, Joe Schlesinger,
John Springer, Johann Stoyva, Peter Sypnowich, Bill Tracey, and
Bill Whyte.
ANFIELD, David
FARIS, Ken
FELTHAM, Ivan
FOTHERINGHAM, Alan
FRASER, John
GOLDSMITH, Alan
LUSZTIG, Peter
ST. JOHN, Bill
Delta Sigma Pi      §.
ADAMSON, Nan
BALLA, Brigitta
BANFIELD, Jane
CHOMA, Ann
ENGELLAND, Shirley
HOOD, Jean
MacARTHUR, Joan
Not pictured:
SCOTT, Lila
116  Alpha Gamma Delta
CARLSON, Lois
CONNELL, Rae
COOK, Beverley
CROKER, Pat
DICKINSON, Veda
DUCKWORTH, Muriel
DUFF, Marianna
FINDLAY, Barbara
FLETCHER, Dona
GRIFFIN, Shirley Anne
HURLSON, Helen
KEPPER, Eleanor
LAM, Diana
LEGGE, Gerry
LEUCHTE, Anne Marie
McLEAN, Margaret
PETERSON, Denise
ROSE, Alison
SAINAS, Bessie
SLINGER, Judy
SUTHERLAND, Ann
UNDERHILL, Nancy
WILSON, Jean
YURICH, Mary
Not pictured:
SETTERFIELD, Gwen
ALPHA, the original chapter of
Alpha Gamma Delta, was
formed at Syracuse University, New
York, on May 10, 1904. From its
first eleven members the relatively
young fraternity has expanded to
sixty-two chapters. Delta Zeta, the
UBC chapter, was installed in May,
1930.
The largest project sponsored by
the active chapter and the alumnae
is the annual "Winter Wonderland
Cabaret," this year called "Neptune's Wonderland." This project
is in aid of B.C.'s Spastic Paralysis
Society. Further funds are raised
each year to aid the Coquileetza Indian Hospital at Sardis. This year
chapter members also delivered
Christmas stockings to the patients
and sang Christmas Carols.
During 1953-1954, Alpha Gams
have taken an active interest in
campus organizations and activities.
The year was climaxed by an enjoyable ten days at camp, following
final examinations.
[18 Alpha Delta Pi
ALPHA DELTA Pi women's fraternity was founded
on May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan Female College.
Since its inception, Alpha Delta Pi has expanded until
it now has eighty-one chapters throughout Canada and
the United States. Beta Kappa chapter was installed
on the U.B.C. campus in  1931.
The national philanthropic project of Alpha Delta
Pi is help to the National Society for Crippled Children. In addition to this work, the B. C. chapter spent
many interesting hours helping at the Kitsilano Youth
Recreation Centre.
This year the chapter took an active interest in intramural sports, student affairs, and song fest. Nan Adamson held the position of president of Women's Undergraduate Society while another member Wendy Sutton,
was Editor in Chief of the Totem.
Beta Kappa chapter enjoyed an active social chapter
including the pledge party, initiation banquet, and the
annual Dixieland Ball.
At the conclusion of the term, the ADPis attended
their summer camp at Birch Bay and readied themselves for the bi-annual Province Convention which is
to be held at Pullman, Washington, this fall.
First row: Adamson, Nan; Birkinshaw, Beverley; Byrne, Anne; Col tis, Madelyn; Crumb, Patricia. Second row: Dilworth, Dorothy;
Driscoll, Diane; Goudy, Kay; Hall, Glennys; Hogg, Betty; Kelley, Dora; Ledingham Sylvia. Third row: Legace, Yvonne; Liptrot,
Frances; McCargar, Donamae; Meadows, Sylvia; Morgan, Shirley; McPherson, Elspeth; Palleson, Paddy. Fourth roxc: Salter, Nancy;
Shobrook,  Lenora;  Smith,  Donna;  Sutton,  Wendy;  Thompson,  Betty Anne; Valentine, Anne; Woolrich, Mary Lou.
19 Delta Gamma
"pvELTA GAMMA women's frater-
■*-' nity was founded in 1873 at
Lewis School, Oxford, Mississippi.
Alpha Phi, the UBC chapter, was
installed in 1928. B.C.'s Delta
Gammas take an active part in sup
port of the national philanthropic
project of sight conservation and aid
to the blind. DCs read several
hours daily to a blind university
student, and on Saturdays drive
sightless bowlers to and from the
bowling alley.
First row: Allen, Liz; Baxter, Cathy; Beck, Peggy; Bissett, Ann; Boniface, Rosemary. Second row: Bowell, Dorothy; Cassidy, Anne;
Compton, Barb; Coursier, Joan; Darling, Val; Donaldson, Verna; Fountain, Joyce. Third row: Foote, Judy; Foster, Anthea; Grant,
Phyllis; Henderson, Janet; Jacobson, Mary Ann; Kent, Stevie; McBey, Helen. Fourth row: Miller, Marilyn; McNab, Nancy; Miles, Rene;
Munro, Cathie; Murray, Nancy; Pentland, Ann; Pipes, Marilyn. Fifth row: Rennie, Joan; Robinson, Betty Jane; Rogers, Maggie;
Shrum, Janie; Sclater, Shirley; Walley, Donna Mae; Wilson, Marilou.
120 Kappa Alpha Theta
KAPPA ALPHA THETA fraternity was founded at De
Pausa University, Greencastle, Indiana, on January 27, 1870. Since
then, seventy-nine active college
chapters have been established,
four of which, are located in
Canada: UBC, McGill, Alberta,
and Western Ontario. The local
chapter, Beta Upsilon, received its
charter in 1930.
This year Thetas participated in
intramural sports and activities,
and entered the Greek societies
songfest. Support was also given to
the fraternity's national charity,
the Institute of Logopedics at
Wichita, Kansas.
Kappa Alpha Theta's social calendar included the Founders' Day
Banquet in January, the Mother
and Daughter tea, and the spring
formal at the Panorama Roof of
the Hotel Vancouver.
Climaxing a busy session, the
Thetas relaxed at summer camp on
Shawnigan Lake. There they eagerly anticipated the annual convention to be held this year in
Quebec.
ADAIR, Mary
ANDERSON, Shelagh
ERSKINE, Pat
GREEN, Maxine
HINKE, Margaret
JOHNSON, Edie
KNOX, Marylen
LAWRENCE, Nan
MORRISETTE, Pat
McCURRACH, Helen
RANAGHAN, Roma
ROSE, Pam
SAY, Jill
SMITH, Shirley
TAYLOR, Jean
WAINWRIGHT, Joan
WEBSTER, Margaret
121 Delta Phi Epsilon
■AE\*
FISHMAN, Mollie
GARFINKLE, Rochelle
GORDON, Fay
LERMAN, Joan
RJBACK, Faith
SATINOVSKY, Josephine
TADMAN, Blooma
MISSING:
KALEF, Sandra
ON March 17, 1917, Alpha, the original
chapter of Delta Phi Epsilon was
founded at New York University. In 1822
the fraternity became international with
the founding of a Canadian chapter at McGill University. Each year on March 17th
undergraduates and alumnae traditionally
celebrate Founders' Day in honour of their
four founders. The Delta Gamma Chapter
was founded at UBC in 1946.
The members of the Delta Phi Epsilon
contribute towards several philanthropic
funds. It has become affiiliated with
Irvington House, a hospital, home, and
school for underprivileged children striken
with rheumatic fever.
It also supports a fund supporting the
Foster Parent Plan for War Orphans.
This year Delta Phi Epsilon participated
in intramurals, song fest, and other activities. On the social side they held their
annual pledge party, participated in exchanges, and ended the year with a spring
formal.
122 Alpha Phi
ALPHA PHI women's fraternity was founded at
Syracuse, New York, in 1872. There are now
fifty active chapters throughout Canada and the United
States. Beta Theta chapter, which was affiliated at
UBC in 1929, celebrates its twenty-fifth anniversary
this vear.
At Christmas the Alpha Phi's went carol singing with
Beta Theta Pi. The proceeds from this project went
to the Alpha Phi Cortisone Fund of the Canadian
Arthritis and Rheumatism Society.
During October some of the B.C. members went to
Tacoma to attend the installation of the new Alpha
Phi chapter, Gamma Zeta.
After the spring formal held at Canyon Gardens, the
girls finished the term preparing for their International Convention to be held this summer in Victoria.
Alpha Phi this year entered the intramurals with
teams in volleyball, basketball, ping-pong, and archery
as well as participating in the Panhellenic bridge
tournament and the song fest.
First row: Baird, Bev; Birch, Betty; Blankenbach, Pat; Boon, Thelma; Cairns, Ruth; Cameron, Rusty; Cooper, Ann. Second row: Dwyer,
Loretta; Fearnside, Gwen; Fingarson, Fay; Fletcher, Joan; Gillespie, Sheila; Harries, Beth; Kolle, Phyllis. Third row: MacDonald, Wendy;
Mercer,  Barb;  Miller, Elinor;  Moody, Audrey; Neave, Bufty; Pendray, Madge; Richardson, Fay Ann. Fourth row: Bev, Saul; Stevens;
Marilyn;  Standell, Valri;  Thorne, Norma;  Todd,  Adrienne; Welsh   Helen; Vale, Lorna.
Not pictured: Battie, Marg; Huntington, Jay.
123 Gamma Phi Beta
GAMMA PHI BETA sorority was
founded at Syracuse, New York,
in 1874. It was the first sorority on
the University of British Columbia
campus, Alpha Lambda chapter being installed in the spring of 1928.
Gamma Phi has established, as its
national philanthropy, summer
camps for underprivileged children.
The two camps, at Sechelt, British
Columbia, and Denver, Colorado,
are owned and maintained by the
sorority. During the summer
months, girls from the 68 chapters
of Gamma Phi Beta act as counsellors at the camps.
This year's edition of the Gamma
Phi-Kappa Kappa Gamma Cabaret,
the "Cotton Ball," was held in October. The chorus lines, trained by
Gamma Phi alumna, Diane Bancroft, were the hit of the evening, as
they romped through unorthodox
modern dance routines.
Outstanding among Gamma Phi's
social events this past year were the
annual Christmas party, held at the
home of Elaine Kennedy, the hard-
times pledge party in October, and
the traditional Carnation Ball in the
spring, held at St. Mawe's.
After the mental work of final
exams the Gamma Phi's tried a
little of the physical kind when they
migrated to their own sorority camp
at Sechelt and readied it for the
summer season, a job usually taken
on by the Alumnae Chapter.
First row: Alden, Rosemary; Andreen, Peggy; Brown, Doreen; Donnelly, Helen; Forrester, Norma; Holloway, Barbara; Jagger, Barbara;
Johnson, Kathleen. Second row: Kemp, Beverley; Kennedy, Elaine; Lewis, Sally; Manson, Barbara; Marchese, Angela; Matheson, Elizabeth;
McColl, Diane; McConville, Patricia. Third row: McLallen, Marilyn; McLennan, Patricia; Moore, April; Morrow, Lorraine; Prentice,
Elizabeth; Rohrer, Joyce; Robertson, Marguerita; Salter, Kathryn. Fourth row: Schaffer, Susan; Sharp, Kathleen; Swinarton, Sheila;
Trafford, Jacqueline; White, Marilyn; Wilson, Sylvia; Wright, Janie; Young, Margot.
124 Kappa Kappa Gamma
THE first chapter of Kappa Kappa
Gamma was founded in 1870.
Gamma Upsilon chapter at UBC
was formed in 1929 from the original Delta Phi local sorority.
1953-54 has been a busy year for
the Kappas. The first big event was
the annual charity ball held in conjunction with Gamma Phi Beta. The
girls went down south for inspiration and chose a "Cotton Ball"
theme. Later in the year came the
barn dance, the pledge party, and
the Spring Formal held at Canyon
Gardens. During the Christmas holidays the girls made hampers for
needy families and sang carols in the
Old People's Home.
Intramural sports hold an important part in university life and
this year the girls entered volley-ball,
badminton, and bowling teams.
In the annual Kappa-Zete bridge
tournament, the boys were the proud
victors of the trophy.
The year ended with the traditional week at sorority camp, where
the girls recovered from final exams.
BRICE, Ann
BROWN, Sally
CAMERON, Ann
CROTTIE, Jan
FARRIS, Evlyn
FEVLAY, Ann
GREGORY, Carol
GRAY, Pam
HALLMAN, Lonnie
HOLMES, Patsy
HOUGHLAND, Joan
LOURIE, Susie
McLEAN, Helen
McLENNAN, Lila
MAWHINNEY, Pam
STURDY, Sandra
TURNBULL, Sheila
Not pictured:
ROBERTSON, Lois
125 Alpha Omicron Pi
iLmt^dLmmm
ABRAHAMSON, Carol
BIGALOW, Cynthia
BOOTH, Liz
BRACHER, Anne
CARR, Marilyn
CATHERWOOD, Ann-Marie
COCKBURN, Sandra
GOUGH, Joan
HALPIN, Connie
KOWLUK, Mary Beth
LEONARD, Tani
LEWIS, Margaret
McALPINE, Mayli
STENHOUSE, Lynne
VEAR, Gwen
VENABLES, Shirley
WALKER, June
WOLVERTON, Bernie
ALPHA OMICRON PI fraternity
was founded on January 2.
1897, at Barnard College, Columbia
University, New York. Beta Kappa,
the UBC chapter, was installed on
October 17, 1931.
As its national philanthropy,
Alpha Omicron Pi maintains the Social Service Department of the
Frontier Nursing Service. This charity group operates in the most remote, inaccessible region of the
mountains of Kentucky. Locally, the
members also spend every Saturday
afternoon entertaining children in
the Vancouver General Hospital. In
the fall the girls modelled in the
Alpha Omicron Pi fashion show,
which is a competition for original
dress design. The proceeds from the
show go to charity.
The chapter was active this year in
all campus activities such as sports,
bridge tournaments, and the Song
Fest. This year they sang the sorority's "Prayer of Thanksgiving."
Social activities included the
Founders' Day Banquet, Mother and
Daughter Tea, and the Sugar Plum
Ball held at St. Mawes Hotel. In
May some of the girls will travel to
Seattle to attend that Chapter's
spring formal.
126 F
OUNDED in 1833 at Union College, Schenectady, New York, Psi
Upsilon is one of the oldest Greek
letter societies in North America. Il
has thirty active chapters, three of
which are in Canada at Toronto,
McGill, and UBC.
From the beginning the fraternity's policy has been one of gradual
expansion along the lines of the
"Rhodes Idea." For this reason the
number of chapters has been kept
down to about thirty.
Highlights   of   the   social   season
were the fall pledge party, the post
Psi Upsilon
Christmas  exam  party,   the  French
party and the fraternity formal.
Prominent Psi U's on the campus
during the past year were Bruce
Pepper, Ken O'Shea, Clyde Fox, and
Bob Johnson.
IifSIi
HEk
mWLWmm
First row: Archer, Len; Baxter, Al; Boe, Bob; Burton, Ed; Carfrae, Jim. Second row: Carmichael, John; Charpentier, Maurice; Clarke,
Jim; Danard, Maurice; Dicks, Richard; Third row: Drab, Al; Duggan, Bob; Czieciuch, Max; Easter, Cal; Elliott, Donn; Fox, Clyde;
Gale, Henry; Giegerich, Joe; Girling, Pete. Fourth row: Griffiths, Barry; Guile, Bob; Holmes, Don; Ikeda, Ron; Irwin, Grant; Johnson,
Bob; Liebelt, Al; McCamey, Mac; McLaren, Glen. Fifth row: Macey, Glen; Malone, Jim; Maze, Dick; Meeker, Henry; Middleton, Gil;
Middleton, Keith; Nolan, Don; Ornes, Norm; O'Shea, Ken. Sixth row: Preston, Jack; Schachter, Bernie; Cherrin, Derry; Sorochan,
Walt; Sortwell, Ted; Smitheringale, Bill; Stickland, Mike; Tappay, Bob; Ten Broeke, Hank.
Not pictured: Aird, Cam; Beaubier, Dean; Farncombe, Scott; Harris, Cliff; Pepper, Bruce; Philippson, Gerry; Stanton, Rodger; Stanton,
Russ.
127 Sigma Chi
ARCHAMBAULT,
Dick
BENNETT, Dick
BOLTER, Stan
BUTTERFIELD,
Jack
CAREW, Derry
CLARK, Wes
DIXON, Robert
DONALDSON,   Bob
GORDON, Bert
GUSTAVSON,
Clarence
HALLAM, Hugh
KENT, James
KIRK, Hugh
LLOYD,  Tony
LONEY, Tom
MARTIN, Hal
MORGAN, Vic
MUNDLE, Gordie
OBERHOFER, Matt
O'BRIEN, Barney
REINER, Tom
ROBLIN,  Robert
ROED,   Lome
SPRIO, Grant
STRANG,  Ian
THOM,  Gordie
WOOD, Connla
Not pictured:
ANTLE, John
ARMSTRONG, Lyall
BARNETT, Doug
BREALEY, Laurie
COOPER, Jack
GLEIG, Donald
PRASLOSKI, Peter
PHILIPS,   Bill
SIGMA CHI fraternity was
founded on June 28th,
1855, at Miami University,
Oxford, Ohio. Since then it
has gained a place of unsurpassed prominence in the
fraternity world. With 122
active chapters across the continent, Sigma Chi, one of the
famed Miami Triad, is firmly
established on the campi of
the better colleges and universities of Canada and the
United States.
In January of 1949 Sigma
Chi was installed at UBC as
Delta Omicron chapter. Since
that time it has grown from
an unknown fraternity on the
campus to a well established
and respected one. A sign of
steady progress is the new
acquisition of a chapter house
for meetings, parties, and
accommodation for out-of-
town members.
Made famous internationally by the many prominent
members and the best-known
and beloved of all fraternity
songs, "The Sweetheart of
Sigma Chi", the fraternity is
becoming better known every
year. Social events include the
"Toga Pledge Party", the
Miami Triad Ball", and the
"Sweetheart Ball". This year's
sweetheart, chosen at the Ball,
is Miss Barbara Findlay, of
Alpha Gamma Delta.
Delta Omicron takes an
active interest in intramural
games and many Sigs were
active in campus activities
this year. Every Sig is expected to obtain good scholastic marks. To date, one
member of Delta Omicron
has been awarded the Rhodes
scholarship.
This year's officers were:
Clarence Gustavson, president; Tony Lloyd, vice-president; Robert Donaldson, an-
notator, and Don Gleig, treasurer. Phi Delta Theta
PHI DELTA THETA was founded at Miami University in 1848
and the B.C. Alpha chapter was
established in 1930. Active in football, rugger, basketball, rowing, and
ski circles, the members also include
the new president of the Student's
Council, Dick Underhill, and Mem-
ber-at-large, Don Jabour.
First row: Atkinson, John; Archibald, Ted; Banfield, John; Basi, Bhagat; Bell, Mike. Second row: Brown, Bob; Carnsew, Neill; Cook,
Phil; Cook, Tom; Ezzy, Albert. Third row: Fraser, Russell; Gadd, Pat; Gregory, Pete; Harjula, Terry; Harstone, Cam; Henderson, Matt;
Hudson, Buzz; Jabour, Don. Fourth row: Jackson, Pat; Kelly, Boyd; Knight, Ed; Liddle, Keith; Mair, Ian; Maxwell, Bill; McDermid,
John; Maclnnes, Bob. Fifth row: Maclnnes, Ian; MacKay, Ken; McLean, Bob; McLeod, Doug; MacNicol, Jim; Mitchell, Jim, Monaghan,
Bob; Montaine, Lome. Sixth row: O'Flanigan, Gerry; Powers, Barney; Puder, Richard; Rae, Allen; Rae, Doug; Richards, John;
Seymour, George; Shaw, Dune. Seventh row: Shippibotham, Jack; Stuart, Bill; Taylor, Gary; Turnbull, Ian; Upson, Brian; Vogel, Dick;
Vogel, Walter; Yuill, John.
Not pictured: Bailey, Roger; Underhill, Dick.
129 Zeta Beta Tau
ZETA BETA TAU is an international fraternity with
47 chapters across the United States and Canada.
Alpha Chi of U.B.C. had a masquerade, spring formal
at Canyon Gardens, and once again sponsored the
interfraternity Bridge tourney. ZBT's who made outstanding contributions in extra-curricular work were
Allan Goldsmith, Howard Beck, Jerome Angel, Stanley
Berk, and Jerry Lecovin.
ALBERT, Henry
ANGEL, Jerome
BECK, Howard
BECK, Stanley
CHESS, Martin
FINKELSTEIN, Norton
FLADER, Charles
GLADSTONE, Sidney
GOLDSMITH, Allan
GOLDSMITH, Daniel
GOLDEN, Myron
BIELY, Gordon
GREEN, Norman
GROBERMAN, Herbert
GROBERMAN, Joel
JOFFE, Jay.
LAVEN, David
LECOVIN, Gerald
LEVEY, Gerald
LOOMER, Herbert
MILNER, Earl
RAISEN, Jerry
SAPERSTEIN, Manuel
SIRLIN, Irving
SKY, Milton
SPEVAKOW, Bob
Not pictured:
BREEN, Harvey
COLEMAN, Sidney
DIAMOND, Charles
EDWARDS, Ted
FREEMAN, Larry
GOLDBLOOM, Ted
LEVINE, Sefton
SHUBER, Simms
130 Delta Upsilon
DELTA UPSILON, a non-secret fraternity, was
founded in Williamstown, Mass., in 1834. The
British Columbia chapter of Delta Upsilon began with
the formation of the local fraternity, Chi Omega Psi,
in 1928. This group was installed as a chapter ot
Delta Upsilon in 1935.
The B.C. chapter has participated enthusiastically in
intramural sports, student affairs, boys' work, and the
song fest.   Some prominent DP's on the campus this
year were Pete Lusztig, president of MAD and Bill
Esselmont, Co-convenor for the Mardi Gras. Bob
Brady was captain of the Thunderbird football team
and was chosen Evergreen Conference all-star guard.
Social events of the year were the Apache party, an
Orphans Christmas Party, and the Spring Formal held
at Panorama Roof, and closing with a party for newly
pinned members.
First row: Anderson, Don; Bailey, Gunner; Barnes, George; Bendrodt, Eric; Bouck, John; Bruce, Jack; Burritt, Ron. Second row: Carter,
Jim; Caulfield, Jim; Davies, Bill; Drew, John; Esko, Sam; Esselmont, Bill; Fawcus, Ken; Flather, Barrie; Forbes, Bill. Third row: French,
Basil; Graham, Gordon; James, Bob; Joyce, Murray; Kemp, Ray; Kirk, Denis; Larson, Dan; Lew, Chuck; Loney, Dick: Fourth row:
Lusztig, Peter; MacDonald, John; MacDonald, Ted; Matthews, Stu; Merrill, Keith; Nelson, Ron; Rebarits, Bill; Rjtchie, Bruce; Rowan,
John. Fifth row: Stewart, Don; Stewart, Jim; Taylor, Greg; Walsh, Bill; Watts, Doug; Weatherall, Bill; Weeks, Graham; Westlake, Don;
Wooton, Art.
Not pictured: Brady, Bob; Flemons, Gord; Schultz, Ron; Taylor, Tom.
131 Delta Kappa Epsilon
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON had
its beginning in 1844 as a protest against the injustice of the then
existing society system at Yale.
Phi Alpha Charter of D.K.E. was
chartered in 1949 after the petition
to establish a chapter at UBC had
been submitted by a local fraternity
known as Beta Chi.
Phi Alpha was the fiftieth of the
now fifty-one Deke chapters, five of
which are in Canada.
First row: Adams, Ted; Baldwin, Bill; Baver, Henri; Brooks, Allen; Cvetkovitch, Joe; Davis, Art. Second row: Dunne, Alf; Dykeman,
Murray; Eberts, Tony; Edwards, Jack; Eidsuick, Harold; Evans, Jon; Foreman, Guy. Third row: Hickichi, Mits; Junas, Walt; Kent,
Dick; Lea, Colin; MacDonald, Ken; McCallan, Skip; McLean, Don. Fourth row: Olsen, Barry; Philpott, Dale; Powell, Frank; Preston,
Mert; Salter, Bill; Simpson, Brian; Spencer, Bruce. Fifth row: Stewart, Sandy; Sullivan, Terry; Thorne, Trevor; Turner, Frank;
Turner, Geoff; White, Paul; Wiens, Dave.
Not pictured: McLaren, Angus; Burge, Bill; Simms, Pete; McCullough, Hugh; Barbeau, Jack; Nelson, Roger; Hosse, Dave; Caldato, Remo,
132 Alpha Delta Phi
ALPHA DELTA PHI was founded in 1832 at Ham-
ton College, Clinton, New York. The B.C. chapter
was established in 1926 when a charter was granted to
Phi Epsilon, then fourteen years old.
Social calendar included a pledge party, an International Weekend with the Washington chapter, and
a Spring Formal.
First row: Alexander, Ken; Anderson, Dick; Armstrong, Gordon; Blair, Hugh. Second row: Clyne, Stu; Cole, Dennis; Connell, Pete;
Dawson, Bob; Dempster, Gavin; Dixon, Ray; Eccott, Jim; Emery, Al; Ford, Ritchie. Third row: Fredrickson, Bud; Gourlay, Bruce;
Hamilton, Jack; Holland, Fred; Howard, Ron; Hunt, John; Jefferson, Pete; Kenny, Brent; Kirkland, Bob. Fourth row: Longstaffe,
Ron; Lord, Ray; McCallum, Don; MacDonald, Don; MacDonald, Jim; McDougall, Graeme; MacMillan, John; McLeod, Gundy; McLeod,
John. Fifth row: McNulty, Bill; Mann, Jim; Marshall, Don; Matthews, Dick; Montgomery, Roger; Newton, John; Peretz, Dwight;
Ridley, Bob; Rosenberg, Jerry. Sixth row: Rosenberg, Ken; Shields, Pete; Shalman, Denis; Sinclair, Bob; St. John, Bill; Standfield,
Derek; Thurston, Quentin; Welsford, Duthie; Wickson, Malcolm.
133 Phi Kappa Pi
&Wi
K
\
jm
PHI KAPPA PI fraternity was founded as the only
Canadian National Fraternity in 1913 by the
amalgamation of two local fraternities, Sigma Pi at
the University of Toronto and Alpha Beta Gamma, at
McGill  University.
The Local Chapter of Phi Kappa Pi was formed in
1919 when, as the first fraternity on the UBC campus
Alpha Iota was formed by ten men who wanted to perpetuate a friendship formed overseas.
The first few years were mainly a
stuggle to survive as the idea of a
fraternity on the campus was not
generally acceptable and the Senate
was opposed to the establishment of
fraternities here. Gradually UBC
got reconciled to this new creature
and this opened the way for other
fraternities which were now freely
founded.
ALDERMAN, Richard
BADOVINIC, George
HARVEY, Brace
HUTCHINSON, BUI
MacAULAY, Jim
PARKIN, Bill
RISK, Jim
ROWLAND, Gary
SAARINEN, Carl
SAMBOL, Matthew
THOMAS, Harry
THORDARSON, Ted
WALLEY, Peter
WASYLKOW, Norm
WHITE, Donald
Not pictured:
JAMES, Charles
MULHOLLAND, Bill
SAUNDERS, Alex
HAEREID, Bjoem
O'RETLLY, Glenn
Since its inception 40 years ago,
Phi Kappa Pi has maintained and
strongly emphasized the spirit of
Canadianism. Its motto "Philuminoi
Kanadioi Piuamet," "In brotherly
love as Canadians we benefit one
another," is indicative of the aim
and spirit of the brotherhood.
Phi Kappa Pi has chapters at
Alberta, Manitoba, Toronto, McGill and Dalhousie. Close contact is
kept through a national council,
with each chapter which results in
an integration of purpose and activities throughout the fraternity in all
parts of Canada.
The fraternity house on West
11th is as usual the center of all
activities. Nearly all parties take
place there and the bar does a wonderful business. Twelve brothers live
in the house.
134 Zeta Psi
IN 1847, the parent chapter of
Zeta Psi came into existence at
the University of New York. Zeta
Psi became an international fraternity with the establishment of a
chapter at the University of Toronto
in 1879. The UBC chapter of Sigma
Epsilon was chartered in 1926, and
was the first internationally affiliated fraternity on this campus.
The chapter tries to keep its
membership well rounded and be
active in all phases of university
life. A chapter house near campus
serves as a center for social activities, meetings, and living accommodation for out-of-town students.
The Zetes held their annual
Apache party in November and
their spring formal in February at
the Panorama Roof of the Vancouver Hotel. In January the Sigma
Epsilon Zetes played host to other
chapters in a newly adopted policy
of inter-regional conferences to
strengthen relations between chapters.
By tradition, the Zetes took last
place in the annual Greek Song Fest
as the whole fraternity gave its usual
exhibition of antics. Complete with
grass skirts and loud shirts, the boys
raided the Auditorium to put a
colourful ending to the show.
HI.
First row: Barnsley, Dick; Boyle, Ted; Bridge, Bob; Buhner, Pat; Bush, Pat. Second row: Calkins, David; Carroll, Frank; Christopher,
Gordon; Claman, Peter; Clavel, Jim. Third row: Coltart, Dudley; Dutton, Ross; Fisher, Robin; Futcher, Gordon; Futcher, Jim; Gault,
John; Grais, Gary; Grant, Bill. Fourth row: Jones, Ken; Letson, John; MacDonald, Peter; Maclnnis, Duncan; McLuckie, Bill; Mair,
Rate; Norris, Mac; Price, Keith. Fifth row: Ricmond, Rod; Ritchie, Bill; Skelding, Jim; Sterling, Tom; Sweet, Dave; Tufts, Frank;
Usher, Don; Wooster, Tony.
Not pictured: Cowie, Jim; Dewis, Geoff; Edwards, John; Horsey, Ted; McWilliams, Bruce; Martinson, Ralph; Mead, Stafford.
135 Beta Theta Pi
BETA THETA PI fraternity was founded at Miami
University in Oxford, Ohio in 1839. Gamma
Omicron, one of the three Canadian chapters, was installed at UBC in 1936 with the Canadian football
team as its nucleus.
On campus, Betas take an active interest in sports
and student affairs. This year Ivan Feltham held office
as the president of the AMS.
The first social event of the fall term was a costume
pledge party on Halloween. Next followed the Third
Annual Miami Triad Ball and the Spring formal held
early in February. Towards the end of February
Gamma Omicron was host to seven other chapters for
the Beta Conclave.
First row: Alexander, Ron; Atkins, Glen; Baker, Glen; Bennett, Keith. Second row: Bone, Bob; Bossons, John; Braidwood, Tom; Brown,
Hugh; Cassady, George; Connell, Gav; Coopland, Ashley; Desaulniers, Neil; Deeble, Doug; Third row: Duncan, Ted; Fairbairn, Bob;
Fitzgerald, Glyn; Grantham, Pete; Gribski, Ed; Hakstian, Bob; Hltalin, Ken; Hastings, Dave; Hemphill, Dave. Fourth row:
Homola, Bob; Killeen, Jim; Lauener, Roland; Lawrence, Bill; Lee, Ted; Legg, Ed; Little, Blair; McAlpine, Ted; McConville, Jack. Fifth
row: McGhee, Jack; Mackenzie, Graham; McLeod, Ken; MacRae, Ron; Myers, John; Noble, Ken; Nordman, Vol; Pearce, Don; Ritchie,
Jack. Sixth row: Russell, Ken; Sinillie, Howard; Sultan, Ralph; Unwin, Ernie; Walton, Norm; Westerlund, Bruno; White, Harry; Whitworth, Doug; Wright, Bill.
Not pictured: Bailey, Pete; Frith, Hector; Peebles, George.
136 Lambda Chi Alpha
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA, a general
social fraternity, was founded at
Boston University in 1909. While it
is one of the youngest of the international fraternities, it has the largest number of chapters with 145 in
the U.S. and Canada. Lambda Chis
came to UBC in 1948 and the chapter has expanded steadily. Plans are
now being made for the purchase of
a chapter house next fall.
Zeta Xi, the UBC chapter, takes
an active interest in campus events.
Thep sponsor the annual Freshette
Queen contest. This year's winner
was popular Sylvia Tremaine, and
her attendants were Marilyn Wheel-
ock and Carol Thomson. Later in
the fall a clothing drive for Greek
earthquake victims was organized,
complete with Pep Meet. At Homecoming, the fraternity donated a
silver plate to be given as second
prize in the float contest for the
Homecoming Parade. Lambda Chis
built their float in conjunction with
Delta Gamma sorority. The chapter
also aided the publicity for the
Blood Drive by staging a parade on
the main mall.
As the year ends several members
are looking forward to the international convention at Miami this
summer.
AFLECK, Bob
BALDWIN, Barry
BIEHL, Norm
BOURNES, Dave
FONSECA, Al
FRITH, Clive
HALSEY, Gene
HARRISON, John
JENKINS, Dave
LOGIE, Roy
LOZOWSKI, Peter
LUCAS, Neil
MARSHALL, Ron
McDORMAN, Les
NYLANDER, Bam
RICHARDSON, Gordon
SAVARIE, Louis
SHAW, Cliff
SHEPPARD, Barry
STEPHENS, Vic
STEWART, Bob
STEWART, Gene
WADE, Ed
WALLACE, Clark
Not pictured:
JACK, Don
137 Phi Gamma Delta
A
$.r.A.
First row: Abrams, Donald; Armstrong, William; Balcom, Graeme. Second row: Cameron, Donald; Cant, Eric; Davenport, David; Davidson, Grant; Desbrisay, George; Drost, Ian; Eadie, Desmond; Edgett, Rennie; Elliot, Gordon. Third row: Flynn, Robert; Gartside,
William; Gilmore, Robert; Hall, David; Hornstein, Walter; Hurst, John; Isaac, Ronald; Johnson, Hugh; Jones, George. Fourth row:
Killam, Douglas; Rules, Charles; Kyle, Douglas; Lowther, John; MacSorley, Clare; McDonald, Bruce; McDonald, David; McKenzie,
Murray; McKenzie, Patrick. Fifth row: McLeod, John; Madill, Stewart; Morgan, Donald; Neil, Cleveland* Nelson, William; Nyhaug,
Ernest; Patterson, James; Pearkes, John; Pekovich, Daniel. Sixth row: Peterson, Jerry; Plant, Albert; Pollock, James; Purvis, David; Rainer,
James; Ramage, Edward; Ross, Kenneth; Rourke, William; Scott, Vernon. Seventh row: Spare, Gordon; Thomas, William; Vaughan,
Lome; Verehere, William; Walters, Harold; Watkins, Ronald; Wotridge, Alan; Wright, Ronald; Young, Andrew.
Not pictured: Forward, Herb; Hibbard, John; Hume, Phillip; Husband, Kim; MacKay, John; Olsen, William; O'Shaughnessy, Bob;
Thomson, Brace; Thiesen, Bill.
138 Alpha Tau Omega
ALPHA TAU OMEGA was founded at the Virginia
Military Institute, Richmond, Virginia in 1865.
Since that time it has expanded to contain 117 chapters throughout the United States and Canada. The
Epsilon Pi chapter was found at UBC in 1946 and in
the following year became affiiliated with the international organization.
ATO takes pride in its wide participation in all
forms of university life. It was the first international
fraternity to replace the traditional "Hell Week" with
"Help Week".
The main social functions of the year were the
Shipwreck Party, the pledge party, the initiation party,
and the formal.
The new chapter house, which is located near the
campus, was purchased in September and will accommodate sixteen brothers.
First row: Aitken, Bob; Brown, Jerry; Byberg, Ed. Second row: Coe, Ted; Constabaris, John; Cooper, Brian. Third row: Emerton, Bill;
Fast, Vic; Feme, Dave, Gilders, Jim; Hurst, Ron; Johnston, Ron; Leckie, Merrill; Lynes, Ken. Fourth row: Morgan, John; Neen, Bill;
Neen, Jack; Niven, Les; Pyper, Ian; Reston, John; Selbie, Bill; Smith,  Ted. Fifth  row:  Steeves,  John;  Stobart,  Rod;  Taylor,  George;
Taylor, Alex; Thodeson, John; Trunkfield, Chris; Veith, John; White, Gordon.
Not pictured: Fingarson, Lome; Riddell, Dave; Wallace, Bill.
139 Sigma Phi Delta
BROWN, Bob
DUFTON, Dave
GALE, Bob
GALLOWAY, Les
MARTINEAU, Ray
MASTIN, Walt
Mccormick, Bill
PARKINSON, Denny
SHELLY, Mel
SYLTE, Len
VOGEL, Henry
WESEEN, Art
Not pictured:
BELLOW, Don
BLACKERY, Andy
FINLAYSON, Malcolm
JARVIS, Don
MARANDA, Laurie
SIGMA PHI DELTA is an international society fraternity of
engineers. Since it is open only to
students of the Engineering faculty,
Sigma Phi Delta is also a professional fraternity. It was founded at
the University of Southern California in 1924. Theta Chapter, at the
University of British Columbia, was
organized in 1932.
Due to the rather heavy Engineering course, activities are more limited than those of other fraternities.
Meetings are held bi-monthly and
one social function takes place per
month. Activities are co-ordinated
with activities in the Engineering
faculty in order that the members
may take full advantage of the
social program of both the faculty
and the fraternity.
Sigma Phi's are active also in intramural sports, with teams entered
in volleyball, basketball, ping-pong,
badminton, and softball.
A well-defined professional program is maintained and a very close
relationship exists between the
active and the alumni group.
The activities have been highlighted by the purchase of a house
which will be in operation next
year.
140 ■■MPTiV IV
ZAWmW
HtMl
\\   \
Alpha Tau Omega missed the trophy by two points as they
left last year's cellar position to place second. They sang "Some
Enchanted  Evening"  and  the  "Chant  Marchant."
Beta Theta Pi is becoming a constant winner as it again claimed
top position in this year's Song Fest. Bill Lawrence led the Betas
in "Marching  Along" and  "You'll  Never Walk  Alone."
Greeks Sing to Huge Crowd
IN the evening of March 9, people aftei
people crowded into the UBC Auditorium.
Soon all seats were filled, and then people
began sitting in the aisles. The reason: sixteenth annual UBC Greek Letter Societies'
song festival. It was the first time the Greeks
moved their singing from Brock Hall; it was
the largest attended festival in UBC Greek
history.
Adjudicators Ifor Roberts and Merlin
Bunt picked fraternity Beta Theta Pi and
sorority Delta Gamma as the winners. Fraternity runners-up were Alpha Tau Omega,
and Phi Gamma Delta tied with Psi Upsilon;
sorority runners-up were Alpha Omicron and
Alph Gamma Delta.
Patrons of the fest were UBC president and
Mrs. Norman A. MacKenzie, Chancellor and
Mrs. Sherwood Lett, Mrs. K. Morris, secretary
to Dean Mawdsley, Miss Marjorie Leeming.
and Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Renta.
Co-chairman Clyde Fox, Psi Upsilon, and
Nancy Underhill, Alpha Gamma Delta,
directed the committee which arranged the
lest iva 1.
~J—:—j t- ■■ ■■■>—»—.^—,. ...,.
Zeta Psi lived up to its reputation of coming last in the Song Fest by
entertaining with their loud and colourful "Novelty Numbers."
Coming through the back doors of
the Auditorium, the Zetes swarmed
over the audience and onto the
stage. Pete Claman, as one of the
famous Marx Brothers, stops to
feed celery to  the crowd.
141 Nancy Murray led her Delta Gamma sisters
to victory at the sixteenth annual Song Fest.
"Red Sails in the Sunset" brought them top
honors as they rendered it in beautiful three-
part harmony. Their second selection was a
fast moving sorority song called "Why D'you
Suppose."
Alpha Phi sorority, led by Fay Fingarson,
scored a close second place. Their first song
was the Scottish medlay, "Eris Kay Love
Lilt." Fay wrote the catchy lyrics for their
second song, "My Father was a Member,"
which gained gales of laughter and applause
from an appreciative audience.
Alpha Gamma Delta, last year's winners of
the Song Fest, took third place. Leader Ann
Sutherland and her sorority sisters, looking
very smart in white blazers, sang two fast
moving selections. Their first song was the
sorority's "Alpha Gamma Delta Hymn" and
they chose the popular "Greensleeves" as
their second number.
142 Jumping at balloons and chasing hearts are these hippy people who attended the Phrateres' Valentine
Party  in  the spring. It is quite evident that everyone  had   a  wonderful   time.
Phrateres Have Active Year
FAMOUS for friendliness among UBC coeds is the
Theta chapter of Phrateres international, resident
here. Phrateres is open to all women on campus who
sincerely want to promote friendship among students
and to help Phrateres in its social services. President
of Phrateres this year was Joy Mounce, vice-president
Maureen Sankey, sub-chapter chairman Joan McArthur.
Girls interested in joining signed up on club day in
September and attended meetings and fireside gatherings in the Brock to learn about the organization. The
160 new members chose the Greek-letter sub-chapter
they wished to join and were pledged in October.
Pledges were required to attend their bi-monthly
sub-chapter meetings, the monthly all-Phrateres meetings and 75 per cent of all social functions. Those
girls who successfully fulfilled requirements were initiated by candlelight in January, while chapter faculty
sponsors and mothers watched.
Sub-chapter social activities ranged from pyjama
parties and pot-luck dinners to splash parties and skating nights. Sports chairmen enter chapter teams in
intramurals and gained points towards the sports
trophy awarded at the final all-Phrateres meeting in
March.  Social service projects headed the activity list,
Phrateres' Publicity chairman, Betty Merrick, puts
a finishing touch to the decorations as the group
ready Brock lounge for the Valentine Party.
143
with chapters reading to the blind, sponsoring book
and record drives for sailors and juvenile detention
homes, entertaining under-privileged children and
working for the Red Cross downtown blood clinic.
Points for their projects were added to chapter activity
standings.
All-Phrateres, governed by the council comprised of
the Theta executive and sub-chapter presidents, spon- A meeting of the executive of Phrateres results in coke parties and formats for members. Sitting around the conference table are: Esther Marrion, Joan MacArthur, Joy Mounce, Joan Clarke, and Maureen Sankey. Standing are
Pat Babcock, Margot Salter, Ann Thrasher, Beth Harries, and Joan Brown.
sored the two major social functions. The girls and
their guests took an imaginary cruise on the "S.S. Stardust" in November and were entertained at the "To
My Valentine Ball" in February. Members of the
University of Washington Adelphi were special guests
at the fall formal while Beta chapter of Phrateres from
U of Washington exchanged with Theta for the
respective spring formals.
Other all-Phrateres activities included signing up
Big and Little Sisters for the women's undergraduate
society   in   September,   Christmas   carolling,   Bowling
night, bandage folding for Red Cross, camp night in
March and camp in May.
Each year a $100 scholarship is awarded to a woman
student entering UBC for the first time.
Recording secretary Lois Carlson, corresponding secretary Ann Thrasher, treasurer Joan Clarke, publicity
chairman Beth Harris, social service chairman Margot Salter were also on Phrateres executive this year.
Appointed members of the executive included historian Esther Marrion, initiation chairman Joan
Brown, and pep activities chairman Pat Babcock.
Here are a group of initiates being escorted by executive members to be introduced to President Joy Mounce
(with back to the camera).
Four sailorettes in the background watch with eager eyes as they visit Gay
Paris and the Cancan Dancers at the Fall Formal—S.S. Stardust. The entertainment is a big feature at these formals.
144  «8L    Wi
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A few members of Mamooks pose for Totem photographer in their paint-smeared clubroom. Left to right: Peter Lazosky, Eva Lyman,
Erika Tobler, Irma Deering, Agnes Wilfort, Dave Bourns, and Boyd Ivens. Thousands of banners were turned out to advertise everything from Homecoming to Elections.
Mamooks Dabble In Dates
WITH splosh of paint, dab of brush, and scribble
of pencil, Mamooks Club splashed and painted
their way through another year of manufacturing
posters for campus organizations. There was hardly an
event held at UBC the whole year which did not receive advertising from the animated brushes of
Mamooks.
Sloshing colors in their paint-pot littered room in
Brock Hall basement, the Mamookians tried their most
to live up to their Indian-origin name, which means
"service."
Last year paint club Mamooks joined hands with
with pep club Kickapoos. This year Mamook-Kickapoo
did double the job of kicking up posters to pep up
the campus.
Nimble-fingered and artistically minded Boyd Ivens,
Gerry Hodge, Ben Quan, Doug Faris, Mary Ferrario,
Peter Lazosky, and Ken Faris, splattered hundreds
of posters and banners telling students about concerts,
speakers, dances, et al.
Jerry Hodge and president Boyd Ivens work industriously on
poster for the Blood Drive. Both were mainstays of the club,
which was hampered by a lack of members. Hodge took time off
to run for vice-president of AMS and be proxy of Jazz Society.
146 Ardent member of the Camera Club, Rick Bell, prints one of the
many pics he has snapped. Paid up clubbers had complete freedom of the darkroom.
Camera Club
MEETING every Friday noon in room 859 of the
library was UBC's camera club, this year. For $2,
members of the club are permitted to enter discussions,
hear lectures by prominent photographers, see club-
sponsored films and to use the club's darkroom. Darkroom is equipped with a contact printer, enlargers,
drier, developing tanks and trays. Any who have paid
the dues of the club may use the darkroom, but club
owns no camera.
Biggest event of the club this year was its sponsorship of the Intra-varsity salon, in which pictures from
all over Canada were sent here to be judged by a
Camera-club-selected panel.
Darkroom procedure, pictorial composition, portrait
photography, color and creative photography are the
items students discuss in meetings. Lloyd Bygraves was
president of the 30-student club this year.
Slides on "Night Photography" were shown at one
meeting. Later, Ben Hill-Tout, always a guiding hand
of the club, spoke on "Salon Work." Kodak movie on
"Hints for better color photography" was shown in
the library room in November. "How to Improve
Your Photography with Filters," was shown later the
same month.
Visual Arts Paint and Mold
IN a vault-like room, towering six stories high with
entrance from the library basement, 20 students
could be seen working each Wednesday this year. The
room is called the Visual Art Workshop.
Voices of the 20 artists echo unnaturally, rebounding
from the vaulted ceilings. Paintings and sketches hang
from the soaring walls—all done by students. On desks,
stands and tables around the walls, abstract clay models
rest, mute evidence that this is the club room of UBC's
Visual Arts Society.
Lionel A. J. Thomas, instructor of UBC's school ot
architecture, is responsible for the increased activity of
Visual Arts Club this year. He has become guardian
angel of the club, helping students with problems,
judging results and praising merit. Al McKoffkin is
playing the same role regarding painting tile and ceramics. Still-life work and oil paintings are also produced by student-artists.
President of the club for this year was Louise Watts.
Pat Prenter served as secretary.
Ron Bibace, Marlene Figol, and Danny Matthews gather around
president Louise Watts to glimpse her still life painting. Weekly
get-togethers allowed members to let their creative abilities flow.
147 Liberal Club
FEW campus politicos but the Liberals themselves
thought the Liberals would win Mock Parliament
elections this spring. Most of the other parties were
confidently predicting their own victories. But the
Whigs won, and they did it by a landslide.
The win gave the campus Liberal Club 23 out of
50 seats in the parliament, a total of 1158 votes out
of the 2608 students who voted. It gave Liberals official
recognition as the strongest political club on the campus. The winning campaign: Posters of Prime Minister
St. Laurent posted all over the campus. With the gift
of strength, student Liberals passed a Provincial Education Bill while they were the "Government."
President Anthony Lloyd, secretary Ron Basford, and
treasurer David Chong sparked the club which brought
to the campus such stalwart Liberals as B.C. leader
Arthur Laing, and Member of Parliament James Sinclair. Laing participated in a panel discussion during
the Columbia Bi-Centenial celebrations held here. MP
Dr. J. L. MacDougal previewed the "Coming Session
at Ottawa" for students last fall.
President Tony Lloyd presides over meeting of the Liberal
Club. Liberals were the strongest political organization on
the campus this year.
LPP Revived On Campus
Barrage of questions detains Tim Buck after packed LPP-spon-
sored speech. Keith Hollands, with back to camera, is secretary
of the growing club.
AFTER three years' absence, the campus Labor
Progressive Party this year was re-organized and
presidented by Artsman Archie McGugan. The club
was responsible for some of the liveliest meetings the
campus has seen in recent years.
At his first meetings, Marxist McGugan was greeted
with tossed tomatoes and lunch bags from a small
group of students. Later, when Canada's chief communist Tim Buck appeared, he and McGugan had to
dodge tomatoes and eggs, as a few students again registered protest. Chief result of the pelting, however, was
not what the tossers would want. Public sympathy
soon gathered to the side of dedicated McGugan and
his speakers, as people cried, "Give them a fair chance
to speak."
An indication of the communist party's campus
strength: in Mock Parliament elections LPP seated
two members and polled 108 votes out of a total 2608
count; in student council elections McGugan was third
of four candidates trying for second member-at-large,
earning 311 votes out of a 2114 total.
148 Pro-Con Club
SIGNIFICANT role of UBCs Progressive-Conservative club in provincial politics was proven this
year as club president J. Gait Wilson and vice-president George Cassidy took up comparable positions in
British Columbia's Young Progressive-Conservative
Association. Other club executives, secretary Douglas
Whitworth, Jim MacAulay, and Brian Weddel became
members-at-large for the association.
Active membership of the campus club was 25 this
year. Mass student voting in the Mock Parliament
election gave the club nine of the 50 seats in UBC's
mock government.
Club published five issues of its "Phoenix" this year.
Issues dealt with: Prog-con policies and criticism of
other parties; needlessness of 10 per cent tax on machinery; differences between Liberal and CCF policies.
Three big speakers were sponsored by the club this
year. Deane Finlayson, B.C. Conservative chief, discussed the role of the party in provincial politics. Miss
Lorraine Johnson, downtown lawyer who ran as candidate in Vancouver South last federal election, spoke
later in the year. Civil-Liberties-sponsored series of
speeches by all-party politicos featured in its third
week Stuart Chambers, discussing the difference between Progressive-Conservative and Social Credit
policies.
Gait    Wilson,    president    Progressive
Conservative Club.
Doug Whitworth, Miss Lorraine Johnson and Peter Henslowe discuss the
party's role in politics.
CCF Club Reaffirms Aims
UNDER direction of hollow-cheeked Edward R.
Zilke, campus branch of Canada's CCF party made
news and stimulated thought this year. Aided by Vice-
President Harold E. Mathias and Secretary-treasurer
Walter Shoen, President Zilke arranged bi-weekly
meetings and earned his club 10 seats in UBC's 50-seat
Mock Parliament.
Over 500 of the 2,608 students balloting in the elections cast votes for the CCF making it official Mock
Parliament opposition for the first time. Liberal club
will head the Mock government.
Top CCF leaders addressed students under CCF club
auspices. Arnold F. Webster, CCF leader for British
Columbia spoke early in the year, followed by MLA's
Robert Strachan, Arthur Turner and Tony Gargraves.
Member of federal parliament Ernest Regier, spoke
later to a packed Arts 100.
' CCFers rose in opposition to two charges during the
year. From the British Columbia Federation of Trade
and Industry they faced charges that Socialism and
Communism were the same. At the same time, Canada's
communists charged the CCF was not socialist.
Tony Gargraves, MLA, holds the attention of CCFers after packed
Arts 100 speech. Left to right: President Ed Zilke, Dave Armit,
Walter Schoen, and Bill Marchak.   Club had biggest membership
149 ** widely known advertising by-lines in campus publicity as the club swelled to 120 members to take its
place as one of the largest groups on the campus.
Enthusiastic jazzophiles filled the Brock Stage Room
on Tuesday noon hours to hear downtown disc jockeys
Bob Smith, Al Reusch, Dave Dixon and Art Hives
present record discourses on the jazz art form. Jazzsoc
members in turn spun their favourite records and explained the subtle intricacies that make up a great
jazz disc.
Frequently the club imported downtown combos to
perform "miniature concerts" in either the blues or
cool idioms of jazz. Club calendar was climaxed by a
series of films starring various bands and singers, including an artist's interpretation of the music of Canadian pianist Oscar Peterson.
Gerry Hodge, president, led a very capable Jazzsoc
executive composed of Jim Carney, vice-president; Pat
Carney, secretary, and Martin Toren, program director
of the club's most successful year yet.
Main undertaking of the club was the presentation
of an Auditorium concert series featuring Ray Norris
and Tommy Struthers who dispensed modern jazz
sounds, and Ren Williams who provided the more
traditional Dixieland form of jazz.
Campus  Coolsters Jim Johnson on clarinet and Jim Carney on
trumpet perform  for fans at Jazz Society's October concert.
A Jumping Year For Jazzsoc
Jim Carney, ex-disc jockey Al Reusch, Jerry Hodge, Pat Carney,
and Martin Toren discuss Reusch's record discourse on Duke
Ellington.
Campus Coolsters give it all they've got at one of their many
shows in the auditorium. Performances always packed the
crowds in.
150 "I  H     'i'HjTi  t
Grand finale of the Third Annual Dance Club Review brings everyone on stage. Show featured
every type of dancing from waltzing and jiving to the rhumba.
Dance Club Swings, Sways
GRAB your partners, and away we go," sang President Collin Carlisle, as Dance Club members
l'ootsied-to-music their way through a successful year
of tango, samba, jive, Charleston, square dance, Italian
quadrilles, and the tarantella.
Hit of the vear was the club's third annual dance
Colin   Carlisle,   president,   and   Shirley   Brewer   practise   square
dance steps.
and stomp review in the Auditorium, which featured
routines of all the popular dances both slow and fast.
Members spent most of their noon hours prancing and
dancing in their club room by the Commerce huts, but
took time out to sponsor square dance and popular
instructional classes.
Marigold Murray, Hot Hit Po and Alison Leiterman give dancing show sex. Christian Fellowship
ORGANIZED study over-and-above University curricula is one of the more amazing habits of Varsity
Christian Fellowship. Half-a-dozen members meet in
the clubroom each week for study and discussion on a
"strictly informal" basis. And each Sunday, all members meet for Bible study at a private home.
With a 58 membership, the Varsity Christian Fellowship sponsored four important speakers this year. Included were: Burton Pedlar, "Christianity and Communism; a parallel?"; Rev. W. R. Wighton, "Racial
Problems in South Africa"; and J. Speake on "Reconciling the Bible to Science."
Leadership of the club this year was given by Alfred
Siemens, president, and Susan Friesen, secretary. Clubroom of the VCF is Hut B-4. Main social event of
this year was a 25-item "Dagwood Lunch" held in
library Hut 4, in the fall, to initiate new members.
Lunchers were equipped with two pieces of buttered
bread and directed along a table laden with 25 possible
fillings, giving a variation potential of one less than
the twenty-fifth power of two sandwiches.
Left to right: Margaret Klassen, Ann Konrad, and Alf Siemens
paint posters to advertise VCF sponsored part of Columbia Bicentennial Week. Club met often for study and discussion in
their hut.
SCM Features Lively Panels
THE 90 members of Student Christian Movement
this year spent much of their time visiting various
churches, where they described the work done by
World Student Christian Federation.
In between trips they sponsored thought-provoking
discussion panels and study groups on the campus.
Some of the discussions: Professor Edro Signori,
psychology department, and Prof. F. A. Peake, Anglican
College, who talked about "Sin: Illusion or Reality";
tind Dr. Barnett Savery, philosophy department, and
Rev. G. M. Tuttle, Union College, who held a four-
panel discussion on Science and Reason. A study group:
Dr. A. M. Renball, a series of five lectures on love and
marriage.
For the lighter side SCM'ers took time out to hold
a Valentine Dance, mixed with assorted firesides, and
parties. Tall Ken Faris, president, was assisted by hardworking general secretary Rev. R. C. S. Ripley, and
treasurer Roy Officer.
152
SCM gather in their club room at the top of the auditorium for
weekly discussion groups. Back row, left to right: Miriam McEown,
Don Stewart, George Landis, Esther Harrison, Gary Gibson, Joan
Buker, Lorna Bell, Heather Spears, Donna Runnals, and Reverend
Chuck Ripley. Front row, left to right: Doug Faris, President Ken
Faris, Don McKinnon and Roy Officer.
a M
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NEWMAN CLUB members this year went skating in
the winter, spent an "Evening in Paris" and retreated in the spring.
Under the leadership of president Terry Nicholls,
helped by secretary Maureen Roach, treasurer Ralph
Kitos, and chaplain Father Oliver, the club had its
biggest time when they went to Stanley Park Pavilion
to celebrate "An Evening in Paris", their annual
formal. They squeezed in an informal dance before
December exams, and retreated in the spring, girls
week-ending at Convent of the Cenacle, boys at Lad-
ner's Augustinian Monastery.
Newman Clubsters held a communion breakfast at
Convent of Sacred Heart, and a special one at St.
Mary's Ukranian Catholic Church. During lent they
held mass in the clubhouse. For sports, they successfully competed in intramurals. For intellectual activity, they sponsored such speakers as Rev. Audrey
Ouroussoff of Fordham University, New York, who
spoke on Communism and Russia.
Clockwise: Sandra Ramsbotham, Theres Guichon, Neil Smithe, and
Al Bombardieri play a hand of bridge while Dick Riopel, Bill
Lynch, and Terry Nickolls discuss plans for Newmanite dance,
"Evening in Paris."
Talk and Bridge Divert Hillel
Herbie Groberman explains the elements of checkers to (clockwise): Rosalie Moskovitch, Fay Gordon, Mrs. Steiner, Mike Dales,
Monty Simons, Gerry Krangle, Stan Goldman, Max Langer, and
Al  Boxer.
FALL program alone of UBC's B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation covers two yards of paper; over 5000
student-hours were spent in Hillel sponsored meetings
this year. With a membership of 85, the foundation
held 57 meetings, attracted audiences ranging up to
1000.
Under direction of Rabbi David C. Kogen, student
president Danny Goldsmith, vice-president Simsie
Shuber, secretary Fay Gordon and treasurer Gerry
Raisen, Hillel conducted debates, sponsored lectures,
and held seminars, religious services and social events
this year.
General meeting and cocktail party followed by fall
ball and Halloween party opened this year's Hillel
program. Second term social calendar included presentation of the play "Light up the Sky," with Larry
Freeman, directed by John Emerson, and a March
party.
Biggest event on the Hillel calendar this year was
its co-sponsorship of a panel for the Columnia Bi-Cen-
tennial meetings: "Are religion and the public school
system compatible?"
153 French Club
A SPECTACULAR and well-planned member-catching drive on Club Day combined with an ambitious program for the year netted Circle Francais the
largest membership of any national or language club
on campus.
In 1920 the French Club was founded to encourage
conversational French, and to further interest in
French culture. Today a third objective has been
firmly installed: to increase friendship, understanding,
and knowledge between English and French-speaking
Canadians.
Activities of the year included a weekly "causerie" in
the Fort Camp dining room, and monthly soirees at
members' homes. Comical skits added interest to the
soirees, and an illustrated talk on the songs of Charles
Trenet added thought. An end of the term 'existential-
iste' dance was planned in conjunction with the club's
best friend, El Circulo.
President of the club is Peter Collins, aided and
abetted by fellow executive members Arthur Hughes,
Diane Liggins, Anne Avison, and Roland Magny, an
exchange student from France. Hughes was a one-man
band for the club, trying to get three pics in Totem
where space permitted one.
Clockwise: Michael Rothery, Bill Phillips, Michael Sciabine, Pierre
Collins, George Auriol, and Arthur Hughes act out humourous
French skit.
Spanish Club gathers in the Psychology hut to elect new officers
for the next year and to discuss plans for the "Picasso Panic,"
dance held in conjunction with friendly rivals, the French Club.
Left to right: Betty Barrett, Lille d'Eason, Diana Livingston,
Franco Albi, president "Mac" McCamey, Bob Gray, Jan Stanow-
ski, honourary president Sr. Pablo Arriola, and Alice Leiterman.
Spanish Club
KNOWN at El Circulo Latino Americano among its
Spanish-speaking members, the Spanish club continued its pursuit of understanding both Spanish language and Latin-American culture this year. The 40
members of the club this year tried also to develop
general student appreciation for Latin-American culture by sponsoring lectures open to all UBCers.
Rolling on student tongues were rounded Spanish
vowels as students met weekly for conversation classes.
Classes are under the direction of the club's honorary
president Senor Pablo Arriola, a lecturer of the
Spanish department.
As another part of its program the Spanish club
sponsored three speeches this year. Dr. C. V. Brooke
and Senor Pablo Arriola have given student addresses
during the year. Senorita McDonald, a local business
woman, later spoke to students under Spanish club
auspices.
Spanish club members danced and sang at the most
successful social function of the club this year, a party
called "Picasso Panic". Panic was staged in conjunction with the French club and was produced in March.
President of the club for this year was M. McCarney.
Holding the position of vice-president was Franco
Albi; secretary-treasurer, Diane Livingston; public relations officer was Robert Gray.
154 Frank Lewis of the Liberal Party holds the attention of (left to
right) Vaughn Lyon, Ron Basford, Bob Langlands, Marney
Stevenson, and Tony Lloyd.
Civil Liberties Union
FOR only twenty-five cents you can become a fully
qualified member of the Civil Liberties Union.
One of the most unique clubs under the LSE, the
CLU attempted to promote the understanding of civil
liberties among students on the campus and give publicity to issues involving these liberties.
For the second consecutive year, Marney Stevenson
led the group, which numbered thirty-five members.
Main project was to bring out representatives of
different political parties to express their views on the
role of civil liberties in every-day living. Speakers included Stuart Chambers, Progressive-Conservative; Mrs.
Dorothy Steeves, CCF; Nigel Morgan, LPP; Les Peterson, Social Credit, and Frank Lewis, Liberal.
Highlight of the year was the annual banquet to
present the Sedgewick Award to an outstanding individual who has done the most for civic liberties in the
past year. The deserving recipient was Mrs. Rex Eaton,
OBE. The award was presented by Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie.
Outstanding winners of fhe plaque in past years have
been Jack Scott, popular Sun columnist and Reverend
A. E. Cooke, founder of the Sunday Forum.
The Award honours the late Dr. Garnett Sedgewick,
who was one of those responsible for the creation of
the club here.
Social Problems
MAIN  problems of the Social Problems Club, as
always, is to overcome apathy and help clarify
controversial issues. They tried again this year.
Led by president Ray Logie, secretary Sandy Stewart,
and public relations officer Al Smith, the twenty-two
members of SPC held club meetings on Fridays. They
also took time out to present notables who talked on
controversial issues. Some of the speakers and some
of the issues:
Alma Mater Society president Ivan Feltham, who
talked about National Federation of Canadian University Students;
,  AMS treasurer Allan Goldsmith, who talked about
UBC finances;
Commerce Department head E. D. MacPhee, who
also spoke on UBC finances.
Two of the club's biggest issues of the year: Beatrice
Ferneyhough, Labor Progressive Party member who
was discharged from the Red Cross, and recordings of
Un-American Activities Subcommittee hearings. Both
meets were well attended.
Club proved a problem to Totem photogs by making
themselves scarce whenever picture taking time loomed
up.
Hot argument is waged by Social Problems president Raymond T.
Logie and Public Relations officer Allan Smith (center) against
unconvinced outsider, Alexander Cameron Ross (left).
155 f
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A few of the members of the Chinese Varsity Club perch in
the sunlight for the Totem photographer. The Club and the
Totem had great difficulty getting together and it was only
after four tries that they finally made it. Pretty Gloria Yuk
is surrounded by (front row, left to right): Ron Con and Byng
Woo. (Middle row): Sonny Chan-Kent, president, and Don
Jinouchi.   (Back row): Roland Chew, David Lee, and Jack Lee.
Chinese  Varsity
ALL UBC students either Chinese-born or of
Chinese descent are eligible for membership in the
Chinese Varsity club. The aim of the club is to promote better, friendlier relations between members and
other campus organizations and individuals,
With these aims in mind, the 80 club members had
a busy year planning and conducting meetings, dances,
basketball games and sponsoring noon hour lectures.
Spring and fall general meetings were held by the
club. Both were held in library hut number six (HL 6),
the regular group meeting place of the club. Films
were also shown under sponsorship of the club.
"Philippines—Economic and Social Conditions" and
"Waterways of Thailand", were two of the films seen
by club members during the year. Both were shown
in the regular meeting room of the club, in the Physics
building.
Dr. William Black, social psychology lecturer and
president of the British Columbia department of Citizenship and Immigration, spoke to the club on "Role
of the Newcomer", in November. Dr. Ping Ti Ho, of
the history department, spoke later to the club on
"Confucius". Well attended was the address by Chinese
consul S. D. Leung, who spoke on "Free China Today",
in February.  Pak Kun spoke later on "Korea Today".
Alpha   Omega
TWICE a month 20 students gather together to talk
about Ukrainian culture, history, and politics.
Their aim is to promote the study and application of
Ukrainian culture as a contribution to Canadian cultural development. Their name is the Alpha Omega
Society. The members are students of Ukrainian
descent.
Biggest exhibition of the year was a well arranged
exhibit in the little window of the Library. As well as
their regular meetings, club members attempt to sponsor lecturers, films, and concerts on or about Ukrainian
topics.
A close liason with club alumni and with other
Alpha Omega Societies on other universities is kept,
with exchange of ideas one of the chief objectives.
A few years ago Alpha Omega donated some books
on Ukrainian topics to the Library. They have since
made it one of their main projects.
This year the annual banquet was held in February
at the Gai Paree. Other entertainment was gained from
smaller parties held throughout the year.
Left to right: John Hayduk, Ihor Zajac, President Erast Huclak,
Orest Ostynsky, Marlene Figol, and Xenia Goshko gather in
the Publications office to have their photo snapped. The Club's
main contribution to campus culture was a beautiful Library
display of Ukrainian art.
156 Louise Millington and George Landis, in authentic Ukrainian Bright fall day brought out every Slavonic Circle member to urge
costumes, take a turn around the floor as paper lady on the unsuspecting freshmen to join their ranks. A latent club the past
left looks on in wonderment.   Clubbers appeared in gay cos- years, the Circle blossomed forth with dances, concerts, and lectures
times whenever possible. this year.
Slavonic Circle Blossoms Forth
THREE years ago UBC's Slavonic Circle stumbled,
withered, and then died. Each year people tried
to stir the body, but there was no success. This year
Russian lecturer Miss Irene Carlsen finally did the
trick. She managed to breathe life into the dormant
body, and soon had a Circle full of Slavonic tang hopping about the campus.
Dances and noon-hour discussions, under the directorship of President Lillian Rudkiewich and vice-presidents Michael Peers and Lenora Shobrook, started the
Slavonic Circle going. A grand Slavonic Concert with
Russian-style entertainment, rounded out the club's first
year of.new life.
For year-round entertainment they had on the intellectual side, lectures on Yugoslavia and the Doukhobor
Question; on the lighter side, two stag-stagette dances.
Helping handle details were recording secretary
Christine Mathieson, corresponding secretary Ron
Hangen, treasurer Lois Millington, and public relations officers Effie Bouchla, Dennis Wood, and Alan
Smith.
Biggest off-stage show for the students was a Club
Day demonstration. Live-wires of the club donned
Ukranian get-ups and danced on Main Mall lawn.
Partial result: almost thirty new members.
157
Effie Bouchla dressed in Polish costume dances a Greek dance to
Russian music for the Slavonic Circle Club's recruiting drive on the
annual Club Day. Effie's blonde locks attracted many new members. Grim, but unidentified stalwart in background looks approvingly at the girl's efforts. Sex entered the McGoun Cup debates when, left to right: John Whittaker, Ken Perry, Danny Goldsmith, and Joan Coates contested
fact "That the Kinsey Reports are a benefit to society." Despite good arguments the team lost to University of Manitoba.
Parliamentary Forum Debates
Holds Mock Session
ONE day last October Law student John Gait told
a room full of students he thought women's skirts
should be lowered to below the knees. Let's return to
the "tranquil solidity of the Victorian Age," he urged,
because, "all modern moral corruption is a direct result
of the raising of the hemlines."
Fellow Law student John Coates disagreed. Position
of the hemlines "is not to blame," he argued. The
listening students liked his argument, overwhelmingly
rejected Gait's stand. So ended another Parliamentary
Forum session, one of the liveliest weekly noon-hour
meetings on the campus.
Law students, engineers, and pubsters all took turns
arguing with tongues in cheeks during the Thursday
noon student debates. Mock Parliaments for the campus
political clubs were also held under sponsorship of the
Forum Club.
On the serious side, Forum Club provided speakers
for the McGoun debate, which UBC lost, and Vancouver Debating Club. A UBC talk team also entered
a Pacific North-west debating contest.
A new edition this year was Intramural debating, an
effort to stimulate more interest in student debating.
President of Parliamentary Forum was hard-working
Maurice Copithorne, aided by executive members John
Loewen, Marg Wiebe, Peter Henslowe, and Colin McDiarmid.
Charlie Sear presents the Liberal Bill at annual Mock Parliament
session.   Tony Lloyd looks satisfied as Patsy Byrne delivers notes.
Parliamentary Forum executive are, left to right: Colin Mc
Diarmid, Maurice Copithorne, John Loewen, Marg Wiebe, and
Peter Henslowe.
158 UN Club
AMERICAN delegates to the United Nations General Assembly last October threatened to walk out
of the assembly. The Americans violently protested a
resolution to admit Red China to the UN. "We want
no part of it," they cried, staring defiantly at the Russian delegates. But China was admitted, and the Americans didn't really walk out.
After the meeting was over everybody congratulated
everybody. It was another successful Model General
Assembly, presented by UBC's UN Club, and held in
Brock Hall. Hon. Mr. Justice Whittaker was elected
president of the 60-nation assembly which was held in
conjunction with a flag raising on the Main Mall to
honor UN Day.
With well-travelled Jane Banfield as president,
assisted by secretary Vaughn Thorsteinson, and treasurer Ron Con, the UN Club had another busy year.
This lively bunch, Canada's first campus UN organization, held weekly panels, five two-hour seminars,
produced four issues of a magazine, and raised $232
for UNESCO and UNICEF.
UN executive. Left to right: Ron Con, Shirley McLeod, Maldy
Thomas, Jane Banfield, Don Olsen, Mark deWeerdt, and John
Bossons.
Representing Egypt at the Assembly, John Gault and Geoff Dewis
appear in usual Arab garbs. Creme de menthe bottle unfortunately holds grape juice.
Horn-rimmed glasses are the order of the day as John Bossons,
Izzy Wolfe, Dave Sweet, and Ted Lee scribble notes at the UN
assembly. International
House
ONE day last March UBC president Dr. N. A. M.
MacKenzie took a hammer in his hand and firmly
nailed a sign to the wall of a newly-painted army hut
near the Library. By the time he had finished the
crowd of people watching were bursting with pride.
The reason: it was the unofficial opening ceremonies
of a transformed and remodelled hut on East Mall
which became the first International House Centre in
Canada.
At the official opening later, Dr. MacKenzie spoke,
while representatives of Marpole Rotary, who paid for
the renovations, Vancouver Zonta Club, who furnished
the hut, and UBC Board of Governors looked on.
Mouthing their motto "That Brotherhood may Prevail," Canadian and foreign students will use this hut
for informal discussions, social gatherings, and a clubhouse, all under the counsel of Miss Anne Furness,
foreign student advisor. The only limitations of membership: that there be half Canadian, half foreign
students.
IHA is a world organization with headquarters in
New York. UBC IHA'ers are planning for a International House in the near future, which would
accommodate 400 or more IHA members.
President this year was Ann Choma, helped by vice-
president Benny Guilliamse, treasurer John Bruk, and
committee members Piero Ariotte, Mike Scriabin, and
Pat Brock.
Bill Phillips, Benny Guilliamse, and Mike Scriabin whoop it up
at the official IHA opening, while Milena Krajina, John Bruk, Ann
Choma, and Piero Ariotti watch the fun.
Indian students pose in the Brock lounge with their honorary
patron, C. B. Wood. Sitting, left to right: John Dusanj, Niranjan
Gill, Nirmal Dial, Bhagwaut Jawanda, and Daysham Giani.
Standing, left to right: Gurdev Gill, Bhagat Ram, Kesar Bhatti,
Majir S. Johal, and Kami Manhas.
Indian Students
THE most prominent characteristic of our age, said
India's vice-president Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrish-
nan recently, "is the getting together of different parts
of the world. In the future," he continued, "man will
not talk of our age as the age of wars, rumors of wars,
and economic dislocations, but as an age in which
different parts of the world .have come to 'jostle' each
other, and thus the fundamentals of the different attitudes of life have been drawn into closer intimacy."
Doing their part to get the world closer together are
members of UBC's Indian Students Club, which endeavors to give the Asian point of view on world
affairs. President of the hard-working little group is
Behair Verma. One of the founders was Raghbir Basi,
1952-43 Alma Mater Society president.
Only four years old, this club has been devoting
much of its time to helping downtown East Indians
adjust to the community.
Highlight of the year: Indian Independence Day
banquet, attended by 240 people including UBC president, Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie.
160 NFCUS
NFCUS President Vaughn Lyon studies forms for student ratings
of professors while Anne Avison, Colin McDiarmid, Jim Craig,
and John Bossons look on.
WHEN Ivan Feltham and Vaughan Lyon returned
from the fall national convention of NFCUS
(National Federation of Canadian University students)
they were worried. U of Toronto demands for increase
of per-student fee levies from 20 to 50 cents had gone
through although UBC students were unwilling to pay
the extra shot.
We may have to get out of the federation, delegates
warned UBC students. Fuming from the east came new
NFCUS president Antonio Enriquez. He was going to
straighten the whole mess out. But poor timing
•brought Enriquez on his mercy mission at exam time—
students stolidly studied while Enriquez addressed
eleven campus NFCUS coordinators.
NFCUS settled down to usual yearly business.
Record 25 students applied for exchange scholarships,
to get fees paid at other NFCUS universities. Thinking NFCUS was for better things or nothing, Vaughan
Lyon disdainfully flung to the Ubyssey rules of a
national short story contest and an art contest. UBC
coed, spritely Heather Spears took first prize in oils.
With UBC and Toronto demanding old price and
McGill favoring increase, next NFCUS meet will be
lively.
World University Service
TWO university students from Germany, and one
each from France and Yugoslavia enrolled at UBC
last fall. At the same time, three students from UBC
went to school in Germany, one in Japan. The organization responsible: World University Service, UBC
Committee, a small group of students and faculty members with world-wide ambitions.
One dollar out of every Alma Mater Society's $16
student fee goes to WUS. Since 1949, $25,805 have been
raised this way. This money, plus a little more which
has been raised by other means, provided exchange
scholarships, assisted immigrant students to come to
Canada, and sent material aid to students in European
and South-East Asian countries.
Each year UBC's WUS holds the East Indian Art
Display in the Memorial Gymnasium to raise more
shekels for students. A new project is helping to sponsor a T.B. clinic in India.
Big names are prominent in the membership list.
Along with chairman Joan C. MacArthur, and vice-
president G. C. Andrew are students Dick Underhill,
Jane Banfield, Ken Faris, Eb Grebski, Agnes Willfort,
Lois Millington, Vaughn Lyon, Jim Craig, and Roy
McLaren. Faculty members are Dr. Margaret Ormsby,
Dr. T. Scott, Professors C. Belshaw and D. Corbett,
and R. D. Farquharson.
World University Service sponsored East Indian Art Display finds
members of the organization looking over the oriental food at the
display. President Joan McArthur, in blazer, is surrounded by
(left to right) Ken Farquharson, Jane Banfield, Ken Faris, Ross
Anderson, Dick Underhill, Roy MacLaren, and Lois Millington.
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L33I FACULTIES Lack of a building of their own casts Art students adrift on the campus; coffee drinkers gather in the cafeteria, bridge players get
together in the Brock, while enterprising undergrads congregate in the library for a look around, a gossip, a serious discussion,
and occasionally for study.
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, S. N. F. Chant.
ALTHOUGH first priority by University building
planners is now given to Arts building, hopes for
the new plant are dim. Until all Arts classes are under
one roof, any close organization of the Artsmen or
developed integration of the courses will be in jeopardy. Disorganized student activities and lectures
spread from M to G huts now type this faculty, UBC's
largest.
Arts chief, Dean S. N. F. Chant, announced a new
attempt to integrate courses this year. Far Eastern
Studies, dealing with geography, history and anthropology of the East, will begin next fall. It will start
at second or third year level. A new course was added
to the highly integrated Slavonics Studies department
this year: Geography of the Soviet Union was taught
by Professor M. Ruggles.
Retiring this year are: Professor H. T. Logan,
Classics department, Dr. C. W. Topping, Sociology, and
Dr. Andrew H. Hutchinson, dean of Biology and
Botany   department.
164 Attention of class is riveted on violin-playing Harry Adaskin,
Profewor of Music. Students at lecture on Music Appreciation.
DRIPPING ectoplasm, the ghost of Arts Undergraduate Society stalked UBC for fourteen months
until it was returned to limbo by Council decree in
October this year. The spectre's last three weeks on
earth were spent spooking student government committee rooms, as its medium, pert Arts president Jean
A. Taylor, convinced student chiefs this plan for activating Arts students was unfeasible. "Arts is just too
big," said Taylor.
Mulling the end over coffee cups, campus caf-chair
politicos began mooting a reorganization of the intang
ible society through splinter clubs of organizable size.
First ghostlet appeared as erect, talkative Philip
Greenberg, Freshman undergraduate president, talked
and redshirt-baited a new set of initials, FUS, into
headlines. FUS success prompted Allan Goldsmith,
AMS treasurer, to suggest a Sophomore Undergrad
Society.
Undergrad committee members balked at SUS, but
Pre-Education and Pure Science Undergraduate Society
poltergeists, PEUS and PSUS, began to haunt student
offices.
Minus beard, UBC's only home-
owned novelist, Dr. A. Earle Birney,
of the English department, returned
to UBC from France after a year
in Paris on fellowship.
With South Seas suntan, Dr. Harry
B. Hawthorn turns pale again reading in library basement. He spent
the winter doing Anthropology field
work in the Phillipines.
Smiling good-bye to his hundreds
of students is Dr. C. W. Topping
who is retiring this year. Until recently, Topping carried all UBC
Sociology courses. Visitors peer into flower pots and evaporating glasses as white-coated .Don Faris explains the processes going on in the Plant Breeding
Display. Tall shoots of barley illustrate the success of the work going on in the Faculty of Agriculture.
FACULTY of AGRICULTURE
Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, Blythe Eagles.
FEELING at home on a well-kept farm and range
where bulls, cows, pigs, and rabbits roam, is a
small but lively undergraduate faculty known to all as
the Aggie Undergrads. Watching over this brood of
students is AUS president Graham Drew, assisted by
vice-president Richard Ford, secretary Christine Cross,
and treasurer Joe Sadowsky.
A quiet moment seldom was heard all year as AUS
organized a salmon barbeque, fall and spring banquets,
and Farmers' Frolic. Four bearded and corn-cobbed hillbillies slouched on a tractor-drawn float for the Homecoming Parade; student-made departmental displays
deed for the year: Aggie Apple Day, which netted $250
for the Crippled Children's Hospital.
The dear on the range were the Aggiettes. Already
two-time winners of the Women's Undergraduate
Society activities cup for the most active women's group
on the campus, the Aggiettes trotted through another
busy year. Highlight was raising over $100 for Christmas charities.
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High-kicking couple go rural in blue jeans and old
shirts at this year's Farmer's Frolic, celebrated
hard-times style.
Vancouver may have a mild climate, but banana
trees are still rather rare. However, in the Agriculture lab anything can happen.
BRIGHT and early one morning last September, 29
agricultural students, six faculty members, and
three agrologists loaded the Dean's car and two buses
full of bedding, tents, and food, then sallied forth into
a 1200-mile week-long voyage throughout B.C. The
safari visited truck farms, drainage and dyking projects
and farms all over the province.
The safari, led by Dean of Aggies, Blythe A. Eagles,
was the faculty's first annual field trip, called Agriculture 300, a value unit. The thought behind the trip:
"To bring a closer mutual understanding from an
educational viewpoint, between students, professional
workers, and practical agriculturists." It is all part of
Faculty of Agriculture's diversified and expanding
program.
Also included in the program: Horticulture Department, whose products were displayed on T.V. and
talked about in newspapers across the continent; Agricultural Mechanics, which graduated this year a total
of four students; Food Technology, which had its first
graduation in 1949; and assorted other departments
covering subjects from horses to mice.
Biggest thrill of the year: second annual Open
House day, which featured everything from bananas
in a greenhouse to two run-away pet bulls.
Tiny pig squirms and squeals in
fright as it waits for a dental
operation. Dentist-for-the-day is
Ron Bradshaw, Research Assistant, who is working for his
Master's degree. Holding the
piglet is undergraduate student
Ritchie Ford.
167 a-
41
All pharmacists need practice in making up prescriptions, and Faculty of Pharmacy's dispensing labs provide a place for the
gaining of experience. Here Phyllis Cooper mixes up an emulsion — it looks like a chocolate milkshake — who knows, it may be a
chocolate milkshake. Miss B. Logan gives instruction to Jack Wong, and Irma Deering tries her hand at making a saturated solution
of boric acid.
FACULTY OF PHARMACY
SITUATED in UBC's classy Biological Sciences and
Pharmacy building, the school of pharmacy offered
Dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy, A. W. Matthews.
courses leading to a degree of Bachelor of science in
pharmacy to 129 undergraduates this year. Pharmacy
school occupies three floors of one wing in the building. Rooms available include: several laboratories and
lecture rooms, and a model dispensary, outfitted with
equipment for the manufacture of pharmaceutical
preparations, on the same scale as a hospital or small
manufacturing plant.
Entrance requirements for Pharmacy were changed
this year. The one-year period of practical training
before entering the four-year university course may
now be completed during summers or after graduation.
Under football-fan Dean A. W. Matthews, students
were taught by four new lecturers this year, all UBC
graduates. Raymond E. Counsell, class of 1953, taught
this year, leaving at the end for further training in
USA. T. H. Brown, 1950, masters from U of Washington, taught also. Graduate assistant was newcomer
Miss L. C. Davies, class of 1953; sessional lecturer was
Miss B. A. Logan, class of 1951.
168 NEXT May all UBC pharmacy students
who have managed to find train fare will
leave for Indianapolis to tour the Eli Lilly
manufacturing plant. Arrangements for the
trip, from this end, were conducted by the
Pharmacy undergraduate society.
As well as doing this job, society staged
five big social events, three speeches, several
films. Biggest social event was the graduation
banquet and ball. Best speeches were: Erling
Bjornson, Cunningham Drugs, and Cecil Law,
Owl Drugs, on "Chain Store Merchandising,"
and Sid Arnesen and Reg Worsley on medical
detailing.
Students running the society this year were:
president Al Cory, vice-president Howard Fry,
secretary-treasurer Anne Tomljenovich, social
convener Owen Nelmes, undergrad reps
Alfred J. Spencer and Ernie Hukylak, second
year rep May Dong and publicity officer
James Warne.
Winners of the five big Pharmacy scholarships from this year's graduating class were:
Paul P. Antosz, winner of the Charles E. Frost
and Co. scholarship; Glen W. Smith, Cunningham scholarship in pharmacy; Anne Tomljenovich, the Dr. L. L. Horwath scholarship;
Phyllis M. Cooper, Canadian Foundation for
Advancement of Pharmacy scholarship; Alfred
J. Spencer, Pharmacy Alumni Book prize.
Whomping up a new batch of energy pills are Irma
Deering, Phyllis Cooper and Bill Commons. This would
be better if we could see the determination written all
over their faces but unfortunately the photographer fell
off the shelf.
Model dispensary provides a good place for
practice for Pharmacy students. Dora Kelly
works at the glamorous job of labelling bottles
while steady-handed Jim Warne mixes liquids.
169 HT "v.
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Wood so thin that light can be shone through it is made by Dave Armit, fourth year Forestry student. He is using a microtome, an
instrument that cuts sections of wood about 15 microns in thickness for use in microscopic slides. Slides are used for identification purposes
in courses on Wood Anatomy.
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Dean of the Faculty of Forestry, George Allen.
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HAPPILY settled in a temporary building in UBC's
Faculty of Forestry occupying the second storey
of the Forestry and Geology building. Faculty boasts
a library and reading room, a spacious common room,
offices, lecture rooms, laboratories and storerooms.
Popular Professor George S. Allen became new dean
this year. He is an old-time UBCer, well-known for his
work on Douglas Fir silviculture, which he carried out
under B.C. Forest Service and at the University Forest.
New this year is associate professor and ecology-expert
Dr. Philip G. Haddock, formerly on the staffs of New
York State College of Forestry and the University of
Washington.
Another UBC man back on the staff this year is Professor John W. Ker. He has just spent two years at
Yale getting his doctorate degree. Professor Ker's
masters was gained at Yale, after several years with
the B.C. Forest Service both as ranger and mensura-
tionalist with the Economics and Finance division. In
his summers Professor Ker makes growth and yield
studies in Arrow lakes region for Celgar.
170 FAMOUS for its three successful spring blood
drives, typed by the green jackets won by its members, the Forestry Club is composed of undergraduates
in both Forestry Engineering and Bachelor of Science
in Forestry courses. President of the club Glen Muri,
treasurer Allen Campbell, secretary James Trebbet,
with Esmond Preus, Donald Graham, David Wellinger,
Peter Pierce and Auther Scholefield, ran the club this
year.
Above its perennial functions in research, education,
sports and social life, Forestry club this year prepared for publication a "Forestry Handbook for
British Columbia," its most ambitious undertaking.
The 350-page book is a condensation of the four-year
Forestry course, containing graphs, tables, charts and
keys which make it invaluable as a reference manual
for graduates and undergraduates. Thirteen students,
with the aid of faculty advisor Professor J. Harold
Smith and special advisor Kingsley Harris, compiled
the   manual.
Woodchoppers' Ball, speeches, sports, and of course
the spring blood drive were the contributions of
Forestry to general campus life.
Looks of grim determination are seen on the faces of John Moodie and
Jim Trebett—the hair at left side of picture belongs to Monty Mosher—
as they work on this year's Forest Club project, a MacLean Boom Loader.
Summer work for Forestry students gives them experience which is useful
both for their courses and future work. Here Mike Nuttall and Jim
Trebett, plant trees at Haney Experimental Forest.
171 /*»
Director of the School of Commerce, E. D. MacPhee.
Time is the big factor here as Bill Murdoch eyes his stop-watch aid checks how long Brian Cooper takes to drill holes in a piece of
wood. Timing is taking place in a Commerce Production lab. Boys are trying to arrive at a standard time for hole-drilling—that is, an
average time for an average man.
SCHOOL OF COMMERCE
CLOTHES may make the man, but Army huts don't
spoil a faculty. Still in L-shaped huts, but definitely not spoiled, is the School of Commerce, a place
where business has been booming all year.
Indication of the boom is the steadily increasing enrolment. It now boasts of 475 students, and shows signs
of more next year. Tieing in with that are these facts:
among new courses added last year was a Master of
Commerce degree; new addition to the teaching staff
next year will be another accountant.
A reason for the boom: Director E. D. McPhee, who,
since his arrival a few years back, has had some courses
completely revised, some new ones added.
Another reason: new faces in the department, who
are J. W. Wilson, lecturing in retailing, and W. O.
Perkett, talking about wholesaling and retailing.
School is now working for the first time in conjunction with various associations in offering night courses
for Certified General Accountant students (CGA).
Good results of the boom are now showing. UBC's
School of Commerce is now up among the best in
Canada.
172 Money and the making of it are
still on the minds of Commerce
students even when they dance.
Mural decorating wall at Commerce Ball shows rising profits
and capitalists' daydreams.
WITH Bruce Pepper as president, the executive of
the commerce undergraduate society has piloted
the commerce students through a year of social and
undergraduate events. Members of the executive were:
Glen MacLaren, vice president; Kay Salter, secretary;
George Taylor, treasurer; Elizabeth Booth, commerce
women's undergraduate president; Peter Peters and
Geoff Conway, executive members; Bruce Williams,
sports representative.
Commerce activities included a smoker, formal and
informal dances, commerce banquet, and graduation
party. A new activity this year was the commerce
"Balance Sheet," a periodical designed to keep commerce students aware of all CUS activities.
[nnovated too was the series of public speaking
classes sponsored by CUS and the Junior Chamber of
Commerce, held every Wednesday noon for all second
year commerce students.
Campus-at-large felt effects of commerce organizing
ability as CUS presented a football dance, a basketball
dance, and organized the Community chest drive which
netted $607 in 8:30 class blitzes, the first held on
campus. CUS went wild in the spring blood drive,
were just a few pints short of the trophy. Active
association has also been maintained with the undergraduate societies committee through executive member Peter Peters and with other societies through the
intramural competitions.
Working on statistics in the
Statistics lab — prerequisite for
Commerce classes — are Clare
MacSorley, Al Broad and Alan
Jenkins. Statistics can deal with
anything from size of average
woman's figure to the length of
life of a flashlight battery.
173 This is a Home Economic class in the process of cooking something. Barbara Brown seems to think the experiment was a roaring success
but Miss Demchuk, instructor, is not so easily satisfied. She still wants to know who hid the remains of the last experiment in the sink.
Ruth McFarlane and Sheila Smith feign innocence as the water pours out on the floor.
FACULTY OF HOME ECONOMICS
Director of the School of Home Economics, Miss Charlotte S. Black.
WITH double trouble and cauldron bubbling,
Home Economics girls this term cooked up a full
season of festivities, including everything from "punch
parties" to a blank page in The Ubyssey.
First to go into the Home Ec. cauldron was a successful fall blood drive, co-sponsored with the Nurses.
Home Ec.'s then tossed in assorted luncheons, punch
parties, a "prisoner party" for Forestry, an Engineers'
"invasion" of Home Ec, and two appearances on
University Radio Society, all conducted under the
chefmanship of HEUS president Irene McCallum.
Trouble came when HEUS prepared for their Home
Ec. paper, the first Ubyssey faculty edition, and had
most of the copy rejected as "not up to standards of
a university newspaper." Hissing and steaming, the
girls threatened to raid the Pub offices, but simmered
down after soft words from Ubyssey editor-in-chief
Allan Fotheringham, who said it was "unfortunate"
HEUS got a half-blank page for a faculty edition, but
that it was necessary to set a precedent for "higher
standards" in future faculty editions.
174 HOME ECONOMICS FACULTY is well
on its way towards achieving a two-fold
objective: to provide students with practical
knowledge for a professional career, and to
give them an understanding of human nature.
With an ever widening range of courses
keeping pace with an ever increasing demand,
the 11-year-old faculty, under the directorship
of Miss Charlotte S. Black, offers a choice of
majors in teaching, dietetics, and textiles, as
well as opportunities for students to specialize
in retailing, social work, and designing.
The two-fold objective will be much more
obtainable when Home Ec. gets its $40,000
Home Management House to replace the
make-shift one at Fort Camp. A campaign,
started in 1945, is now three-quarters completed, and faculty heads hope to start definite planning of construction this summer.
The HMH will house a group of senior
students and an instructor, who will use it
as a "practice house" to learn homemaking
skills and the importance of good human
relationships.
Jean Parmley will probably be in time to save her nine
stitches, but unless Norma Lampwort can get her machine
into action and Joan Hunter starts to watch her own
work, they will undoubtedly have to put in overtime to
catch up.
Seeing if the soup is soupy enough
are third year Home Economics students Eleanor Soong and Kathy Johnson, who have hooked up a pot of
Soong-made soup to a Viscosimeter in
the Experimental Foods Lab. The
Viscosimeter tests food products for
their viscosity, which means it finds
out how big a slurp would be needed
to drink it.
175 Balance and coordination, two of the main requirements for Physical Education students, are both well illustrated here as gymnasts
form the intricate pattern of a pyramid at this year's Phys. Ed. show.  Students in the faculty put on the show annually.
Faculty of Physical Education
Director of the School of Physical Education, Robert F.
Osborne.
IN late October, when workers of Paddock and Mar-
well began grubbing outside the memorial gymnasium to build the 50 by 165 foot British Empire
Games pool, Robert K. Osborne and his eleven-man
staff breathed with relief. Osborne, UBC physical education chief, had watched apprehensively while Games
directors awarded the $297,000 pool first to UBC, then
to a downtown park, then finally to UBC again.
Roofless pool, which is to seat over 5000 when the
Empire games are held in August, will be roofed later
and become an annex to UBC's million-dollar glass
palace, the memorial gymnasium. With debt on gymnasium gradually being reduced, school of physical
education is equipped with one of the finest plants in
Canada.
Undergraduate activities of the school are conducted
by the physical education undergraduate society. Society heads for the year were: president Gerry Kenyon,
vice-president William Wilson, secretary Gerry Kenyon, committee representatives Doug Cole and Mary
Jean Pearson, public relations officer Lloyd Wilkinson.
176 PHYSICAL education played all
four quarters of their annual
sport this year: social events.
Breaking away early, the physical
education undergraduate society
racked up a fall dance, held in the
upper foyer of the War Memorial
Gymnasium. Here students and staff
enjoyed a floor show and danced
till 1 a.m.
Second quarter of the social game
was the annual homecoming golf
tournament. Faculty man H. Douglas Whittle was given the trophy
at the victor's luncheon. He out-
stroked grads, undergrads and faculty members.
February saw the third quarter,
the annual Phys. Ed. Show produced
by majors with an assist from groups
from many parts of the lower mainland. Production culminated many
months of practice, during which
show coach William Wilson tore his
hair organizing the contributing
acts.
Time out was called as phys. ed.
men laid plans for a men's professional fraternity. Part of an international association Phi Upsilon Kappa, UBC's fraternity would be the
first of its type in Canada.
Game resumed as physical education society members played their
best quarter of the year. Fourth
quarter was the annual April graduate banquet and ball. Planning
next year's game in the dressing
room, society executives have decided to purchase common-room furniture.
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"London Bridge is falling down,
London Bridge is falling down,"
might these Physical Education
students sing as they go through
the ups and downs of a gymnastic
life. Some make straight bridges,
some sag, and some, like the fellow
in the middle, reach for new
heights.
Her grandfather mayn't have shot
a good longbow at Hastings, but
Joy Eveleigh looks as if she could
split an arrow in the center of the
target.
"Look ma, no feet," cries Physical
Education student Stevie Kent as
she goes bottoms up on a gymnastic box horse while fellow student
Janie Wright supports her acrobatic attempt. No one is quite sure
what Stevie is attempting, but they
do it all the time in Phys. Ed.
177 Explaining specimens in Dr. Boyd's Pathological Museum is Faculty of Medicine's Dr. Cody. Listening avidly are second-year Meds
—students Luigi Simmonetta, Diana Sawyer, Terry Rutherford, Roy Schofer, and Eva Stekl. Board holds rows of diseased body specimens, used in study.
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Dean  of  the  Faculty of Medicine,  Myron  M.  Weaver.
RESULTS of UBC's latest experiment, the Medical
Faculty, were recorded successful this year as the
American Medical Association awarded the medical
school an "A" rating after 57 white-coated students became UBC's first class to graduate with Medicinae
Doctores.
With over 200 book-analysing students and 275 catalytic full and part-time lecturers, the four-year-old
Medical faculty now equates with top schools in United
States and Canada.
Mixers of the medical brew, led by one of the leading medical educators in North America, Dean Myron
M. Weaver, are planning to toss into the pot a five-
year course in Logopedics, or speech therapy, with
four years in Arts and Science and the final year in
Medicine.
Main bug in the pot for Medicine is fire hazard. The
reason: majority of its classes and laboratories are in
easily combustible huts, along with thousands of dollars worth of equipment and research papers. But the
experimenters continue undaunted.
178 MEMBERS of the Medical Faculty have more than one method
of working their way through uni
versity. Each year they hold a Medical Ball, and each year they use the
profits for scholarships.
All year Med students concentrated on studies and on getting
to know each other. The annual
smoker, where the first-year class was
informally introduced to senior
members and the faculty, started off
the year. Professors and students
struggled through winter snow to
Flame Supper Club for a Christmas
party.
Sparkplugs of the Med Undergrad
Society were president Gordon
"Dutch" Heydon, vice-president Bob
Hakstian, treasurer Tom Davis, and
secretary Ann Worth.
Although a big time was had by
all Med students, the fourth year
students had the biggest time of
everyone. They were the first class
to graduate from UBC's new Medical School.
In the Museum are Dr. William Boyd, Roy Schofer and Eva Stekl. Dr. Boyd, who was
the mind behind the museum, is one of North America's leading pathologists.
Using an ophthalmoscope to take a peek at a patient is first-year
UBC Medical student Joseph Hinke. Hinke, along with all other
med students here, is enrolled in a med school credited to be
one of the best in North America.
Having an easy time of it is Biackie Forbes, first-year Med student,
who is gently put to sleep while Maynard Christian takes his pulse.
179 Stern-looking judges—Law students Tony Lloyd, Don Mawhinney and John Fraser—watch and listen while Ron Basford and Jarl Whist
settle claims arising out of a bootlegging establishment case. Case was presented in one of Law Faculty's Moot Courts. Every Law student
before graduation has to argue two Moots and judge one.
FACULTY OF LAW
Dean of the Faculty of Law, George F. Curtis.
IMPORTANT to student life is the Law faculty,
contributing more student leaders and the most hot
air at general student meetings. Ivan Feltham, this
year's AMS president, and Richard Underhill, next
year's, are both Law students. Over 250 students are
now registered under 21 lecturers in the Law Faculty,
situated in the modernistic Law building, extreme
northeast corner of the campus.
Students of Law not only read cases and go to lectures, they also participate in moot courts, comparable
to science students' labs. Before professors, lawyers and
judges from the city, first year law undergrads argue
cases during the fall term. In spring, second year
students argue before the professors, while first year
is judged by third year students.
Most important job done by the Law Undergraduate
Society this year has been the publication of "Legal
Notes." An annual publication, "Legal Notes" is a col-
180 lection of legal articles and commentaries. Circulation increased this year to over 700 as the
periodical found its market among students,
downtown barristers and students of other
universities. David Anfield edited the journal
this year.
That was just one event the Law students
participated in around campus this year. Lawyers
started off a talkative year by organizing Frosh
regalia court during Orientation Week, which
was so successful that they duplicated the idea
in the Law Undergraduate Society's Homecoming parade float.
Public speaking classes, McGoun Cup debates,
and Moot Courts kept Law talkers vocalizing
and verbalizing through fall, winter and spring.
The social side included Halloween Dance at
Lions Gate Hall, and Law Ball at Commodore
Cabaret. Leading the Law Undergrads was
president John Fraser, vice-president Joan McArthur, secretary Jane Banfield; treasurer Al
Campney, and aids Vic Bennett and Ken
Faucus.
Spaciousness and lots of light and the leathery smell
of books combine to make the Law library a good
place for study. Frank Pawlowski and Rendina Hossie
work in its pleasant atmosphere.
Toe-pointing chorines practice their dancing for the
Law Ball Chorus line. From left to right: Bill Solloway, Stu Clyne, Ian Fraser, Joan MacArthur, Dick
Underhill, Roy Logie, Denny Dallas. Surrounded by the mass of steel and nickel that is the Van de Graaf are graduate student Gil Phillips and Dr. D. B. James. The
24-foot high machine, located in the Physics building, was built to open the atom nucleus, and is capable of shooting a 4 million
volt, 25 foot long, crackling blue streak of electrons.
GRADUATE
STUDIES
Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, Henry F. Angus.
DISSEMINATION of knowledge is only one role of
this schizophrenic university. Besides teaching, a
university acts as a tool for organizing and furthering
original research. It is seldom realized that Graduate
Studies Faculty, which controls this part of University
life, is the third largest faculty on the UBC campus.
Over 250 men and women in Grad Studies were engaged in research projects of varying importance this
year.
Led by Grad Studies Dean, stocky Dr. Henry F.
Angus, students are working for Masters, Doctorates or
just in research. Students in two of UBC's largest research projects under the Institutes of Fisheries and of
Oceanography are not seeking degrees.
Most organized and original is the work being done
by the two big institutes, Oceanography and Fisheries,
in Regional planning and in the departments of
physics and zoology. Less photogenic than UBC's
glamorous Van de Graaf generator, books, files and
reports are being scanned and synthesized by grad
students in other departments. "UBC has the beginnings of some constructive, organized research in the
institutes," remarks Dean Angus.
182 COURSES in community and regional planning were
offered for the first time this year when Central
Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Ottawa, asked
UBC to undertake a large community planning project.
Students working in this project will be earning masters' degrees in either Arts or Science. Instructor for
the course is Ira M. Robinson, aided by an advisory
board of nine.
Another important project under the direction of
Grad Studies is that of the Oceanography Institute.
Grants for the Defence Research Board and the Joint
Committee on Oceanography established the institute
in 1949. The Joint Committee on Oceanography represents the Royal Canadian Navy, the National Research
Council, the Fisheries Research Board and the Hydro-
graphic Service. Cooperative effort of three departments to train graduate students of Chemistry, Physics
and Zoology in the principles and techniques of ocean-
ographic research are represented in the project. Dr.
W. A. Clemens, Zoology department chief, is in charge.
Paralleling the Oceanography Institute is the Institute of Fisheries now being established on campus.
The objective of this project will be to give, at the
graduate level, broad and advanced instruction in various fields relating to the best use and management of
the fisheries resources of Canada.
Fuzzy-eared young deer looks dubious as he
watches graduate student P. J. Banoly. The
animal is used for a research course in
Zoology.
Research by Grad students Harold H. Waterman and N. G. Crana is carried out in the
Physic's building basement with the aid of
crystal models.
183 Students in the School of Education
take lectures too, but twice a year
they go out into the wide world to
do some teaching of their own. Here
Edward Strother gives some help to
students in a class he is supervising
at Kitsilano High School.
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SUPPLYING the always-present demand for new
teachers, UBC's Teacher Training department
offered lectures to students on campus and an expanded
extension service reaching teachers in service as far
afield as Langley and Victoria. Ex-West Vancouver
high school teacher Robin N. Smith joined the department this year, giving courses in tests, measurements,
mathematics and science methods. New courses were
offered by Murray Hockridge, Effective Living, and
Dr. A. W. deGroot, Linguistics.
Representation at the Western Canada Student
Teachers' Conference in Moose Jaw, February of this
year, was made by Teacher Training Undergraduate
Society. Brian LeRoi Daniels reported on the meeting, giving pertinent information on chronic teacher
shortage, teacher training programs and comparative
teaching conditions in western Canada.
In conjunction with the B.C. Teachers' Federation,
professional teachers' association, the class held a
round table discussion and a workshop early in spring.
The Federation also sent several speakers to TTUS'
regular Friday meetings.
An annual formal, several informal parties and a
Chinese "Food for Thought" rounded out the Student
Teachers' social life.
On successful completion of the Teacher Training
Course, the graduate will be awarded a university
diploma in Education and a Provincial Department of
Education Academic A Certificate which entitles the
holder to teach in the high schools of British Columbia.
There are approximately 110 students enrolled in this
year's Teacher Training course and this number is
only one-third of that required for B. C. schools this
coming September.
Director of the School of Education, J. Ranton Mcintosh.
184 Case work — dealing with the problems of individuals—is one of the
fields in which a social worker
must have experience. Here Michael
Wheeler, who is working for his
Bachelor of Social Work degree, does
some undergraduate-level case work
by giving suggestions on how to deal
with some of an applicant's difficulties.
SCHOOL of SOCIAL WORK
WHILE student enrollment in social schools across
Canada is getting less and less, UBC's school,
headed by director Miss Marjorie J. Smith, is happily
holding its own. University of Toronto's school is the
only other one doing the same.
This year Social Work has 78 students. Of these, 28
are working for their Master of Social Work degrees,
while 50 are working for their Bachelor's degrees.
Although the enrollment is not doing down, it's not
going up either. One of the reasons, says Miss Smith,
is that there is not a sufficient number of bursaries and
scholarships available to prospective social work
students. In an attempt to make amends to this defect,
a committee composed of members of the school and
from the professional ranks is studying the problem.
Two things new have been added to the Social
Work faculty this year. They are Adrian Marriage, who
was appointed to do research work, and a new course
in correctional treatment methods.
Social Work is unique amongst UBC faculties in that
its students spend at least half of their time doing field
work. In first year SW, students spend three days a
week in lectures and two days doing field work. In
second year, they have two days of lecturing, three days
of field work. Their field work visits include trips to
Family-Welfare Bureau, Vancouver City Social Service
Department, Children's Aid Society, and the mental
hospital.
Director of the School of Social Work, Miss Marjorie J.
Smith.
185 Healthy Carmel Buck, first Nursing, acts the part of a hospital patient while Tannie Leonard and Berte Moi, also both of first
Nursing, run through a part of their practical work. The startling object on the bed is used for arm-bathing—a treatment used for
cases of arm infection such as poison ivy. Students are in a three-hour Nursing lab in 27-bed hospital in Wesbrook building.
SCHOOL  OF   NURSING
Director of the School of Nursing, Miss H. Evelyn Mallory.
UNDERGRADUATE nurses studying for the degree
of Bachelor of Science spent their last year under
the old course of studies. In the past and during this
year, students underwent a five-year program in addition to one year of required and elected courses which
could be taken at university or as senior matriculation
in high school. Receiving the degree upon graduation
from university, students are qualified for staff positions
with either public health agencies or in hospitals. The
new plan, starting next September, calls for only four
years of study after senior matriculation. This one-year-
shorter course will qualify graduates for position in
both public health agencies and hospitals.
For students running short of money, and for those
who want more experience in the field, the School
gives a substantial advantage. After the first part of
her course is finished—one year on campus, 28 months
working in a hospital—the undergraduate may take
nursing employment for a while before returning to
take her final year.
186 WITH students both on campus and in clinical
training at Vancouver General Hospital, the
Nursing Undergraduate Society serves a definite purpose. It must not only guide the activities of students
on campus, but also keep university nurses at the hospital in touch with university life. This definite need
for the society and its close association with the lively
Engineering Undergraduate Society, has made it strong,
taking an active role in the organization of university
functions.
Nursing and Home Economics schools sponsored the
dramatically successful fall blood drive. First drive
organized solely by female schools, the fall drive forced
an early closing of the clinic as Red Cross ran out of
bottles.
President Shirley Engelland and her 10-woman executive, with the aid of vice-president Margaret Stewart,
secretary Elaine Suell, treasurer Pamela Dobbin, and
interfaculty representative Shirley Matthew, June
Walker, Janet Howell, Marie Gillard and Barbara Ann
Brown worked hard in publicity and faculty affairs.
More laurels for Nursing were won as Diane Bray, of
first year, was elected to represent the Engineers in
Homecoming Queen contest. Help to Engineer friends
was given by the Nurses as they spread publicity for
the March of Dimes charity drive and fought out a
football game against Home Economics on the day of
the drive.
Aim of any nurse is to help a patient
get well, and one of the things that
makes an invalid feel better is a cheerful attitude and a big smile. Here Nurse
Diane Hudson demonstrates how, and
student Edward Van der Vliet looks as
though he's practically well already.
Seeing what kind of bolts, screws, and
flywheels a student is made of is X-ray
technician Ann McCormick, who is displaying method used by Nursing students when they perform X-rays. All
the patient does is lie on his back for
a few minutes, and it doesn't even hurt.
187 Surrounded by the mechanical monsters of the Applied Science Building are third-year Mechanical Engineering students Dan McGuire,
Bob Smith, Charlie Morrison, Bruce Madely, Bob Johnson, Jerry Rosenberg and Johnny Letson. Looks of studied concentration are
being centred on the making of wood-turning lathes.
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, H.
EITHER because of long labs or lack or girls, there's
a different attitude in the Engineering building.
Engineers form the campus' loyal opposition to every
move, throwing brickbats when councillors praise, heaping laurels where councillors find fault.
With a new dean, Dr. Henry C. Gunning, and
driven by threats of "flunking" by professors like Alexander Hrennikoff, irreplaceable civil engineering professor, Engineers studied hard and raised hell. Publicized heavily were: the traditional Engineer smoker
with its annual kidnappings, the continuous Publications board assaults and the always-successful March
of Dimes charity drive.
Less well-known is the general tomfoolery in the
building. Dare any new boy challenge the majesty of
EUS president David Dufton, secretary Douglas Harvey-Smith, treasurer Robert Johnson, Edward Jakeman,
Herbert Stephens, William Tracey or Monte McKay,
the Third Civils are always prepared to push him in
the showers, steal his shoes or tie him in the elevator.
Cleverest move in years was made as Faculty chiefs
strengthened the building's windows—less than 100
were broken this year.
188 Metallurgy student Clement Simard
studies a specimen through a combination microscope and camera.
Simard is working particularly in
the field of color-photography of
metals. Metallurgy is one of the
smallest departments of the Faculty
of Applied Science, with 13 undergrads and eight graduate students
this year. Work is done in the department on treatment of uranium.
"We are the Engineers!" is the answer to Der Fuehrer Dave Dufton's question "Who are we?" at a meeting
of the Engineering Undergraduate Society. Vigorous support of the EUS has helped make Applied Science
the best co-ordinated faculty on the campus. Disorganized artsmen were hauled off to give their blood and
many stray dimes were squeezed from Commercemen to support the Blood Drive and March of Dimes. Fifth year Architecture students William Rennie, John Broger, Arthur Capling, David Jenkins and Derek Weis-
miller hold a consultation over a drawing board in a Structural design lab. Drawing is an architectural plan.
SCHOOL OF
ARCHITECTURE
Director of the School of Architecture, Frederic Lasserre.
AN American industrial designer visiting here last
year was asked to comment on good courses for
design. Philosophy is most important, he said, and
UBC's school of architecture agreed with him. This
year, Frederic Lassere, school director, announced inclusion of Philosophy 412, philosophic problems, in
the Architecture course of studies.
New course will give logistic training to students
with no philosophic background to enable them to
solve problems in value, knowledge and social philosophy arising from design. "A good building requires
a certain intellectual approach—students often have
difficulty coming to a decision of what is right or
wrong," comments Lassere.
This is the first change in a redirection program
under way at UBC's school of architecture. Hopes of
head Lassere: without sacrificing technical training, to
encourage students to question first concepts; to give
students less courses per term by concentrating subjects, changing courses at Christmas.
Registration in Architecture this year was the highest
yet as 27 new students started. Although only 83 are
registered in all five years, class distribution shows
school is growing. W. R. Ussner, a registered architect,
joined the staff this year, replacing H. K. Gallagher.
Ussner takes draughting, third year design and runs
the photography lab.
190 UNDERGRADS
fli"*w ARTS...
ABBOTT, RICHARD M.
ABBOTT, DONALD N.
ADAIR, PHYLLIS MARY
ADSIT, DOUGLAS F.
AISH, ARLENE E.
ALDEN, ALISEN
ALLISON, ROY W.
ALSGARD, STEWART B.
AMIGHETTI, A. LEOPOLDO
ANDERSON, GRAHAM L.
ANDERSON, GERALD H.
ANDERSON, ROUND F.
ANDRESSON, EDDA
ANTHONY, THOMAS M.
ARCHIBALD, D. BENJAMIN
ARMOUR, ROBERT
ARMITAGE, RICHARD E.
ARMITAGE, RONALD H. 0.
ARMSTRONG, SUSAN J.
ARMSTRONG, JAMES F.
ARNOLD, GLENDA R.
AROLA, DORIS ANNE
ARTHURS, JAMES BARRY
ASTBURY, FRED RALPH
ATKINSON, WILLIAM J. H.
AUSTIN, J. ROBERT
AYLING, ANITA D.
BABB, ALAN FREDERICK
BABCOCK, THOMAS JAMES
BAIKIE, NORMA ELAINE
BAILEY, GEORGE R.
BAKER, GERALD H.
BALDEN, MICHEL W.
BALLARD, JOAN I.
BANNERMAN, L ARNOLD
BARBERIE, D. JOAN
BARCHARD, WILLIAM G.
BARCLAY, W. BRUCE N.
BARR, MATTHEW RONALD
BARRETT, PATRICIA F.
BARTOSH, REGINALD W.
BARTON, B. LYNN
BASKETT, MORRIS
BAUMGART, ALICE J.
BAWN, W. TERRY
BEADLE, LAWRENCE C. W.
BECKER, LORNA N.
BEDFORD, CATHERINE E.
BELL, DONALD F.
BELL, GERALD M.
BELL, J. PHILIP
BELL, LORNA L.
BENNETT, FRANK H.
BENNETT, THOMAS H.
BENT, NATHANIEL A.
BENWELL, GEORGE L
BERG, BRIAN ALEXANDER
BERSTEIN, LAWRENCE A.
BERWICK, A. EDWARD
BIGSBY, ROBERT A.
BINKLEY, H. JEANETTE
BIRD, ROBERT R.
BISHOP, JOHN R. W.
BLACKABY, HENRY T.
BLACKABY, JOSEPH A.
BLAIR, B. GILLIAN
BLAIR, M. GERALDINE
BODWELL, LOUISE J. D.
BOOMER, WILLIAM C.
BORAM, DAVID L.
BOTEL, WILLIAM G.
BOWDEN, NEIL M.
RDXFR   AIVIN BOYD, JUDY
BRADSHAW, ALLAN R.
BRANCA, NAOMI C.
BREMNER, DAVID G.
BRIDGE, ROGERT S.
BRISKER, MURRAY S.
BROOKMAN, RONALD ROY
BROOKE, ROBERT C.
BROOKS, SHIRLEY D.
BROOKS, NOEL PETER H.
BROOKS, CAROL ANNE
BROWN, DOUGLAS W. R.
BROWN, ELIZABETH J.
BROWN, F. ANN
BROWN, GARY W.
BROWN, HELEN ZO
BROWN, JACOLYN MARIE
BROWN, PATRICK S. E.
BROWN, PHILLIP N.
BROWN, ROSS
BROWNLOW, DIANE H.
BRUNKER, C. THOMAS
BUDD, WILLIAM L.
8UKER, BEVERLEY JOAN
BURNYEAT J. PETER
8URNS, PETER L.
BUTLER, RICHARD K.
BUTTERFIELD, RITA Y.
BYERS, DONALD H.
CAHILL, EDWIN B.
CAIN E. ETHEL
CALDER, MYRNA JOAN
CALDWELL, IAN CARL
CALHOUN, MARILYN F.
CAMERON, LORNA ISOBEL
CAMERON, MARIE E.
CAMPBELL, JOCELYN E.
CANTALINI, GEORGINA
CARLEY, A. LOIS
CARTER, JOHN JOSEPH
CASE, VERNON W.
CASWELL, WILLIAM B.
CASWELL, BRUCE
CATHERWOOD, GORDON A.
CAVAYE, RICHARD BRUCE
CHANCELLOR, VICTOR D.
CHAPMAN, JACQUELINE S.
CHAPPEL, MARK S.
CHARPENTIER, CHAVES E.
CHARLESWORTH, JOHN E.
CHICALO, JACK E.
CHIN, RAYMOND K. F.
CHISHOLM, ROBERT D.
CHISHOLM, RONALD G.
CHONG, RONALD
CHRISOS, DEMETRA C.
CHURCH, FREDERICK
CHUTSKOFF, J. JERRY
CIEBIEN, EDWARD T.
CLANCEY, WM. STEPHEN
CLARIDGE, DEREK
CLARK, JOHN A.
CLARK, WILLIAM CRAIG
CLARKE, DONNA LOU
CLARKE, GEORGE WM.
CLAYTON, JOHN EDRIC
CLAY, NORMA E.
CLEMSON, JAN
CLERIHUE, A. DONALD
COLEMAN, SIDNEY
COLLETT, CATHERINE M.
COLLINSON, W. EDWARD
CONDON, PHILIP A.
COOK, DONALD CHARLES
COOKE, DOROTHY E.
COOPER, GRAEME M. G.
COOPER, ROBERT G. COOPLAND, GARY N.
COPEMAN, E. ANN M.
COSTANZO, RONALD A. J.
COULTER, KATHRYN M.
COX, JOHN C. A.
CRAIG, MAUREEN A.
CRAIG, WILLIAM M.
CRAWFORD, MOIRA A.
CREHAN, C. J. PENELOPE
CROIZIER, RALPH C.
CROSBY, BEVERLEY A.
CROUSE, PHILIP JOHN
CROWE, KEITH JEFFRAY
CROWSON, DONALD B.
CURTIS, MARY FRANCES
DA COSTA, ARMAN G.   '
DAGG, ROBERT M.
DALE, MICHAEL DONOVAN
DALE, B. M.
DANIEL, MICHAEL JOHN
DANIEL, EILEEN M.
DARLING, JOHN M.
DAVENPORT, LEONA N.
DAVIDSON, DAVE A.
DAVIDSON, FERN MAE
DAVIES, ROBERT
DAVIES, ROBERT K.
DAVIS, BARBARA M. M.
DAVIS, CLAYTUS J.
DAVIS, D. D.
DEATON, RONALD JOHN
DE DIEGO, RENI
DE LA GIRODAY, D.
DELESALLE, PHILIPPE
DELUCA, ENRICO FRANK
DEYONG, PAUL LOUIS B.
DEY, WILLIAM G.
DIAKONESKI, JOHN
DICKSON, HARRY H.
DIERKS, RALPH T.
DINWOODIE, MARGARET H.
DINICOLA, JOANNE
DIPALMA, RICHARD
DITTRICH, GERALD A.
DIXON, JOHN C.
DOBBS, MARJORIE G. A.
DODD, W. ALAN H.
DOLPHIN, ROBERT L
DONALDSON L. JOAN
DONNELLY, MARION A.
DOUGLAS, GEORGE R.
DOYLE, RONALD GLEN
DRAYTON, RICHARD WM. L
DRUMMOND, PATRICIA A.
DRUGGE, CARL FOLKE
DRYVYNSYDE, B. O.
DUERKSEN, JOHN H.
DULMAGE, G.
DUNBAR, HARRY BOYD
DUNLOP, ROBERT KEITH
DYCK, LEONORA MARY
DYCK, GERDA B.
EAGLE, BRUCE G.
EASTON, JOHN CHARLES
EBBETT, AUDREY LOIS
EDMOND, JOHN B. H.
EDWARDS, EDWARD M.
EISENHUT H. KATIE
ELLIS, H. THEODORE
ELSENER, L. FRANK
EMMONS, HELEN J.
EMMONS, PATRICIA R.
ENGER, GERALD ROY
EVANS, DAVID A.
EVANS, MARTHA L
EVANS, NOEL DAVID H.
EYTON, T. RHYS FABRO, NIDA A.
FAIRBROTHER, DONALD
FALKINS, MICHAEL J.
FALKOSKI, JOSEPH
FARMER, HAROLD V.
FAWSITT, T. E.
FERGUSON, J. ALLEN
FERGUSON, ANTHONY G. S.
FERRARIO, MARY
FERRY, DAVID
FIELD, WILLIAM J.
FINKELSTEIN, SHIRLEY
FINDLATER, BRYAN L
FINNIGAN, ANDREW P.
FIRTH, KEITH W.
FLEMING, W. A. E.
FLETCHER, RICHARD M.
FLEURY, HARVEY A.
FOOTE, W. CLINTON
FORD, JENEFER D.
FORD, J. DONALD M.
FORMAN, JOAN ELMA
FORREST, ALAN S.
FORREST, DOUGLAS R.
FOSSETT, RENEE E.
FOSTER, CATHERINE
FORSTER, RALPH W.
FOUND, MAUREEN E. L.
FOWLER, BARBARA JOAN
FOWLER, ALVIN G. J.
FOWLER, AMYE S.
FRANCIS, JEAN MARIE
FRASER, RODERICK P.
FRASER, KENNETH C.
FRASER, ARTHUR ROY
FRASER, GEORGE G.
FRASER, LEO STEWART
FRAZER, EDWARD J.
FRISBY, DAVID EDWARD
FROMSON, E. ELAINE
FULTON, R. LORRAINE
FURBY, RICHARD E.
GALE, JOANNE M.
GAMBLE, LEONARD J.
GANDOSSI, BRUNO F.
GARBUTT, MELVIN ROSS
GARDINER, WILLIAM G.
GARNETT, DON GILBERT
GARRETT, TODD W.
GARRISON, GARRY JACK
GATES, LYNDA J.
GAUDRY, ARTHUR L.
GEDDES, JAMES H.
GEEN, VIVIAN B.
GEIGER, SHIRLEY E.
GENELLE, JOHN C.
GERBER, RUBY
GIBBARD, GLEN A.
GIBSON, M. H. NORAH
GIEGERICH, DARYL J.
GIEGERICH, ROBERT M.
GILES, JACK M.
GILLESPIE, DONALD K.
GILLEY, WILMA GRACE
GILLINGHAM, JOHN C.
GIRVEN, ALAN RAY
GIRARD, ERNEST J.
GIRLING, MICHAEL M.
GILASON, GUPJON
GLOVER, JUDITH K.
GODDARD, WILLIAM P.
GODFREY, PETER T.
GOLDSWORTHY, RAYMOND
GOLF, A. G. J. TED
GOODWIN, PATRICIA
GORDON, GERALD LESLIE
GORDON, WILLIAM
1SS *. K^m   i
GORDON, ANNE
GORDON, JOHN
GORDON, EVELYN NE M.
GOV AN, PHILIP R.
GRAHAM B. E.
GRAHAM, ROBERT C. S.
GRANTHAM, SALLY ANNE
GRAY, ROBERT EARL
GREBSKI, IRENE HELEN
GREENBERG, PHILIP
GREENWOOD, BLAIR G.
GREENWOOD, DON S.
GREENOUGH, RONALD LEE
GREGORAK, JOHN
GREGG, MARILLYN R.
GRIFFITH, ROY GEORGE
GRIMSTON, M. EVELYN
GRIMMETT, SARAH ANNE
GRIMSON, JULIET L M.
GRUBB, GERALDINE J.
GUNNING, RUTH E.
HADFIELD, ROSEMARY E.
HAERING, PETER C.
HAIG, BROWN VALERIE
HAIGH, RONALD WELLYN
HALES, RICHARD A.
HALL, JOHN
HALL, JOHN
HALL, JOHN
HALL, SUSAN DIANE
HALLMAN, MADELON EVA
HAMAGUCHI, ROY I.
HAMILTON, FRED ROSS
HAMORI, CHARLES
HANSEN, W. H. BRUCE
HARDER, DAVID H.
HARDY, DIGBY KENNETH
HARE, TERRY M.
HARJULA TERENCE V.
HART, BARBARA E.
HASTIE, ELIZABETH M.
HASTINS, ROWLAND V.
HATTRICK, ANDREW J.
HAWTHORN, ALAN ST. G.
HAYTER, ROBT. C. K.
HEBRON, MARGARET D.
HEBENTON G. SHOLTO
HECKER STAN JAMES
HELLER, H. DAVE
HELLIER, LORRAINE M.
HELLIWELL, DAVID L
HENDERSON, A. NEAL
HENRY, JUNE M.
HERD, LOIS 0.
HERON, R. CLAYTON
HESKIN, BERNARD A.
HEWSON, PATRICIA M.
HICKS, EDWARD T. A.
HIGGS, BARBARA J.
HIGGINS, ELMER R.
HILDEBRAND D. GERALD
HILL, GARY RAYMOND
HIPP, PETER
HODGE, MARIAN A.
HOECHSMANN, KLAUS F.
HOEN, ERNST LEON W. B.
HOFF, NORMAN E.
HOGG, JEAN MARGARET
HOLMAN, AUDREY J.
HOOD, JAMES McDONALD
HOOD, THOMAS ANDREW
HORTON, SHEILA
HOUGH, JEAN MARIAN
BROWN, RALPH
HOWIE, DOUGLAS S.
HUCKVALE, JANE E. V.
HUGHES, R. WILLIAM A. HUISH, RONALD A.
HUME, NANCY
HUMPHREY, LAWRENCE G.
HUNTER, WILLIAM T.
HURT, BRUCE E.
HUSBAND, BRYAN ERIC
HUTCHERSON, WILLIAM R.
HUTCHINSON, JACK C.
HYNDMAN, BARBARA I.
IRELAND, L. CHARLES
IRVINE, WILLIAM G.
IRVINE, P. JOAN
IRWIN, ROBERT L
IRWIN, CAROLYN ALICE
ISBISTER, GORDON A.
JACK, WILLIAM KAY
JACOBSON, EVELYN R.
JAEGER, J. DONALD
JAMBOR, JOHN L
JAMES, C.
JEFFERY, MICHAEL C.
JENSEN, NANCY CLARA
JENSEN, 0.
JESSON, DENIS M.
JOHNSEN, JOAN H.
JOHNSEN, EDWARD C.
JOHNS, HENRY D.
JOHNSON, BARBARA M.
JOHNSON, ELINOR ANNE
JOHNSON, L NAOMI RAE
JOHNSON, MICHAEL D.
JOHNSTON, JIM
JOHNSTON, JOHN IVAN
JOHNSTON, NORMA B.
JOHNSON, ROBERT
JOHNSTON, ROBERT L
JOHNSTON, RONALD M.
JONES, ALAN McLEAN
JONES, HELEN F.
JONES, JOHN RUSSELL
JONES, LORNA B.
JONES, MARY ISABEL
JONES, REDNER NORMAN
JONES, RONALD A.
JONSSON, CARL ROUND
KAGNOFF, BEVERLEY
KAROLY, KADOS DEZSO
KAIU, KENNETH M.
KALYK, JENNY L
KAN, ELIZABETH A.
KAYE, DAVID E.
KENDALL, THOMAS G.
KENNEDY, CAROL ANN
KENT-BARBER, R. K.
KERR, E. MARILYN
KERR, ARNOLD S.
KILBURN, DOUGLAS G.
KILBRIDE, M. PATRICIA
KILLOUGH, HARRY F.
KILLAM, DAVID L
KINCADE, C. ANNE
KING, DAVID C.
KINGZETT, C. MICHAEL H.
KINOSHITA, GENE
KIRKUND, JOAN M.
KIRKUND, PHILIP J.
KITCHEN, RICHARD A.
KUSSEN, HARVEY OWEN
KLOCKOW, IAN ROBERT
KNIGHT, DOUGUS A.
KNIGHT, GEORGE F.
KO YEE, YEUNG DAVID
KOLLE, K. JOAN
KORE, RUNJEET
KORSCH, PAUL S.
KOVAMEES, JUTA
KULU, KENNETH, J. V. KUSS, WILLIAM
UIRD, ALUN D.
UISHLEY, DONALD W.
UKE, RICHARD GARY
UMB, KENNETH B.
UNDIS, GEORGE B.
UNE, EDWIN DAVIE
UNE, GEORGE A.
UNGHOUT, DONNA J.
UNGFORD, MICHAEL
UNGUNDS, ROBERT P.
UNTZ, MYRU A.
URDEN, TREVOR N.
LARSEN, RITA ANNIE
URSEN, MARIANNE I.
UURENCE, DAVID L.
UWLESS, DARRELL M.
UWRENCE, EDWARD A. P.
LEASK, MARALYN
LECKIE, ROGER K.
LEDINGHAM, J. BRIAN
LEDGERWOOD, ERNEST R.
LEE, GEORGE
LEE, ROBERT E. D.
LEE, SHANG KEY L G.
LEEK, WALTER E. CHAS.
LEGG, JOHN F.
LEITERMAN, RICHARD M.
LEITCH, ROBERT REEVES
LENKO, PHYLLIS JANE
LEOWSKI, ARTHUR DALE
LEPPARD, BRIAN E. H.
LEUNG, JOCK
LEWALL, DAVID B.
LEW, GEORGE
LEWIS, N. CLIVE
LIDDELL, LOUISE M.
LIEBELT, WILLIAM
LIND, L AUN
LINDSAY, T. BARRIE
LINDSAY, ROBERT M.
LINTON, SHIRLEY R.
LITKE, GERALD A.
LITTLE, DAVID BELL
LIVSEY, BARBARA JOAN
LLOYD, STANLEY F.
LOCKIE, DOUGUS A.
LOCKEY, BRUCE J.
LOCKHART, T. GLEN
LONDON, TAMPION A.
LONGSTAFF, KENNETH A.
LORTIE, GEORGE ROBERT
LOUTTIT, ROBERT G.
LOVESETH, GEORGE E.
LUFTKEHOELTER, D. A. E.
LUMSDEN, C. ANNE
LUTZ, GEORGE W. A.
LYALL, NORMA FRIEDA
LYNCH, GARY M.
LYONS, MARTIN W. I.
MADDEX, E. LOVERNE
MADELY, PATRICIA ANN
MAIR, ROBERT JAMES
MAKORTOFF, ALEXANDER
MALCOM, NITA LOUISE
MALCOLM, KENNETH ROY
MALLINSON, DIANA LEE
MANSON, DOROTHY
MAPSON, JANE
MARKLE, SHAREN
MARKSTRON, JUDY K.
MARRA, RONALD D.
MARSHALL, SONYA S.
MARSTON, SYLVIA
MARTIN, MARY M.
MASON, DAVID BRUCE
MASON, JOAN EASTOE mason, william r.
matheson, george i.
mathus, arnold p.
mathieson g. irvine
mauriaucort, simone
may, john walter
mayuk, donald e.
McAfee, daniel e.
McAllister, sheiu a.
McALPINE, HELEN F. L
McAllister, ian r.
McAllister, ira m. w. s.
McCANDLESS, HENRY E.
McCartney, maureen d.
McCAW, MALCOLM H.
McCLURE, RICHARD N.
McCOMB, DECIA K.
McCOWAN, ROY JAMES L.
McCOURT, WILLIAM
McDERMOTT, DANIEL W.
McDONALD, DOUGUS J.
MACDONALD, JOHN F.
McDONALD, JAMES W.
MACFARUNE, CHRISTINA
MACFARUNE, LORNA, M.
McGORAN, MARY T.
McGOWAN B. DAVE
McGRAW, ROBERT W.
MACINTOSH, SYLVIA E.
McKAY, MARY WINIFRED
McKAY, KATHRYN ANN
MACKAY, MARILYN KAREN
MACKAY, NORMA M.
MACKAY, MALCOLM C.
McKENZIE, JOYCE M.
McKENZIE, UWRENCE G.
McKENZIE, JOHN WALTER
McUREN, JEAN E.
MACUREN, PETER G. B.
MACLEAN, DUART S.
McLEAN, IAN ARCHIBALD
MACLEAN, MARY E.
McLEAN, H. J. BAIRD
McLEUN, HELENA DIANE
McLEOD, ARCHIE IAN R.
McLEOD, AUN RALPH
McMILUN, D. BRUCE
McNABB, ROBERT R.
mcnaught, mary ellen
macnaughton, robert g.
McNeill, maureen n.
mcnish, catherine ann
McPHERSON, JEAN M.
McRAE, BRUCE A. HENRY
MACTAGGART, FRANK A.
MEEKISON, DOUGAL M.
MEILICKE, JULIA P.
MELENDY, W. ANTHONY
MELVILLE, WILLIAM L
MEREDITH, GORDON THOS.
MERRICK, NEIL V.
MERRITT, ROY STANLEY
MERSTON, CHAS. JAMES F.
METZKER, RICHARD
MIDDLEMASS, ROBERT A.
MILUR, LOIS ANN
MILLER, DAVID C.
MILLER, DONALD R.
MILLER, SHARON ANNE
MILLER, STANLEY W. I.
MILLHAM, BEVERLY J. M.
MILLS, WILLIAM E.
MILLS, ROBERT L
MINAMIMAYE, JOJI
MINICHIELLO, PETER
MITCHELL, GORDON W.
MITCHELL, HOWARD G.
r   dZmifrm. MOIR, SHEIU J.
MOLSON, ROBERT OWEN
MOLBERG, JAMES R.
MOLTZAU, MARGARET M.
MONTALBETTI, IRENE R.
MOORE, ROY ARTHUR
MORRIS, GLENDA WYNNE
MORRIS, C. WILLIAM
MORROW, VERITY M.
MOSCOVITZ, ROSALEE
MOUL, DOUGUS W.
MOUNCE, TRUDEAN
MUIR, MARIAN MAY
MUIR, J. DOUGUS
MUKAI, ASTER A.
MUNCK, JORGEN STAHPE
MURPHY, TOM ALFRED
MURRAY, DONALD
MURRAY, FLORA M.
MURRAY, SHEIU J.
MYROS, BARBARA I.
NAKAMURA, MINORO
NAKATANI RUTH M.
NATSUHARA, LUCY T.
NEATE, BRUCE A.
NEAVE, GORDON EDWARD
NEGRIEFF, MARY
NELSON, ARNOLD M.
NELSON, JUNE E.
NEILSON, JOHN T.
NELSON, WILLIAM F.
NEW, CHRISTOPHER B.
NEWCOMBE, WENDY E.
NEWELL, MARGARET E. L
NICHOLS, LM.C
NIELSON, SHIRLEY M.
NIGHTINGALE, GEORGE R,
NIRO, FRANCIS A.
NISHIGUCHI, KAY
NOBLE, BRUCE JAMES
NOBLE, JAMES R.
NORDSTROM, THOMAS A.
NORSTRAND, RONALD B.
NORDQUIST, J. R.
NOVIK, INGER J.
NUTTER, EUGENE
OAKLEY, PHILIP
ODONNELL, JOHN W.
OKA, T. PAT
OLIVER, JAMES E.
OLSON, ARNOLD H.
OLSON, YVONNE LOUISE
ORTENGREN A. BERNICE
O'SHAY, M. MAUREEN
OTTO WOLFGANG G. W.
OWENS, ROY J.
PALMER, GARY E.
PARENT, MILTON J.
PARKER, AUN G.
PARKER, MARGOT ANN
PARKER, MARGARET R. M.
PARMLEY, LESLIE JAMES
PASNAK, JOSEPHINE M.
PATKO, PHI UP
PATEWAUDE, M. C.
PATTERSON, BRUCE F.
PAUL, ALUN
PAULSON, GORDON R.
PAVELICH, ANNIE
PAYER, RAYMOND
PAYNTER, DAULTON L
PEEL, A. L
PEEL, BRUCE C.
PEERLESS S. JOHN
PELOSO LIDO ALFRED P.
PELLICANO, MARIE P.
PENEFF, PENIO S. PENNINGTON, DONALD E.
PERDIA, NICK
PETERS, JOHN ROSS
PETERS, MERRIL E.
PHILLIPS, JOHN
PHILLIPS, RAYMOND E.
PICKERING, BETTY ANN
PIKE, MAY PATRICIA
PIZARSKI, TED A.
POIDEVIN. HILTON F. G.
PORTER, JAMES F.
POUNTNEY, LLOY JOAN
PRENTICE, MARIETTA
PRICE, EDMOND
PRICE, ROSEMARY ANN
PRINCE, LOIS K. M.
PRYTUUK, MYROSUW
PURDY, JOHN W.
PURICH, BETTY HELEN
PURVES, ROGER A.
PUSKAS, ALBERT
PYPER, GERALD A. P.
RACKHAM, ROBERT G.
RACICH, JOHN
RAND, MARSHALL C.
RANKIN, JOHN A.
RASMUSSEN, WALTER R.
RAY, C. JULIAN
RAY, WENDA R.
REA, ANNABELLE M.
READER, DOROTHY C.
REDIVO, LIVIO S.
REID, ROBERT JAMES
REINER, RICHARD R.
RENAUD, A. ISABELLE
REYNOLDS, JOHN J.
RIBACK, FAITH
RICE, HAROLD W.
RICHMOND, ANTHONY E.
RICKSON, ANN LOUISE
RICKSON, BARBARA J.
RISING, NORA M.
ROACH, VALERIE J.
ROBERTS, AGNES C.
ROBERTS, BRIAN ALAN
ROBERTS, CHRISTINA L
ROBERTS, MARELYN A.
ROBERTSON, MARGUERITA
ROBERTSON, ELIZABETH
ROBERTSON, MARGARET B.
ROBERTSON, V. DIANE
ROBERTSON, R. GEORGE
ROBI, WILLIAM W.
ROBINSON, D'AMOUR
ROBINSON, F. R.
ROBINSON, ERIC H.
ROBISON, DONALD G.
ROBSON, DONALD H.
ROBSON, DIANE
ROCHE, LORNA J.
ROGER, ROBERT STEWART
RODGER, WILLIAM S.
ROGERS, GYLN DAVID
ROMEREIN, PAUL R.
ROSS, ALEXANDER, C.
ROSS, JOAN J.
ROTENBERG, URRY A.
ROTHWEILER, JACK M.
ROVERS, GERALD JOHN
ROWLES, SIDNEY W.
RUBBRA, F. DALE
RUMSEY, GAVIN M.
RUSHTON, DAVID I.
RUSH, DONALD R.
RYAN, SHEUGH C.
SAGRIS, JOHN NICHOUS
SAIMOTO. SHIGEO SALOFF, STANLEY
SAMIS, ROBERT B. E.
SANDBERG, WALTER I.
SAPERA, RONALD JOHN
SAVAGE, RICHARD AUN
SCHAFFER, MARY
SCHIBILD, DONALD A.
SCHULTZ, 0. ALUN
SCHULTZ, SHIRLEY A.
SCHWENK, BARBARA ROSE
SCOLLON, JAMES R.
SCOTT, BEVERLEY J.
SCOTT, HEATHER A.
SCRIABINE, MICHAEL
SEDER, PAUL W.
SEEDS, KENNETH J.
SEWELL, RAYMOND JOHN
SHANNON, RONALD C.
SHARP, MARY JOSEPHINE
SHARP, MURIEL ANITA
SHAW, DONALD WILLIAM
SHAW, JOHN HAROLD S.
SHEARMAN, DAUNA F.
SHEPPARD, BARRY L
SHIELDS, PATRICK L
SHIPP, DOUGUS AUN
SHIPPOBOTHAM, M. P.
SHIU, SOLOMON D. C.
SHKURATOFF, ALEX M.
SHUMKA, JANE MARY
SIGRIST, BRENDA MARIA
SILBER, JEANETTE
SIMMONDS, WM. DAVID F.
SIMMONS, MARTIN
SIMONS, MONTAGUE
SIMPSON, GERALDING Y.
SINCUIR, SHARON S.
SINGH, G. DAVID
SINGH, MAJOR
SKINNER, DONALD E.
SKYTTE, RAYMOND A.
SMITH, DIANE E.
SMITH, DARREL G.
SMITH, EDWIN ROSWELL
SMITH, LEONARD WALTER
SMITH, M. ANN
SMITH, NORMA JUNE
SMITH, PATRICK JOHN
SMITH, PATRICIA
SMITHSON, V. DANIEL
SNOWBALL, GEOFFREY R.
SNOWBALL, ROBERT F.
SOBISKI, ROBERT J.
SOLLOWAY, CHAS. ROBERT
SOLEWAY, ROBERT O.
SOMERSET, JAMES E.
SOMMERS, MONTROSE S.
SOPHER, STEPHANE R.
SOUKOREFF, FREE
SPERRINGS, KAREN L.
SPRING, ROBERT H.
STAINES, AUDREY G.
STANHUIS, AREND JAN
STAMHUIS, HARMANNUS
STAMNES, ROBERT W.
STANLEY, CONSTANCE L.
STANYER, JASPER D.
STAVDAL, WILLIAM S.
ST. CUIRE SMITH, ROBT.
STEEVES, CAROLE I.
STEVENS, RUTH E.
STEVENS, ROBERT M.
STEVENSON, DUNCAN N.
STEWART, ALEXANDER C.
STEWART, LILLIAN G. A.
STEWART, RONALD A.
STOBART, GRACE STONIER, WILLIAM R.
STORM, J. HERBERT
STORGEOFF PHILIP
STOREY PATRICIA L.
STORY, ROBERT H.
STOWE, DAVID H. R.
STRACHAN, PETER R.
SULLIVAN, E. MAUREEN
SUMMERFIELD, RUTH V. M.
SUNDERUND, DOLORES E.
SUTTER, MARY ALICE
SUZUKI, TOSHIO
SWAIN, CAROLINE E.
SWANSON, JAMES DONALD
SWOBODA P. DONALD
TABATA SACHIKO
TAIT, ROGER M.
TAIT, D, LOGAN M. M.
TANG, KAREN E.
TAPP, SHIRLEY ANNE
TARLING, FRANK BRUCE
TAYLOR, HARRY F.
TAYLOR, TOMMY H.
THOM, BETTY M.
THOMAS, DAVID C.
THOMAS, MELVIN H.
THOMPSON, G. UURIE
THOMPSON, JACK P.
THOMPSON, ROBERTA B.
THOMSON, CAROL ELLEN
THORBURN, HERBERT J.
THORUCIUS, BUI
THROWER, JOYCE A.
TINGLEY, RICHARD W.
TOBAN, HOWARD LEE
TODD. RODERICK DUNDAS
TODD, MARJORIE LOUISE
TODD, IAN ST. P.
TOWGOOD, ROBERT B.
TRELEAVEN, EMALYN GAY
TREASURER, R. BERNARD
TREMAINE, SYLVIA M.
TUCK, A. LOIS
TUPPER, JOANNE E.
TURNBULL, NORAH M.
TURNER, J. M.
TURVEY, M. ELIZABETH H.
UCHIDA M. JANE
VALENTINE, JANET ANNE
VANSICKLE, DORIS E.
VARGA, JOSEPH
VARAH, EUINE D.
VERCHERE, DAVID G.
VIRTUE, ROBT. ARNOLD
VONROSEN, ELSE
WADDINGTON, MARGARET
WALE, WEONARD M.
WALKER, JOAN B.
WALKER, MICHAEL R. B.
WALL, W. ELIZABETH
WALUCE, DAVID W.
WALUCE, FRASER G.
WALLS, D. V.
WALSH, WILLIAM D.
WALTON, JAY ANNE
WARREN, CHARLOTTE L
WARREN, MICHAEL P. F.
WASSON, BRIAN WILLIAM
WASYLUK, WILLIAM A.
WATSON, DONALD ALUN
WATSON, JUNE E.
WATTS, STUART B.
WEBSTER, JOHN M.
WEEKS, GERALD M.
WEINBERG, ROBERT L.
WELLS, GARY E.
WENSLEY, RONALD KEITH WEST, UURENCE K.
WESTCOTT, FREDERICK L.
WESTCOTT, MICHAEL R. D.
WESTENDORF, SIGRID C.
WESTWICK, HENRY
WESTON, WILLIAM C. P.
WHAUN, JUNE MORDINA
WHEELER, NORAH J.
WHEELOCK, MARILYN C.
WHITE, IAN GEORGE
WHITE, M. PATRICIA
WHITEOAK, DOROTHY L.
WHITEUW, HADDEN G.
WHITEHOUSE, B. ALUN
WHITESIDE, WILLIAM J.
WHITESIDE M. JEAN
WHITING, PATRICIA M.
WHITON, GEOFFREY A.
WILCOX, GORDON L.
WILEJTO, MARY
WILKINS, MICHAEL J.
WILKINSON, AUN K.
WILKS, PATRICIA M.
WILLIAMS, CAROL ROSE
WILLIAMS, DAPHNE S. S.
WILLIAMS, JOHN C.
WILLIAMS, MARY ANNE
WILLIAMSON, C. ROBERT
WILLOCK, R. GEORGE
WILSON, JOHN C.
WILSON, ROBERT ANDREW
WILSON, SYLVIA ANN
WILSON, THOMAS A.
WOLFMAN, WILFRED S.
WONG, CAROLE ANNE
WONG, EILEEN
WONG, EDMUND
WOOD, JAMES E. T.
WOOD, WILLIAM J.
WOODHOUSE, EDWARD A.
WOODHOUSE, GARY 0.
WOODROW, BRUCE
WORSLEY, LEWIS AIRD
WORTHINGTON, G. R. L.
WRIGHT, IAN G.
WRIGHT, WILLIAM JOHN
WYNNE, BARBARA JOAN
WYPER, GLENN ALLAN
YANO, ALBERT H.
YAROSH, WALTER
YIP, YAT W.
YOUNG, G. WILLIAM
YOUNG, JAMES H.
YOUNG, ROBERT L.
YOUNG, ROSIE L.
YOW, KWOCK KIM
YUAN, JOHN T.
YUE, PONG C.
ZIEGLER, WILFRIED H.
ZILM, GLENNIS N.
ZUCKER, HARRIET
ADLER, JANOS G.
ADURD, C. GORDON
AITCHISON, JOHN P.
AITKEN, ROBERT
ALBERT, HENRY ALUN
ALUN, RONALD J.
AMES, MICHAEL McCLEAN
ANDERSEN, SIDNEY B. J.
ANDERSON, E. LLOYD
AOYAMA, RAY
APTED, EDWARD AMES
ARCHIBALD, EDWARD R.
ARMSTRONG, G. A.
BAIRD, ALEXA E. BANERD, AUDREY JEAN
BANERD, ADAIR JOHN
BARCUY, FRANCIS W.
BARKER, JULIAN TODD
BARNES, LORNE R.
BARTON, BARBARA A.
BAUMAN, EDWARD
BAYNE, ALLEN R.
BECK, STANLEY MARTIN
BELITHER, ANN
BELL, HENRY MICHAEL
BERTRAM, DONALD J.
BIRCH, JOHN ROBERT
BIRCH, PAUL RUSSELL
BUCK, M. JOAN
BUCKLOCK, DONALD J.
BUNCHE, KENNETH P.
BUNKENBACH, PATRICIA
BUND, MAUREEN JOYCE
BLEDSOE, M. YOUNDE
BLOMGREN W. EUGENE
BOLTER, STANLEY A.
BOMBARDIERI, JOSEPH
BOOTH, JOHN H.
BOSSONS, JOHN DAVID
BOUCHLA, EFFIE
BOVEY, JOHN ALEXANDER
BRAUN, DIEDRICH
BRAWNER, KENNETH L.
BRENT, FREDERICK JOHN
BRICE, MARJORIE ANN
BRICKMAN, MYFANNY
BRODIE, ELIZABETH M. L.
BROWN, ALUN G.
BROWN, DOREEN JOAN
BROWN, I. ERNIE
BROWN, JEREMY JOHN F.
BROWN, ROBERT GRAHAM
BRUEHLER, GUSTAV
BRYDON, AUN W. B.
BRYAN, PATRICK R.
BUICK, ANNAMAY
BURDETT, SHIRLEY A. M.
BURGESS, KENNETH B.
BURGESS, RONALD R.
BURNS, ALEXANDER
BURTON, MARYBETH
BUSH, PATRICK GEO. S.
BUZZA, ROBERT M.
CAMPBELL, EDITH M.
CARDINALL, SANDRA M.
CARFRAE, JAMES D.
CAREY, ALBERT PATRICK
CARLSEN, C. TRYGUE
CARNEY, D. PATRICIA
CARNEY, JOHN JAMES
CARRICK, DOUGUS A.
CARTWRIGHT, JOHN WM.
CASSADY, E. ANNE
CASTLEY, GORDON ALLAN
CERVO, BEATRICE V.
CHEVELDAVE, JOSEPH
CHIN, BEVERLEY
CIARNIELLO, DOMINIC
CINITS, EDDIE
CURK, BARRIE A.
CURK, RICHARD DAVID
CURK, WESLEY W. L.
CURKE, DENIS C.
CURKE, CHARLES R.
CON, RONALD J.
CON, BILLY
COOPER, JOHN R.
CORBETT, PETER G. P.
COURSIER, JOAN P.
COWLEY, MARION V.
COX, BRIAN DOUGUS CRAIG, RONALD S.
CRANMER, GLORIA
CRAWFORD, MICHAEL A H.
CREEMER, TERRANCE
CREEMER, ALBERT LEE
CREIGHTON, THOMAS N. B.
CROSATO, RENO F.
CROTTY, JANIS
CUBBAGE, JOHN STANLEY
DALES, MICHAEL
DAVIDSON, ROY A.
DAVIES, AUN DAVID
DAYLE, IVON F.
DEARIN, ROBERT E. A.
DENNIS, GORDON T.
DESPREZ, BARBARA F.
DIAMOND, CAHRLES
DICKS, RICHARD DAN
DILWORTH, DOROTHY A
DIXON, SELMA J.
DONALDSON, VERNA C.
DOUGAN, HENRY JOHN
DRUGGE, S. ERIK
DUCKWORTH, MURIEL J.
DZIECIUCH, MAX A.
EAGLES, NELSON P.
EARL, JOHN PATRICK
EDWARDS, DAVID LLOYD
ENNIS, PETER
EDWARD, ALFRED M.
ERB, JAMES G. C.
ESCOTT, AUDREY H.
ESTLIN, HARRY GRAY
FAIRBAIRN, ROBERT H.
FARIS, JOHN DOUGUS
FARRIS, EVLYN F.
FEDOROFF, MICHAEL
FELDES, JOSEPH JACK
FENNELL, MARGARET A.
FENTON, UWRENCE G.
FETT, Z. JOYCE
FINDUY, BARBARA S.
FISCHER, GRETL
FITZER, CARLTON E.
FOLI, LEA
FORRESTER, ROBERT R.
FOSTER, L. NOREEN
FOSTER, RICHARD E.
FOUNTAIN, JOYCE RUEL
FREDERICKSON, DIANE J.
FREEMAN, STEPHEN L
FREEMAN, URRY ASER
FRIEND, RAYMOND C.
FRIESEN, GARY
GALLOWAY, ROBERT D.
GARNET, GRANT M.
GARVIN, MURRAY LLOYD
GIANI, DARSHAN S.
GIBBARD, HAROLD JOHN
GIBSON, GEORGE B. F.
GILDERS, C. JAMES
GILUNDERS, ROSS C.
GIMPLE, GORDON W.
GIRVIN, GERALD WAYNE
GIRODAY, MICHAEL R. C.
GIRARD, WILLIAM
GLUCKSMAN, MYRON L.
GOLDMAN, STANLEY D.
GOPAULSINGH, RODAN
GORDON, ALBERT VICTOR
GORDON, ROBERT BRUCE
GORDON, FAELYN
GOUDY, ELIZABETH
GRANT, HUGH JOSEPH
GRANT, WILLIAM EDWARD
GRANT, HUGH M.
GRAY, CUIRE MURRAY GREEN, MAXINE W.
GREEN, SYLVIA JOY
GREGORY, JAMES H.
GREGORY, CAROL E.
GRIERSON, F. JOAN
GRIGORUK, DANIEL
GROBERMAN, HERBERT
GUTMAN, FRANCIS
HACKING, IAN M.
HAINES, ALFRED RAE
HALL, DOUGUS GARY
HALL, NORMAN N.
HALLETT, REGINALD D.
HALTALIN, KENNETH C.
HAMILL, PATRICIA M.
HANDLING, F. KAYE
HANSON, LEONARD C.
HARDIE, E. MARION
HARDING, DAVID R.
HAZLEWOOD, GORDON A.
HEATH, FRANCES EDITH
HEINRICHS, ERWIN
HELSING, J. ANITA
HEMPHILL, H. DAVID
HENDERSON, DOUGUS J.
HIGANO, ALBERT K.
HILDRED, PHILIP
HILBORN, KENNETH D.
HILL, MARLENE ANNA M.
HILLMER, ROBERT I.
HOGG, ELIZABETH R.
HOGAN, I. RUTH
HOLLETT, EDWARD L
HOLUB, RONALD VINCENT
HOMOU, ROBERT BOHOAN
HOWARD, JOHN L
HOWELL, WILLIAM B.
HROMYK, WILLIAM JOHN
HUNT, EUGENE DEDOLPH
HUNT, LORRAINE LOIS
HUNTER, BRYANT
HUNTER, BEVERLY J.
HUTTON-POTTS, MARGOT
IMAYOSHI, C. JEAN
IRVINE, WAYNE RONALD
IWATA, ARTHUR MINORU
JACKSON, KENNETH E.
JACKSON, ROBT DAVID
JAMIESON, JAMES D.
JAMIOLKOWSKI, CUUDE
JARVIS, ALUN E.
JOHNSON, RONALD W.
JONES, BEAUUH L
JORY, WILLIAM MERVIN
JULIAN, CHAS. JULIAN
KALEF, SANDRA
KALMOKOFF, DONALD M.
KAMACHI, YOSHIHIRO
KAPUN, VALERIE LOIS
KARME, AUN BRIEN
KATARIUS, JOHN WM.
KEENAN, JAMES PATRICK
KEHLER, CORNELIUS N.
KELLY, COLLEEN C.
KEMP, BEVERLEY HELEN
KENNEDY, MAUREEN I.
KENT, JAMES ALBERT
KERWER, BRIGITTE
KIDD, ROBERT STUART
KIMURA, EDMUND
KINNEY, E. PATRICK
KISSKA, STEPHEN
KLISH, STANLEY M.
KNIGHT, WILLIAM R.
KRANGLE, GERALD B.
KRAJINOVA, MILENA I.
KRANE, RUTH J.
■'.■^n ^R ?-m
%%%%« KUJAU, STANLEY JOHN
KYLE, MARILYN AUDREY
UM, DIANA, MARGOT
UNGER, MAX MICHAEL
LARSON, MARJORIE F.
U VALLEY, LEROY E. E.
LAWRENCE, DIANE V.
LEATHERDALE, B. GENE
LEDINGHAM, M. SYLVIA
LEE, ARTHUR
LEE, JACK
LEE, NORMAN ADDISON
LEEDHAM, LELIA R.
LEGGATT, MAUREEN H.
LENNOX. SHIRLEY C.
LEONARD, HAROLD
LERMAN, JOAN DIANNE
LEWIS, GEO RICHARD
LEWIS. MARGARET A.
LIGHTBODY, WALLEY P.
LIND, EARL PETER
LIPKEWICH, WILLIAM
LOGAN, DONALD HUGH M.
LOGIE, RAYMNOD THOS.
LONGSTAFFE, J. RONALD
LORD, RAYMOND A.
LUNDBERG, ERIC H.
MADDAFORD, LINDA B.
MADILL, N. STEWART
MAIER, ROBERT WALTER
MARCHESE, ANGEU L
MARMINA, JOSEPH
MARRION, ALICE ESTHER
MARSHALL, RONALD H.
MARSHALL, HELEN JANE
MARTIN, JOHN EDWARD C.
MARTIN, JOHN EDWARD
MATHIESON, CHRISTINA
MATTHEWS, JOHN T.
McBRATNEY, JAMES H.
McCANDLESS, DAVID L.
McCONECHY, ROBERT T.
McCOWAN, CONRAD WM.
MACDONALD, DAVID R.
MACDONALD, JAMES C.
McDONALD, PHILIP RAE
McDOUGALL, GRAEME E.
McGIBBON, JOAN M.
McGUIRK, ERMA GRACE
MACINNES, MARY LOU
McKAY, ELEANOR M.
MACKENZIE, GEORGE A.
MACUREN, ROY WAYNE
MACLEAN, E. LOUISE
McLUCKIE, WILLIAM G.
McMILUN, DAVID H.
McNAB, NANCY ISABEL
McNeill, margie alice
macphail, john donald
McPHEE, BARBARA A.
McQUEEN, SHIRLEY ANNE
MEAD, JAMES S.
MEEKISON, WILLIAM G.
MELENKA, ROY EDWARD
MELNYK, CLIFFORD S.
MENKEE, EDWIN THOMAS
MENDUM, MELVILLE J.
MERRICK, BETTY L.
MICHAUD, LEONA
MIKI, ICHIO
MIKI, TSUNEO
MILLS, ANNETTE B.
MISE, G. TONY
MITCHELL, LORNA ANN
MITCHELL, PETER JAMES
MIYAGISHIMA, ROBERT T.
MOISIO, ARLENE ILVI MOODIE, ALUN G.
MOONEY, MALCOLM G.
MOORE, APRIL FRANCES
MORGAN, MICHAEL F.
MORLEY, DAVID C.
MORROW, MAXINE FREDA
MORT, WALTER
MORTIMER, MAITUND E.
MOSSOP, ROGER BOWEN
MOTTLEY, IRENE V.
MUNDELL, RICHARD F.
MUNRO, GORDON ROSS
MURPHY, JOHN FRANCIS
MURRAY, JAMES GORDON
MURRAY, LEIU M. GRACE
MURSHY, GREGORY
NAGANO, AUDREY A.
NEAVE, A. ELIZABETH
NEWTON, SHIRLEY L.
NICHOL, DENNIS WM.
NICHOLLS, DEREK S.
NIXON, JOHN ROY
NOBLE, KENNETH D.
NORDQUIST, EDNA I. C.
NORMAN, F. M. JEAN
NYUNDER, JUNE M.
NYMAN, JAMES
OBERHOFER, MATTHEW
OBRIEN, TERENCE C.
OIKAWA, MITSUO
OREILLY G. R. GLENN
OSTENSOE, LEIF 0.
PAGE, ROGER HUBERT V.
PAHL, EDWARD
PALLESON, EDWARD ROBT.
PALLESEN, PATRICIA E.
PATEY, JEAN M.
PAULSON, E. MARIE
PEARSON, THOMAS R.
PEDERSEN, A DANIEL
PENTUND, GERTRUDE D.
PENTUND, LOUISA L
PEPPER, DONALD ALUN
PETERS, BERNHARD E.
PETERSON, G. DENISE
PHILLIPS, WILLIAM H.
PHILPOTT, DALE C.
PIPES, MARILYN E.
PITT, THELMA MARIE
PLOTNIKOFF, PETER WM.
PLUNKETT, PATRICK D.
POLSON, BEVERLEY A.
POOLE, HOPE MAVIS
POTTER, ROY
PRESTON, HENRY M.
PRIEGER, JOHN STEPHEN
PRYJMA, THEODORE
PURVES, SMITH, WM. R.
QUAIL, PATRICIA ETHEL
RAE, CATHERINE ANNE
RAISEN, JERRY
RAMAGE, THOMAS EDWARD
RAYNER, GERALD H.
REDMAN, A. BARRIE F.
REIMER, ERNEST M.
RICHARDS, JOHN SIMON
RICHARDSON, NANCY S.
RICKSON, JEAN I.
RIDDELL, DAVID KEMP
RIGBY, RALPH NAPIER
RIOPEL, CHAS RICHARD
ROACH, MAUREEN HELEN
ROBERTSON, DONALD GEO
ROBERTSON, IVAN L
ROBERTSON, JOHN KEITH
ROBERTSON, MARGERY F.
ROBERTSON, SARAH E. ROBIN, PETER WILLIAM
ROBINSON, DAVID NEIL
ROBSON, MARILYN JOAN
ROMERIL, PAUL ERIC A.
ROSE, JEAN ALISON
ROSE, PAMEU ESME
ROSEN, NORMAN F.
ROSS, DOROTHEA M. N.
ROSS, SHEIU ANNE
ROSS, WILLIAM EARL
RUDDICK, MARY ALICE E.
RUNDGREN, MARIE S.
RUNNALLS, DONNA RUTH
RUSSELL, PAUL
RYAN, URRY TELFORD
SALTER, NANCY JEAN
SANDIUNDS, KEITH M.
SANGHA, T. S.
SCHOENLE, JUNE E.
SCOTT, MONGRIEFF N. D.
SCRIMGEOUR, K. GRAY
SEARS, CHARLES NORMAN
SERAPHIM, ADA JOYCE
SHEA, WILLIAM RUSSELL
SHUBER, SIMMS
SHYNKARYK, WALTER W.
SIEMS, MARION LOUISE
SIERPINA, RAYMOND J.
SIGAL, CECIL
SIMMS, THOMAS B.
SKOKO, NORMAN MARK
SMITH, ROBERT ROGER
SMITH, RODERICK L.
SMYTH, ROBERT W.
SOLONECKI, WILLIAM J.
SOMERVILLE, RONALD L
SORTWELL, EDWIN T.
SOUKOREFF, WILLIAM W.
SPEARS, MARION H.
SPURGIN, ROBIN HUGH
STAINES, GORDON H.
STANIUND, JOHN P.
STEEL, MAY
STEIN, ALBERT EUGENE
STEINER, GEORGE
STEINSON, E. BRUCE
STEVENS, MELVIN G.
STEWART, WM. DOUGUS
STOLAR, GERALD P.
STONE, SYLVIA UUREAN
STORM, STEVE
STRASDINE, GEORGE A.
STUCKEY, WILLIAM T.
STUPICH, MARJORIE
STUSIAK, A. T.
SUGIMOTO, MINORU
SWEENEY, JEAN E.
SWEET, DONALD ARTHUR
SWINARTON, SHEIU M.
SYMONS, CHRYSTAL P.
SYPNOWICH, PETER J.
TALLON, GEORGE B.
TAYLOR, A. N.
TERMUNDE, ROBERT W.
THIESSEN, WILLIAM J.
THOM, DONALD CULLEN
THOMAS, GREGORY W.
THOMAS, WILLIAM D. S.
THORNE, NORMA UURIAN
THURSTON, A. QUENTIN
Tl FEN BACH, CURENCE W.
TINGLEY, ROGER ROSS
TOBLER, WALDO R.
TODD, ADRIENNE
TOPHAM, LORNE WHITE
TOPPINGS, EARLE W.
TOREN, MARTIN S. TOSOVAC, JOHN
TOYNBEE, THOMAS A.
TRAVERS, KENNETH J. D.
TSUYUKI, ROY
TURNBULL, AUN C.
TURNBULL, SHEIU ANN
TYERMAN, KATHRYN JOAN
VALENTINE, EVELYN A.
VAN EEDEN JACQUES H.
VEA, ASBJORG SYLVIA
VOUTE, PAULINE H. E.
WAGNER, WILURD W.
WAINWRIGHT, JOAN F.
WALKER, GAVIN
WALKER, LEONARD GEO.
WALL, ROBERT OLIVER
WALUCE, MARION D.
WALLS, LEWIS J.
WALPOLE, JOY C.
WARD, JOHN F.
WASSON, GARTH CURTIS
WATSON, GEO. RICHARD
WATSON, JOHN A.
WATT, ROBERT
WEDEL, ALBERT
WEICK, EDWARD RALPH
WEIR. MERVYN CURICE
WESTWICK, ROY
WHITTLE, ALBERTA A.
WHYTE, DOUGUS STUART
WIEBE, HELEN
WILSON, H. DAVID
WILSON, RONALD W.
WILSON, SYLVIA M.
WINTONYK, WILLIAM
WOLF, ROBERT DARRYL
WOLVERTON, BERNICE E.
WONG, RODERICK
WOOD, DENIS CHARLES
WOODBRIDGE, W. DAVID
WOODS, W. JOHN
WOOLRICH, MARY L
WRIGHT, NORMAN ROSS
YATES, KEITH
YELLIN. RACHEL NANCY
YIP, WING SIMM
YOUNG, ANDREW BRYSON
YOUNG, MAXINE ROBERTA
ZIPURSKY, IRVIN
ZACHARIAS, RAYMOND G.
ALDEN, ROSEMARY SELMA
ALUN, BARBARA MUIR
ALLEN, ELIZABETH LYNE
ALLISON. DONALD E.
ANDERSON, DARRELL V.
ANDERSON, HELEN S. A.
ANDREEN, PEGGY LOU E.
ANDREWS, DONALD H.
APPLETON, FRANCES E.
ARCHER, LEONARD T.
ASHWELL, WILLIAM H. J.
AU KENG TONG
BABCOCK, PATRICIA A
BAILEY, SHERRY RAE
BAIRD, BEVERLEY ANN
BAIRD, DUGAID M.
BAIRD, WILLIAM L.
BARKER, A. STANLEY
BAXTER, CATHERINE A.
BEESLEY, WILLIAM E.
BENNETT, E. BERTRAM
BENNETT, RICHARD B.
BIRCH, JOHN ALFRED
BOE, KENNETH INGE
BONE, ROBERT MARTIN BOULTON, JOHN THOMAS
BOURNE, ROBERT K. T.
BRANTON, KENNETH GEO.
BREEN, HARVEY
BRINKWORTH, BARRIE W.
BROOKS, JEAN ALURDYC
BROOKS, EDITH GERVIN
BROWN, BERNARD JOHN
BROWN, M. LORRAINE
BURCHNALL, ARTHUR F.
BURTON, JEFFREY D.
BYBERG, ROBERT
CALDOW, GORDON L
CAMPBELL, DOREEN L.
CANDIDO, UWRENCE M.
CARLILE, COLLIN
CARRUTHERS, JOHN F.
CARSWELL, HENRY THOS.
CASS, RICHARD V.
CASSELMAN, AUN C.
CAVIN, RONALD GORDON
CEPELIAUSKAS, ANTHONY
CHAMBERUIN, JOS. A.
CHAN, EUGENE JOHN
CHAPPELL, JOHN STUART
CHARPENTIER, MAURICE
CHERAMY, JOHNNY A.
CLARKE, JOAN MARION
COOK, CHRISTINE
COOPER, A. MILDRED
COOPUND, ASHLEY T.
COPPENS, JULIA
CORNISH, ELIZABETH M.
COSTERTON, J. WILLIAM
COULCHER, BUNE A.
CRAIN, FINUY ROSS
CROKER, PATRICIA ANN
CROSS, WILLIAM CHAS F.
CROWE, RONALD B.
CUMMING, JEAN E.
CUNNINGHAM, WARREN J.
DAVIS, PATRICK AUSTIN
DERRY, JANE
DLEY, GURDEV
DODS, GORDON ARTHUR
DONALDSON, WM. ROBERT
DONNELLY, HELEN ANNE
DOSSO, HARRY WILLIAM
DOYLE, JAMES LORNE
DREWS, REINHOLD E.
DUFF, MARIANNA E.
EBERTS, ANTHONY B.
ENDO, MARY AWIKO
ERSKINE, PATRICIA L
ESTELLE, RALPH A
EVANS, JONATHAN W.
EVANS, WILLIAM ROBERT
FARQUHAR, DONALD JAS.
FENWICK, THOMAS L
FERGUSSON, WM. JOHN
FIGOL, MARLENE ANNE J.
FINGARSON, FAYE E.
FINUY, ANN HUNTER
FITCH, EDWIN UWRENCE
FITZGERALD, GLYN
FLETCHER, V. JOAN
FONG, ROY V. J.
FORBES, GEORGE HECTOR
FORSENG, EVAN GERALD
FORSGREN, N. J.
FOUCHER, MAURICE
FOX, CLYDE F. D.
FRANCIS, J. DANIEL
FRIESAN, BARRIE F.
FRIESEN, SUSAN
FRODSHAM, STANLEY A.
FULTON, HARRY RAY GALBRAITH, DONALD S.
GALUGHER, ROBERT M.
GARMULEWICZ, BOGUSUW
GARTLEY, MARY M.
GARTRELL, BEVERLEY
GEDDERT, GEORGE D.
GEEN, GLEN HOWARD
GILLIS, AUSTIN CHAS.
GINSBERG, ROSE
GOUGH, JOAN ELIZABETH
GRANTHAM, PETER ROBT.
GRAY, PAMEU A.
GREAVES, FREDERICK T.
GREENWOOD, G. DOUGUS
GRIFFITHS, ROBERT R.
GRIGORUK, ALEXANDER
GRISEDALE, MARY C.
GROVUE, ALEXANDER J.
HALEK, JOSEPH
HALEY, WILLIAM N.
HALVORSON, HAROLD N.
HENSEN, RONALD MARK
HANSSEN, LOUIS J.
HARRISON, DANIEL P.
HARSHENIN, ALEX PETER
HASTINGS, DAVID ERIC
HAZELL, SHIRLEY G.
HELUM, NEVILLE
HENDERSON, DUNCAN L.
HENDERSON, DONNETTA
HENSCHEL, PATRICIA H.
HEESTER, ANTHONY C.
HILLHOUSE, D. NEIL
HINTZ, EDWIN HAROLD
HORN, AKIRA
HUANG, MONA
HUBSCHER, ARTHUR R.
HUNT, JOHN E.
HUNT, KENNETH
HUNTINGTON, M. JOCELYN
HURLSTON, HELEN W.
ISMAN, ERU FAE
JANZ, LESLIE BUKE
JOHNSON, JOHN R.
JONES, H. GORDON
JONES, MARILYN E.
JONES, MARION RUTH
KAMAR, ASTA
KELLER, RODNEY AUN
KEW, JOHN E. MICHAEL
KINAHAN, MICHAEL THOS.
KIRCHNER, DAVID C.
KIRSTIUK, JULIAN
KIRWAN, JOHN MICHAEL
KUSSEN, JOHN
KNOX, MARY HELEN
KOMAR, NADIA
KONRAD, ANNE JUSTINE
KOVACH, GERALDINE A.
KRISS, JOHN
KROSBY, HANS PETER
KUNDERT, RITA IRENE
KURAMOTO, KYOKO
LARSON, ERNIE ANDREW
UU, SYLVIA SHIU WAI
UWRENCE, NAN M.
UZENBY, GEOFFREY J.
LEGG, WILLIS DAVID E.
LEITERMAN, ALISON C.
LERET, MARGIT
LEWIS, SALLY L
LIPINSKI, EDWIN
LITTLE, WILLIAM F.
LONEY, THOMAS WILLIAM
LONGRIDGE, ELIZABETH
LOOMER, MONA LOUISE
LOW, RAYMOND I At i i / ^ -
madden, shieu c.
mah, bebe mae
marriott, barbara a.
martinsen, henry h.
maunsell, a. robin m.
McAllister, donald e.
McCARGAR, DONAMAE A
McConville, patricia
macdonald, luelu
macdonald, wendy m.
Mcdowell, kathleen v.
McFEELY, D. PATRICIA
MACGREGOR, ARTHUR JOS.
MclNNES, DOUGUS N.
MACKAY, DONALD AUN
McULLEN, MARILYN
McLEAN, DONALD JAMES
McLENNAN, LIU RUTH
McLEOD, ISABEL ANN
McNULTY, WILLIAM H.
macphee, katie ann
McWilliams, bruce
messerschmidt, freda
metcalfe, george r.
michell, beverley p. m.
middleton, arthur g.
miller, jack allen
millington, lois anne
milne, john buchanan
mimoto, michiho
mitchell, donald h.
mitsushio, minato
miyazawa, jean
monson, reta leona
montgomery, bruce t.
montgomery, mabel l
morelli, rudolph
morris, darryl glyn
moyes, alexander
muirhead, c. robert
murphy, margaret jean
murray, norma m.
neen, john jacob
nelson, john n.
newitt, eve margaret
obrien, p. barney
officer, ernest roy
olsen, donald j.
peers, michael g.
peirce, yvonne joan
petersen, peter bryan
peyman, bruce g.
pineo, peter camden
putford, robert f.
purcell, patricia m. a.
racine, joan ellen
rainer, marian eileen
rayment, george ross
redekop, john harry
renfrew, patricia
richards, b. maralyn
ringuette j. norman
robertson, james e.
robertson, lyle p.
robinson, betty jane
roger, ann jocelyn
rohrer, joyce kathryn
rosen, loralynn
ross, john m.
ross, john kenneth
rousseau, leo
rowund, dennis gary
rowles, elizabeth
russell, kenneth g.
ryley, frances diane
sankey, maureen l
scales, allen alex SAVAGE, LAUREN WM. C.
SCHMID, ALBERT P. R.
SCHOFIELD, JOHN S.
SEEMUNGAL, FRANK
SEELY, MARY LILLIAN
SETTERFIELD, GWEN A
SHARMAN, C. ANTHONY
SHERIDAN, MARGARET M.
SHERRIN, DARRELL A.
SHRUM, LAURA JANE
SIEMENS, ALFRED HENRY
SIMS, PETER HARVEY
SIRLIN, IRVING ALBERT
SMILLIE, HOWARD A. G.
SMITH, ALUN
SMITH, DAVID LORIN
SMITH, S. B. CHERIE
SOUTHWELL, JOHN R.
SPALDING, DAVID J. R.
SPRAGGE, DONALD L.
STANOWSKI, JAN
STATHERS, JACK K.
STEELE, PATRICIA A.
STEWART, BURTON M. ANN
STRALENDORFF, S. J.
STARLING, CHARLES E.
STURDY, SANDRA JOAN
SUTHERUND K. ANN
SUTTON, WENDY K.
TAYLOR, THOMAS M.
TEMPLE, E. PAMEU
TERNAN, DONALD ERWIN
TERADA, NAGATOSHI
THIESSEN, NICHOUS
THOMPSON, W. JAMES
THORNTON, HOWARD P.
TOBLER, ERIKA
TRAFFORD, JACQUELINE
TUURA, HARVEY OSCAR
ULLMANN, WALTER
UNDERHILL, NANCY E. S.
URBANOVITS, ANNIE I.
WAKHRONCHEFF, DEENA
WALKER, MARILLYN D. S.
WARD, JAMES D.
WARN, RONALD DOUGUS
WARNOCK, JOSEPH H.
WARREN, JOHN SALCOMBE
WATTS, LOUISE DIANNE
WEBBER, WILLIAM A.
WEBBER, BARBARA JOAN
WEBSTER, MARGARET A.
WEEDEN, D. RICHARD P.
WHITE, HARRY ALTON
WIEBE, MARGUERITE ANN
WILSON, MORRIS JOHN
WINSTANLEY, GORDON
WRIGHT, S. WILURD
YOUNG, WALTER DOUGLAS
ZOCHER, DOROTHEA AGRICULTURE
BARRON, DAVID WALLACE
CURKE, E. CONNER
DALLYN, JACK
DOBB, JOHN LLEWELLYN
DOVER, ERNEST DAVID
ELLISON, MARY E.
FARMER, JOANNA M.
GROVES, TOM DAVID D.
GRUGER, RONALD PAUL
HYNARD, M. DAVID
KIRWIN, BRYAN W.
LEACH, A. LORNE
LYNCH-STAUNTON, B. M.
MACLEAN, JAMES
MILLNER, E. ANNE
MOLYNEAUX, ALFRED E.
MOUAT, NORMAN G.
MOYER, RUDY H.
RADFORD, BRIAN TREVOR
ROBSON, MICHAEL F.
SHKURHAN, EUGENE
SMITH, RICHARD L
STEPHENSON, KENNETH
WINDT, THOMAS AUN
BALDWIN, RICHARD W. W.
BICE, WILLIAM CHARLES
BOWUND, FREDERICK H.
BRADSHAW, R. GRAHAM
CAMPBELL, STANLEY S.
CUY, LESLIE K. C.
CRONKHITE, MARSHALL A.
DUNCAN, DOUGUS W.
EBBETT, THOMAS W.
GOODALE, LONALD ROSS
JACKSON, DONALD BARRY
JOHNSTON, HOWARD E.
KOVACS, AUDREY IRENE
LEE Y. HOW
MACKENZIE, RICHARD N.
MACLENNAN, DOUGUS A.
MOORE, ZELMA ESTHER
PYLYPA, HENRY J.
RUSSELL, ERIC G.
SJERDAL, ALBERT R.
STEFFENS, R. JAMES H.
SUTHERUND, MARIE
WATKINS, RONALD JOHN
WEISS, G. MILTON
WIEBE, WALTER
WILLIAMS, THOMAS F. G.
CHRISTIE, HELEN W.
GUSGOW, STANLEY K.
HUROV, HERB RONALD
KOBRLE, UDISUV
McKEAGUE, J. ALEX
MOLYNEAUX, WILLIAM E.
SIEW, SUKNANAN J.
SLEEMAN, KENNETH J.
VESELY, P. ANTHONY J.
YOUNG, LORNE NELSON
CAVERLY, WALTER J.
CUMAN, PETER CHARLES
JONES, DONALD G.
MOZLEY, ANNE P.
RICHMOND, RODERICK
VORBECK, HELGE BORGE
WATERFIELD, EDMOND N. ARCHITECTURE
BATCHELOR, PETER
BENSLEY, JAMES
BROCKINGTON, DAVID H.
CARDINAL, DOUGUS J.
CARFRAE, WALTER J.
CARLSON, EDWARD PAUL
CARR, H. EDWARD
DIETZE, S. H.
DOUGUS, MARTIN
ESTRIN, UWRENCE
KIRK, DENIS H.
KITAGAWA, KIYOSHI
LAZOSKY, DANIEL E.
LOVETT, ERIC TUPPER
McCALLUM, J. DONALD
ORME, PETER T.
RAPANOS, D. P.
ROED, LORNE J.
RUDDERHAM, WILLIAM L.
SAGER, GERALD ERLE
SIGURJONSSON, JOHN F.
SKJELV1K, TORALV
THIERSCH, WOLFGANG B.
YUEN, GORDON
AMANO, SHIGERU
BURTON, WM. DONALD
DODD, ARTHUR H. B.
FEISTMANN, J. GEORGE
GRAHAM, GORDON R.
HO, HIT PO
HOWARD, RONALD V. B.
JONES, NORMAN SIDNEY
NAITO, JOSEPH
SKAKUN, CASEY
BARCUY, UWRENCE E.
EASTON, CHARLES H.
EWING, ROGER KEITH
MANN, DEREK SPALDING
NELSON, RONALD KEITH
RAND, BARRY AULN
SMEETH, ROGER W.
WENSLEY, BEVERLEY J.
WILES, FRANKLIN A.
YOUNG, CLIFFORD M.
CHURCH, ALBERT JOHN
COULTER, DON W.
GILMOUR, JAMES F.
HOLUND, ARTHUR M.
LOUKES, PATRICK E.
MIRKO, IVAN GEORGE
NEGRIN, RENO C.
PEARCE, DONALD R.
ROWETT, CLYDE DANCY APPLIED SCIENCE
ABBOTT, JOHN MELVYN
ABBOTT, BRIAN MICHAEL
ARCHIBALD, DENNIS J.
ARNASON, NORMAN G.
ASSIMES, LEONARD T.
BAGOT, TREVOR RICHARD
BAILEY, JAMES WM.
BAKER, COLIN M.
BALCOM, GRAEME S.
BANKES, HUGH JOHN
BEER, GEORGE A.
BELL, SIDNEY A.
BERMAN, SAUL
BERKEY, DUANE A
BERRY. WILLIAM D.
BHATTI, KESAR SINGH
BIRNIE, THOMAS A.
BUCKBURN, ROBERT WM.
BROCKS, HANS D. W.
BUCHANAN, DONALD L.
BUNBURY, ALEXANDER C.
BYGRAVE, H. LLOYD
BYRES, JAMES JACK
CAMPBELL, BEVERLEY H.
CHEVELDAVE, HARRY G.
CHEW, BING GAN
CHRISTIAN, RUPERT H.
CURKE, ROGER W.
CLEGG, ROBERT N.
CLISCH, DONALD FRED
COLEMAN, WAYNE A.
CONNELL, PETER STUART
CONSTANTINIDIS, E. A.
COULDING, DAVID L. G.
CRAIG, DOUGUS B.
CROOK, WILLIAM F.
DALTON, PATRICK R. O.
DAR, WOON JAMES R.
DAVIS, ROBERT ARCHER
DAY, CLIFFORD ALLEN
DEFAYE, PHILIPPE JOHN
DEPAOLI, EDWARD
DEPAOLI, LIVIO
DILL, HERBERT JAMES
DINSMORE, NORMAN H.
DI PASQUALE WILLIAM
DIROM, IAN CARTER
DRIEDGER, ELWOOD W.
DRUMMOND, AUSTAIR M.
DUNCAN, DENNIS
DYRMOSE, UWRENCE
ELDER, HOWARD
EMIGH, WILLIAM R.
FEVANG, RONALD KIETH
FLETCHER, NORMAN W.
FORBES, M. JACK
FORNASIER, OSWALDO
FRASER, DONALD C.
FRASER, RUSSELL G.
FRAZER, GLEN GARRY
FRIEND. RONALD G.
FUTCHER, RALPH JAMES
GADD, THOS. HOWARD
GARTSHORE, IAN S.
GAYTON, JOHN W.
GISKE, RICHARD CARL
GOLDIE, CHARLES ALUN
GORKOFF, JOHN JOHN
GRAIS, GARY SCOTT
GRANT, RICHARD ALLEN
GRAY, DARYL HERBERT
GREENE, ROBERT EDWARD
GRIER, BOYD B. ARTHUR GUSTAVSON, CURENCE S.
HACKETT, CEDRIC BASIL
HALES, F. WILLIAM
HARMAN, CHARLES K.
HODGE, GERALD JAS. F.
HOEKSTRA, BRUCE R.
HOLMES, AUN DONNAN
HOLMES, BRIAN W.
HOLMES, RONALD L WM.
HUNT, C. E. UWRENCE
HUNTER, DARREL W.
HUNTLEY, DAVID JOHN
ILOTT, JOHN RALPH F.
JAMES, F. TREVOR
JOHNSON, DONALD GEO.
JOHNSON, LLOYD ALBERT
JONES, COLIN R.
JONES, KENNETH S.
JOY, KERRY ROBERT
KUZKOW, TONY PETER
KARAS, ALEXANDER N.
KEMPE, ARTHUR JOSEPH
KIKUCHI, A. ROBIN
KROEKER, C. HENRY
KURTA, JOHN
KWOK, KWAN LEUNG
UCY, HAROLD ORD
UIRD, ALEXANDER M.
UURIE, GORDON H.
LAZZAROTTO, ERNIE E.
LEE, ALBERT
LEE, DAVID MANUEL
LIEBERT, ALVIN
LIM, RICHARD F.
LIND; JOHN ARNOLD
LINDSAY, RUSSELL M.
LUNDER, HANS JAKOB
LUNDEMO, GUDBRAND
MAH, GORDON
HANHAS, KARM S.
MARTIN, ROBERT JOHN
MATTHEWS, JOHN WM. P.
MATTHEWS, STEWART W.
MAWDSLEY, JACK S.
MACDONALD, JOHN MURDO
McEACHRAN, DAVID J.
McFARUNE, DONALD G.
McGHEE, GORDON DONALD
MACKENZIE, GORDON R.
McKENZIE, M. MURRAY
MACKENZIE, GORDON W.
MACKINNON, JOHN M.
McLELUN, JOHN F.
McLEOD, KENNETH G.
McNEILLY, WM. ROBERT
MERCER, GERALD S.
MILLER, GERALD S.
MILUR, WILLIAM R.
MILTIMORE, AUN ROSS
MITCHELL, RONALD R.
MOIR, LEWIS ERNEST
MORRISON, GARY C.
MUNRO, DANIEL EDWARD
NEILD, PETER JOHN
NEILSON, JOHN ALUN
NG CHUNG, Ul PAUL
NICHOL, ALBIN
NIELSEN, GEORGE O.
NOBLE, GEORGE P.
NOVAK, JIRI JAN
NUTTALL, DAVID S. C.
NYBERG, DONALD WALTER
OBRIEN, JAMES R.
O'CONNELL, KEWIN D.
OLESEN, NIELS JORGEN
OLSEN, CLIFFORD LEROY
OPTUND, CHRISTIAAN OTT, RICHARD PHILLIP
OTTEWELL, DENIS W.
PAGET, NORRIS RAYMOND
PATSCHKOWSKY, BENNO
PEARSON, GEORGE E.
PEEBLES, GEORGE ALUN
PEHOTA, ROBERT L.
PETERSON, EDWIN JOHN
PHILPOTT, STUART B.
PICHA, JOE LOUIS
POPE, MICHAEL ANTHONY
POUSETTE, RONALD DAN
POWER, GERARD T.
PRITCHARD, JOHN R. G.
PRUDHOMME, HECTOR R. T.
RATUSHNY, FRED M.
RAYER, FREDERICK GEO.
READ, PETER BURUND
REDMAN, DONALD ERNEST
REID, LORNE JAMES
REINER, THOMAS H.
RION, WILLIAM DAVID
ROBERTS, DONALD EARL
ROHLOFF, LYN H.
ROSS, PETER AUN
RUSHCALL, EDWARD M.
RUSK, WILLIAM E.
SAPERSTEIN, MANUEL J.
SAWATZKY, JOHN R.
SCOTT, ROBIN ADAM
SHIELDS, PETER A.
SILVERSIDES, RICHARD
SIMPKINSON, WILLIAM V.
SINGH, SUCHA
SISCOE, JOSEPH K.
SMITH, EDWARD LETSON
SMUIN, DONALD EDWARD
SOMERVILLE, GRAHAM F.
SPENCER, BRUCE E.
STEEVES, JOHN G.
STEWART, GARY McLEAN
STEWART, RODERICK D.
STIEH, CARL
SYMONS, DOUGUS ROBER
TAYLOR, GEORGE EDWARD
TAYLOR, JAMES C.
TAYLOR, WILLIAM B.
THOMPSON, GLENN A.
THOMPSON, WAYNE DALE
THOMSON, CECIL ROLF V.
THOMSON, DONALD S.
THOMSON, PETER F.
TODERAS, WILLIAM J.
TOOP, GERALD WESLEY
TRAPP, ROBERT GEORGE
TUFTS, TERENCE R.
TURNER, NIGEL A.
TZVETCOFF, GEORGE A.
VANSACKER, KENNETH G.
VERNON, JERROLD E.
VERSTEEG, PIETER
WASYLIK, JOSEPH W.
WHITE, GEOFFREY G.
WILKINSON, CLIFFORD H.
WILSON, GEORGE A.
WILTSE, RONALD KEITH
WOOLVERTON, ROY W.
WOOTTON, ARTHUR E.
WOOTTON, GEORGE C.
YOUNG, DARREL JACK
ARMSTRONG, JOHN E.
ADAMSON, ROBERT SIDNEY
ARMSTRONG, A. GORDON
BARRON, KENNETH E.
BAZELEY, EDWARD G. BAZETT, MICHAEL D.
BELLOW, DONALD
BUCKERY, ANDREW JAS.
BOULDING, JOHN DAVID
BOUUNGER, MAURICE N.
BOWKER, ARTHUR JAMES
BURCH, BARRY JOHN
BURGESS, ROBERT F.
BURTON, EDWARD HARRY
CALDWELL, CHAS. BRUCE
CAPLE, N. RODERICK B.
CARLYLE, JAMES W.
CARMICHAEL, JOHN R.
CARTER, WM. AUN
CIANCI, J. DONATO
COBURN, JOHN WYLLIE
COSTANZO, PETER F.
CRAMB, JOHN ALUN
DARKE, H. KENNETH
DAVIES, ALUN HOWARD
DE COURCY, DONALD
DEMPSTER, GEO. GAVIN
DENHOLME, JAMES LEON
DODGE, DONALD PHILLIP
DOTTO, GEORGE
DRAB, ALUN JULIAN
DRENNAN, JOSEPH A.
DRUMMOND, KENNETH JAS.
DUPREY, DONALD
EASTWOOOD, JOSEPH
ELKINS, FRANK GEORGE
ELVIDGE, GEORGE
ERICKSON, PHILIP T.
FALCONER, KEITH F.
FEATHERSTONE, HAROLD
FLETCHER, DAVID M.
FRAME, CLIFFORD H.
FREEDMAN, MAX
GIFFORD, ROBERT G.
HANSLIP, GAVIN
HARDY, JOHN ALLEN
HARRIS, T. MICHAEL
HARVEY, PETER
HAY, DAVID GEORGE
HAYWARD, HERBERT M.
HIK, WILLIAM
HIPP, THOMAS M.
HODGSON, STANLEY G.
HOLUND, FRED CHARLES
HOMER, UWRENCE JOHN
IRWIN, WILLIAM GRANT
JACKSON, AUN W.
JOHNSON, KENNETH M.
JOHNSSON, ESKIL L
JONES, HAROLD MERVIN
JONES, JOSEPH AUN
KEELE, KENNETH D.
KELLY, ROBERT JOHN
KENDRICK, ROBERT W.
KIRKUND, ROBERT W.
KUHN, ARTHUR
KULES, CHARLES ERIC
URSEN, RAYMOND S.
LEGG, EDWARD ROUND
LEPAGE, NORMAN ALLEN
LOEWEN, JOHN J. F.
MAH, EDWARD
MAR, JOHN
MARTIN, HAROLD CHAS.
MASON, GRENVILLE ROBT.
MATTERSON, B. DALL
MACKAY, EDWARD L.
McKAY, JOHN STUART
McKEE, JOHN HUGH
MACPHERSON, AUSTAIR
MEEK, JOHN QUINN
MELDRUM, MURRAY A. MORGAN, DONN LEACH
MULDER, TERENCE ERICK
NEWTON, KENNETH C. G.
NISHIZAKI, SUSUMU ROY
O'FUNAGAN, GERALD P.
OLSEN, WILLIAM CHAS.
O'SHAUGHNESSY, ROBERT
PALMER, JOHN WILLIAM
PARK, HOWARD M.
PARKINSON, WM. DENZIL
PAVLOFF, VUDIMIR N.
PETERS, TERENCE DAVID
PRESTON, JOHN GALT
PREVARSKI, MICHAEL
PRITCHARD, JAMES D.
RAWSON, DONALD A.
RILEY, PETER JULIAN
ROBLIN, ROBERT F.
ROBSON, WILLIAM L. P.
RODD, DENNIS GWYN
RUSSELL, J. G.
RYLL, ARTHUR WITHOLD
SAWATZKY, RONALD KURT
SCRATCHLEY, EDWARD WM.
SHERWOOD, WILLIAM L.
SHIU, SAMUEL DO WING
SKELDING, JAMES A.
SMITH, ALUN ROBERT
STERNE, RONALD ALFRED
SULTAN, RALPH GEO. M.
SUTHERUND, JOHN P.
TALBOT, RICHARD JOHN
TANAKA, EDWARD H.
THACKER, JAMES J.
TUFTS, FRANCIS CHAS.
UNWIN, ERNEST ARTHUR
VALDE, GLENN EDWIN
VIVIAN, GORDON EDWARD
WALLIS, GEORGE GRAHAM
WALSH, JOHN
WATTS, DONALD GEORGE
WHITTLE, DONALD JAS.
WILD, ALEX
WILLIAMS, F. MICHAEL G.
WILSON, WM. RICHARD
WONG, GEORGE TIM
WOOD, PATRICK OHARA
YANKE, MERVIN WILFRID
YEE, HARRY THOMAS
YIP, HOY WING
ZAIONCHKOVSKY, A. A.
AARON, JOHN D.
AFFLECK, BOB
AUKSMANN, BORIS
BOHNEN, ARTHUR F.
BROOKS, FRED J.
BROSSARD, DONALD K.
BROWN, ROBERT M.
BRYDON, JAMES R.
CAGNEY, TERENCE A.
COPUND, GORDON S.
CORMACK, GEO. D.
CORNISH, GEORGE
CSEPE, ALEX H.
DARCOVICH, JACOB
DAWSON, WILLIAM J.
DEETH, FRANK S.
DIETIKER, WALTER
DOUGUS, IAN
DUNCAN, DAVID
EDMONDS, ARTHUR
ENNIS, KEITH
FALL, STEWART T.
FJARLIE, EARL J.
FLYNN, ROBERT A. FONG, NELSON
FONT, D.
FORREST, D.
FOX, J. F.
FUKAZAWA, ROY H.
GAIRNS, CHARLES H.
GALE, ROBERT M.
GIBSON, GARY
GREGORY, WILLIAM
GRIFFIN, JAMES R.
GRUENTHAL, MARTIN H.
HARDWICKE, GORDON B.
HARPER, TONY
HEBBERT, ROBERT H.
HEPBURN, D. GRANT
HOWE, UWRENCE M.
HULSE, JOSEPH H.
ISFELD, V. L
JARVIS, DONALD G.
JOHNSON, CARL R.
JOHNSON, RAYMOND G.
JOHNSON, WILLIAM P.
JUDYPHI, N.
JUNG, DOUGUS
KANT, DONALD G.
KElLY, R. J.
KELSEY, HARLEY E.
KOMARNICKY, WALTER
KOYANAGI, M.
LEE, GEORGE
LETSON, JOHN H.
LEVY, JOSE A.
MADELEY, J. BRUCE D.
MARANDA, L.
MARTINEAU, RAYMOND
MITCHELL, JOHN B.
MOLLOY, JOS. R.
MORLEY, GORDON A.
MOUNTJOY, ERIC W.
MURRAY, DONALD R.
MUSSIO, SERGIO
MYKYTIUK, UURENTIUS
MACDONALD, ROBERT L.
MACGILLIVRAY, A. DEAN
McGRAW, JOHN JAMES
MACGREGOR, EDWIN R.
McGUIRE, JAMES D.
MACKAY, G. M.
McKAY, JAMES R. M.
McUURIN, DUNCAN M.
NODWELL, JOHN A.
NORMINTON, ROBERT S.
PARK, WILLIAM J.
PARKER, BADEN A.
PATERSON, JIM M.
PATTON, ROBERT J.
PELTON, THOMAS E.
PETERS, BRUNO F.
PLESHAKOV,
ROSEN, CALMAN
ROSENBERG, JEROME C.
RUEGG, FRANK A.
RUTLEDGE, WILLIAM J.
SAAREMAA, El NO
SABBE, ARNE L
SHELLEY, MELVIN J.
SMITH, ALUN R.
SMITH, JAMES H.
SPEER, EARL W.
STEWART, MORGAN A. R.
STILES, PETER
STROTHER, ARTHUR J.
SULLIVAN, JOHN T.
TALBOT, JACK T.
TAMAGI, T.
TRACEY, WILLIAM R.
VEALE, AUN C. VERESHACK, DAVID P.
VOGEL, HENRY B.
WERNER, JOSEPH
WILLI ANSON, DOUGLAS F.
WRIGHT, ALBERT E.
WALSH, JOHN H.
ZELIKOVSKY, ABE
COMMERCE
ALLAN, D. VICTOR
ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM S.
BAILEY, ROGER J. D.
BABER, CECIL
BARNES, REES V.
BENDRODT, ERIK HAROLD
BORG, RONALD PETER
BROAD, AUN E.
BRUK, BOSNIC JOHN
BUCHANAN, RONALD W.
BYBERG, EDWARD
CAMPBELL, DAVID V.
CAMPBELL, MARY E.
CARNSEW, NEILL T.
CASSELMAN, AUN R.
CASTLE, GARY C.
CHURCHMAN, VERNON G.
CLARKE, BETTY MARION
COLE, PETER DENNIS
CROWTHER, JOHN W. F.
CUMMINS, TERENCE P.
CURRIE, JAMES EDWARD
DAVIS, ARTHUR MAURICE
DAVIS, RAYMOND L.
DAWSON, JOHN CHARTERS
DEWHIRTS, GORDON H.
DOIG, JAMES IAN
DRINKWATER, BARRY K.
ENG, DAVID
ERICKSON, KEITH R.
FARAC, DUSAN A.
FISHMAN, MOLLIE
GARRAD, NORVAL VERNON
GHITTER, RONALD D.
GUSSNER, IRVING
GUSPIE, MICHAEL B.
GOLDRICK, MICHAEL K.
GREENING, JOHN C.
GRIFFIN, WILLIAM W.
GUNS, THOMAS BRIAN
HALL, DAVID ALBERT
HENDERSON, MATTHEW H.
HOLM, ARNOLD LEW
HORSMAN, JAMES D.
HUGHES, WM. VERNON
INOUYE, RAY HIASHI
JABOUR, DONALD ESSEY
JEFFERSON, PETER N.
JENKINSON, WM. GRAHAM
JEWITT, JOHN
JOHNSTON, E. PALMER
JOHNSTON, RONALD G.
HURST, RONALD E.
HUSBAND, JOHN K.
INK, NORMAN S.
KENNEDY, JAMES V.
KILLICK, RONALD M.
KITOS, RALPH MARTIN
KUBASEK, MICHAEL P. uvellee, bernard c.
lee, ken james
logie, john dee
lucas, john neil
lynch, bill wayne
madsen, john ouf
mahon, kenneth wm.
malone, james charles
McAllister, william b.
McARTHUR, JOHN H.
McATEER, KENNETH D.
McCAMEY, MARY ANN
McCULLOCH, HUGH JOHN
McDERMID, JOHN C.
McLUN, ROBERT HUGHES
McQUEEN, ROBERT WM.
MACSORLEY, CHAS. CURE
MACTAGGART, ALUN J.
McVEIGH, WM. HAROLD
MELLETT, RONALD C. S.
MERRILL, KEITH W.
MILLER, HARRY
MIYAZAKI, ELIZABETH
MONROE, B. JEAN
NELSON, ROBERT D.
OXSPRING, HARVEY K.
PANTAGES, ANTHONY P.
PUDER, RICHARD HAROLD
RAE, JAMES DOUGLAS
RAM, SHAGAT
RAMSAY, R. C.
RANDALL, M. J. G.
REDGRAVE, W. DOUGUS
RITCHIE, ALUN BRUCE
ROBERTSON, DONALD WM.
ROBERTSON, GORDON T.
ROBERTSON, JOHN HARRY
ROLFE, M. HAVELOCK
ROSEN, UWRENCE S.
RUDGE, GORDON LEONARD
SAMBOL, MATHEW
SAVAGE, JOHN KENNING
SCHUMACHER, STANLEY S.
SMITH, DOUGUS C.
SMITH, THEODORE A.
SORENSEN, KEITH THOS.
STAUGHTON, DOUGLAS V.
STENHOUSE, C. L
STEWART, RONALD K.
STOBBS, DOUGUS HENRY
THOMPSON, ELIZABETH A.
THRASHER, PETER D.
VANDERVOORT, STANLEY
VOGEL, WALTER M.
WILLIAMS, CHARLES B.
WILSON, JEAN
WOLFE, ISIDOR MORRIS
WOO, BYNG SING
WYMAN, RICHARD BRUCE
YAMAMOTO, NORORU
ABRAHAMSON, CAROL LEE
ALEXANDER, WM. ROY
ANDREW, PETER ROBERT
AURIOL, GEORGE ROBT.
BANFIELD, JOHN ALLEN
BAXTER, ALLEN
BENNETT, KEITH JOHN
BOURNS, CHAS. DAVID
BOYLE, ERNEST EDWARD
CALKINS, DAVID BRUCE
CHESS, M. R.
COLLS, JOHN MICHAEL
CONWAY, GEOFFREY R.
COOK, UWRENCE EDWARD
CORBOULD, BRIAN B. COWIE, JAMES F.
DARKE, ERNEST WILFRED
DAVIS, KENNETH BRIAN
DAWSON, ROBERT MUIR
DELONG, H. THOMPSON
DEVITO, LEONARD JAMES
DREW, JOHN DAVID
DROZDZIK, CHARLES A.
DUTTON, ROSS WILSON
ESKO, SANDFRID I.
FINDUY, ALUN G.
FINDUY, JACK AUN
FOSTER, ANTHEA W.
FYFE, WM. GEORGE
GARTSIDE, WILLIAM M.
GILL, SINGH SARDUL
GLEIG, DONALD B. F.
GORDON, CHARLES ATHOL
GREEN, HAROLD
GREEN, ROWUND B.
GREGORY, PETER JAMES
HALL, D. S.
HILL, JOSEPH ROYSTON
HINKE, MARGARET C.
HOLDEN, DOUGUS
HORSEY, EDWARD F.
HOUGHUND, L JOAN
JONES, ROBERT EVANS
KUEBER, PHILIP THOMAS
UCEY, DENNIS S.
UVIS, CHAS. EDWARD
LECKIE, PETER DUNCAN
LECKIE, W. MERRILL
LECHUK, GEORGE
LEE, ROBERT
LEGGE, GERALDINE JUNE
LIGHTBODY, MILFORD A.
LIND, STANLEY
LODGE, TERRENCE OWEN
LONEY, RICHARD COOPER
LONG, RALPH
LOOMER, HERBERT MYER
LOZOWSKY, PETER
LYNES, KENNETH P.
MANN, JAMES GILMORE
MARTIN, ALEXANDER
MAYNARD, JOHN KERR
McALPINE, EDWARD A.
McDONALD, DANIEL L.
MaclNNES, ROBERT ROSS
MaclNNES, MICHAEL C.
MacUREN, ANGUS
McLEAN, HELEN ETHEL
McLEOD, JOHN TAYLOR
MacMILUN, DOUGUS T.
MIDDLETON, KEITH JOHN
MILLER, DAVID M.
MONTAINE, LORNE A.
MORROW, BOSWELL R.
MURRAY, MORAG JEAN
NEIL, RUPERT C.
O'SULLIVAN, PETER FRED
PAGET, JAMES F. NOEL
PALMER, ALUN HERBERT
PEACOCK, ROBERT L.
PEARSON, ROBERT L
PETERSON, JERROLD K.
PISAPIO, ALBERT HENRY
PRENTICE, ELIZABETH R.
PTUCHA, JOHN JACOB
RAYER, JOHN
RIBARITS, WILLIAM J.
RIDINGTON, JOHN F.
ROLFE, CLIFFORD M.
ROMANCHUK, PETER ROY
SHIPPOBOTHAM, JOHN P.
SINCUIR, ROBERT S. SKY, MILTON
SPARE, GORDON
STICKUND, MICHAEL H.
TAYLOR, JEAN ANN
THACKRAY, ALUN D.
THODESON, JOHN CONRAD
TRIPP, LEIGHTON 0.
VAUGHAN, LORNE DAVID
WESTERLUND, BRUNO V. W.
WIGEN, VERNON RAE
WILLIAMS, BRUCE M.
WILLIAMS, BRYAN
WILLIAMS, MICHAEL
WILSON, MARY LOIS
WOOSTER, ANTHONY KING
WYMAN, WILLIAM ROBERT
YERXA, DON WINSLOW H.
ZARNKE, GERRARD ERIC
ANGEL, JEROME HARVEY
ANTLE, JOHN V. S.
ATKINS, GLEN CHARLES
ATKINSON, JOHN LYLE
AULD. IAN JAMES M.
BAARDSEN, ARNOLD P.
BADOVINAC, GEORGE
BARTLETT, ROBERT E.
BASI, BHAGAT INGH
BRADY, ROBERT HENRY
BROWN, JOHN B.
BROWN, JOHN JOSEPH
BULMAN, PETER RALPH
CAMPBELL, NORMAN S.
CANT, ERIC GEORGE D.
CAREW, N. DARRELL
CAULFIELD, JAMES E.
CHAN, KENT SONNY C.
COLTART, DUDLEY W.
COOK, THOMAS ARTHUR
COOPER, BRIAN ALISON
COOPER, JOHN BREMNER
CVETKOVICH, JOSEPH
DAVIDSON, COLIN GRANT
DIXON, RAY SPENCER
DIXON, ROBERT TRENT
ECCOTT, JAMES ELIOT
EGAN, JOHN BRUCE
ELLIOTT, GORDON A.
EMERTON, WILLIAM ROBT.
ESSELMONT, WM. JAMES
FINKELSTEIN, NORTON
GRIFFITHS, JOHN BARRY
HAMILTON, JOHN F.
HANSEN, JOHN INGE
HUDSON, RALPH EDWARD
ILCZENKO, ALEXANDER
ISAAC, RONALD JOHN
JONES, KENNETH F.
JOYCE, MURRAY R.
KENT, RICHARD F.
KNIGHT, EDWARD HOWDEN
LECOVIN, GERALD
LEE, JACK
LEINWEBER, ALUN G.
LONZA, MARTIN
LYNE, HERBERT D.
MARIK, JAROMIR
McCAMEY, W. UFAYETTE
McDONALD, PETER M.
MACDONALD, SOMERLED
McLEOD, CHAS. GORDON
MACLEOD, ARTHUR ROBT.
MACNICOL, JAMES M.
MEYER, RICHARD BURTON
NEWTON, JOHN FARADAY
NISHIZAKI, HIDEAKI H. FORESTRY
FIRST YEAR
NORRIS, MACAUUY C.
OHASHI, GENICHI
O'ROURKE, WM. GARRY
PARKER, WARWICK H.
PEPPER, MELVIN BRUCE
PETERS, PETER JOHN
PEW, COLIN GIBSON
PIPER, ROBERT GEORGE
PUNT, ALBERT CHARLES
PURVIS, WELDON B.
QUAN, JOE
RAE, BASIL ALLEN
RAINER, JAMES ARTHUR
RIDLEY, JOHN CHARLES
ROBERTSON, ALEXANDER
SALTER, KATHRYN M.
SCHULTZ, RONALD F.
SLIGHT, GORDON PETER
SPRINGER, ROBERT JOHN
STEWART, DAVID JAMES
STEWART, F. ROBERT
STEWART, WILLIAM R.
TAYLOR, GEORGE HARVEY
THOMAS, JOHN MALDWYN
THOMSON, WILSON BRUCE
TINKER, ROBERT PERCY
UNDERHILL, J. GERALD
VERCHERE, ARTHUR WM.
VOLKER, RUSSELL JAMES
WALLS, STANLEY R.
WOLRIGE, AUN F.
WONG, PAUL
WONG, NORMAN WAH C
BALOGH, MIKE
BELL, MARCUS A. M.
DALGLEISH, ANDREW E.
DAVIDSON, JOHN G. N.
DUGGAN, ROBERT E.
EIDSVIK, HAROLD K.
GILBERT, PHILIP G.
HINDLEY, EARLE W.
HOWARD, EDMUND W.
JACKSON, JAMES K.
JEANES, TREVOR G.
JEBSON, DOUGUS
KENNEDY, URRY L.
LITTLETON, DENNIS G.
LOMAN, AGUST A.
MEAGHER, MICHAEL D.
MUNRO, R. NEIL
NYUND, EDO
PIGEON, HENRI JOSEPH
RENSHAW L. FRANCIS
RICHARDS, DOUGUS P.
SAVOU, RAYMOND A.
SMITH, RICHARD B.
SMYTH, NEIL PATRICK
STROMBERG, RONALD J.
VALG, LEONID
WINKWORTH, ALFRED V.
APPLEBY, PHILIP W. R.
CHESTER, G. STANLEY EASTWOOOD, JOHN W.
GOURUY, ROBT. BRUCE
GRAY, JOHN ANDREW
HARTMAN, FAY HERBERT
KREWAZ, JOSEPH
PEARSE, PETER
POPA, CORNEL
RICKSON, DOUGUS E.
BRAHNIK, FREDERICK
CAMPBELL, LLOYD ALUN
DUFFY, PATRICK JAMES
DUNSMORE, R. O.
FAJRAJSL, MIROSUV R.
GRAHAM, DONALD M.
HARPER, ALEXANDER J.
HARRIS, PETER
KEMP, DAVID BURNETT
KENT, HENRY DORRELL
MARSHALL, DONALD GEO.
MARSHALL, JAMES E.
MACRAE, RONALD D.
SCHON, DONALD 0. L.
SOCHER, HEIKO, J. C.
TOOVEY, JOHN W.
BOYCHUK, DEANNA M.
BROWN, BONNIE E.
BURROWS, KATHLEEN L R.
CLEASBY, BARBARA A.
DALY, M. GEORGINA
DAVIS, DIANE LORNA
DRISCOLL, MARY JILL
FERGUSSON, A. G.
FOWLER, M. ELIZABETH
GROVE, GLENDA M.
HANCOCK, SHIRLEY A.
HUNTER, E. JOANNE
UPWORTH, NORMA RAE
LEPAGE, SHARON GAIL
LERET, AGNES M.
MOIR, MARGARET JEAN
MOWATT, MARY E.
NELSON, M. MAXINE
PARMLEY, M. JEAN
PAUL, DOROTHY MAE
PETERS, DIANE
REID, SHIRLEY JEAN
ROBERTS, JOAN EUYNE
ROBERTSON, BONNIE M. J.
ROWBERRY, JUNE A.
SINE, ELSPETH LOU
TAYLOR, IRMA M.
TRICK, PATRICIA A.
VANCE, JULIA ROSE
VAWDEN, KATHLEEN J.
WEBSTER, LYNN R.
WIENS, ESTHER
WILSON, DIANNE E.
WOYWITKA, LORNA S.
ALSBURY, MARY DIANE
BIRCH, ELIZABETH M.
22a BOWELL, DOROTHY RAE
BRACHER, ANNE H.
BROWN, BARBARA ANN
ARLSON, LOIS M.
COMPTON, BARBARA E.
DAUGHERTY, JANET L.
DIENO, AUDREY CURA
EDMONDS, MARY JANE
ENGLISH, PATRICIA J.
GERBER, EUINE F.
GRAHAM, VERNA JEAN
HALPIN, CONSTANCE B.
HAMILTON, IRENE JANET
HARRIES, ELIZABETH
HOBBY, FRANCES MURIEL
HORNE, DOROTHY S. K.
HUSBAND, MARY ALICE
KIMPTON, VIVIAN M.
MATHESON, ELIZABETH
MATZEN, IRENE
McFARUNE, RUTH ANNE
McINTYRE, MOLLIE C.
MclVOR, JOAN L
MONEY, SHEIU M.
MYERS, MARGARET S.
ORTON, JOAN E. E.
PHILP, GERTRUDE L.
POVAH, MARY MARGARET
RAE, SUZANNE
ROBERTSON, G. BETH
SABISTON, VIVIAN ANN
SHERRY, MARGARET JEAN
SLUGGETT, M. R. PEGGY
SMITH, SHEIU IRENE
SNYDER, M. MAUREEN
SOUTHER, DOROTHY H.
TALBOT, SUSAN E.
TWA, MAUREEN G.
VIRTUE, CAROL RUTH
WEIR, E. CHRISTINE
WENSINK, PHYLLIS M.
WIEDRICK, PHYLLIS R.
WOOLLIAMS, JANE M.
CAIRNS, RUTH LILLIAN
DICKSON, AILSA RUTH
FOOTE, JUDITH JANE
FORRESTER, NORMA GAY
FUKUYAMA, CHIYEKO
GILBERT, CAROL
GOUDY, KATHERINE ROSE
HAWKINS, SHIRLEY JOAN
JAGGER, BARBARA JOAN
KIDDOO, MARGARET V.
KOWLUK, MARY BETH
MANSON, BARBARA JOAN
MACLENNAN, MARY
McPHERSON, ELSPETH J.
MEADOWS, SYLVIA M.
PARSON, MARY KATHLEEN
PENTUND, ANN McGILL
ROBERTSON, LOIS
SATINOVSKY, JOSEPHINE
SHARP, J. KATHLEEN
SMITH, DONNA ROSE
VENABLES, SHIRLEY A.
YOUNG, MARY MARGOT
YUK, GLORIA JANE BARBEAU, JACQUES R.
BASFORD, STANLEY R.
BECK, HOWARD LEIGHTON
BERGER, THOMAS RODNEY
BUIR, HUGH MACLEAN
BRAIDWOOD, THOMAS R.
BUCHANAN, RICHARD D.
BUTLER, PETER WOODS
BYRNE, BEVERLEA P. M.
CAMERON, HAMISH C.
CAMERON, TIMOTHY P.
CHERTKOFF, GARY
COLLINGWOOD, THOMAS A.
DANDREA, RICHARD 0.
DONALD, WILLIAM IVOR
DONEGANI, FRANCIS T.
DROSSOS, NICHOUS
DUSANJ, JOHN H. SINGH
FRITH, HECTOR GEE N.
FUJISAWA, GEORGE K.
GHITTER, HARVEY AUN
GILHOOLY, ROBERT
GREBSKI, EDWARD S.
GROBERMAN, JOEL
GUILE, ROBERT HENRY
GUTTORMSSON, KRISTJAN V.
HARPER, JAMES LEITH
HARRISON, ELOUISE R.
HERBRIK, GEORGE R.
HOLLINRAKE, HAROLD A.
HOSSIE, DAVID S. D.
HOSSIE, M. RENDINA K.
HUTCHISON, ROBERT B. M.
JASICH, ANTHONY J.
JEPHSON, RONALD JOHN
KEMP, GERALD MARVIN
KENNY, BRENTON D.
KIRK, ORIS J.
LEVINE, SEFTON LEWI
LEW, CHUCK
MAIR, KENNETH RAFE
MANNING, MERVYN
MACAUUY, JAMES A.
MACDONALD, DONALD D.
MACKENZIE, GRAHAM
MACWILLIAM, DONALD A.
NICHOLLS, TERRANCE
RAPANOS, GEORGE PETER
SHAW, DUNCAN WELD
SIMPSON, BRIAN
SOULE, MARSHALL M.
SPENCER, JOHN EVAN
STANDFIELD, DEREK H.
VANDERVLIET, EDWARD L.
VOGEL, RICHARD HUNTER
WALUCE, WILLIAM K.
WATT, KENNETH GORDON
WHIST, JARL AAGE B.
WRIGHT, J. HARVEY
AIRD, HUGH C.
AUSTIN, JACOB
BEAUBIER, J. DEAN
BOUCK, JOHN CHARLES
CASSADY, GEORGE P.
CONSTABARIS, JOHN
CREIGHTON, DENIS W. H.
DALUS, GEORGE DENNIS
DAVIES, WILLIAM HUGH
DEWEERDT, MARK MURRAY
DROST, IAN LOUDEN
EDWARDS, JAMES H.
I AW... enderton, stewart wm.
errico, robert thos.
goldman, nisson m.
goldsmith, daniel
green, stephen h.
haereid, hans bjoern
henslowe, peter j. l.
king, lawrence aun
lee, edward graham
lee, george n.
logie, roy
martin, wm. robert
matthews, g. richard r.
McConville, john m.
McGINLEY, FRANCIS G.
McLEOD, JOHN F.
McLEOD, SHIRLEY E. KAY
NYUNDER, CLIVE V.
PAUL, YVONNE PATRICIA
PEARKES, JOHN ANDRE
PRENTICE, THOMAS B.
ROBERTS, W. TREVELYAN
SCOW, ALFRED JOHN
THOMAS, HARRY F.
THOMSON, GORDON W.
UNDERHILL, W. RICHARD
WALKER, CARL IAN
WASYLKOW, WALTER C.
WHITE, DONALD STAVERS
WHITWORTH, DOUGUS V.
WILSON, JOHN GALT
WOOD, JOHN FIWUYSON
WORRALL, WILLIAM JOS.
BEACH, AUN WINSTON
BRUMMITT, JOHN R.
BURR, JOHN BARTLETT
BURTNICK, WALTER
CURK, MICHAEL D.
COSGROVE, THEODORE J.
DAWKINS, OSWALD S.
DEJONG, BERNARD PETER
DICK, KENNETH DAVID Y.
FINNEMORE, BRIAN I.
FLATHER, BARRIE C.
FORBES, FRANCIS D.
FORWARD, AUN DOUGUS
FREDERICKSON, JOHN M.
FROESE, DANIEL
GILL, GURDEV SINGH
GILLANDERS, DAVID A.
HAKSTIAN, ROBERT W.
HANCOCK, RONALD JOHN
HARDWICK, DAVID F.
HEFFERNAN, DOUGUS D.
HIBBERD, JOHN CYRIL
HINKE, JOSEPH ANTHONY
HOSSIE, BARBARA E.
UHAY, WM. DOUGUS
MARITS, MALDUS
MARTIN, DONALD CARL
MARTINKOVA, HELENA
MATHESON, DONALD C.
MACDONALD, A. E.
McPHERSON, GORDON B. MACRAE, CATHERINE D.
MURAKAMI, ERNEST F.
PITTS, M. SHARON
RANGER, AGNES BETTY L.
SAUNDERS, ALEX M.
SMART, JOHN M.
STEWART, DONALD
STRANG, ROBERT IAN
SUTHERLAND, ROY A.
SYMONDS, JOHN GARY
TAM, ENNIO ANDREA
TAN, ENG SENG
TEASDALE, DONALD N.
THOMAS, ARTHUR NORMAN
TRAFTON, WALTER DAVID
WHEELER, JOHN S.
WILBEE, G. STANLEY
YAMANAKA, GEORGE JO JI
BARNETT, ROBERT D.
BEBB, DOUGLAS EVAN
BERRY, KENNETH
BOON, DAVID A.
CAIRNS, ALEXANDER R. M.
CHONG, HENRY
CURK, DENNIS M.
CURK, NIGEL W.
CLAY, MICHAEL GRAHAM
DAVIS, THOMAS W.
EISENSTEIN, BARNEY
FRASER, DONALD G.
GAIN, DONALD B. M.
GALBRAITH, L. T. CRAIG
HALL, JOHN VERNON GEO.
HALL, THAIS L. E.
HERD, JAMES AUN
HUTCHINS, DONALD JOHN
JOW, ELEANOR
JUBA, EMIL
KARJAU, ROY JOHN
KOCH, PETER RUDOLF D.
KORNDER, LEE DONALD
LAUENER, ROUND W.
MARTIN, MATTHEW JACK
McGHEE, JOHN JAMES
McLEAN, EDWARD HARRY
MACLEAN, R. BRUCE
MORRISON, GEORGE E.
NELSON, RODGER, A. C.
NESTMAN, JERRY M.
NIXON, RODNEY THOMAS
PEARCE, WILLIAM G.
PERETZ, DWIGHT IRVING
PHILIPPSON, GERALD J.
PRASLOSKI, PETER F.
PRITCHARD, RINFORD B.
QUENVILLE, NOEL F.
ROSS, JOHN R. H.
RUTHERFORD, TERENCE
SAWYER, K. DIANE
SCHOFER, ROY CARL
SIMONETTA, LUIGI R.
SLEATH, GEORGE WM.
STANTON, RODGER CYRIL
STEKL, EVA MARIE
STEWART, GERALD NOEL
STEWART, IRWIN F.
STONIER, PETER FINDEN
THORDARSON, THEODORE
TURPIN, J. E. HARTTEY
VAUGHAN,FRANK W.
WATT, JOHN GORDON
WILLIAMS, MAURICE E.
WONG, JOHN
YOUNG, ROBERT NEILL NURSING
FIRST YEAR
AIKENHEAD, DONALD H.
ARNOLD, W. JOHN D.
ASPINALL, ROY J.
ATKINSON, KENNETH G.
BAERG, PETER JOHN
CAESAR, JOHN JULIUS
CARSON, PATRICK J.
CAVE, GEORGE D.
CHWELOS, NICHOUS
COOPER, DONALD ASHLEY
COX, GORDON EDWARD
DONNELLY, KENNETH R.
FLATHER L. W. ELWOOD
FRACKSON, S. HARRY
FUNG, EDWARD W.
GELL, GORDON WILFRED
GORDON, MARY ETHELWYN
HARLOS, ROUND EDWIN
HENNING, JAMES NEWTON
HEWSON, ROY THOMAS
HOBSON, JIM DIGBY
KENT, GERALDINE E.
KINAHAN, PATRICK JOHN
KOOP, WALTER
KRAHN, JOHN JACOB
LE HUQUET, J. RAYMOND
LEWCHUK, WILLIAM
LUKENCHUK, JOHN JOS.
MANDEVILLE, ALEX F.
MANDEVILLE, AUDREY M.
MARKHAM, WILLIAM G.
MACDONALD, WALTER C.
McFARUNE, WILLIAM J.
MESHER, FRANKLIN S.
NAROD, PHILIP
NEMETZ, ARNOLD DAVID
NEWHOUSE, AUN L
POSTUK, PETER
RADFORD, HUGH W.
SCARFO, JOHN R.
SCOTT, LIU LEE
STEIGH, ALFRED D.
SMITH, DAVID M.
SMITH, ROBERT BEN
STRINGER, DONALD WM.
TRELOAR, E. JAMES
URE, JEAN ADELE
WESTGATE, HUGH D.
WILLMS, JOHN
WILSON, ROBERT R.
WORTH, ANN JULIS
YURKOVICH, ANTHONY
ZIMMERMAN, HAROLD W.
ADAIR, MARY DREW
BACKSTROM, LOISE A.
BENSON, E. SHIRLEY MAE
BRAY, A. DIANE
BROWN, BARBARA ANN
BUCK, CARMEL
CAMERON, MARGARET MAY
CARR, MARILYN C.
COOPER, ANN MAUREEN
DARBEY, DIANE MARY E. DICKINSON, VEDA J.
DONALD, ELIZABETH J.
GILMOUR, ANN G.
GUDMAN, DIANE V. P.
HILLS, S. DIANE
HOLMES, D. PATRICIA
KAHR, JOAN ALEXIS
LEONARD, TANNIS S.
McCRACKEN, MAXINE G.
MACDONALD, MALUINA A.
McEOWN, MIRIAM I.
McINTYRE, ETHEL M.
MESTON, JULIA H.
MOI, BERTE LILY
MONTGOMERY, JANET E.
MOODY, AUDREW RUTH
MORGAN, MARGARET ANNE
O'BRIEN, ERIN LOUISE
O'CONNELL, S. MAUREEN
PATERSON, J. PATRICIA
TAYLOR, MARION G.
TSUJIMURA, M. MARGARET
UDESEN, MARY PAULINE
WHITTINGTON, C. ANNE
WILCOCK M. FREDA
ARNET, ELLEN A.
BAMBER, VERNON F.
BELLOWS, ALBERT L.
BORSATO, FREDRICK A.
BURNSTEIN, MITCHELL
DAVIES, JOHN
DEMARCOS, EARL C.
FYFE, JOHN STANLEY
GERRARD, CHARLES F. H.
HADFIELD, ROSEMARY E.
HUCUUK, ERAST
IDDINS, KENNETH J.
KARLSON, HARRY
UTIMER, JOHN A.
LEONG, FAYE QUEN
LE VAE, AUSTIN JOHN
LITTLE, EDWARD BRIAN
LOUIE, KENNETH
LUM, CHOY GING
McCALLUM, DOUGUS F.
McDONALD, KENNETH G.
MULU, G. ELIZABETH
NOLON, DONALD ANDREW
ORTYNSKY, OREST JOS.
OSBORNE, HAROLD E.
PARKER, JOHN E.
PAYZANT, KEITH W.
QUAN, LOUISE G. H.
RANAGHAN, MARY ROMA
SETO, WAH KUEY
SHARPE, ELAINE ALICE
SHATZKO, PAUL
SIMONSON, ERIC J.
SIMS, THEODORE
SPEVAKOW, ROBERT L.
STOCKLEY, DAVID G.
STUART, SONIA C.
WOODSWORTH, JANICE L ii
ATHERTON, DAPHNE L
BACON, AUN HARRY
BOXER, UVIE
CAMERON, DONALD KEITH
CATHERWOOD, ANN MARIE
CREIGHTON, WILLIAM A.
CUNNINGHAM, MAURICE A.
DALBY, VIRGINIA C.
DONG, MAY
DUFLEIT, RENE MICHEL
FRY, HOWARD CALVIN
GOODUND, KATHERINE M.
HALL, JOHN CHARLES
HAYDUK, JOHN STANLEY
HOLMES, DONALD GORDON
MACDONALD, BRUCE W.
MACLEAN, JAMES ALUN
MILNER, EARL
MOORE, EUINE MARION
MORRIS, DENNIS A.
NIMI, PETER K.
PHILLIPS, GEORGE B.
PICKERING, WILFRED E.
POLLOCK, KENNETH ROSS
RANGER, ERIC ALFREY
RICHARDSON, DONALD D.
SILVAN, ALEX
STEARMAN, HOBART F.
STEVENS, MARILYN I.
TUCKER, ROY K.
WICK, JOHNNY H.
WIEDRICK, NORMAN H.
WISE, THEODORE SANDY
BEST, BETTY JEAN
BRETT, M. DOUGUS
CORRADO, AMERIGO A.
DOBB, THEODORE C.
GILMORE, GERALDINE W.
GUSSFORD, R. GERALD
GOSHKO, XENIA C.
HILL, DONALD R.
HUGHES, CLIVE R.
ING, RAYMOND
MARSHALL, MARILYN C.
McCORMACK, JOHN A.
McKELUR, JAMES ROBT.
MOLNAR, ANDREW F.
MURDOCH, JOHN H.
OWENS, L. JEAN
REDLINE, DAVID
SIMMONS, PATRICIA A.
SINCUIR, GARY DANE
STAFFORD, BARBARA I.
STEINLEY, CALVIN F.
SYMONS, HEATHER JOAN
TOBAN, SANDRA L.
VAN ACKEREN, JOAN L. R.
WONG, KAREEN BONITA L. R.
YASUI, ROY Y.
ALDERMAN, RICHARD B.
BAGGS, BRIAN C.
BEAGLE, MERVINE DAWN bergen, robert c.
debuysscher, robert a.
edwards, wiliam v.
falk, herman j.
fletcher, donald
gannon, norene a.
gavin, elma marie
gibson, wm. garnet
jones, magreta g.
joughin, william h.
kent, stephanie joan
kirk, hugh
knight, joseph irving
krongvist, roger
lervold, oddmund
lydiard, bonnie j.
mccallum, elizabeth m.
McCarthy, john l.
macfarune, reginald
mundle, gordon embert
perlstrom, roy hilmer
petersen, karen e.
runnalls, joyce e.
sainas, bessie
smart, mary w.
smith, william h.
spence, donn ernest
street, richard h.
urquhart, kenneth g.
walters, harold a.
young, lois m. irene
BOULDING, JAS. PHILLIP
DRISCOLL, DIANE I.
DWYER, LORETTA ANNE
GEGGIE, IAN MARTIN
GOODSHIP, JEFFREY L.
HEALEY, KENNETH HUGH
KEPPER, ELEANOR K.
LEGAGE, MAE YVONNE
LYMAN, EVA
McGARRIGLE, GAIL L.
MORRISETTE, PATRICIA
PEARSON, MARY JEAN
ROOTS, FREDERICK F.
WILKINSON, LLOYD J.
WRIGHT, JANIE DIANE
AMERMAN, DALE E.
ASGEIRSSON, THORDIS
BALDEN, MARY ANN
BOUSCHARD, PHYLLIS L.
BRAITHWAITE, JOHN WM.
BREWER, SHIRLEY L.
BROWN, JOAN LOIS
BUCKUND, JOYCE M.
COBBIN, JACK M.
COPPOCK, AUDREY MARY
DE RIMANOCZY, MAGDA
DONALDSON, EDITH K.
FUDER, SALLY
GIBSON, WILMA MARY
HENDERSON, ANITA L.
HU, MARION YA PIN
JACKSON, DOUGUS L.
SOCIAL WORK KING, A. WILLIAM
KLOEPFER, ARTHUR
MARCH, GEORGE JOHN
McCOMBIE, SARAH
NANN, RICHARD
PATON, JOHN R. D.
PISAPIO, LYOYD M. W.
REES, HELEN CUIRE
REES, MARY JANE
RITCHIE, INA J.
ROGERS, ROGER HAYWARD
ROSE, SHEUGH ANN
SOMME RS, GERALD A.
WEBB, GERALD KIETH
WHITE, BILLIE DOROTHY
WILKIE, GEORGE A.
ZUKERMAN, HAROLD
BAXTER, MAUREEN E.
BUCKHALL, ROBERT J.
BREALEY, UURENCE D.
CALDATO, ANTONIA REMO
CAMERON, JOHN RONALD
CAMPBELL, KENNETH
CATHERALL, GEORGE WM.
CAUFIELDS, PETER J.
CONNOLLY, PHILIP H.
CORNISH, NORMAN C.
DANIELS, LEROI BRIAN
DAY, HOWARD W.
DESPREZ, ROGER L.
DOBSON, JACK WALTER
FARNCOMBE, SCOT
FERGUSON, CHAS. WM.
FETHERSTONHAUGH, F. A.
FLORANCE, GAIL E.
FUTCHER, GEORGE G.
GALBRAITH, GEORGE WM.
GIBBARD, KENNETH CHAS.
GILBERT, JOHN RALPH
GRAHAM, BARBARA ANN
GRAHAM, SHEIU HELEN
HALSEY, EUGENE J.
HAMMARSTROM, LOUISE J.
HOOD, JEAN AUDREY
HUNTER, UURENCE P.
INOUYE, KIKOKO
JACOBSEN, WILLIAM A.
KAETHLER, JAKOB ADOLF
KENWOOD, JOHN W.
KING, DAVID J.
URSEN, DANNY L.
LAURSEN, AUDREY P. H.
LOCKHART, JEAN M. C.
LOWTHER, JOHN JEROME
LUBE, EUGENE M.
LYON, K. R. VAUGHAN
MARCUZZI, LILLIANA J.
MARTINSON, A. RALPH
McMAHON, VERNON H.
McMAHON, JAMES P.
MORGAN, JOHN HERBERT
NEILL, DOREEN HILDA NEUMANN, JOHN B.
PANKRATZ, HARRY E.
PARKIN, WILLIAM
PETTIS, WALTER HARVEY
ROOTS, J. WALTER
ROUSSEAU, RENE C.
RUTHERFORD, ANDREW H.
SANGSTER, MAUREEN W.
SANFORD, PETER L.
SEARS, CHARLES JOHN
STAINTON, N. R. KEITH
TAYLOR, DON NEWMAN
THOMAS, PATRICK H.
TOMKINS, EVELYN M.
UPSON, GEORGE W B.
WALDEN, ADELENE M.
WHITE, ANNIE ISABELLE
WILSON, ROBERT JAMES
WINTERINGHAM, V. DAVE
WOLSTENCROFT, JOAN E.
ZAHARKO, DANIEL S.
i
>4 NABOB
fQ09
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«**£
Wfc'
rlV^UV^ ADVERTISING THE U.B.C. WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Massey Foundation Silver Award Winner—1953
.    .    .    .    one of the many projects developed
since 1944 by the UNIVERSITY ARCHITECTS.
This  gymnasium   was  designed   in  association  with
Professor Lasserre, head of the Faculty of Architecture
242 An advertisement directed to
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Ja*A
YOUNG   MEN
CHOOSING  A
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and Well-paid PROFESSION
For young men of active, enquiring minds contemplating a business career, few opportunities offer greater
promise than Chartered Accountancy.
Chartered Accountants see "backstage" in a wide variety
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Because of the high standards set by the Institute, wide
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If you — when you leave U.B.C. —are anxious to
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THE INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
OFBRITISH COLUMBIA
475 HOWE ST., VANCOUVER 1
243 Phone: PAcific 6338-9
944 Richards
Vancouver, B. C.
g.WBow&Co.JltA.
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SELECT    YOUR     CHALLENGER
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Manufacturers of the
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Fine Papers, Stencils
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660 Seymour St. Vancouver, B. C.
MArine 6556 - 6557
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FACTORY—LONDON, ENGLAND
244 for
BOOKS    •    PAMPHLETS
BROCHURES • MAGAZINES
WRIGLEY PRINTING CO
printers of
TOTEM
STUDENT DIRECTORY
SIWASH and LEGAL NOTES
LIMITED
Phone: MA 9257
1112 SEYMOUR STREET
Campus Strives For New Housing
The stop gap huts at UBC are nine years old. A
scattered 150 of them make up the University's infamous
"shacktown," so-called because the shabby huts resemble
Vancouver's False Creek shacks. Flung into emergency
use in the veteran boom after World War Two, the
campus huts were never replaced and barely maintained
by a crippled budget. They are still labelled "temporary
buildings" in the campus layout plans.
This Spring, students campaigned and failed to get a
government grant to replace some of the huts. They
campaigned for better residences because "... some
rooms are 58 square feet in size, there are 17.7 students
per toilet and per shower in some areas, rooms are separated by i^-inch plywood partitions; four huts, each 20
by 80 feet overall, house a total of 72 students under
hazardous fire and health conditions."
The Ubyssey tossed the yeast first into what rapidly
became a witches brew. A series of Ubyssey stories exposed "disgraceful conditions" in the residential huts at
Fort and Acadia camps. Rolling up their sleeves, some
900 out-of-town students living in the campus huts began
writing letters home and to their MLA's urging a capital
grant for better housing.
To follow the Ubyssey's initiative, Student Council
appointed a student housing committee. "Get me all the
facts and figures," said Council president Ivan Feltham.
The Alumni Association, some faculty members, and
some of the University administration, and many people
outside the University added their voices to the pressure
campaign. But echoes fell on deaf ears in the Victoria
parliament buildings.
The witches brew needed more ingredients.
Two Ubyssey staffers, armed with copies of a fact-
loaded housing edition, visited the legislature in Victoria.
They returned 30 hours later with news: Opposition
leader Arnold Webster (CCF), Liberal leader Arthur
Laing, and Laborite Tom Uphill were in favor of a
large capital grant to UBC. But the man who is a UBC
law graduate, said No. Robert Bonner, Attorney General
and Minister of Education, predicted accurately that
UBC would get the thin end of the budget.
(Later UBC got $200,000 added to its current grant,
none of an asked for $10 million capital grant.)
Time began to run out. In Victoria the budget was
ready for the first of many proofs.   The witches brew
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George 0. Vale, Manager
bubbled and began to boil. Committee co-chairman Don
Laishley and John Turnbull conferred with Ubyssey
housing editor Dick Dolman, and shelved plans to
organize a repeat of the great trek.
Instead the three presented Student Council with a
report, simultaneously distributed to community groups
throughout B. C. The report showed "drastic" living
conditions in the hut residences. Council president Ivan
Feltham immediately warned he might call for an official
investigation of housing conditions if a further student
report warranted such a move.
There was no official investigation. Dr. Gordon Shrum,
UBC housing administrator, said he might be obliged
to close the hut residences if an official report was made.
And student residents at Fort and Acadia, according
to a comprehensive Ubyssey survey, stood three to one
against having the huts closed down. Their reason: No
alternative residence is available and none could be
expected for some time.
HOUSE OF THE ORIENT
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WISHES THE GRADUATING
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Supplying an embracive insurance market to agents
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246 A big bank
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Entrance to Vancouver Branch
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
76 BRANCHES TO SERVE YOU IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
The University Book Store
The Book Store was established for the convenience of
students and has effected a considerable saving to the
students in time and money. It is prepared to supply
all text books required for the various courses offered
in the University, also such articles as note books,
loose-leaf sheets, fountain pens, drawing paper and
= instruments. ==
247 ANGLO CANADIAN
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"PLYWOOD MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EXTERIOR GRADE
The Story Of Discrimination
A one-year deadline set up last year by UBC students
to wipe out discrimination in campus organizations, this
year forced Student Council to suspend two "discriminatory" religious clubs.
At a special AMS general meeting later, students
reinstated Varsity Christian Fellowship and the Newman
Club, produced UBC's first working definition of unfair
discrimination, and refocussed attention on discrimination in fraternities, which come under the Senate.
The deadline (which did not apply to fraternities)
was to remove all discriminatory clauses from campus
organizations. It was enforced to suspend the two
religious clubs when they retained clauses which
resricted membership to persons of their specific
religious belief.
In an AMS general meeting the day before the deadline, Student Council treasurer Allan Goldsmith's motion
to exempt minority groups from the deadline was
defeated. Council then unwillingly suspended VCF and
Newman Club.
Press reports brought strong criticism from ministers,
columnists, and the general public.
Incoming AMS president Dick Underhill called a
special meeting to reinstate the two religious clubs. He
said the meeting "defined the problem of unfair discrimination and expressed the true feeling of students
toward religious clubs."
The motion which reinstated them read:
"That the rule against discrimination shall not prevent religious clubs whose primary purpose is the
furtherance of their religion, from restricting membership where desirable, to those of their specific religious
belief."
The motion was raised by Student Council. It was
passed after an amendment by Nigerian student Alade
Akesode, to include the phrase, "... whose primary
purpose is the furtherance of their religion ..."
During his amendment, Alade remarked, "I have never
seen a campus where students are as unprejudiced as
they are at UBC."
A second motion by Sandy Manson was passed which
reaffirmed student disapproval of unfair discrimination.
The second motion asked Student Council to exert
pressure against discriminatory clauses in certain campus
fraternities.
249 Compliments
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CHAIN
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LABORATORY SUPPLIES
ASSAY, INDUSTRIAL AND EDUCATIONAL
LABORATORY SUPPLIES    -    CHEMICALS
Cave & Company Ltd.
567 Hornby St. Vancouver, B. C.
Compliments of
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Telephone:
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250 An amendment to the motion by Johann Stoyva was
also passed. It read, "That a committee be established to
investigate ways and means by which certain fraternities
be assisted to remove discriminatory clauses, if there be
any, in their constitutions or bylaws."
Said Varsity Christian Fellowship president Alfred
Siemens, "We are thankful for the motion reinstating the
two religious clubs. We are sorry that public opinion
turned against the Student Council when they were
obliged to suspend the two clubs."
Inter-Fraternity Council president Jack Hamilton expressed satisfaction with the motion affecting fraternity
discrimination.
"Now we can co-operate to get rid of discrimination.
We've been working toward this same end for four years,
and now we have the backing of all the students."
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THE
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PRINTING IS OUR BUSINESS
We have served your Alma Mater during your collegiate years. May we have
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Call us at CEdar 3111
A-^rndefdon j-^rlntlna  L^ompanu oLlmlted
12th AVENUE AT ARBUTUS STREET
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Since 189S
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Phone: PAcific 6023
Free Parking at Service Station Lot, cor. Pender & Carroll Sts.
IN  1953
Famous Players Canadian Corp. Ltd.
Gave You the Latest in Motion  Picture Development
CINEMASCOPE,  STEREOPHONIC  SOUND and
3 DIMENSIONAL PRESENTATIONS
Always  in   the  Lead — Famous  Players Theatres Will
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AT THE
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Kerrisdale — Kitsilano — Regent
Victoria — Windsor
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4430 W. 10th Ave.
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"The House of Service"
The Vancouver Supply Company Ltd.
Wholesale Grocers and Janitors Supplies
25 ALEXANDER STREET
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Phone: PA. 8321
With the Compliments of
Boyles Bros. Drilling Company Ltd.
DIAMOND DRILL
CONTRACTORS & MANUFACTURERS
1275 - 1291  Parker St.
Vancouver, B. C.
To the Student Body
OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND
BEST WISHES
Bell & Mitchell Agencies
641 Richards Street
•    INSURANCE
Vancouver, B. C.
MArine 6441
252 ^ervlna ^Jheir ~^fima   iVlah
er
THE
U.B.C. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
(Permanent Organization of former students)
Sponsors of the
Alumni - U.B.C. Development Fund
(An annual giving programme to help U.B.C. and students)
Publishers of the
U.B.C. Alumni Chronicle
(Quarterly magazine by and about grads)
Please address your enquiries to Frank J. E. Turner, the Association's Executive Director, Alumni
Office, Room 201, Brock Hall, U.B.C. (ALma 3044) There are Branch Groups in many major cities
in Canada.
Discussions Highlight Columbia
Bi-Centennial
The Columbia Centennial celebrations held here in early
February could have come at no better time. People in
Victoria were demanding "subversive books" be burnt;
Sen. Joseph MacCarthy was chasing "subversive" Communists. The theme of the celebrations: "Man's right to
knowledge, and his free use thereof." The key statement
of the week-long celebrations: "Knowledge is by nature
subversive."
The man who claimed knowledge was subversive was
Dr. Irwin Edman, professor of philosophy at Columbia
University. In the search for knowledge, he told UBC
students and faculty members during the Bi-Centennial
celebrations, "the established conventions, superstitions
and fanaticisms of society are brought to question." Not
only that, but "knowledge and freedom are inseparable,
and must not be taken for granted." Most important,
"change is never agreeable, always upsetting," but it is a
necessary consequence of increased knowledge.
Freedom, he said, is not merely freedom from censorship, suppression and book burning, but is freedom for
"the absorbing enterprises of art and knowledge." We
trust knowledge in physical science and we are "beginning to trust knowledge in the human sphere, but we
do not yet trust knowledge in politics and economics,
where emotions, passionate obsessions and slogans" are
foremost. In short, "nothing is sacred, above enquiry or
above discussion," and "knowledge is a condition of freedom."
Highlights of the week-long Bi-Centennial celebrations
were four panel discussions held during noon hours, each
talking about a different side of the theme, "Man's right
to knowledge, and his free use thereof."
"Religion and Education—Incompatible?"—a question
posed by the religious council and Literary and Scientific
Executive, provided the theme for the first panel. Hector
M. McRae, Roman Catholic, Rabbi David C. Kogen,
Jewish, and Rev. Murdo Nicholson, Protestant, tried to
answer the question.
"Academic Freedom: Is it in Danger?" asked and
answered the second panel, sponsored by United Nations
253 BEST WISHES
and
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
GRADUATES OF
1954
FROM
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• • •
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COAL
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Wholesale
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Manufacturers of 'Totem" Brand
Scribblers and Exercise Books
Vancouver, B. C. Victoria, B. C.
Prince Rupert, B. C. Kelowna, B. C.
Compliments
of a
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254 Club, and consisting of Dr. B. W. Hoeter, International
Service department of CBC, Dr. Vladimir Krajina, professor of botany, Dr. E. J. Ronimois, professor of
Slavonics, and S. Saraceno, Italian Consul. Chairman was
Dr. W. G. Black, regional liason officer, department of
citizenship and immigration.
"Do Canadians Need a Bill of Rights?" was the third
panel, sponsored by the political council. Speakers were
top B. C. politicians: Attorney-General Robert Bonner
(Social Credit), Deane Finlayson (Conservative), Arthur
Laing (Liberal), Nigel Morgan (LPP), and Arnold
Webster  (CCF).
"Can Scientists Talk?" asked the last question of the
week, sponsored by Literary and Scientific Executive.
The scientists who talked in this panel were Dr. Gordon
Shrum, physics head, Dr. J. B. Warren, associate professor of physics, Dr. J. B. Brown, assistant professor of
physics.
Almost all at UBC fell into the swing of things for
this celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the
founding of one of America's leading universities, Columbia. The theme provided ample opportunity for communists to righteously attach "witch hunters", and for
witch hunters to righteously attack "communists."
Cynics, skeptics, and middle of the roaders usually took
a general attack at everything within reach.
Universities all over the free world joined with
Columbia to honor its two hundreth birthday. When
officially inaugurating the Bi-Centennial Celebrations at
Columbia, US president "Ike" Eisenhower advised
"through the free and just use of all the knowledge he
can acquire, man may triumphantly ensure the peace
and progress for which he strives."
UBC was lucky to get Dr. Edman to open our celebrations. He is a busy man. Besides being a world
renowned philosopher and author, Dr. Edman is also
vice-president of the National Institute of Arts and
Letters, and a director of the American Council of
Learned Societies.
To Complete the Evening
Writer  Ujour
PARTIES
DANCES
FORMALS
You will be welcomed most
graciously by the
70. X. WRDSTtS
127 EAST PENDER
[THE  HEART OF CHINATOWN)
We Specialize in Delicious Occidental and
Chinese Foods under an Exotic
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Also Caterers for
• WEDDINGS
• BANQUETS • CLUBS
SHORTHAND
_               FAMOUS ABC SYSTEM
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SCHOOL
Special Summer Groups
for UBC Students
•
We  also teach   Bookkeeping
and Accounting, Pitman Shorthand and Touch Typewriting.
522 West Pender Street
PAcific 7567
EASIER   -    FASTER   -   CHEAPER
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255 MAKE UP A PARTY
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Reservations: PA. 7838
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MArine 3248-9
r Street                         Van<
ity
.SON
:ouver, B. C.
AT
YOUR
SERVICE
AND DRY CLEANERS
FAirmont
1228
The Largest
and Best Equipped Electrical
Repair Shop in Western
Canada
Distributors of famous make electric
motors, air cylinders, reduction
units, motor reducers, speed controls,
mixers, transformers, valves, controls
and allied products.
CROSSMAN
MACHINERY COMPANY LIMITED
806 Beach Ave., Vancouver 1, B.C. - PAcific 5461
256 Building Supplies
Steel and Coal
wwsSBUHwis
MArine 3171
YOrk7111
Working Partner with those who
build in B. C.
' Latu
m^Xec/*
•*!»
%#*/***
m°A°*«'S
HSTTOAPHY .
FINEST RUBBER PAINT
at Lowest Price!
16 BEAUTIFUL COLORS    —    FAST CLEAN UP
AT ALL
I lHonamel— I v lonaSeal
DEALERS
It has been proven that
Athlete's in training get
^rd of their nourishment
from BREAD .. and there's
no  finer  bread   tha n
McGAVIN'S
The next lime you need gasoline
drive in at the sign of the big B-A.
Fill up with B-A 88 or B-A 98.
You will see why B-A gasoline ii
Top-Rated by more people
than ever before.
THE BRITISH  AMERICAN OIL
COMPANY LIMITEI
257 Remember!
The
UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICES
offers a complete low cost catering service throughout the campus
For your convenience the locations are
FORT CAMP
ACADIA CAMP
BROCK HALL
(Snack Bar and Dining Room)
INFIRMARY KITCHEN
at Westbrook
CAF
BUS STOP COFFEE BAR
Arrangements may also be made for:
TEAS, BANQUETS and WEDDING RECEPTIONS
"Siwash" Brings Humour To UBC
1954 saw the return of a literary magazine to UBC
with the publication of the first issue of Siwash.
Members of the students council and the publications board have been dubious about the success of any
literary magazine on the campus ever since the ill-fated
Thunderbird folded in 1948, and the never-published
Wyvern quietly died from lack of support last year.
But always hopeful, they provided a budget of $200,
and told editor John Darling to go ahead.
There were two opinions on the question of how to
sell a literary magazine at UBC. The purists felt that
it would sell on its artistic merits alone, the cynics
insisted culture was fine but that it won't sell unless it's
combined with large amounts of humour.
After two months of meetings and arguments, John
and his staff decided to make the tone predominately
humourous, but not as bawdy as some pubsters would
have preferred.
The Siwash suffered from the same complaint that
killed the Wyvern: lack of contributors. But by drawing
on his staff for contributions, and adding material by
such former UBYSSEY greats as Eric Nicol, Hal Tennant, and Al Fotheringham, John was able to turn out a
good sized magazine.
The first issue was a sell-out as the nine hundred
copies put on sale disappeared within two hours. If the
response to future issues is as good as it was to the first,
the Suvash should be on the campus to stay.
258 OlNCE the founding of the Company two years after Confederation,
EATON'S has been proud of its
close association with Canada's
citizens and with the Canadian
way of life.
EATON'S of CANADA
259 %SJ
.. New Businesses Bring
More Job Opportunities
Every time a new business moves to B. C. new
jobs are created. Often new kinds of careers become available to B. C.'s young men and women.
In order to provide plenty of cheap hydro-electric
power to help attract still more business and
to provide better service for our customers, the
B. C. Electric will have invested in all its services
over $225,000,000 in new facilities from 1946 to
the end of 1954.
This B. C. Electric development program, which
is one of the largest industrial undertakings in
Canada, itself helps to provide steady jobs and
more employment for B. C. people.
260 m   /^
TOMORROW'S    «*■ «^
IIES... Stf#e at
Bank of Montreal
(ZatULcOxA *?&t4t *ScUt&
GJDJ
Your Bank on the Campus     —     In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
WORKING   WITH   CANADIANS   IN  EVERY   WALK   OF   LIFE   SINCE    1817
STUDENT   INDEX
Abbott, Dick  76
Able, Harvey  86
Abrahamson, Carol  126
Abrams, Donald K 138
Adair, Mary  121
Adaskin, Harry  165
Adams, Audrey Marilyn  32
Adams, Bonnie 32
Adams, Howard  32
Adams, Ted 95, 132
Adamson, Nan 22, 24, 32, 116, 119
Adrian, John J 51
Afleck, Bob  137
Aitken, Bob  139
Albert, Hank  130
Alden, Rosemary  59, 66, 124
Alderman,  Richard  134
Alexander, Kenneth R 32, 133
Alexander, Ron  95, 136
Allen, Liz  120
Allen, Terrence M 44
Alston, Robin C 32
Ames, Mike 100, 105
Amskold, Ruth  48
Anderson, Raymond M. A 32
Andersen, Richard G 32
Anderson, Al 108
Anderson, Don  51, 131
Anderson, Donald C    32
Anderson, John D 42
Anderson, Richard 86, 133
Anderson, Ross 161
Anderson, Shelagh  121
Andreen, Peggy  105, 124
Andrews, W. Douglas  32
Anfield, David 49, 116
Angel, Jerome  100, 101, 130
Annesley, Patricia  48
Antrobus,  John   32
Anthony, Tom  66
Antle, John   128
Antosz, Paul  52
Archambault, Dick  128
Archer, Dorothy  32
Ariotti, Piero  160
Armit, Dave  47, 149, 170
Armstrong, Gordon  133
Armstrong, William S 138
Arnison, Ronald  41
Arnold, Gordon  49
Arnoldwallinger, David  47
Arrowsmith, Ralph C 51
Avison, Anne  32
Auriol, George  154
Austin, Sheila   32
Archer, Len  127
Atkins,  Glen   136
Atkinson, John  129
Archibald, Ted 129
Babcock, Pat  143
Badiuk, Jack  42
Badovinic, George  134
Bailey, Charles B. M 40
Bailey, Charles L 43
Bailey, Gunner  97, 131
Bailey, Roger  129
Baird, Bev 123
Baker, Glen  136
Baker,  Robert  32
Bakich, Nora  32
Balcom, Graeme  138
Baldwin, Barry  137
Baldwin,  Bill  132
Ball, Duain  102
Balla, Brigatta  116
Ballam, C. F 51
Ballanryne,  D.  J 45
Bancroft,  George   39
Banerd,  Blanche  48
Banfield, Jane
49, 114, 115, 116, 161
Banfield, John   86,  129
Banno, Masakazu Pat  32
Banoly, P. J 183
Barnes, Ernest R 32
Barnes, George  93, 97, 131
Barnes, Thomas  40
Barnsley, Dick  45, 135
Bartosh,   Reg 107
Basi, Bhagat  129
Basset, Brian N 32
Basford,   Ron   155,  180
Batty, L Margaret 45
Bauer,  Henry  45,  132
Baxter, Al 127
Baxter, Catherine 65, 120
Baxter, Eileen 32
Baxter, Margaret  32
Beach,  Herbert  39
Beck, Stan   102,  130
Beck, Howie  _ 23, 130
Beck, Margaret  32
Beck, Marjory  86
Beck, Peggy  120
Beckett, Daniel  32
Beckett, Matthew _«. 51
Bell, Doug  108
Bell, L. Gerald 42
Bell, Lorna  152
Bell, Mike  129
Bell, Robert D 32
Bell, Rick  32, 147
Bell, William J 51
Bendrodt, Eric 131
Bennett,  Dick   128
Bennett,  Fred   87
261 FOR     -     -
TELEVISION
RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS
RECORDS
AND ALL     -     -
ELECTRIC APPLIANCES
THOMSON & PAGE LTD.
2914 Granville Street
CHerry 5144
and
PARK ROYAL
West 2302
Whether   for   Home   or   Business   Office,   our
Stationery and Printing Department will
Serve You in Many Ways
Gehrke Stationery & Printing Co.
Limited
1035 Seymour St. PAcific 0171
• RESIDENTIAL
* ^E*L. INSTALLATIONS
• INDUSTRIAL
By
FLOORCHAFT LIMITED
VANCOUVER'S  LEADERS  IN   FLOOR  COVERINGS
1964 W. Broadway BAyview 4628
"Your Satisfaction is Our Best Recommendation"
1954 PHOTOGRAPHY FOR
Home Economics
Commerce
Agriculture
Physical Education
2)'J,
Applied Science
Alpha Phi
Phi Delta Theta
Phi Gamma Delta
Sigma Phi Delta
Zeta Psi
l*CU, —Maker of Fine Photographs
2932 Granville Street
G. E. D'ARCY
CEdar 1314
Bennett, Keith  136
Benson, Robert H 41
Benquist,  Edward   44
Beuker, E. P 47
Bhatti, Kesar  160
Bibace, Ron  147
Bice, Bill 97
Biddle, Joan E 32
Biehl, Norm  137
Biely, Gordon  130
Bigalow, Cynthia 48, 126
Bilsland, Allan  49
Birkinshaw, Beverly  32,  119
Birney, Dr. A. Earle 165
Bischoff, John  32
Bissett, Ann  27, 32,  120
Bissonnette,  Gerald   51
Black, Delbert  49
Black, Joan  108
Blair, Hugh   133
Blagg, Anthony  .47
Boggie, Alexander  51
Bolter, Stan  128
Blake, Elizabeth  52
Bombardieri, Al  153
Bone, Bob  76, 97, 136
Boniface, Rosemary  32, 120
Boon, Thelma  23, 123
Booth, Liz  126, 45
Borden, Jane  39
Boreysza,  Boleslaw  32
Bose, Bob  127
Bossons, John  136, 161
Bouchla, Effie  157
Bouck, John  131
Boulding, Bill  97
Bouman, Roland 49
Bournes, Dave  137, 146
Bowell, Dorothy  120
Bowering,  David   32
Boxer, Al  153
Boyle, Gorden S.  42
Boyle, Ted  135
Bracher, Anne  126
Bradshaw, Ron  167
Brady, Bob  97
Braham, John W 42
Braidwood, Tom   136
Brewer, Shirley  151
Brennan, Robert  49
Brice, Ann  125
Brickman, Anlee  104
Bridge,  Bob  135
Brinkworth. Darlene  32
Brisker, Murray  100
Brocke,  Hank  127
Broger, John  190
Bronger, John   40
Brooks, Allen  132
Brown, Barbara  174
Brown, Bob  129, 140
Brown, Donald H 41
Brown, Doreen  124
Brown, Hugh  136
Brown, Jerry 139
Brown, Joan 32, 143
Brown, Sally  32, 125
Bruce, Jack  131
Bruk, John  160
Brumwell, Charles  39, 97
Bryden, Marjorie  52
Buch, Betty  ,..123
Buck, Carmel 186
Buker, Joan  152
Bulmar, Pat  135
Bulmer, John P 45
Burge, Charles  49
Burton, Alexander  32
Burton, Ed 127
Burritt, Ron  131
Bush, Pat  135
Bushell,  Doris  48
Butkov, Eugene  42
Butler, Arthur G 41
Butler, Audrey  45, 58
Butter, Lawrence S 41
Butterfield, Jack  82, 128
Byberg, Ed  139
Byman, Al  97
Byrne, Anne  32,  119
Byrne, Patsy 158
Cabeldu, Anne  32
Cairns, Ruth  123
Calkins,   David   135
Cameron, Ann  32, 125
Cameron, Donald K 138
Cameron,   Rusty   123
Campbell, Janet E 33
Campbell, Ken  82, 97
Campbell, D. Scott 44
Campbell, Stan  83
Campbell, William W 51
Campney, Alan  49
Cant, Eric G. D 45, 138
Cant,   Isobel   33
Caple, Rod  86
Capling,  Arthur   40,   190
Carnsew, Neill 129
Carew, Derry 80, 128
Carfrae, Jim   127
Carlile, Collin  151
Carlson, Lois  118
Carlson, Trygve  83
Carmichael, John  127
Carpenter, Marvin  45
Carr, Marilyn   126
Carroll, Frank  _ 135
Carstairs, David  43
Carter, Jim  76, 131, 150
Carter, Harold R 51
Carney, Pat  100, 150
Casperson, Ralph  33
Cassady, Anne  120
Cassidy,  George   136
Cates, Suzanne  33
Catherwood, Ann-Marie 126
Caulfield, Jim  131
Chalk, Raymond  41
Chan-Kent, Sonny   156
Chapman, George  49
Chappell, John   108,   109
Chappell,  Michael   43
Charpentier, Maurice  127
Chess, Martin  102, 130
Chew, Roland   156
Chilcott, Doris  110
Choma, Ann  116, 160
Chong, David  49
Chown, Ruth  39
Christensen, Ralph M 51
Christian, Maynard  179
Christie,  Martin   33
Christie,  Norman   49
Christopher, Gordon  49, 135
Chu, Vivian  48
Ciprick, William  33
Claman, Peter  135
Clare, Lome  49
Clark, Sidney  49
Clarke, Alf  49
Clarke, Bob  108, 109
Clarke, Cynthia  33
Clarke,  Jim   75,   127
Clarke. Joan   143
Clark, Nigel H 51
Clark, West  128
Clyne, Stuart  133, 179
Cobbin, Alexander  45
Cockburn, Sandra   33,  126
Coe, John  38
Coe, Ted  139
Coe, Terry  27
Cole,  Dennis   133
Cole, Douglas E 54
Collins, Peter  33, 154
Coltart, Dudley  135
Coltis, Madelyn    33, 119
Commons, Bill 52, 168
262 Shown on the left is the attractive "Kidney"
Swimming Pool at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
W. Allan, 6224 St. Georges Crescent, Glen-
eagles.
SWIMMING POOLS
for GRACIOUS   LIVING AND   ENTERTAINING
It's so easy to entertain your friends and visitors if you have your
own private swimming pool, and you have the happy feeling of
knowing you are giving your guests the finest in hospitality.
A private swimming pool is a very worthwhile investment in good
health for your family, and also an investment that will increase
the value of your property by far more than the dollars you put
into it.
Many beautiful PADDOCK Pools are already installed in Vancouver and district. The four illustrated give you an indication
of their beauty and arrangements. PADDOCK Pools (the nation's
finest) are available in fifty different sizes and shapes .... all
skilfully engineered and fully guaranteed.
The PADDOCK Pool Division of
Marwell Construction Co. Ltd. is at
your service to help you receive the
most enjoyment possible from your
pool. Our maintenance department
has available pool paints and coatings, and our engineers will gladly
advise you on all phases of pool
upkeep—sanitation, filtration, algae
control, lighting and cleaning.
Phone or write today for further
information and pamphlets
The "Blue Turquoise" Pool pictured immediately below was the choice of Mr. and Mrs.
P.  T.   Rogers,  at 2011   S.W Marine  Drive.
Mr. and Mrs. H. A.
Martin, 7250 Hudson
Street, also have the
popular "Blue Turquoise" styled pool
as illustrated in third
picture.
On the left is shown
the "Avalon" Swimming Pool in the
garden of Mr. and
Mrs. A. J. Ross,
6120 MacDonald St.
MARWELL   CONSTRUCTION   CO.   LTD.
1500 West Georgia St., Vancouver, B. C.
PADDOCK POOL DIVISION
MArine 2311
W. J. (Jimmie) Stewart, Mgr.
263 THE
J. H. McRAE
COMPANY
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
590 West 8th Avenue
VANCOUVER
Free Enterprise at Work . .
This organization catches salmon by the
ton, ships canned salmon by the carload. The salmon is wholesaled by the
case, and retailed by the can .. . and the
whole success of the operation depends
on the satisfaction and enjoyment given
to a customer either at home or abroad
.  .  . ONE FORKFUL AT A TIME.
To this end, the fishermen on the fishing grounds, the processors in the cannery, and everybody in the Nelson Bros,
organization prepare this delicious food
with every care. Wherever it is purchased, it is a credit to CANADA and
worthy to carry the PARAMOUNT label.
NELSON BROS. FISHERIES LTD.
Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
Compton,  Barb   120
Conder, Geraldine  33
Connell, Gavin   136
Connell, Peter  133
Connell, Rae  33, 118
Constabaris, John  139
Cook,  Beverly  .Tl8
Cook,  George   33
Cooke, John    33
Cook, Philip T 41, 129
Cook, Tom  129
Cooper, Ann 22, 23, 39, 123
Cooper, Brian  108, 139
Cooper, Phyllis  26, 52, 168
Coopland, Ashley 136
Con, Ron  156
Conway, Geoff 102
Copithorne, Maurice  158
Corregan, Robert  33
Cory, Allan  52
Costanzo, Pete  84
Coursier, Joan  120
Coutts, A 45
Covello, Thomas  41
Cox, Albert, R 51
Cox, Wendy  65
Craig, Donald   39
Craig, Jim  161
Craig, Jeffreys  41, 76
Craig, Wallace  49
Crain,  Ross   107
Crana, N. G 183
Crehan, Patricia  54
Crispin, George  44
Cross, Christine  H 39
Cross, Stanley W 39
Crosseti, E. J 54
Crottie, Jan  125
Croker, Pat  118
Crumb, Patricia  48,  119
Cunningham, Maurice   80
Cvetkovitch, Joe  45,  132
Dales, Mike  153
Dallas,  Denny   179
Dallyn,  Jack    39
Danard, Maurice  127
Darling, James  52
Darling, Val  48, 120
Davenport, David C 138
Davenport,  Lee  92
Davidson, C. Grant  138
Davies, Bill  131
Davies, John L 49
Davies, James W 54
Davies, Katherine  33
Davies, Norman G 42
Davies,   Ronald   39
Davis, Art   132
Dawson, Robert  133
Dawson, Fred  39
Dawson, George  45
Day, John W. B 42
Day, William  33, 106
Deakin, Thomas A 42
Debrecen, Julie  33
Deeble, Douglas  33, 136
Deering, Irma  52, 146, 168
Delmas, Francis  52
Dempster, Gavin  133
Derry, Jane   62
Desaulniers, Neil  47, 136
Desbrisay, Albert G 45
Desbrisay, George H 138
Desprez, Barbara  108, 109
Devito, W. P 51
De Voogd, Abraham  44
Dial,  Nirmal   160
Dicks, Richard  127
Dichsore, Ailsa   123
Dickinson, Veda   118
Dilworth, Dorothy  119
Dixon, Ray 133
Dixon,  Robert  128
Dobbin, Pamela  44
Dobson,   Bub  82
Dodson,  Earl   33
Dodek,  Morton   51
Donaldson, Verna  120
Donaldson, Bob  128
Dong, Gordon  33
Donnelly, Helen  58, 62, 64, 124
Douglas, M. G 51
Doyle, Ron  106
Drab, Al  127
Drew, John  131
Driscoll, Diane  24, 64, 119
Drossos, John  39
Drost, Ian  138
Drummond, Glen  76
Drummond, Ian  33, 114
Drummond, Ken  84
Dryvynsyde, Barry  108
Duckworth, Muriel   118
Duclos, Gerald  45, 115
Dudley,   Elizabeth    33
Dudley, John M 51
Duff, Marianna  118
Duffy,  Pat  86
Dufton, Dave  42, 140
Dufton, William C 42
Duggan, Bob  127
Dutton,  Ross   135
Duncan, Ted  136
Dunlop, Lois  39
Dunn, Alfred  45, 132
Durante, Ray  33
Dusaj, John   160
Dwyer, Loretta  25, 123
Dykeman, Murray  132
Dzienciuch, Max  127
Eadie, Desmond A 45, 115, 138
Earl, John  84
Easter, Cal  127
Eberts, Tony 132
Eccott, Jim  133
Eddy, Fred  33, 49
Edwards, Jack  45, 132
Eidsvich, Harold 132
Elliott,  Don   127
Elliott, Gordon A 138
Ellips, Maimo  33
Emerton, Bill  139
Emery, Alan  133
Endersby, Stanley A 41
Endicott, Orville R 33
Engelhardt, Karl  43
Engelland, Shirley  44, 59, 116
Erskine, Pat  121
Eshelman, Valden  45
Esko, Sam  131
Esselmont, Bill  131
Evans, Jon  132
Eyeford, Margaret  48
Eveleigh, Joy  25, 176
Ezzy, Albert 129
Fairburn, Bob  136
Faris, Don  40, 166
Faris,  Doug   152
Faris, Kenneth
33, 115, 116, 152, 161
Farmer, Colin  33
Farmer, Harold  83
Farquhar, Simonne  33
Farquharson, Ken   161
Farris, Evelyn  125
Farris, Walter  52
Fast, Vic  45, 139
Faulder, Geo. A 42
Fawcus, Ken  97, 131
Feltham, Ivan  22, 25, 49, 116
Fenton, V. Charles  41
Ferguson, Al 76
Ferguson, Isobelle  33
Feme, Dave  45, 139
Fearnside, Gwen  45, 123
Ferris, Arthur 49
Figol, Marlene  147,  156
Findlay,  Barbara   70,  118
264 Park
Royal,
West Vancouver, B. C.
—- -^r,a,g
■un niniuu
""•a*!*,.
ymfiwju.TffisalQE
^iai«^T
Port Alberni, B. C.
Vancouver, B. C.
OVER 60 years of progress mark
the growth of Woodward's into
a great Family Shopping Institution.
Since its beginning in 1892 this
pioneer firm, still owned and controlled by the founding family, has
kept pace with the rapid development
of Western Canada, supplying the
needs of a growing population.
Besides the large main store in Vancouver, Woodward's today has stores
in West Vancouver, Port Alberni and
Victoria on Vancouver Island and in
Edmonton, Alberta. A sixth 'Family
Shopping Centre' is now under construction in New Westminster.
Woodward's is a Western Canadian
enterprise owned and operated by
people who have made the West their
home. Profits of the company are
shared with the employees who are
vitally interested in continuing the
friendly relations of the past.
We look forward to a greater future
bringing to you the merchandise
and services demanded by a growing country.
Your Family Shopping Centre
BUYING     OFFICES      IN     MAJOR     CITIES     THROUGHOUT     THE     WORLD
265 THE SUN
Has the IVriters...
JACK SCOTT
His column, "Our Town", is a daily feature of such
wide appeal that it is reprinted regularly by many
other Canadian newspapers.
BARRY
MATHER
The Sun's deceptively homespun Page 1
humourist extracts
many a subacid jest
from the daily round
of life and brightens
each day for thousands.
...perhaps
the ablest
and most
articulate
group of
free-wheeling
commentators
in Canadian
Journalism.. .
gk              :
PENNY
WISE
This is the girl who
generates a full head
of steam about prac
\r^          ^V^H
tically anything and
communicates her enthusiasm and enjoy
JmrnrnT*
ment to a legion of
^i^Hk~.. .
pleased readers.
MAMIE MOLONEY
This   level - headed   and   warm - hearted
Vancouver Island housewife refiects upon
her family, her neighbors and the world,
and her resulting
column has the affec-
tionate loyalty of
all Sun readers.
At The Sun and among its readers there is a most favorable climate
for people with something to say and an interesting way of saying it.
It is only natural, therefore, that The Sun's pages are illumined daily
by writers who are nationally recognized for their sprightly contributions
to the discussions of our times. In addition to the four pictured here,
there are many of solid gifts, such as Elmore Philpott, Harold Weir,
Clyde Gilmour, Jack Wasserman, Dick Beddoes and others. Collectively they are a potent reason why most British Columbians read and
enjoy The Sun.
€he %ncouuer Sun
Phone TAtlow 7141 for Daily Delivery to Your Home
266 DAIRYLAND
goes to U.B.C.
Dairyland is proud of its long association with the
University of British Columbia. Not only does
Dairyland go out daily to the Campus, supplying
faculty and students with top-grade dairy products,
but it has worked in close co-operation with
the Department of Agriculture and Science for
many years. This co-operation and
our UBC-trained staff of Bacteriologists have helped
immeasurably in the achievements and maintenance
of Dairyland's high standards.
A      DIVISION      OF     THE     FRASER     VALLEY     MILK     PRODUCERS'     ASSOCIATION
COMPLIMENTS OF
B. BOE LIMITED
• PLUMBING
• HEATING
• OIL BURNER SERVICE
652 SEYMOUR STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
267 WmWfi
mm
Active people of all ages need the
sustaining, satisfying food value of
Roger's Golden Syrup. It replenishes muscular energy in a matter
of minutes. It is delicious tasting,
wholesome and pure.
COUVER.B.C.
l\##
THE B.C.SUGAR REFINING CO. LTD.
UNIVERSITY
OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
A PROUD NAME IN THE FIELD OF
SCHOLASTIC ACHIEVEMENT
Congratulations to YOU on being a
Student at such a fine
University!
•
Continue associating with institutions
of distinction by dealing
with
Murphy Stationery Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS   -   PRINTERS
DUPLICATING   MACHINES   and   SUPPLIES
1040 Hamilton St. Vancouver 3, B. C.
PAcific 9251
Also in Victoria
621 Fort Street
Phone Empire 4616
Fingarson, Faye  ....108, 123
Finkelstein,   Norton   130
Finlay, Ann 125
Fiorentino, Joseph S 42
Fisher, Marg 158
Fisher, Robin  135
Fishman, Mollie  122
Fitzgerald, Glyn  136
Flader, Charles 49, 130
Flather, Barrie 131
Fleming, Kenneth  45
Flemons, Gordy  74
Fletcher, Art  45, 66
Fletcher, Dona  33,  118
Fletcher, Don   83
Fletcher, Joan  123
Flynn, Robert A 138
Fonseca, Al  43, 137
Foote, Judy  120
Forbes, Bill 131
Forbes, Biackie  179
Foreman, Guy  132
Ford, James Michael 39
Ford, Lyman D 43
Ford, Richard  39, 133, 167
Forest, Douglas  33
Forman, George  43
Forman, Guy  33
Forrest, John A 42
Forrest,  Robert  40
Forrester, Norma  124
Forward, Herb  76
Foster, Anthea  120
Fotheringham, Al
22, 33, 62, 100, 102, 116
Foulks, Richard 51
Fountain, Joyce  120
Fox, Clyde  127
Fox, Roger  83
France, Cliff  80
Franksen, Eleanor  48
Fraser,  lain  179
Fraser, Mike  76
Fraser, John Allen ...44, 116, 180
Fraser, John Allan  41
Fraser, Russell  129
Fredrickson, Bud  82, 97
Fredrickon, John  133
Freeman, George  33
French, Basil  131
Friesen, John  33
Friend, Ron  76
Frith, Clive  133, 137
Frith, Hek  76
Fulford, G 44
Fuiler, W. M 51
Fulton, Sidney ...; 33
Futcher, Jim  108, 135
Gaensbauer, Herbert 43
Gale, Bob  140
Galbraith, Don  107
Gale, Henry  51, 127
Galloway, Leslie R 41, 140
Gone, Frederick W 42
Gannon,  Noreen   93
Gardner, Donald A 42
Garfinkle, Rochelle  122
Gartside, William M 138
Gates, Alan  34
Gawiuk, Michael  52
Geggie, Ian  76
Gerry,  Dudley   74
Gerein, Alfred  51
Giani, Daysham  160
Gary, Gibson   152
Giegevich, Joe  127
Giegerick, Bob  80
Gilbert,  Richard  D 47
Gilchrist, Alvin  34
Gilders, Jim  139
Gilhooly, Bob  80
Gillard, Marie  44
Gilmore, Robert C 46, 138
Gill, Gerald  34
Gill, Gurdev Singh  34
Gill,  Niranjan   160
Gillespie, Sheila  39, 123
Gimple, Gordon  76
Girling, Peter  41, 127
Girling, Valerie  34
Giroday, Mike  80
Gladstone, Sidney  130
Glasgow, Stan  39, 97
Glaspie, Mike  102
Goberdhan, Lincoln  83
Godson, Denis  34
Goldon, Myron  49, 130
Goldman, Stan  153
Goldsmith, Al
22,23,25,47,62, 116, 140
Goldsmith, Daniel  130
Gonzale, Bruce  52
Goodall, Roger  34
Goodwin, Pat  93
Gorbat, Elsie  34
Gordienko, G 42
Gordon, Bert 101, 102, 128
Gordon, Fay  122, 153
Gorwill, Ruth  25, 54
Goshko, Xenia  156
Goudy, Kay  119
Gough, Joan  126
Goult, John  47, 135
Gourlay, Bruce 65, 133
Graham, Douglas 49
Graham, Gordon  131
Graham, John M 51
Graham, Verna  93
Grais, Gary   135
Grant, Basil B 41
Grant, Bill  135
Grant, Elizabeth  33
Grant, Phyliss  48, 120
Grantham,  Peter  59,  136
Gray, Pam 125
Grayson,  Norma   48
Green, Maxine  121
Green, Norman  130
Greenwood, Hugh J 44, 78
Gregory, Carol  125
Gregory, Pete  74, 129
Grenon, O. Joseph  43
Gribski, Ed  136
Griffiths,  Barry  127
Griffiths, John  B 46
Griffin, Shirley Anne  33, 118
Grimson, Juliet  62
Groberman,  Herbert  130,  153
Groberman, Joel  130
Grunewald,   Gisberl    39
Guest, Cowan  49
Guest, Margaret 51
Guglielmin, Alfred 34
Guichon, Therese  46, 153
Guile, Bob  127
Guillomse, Benny 160
Gustovson,   Clarence    128
Guthrie, David A 41
Gwands  97
Haapala, Ray  34
Haering.  Rudolph   34
Haley, Richard  40
Hakstian, Bob  136
Hall, David A 138
Hall, Glennys 34, 119
Hall, Richard F 34
Hallam, Hugh  128
Hallbauer, Robert E 44
Hallgrimsson, Herman 82
Halpin, Connie  126
Halsey, Gene  137
Haltalin,  Ken    136
Hamilton, Howard  49
Hamilton, John   51
Hamilton, Lorna 34
Hamilton, William   62
Haniuk,  Einard  39
Hansen, Ron   110
Harding, Dave  107
Harjula, Terry  129
268 HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY SERVICE AWARDS
IN COMMERCE
toj
Each year the'Hudson's Boy Company offers two Service
Awards, open in competition to students completing Second
■r Commerce or, in appropriate options, Second Yc
''Arts and Sciences, and proceeding to o higher yeanv Winners will be given their tuition fees for each of Third and
Fourth Years and guaranteed employment with the com*
my on all possible occasions while studies continue. Subject to satisfactory performance they will^n-graduatlon,'
be given an opportunity for am^executive career with the
company. Further information may be obtained from the
Offices of the Dean of Administrative and Inter-Faculty
Affairs, the Director of Student and Personnel Services, ond
the Director of the School of Commerce. Inquiry should be
mode not later than February 15th.
I^tftjffinlfflfratl (tampan^
INCORPORATED   2*»   MAY   iCTO,
269 To the '54  Grads we Wish Every Success
L^ampbeit \25tudio6 <JLtd.
PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR THE FACULTIES OF
ARTS AND LAW
581 GRANVILLE
MArine 3625
TAtlow 7937
MEN'S AND LADIES' SLACKS
SKIRTS
Made to Measure   .   .   .   Our Specialty
ON WO TAILORS
MEN'S    AND    LADIES'   SUITS
WITH  DISTINCTIVE STYLING
11 West Pender
TAtlow 3740
PETER'S
ICE  CREAM CO.
"The Quality Ice Cream of the Pacific Coast"
CEdar 9181
3204 West Broadway Vancouver, B. C.
BARNES JmJL* Jtd.
Watches by
Omega Tissot
Bulova        Huguenin Lorie
— TWO LOCATIONS ONLY —
10th and Granville
CHerry 2025
733 Granville
TAtlow 5415
Harries, Beth  123, 143
Harriott, Rosalie  34
Harris, Charles  34
Harris, Mike  84
Harris, P 97
Harris, Ronald  34
Harrison, Esther  34, 152
Harrison, John  46, 137
Harstone, Cam  129
Hart, Barbara  97
Hartman, Gordon  34
Hartwell, Leagh 51
Harvey, Bruce  49,  134
Hastings, Dave  136
Hatch, William R 41
Hawrelak, Dick  80
Hawthorne, Dr. Harry  165
Hayduk, John  156
Hayduk, Walter  41
Hebenton, Shalte  66
Hector, James  34
Hedgecoek, Nigel  34
Heimbecker, Grant  46
Helliwell, Dave  66
Hemphill, Dave  65, 66, 136
Henderson, D. J 49
Henderson, Janet  120
Henderson, Matt  129
Henniger, James  51
Henrion, Yvonne  34
Henslowe, Peter 114, 149, 158
Heydon, Gordon  51
Hewer, C. Russell  49, 138
Hibberd, John C 138
Hicks, G. F 51
Hickichi, Mits  132
Hildebrand, Percival  43
Hillman, Keith  49
Hilton, Gerry  39
Hinke, Joseph  179
Hinke, Margaret  121
Ho, Hit Po 92, 151
Hobbs, Edwin  39
Hodge, Gerry  26, 146, 150
Hogon, Ruth 93
Hogg, Betty  119
Holland,  Fred  133
Hollands, Keith  39, 148
Hollman, Connie  125
Hollaway, Barbara  34, 124
Holmes, Don  127
Holmes, Patsy  125
Homola, Bob  136
Holmwood, Leslie  34
Hong, Edward  46
Hood, Jean  25, 116
Hood, Neil  47
Hopkins, Jean  44
Horel, Helen  48
Hori, Aiko  39
Hornstein, Herbert  41
Hornstein, J. Walter  46, 138
Horton, Dave  76
Hossie, Rendina  179
Hotchkiss, James  42
Houghland,  Joan    125
Howard, Ron  133
Howard-Gibbon  49
Howell, Ginny  45, 69
Howell, Janet  44
Howes, Barton  39
Hruskowy, Ernest  34
Huclak,  Erast  156
Hudson, Buzz  74, 76, 129
Hudson, Diane  187
Hudson, John R 42
Hughes, Arthur  114, 154
Hume, Philip G 138
Hunt, Jean   108
Hunt, John  133
Hunter, Joan  175
Hunter, John  49
Hunter, Ray 34
Hurlston, Helen  118
Hurst, John N 138
Hurst, Ron  105, 139
Husband, J. Kimball  138
Hutchinson, Bill  25, 134
Ikeda, Ron  127
Iredale, Randle  40
Irwin,  Grant  127
Isaac, Ronald J 138
Isbister, Gordon   106
Ivanisko, Henry  34
Ivens, Boyd  49, 146
Jabour, Don  66, 129
Jack, Donald N 42, 137
Jackson, Pat  129
Jacobson, Mary Ann 48, 120
Jagger, Barbara  64, 65, 124
James, Charlie  74
Jansch,   Marjorie    51
Jansch, Theodore  51
Jawanda, Bhagwaut  160
Jefferson,  Peter  133
Jeffries, Roy  51
Jenkins, David  40, 137, 190
Jerome, Kelvin K 46
Jinnouchi, Donald  34, 157
Joffe, Jay  46, 130
Johal, Major S 160
Johnson, Bob  127, 188
Johnson,  Edie  121
Johnson, Elinor  Ill
Johnson,  Hugh A 138
Johnson, Jim  150
Johnson, Kathleen ...48, 124, 174
Johnson, Norman  34
Johnson, Robert 34
Johnson, Walter  34
Johnston, Ron  139
Johnston, Hugh A 41
Johnston, Ivan  84
Johnston,   Patricia    34
Jokdnovich, John  39
Jones, Bob 131
Jones, George F 138
Jones, Gwenneth  44
Jones,  Ken   135
Jones, Lorna  66
Jones, Margretta   93
Junas, Walt 132
Jung, Douglas  49
Joughin,  Bill  83
Joyce, Murray  131
Kalef, Sandra  122
Kansky, Ladislav  39
Kawase, Yoshio  44
Keane, John   34
Kearns, Sheila  34, 123
Keffer, James L 49
Kelly,  Boyd  129
Kelly, Dory  53, 119, 168
Kelly, Terrence  49
Kemp, Beverly  124
Kemp, Ray 46, 131
Kennedy, Elaine  27, 34, 124
Kennedy, Maureen  93
Kennedy, Nan  44
Kenny,   Brent    133
Kent, Ab  100
Kent, Dick  46, 132
Kent, Gerald  34
Kent, James 128
Kent, Stevie  120, 177
Kent-Barber, Rosemary  100
Kenyon, Gerald S. 54
Kepper, Eleanor  25, 65, 118
Kerr, Mary  34
Kevill, Paul  43
Kilburn, Doug  84
Killam, G. Douglas  138
Killeen, Gerald  34
Killeen, Jim ...35, 66, 92, 97, 136
King,  Sheila   48
King, Olive  35
King, Robert  39
Kirby, Joan   35
270 Power Shovels, Road Graders, Road
Rollers, Rock Crushing and Screening
Equipment, Air Compressors, Concrete
Block Making Machines, Concrete
and Plaster Mixers, Concrete Vibrators, Bituminous Sprayers, Pavement
Heaters, Melting Furnaces, Steam
Cleaners, Roofers' Kettles, Flame
Guns, Heavy Duty Water Heaters,
Weed Burners, Golf Course Equipment, Estate Maintenance Equipment,
Hoists, Pipe Pushers, Soil Aerators,
Band-It Universal Clamps, Industrial
Ceramics, Specialty Fertilizers for
Golf  Courses,   Lawns  and   Gardens.
We guarantee everything we sell.
Willard Equipment
(Est. 1919)
2099 W. 11th Ave. - CE 9161 - Vancouver 9, B.C.
With   KJur   Compliments
PROVINCIAL PAPER
LIMITED
TORONTO
MONTREAL
WINNIPEG
271 More Opportunities
... than men I
to till them I
The expansion program is a most important consideration when choosing a company with which to
build your future. Our record of progress is outstanding in the life insurance industry.
We now have offices in Canada, the United States,
Hawaii, the Caribbean countries and Great Britain.
Our operations are continuing to expand and we
are selling a larger volume of insurance each year.
Our Organization is still young enough to offer
unlimited opportunity and rapid advancement in
every phase of our business to young men with
initiative.
Before you decide on your future—write
The Crown Life Insurance Co.
59 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario
Canada's youngest billion dollar Life Insurance Company
Ask for a free copy of our fifty-third annual report
Fine Furniture tor the Office
• a   complete   line   of   wood   and
metal desks and chairs;
files; filing supplies;
visible equipment; safes and vault
doors; lockers; shelving
and partitions.
OFFICE   SPECIALTY
Head Office • Factories • Newmarket, Ont.
VANCOUVER BRANCH:
938 Howe Street
MArine 5274-5
Kirk,   Denis   131
Kirk, Hugh  128
Kirkland,   D 97
Kirkland, J. Gordon  41
Kirkland, Robert  133
Klassen, Abraham  53
Klassen, Alfred  35
Klassen, Margaret  35,  152
Knight, Ed  129
Knight, Irene  35
Knowles, Edward E 41
Knox, Marylen   104,121
Knudsen, Albert  51
Kolle, Phylis  35, 123
Konrad, Ann   152
Konrad,  Daniel  35
Kowluk, Mary-Beth  126
Kowther, John J 138
Krajina,   Milena    160
Krangle, Gerry   153
Kringhaug, Olaf  51
Kreutz, John  35
Kronquist,   Roger    74
Kuhn, Art  84
Kuijt, Job  35
Kules,  Charles  E 138
Kushnir, William 54, 97
Kuyt, Ernie  82
Kyle, Douglas 44, 97, 138
Lacey, Wallace Keith  43
Laishley, Don  84
Laird, Donald  46
Laithwaite,  Albert   78
Lake, Lancelot  42
Lam, Diana  65, 118
Lamb, Ken  100
Lampwort, Norma  175
Landis, George  152,  157
Longer, May  153
Langlands, Bob  155
Larson, Dan  131
Laven, David Louis  50, 130
Lavetl, Eric  80
Lavener, Rollie  136
Lawrence, Bill  65, 136
Lawrence,  Nan  121
Lawson, Lawrence  39
Lawson,  Stanley  54
Lazenby, Arthur  46
Lazenby, Dick  87
Lazosky,   Peter   137,   146
Lea,  Colin   132
Lear,   Howie    82
Leckie, Merril  139
Lecovin, Jerry 46,  108, 109
Ledingham, Sylvia  119
Lear, Howard  46
Lee, David   156
Lee, Jack  156
Lee, Ted  116, 136
Legace, Yvonne .25, 86, 96, 119
Legg, Ed  136
Legge, Gerry  118
Leggatt, M. Stuart 50
Leiterman, Alison  151
Leonard, Tani 126, 186
Lennox,  Mary  135
Leaman, Joan  122
Leuchte, Annemarie
35, 86, 87, 96, 118
Letson, John  135, 188
Leversage,  Ronald G 54
Levey, Gerald S 50
Levis, Eileen W 35
Levis, William  51
Len, Chuck  131
Lewis, Margaret  126
Lewis, Sally  124
Liddle, Keith  129
Liebett, Al  127
Lightfoot, Edward  40
Linburg,  Jack   46
Linnes,  Audrey  39
Liptrot, Frances  24, 35, 119
Little,  Blair  136
Lloyd,  Frederick A 50
Lloyd, Tony 128, 148, 155, 158, 180
Loewen, Charles  35,
Loewen, John  158'
Logan, Daryl  35
Logie, Ray  100, 101, 155
Logie,  Roy  137,  179
Lok, Elizabeth  35
Loney, Dick  131
Loney, Tom  128
Longstaff, George E 54
Longstaffe, Ronald  133
Loomer, Herbert  130
Lord, Ray  133
Lourie, Susie  125
Lucas,  Neil   137
Lucket, Ed  82
Lusztig,  Peter
22, 25, 46, 97, 116, 131
Lynch, Bill  153
Lynes, Ken  139
Lynum,  Godfrey   44
Lyon,  Vaughn   155,   161
Macey, Glen  127
Madden, William  35
Madely,  Bruce  82,  188
Madhosingh, Clarence  39
Madill, Stewart 76,  138
Mair, Ian  129
Mair, Rafe  135
Malone, Jim  127
Manhas, Karm  160
Manning,  Walter  51
Makovkin, Alexander  35
Mann, Jim  133
Manson, Barbara  124
Manson, Dave  106
Marchak,  Bill   149
Marchese, Angela  124
Maeke, Siegfried   35
Marrion, Esther  143
Marshall, Don   133
Marshall, Ron  137
Mastin, Walt  140
Martin, Hal  128
Martin, Moya   35
Martin, William  51
Martineau, Ray  140
Matheson, Betty  124
Matheson, Donald J 41
Matheson,   Hank    84,   97
Mathews, Robin  35
Mathews, Shirley  45, 69
Mathias, Harry  35
Matthews, Danny  147
Matthews, Elmer S - 54
Matthews, Richard  ..82, 133
Matthews, Stephen  42
Matthews, Stu  131
Mawhinney, Donald J. S 50, 180
Mawhinney, Pamela  35, 125
Maxwell, Bill  129
Mayne, Norah  35
Maze, Dick  84, 127
Meadows, Sylvia  119
Meachem,   Gwendolyn    36
Meeker, Henry  36, 127
Mendoza, Leon  36
Mercer, Albert G 41
Mercer, Barbara  36, 123
Mercer, Edward N 42
Merner, Jack  36
Merrick,   Frances   36
Merrill,  Keith 131
Merston, Jim  83
Meyerhoff, John  36
Middelveen, John W 42
Middleton, Gil  127
Middleton, Keith  127
Miles,  Rene  48,  120
Miller, Elinor  36, 123
Miller, Joseph   42
272 Mar chant's New FIGUREMATIC Brings You
Automatic Calculating At a Price That's
Amazingly Reasonable
Enthusiastic Users Say   ....
"Now my MULTIPLICATION goes like a streak.
All I do is enter my multiplicand, then the multiplier and read my answer."
"DIVISION is so easy. When I figure percentages, I just enter the dividend, then the
divisor and there's my answer."
"Anyone in the office, with a little practice,
can operate a FIGUREMATIC efficiently. I use it
myself.   I don't have to train my operators."
FRANK L BOTT & CO.
418  ABBOTT STREET PAcific 5846
VANCOUVER 4, B.C.
Victoria - 23812    -    943 Yates Street
New Westminster N.W. - 1931 70 - 8th  Street
BRITISH
COLUMBIA'S
r
Wheels of Industry
Turn —
to YOU - The Graduate of 7954 .
offering you the opportunity for which you have prepared yourself —
to  become A  DRIVING  FORCE  in  the  continuing  progress of  the
fastest-growing Province in Canada.
CONGRATULATIONS
SUCCESS
DEPARTM
E N T
OF    T R A
D
E
AND
INDUSTRY
PARLIAMENT  1
3UILDINGS
7 VICTORIA,   B.C.
E. G. ROWEBOTTOM, Deputy Minister
HON. RALPH CHETWYND, Minister
273 Miller, Marilyn  48, 120
Millington, Lois  157, 161
Milner, Earl  130
Mirko, Joseph F 43
Mitarewsk, Walter  35
Mitchell, Dick  74
Mitchell, Joan  36
Mitchell, Jim  129
Mitchell, Thomas 52
Mitchell, William  52
Moi, Berte  186
Moir, Reg. J. S 50
Monaghan, Bob  129
Montaine, Lome  129
Montgomery, Roger  133
Moodie, John  171
Moody, Audrey  123
Moore, April  124
Compliments
of
CRANE
LIMITED
540 Beatty Street                        Vancouver,
B.C.
MWAYSASKfOl
000
EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY
LOOSE LEAF BOOKS - SLIDE RULES
FOUNTAIN PENS - SCALES
DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
CLARKE & STUART
CO. LTD.
STATIONERS, PRINTERS, BOOKBINDERS
550 Seymour St. Vancouver, B. C.
Morford, B 97
Morgan, Donald R 138
Morgan, John  36, 139
Morgan, Shirley  119
Morgan, Vic  128
Morris, Glenda  93
Morrisette, Pat  121
Morrison, Charlie  188
Morrison,  Kenneth  52
Morrow, Blake  53
Morrow, Lorraine  36, 124
Mort, Walt  84
Mosher, Monty  44, 171
Moskovitch,  Rosalie  153
Mounce, Joy  36, 66, 143
Mounce, Joyce  36
Mounce, Trudy  93
Mowatt, Betty 59, 70
Mudie, John A 44
Mulholland, Bill H 50, 97
Mundle, Gordon   80,  128
Munro, Cathie  48, 120
Munson, C 53
Murdock, John F 50
Muri, Glen  47
Murray, Marigold  151
Murray, Nancy  35, 120
Myers, John  47, 136
McAfee,  Dan    76
McAlpine, Mayli  35, 65,  126
McAlpine, Ted  136
MacArthur, Joan C.
50,96, 115, 116, 161, 179
McArthur, Joan V 35, 143
MacAuley, Jim  134
McBey, Helen  35, 120
McCallum, Don 133
McCallum, Irene  48
McCallum, Liz  93
McCallan, Skip  132
McCamey, Mac  127
McGargar, Donamae  35, 119
McColl, Diane  35, 124
McCormick, Ann  187
McCormick,  Bill  140
McConville, Jack  136
McConville,   Patricia    124
McConnell, Ruth  35
McCormick, William  43
McCowan, Roy 86
McCrae, Allan M 41
McCurrach, Helen  35, 121
McDermid, John  129
McDiarmid, Colin.26, 35, 158, 161
McDonald, Bruce W 138
McDonald, David A. V 138
MacDonald, Don  133
MacDonald, Don W 41
McDonald, Doug  84
McDonald, Howard  43
MacDonald, Jim  133
MacDonald, John  44, 131
MacDonald, John A 50
MacDonald, Ken  132
MacDonald, Nora  35
MacDonald, Peter  135
MacDonald, Somerled   83
MacDonald, Ted  131
McDonald, Vernon  42
MacDonald, Wendy 123
McDorman, Les  43, 137
McDougall, Graeme  133
McEown, Miriam  152
MacFarlane, George  35
McFarlane, Robert  35
McFarlane, Ruth  174
McGarrigle, Gail  25, 93
McGeer, Michael G 50
McGhee, Jack  136
McGuire, Dan  188
Mcllwraith,  Margaret  35
Maclnnes, Bob 129
Moclnnes, Duncan  135
Maclnnes, Ian  129
Mclntyre, Kenneth  35
Mclvor, Joan  107
McKay, Donald R 44
McKay, John C 44
Mackay, John  27
MacKay, Ken   129
McKay, Monte 62
McKelvie, Roy W 54
MacKenzie,  Graham   136
McKenzie, M. Murray  138
McKenzie, Patrick F 138
McKinnon, Tom   152
MacKinnon, Donald D 42
McLallen, Marilyn  62, 124
McLane, Margaret  36
MacLaren, Roy  161
McLean, Bob  129
McLean, Don  132
McLean, Helen  125
McLean, Margaret  118
McLellan, Helen Jane  50
McLennan, Lila  62, 65, 125
McLennan, Pat 36, 124
McLeod, Doug  43, 129
McLeod, Gordon  133
McLeod, John  76, 133
McLeod, John M 138
McLeod, Ken  136
McLeod, Patricia  48
McLuckie, Bill 135
McMahon, Jim  80
McMillan, D 97
MacMillan, John  133
McMorran, Richard L  41
McNab, Nancy  120
MacNicol, Jim  97, 129
McNish, Jim  22, 24, 43
McNulry,  Bill  133
McPherson, V. A 51
McPherson, Elspeth  119
McRae, Ron  136
MacSorley, C. Clare  138
McVickar, Robert  36
McWilliams, Bruce  100
Nacaie, Martha 36
Nakashima, Rosalie  36
Neave, Bufty  123
Neen, Bill  50, 139
Neen, Jack  139
Neil, R. Cleveland  138
Neilson, Ronald  42
Neimes, Thomas  53
Nelms, Leroy  43
Nelson, Bob  83
Nelson, Ron  131
Nelson, William C 138
Newstead, James  36
Newstead, Ninita  36
Newton, John  133
Newton, Linnea  36
Nicholls, Terry  153
Nilson, Verna  36
Niven, James L 46
Niven, Les  139
Nixon, George E. B 42
Noble,  Ken  136
Noel, Ross  53
Nolan, Don  127
Nordman, Vol  36, 136
Norris, Charles M 46, 135
Nuttal, Mike  22, 47, 171
Nyhaug, Ernie....54, 74, 76, 97, 138
Nylander, Clive 108, 137
Oates, Gordon  42
Oberhofer, Matt  128
O'Brien, Barnie  108, 128
O'Connor, Kevin  76
Officer, Roy 152
O'Flanagan, Gerry  74, 129
Oliver,  Elizabeth    36
Olliver, Leslie R 43
Olsen, Barry 132
Opechowski, Sylvia  36
O'Shaugnessy, Bob  67
274 v*
It's Astounding
...that your policy paid me more
in dividends than I paid out
in premiums"...
says Mr. R. B. Blyth.
0lofobt
w
%n#
ffilylh
25 January.  195
011   ^-V/ ,- RoA0
4490BROA0AUR
clEVELAND 9, «
„„ of Canada,
, uf ^rance C°mP
The Wutua    i0. yarding
Waterloo. 0* promptness i»»r t want
•  settlement °A ,,ficationax
tne oM<l«- «■**  great «»U£^ for m. <°'
t,o to express j   victoria, seemed advi        Had j.
a    -hen I uved + *>.«. oolicv- it. .... been ever sin^ ^ur
by me *n ^^ out
, in setx^—  ratlfioa,— - for
Iso - -PrSSS ?d in victoria. B.C. ^f^e. Had I
- -n X 1-d >     ^  ^ it        Se5^^^^
-\rto cX - *£ -r/Uve ^ja^ several P0--%heSe
reffiain6v but living o» ^^ ,een P^J^ the one I ^
coSrCo:--of r/oo^esf—
-rS'^- five ohiidren. ^^o-P-^ "
""    It happens ^ZF>^^ ??»*£""
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favorably poUcy    ding ^a\\0 tw total amo
x presume yo ^ „, lt ^ ^ tMJl equal t°    tection ^
uo nroud-  1U    amount o°l°  , offers ^no ^ .  arateiui-
letter of Jonoanf
Ml* •«-**'   Ue odvonto9es offer
ofoV.derP^c» ^A/
yoor company-
THE
MUTUAL IIFE
o/ CANADA
HEAD  OFFICE
WATERLOO, ONTARIO
Catuzc&zX jfritifr ttu<tea£'
Mt-17-54
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VANCOUVER, 402 Pender St. W. VANCOUVER, 475 Howe St.
VICTORIA, 201-26 Scollard Bldg. NEW WESTMINSTER, Zeller Bldg., 604 Columbia St. NELSON, 450 Baker St. £
* ^Jfi
9
L^oior f-^lctuiteA :
A few minutes with us today and
you can be snapping them tomorrow.
Step into the fascinating world of color picture
taking with the help of our trained photographer-
salesmen. They'll show you how almost any modern
camera becomes a color camera when loaded with
Kodak Color Film.
EASTMAN
PHOTOGRAPHIC I th
MATERIALS     LI Ui
610 Granville St. MA 4331
Vancouver
WHOLESALE
RADIO
SUPPLIES
^hruarade
rsadto
oLtd.
The Favourite Spot for Radio
Amateur and Experimenters.
Vancouver's Largest Stock
and Assortment of Radio Parts
and Equipment
TAtlow 1421
971 RICHARDS STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
O'Shea, Ken  46, 127
Ostynsky, Orest   156
Ornes, Norm  127
Orr, Archibald C 42
Owen, Johnny  76
Palleson,   Paddy   119
Palmer,  Patricia  36
Panaiote, Demetrius  82
Papezik,  Vladmir   36
Parker, Ed  36, 101
Parker, Walter  36
Parkes, Francis  36
Parkin, Bill  134
Parkinson,  Denny   140
Parkinson, Raymond  52
Parle, Victor E 43
Parmley, Jean  175
Patterson, Colin  46
Paterson, James M 138
Patch, Gordon  36
Paul,  Arthur   47
Pauls,  Henry   52
Pawlowski, Frank  179
Payne, Frank Alden  42
Peacock, Joan S 50
Pearce, Don  136
Pearkes, John A 138
Pearson, Donald  36
Pease, Helen  36
Pegg, Sidney L 46
Pekovich, Daniel  138
Peloso, Lido  103
Pendray,  Madge  48,   123
Pentland, Ann  104, 120
Pepin, Herbert 40
Pertz, Dwight  133
Perlinghis, Costa  46
Perry, Kenneth J 50
Peterson, Denise  118
Peterson,  Jerry   138
Petri, Don 83
Phillips, Bill  154, 160
Phillips, Gil  182
Philpott, Dale  132
Phipps, Jill  36
Pineo, Pete  105
Pinson, William E 42
Pipes, Marilyn  120
Plant, Albert C 138
Pollock, Jim  76, 138
Poole, Graham  43
Poole, Kenneth  36
Pontifex, Alexander   52
Potter, Ross  36
Pound, Kathleen  36
Pountney,  Lloy   58,  71
Powell, Frank E 46, 132
Powers,  Barney   129
Purkis, Robert  52
Prentice, Elizabeth  124
Preston,  Jack   127
Preston, Mert  132
Price, Keith  135
Price,  Miriam    48
Prpich, Verna  45
Ptucha, John  83
Puder, Richard  129
Pugh, Robert E 36
Purdy, John  108
Purvis, David G. S 138
Pyper, Ian  50, 139
Quaglia,  L.  A 46
Quan, Joe  103
Quistwater,   Jacques     36
Rae, Allen  93, 129
Rae, Doug  129
Rae, Ewing 39
Rae, Sue  86
Rainer, James A. 138
Raisen, Jerry  130
Ram, Bhagat 160
Ramage, E. Edward 138
Ramsbotham, Sandra  153
Ramslie, Gunner J 54
Ranaghan, Roma  121
Read, Dale 37
Rebarits, Bill  131
Reiner, Tom  128
Remesz, Louis  37
Rempel, Theodore  37
Rennie, Joan  37, 120
Rennie, William  40, 190
Renton, Donald N 46
Reston, John C 46, 139
Riback,  Faith   122
Richardson,  Fay-Ann   37,  123
Richardson, Gordon 137
Richmond,  Rod  135
Rickson, Barbara  108
Ridgers, Arthur H 41
Ridington, John  87
Ridley, Bob  46, 133
Riopel, Dick  26, 153
Risk, Jim  134
Ritchie, Bill  135
Ritchie, Bruce  131
Ritchie, John C 46,  136
Rive, Elliott  39
Roberge, Edmund  53
Roberts, Ben  40
Roberts, Richard  37
Robertson, Alec C 46
Robertson, John   103
Robertson, Lois  125
Robertson, Marguerita  124
Robertson, Margaret 37
Robin, Edwin P 52
Robin, Pete  103
Roblin, Robert  128
Roed, Lome  128
Roger, Ann  105
Rogers, Maggie  37, 120
Rohloff, Robert  37
Rohrer, Joyce  108, 124
Romman, Aimar  42
Rosen, June  37
Rosenberg, Kenneth  46
Ross, J. Kenneth  138
Ross, William C 52
Rothery, Michael  37, 154
Rourke, Harold W 54
Routledge, Margaret  45
Routley, John  52
Rudiewich, Lillian  37
Rundle, Howard  37
Rye, John  37
Rose, Alison  118
Rose, Pam  121
Rosenberg, Jerry 133, 188
Rosenburg, Kenneth  133
Ross, Sandy  155
Routh, Gordon L 42
Rovers, Jerry  83
Rowan, John  131
Rowland, Gary  134
Robinson, Betty Jane  120
Rudge, Gordon   82
Runnals, Sonno  152
Russell, John  93
Russell, Ken  136
Russell, Marilyn  22, 25, 54
Rutherford, Terry  178
Saarinen, Carl 54, 134
Saimoto, Mikio  43
Sadowski, Joseph   39
Sainas, Bessie  T18
Salmon, Ray  39
Salter, Bill  47, 132
Salter, Kathryn  124
Salter, Margot  37, 143
Salter, Nancy  119
Sambol, Matthew 134
Sanchioni, Carlo  53
Sankey, Maureen 143
Sapera, Ron  102
Saperstein, Manuel  130
Satinovsky, Josephine  122
Saul, Bev  37, 133
276 PAcific 9936
Brooks-Corning Co. Ltd.
ZJne \Jffice Zrufniture ^tore
655 HORNBY STREET
Vancouver 1, B. C.
m&j miLSon
VICTORIA VANCOUVER
Importers of Fine British Woollens
FEATURING
Women's
Braemar of Scotland Sweaters
Liberty of London Yardage and Scarves
Jacqmar of London and Paris
County Sports of London
Men's
Warren K. Cook suits and sports jackets
Chester Barrie and Rodex topcoats
Daks Slacks
HOTEL   VANCOUVER
FOR   LABORATORY   CHEMICALS
^/y./y NICHOLS &ha
•• •
C.P. Acetic Acid
C.P. Ammonium Hydroxide.
C.P. Hydrochloric Acid
C.P. Nitric Add
C.P. Sulphuric Acid
Complete line of Baker &
Adamson Laboratory Reagents and Fine Chemicals
for educational, research and
industrial uses.
Iho NICHOLS CHEMICAL COMPANY. Limited
1917 Sun Life Bldg., Montreal 2 - 137 Wellington St. W., Toronto 2 - Vancouver (Barnett, B. C.)
277 CH. 8010
CE. 6822
N.ghts: | GL 2126L
Murphy Excavating
CO. LTD.
G. MURPHY
J. HOWE
1466 W. SIXTH AVE.
VANCOUVER 9, B. C.
MANUFACTURERS OF
WIRE ROPES OF ALL
DESCRIPTIONS
BLUE STRAND
BRITISH  ROPES CANADIAN FACTORY
LTD.
VANCOUVER,    B.C.
"Dickson's MUST
Supply the coffee!"
• You'll find that when you particularly enjoy a cup of coffee at
your favorite eating place ... ten
to one it's been roasted by Dickson's ... the 'Blossom' people!
Savage, Al  107
Savarie, Louis  137
Sawyer, Diana  178
Say, Jill  37, 121
Scadding, Sharon  Ill
Scantland, Cecile  35, 87
Scatchard, Lawrence  37
Schachter, Bernie  50, 127
Schaffer, Susan  37, 124
Schofer, Roy  178, 179
Schoen, Walter  37
Scholefield, Arthur  47
Schon, Carol  37
Schmok, Arthur  52
Schwank, Barbara  110, 111
Schlater, Shirley  54,   120
Scott, Barry  37
Scott, George E 50
Scott, Vernon H. K 47, 138
Scriabin, Mike  154, 160
Sear, Charlie  158
Selbie, Bill  139
Seymour, George  129
Seymour, Ian R 50
Shalman, Denis  27, 37, 133
Sharman, Tony  84
Sharp, Kathleen  124
Sharp, Mary-Jo  93
Sharpe, James  53
Shaw, Clif  137
Shaw, Donald A 41
Shaw, Dune  129
Shearer, Donald 37
Shelly, Mel  140
Sheppard,  Barry  137
Sherrin, Derry  127
Sherwood, Bill  80
Shields, Peter 133
Shier, Robert P 50
Shippobotham, Jack  129
Shobrook, Lenora  37, 119
Shorthouse, Thomas  37, 114
Shrum, Janie  24, 65, 70, 120
Sidoo, Tarlochan  37
Siemens, Alf  152
Siems, Mary-Lou 100, 105
Sier, Herbert N 50
Siew, Chick  82
Simard, Clement  44, 189
Simmonetta,  Luigi   178
Simons, Monty  153
Simpson, Albert  37, 110
Simpson, Brian  132
Sinclair, Robert  133
Sinegeorgis, Mulugeta  41
Singh, J 97
Sirlin,  Irving  130
Skelding, Jim   135
Sky, Milton  130
Slinger, Judy 48, 118
Smillie, Howard  136
Smith, Alan  155
Smith, Bob  188
Smith, Cyril Bee  53
Smith, Donna  119
Smith, Elizabeth  37
Smith, Glen 53, 84, 97
Smith, Gordon F 43
Smith, James W 41
Smith, Kenneth  47
Smith, Michael  54
Smith, Peter 110
Smith, Sheila  174
Smith, Shirley  37, 121
Smith, Ted  139
Smithe, Neil 153
Smitheringale,  Bill   127
Solloway, Bill  179
Sones, Robert 39
Soong, Eleanor  48, 174
Sorochan, Walt  127
Sortwell, Ted  127
Spare, Gordon  138
Spears, Heather 152
Spencer, Alfred J 53
Spencer, Bruce 132
Spevakow, Bob  50, 130
Spiro, Grant   128
St. John, Bill 22, 47, 116, 133
Standell, Valie  37, 123
Standen, Philip  43
Stanfield, Derek 133
Stanton,  Rodger  80
Stavens, Herbert  47
Steeves, John  139
Stekl» Eve  178, 179
Stenhouse, Lynn  126
Stephens, Herbie  43, 59
Stephens, Vic 137
Sterling, Tom   135
Stevens, Gerald  43
Stevens-Guille  80
Stevens, Marilyn  123
Stevenson, Marney  155
Stewart, Bob  137
Stewart, Don  37, 131, 152
Stewart, Jim 131
Stewart, Margie  44, 59
Stewart, Gerry  75
Stewart, Paul  87
Stewart, Ray  137
Stewart, Sandy  132
Stickland, Mike 127
Stobart, Rod 37, 84, 139
Stoyva, Johann 22, 26
Stralendorff, Shirley  37
Strang, Ian 128
Strange, Pat  25, 54
Stride, Terrence  37
Stringer, Terry 86
Strom, Norman H 44
Strother, Edward  194
Stuart, Bill  47, 129
Sturdy, Sandra  125
Sullivan, Terry  132
Sultan, Ralph  136
Sutton, Wendy
27,  87,   104,   115,   119
Sutherland, Ann  118
Sveinson, Borg  82
Swanson,  Max   93,  97
Sweet, Dave  50, 135
Swinarton,  Sheila   124
Sylte, Len  43, 140
Syeklocho, Delfa  37
Sypnowich, Peter  101
Tadman, Blooma 53, 122
Tait, Barbara 37
Tanaka, Tsugio  37
Tanner, William  52
Tappay,  Bob  127
Tarling, Frank  76
Taylor, Alex  139
Taylor, Cary  54
Taylor, George 139
Taylor, Greg 131
Taylor, James 52
Taylor, Jean A 121
Taylor, Jean D 37
Tenenbaum, Sally  37
Tetlock, Norma  38
Thibaudeau, Denis  53
Third,  Douglas  .43
Thodeson, John  139
Thom, Gordie 128
Thomas, Claire  38
Thomas, Harry 134
Thomas, Howie  80
Thomas, Meredith  38
Thomas, William D. S 138
Thompson,  Basil 52
Thompson, Betty Anne  119
Thompson, Joyce  48
Thompson,   Lorimer   47
Thompson, Donald R 54
Thompson, Robin  38
Thorne, Norma  123
Thorne, Trevor  40, 132
278 Come In and See . . .
New '54
MERCURY
. . . the Greatest yet!
Tops in beauty and performance
Here it is! . . new '54 Mercury with everything
... yes everything to give you . more beauty,
added safety, greater comfort and outstanding
convenience. Mercury's high-compression 161 h.p.
V-8 engine now gives you still better performance
and economy. A Road Test will prove the '54
Mercury        is the greatest yet!
Visit Our Showroom Soon!
FOR YOUR ROAD TEST SEE
BLACK MOTORS LTD
444 DUNSMUIR
TAtlow 4411
anizen
MAKERS OF THE  WORLD-FAMOUS
fltttttyea Swim Suite, Sweat&te,
'Knitted Suitt and
Sew, (2tt)t6e&
JANTZEN OF CANADA LIMITED
10th Avenue and  Kingsway
Phone FAirmont 1261
VANCOUVER, B.C.
279 'Tis not what we say
'Tis what we do—
For our work shall decide
If we're good for you.
\Jur Sincere   lA/idned 2J-or C^acn of   ijou :
.-aAt^hrappu and\2>ucce66ful
We have been pleased to supply the University
with—
Mimeographed Law Case  Books
Lab Manuals, etc.
Lithographed Charts       Graphs
Manuals, etc.
BEST   MIMEOGRAPH   COMPANY   LTD.
151 West Hastings TAtlow 3742
F. A. BEST—Manager
Famous Names In Industrial
Equipment
Power Transmission:
AMERICAN Pulleys, SKF Bearings, FALK Couplings,
GATES V-Belts. UNION Chain, TROJAN and CASTELOY
Products.
Power, Air and Hydraulics:
GALLAND-HENNING, GOULD, MARTON, VALVAIR Air
Valves and Cylinders, VICKERS-ARMSTRONGS Hydrauli
Transmissions.
Conveying:
LO-HED El. Hoists, M & C Troughing Rolls, STANDARD
Conveyors, TROJAN Conveyor Systems.
Carriers, Fork Trucks and Cranes:
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HANCHETT Grinders, MONARCH Carriages, NEWMAN
Planers, REES Burners, TURNER Resaws, WHITE Woodworking Machinery, TROJAN Sawmill Machinery.
Just a few of our many Quality Lines!
UJI:l:MH!M.-limg!
1331   WEST 6th AVE., VANCOUVER 9,  B. C.       CH 5121
Thornton, Norman ...  52
Thorsteinson, V.      38
Thomson, W. Bruce  „_ 138
Thordarson, Ted 134
Thrasher, Ann 38, 143
Thurston, Quentin  133
Timberley, Dorien  ,. 38
Tinkess, James     38
Tinker, Robert 47
Tobler, Ericko ....  146
Todd, Adrienne  123
Todd, Ian  82
Todd, James S     54
Todd, Jim 80
Tofte, Gordon  44
Tomljenovich, A 53
Toren, Martin  150
Tortorelli, Ralph ... 38
Touchburn, Sherman  40
Towgood, Jomes  38
Toy, Samuel A   50
Toynbee,   Tom       84
Trofford, Jacqueline  105,  124
Trebett, Jim          44, 171
Tremaine,   Sylvia    56,   71
Trigg, C. Murray 44
Trimble, A. Roy 50
Trunkfield, Chris  38,  139
Tufts, Fronk .'..135
Tupling, George  38
Turbitt, Ron  82
Turnbull, Ion  129
Turnbull, Sheila  86, 125
Turner, Fronk  1.132
Turner,  Geoff  132
Turner, James    47
Two, Audrey         38
Tyson, Edword 47
Unwin,  Ernie   136
Underhill, Dick
22, 23, 62,  129,   161,   179
Underhill, Nancy  27, 118
Upson, Brian  65, 76, 129
Urquhort, Williom 53
Usher, Don    135
Usher, Margaret  48
Vale, Lorno  38, 123
Volentine, Anne         119
Vallis, D 97
Van De Bogort 38
Von Exel, Gerrit A 42
Von der Vliet,  Edward  187
Vaughan, Jock   38
Vaughan, Lome D 138
Veor, Gwen  47, 126
Veitch, John   139
Venables, Shirley 126
Verehere, William  47,  138
Verma, Behari  38
Vogel, Dick 27, 62, 129
Vogel, Henry  140
Vogel, Wink  129
Wade, Ed 43, 137
Wainwright, Joan      121
Walker, June  45, 59, 126
Walker, Roy 38
Walloce, Clark    137
Wolley, Donna Mae  38, 120
Wolley,  Peter      134
Walsh, Bill  131
Wolters, Horold A 138
Wolton, Norm  43, 136
Wanklyn, Priscillo  38
Word, Gordon .43
Word, Kenneth  53
Warne, Jim   53,  168
Warner, D. L.  52
Worren, Doreen   48
Warren,  John    84
Wasylkow, Norm  134
Watermon, Horold H 183
Watkins, Ronald J    138
Wotson, John       50
Watt,  Charlie   102
Wotts, Douglas J.  41,  131
Watts,  Louise  147
Weotherall, Bill  47, 131
Weaver,  Kenneth   38
Webster, Harry    ...52
Webster,  Marg 121
Weeks, Grohom       .47, 131
Weismiller, Derek 40, 190
Welsford, Duthie    133
Welsh, Helen 38, 123
Weins, Dove  76
Wells, Chorles  53
Weseen,  Art 43,   140
West, Lorg  84
Westawoy, Raymond ..       50
Westerlund,  Bruno  .136
Westloke,  Don    131
Whist,  Jorl   180
Wetherill,  Ewort  40
Wheeler, Michael      185
White, Donold  134
White, Gordon       38, 139
White, Horry    136
White, Morilyn..38, 59, 62, 66, 124
White, Poul  132
Whittoker, David     38
Whittaker, John 111
Whittome, James 1 50
Whitwhom, Bud   ...53
Whitworth,   Doug   136,   149
Whyte, Williom A 54, 97
Wickman, Thomas 53
Wilson, William B 54
Wickson,  Malcolm 133
Wiens,   Dove   132
Willfort, Agnes  38
Williams, Douglas  38
Willis, Charles 43
Wilson, Bob  84
Wilson, Jean  118
Wilson, Marilou      120
Wilson, Sylvio  124
Wilson,  Richard    38
Wilson, Walter  38
Wing, James  53
Winskill,  Aileen     38
Winter, Ann         25, 54
Withler, Lewis 38
Withrington, George  50
Witt, Marian  38
Wolfe, Isy  154
Wolfe, Lorna    154
Wolrige, Alan F.     138
Wolverton, Bernie , 126
Wong, Ding M 47
Wong, Jack  168
Wong, Wing   53
Woo, Byng  156
Wood, Robert 47
Woods, John H 52
Woolrich, Mary Lou  119
Wood, Conla     38
Woodward, Bob  Ill
Wooster, Tony  135
Wooton, Art 131
Wright,  Bill       .136
Wright, Janie  105, 124, 177
Wright, Ronald H 47. 138
Wright, R 38, 97
Wyman, Dick  103
Yeoman, Alan  43
Young, Andrew  B 138
Young,  Irene  93
Young,  Margot       .124
Youngson, David  50
Yuill, John  129
Yuk,  Gloria   156
Yurich, Mary  48, 118
Yuskow, Wolter     53
Zakarko, Danny  76, 138
Zajac, lhor 156
Zelonko, Anna     38
Zilke, Ed  38, 149
Zlovlikovitz,   Herman. 84
280 LEARNING
BY DOING!
It's experience that counts! That's the reason for Jenkins'
leadership. More than half a century of practical experience
has gone into the manufacture of Jenkins quality valves —
making them the longest-lasting, lowest-upkeep valves money
can buy.
You can gain valuable experience yourself by profiting
from the knowledge of others. Follow the lead of thousands
of Canadian industries. Relying at first on the fine reputation
of Jenkins Bros. — they have now learned from actual experience that valves bearing the famous Jenkins diamond trade
mark give extra-long trouble-free service!
REMEMBER    THE
NAME    JENKINS
—and forget valve worries! Consult
us on any problem concerning valve
selection, installation or maintenance.
t**« r*i hi matM »tt«
VALVE S <s^
%muUn*10rnt
JENKINS BROS. LIMITED
617 St. Remi Street, Montreal
Sales Offices:
Toronto - Winnipeg - Edmonton - Vancouver
281 p3*:
;—-SS"
Cleland - Kent Western, Limited
ARTISTS      PHOTOGRAPHERS      PHOTOENGR AVERS
EtECTROTYPERS STEREOTYPERS Advertisers Index
Advertising Manager—Colin Patterson
Page
0. B. Allan Limited  246
Anderson Printing Co  251
Anglo Canadian Shipping Co. Ltd. 248
Bank of Montreal  261
B. A. Oil Co. Ltd  257
B. C. Electric Co. Ltd  260
British Columbia Government  273
B. C. Sugar Refinery  268
British Ropes Canadian Factory.... 278
Barnes Jewellers  270
Baynes Manning  252
Best Mimeograph Co  280
Birks & Sons  244
Black Motors Ltd  279
B. Boe Ltd  267
Bogardus Wilson Ltd  256
Frank L. Bott Co  273
J. W. Bow  244
Boyles Bros. Drilling Co  252
Brooks-Corning Co  277
Campbell Studios   270
Canada Chain & Forge  250
Canada Packers Ltd  250
Canadian Bakeries Ltd  244
Canadian Wood Pipe & Tanks  250
Edith A. Carrothers  278
Cave & Co  250
Clarke & Stuart  274
Cleland-Kent Western Ltd  282
College Printers   252
Columbia Paper Co  254
Commodore Cabaret   256
Crane Ltd  274
Page
Creamland Crescent Dairy  246
Crossman Machinery Co  256
Crown Life Insurance  272
D'Arcy Studios  262
Dairyland  267
Diethers Construction   254
Dickson Importing   278
Duffus School  255
Eastman Photo Materials Ltd.  276
T. Eaton Co  259
Evans Coleman & Evans  257
Famous Players  252
Gordon Farrell  250
Floorcraft Ltd  262
Foo Hung Co. Ltd  246
Galbraith & Sulley Ltd  280
Gehrke Stationery & Printing  262
General Paint Corp  257
Gestetner Ltd  244
Gordon & Belyea Ltd  254
Hudson's Bay Co  269
Hughes-Owens Co  251
Hygrade Radio Ltd  276
Institute of Chartered Ace  243
I.X.L. Laundry  256
Jantzen Knitting Mills  279
Jermaine's Ltd  250
Jenkins Bros  281
Keystone Press Ltd  248
Kuo Seun Importers  252
Longley Electric Co. Ltd  250
Marshall Wells  246
Marwell Construction  263
283
Page
Bell-Mitchell   252
Modernize Tailors   248
Murphy Excavating Co  278
Murphy Stationery Co  268
Mutual Life of Canada  275
McRae Co. Ltd  264
Macaulay Nicolls Maitland Co  250
Macdonald Tobacco Co  271
McGavin Bakeries   257
Nabob Food Division   274
Nelson Bros. Fisheries  264
Nichols Chemical Co  277
Office Specialty Manufacturing.. 272
On Wo Tailors  270
Peter's Ice Cream  270
Pilkington Glass   248
Pitman Business College  252
Provincial Paper Ltd  271
Royal Bank of Canada  247
Royal Trust Co  246
Seeley & Co  246
Sun Publishing Co  260
Thompson & Page Ltd  262
U.B.C. Alumni Association  253
U.B.C. Bookstore   247
University Food Services  258
Vancouver Supply Co  252
Western Plywood   249
Willard Equipment  271
W. & J. Wilson  277
W. K. Gardens  255
Woodward Stores Ltd  265
Wrigley Printing Co. Ltd  245  Subject Index
Page
Administration   20
Agriculture  ....  166
Alpha Delta Phi 119
Alpha Delta Pi  133
Alpha Gamma Delta                   ... 118
Alpha Omega   156
Alpha Omicron Pi  126
Alpha Phi -  123
Alpha Tou Omega  139
Alumni Association _  21
Applied Science 188
Architecture   190
Arts and Science -  164
Athletics                   73
Badminton                      92
Basketball                        76
Beta Theta Pi  136
Big Block Awards 97
Blood Drive   63
Board of Governors  19
Camera Club -  147
C.C.F. Club - - 149
Chinese Varsity  156
Civil Liberties Union   155
Columbia  Bi-Centennial            253
Commerce  172
Congregations  53
Cricket -  96
Dance Club -  151
Delta Gamma  - 120
Delta Kappa Epsilon .  132
Delta Phi Epsilon .. 122
Delta Sigma Pi  116
Delta Upsilon - 131
Education      184
Engineering   188
Fashion Show -  62
Fencing   91
Film Society  105
Football   -74
Forestry     170
Fort Camp  245
Fraternities                           127
French Club      155
Frosh Week  56
Page
Gamma Phi Beta  124
Golf     93
Graduate Studies     182
Grass Hockey -—    88
Gym Club --    89
High School Conference    66
Hillel Foundation   154
Homecoming    58
Home Economics   174
Honorary Activity Awards  115
Housing  245
Ice Hockey      80
India Students  160
Intramurals      94
Interfraternity Council    27
International House      160
Jarx Society  150
Kappa Alpha Theta  121
Kappa Kappa Gamma  125
Lambda Chi Alpha  137
Low   180
Liberal Club  148
L.P.P. Club   148
LS.E    26
L.S.E. Awards  114
M.A.D    25
Mamooks         146
Mardi Gras      64
Medicine  178
Men's Big Block Club     97
Mock Parliament   158
Musical Society  108
Newman Club   154
N.F.C.U.S  161
Nursing .—  186
Panhellenic    27
Parliamentary Forum  158
Pharmacy  168
Phi Delta Theta  129
Phi Gamma Delta  138
Phi Kappa Pi  134
Photographers  103
Phrateres  143
Physical Education   176
Page
Players'Club  110
Political Clubs  148
Pre-Medical  164
President's Message  18
Progressive Conservative Club 149
Psi Upsilon  127
Publications  100
Queens  70
Radio Society  106
Rowing   85
Rugby  78
S.C.M  153
Sigma Chi  128
Sigma Phi Delta   140
Sigma Tau Chi...  116
Siwash   258
Skiing    86
Slavonics Circle  157
Soccer   82
Social Problems Club  155
Social Work  185
Song Fest  141
Sororities     118
Spanish Club  155
Sports  73
Students' Council  22
Swimming     84
Tennis   92
Totem    104
Track  90
Ubyssey  100
U.N. Club  159
Undergraduates    191
U.S.C  24
V.C.F  152
Visual Arts   147
V.O.C  87
W.A.D.  25
Weightlifting     91
Women's Basketball  93
Women's Big Block Club  96
W.U.S.       24
Zeta Beta Tau  130
Zeta Psi  125
World University Service  161
285  THE British Empire Games last but a moment, but their
spirit pervades our campus throughout every school
year, from the hectic day of registration to the final
scrawled word on our last exam paper. In their everyday
activity, students are not often aware of the currents which
pulse through the life of their university. We, the Totem
staff, in producing this year's Totem, have become acutely
conscious of the dominant role our and every university
plays in creating understanding and tolerance among the
future citizens of the world.
Our sincerest thanks go out to Ben Hill-Tout whose
superb photography in the opening section and on the
section pages helped us to give full expression to our
theme. We are grateful also to Allan Clark of Cleland-
Kent who suggested the use of Econocolor in the opening
section of our book, and to Glen Hyatt of Wrigley Printing, who worked day and night to help us give you the
1954 Totem on time.
This book, we feel, gives you a clear picture of the role
of the university as a determining factor in world co-operation. To those of you who graduate, we hope that you
leave this university with some concept of the part that
you play, consciously or unconsciously, as a representative
of Canada and of the British Empire. We hope also that
your years here have given you, as well as scholastic
knowledge, an increased understanding of those around
you and have endowed you with the ability to be, not a
provincial citizen, but a world citizen. WRIC.LF.Y PRINTING CO. LIMITED
ENGRAVINGS BY CLELAND-KENT WESTERN LIMITED

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