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The Totem 1952 1952

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Array rf&Z Mli w * sr sg _& _89M» EDITOR:   JOAN   FRASER
ASSISTANT   EDITOR    GERRY   KIDD
WOMEN'S   EDITOR:   MAUREEN   CROMIE GRADUATE   EDITOR    ELVA   PLANT
BUSINESS  MANAGER    GEORGE  STEVENSON SPORTS  EDITOR:  BILL  HUTCHINSON
FRATERNITIES:  SALLY HEARD
CLUBS  EDITOR.  GERRY  KIDD
UNDERGRADUATE  EDITOR    JOHN  BANFIELD ADVERTISING:   COMMERCE   DEPARTMENT 9/*
TOTEM
1952
PUBLISHED BY THE
PUBLICATIONS BOARD OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEDICATION
The late Dr. Maxwell A Cameron, former Director of School of Education
at the University of British Columbia, was one of the most able
educationalists of this province. His warm sympathy and
practical sense endeared him to faculty and students alike; perhaps
he will be best remembered for his unfailing good humour.
Interest in education dominated all Dr. Cameron's life. He acquired
his M.A. at UBC and his Ph.D at Toronto, coming back to this
University in 1939 as acting head of the Department of Education.
He was appointed to the headship of the Department in 1945.
Author of several books and educational surveys, Dr. Cameron is noted
for his Royal Commission Study now known as the
"Cameron Report", which included a series of recommendations for
extensive reforms in school administration and finance.
It was adopted almost in entirety by the British Columbia Legislature.
It is to the memory of this far-sighted leader and kindly man
that the Totem is respectfully dedicated. MAXWELL A CAMERON Ml
■ Campus -----
Administration -   -
Social ------
Activities   -   -   -   -     *
Clubs        -   -
Publications   -   -   -     87
Sports ------
Graduates -  -   -   -   127
Undergraduates
149
Fraternities    -   -   -   207
Around Town   -   -   237   QymnaHum
A living memorial to the hundreds of UBC
students and graduates who gave their lives in
two world wars, UBC's new gymnasium combines superb functionalism with a classic simplicity and buoyancy of design probably
unmatched in Western Canada.
A dream conceived by an energetic Student
Council in 1946, the million dollar structure
was largely financed through a series of campaigns arranged by the students. A contribution from the B. C. Government, backing the
mammoth campus expansion programme,
helped complete the central portion of the
building. It was formally opened at the 1951
Fall Convention.  il)e£v%ook (Building,
First permanent building of the new medical school bears the name of Dr. Wesbrook,
UBC's first president. It will contain the new
twenty-six bed university hospital, the departments of bacteriology and preventative medicine and much of the research potential of the
medical school.   Completed in the fall of 1951,
it is used to provide classrooms for first and
second year medical students, and senior
chemistry and bacteriology students. i
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"Let Justice Prevail Even Though the
Heavens Fall" . . . Behind the gleaming glass
and white concrete of UBC's newest building,
student lawyers unravel the complexities of
2,000 years of law which forms the plastic
framework of our society. Overlooking the
boulevard sloping to the cliffs which drop into
Burrard Inlet, the single-storey structure is one
of the most striking examples of modern architecture on the campus. Its book-lined combination reading and lecture rooms contain
one of North America's most complete law
libraries.  Cngineeting Building
Solidly between the botanical gardens and
the familiar bus stop is UBC's new Engineering Building. Three storeys high and built of
thick reinforced concrete, it contains labs, classrooms, and offices for the Faculty of Applied
Science. Campus overcrowding forced Arts
classes into the building shortly after its opening in the Spring of 1951, but eventually it will
be wholly occupied by the rollicking redshirts
for whom it was built.  BioL
is<
ogical &cience£
The Biological Sciences Building, with its
rough-cut stone and concrete exterior, rises
sharply from the old experimental fields of
the Faculty of Agriculture. Opened in the fall
of 1950, the building is a centre of UBC's expanding research programme. Modern classrooms and labs for students of biology and
pharmacy are lined with gleaming electronic
microscopes and complicated dissecting apparatus. A fully equipped amphitheatre, office
space, and part of the quarters of the new
medical school are also located here. *
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!_ ___M  2X •   Chancellor Sherwood Lett, C.B.E.,  D.S.O., M.C, E.D., Q.C., B.A., l.l.D
Members of the Graduating Classes of 1952
can I believe, enter their chosen fields with
greater optimism and confidence than any
of   their   predecessors.
The Dominion of Canada and the Province of British Columbia are today experiencing an economic expansion unparalleled in
their history. With the increased opportunities
for your skills and knowledge, you will also
find greater scope for useful service in a wider
sense.
To become a teacher, a lawyer, an engin
eer or a research worker without an "extra-
professional" outlet for your abilities is rather
a narrow ambition.
I hope you will always feel it a duty
to devote some portion of your time and your
talents to the assistance of those who did not
enjoy the good fortune and advantages which
have come to you.
Our University has always taken a very
special pride in the accomplishments of its
Graduates. I am confident that the Graduates
of 1952 will give us cause for greater pride.
My best wishes to each one of you for success in your new fields of adventure.
Chancellor.
22 It is a great pleasure to have the opportunity of addressing the Graduation Class
through the pages of the Totem. To those of
you who will be leaving us in 1952 with Doctor's, Master's or Bachelor's Degrees, I should
like to offer the best of good wishes.
We have entered upon a period in history
in which the complexities of society are such
that it is no longer adequate to be merely professionally competent.
To serve your profession well, you must
be continually aware of the political, social
and economic forces which relate your profession to the larger community of which you
are a part.
Your University degree should be evidence
that you have met certain minimum professional or scholastic requirements, and in addition that you have developed an appetite and
the capacity for continuing education on your
own initiative.
Good luck and God speed.
• President N. A. M. MacKenzie, C.M.G., M.M. and Bar, Q.C., B.A., L.L.B.,
(Dalhousie), L.L.M., (Harvard), L.L.D. (Mount Alison, New Brunswick, Toronto,
Ottawa, Bristol, Alberta), D.C.L., (Whitman), F.R.S.C.
23 Throughout the year the University as a whole has
looked to its faculty leaders for the clearness and steadiness of vision which distinguish its guiding figures. As
professors these leaders have been liberal of time and
advice for the students; as members of directing bodies
they have contributed their careful judgment to the
welfare of the University; as media of University contact with the community, they have promoted the interest of its staff and students.
Regulation of student discipline, direction of the
affairs of the respective faculties, and determination of
courses of study, are duties which have received the
attention of men and women working to uphold the
highest standards of a modern University.
These standards are the invisible threads which tie
the work of our greatest men in a fabric of University
tone.
Directly responsible for the policy of the whole
University is the Board of Governors. This twelve-man
board, chaired by Chancellor Lett, faced the difficult
problems of 1951-52. They planned the business policy
and dealt with the knottiest problems concerned with
administration.
Under the Board of Governors and charged with
the more straightforward problem of academic policy
was the Senate—a large group of faculty members who
smoothed out the host of academic problems raised by
students and faculty.
It is these men and the faculty as a whole that students may thank for the excellent administration of the
University of British Columbia.
24 WM
S. N. F. CHANT, O.B.E., M.A.
Dean of the  Faculty of Arts and Science
H.   J.   MacLEOD,   O.B.E.
I.Sc,  (McGill), M.Sc.  (Alberta), A.M., Ph.D.,
(Harvard),  M.E.I.C,  Mem.   I.R.E.,  Fellow
A. I. E.E.
Dean  of  the   Faculty  of Applied  Science
BLYTHE EAGLES
I.A.   (Brit. Col.), M.A.,  Ph.D.   (Toronto),
Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture
GEORGE FREDERICK CURTIS
LL.B.   (Sask.),   B.A.,   B.C.L.,   (Oxon.),
Dean   of  the   Faculty  of  Law
HENRY F. ANGUS
B.A.   (McGill),   B.C.L,   M.A.     Oxon.),   L.LD.
(McGill)  F.R.S.C.
Dean of the  Faculty of Graduate Studies
MYRON McDONALD WEAVER
A.B.   (Weaton   College),  M.S.,  Ph.D.,  M.D.
(Chicago)
Dean of the Faculty of Medicine
LOWELL BESLEY,
B.S.   (Cornell),   M.F.   (Yale),
Dean of the  Faculty of Forestry
WALTER GAGE,
M.A.   (Brit.  Col.)
Dean of Administrative and  Inter-Faculty
Affairs
GEOFFREY C. ANDREW
B.A.   (Dalhousie), M.A.   (Oxon.)
Executive Assistant to the  President
MISS M. DOROTHY MAWDSLEY
B.A    (McGill),   M.A.   (Brit.   Col.),   Ph.D.
(Chicago)
Dean of Women
MISS MARJORIE LEEMING
B.A.   (Brit.  Col.)
Assistant to the Dean of Women FRANK TURNER,
Alumni  Association  Director.
First winners at UBC in 1951-52 session of the UBC Alumni
Association Regional Scholarship—provided through contributions to the Alumni-UBC Development Fund.
"The future of the UBC in the next fifty years may
well be determined by the support of our Alumni in
the next five years," says Chancellor Sherwood Lett,
a member of the University's first graduating class in
1916.
"One phase of that support is financial and is expressed by annual giving to the Alumni-UBC Development Fund. The other phase is personal. I urge all
former students to join with us—by friendly interest
and participation—in helping to solve the problems
which lie ahead."
The remarks of Chancellor Lett, UBC's first AMS
president and first Alumni Association President, describe in part Association activities and are certainly a
ringing challenge to new and old alumni. Current President Gordon M. Letson, managing-director of Letson-
Burpee, and a graduate in both Arts ('24) and Applied
Science ('26), heartily agreed when making a special
appeal to '52 grads to become active participants in the
expanding alumni programme.
Referring to the Association's annual giving plan,
Mr. Letson pointed out that an average of $15,000 had
been raised yearly to benefit the University and students
during the first three years of operation, and that although this amount may not seem large at first glance,
it should be remembered that this annual income, for
that is what it is, in fact, corresponds to the income
which would be derived from an Endowment Fund of
half a million dollars. Chairman of this year's Fund
Board is Harry A. Berry, (B.Comm., B.A. '37).
Under the supervision of the Association's executive
director, Frank J. E. Turner (B.Comm., B.A. '39) in
the full-time Alumni office in Brock Hall, some 17,000
alumni are contacted. Approximately 8,000 copies of
the alumni quarterly, the Alumni Chronicle (edited
by Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm., '42, L.L.B., '48), are
printed each issue and it contains feature news by and
about grads as well as articles on the University and the
students.
26 Most of us acquiring a copy of the "Totem" have
reached the end of university education. For the next
few years we will be fully occupied in getting ourselves
established in employment and in the social groups
which compose our society.
It is to be hoped that graduates will take a few minutes to think of what has been gained from University
education. We should assume additional responsibilities as Alumni of UBC to see that we and our
fellow taxpayers recognize the value of a higher education, and to see that the necessary opportunities are
provided for young people proceeding to University.
More important, however, let us visualize the worldwide economic and social potentialities that can be
realized through the application of our knowledge
motivated by our religious philosophy. Following graduation, let us aim high and work together for things
that are really worthwhile. We have the opportunity to
accomplish a tremendous amount—let's not waste it.
Many thanks for your assistance and co-operation
during the past year and the best of luck to everybody
in the future.
Sincerely,
AMS
Presidents
Message
THE ALMA MATER STAFF
A large part of the detailed work of the Students'
Council was carried out by the AMS staff, an efficient
group of people who got out letters, did filing, routine
reports, and accounting for the AMS.
All students who have taken an active part in AMS
affairs particularly appreciate their cheerfulness and interest in campus activities.
This year the staff had a change in personnel with
the incoming of Bunny Beck and Vinnian Lewis.
•   AMS Staft Vinnian Lewis, Mavis Walton, Bunny Beck, and Mr.
H.   B.   Maunsell,  AMS  Business   Manager.
27 Student Councillors kibitzed when they took time off during a  meeting.
Left to right: Ted Lee, Bill Sparling, Mary Lett, Phil Dadson, Jack Lintott.
Treasurer Phil Anderson dangles one of
his carefully watched dollar bills before
President Vaughan Lyon. Anita Jay
thinks  It's all a  big  joke.
Councillors wore gowns to meetings to add a serious businesslike air, but Terry Nicholls, Joan MacArther, and Bill
Neen, as caught by Totem photog, didn't let gowns stop a
little horseplay.
Although it appeared to be wrought with seething
controversy, Students' Council administered the general
business of the Alma Mater Society with efficient dispatch throughout the year. Meeting on the traditional
Monday nights, councillors often stayed past midnight
to solve the knotty problems presented to them.
The completion of the War Memorial Gymnasium
was one of their biggest projects. By the end of the year,
a trust fund was established for the Memorial pool, and
plans were completed for the installation of bowling
alleys in the gym.
On a few occasions bitter argument flew over the
Council table. Weathering threatened impeachment, defending the Editor-in-Chief during the Armoury controversy, and wading into a "ban fraternities" movement, AMS President Vaughan Lyon was able, nevertheless, to guide Council through its difficulties to
success. He led the group in its campaign to remove
University fee increases.
28 • Students' Council met in the Board Room to discuss important campus issues. Left to right: Bill Sparling, Bill Neen, Mary Lett, Jack Lintott,
Allan Goldsmith, Phil Dadson, Vaughan Lyon, Anita Jay, Phil Anderson, Joan MacArther, Ted Lee, Dianne Livingstone, John de Wolfe,
Terry Nichols.
Under one of the most competent treasurers the
AMS has ever seen, the Society ended the year with a
profit. Phil Anderson carefully watched each expenditure and kept close tab on all projects sponsored by
campus organizations. Although considered somewhat
conservative, Anderson's policy showed its soundness
in the year's financial statements.
One of the most criticized members was Co-ordina-
tor Jack Lintott, who had the thankless job of arranging
dates for campus functions. Lintott found the school
year didn't have enough days to cover all the events
campus groups wished to sponsor, and several "double
bookings" occurred. Lintott had better luck, however,
with Frosh Week which came off with much success.
Bill Neen, in addition to preparing several constitutional revisions, chaired the Undergraduate Societies
Committee. USC supervised arrangements for the
undergraduate issues of the Ubyssey.
Perpetual worry characterized Public Relations Officer Terry Nichols, who had the harried task of representing Council on the Editorial Board of the Ubyssey,
co-ordinating campus publicity, and organizing the High
School Conference. His hard work proved to be an
outstanding example of efficient administration.
In addition to their regular duties, the "joe jobs" of
investigation, chairing special committees, and assisting
in council projects fell upon Vice-president Phil Dadson,
Secretary Anita Jay, and Sophomore member Dianne
Livingstone. Although busy with their own large organizations, LSE President John de Wolfe, MAD President Bill Sparling, WUS President Mary Lett, and
WAD President Joan MacArthur also found time to do
additional Council work.
Students' Council went out of office feeling that
they had done their best under many handicaps to prq-
mote the well-being of the student body of UBC.
29  31  ROYAL VISIT
UBC students will long remember the visit of Queen Elizabeth and her Royal Consort Prince Philip to the campus of the
University of British Columbia.
Late in October of 1951, the Queen, then Princess Elizabeth,
and her husband visited the campus on part of their extensive
goodwill tour of North America. They were to see their first
American football game.
Nearly six thousand people jammed the stadium to see the
Royal Couple, whose delay in schedule only served to increase
the anticipation of the crowd.
Finally sirens and bright lights heralded the arrival of the
car parade, and as the plastic-topped limousine came to a stop
in front of the main grandstand, students, faculty, alumni, and
visitors rose with a cheer in tribute to their guests.
The Royal Couple was welcomed to the campus and escorted
to seats of honor in the stadium. After the Princess was presented a miniature argelite totem pole by Mary Lett, president
of the Women's Undergraduate Society, President MacKenzie
led the crowd in three rousing cheers for the visitors.
The Royal Couple then watched five minutes of football.,
though it was partly obscured by darkness. When the Prince
left the grandstand, he was presented with a football autographed by the Thunderbird team.
Now the Princess has become Queen, and students are proud
to think that their charming guest is the symbol of the unity of
the British Commonwealth.
To Queen Elizabeth and her husband, Prince Philip, the
students of the University of British Columbia extend their
sincere wishes for a long and prosperous reign.
The Royal  Couple  leaves the grandstand, escorted  by President
MacKenzie, as crowds strain to catch a glimpse of the party.
•    Princess   Elizabeth   signs   the   guest   book   of   the
University.
Princess  Elizabeth  smilingly shakes  hands  with  C.  B.  Woods, as  Dr.   MacKenzie
and Chancellor Lett look on.
33 • Upper left: Liz Fletcher,
queen of Frosh Week, holds
one of the symbols of her
office.
• Engineers, just back from
the woods, hold a hapless
freshette as a hostoge for the
return of their compatriots.
• Frosh clamor in the registration line-up for a chance to
get the  "ideal"  timetable.
• Time off from hectic activities to watch a football
game.
• Lower left: An enthralled
crowd watches the entertainment  at  the  Frosh   reception.
• Below: One of the seventy organizations huckstering
for members on club day.
• Engineers dunking Frosh
wind  up wet themselves. FROSH WEEK
In spite of Co-ordinator Jack Lintott's ban on Freshman Hazing, the usual spirit of Frosh Week was continued by the Engineers, with the co-operation of the
Frosh themselves.
This year most of the traditional requirements were
abandoned. No longer were seen the name-placards,
pale-lipped co-eds, or rolled-up trousers. A freshman,
however, was still the unmistakable, confused being,
and the Engineers found little trouble in routing them
out. A few of the hardy freshmen wore their blue and
beanies in confidence of their prowess.
The Frosh were herded through the usual ceremonies of the week. They were addressed by Dr. Mackenzie, and received by the Student Christian Movement. The girls were given a talk by WAA and were
invited to tea by WUS, while the men were treated to
a smoked (adult entertainment only!) by the Big Block
Club. The Big-Little Sister Banquet saw the Caf filled
to overflowing with freshettes and their big sisters, who
then snake-danced over to the Brock for an evening of
all-girl entertainment.
The week wound up with the Frosh Reception in
the Armouries, where Liz Fletcher was crowned Frosh
Queen by Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. The reception, the first social event of the year, attracted so many
people that couples were turned away at the door.
Frosh elections saw ex-Magees in domination. Jim
Macdonald presided over the organization with the help
of Joyce Hart, vice-president, and Don McCallum, secretary-treasurer. Each first year English class sent one
representative to the FUS panel, making the '51 Frosh
a solid organization.
Even before formal election of officers the Frosh
organized themselves to deal with the Engineers. Impartial observers say that the Frosh dealt more than
adequate retribution upon the aggressors.
The eagerness of the Frosh continued on as the more
inexperienced joined clubs covering every noon hour in
the week. After several weeks, however, Frosh could no
longer be distinguished from the rest of the students
as they disappeared into the general life of the university.
•    Two   freshettes   and   the   Brock  totem
pole make an attractive trio .
• The charming array of Frosh Queen
candidates pose with an available staircase.
• Frosh executive and Student Councillors  plot  the  coming  year's  activities.
e Undergraduates started tea-for-twoing
early in the year; Frosh started off on
milk. Homecoming Weekend
The culmination of five years work was reached
October 26, 1951, when the War Memorial Gymnasium
was   officially   opened.
The idea of a living memorial to those, who gave
their lives for freedom in two world wars was conceived by the 1946 Students' Council. The Gymnasium
was to be a tribute not only to university students,
but to all British Columbians who were in the two
wars.
One of the greatest campaigns since the Great Trek
was organized. Appeals went out to the provincial government, students, alumni and friends of the University. The students voluutarily raised their fees, giving
five dollars per person per year.
As construction costs mounted so did the efforts
of the students. In the spring of 1951 campus leaders
realized that unless something drastic was done, the
Gym would be nothing but an empty shell.
An energetic pledge campaign got under way with
the slogan, "Let's finish the Gym". In response to this
appeal, students dug into their pockets, scraped up another six thousand dollars, finally pouring a total of
$850,000  into  the project.
The dedication ceremony took place in the glass-
walled Hall of Remembrance following the Fall Convocation Exercises. AMS Council President Vaughan
Lyon presented the Gymnasium to the University on
behalf of the citizens, graduates, and students who
financed  the  Building.
Among the thirty-five hundred who attended the
ceremony were close relatives of those who died in
the two wars. Spectators overflowed around the convocation platform.
Distinguished guests included General A. G. L. McNaughton, one of Canada's greatest soldiers, Air Vice-
Marshal Curtis, and representatives from major Canadian and American universities.
Through student efforts, the University has received
the old gymnasium, the playing fields, Brock Hall, the
Armouries, and now the latest landmark, the War Memorial Gymnasium.
Left: In the foyer of the War Memorial Gymnasium, the
Hall of Remembrance, tribute is paid those to whom the
Building is dedicated.
Below: Vaughan Lyon presents the keys to Sherwood Lett,
Chancellor of the University, and the UBC pipe band
provides a colorful background to the ceremonies.
36 The 1951 Homecoming Week will be remembered for UBC's second football win and the colorful float parades by the hundreds of grads that returned to see a changed campus.
The week was launched with the annual
Frosh-Soph basketball game, with the Sophomores
winning hands down for the second straight year.
On Thursday a racous pep meet in the Armouries
ended in a giant car parade into downtown Vancouver. Hundreds of students snake-paraded to the
court house steps, and brought out dignitaries with
rousing football cheers. Traffic was blocked along
Granville from Georgia to Robson Streets as police
tried unsuccessfully to break up the interminable
line  of  cars   and   students.
Saturday, October 27, 6500 screaming spectators
watched the 'Birds down Central Washington Wildcats 20-15 for their only Conference win of the season.
At half-time, the spectators were entertained by
a colorful parade of floats, majorettes and bands. The
Frosh float, a play pen of crying babies, won the
award. John M. Buchanan, chairman of the Alumni
Development Fund, was presented with the Great
Trekker Award. The award, a replica of the Cairn
on the main Mall, is presented to the outstanding
alumni of the year.
In the evening, two thousand people swayed to Al
McMillan's music at the Homecoming Ball in the
Armouries. The Dance had been so well publicized
that crowds of people were turned away from the
door.
Upper right: The UBC Pipe Band leads off the half-time
parade at the Homecoming game. Miss Mavis Coleman
receives the floral crown of Homecoming Queen.
Right: Winner of the Great Trekker Award, John M.
Buchanan, receives a replica of the Cairn from AMS
President Vaughan Lyon.
Below: Cheered by the crowd, UBC Thunderbirds fought
to final victory. Drum majorettes marched across the
field at half time in part of the parade, and after the
first win of the season, an inspired crowd tore down
the goal posts.
37 • Hard-working chorus girls take
time out to relax at one of the practices. Below: four of the girls practice  the  line.
38 MARDI GRAS
After eleven years the Mardi Gras finally went to
"Hell". Having used themes from every place on the
globe, the committee went "out of this world" for the
twelfth annual Greek Letter Charity Ball.
Mardi Gras in Hades, under the chairmanship of
Rod Filer and Susan James, turned out to be another
great success. Marilyn McRae and Dick Archambault,
using barrels of red and black paint and silver glitter,
transformed the Commodore into an inferno. Twin
devil's heads formed the stage entrances, and the orchestra played in a sea of flames.
The girl's choruses, under the direction of Diana
Cox, delighted everyone with their clever routines.
Sprightly "Ladies from Hades" and the langorous
"Hell's Belles" in slight costumes of red and gold satin
danced with their usual skill.
In addition to the girl's chorus that danced, the men
• Below: Lovely chorus gals in their costumes pose before the
show, while emcee Rod Filer watches solo dancer Diane Cox
practice her number.
provided one that sang. Led by Frank Nightingale,
they depicted sad-eyed angels with drooping wings who
had fallen from grace due to "Cigarettes, Wusky, and
Wild, Wild Women".
To publicize the occasion, a pep meet was held the
preceding Thursday in the Armouries. Floats advertising the queen candidates drifted through the crowd,
while fifteen erstwhile candidates for king, dressed in
red flannels, sang a new version of "Down Yonder".
Highlight of the meet was a magician who did an unparalleled disappearing act by failing to show up at all.
Harry Downs of Phi Delta Theta was announced
Mardi Gras King after the voting.
Late Friday night, after the ballots had been counted,
the 1952 Queen was announced. The crown was bestowed upon lovely Shary Pitts of Kappa Kappa Gamma
by Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie.
• Jeff Dewis, Pep Meet, emcee, looks devilish, but King Harry
Harry Downs takes his position seriously. Queen Shary Pitts
talks to patrons Dr. and Mrs. N. A. M. MacKenzie at the Ball.
39 • Crowds streamed in and out of the new
Biological   Sciences   Building.
• Below: More people. Many went over to
the Physics Building to see the glass-blowing   display.
• Above: People watching the forestry display were
given expert advice by student in charge of the
display.
• Committee members at work.
Front row, left to right—Mary Lett, President, WUS; Ivon
Fetthom, Chairman; Jane Banfield, Secretory; Bill Anstis,
Vice-Chairman  and Co-ordinator of Displays.
Back row, left to right—Philip Keatley, Finance; Cameron
Aird, Assistant Co-ordinator; Denis Creighton, Signs; Mike
Ryan, Guides; Glen Baker, Campus Services; Prof. Geoffrey
Andrew, Faculty Representative.
Also on the committee but not present—Albert Plant, University Week; Ernie Perrault, Publicity and Program; Gerry
Duclos, Campus Publicity; Dr. Gordon Shrum, Prof. B.C.
Binning, Faculty Representatives; Vaughan Lyon, President AMS; Gerard Farry, Nanie Donaldson, Advisers;
Frank  Turner,   Alumni   Representative.
40 • Above:    Small  boys were  intrigued with the huge  military displays in the armouries.
• Below: Granville Street Bridge model attracted crowds.
• Above:  Ecology display fascinated  visitors.
• Below:  The Kitimat   model   project  showed   the   development  of
the huge new B.C.  plant.
OPEN HOUSE-1952
Early in March, over 50,000 people descended on
UBC's sprawling campus to see the year's "greatest
free show."
UBC students had organized another Open House.
The hulking Van de Graf generator buzzed and
sputtered for the "tourists." Art lovers congregated in
the library gallery to see the Massey Art Exhibit, while
engineering fans thronged to see the Fraser River project, the Kitimat project, and the Granville Street bridge
model.
In March, 1951, the Board of Governors passed a
resolution laying the groundwork for Open House.
Students started to work on the mammoth project in
September, asking for contributions from all departments, faculty and student organizations, and provincial and federal institutions.
Ivan Feltham organized an executive committee of
eight students, which supervised every detail of the
plan, involving directly over one thousand students.
The week preceding Open House was University
Week. Most of the extra-curricular clubs on campus
presented programmes on aspects of university life
which could not be displayed on Saturday.
Departmental displays were shown in the library,
with the offerings of international, political and cultural organizations. Relief maps, graphs, charts, political credos, were laid out in simplified form, allowing
the visitors to tell at a glance what each club or department had to offer the students.
A liquid air display and a glass-blowing demonstration were two of the more popular attractions of the
Physics department. In the Home Economics building,
housewives led their astonished husbands into complicated cake-baking demonstrations, by color dynamics
charts, and through revolutionary home furnishing displays.
Over 700 guides, recruited hastily from every faculty by Mike Ryan, directed the crowds smoothly
through the buildings, and kept traffic running at a
reasonable pace.
41 CAMPUS CONVERSATION
• Totem pole got a facelifting, came back with the
spring   in  fresh   new colors.
• Swammi Shivananda,
whose lectures prompted students   to   study  Yogi.
•    Austrian   students   demonstrated   dances   and   sang   folksongs in the Auditorium to a capacity audience.
•    Pat  Taylor,   Rhodes   Scholar,   shows   his   approval   of  the
award.
FROSH WEEK—Frosh "protection" from the Engineers resulting in
the usual swimming lessons in the lily pond ... the Frosh invasion of
the Engineering Building with stirrup pumps, their power-mad
rampage to the caf, where they soaked hapless girls . . . their introduction to Eric Nicol's classic, "Her Scienceman Lover".
TALKED ABOUT—The opening of International House at UBC
.. . imaginary house had real student members who welcomed foreign
students to the campus. Club sponsored international dinners at
Acadia Camp, Congress of Vienna Ball in late March. . . . The opening of the Fiji and Phi Delt houses, the beginning of fraternity row.
PEOPLE, PEOPLE, PEOPLE—UBC students elected a vice-president for the first time — Phil Dadson filled the position. Terry
Nicholls, Dianne Livingstone took over other vacant seats on Council
. . . Les Armour was elected to EIC. Big Dave MacFarlane, captain
of the Thunderbirds, hobnobbed with royalty after UBC won their
first game of the season ... he presented the football to Prince Philip.
CAMPUS VISITORS—"The Messengers", a student group who are
travelling around the world on five dollars, visited UBC to interest
students in their movement. The six Messengers who came to the
campus sold postcards describing their travels to finance the remainder
of their jaunt around the globe. . . . Swami Shivananda from India
visited the campus in February and packed lecture halls for a week
.. . UBC undegrads flocked to see and hear the Swami, a serious, personable man who asked students for more understanding and less
prejudice toward India. His series of lectures ended with a practical
demonstration of Yogi. . . . Austrian students presented "Greetings
from Vienna", a programme of gay Viennese music, folk dances, and
Tyrolean yodels.. . they almost caused an international incident when
they were insulted by an article in the Ubyssey.
UBC's FAMOUS TOTEM POLE—Representing the immobility of
Arts students, disappeared from its usual resting spot in front of
Brock Hall last fall. The weather-beaten monstrosity was removed to
receive a face-lifting job. It returned later in the year in time for
Open House.
RHODES SCHOLAR—Pat Taylor, pipe-playing student taking
honors in physics and biology, won the coveted Rhodes Scholarship.
Pat plans to continue his study of physics at Oxford, return to Vancouver at the end of his term.
AUS FUNERAL—Arts Undegrad Society finally made news this
year. They were declared defunct by the president, who went into
Law, claiming that the "AUS at UBC had done absolutely nothing for
years".
42 ARMOUR CONTROVERSY—Another chapter in the exciting life
of the Ubyssey occurred when an AMS general meeting was called
to discuss whether or not Les Armour should remain in office as
editor. Every aspiring speaker on the campus had a chance to air his
views on Armour until AMS President Vaughan Lyon had to limit
the number of speakers . . . highlight of the meet was Armour's tear-
jerking speech, which won him the approval of the students who
remained to the bitter end.
WELL GROOMED PRESIDENT—UBC's much-decorated President received another honor during the year . . . one of a slightly
different nature than the usual academic award. Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie was recognized as a veritable Beau Brummel in college circles
when he was named Best Dressed Man in Education by the National
Fashion Council.
Armour controversy necessitated a general meeting, resulted in Armour's reinstatement, this classic shot of the
Armouries.
ASCENT OF F6—One of the most controversial plays ever staged at
UBC. The English Department's presentation of the Play by Isherwood and Auden ran for three evenings. Direction and lighting
effects were universally praised, endless interpretations of the theme
were debated for weeks . . .
NEW BUILDING—Latest in a series of new buildings on the campus
opened officially in January . . . the $110,000 building to be used for
research for the B. C. Government. An ultra modern, three-storey
structure, opposite the Biological Sciences Building, it contains labs
and offices for the Council.
LSE SPECIAL EVENTS—Introduced on the campus this year, the
Special Events Programme was extremely successful . . . probably the
outstanding appearance of the year was that of Andre Segovia, the
"Apostle of the Guitar", who thrilled his audience with his guitar
repetoire.
THUNDERBIRD VICTORIES—Thunderbird team came through
with several victories this year . . . notably two wins on the football
field for the first time in ages . . . and another, less touted victory over
bookworms in the Library—when the Library closed, because, as
Library officials stated: "Rooters swarmed onto the Library roof and
into book-stack levels. This created a serious hazard to persons and
to University property."  End quote.
AMS, ETC.—Elections, among the deadest in years . . . several of the
seats were won by acclamation . . . Raghbir Basi was elected to the
presidency for 1952-53. The March General Meeting . . . much debated, called the "hottest in years" . . . MAD proved that the Ostrum
plan was generally accepted at UBC as they again took a 30% chunk
from the AMS budget—much to the dismay of the LSE groups, whose
allotment was slashed to ribbons. Expected fight over fraternities and
sororities was reduced to a motion recording disapproval of racial and
religious discrimination by any campus organization. . .
AND SPRING—Came to the campus with the softest of winds and
the warmest of days, stirring everyone's fancies away from the grind
of exams. "Not conducive to studies," said undergraduates (no, not
students), as they trooped down the 1,000 steps to the beach . . .
43
Dramatic   scene   from   the   "Ascent   of   F6"   shows   Don
Ericson, leading man, under the spotlight.
Spring came again to the campus, and students deserted
the Library for the lawn.  45 • Top left: Comedy team brings yuks to huge
crowd who stood for hours in Armouries being inveigled into parting with 500 cc.'s. Top right: Red
Cross workers were caught without sufficient
facilities; took three days to catch up to overwhelming enthusiasm of competition-minded students.
Bottom right: Wacky Squamish Band was again
proved tops in popularity at huge Pep Meet.
• Top left: Blood Week started with car parade;
blotting horns startled lunch-eating students, who
responded by lining up in alarming numbers outside Armouries. Middle: Mardi Gras Male Chorus
made odd noises at giant Pep rally; all gave blood
after entertaining. Bottom: Big Block Club turned
out in force, as did most other campus organizations, some of which levied penalties on members
who overlooked demand for blood.
• Opposite page, top left: Part of lengthy student
line-up; some stood for hours waiting for harassed
nurses to catch up. • Top right: Energetic majorettes, who performed for practically every student
promotion stunt, led opening-day car parade around
campus. • Bottom, left: "UBC's most controversial figure" let compromising Engineers lead him
into Armouries.   •    Middle:   One of 3,004 donors.
• Bottom, right: On third day, Red Cross brought
in 30 more beds and hundreds of bottles; managed
to have one nurse fo revery three persons who
gave blood.
46 DRIVE
Early in January, Del Sharpe was appointed head
of the spring Blood Drive, a position noted for its
thanklessness. With two years' experience in Blood
Drive promotion on the campus, Sharpe vowed that
this last stint on behalf of the Red Cross campaign
would be the biggest, most colorful of his career.
It was.
Searching for a sure-fire promotion scheme, Sharpe
noticed that Life Magazine had covered the record-
breaking drive at Texas University. With competition
as the stimulant, he set out to "Beat Texas".
On Monday, February 11, Sharpe and his enthusiastic committee sat back and watched their plan unfold.
Gaily decorated cars, most of them contributed by
Forestry Club members, honked their way around the
campus behind ten majorettes and the Varsity Brass
Band. Lecture-bound students were plagued with
thousands of "Give Your Blood Today" posters; loudspeakers boomed from radio cars and Radsoc speakers
in the Brock.
Engineers paraded through the Caf, Library and
the Armouries, button-holing everyone in sight and
signing them up for their 500 cc. contribution.
Tuesday's Pep Meet was the most colorful and inspired student extravaganza of the year. Downtown
entertainers, notably Eleanor from the CBC and Bob
Davidson from the Palomar Supper Club, thrilled a
blood-conscious crowd of over 1,500 students.
Eager to meet the challenge, hundreds mobbed the
under-staffed Red Cross Clinic set up hastily in the
Armouries. The Red Cross sent out a letter of apology
to students for lack of facilities, and rushed in more
supplies from Edmonton to keep up with the tremendous response.
By the end of the week, the blood was flowing into
the plasma bottles faster than the Drive Committee
could tabulate the results, and the following Monday
night, every faculty had overshot its quota.
Tuesday morning, Sharpe's goal was in sight, and
with 50 pints to go, Flo Turple and Bill St. John, with
many hastily recruited aides, rushed around the campus
pledging everyone they met to give a pint sometime in
the future. At 6 o'clock, Tuesday evening, the giant
chart in the Blood Drive offices totaled 3,004 pints, a
phenomenal achievement for a school which previously
had given no more than 1,500 pints in any Drive.
47 INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
In the spring of 1951, with the election of the first
International House Committee at UBC, a latent plan
started to become a reality.
Following in the footsteps of the pioneers, Frene Gin-
valla, Felicity Pope, and Peter Steckl, three international
students who began the work of the organization in
1949, this new institution began its activities. Its aims
were to further world understanding, brotherhood and
peace, to aid in the acquisition of a better knowledge of
the culture and life of all peoples for the furtherance
of goodwill between nations and races, and to help
foreign students derive the greatest benefit from their
stay in Canada.
Although there hasn't been a permanent building
donated to the students by a Canadian Rockefeller, the
rock upon which the committee built its activities was
stronger.
Under Chairman Raghbir Basi, the committee received permission to carry out its activities at Acada. As
a result the International House Committee, with a
membership of 85, has been operating not only among
our 300 foreign students, but also among the approximately 400 residents of Acadia Camp. The arranging
of organization and activities between these groups was
the job of Bob Loosmore, Co-ordinator of Activities.
The official opening ceremonies took place on October 21, when the Patron of the International House,
Mrs. Sherwood Lett, officially declared International
House open, and the emblem of the association was
presented to the House by the president of the Vancouver Chapter, Dr. Murray A. Cowie. From that time on,
the doors of the imaginary house have been kept open
to all who wish to enter.
Pat Crehan, secretary of the organization, alleviated
the great administrative problems of the rapidly expanding group. The general program was administered by
Lukia Michas, who was the organizer of the Swedish,
Spanish, Burmese, French, Chinese and Ethiopian dinners at Acadia on the first Sunday of each month. A
national menu provided the background to informative
talks on the life, customs and problems of these countries, given by speakers who, either as natives or as
travellers in these countries, had ample experience, and
contributed greatly to the success of these evenings.
Dr.   Murray   A.   Cowie   presents   the   International   House
scroll  to  Raghbir Basi.
Mrs. Sherwood Lett,  patron of International House, chats
with Dr.  MacKenzie at the opening  ceremonies.
The Chinese Dinner at Acadia Camp was well attended.
Guests  listen to  informative talks  on  China.
48 INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS
As a president's committee, the UBC branch of the
International Student Service has been working during
the past five years to establish overseas relationships
with foreign universities. It is the only official connecting link between this university and students of other
nations.
Activities have included arranging an exchange
scholarship with Hamburg University, material aid in
the form of money and secondhand text books to universities in southeastern Asia, and postwar European
relief work whereby homeless DP students have been
brought over to study on the campus.
The ISS also arranges for two or three UBC students
to go to the annual ISS seminar which is held each year
in different parts of the world and is attended by representatives of most major American, European, and Asiatic universities. The seminar is an attempt to create an
international community of university students and professors, and through a theme of discussion, to increase
interest and understanding of other nations and peoples.
The summer seminar of 1951, held just outside Ottawa and with a "Southeastern Asia" theme, was
attended by UBC delegates Ivan Feltham and Bill Ans-
tis. The 1952 seminar is to be held in Ceylon.
UBC has been host to ten DP students, four of
whom, Seva Koyander, Deena Wakhroucheff, Kveto
Janda, and Branko Pejovic, attended varsity this year.
They have come from Latvia, Hungary, Czechoslovakia
and Jugoslavia. UBC has also played host to two German exchange students.  Winner of the scholarship to
•    ISS members discuss scholarship nominees for this year's conference  in  Ceylon.
Hamburg for 1951-52 was John Snyder, who will be
studying post-grad chemistry at that university until
this summer.
ISS has also investigated exchange scholarships with
Russia and Asia. At a student referendum in February,
however, most interest was shown in DP scholarships,
the Russian plan being defeated. ISS policy in the future will be in accordance with the wishes of the student
body.
This year, Roy Haapala has been committee chairman; Tommy Korican, treasurer, and Agnes Wilford,
secretary, following the resignation in January of Clare
MacGillivray.
The ISS Committee is made up of about a dozen
student members, two or three faculty advisors, and
representatives from Students Council and NFCUS.
The members are those who have shown particular interest or aptitude in ISS affairs, and who have the time
to devote to some very hard work.
NATIONAL FEDERATION OF STUDENTS
The National Federation of Canadian University
Students is the co-ordinating body between all Canadian universities. Its aims are the promotion of inter-
university activities, the exchange of ideas and information, and the representation of Canadian university
students in all international student affairs.
NFCUS arranges the inter-regional scholarships,
promotes the Canadian University Radio Federation, the
Canadian University Press, and the National Debating
Union. Each year a national conference is held at a
member university and the problems of Canadian students are discussed.
At UBC, NFCUS promotes surveys on student cost
of living with the intention of determining what sums
are necessary in the forms of bursaries and loans from
the government to assist needy students.
The Austrian Students Goodwill Tour was sponsored this year by NFCUS workers, who tried to arrange
international debates between U.S. colleges and USC.
• NFCUS members arrange exchange of UBC students to
other Canadian universities. Here, in the NFCUS office,
members examine scholarship rules as they consider
candidates.
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50 Women's Dorms
Forbidden territory to two-thirds of the students
at UBC, the women's dorms provided "homes away
from home" for campus co-eds. Lucky girls living in
residence found their attractive quarters finished in
blonde wood and soft colour schemes, rooms ideal for
studying and gossiping.
The three modern buildings overlooking the sea
actually represent the realization of a wish of the late
Dean Mary Bollert, who long dreamed of a residence
where girls newly arrived at UBC could find the comfort and companionship of community life. It remained for Dean Mawdsley to contribute the time, effort,
and patience to make this dream prominent in the
university's history, and are supervised by faculty
women in the position of "dons".
Dr. Kay Brearley is resident don in Mary Bollert
Hall. In Isabel McGinnis, Physical Education instructor Helen Bryan occupies the don's suite, as does Nora
Neilson in Anne Wesbrook Hall.
A responsible ruling of the girls' affairs is carried
out by the executive of the residences headed by Audrey
Towler, and by the separate house executives under
Diane Sawyer, Evelyn Tomkins, and Rae Gaetz.
Under his capable executive- many activities were
planned for this year. An old girls' dance, held in October, and a formal for "The Ides of March" to which
all girls in residence at Acadia and all former dorm
girls were invited, have highlighted social life. Also included in the schedule have been an autumn scavenger
hunt, Christmas breakfast parties, swimming parties,
Sunday evening coffee parties, and musical get to-
gethers.
The spacious lounges are scenes of constant activity.
There the girls can relax and entertain their friends. Just
off the lounge is a kitchenette large enough for snack-
making.
Friendly companionship and co-operation make residence life a happy and most memorable experience for
each girl who is fortunate enough to have known it.
• The entrance hall is always alive with girls
looking for letters, answering the telephone,
or greeting visitors.
• The dorm executive solved many of the girls'
problems and governed the three units.
• Individual desks make it easy to study or send
home reports of almost everything that happens
at  UBC.
• left: The lounges provide the ideal place for
feminine discussions of clothes, men and other
women.
51 •    Marilyn Benson, Babs Blake, and Sally Lewis modelled some of the  clothes shown at the WUS Fashion Show in early spring.
• Top left: WUS executive members gathered together to plan Hi-
Jinx party.
Top right: WUS top brass showed
varied reactions as they attempted
chorus  for Hi-Jinx.
Opposite: Student councillors
crashed WUS hen party much to
the hilarity of the crowd.
52 •    Mary Lett, President of the WUS Executive, and her cohorts.
WOMEN'S UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
WUS chalked up a particularly successful 1951-52
because of an increased publicity programme emphasizing women's activities. President Mary Lett, with
veep Kay Stewart and secretary Mary Frances Munro,
planned a lively round of special events to supplement
the girls' regular schedule of classes.
For Frosh Week, distribution of beanies, buttons,
and big sisters was organized by WUS members to
welcome their little sisters. Susan MacKenzie looked
after arrangements for a Freshette tea. With the Big-
Little Sister Banquet, arranged jointly by WUS and
WAD, the Freshettes' formal initiation was complete.
Co-eds in pyjamas gathered one cold evening in October for the annual "Hi-Jinks" hen party. Though the
theme was a sleepy one, the party was in no danger
of becoming dull, for the WUS Executive had planned
an evening of entertainment that could be survived only
by the most wide-awake. Group singing and faculty
skits added to the hilarity of "Hi-Jinks".
Leap Year '52 was warmly welcomed early in Janu
ary by co-eds participating is the Sadie Hawkins Day.
A lively Pep Meet brought impersonations and Scottish dancers to a show disrupted intermittently by the
spectacle of a mere man being pursued by an insistent
co-ed. The spirit of Sadie Hawkins herself rose over
the Brock at the informal dance.
The all-girl talent show was a new event of the
WUS programme this year. It was an excellent presentation of a variety of talent found on the campus. An
enthusiastic audience was well satisfied with the performances of Milla Andrew, Barbara Allen, and Mary
McAlpine. Two Mardi Gras choruses added sparkling
routines to a successful show.
Late in February a display of original designs by
Miss Kay Murray was arranged by WUS for their
annnal fashion show.
The WUS-WAA Banquet ended the year with the
presentation of awards to outstanding girls on campus,
as WUS followed its policy of promoting in every way
the interests of UBC women.
WUS Talent Show Rehearsal
•    Big   and   Little   Sisters  during   Fosh   Week.
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53 e    Phrateres Executive in a party mood
•    President Enid Deering
Phrateres at UBC
This has been a year of hard work in social service
and fun in social events for members of Theta Chapter
of Phrateres International .The spirit of friendliness
for which Phrateres is famous manifested itself in the
many activities of the group.
Phrateres is one of the most helpful organizations
on the campus. This year its members sold refreshments
at the Frosh Reception, checked coats at Homecoming,
sold poppies, packed hampers, gave parties for underprivileged children, and helped at Open House. The
scholarship fund started last year swelled to $100 by
Christmas.
The students that crowded Brock Hall one November evening proved that there can still be a paradise
on earth for those who will dance to it. This particular
elysium had Chinese lanterns casting a romantic glow
over blossoms and pagodas, and drifting fumes of exotic
incense—truly a "Pagoda Paradise". In the spring, the
"Fiesta Formal" blew in a gay whirl of light and colourful Spanish senioritas.
But not all the fun of Phrateres was found at the
formals. Sub-chapters planned hen parties filled with
light laughter. The all-Phrateres bowling league kept
sub-chapters competing. Phratereans also gave a Barn
Dance to which all boys in residence were invited.
The annual October banquet for old members was
highlighted by talks by delegates to the international
convention and a presentation of a plaque for the best
scrap book of the year.
Next year's Phrateres executive, installed at a candlelit initiation ceremony, look forward to promoting the
friendly spirit among -women of a growing UBC
campus.
•    Formal  initiation  ended  pledge  period for new members
Lounging in Phrateres room
54 Patrons at the Phrateres Formal chat during intermission
•    Phrateres and escorts at the Formal
• Above Phrateres' own clubroom
in the north end of Brock Hall was
scene of many council meetings.
Executives here laid plans for all
social functions, while all Phratereans could use the room for
meetings or lounging.
• Below: Cute chorus worked on
routine for the "Pagoda Paradise"
Formal held in early November.
55 CLUBS EDITOR:  GERRY  KIDD •
57 LSE was called together every two weeks to iron out the many problems facing UBC's 67 clubs.   DeWolfe instituted several new positions
this year to give shape and form to an organization which in previous years had been merely an "erand boy for the clubs".
L.S.E. Administration
It has been said that there is more club activity on
this campus than on any other in North America.
In the LSE constitution there is a clause that states
in effect that the LSE directs and controls this activity.
A Major Club president has also stated that the LSE
is merely an errand boy for the clubs. Somewhere between the two lies the function of the Literary and
Scientific Executive. The clubs have as much autonomy
as is possible, and rarely suffer the interference of the
LSE. Yet the officers of the executive are certainly not
errand boys of the clubs. Their duties lie in administration, finance, publicity, and co-ordination.
John de Wolfe headed the sprawling, unwieldly
organization this year, and created a co-ordinated set
of new positions to realize his original conceptions of
the duties of the LSE to the student body. Anne Choma
was secretary; Tom Franck, treasurer; Lawrence Lynds,
executive member; Terry Nicholls and Dianne Livingston publicity directors, and Alan King chairman of
Special Events.
As the first officers in newly-created positions,
Nicolls developed a system of campus publicity rules,
and Franck worked out an effective financial system for
the LSE.
Formerly the LSE was a meeting-place where clubs
could tell each other what they were doing. This year
the officers suggested certain general projects, assisted
the individual clubs, and gave the clubs general projects, and gave the clubs in return the opportunity to request money or representation, or any particular favor
from the LSE.
An attempt was made to work in the Science and
Arts Clubs, by dividing the Major-Minor LSE, or the
body upon which all clubs sit, into four sections: Service (the former Major LSE), Science, Arts, and General,
with a chairman for each. Aside from the added convenience, this division allowed a greater integration of
more specialized interests, without losing the scope of
the whole.
The executive this year sponsored a number of
events in connection with the Faculty Fine Arts Committee, and the Departments of English and Classics.
Professor F. L. Blunt, of London University, and
Keeper of the King's Pictures, spoke on "Art in Britain
at Present". Dr. Ernest Mundt, director of the California School of Fine Arts, held a week-long seminar discussing the problem of "Art and the Communication
of Meaning". The highly controversial Massey Report
was discussed in all
its multitudinous
details by members
of the faculty and
special speakers
during a week of
noon-hour lectures.
• John DeWolfe tried
to imbue in the clubs a
sense of paternal assurance toward LSE. Some
say he succeeded.
58 • Milla Andrew, industrious secretary of the Musical Society, lead
singer in "Cosi Fan Tutti", and
"Les Noce", one of campus' outstanding club members during four
years  at  University.
• Raghbir Basi, president of
United Nations Club; executive
member of Civil Liberties Union,
official UBC observer at International House at Columbia University,  New York.
• Eugene Hunt, chief engineer
of the Radio Society, sole technical advisor to harassed Radsoc
idea-men; noon-hour programmes
into Brock Hall, would never have
been heard without his innovations.
• Elizabeth Riley, president of
the French Club, the minor organization which this year reached a
record of 80 members; member of
German Club, and International
Students Club.
LS.E. SPECIAL AWARDS
• Bill Topping, president of the
Film Society; one of the original
founders of UBC Philatelic Society;
noted campaigner for rights of
clubs on LSE.
• Marne Wilson, vice-president
of United Nations Club; editor of
the UBC U.N. Digest, assistant
secretary-general of Model General Assembly, U.N.  Club.
• Bill Wynne, president of Jazz
Society, member of Special Events
Committee of LSE; liaison worker
between MAD and LSE; member
of Mamooks.
• Norman Young, president of
Players Club, acting stage manager and lighting manager of all
Players Club productions; advisor
to all groups staging productions
in auditorium.
• John De Wolfe, president LSE,
backbone of enthusiastic Special
Events programme, tireless administrator of UBC's 67 problem-
wracked clubs.
• Mr. Norman Barton, director
of Visual Education, Extension Department, honorary president of
the Film Society.
• Dr. Roy Daniells, head of the
English Department, honorary
president of LSE.
• Dr. William Robbins, professor
of English, faculty advisor to
Players Club.
59 The Juillard String Quartet, famous throughout the world for its virtuosity, was one of the most popular attractions  of the LSE Special
Events Committee.   On January 17 and 18, they presented the Canadian premiere of the Bela Bartok Quartet Cycle.
LITERARY-SCIENTIFIC EXECUTIVE
This year was one of great ambitions and greater
disappointments for the Special Events Committee of
the LSE.
In June, 1951, LSE president John DeWolfe and
Special Events Chairman Allan King procured a copy
of "Musical America". Dazzled by the vast array of
talent displayed in the periodical, they dispatched letters
to musician's agents all over Canada and the U.S. They
found that dozens of fine artists, particularly in the
chamber music field would be only too happy to con-
certize at UBC, often at half their usual concert fees.
With so much talent available, the special events
committee determined to greatly enlarge its scope, to
present a series of evening concerts available to both
students and general public. The prime object of the
programme was to fill a gap in the concert field.
In Vancouver, popular music, symphony, and big-
name soloists are available to the musical public. But in
the field of chamber music, and opera, Vancouver is
sadly lacking. The chamber music which is available,
is by and large, of a fairly routine composition. That is,
the 19th century music dominates the programmes,
modern and early music is almost completely neglected.
Consequently, the Special Events programme was designed to rectify this regrettable lack. Under the assumption that universities lead community intellectual life,
and that they should give direction to cultural activity,
the committee went ahead and scheduled seven concerts.
The committee originally planned to open the series
with two concerts in the fall; one by the Vancouver
Chamber Orchestra, under John Avison, the other by
the Renaissance Ensemble. Due to various difficulties,
one had to be cancelled and the other postponed till the
spring.
The series opened January 9, with a presentation of
Mozart's comic opera ,"Cosi Fan Tutte". Undoubtedly,
the most ambitious and difficult undertaking attempted
by a musical group,
the Mozart Opera
Company's presentation lived up to
neither its potentialities or its advance notices. Swamped with
illnesses, a shortage
of stage help, the
production limped
on stage much to
the chagrin of those
who had worked so
hard to present it.
Here, the committee received its
first serious jolt: justifiably confident in
the prospects of a
first-rate show, they
were snowed  under
by last minute, uncontrollable circumstances and De-
Wolfe and King carried their chins well down on their
chests for the following week.
The next event of the series, however, was a resounding success.
•    Alan King
60 \N
Left: Miss Suzanne Bloch, who played to a capacity audience in Brock Hall on March 22. Her unusual versatility astounded the students;
she played lute, virginals, recorder, guitar, piano and flute. • Right: The Griller String Quartet, who played a seldom-heard quartet
by Mozart, and Sibelius' superb Quartet in D minor, to open Special   Events Series in the fall.
SPECIAL EVENTS PROGRAM
The world-famous Juilliard String Quartet, presented the Canadian premiere of the Bela Bartok
Quartet cycle. On two successive evenings, January 17
and 18, immensely enthusiastic audiences heard the
musical genesis, development and fruition of this century's greatest musicians. The Juilliard Quartet gave a
stunning performance of the six quartets, combining
virtuoso technique of the highest order with profound
musical understanding.
On February 7th, upwards of a thousand music-
lovers jammed into Brock Hall to hear one of the finest
musicians of our day—Andres Segovia. In a programme
compassing four hundred years of musical history, Mr.
Segovia played works of the 16th century through
Bach, Handel, Berlioz and Pagannini to compositions
of the present day, many of which were dedicated to
him by their composers.
Replacing the previously scheduled appearance of
the Pascal Quartet, Nicholas Fiore and the deRima-
noczy String Quartet delighted a University audience
with the charming and beautiful flute quartets of Mozart and a magnificent interpretation of Ernst Bloch's
B minor Quartet.
Music of the Renaissance and Medieval periods was
presented to students in two succeeding evening concerts—the first by the Renaissance Ensemble, a group
of vocalists and instrumentalists under the direction of
John Reeves, and the second by Suzanne Bloch. In
addition to singing songs of this period, Miss Bloch
played the lute, virginals, and recorder, ancestors of the
guitar, piano and flute. Students were fascinated by the
61
novel sonorities produced by these ancient instruments,
and the music itself proved delightful.
Preparations for the final concert in the series were
begun in September and involved a staggering variety
of instrumentalists and vocalists. Stravinsky's choral
work—"Les Noces" was the feature of this April concert called for a full chorus, four soloists, four pianists,
and eight percussion instruments. Philosophy students
who studied next door to the rehearsal hall, HM1, were
treated to some weird and fantastic sound effects during
the course of the year, but the resulting concert in April,
proved to be an immensely exciting experience.
• Students of Professor Adaskin's Music 300 class, with Music
Department, presented first Canadian performance of Stravinsky's "Les Noces" (The Wedding) under direction of Colin Slim,
in  early April. Originators of thousands of brilliant posters and  banners which cl ing to every available blank wall and notice board all over the campus
this year: from left, Frank Madill, Barry Baldwin, Ben Quon, Len  Woo, Dick Mann, Joyce MacPherson, Pete Lozowski and Chuck Lew.
MAMOOKS
In Brock's south basement, where most of their den
is taken up with a huge drawing board, paint-spattered,
lab-coated Mamooks turn out the hundreds of posters,
signs and banners which decorate the campus from the
opening cry of Frosh Week to the melancholy gurgle
of the last Cabaret Dance.
Lined side-by-side, the work of Mamooks would
probably extend two or three miles, and would graphically picture the year's activities at UBC.
This year, clubs, social organizations, and various
faculty societies either ordered materials and did the
job themselves, or arranged for Mamooks to outline
their publicity for them.
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Jim Wood's unusually effective designs for the
Homecoming Dance were one of the club's prominent
accomplishments this year. The decoration of the awkward, barnlike Armouries has posed a problem for
generations of Mamooks.
Frank Madill, the club's silk-screen expert, supplied
most of the posters and banners for Aggie Week.
Displays of the club's finest posters and banners,
chosen by the club committee, were shown to Open
House visitors in Mamooks colorful clubrooms and
workshops.
Although "No!" seems to be the most used word in
their vocabulary, not many requests were turned down,
providing a week's notice gave the Mamooks chance to
gather ideas and materials. Some of the more persuasive outsiders coming down to beg for signs were enlisted into the ranks of diligent poster-painters, and
became permanent members of the club. "We haven't
time—do it yourself!" was the answer received by promotion and publicity men from campus organizations.
Prolific poster man Pete Lozowski was Mamooks
president this year, aided by two old-timers, vice-president Joyce MacPherson and treasurer Barry Baldwin.
Secretary Janet Bishop was the only frosh on the executive.
With the unexpected flow of ambitious, inexperienced new members after Christmas, classes in the art
of lettering by brush and speed-ball were formed.
Madill, Lozowski, Woo, Cullen and Baldwin alternated as instructors every Monday, Wednesday and
Friday afternoons.
• Overworked Mamook executive eventually was forced to cons
cript poster-searching club publicity reps to turn out their own signs.
From left: Secretary Janet Bishop, Vice-president Joyce MacPherson,
President Pete Lozowski, and Treasurer Barry Baldwin.
62 •    Radsoc Executive grins for cameraman.
•    Control man looks worried as he checks cue.
RADIO SOCIETY
Entrenched in a maze of offices and control rooms
in the south Brock basement, Radsoc enjoyed its most
active year since the emigration of the veterans.
A long-awaited addition to Radsoc's regular three-
hour broadcasts into Brock Lounge was a half- hour
news-and-features show originating from the cramped
studios of URS and offered to the general public on
Saturday afternoons over CKMO. Called "This Week
at UBC", the program included interviews with prominent campus personalities, sports reports, a general sum-
ary of campus news and a particularly inspiring version
of "Hail UBC".
URS Program directors operate their studio on a
professional basis, and this year prepared commercials
for two paying advertisers. As a free service to campus
organizations, the regular Brock broadcasts were spotted
with publicity announcements for the many functions
presented by the university's 67 clubs.
The club is organized in a pattern closely aligned to
that of downtown stations, and members have at their
disposal a fully-equipped radio studio, lacking only a
transmitter.
President Ron Robinson, a second year commerce
student, and a part-time announcer on CKWX, has
done wonders for the club in the past year, and working
on the foundations provided by the experience of an
ambitious post-war membership, has built up a closely
co-ordinated, smoothly-running simulation of a commercial radio station.
The Club's huge record library has all types of records featuring everything from mountain music to
symphonies. The 15,000 records are carefully filed and
preserved by the Club's librarian, who keeps every record where it is immediately available for reference or
use by Radsoc members. The library has been built up
over a number of years. It was the site of many "favorite artist" arguments between Radsoc members.
A news editor rewrites daily happenings from nationwide syndicated teletypes and presents a five-minute
summary of world news every noon. A traffic manager,
63
promotion manager and sales manager care for other
features of the clubs daily 3-hour program.
Dorwin Baird, a founder of Radsoc, is familiar to all
listeners of CJOR, and the CBC's Lister Sinclair and
George Barnes are prominent alumnae.
Dick Lazenby, famous for his fuzzy complexion and
his leadership of the Squamish band, is Radsoc's business manager; engineering students Campbell Robinson and Gene Hunt are program director and chief
engineer, respectively.
A six-week course in radio writing and broadcasting
sponsored by the B. C. Association of Broadcasters gave
Radsoc members a thorough background in commercial
radio.
The course included training in script and advertising writing. Radsoc members were also taught the
essentials of microphone and voice work.
Brock loungers were amazed to hear "paid political
announcements" in the programs this year, when smart
AMS campaigners arranged for spot announcements
and singing commercials during URS noon-hour broadcasts. Radsoc's hard-working members contributed
much to the enjoyment of Brock noon hours, and listeners awaited the "Hail UBC" that introduced the programme.
• Radsoc'ers choose their favorite records from Club's library. Club
members arranged all details of noon-hour broadcasts from
south basement of Brock Hall. PLAYERS CLUB
The original, rarely performed "Second Shepherds Play", starring
Tom Shorfhouse, Lloyd Pisapio and Ted McAlpine as the shepherds, was one of the three fall plays.
"Tom Thumb" was the second fall play. Louise De Wick is on
the "couch" behind Vic Mitchell, who seems a little taken aback
by the threatening antics of Dave Moilliet.
Joanne Walker and Bob Woodward as Beatrice and Benedick in
the Club's biggest and most energetic production of the year,
Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing". The costume committee stretched a small budget a long way to cover the cost
of Louise De Vick's and Derek Mann's authentic designs.
UBC's oldest and most respected club spent its year
in a whirl of constant activity. The executive members
were Norman Young, president; Lois Williamson, vice-
president; Doreen Odling, secretary; Ralph McPhee,
treasurer. They planned an intriguing programme for
the year, beginning with the traditional performance of
"Her Scienceman Lover", Eric Nicol's beloved burlesque of university life.
Due to the brutal accident of graduation, there were
few old members left at the beginning of the year, and
the ranks were filled with over forty new active members. As is customary, three one-act plays were chosen
in which to introduce the new talent.
These plays were all a departure from the ordinary.
"The Life and Death of Tom Thumb the Great", by
Henry Fielding, has never before been performed in
North America. It is a 17th century comedy in which
Fielding ridicules the heroic tragedies of his day. The
cast of seventeen, starring Louise De Vick and Victor
Mitchell as Queen Dollallolla and King Arthur, was
directed by Peter Mainwaring, well-known Vancouver
actor.
"The Happy Journey" by Thornton Wilder was
directed by student Doreen Odling and featured Jane
Wright as Ma Kirby. Len Lauk was stage manager.
An experimental play, "The Happy Journey" introduced the new technique that Wilder perfected in "Our
Town" and is played on a bare stage, without scenery,
props or lighting.
Perhaps the most unusual of the three, however, was
the "Second Shepherds Play", a 14th centry miracle
play in which the roots of English comedy are plainly
apparent. Tom Shorthouse, Lloyd Pisapio, and Ted
McAlpine were the shepherds; Jean-Paul Riopel was
the sheep-stealer Mak, and Doris Chilcott played Mak's
wife Gill; Jack Thorne was the director.
The three plays represented three very different
stages in the history of English drama, and proved an
64 enjoyable experience both for the club and the audiences.
Another exciting event before Christmas was the
premiere of a play by Eric Nicol, "Brass Tacks", starring
Joy Coghill. Presented in a noon-hour performance,
this hilarious farce drew a large audience of Nicol fans.
One function of the Players Club was to supply
stage crew and technical support to other groups using
the Auditorium for dramatics. A notable instance of
this aid occurred when the English Department put on
their annual play under the direction of Miss Dorothy
Somerset of the Extension Department. A modern play
was chosen, an experimental drama by Auden and
Isherwood, "The Ascent of F6". When a pair of young
and original poets attempt to explore some of the most
important issues of life, the result is likely to be profound and moving, and so it proved.
The most important event of the year was, of course,
the Spring Play.
Shakespeare's lively "Much Ado About Nothing"
went into rehearsal soon after Christmas. Joy Coghill,
permanent director of the club, found there were
enough good actors available to warrant doing a
Shakespeare play, and enough good designers and
workers to make a lavish production possible. Heading
• Below: Doreen Odling and Neil Carson as Claudia and Hero,
the other leads in "Much Ado". Carson is on exchange from
Western Ontario  University.
• Below, right: Norm Young looks over the efforts of the lighting crew, Derek Mann and Ray Christopherson, before the fall
play "Happy Journey".
• Left, above: The indispensable backstage crew: Derek Mann,
Norm Young, Joy Coghill and Doreen Odling, discussing lighting for "Happy Journey".
e Above: Mrs. J. Richardson, costume executor, fits two perplexed
"Much Ado" players, Albert Simpson, as George Seacole, and
Dave Moilliet as Don John.
the large cast were Joanne Walker and Bob Woodward
in the lead roles of Beatrice and Benedick.
John Avison composed the original music, and arranged the four lovely Elizabethan ballads which were
sung in the play by Kelvin Service. Dances of the
period were arranged by Miss Marjorie Miller of the
Physical Education Department. Mr. Mann also designed the set, which was constructed for quick scene
changes. The entire production was under the supervision of the president, Norman Young.
"Much Ado" was presented in Vancouver March 19-
22. After exams were over, it went on tour of the province for two weeks. As the players are the only company to reach the interior of B. C. this annual tour has
an important function in the dramatic activity of the
province. • Practically all members of the Parliamentary Forum this year were Law students. The executive planned debates, found speakers, and
sponsored the Mock Parliaments. Joe Nold headed the executive this year, with Jeff Turner, Ron Cheffins, John Poussette and May Southin
as executive members.
PARLIAMENTARY FORUM
The McGoun Cup debate was the chief event of the
year for members of Parliamentary Forum. Topic of
the concurrent debate between the four western Canadian universities was "Resolved that Western Rearmament is detrimental to World Peace". Jeff Turner and
Ron Cheffins represented UBC, and took the affirmative. They were squarely defeated by a smooth University of Manitoba team.
Debating the negative of the resolution against the
University of Saskatchewan, who defeated UBC 2-1,
were Joan Snape and Tom Franck. All four of the
McGoun debaters were law students, coached by Parliamentary Forum founder and ex-UBC professor, J.
Friend Day.
Eight Thursday noon debates were held, and most
of them drew capacity crowds to Arts 100. "Resolved
separate schools should receive government support"
was perhaps the most controversial topic. Jane Ban-
field won over Armand Paris, when the motion was defeated.
Ian Seymour and Rod Young haggled over the practical and ideological aspects of a preventative war in
another popular debate.
"Resolved NATO contradicts United Nations principles" brought Bob Loosmore and Doug Steinson together in the last Forum debate before Christmas.
Joe Nold was one of the most active campus debaters. Here,
he speaks for the United States at the U.N. Club's second Model
General Assembly, defending himself from the personal attacks
of Russian delegate Tom Franck.
66 MOCK PARLIAMENT
Under the auspices of the Parliamentary Forum,
four Mock Parliaments were staged during the year.
Chairman of the Steering Committee was John Pous-
settee with Jeff Turner assisting him in the scheduling
of the Parliaments, the approval of bills and amendments, and the compilation of the rules of procedure.
Three Parliaments were held before March, to give
each political club affiliated with Parliamentary Forum
a chance to play the role of the government. On March
17, an election gave the Liberals control of the government for the final meeting of the "House".
In the individual Parliaments, the Liberals tried to
create a national railroad, the CCF brought in a bill to
nationalize Canada's steel industry, and the Conservatives fought to have Canada join a North Atlantic
Federation.
"The "Joker Bill" of the year was brought up during
the Conservative Parliament, when Mary Southin's
group of staunch Tories whipped through a bill legalizing "trigamy" a doubly evil form of bigamy.
• Top: CCF Club president, Jean McNeely, tried to push through
bill nationalizing Canadian Steel. • Top right: Traditional
"back bench huddle" took up much time; served as excuse for
female M.P.'s to repair makeup. • Below right: Liberal Club
bench found no serious opposition to their government; put
through bill nationalizing Canada's railways. e Below:
Straight-laced Tories Mary Southin, Jeff Turner, Tom Franck, John
Gault, John Fraser and Doug Whitworth weren't able to persuade
government to support North Atlantic Federation.
Doug Steinson, president of Student Liberal Club, discusses a
mute point with John Poussette, Prime Minister of the final
Mock   Parliament.
67 •    Finale of Mussoc's highly successful  presentation of Sigmund Romberg's "Student Prince".   Intricate choral arrangements took many hours
of tedious rehearsal time, eventually served as major contribution   to the most ambitious undertaking in Mussoc's 20-year history.
THE MUSICAL SOCIETY
i
For the first five months of the school
year, the Musical Society was strangely silent.
No brilliant banners stretched across the
quad inviting caf-bound students to the familiar classical operettas and period musicals.
For those who seen the AMS co-ordi-
nators schedule, the apparent inactivity was
explained. For the first time in the 20-odd
years of the club's existence, a 20th century
operetta, staged on a scale comparable to
to any Broadway production, was being
planned.
"The Student Prince", Sigmund Romberg's universally praised story of the tribulations of a young prince at a European
university, thrilled capacity crowds in the
auditorium for three days in the middle of
February. The production was the club's
first attempt at a modern musical comedy,
and it was hailed a new era in Mussoc's
presentation policy.
The success of the most extravagant and
difficult show in the club's history was due
primarily to the professional ability of Musical Director Harry Pryce and Dramatic
Director E. V. Young.
Although this was his first year with the
Musical  Society,  Harry Pryce  was  by  no
• Two lead stars Milla Andrews and Cal Service sing
one of many love-song duets in impressive photo
by Publications Board Photography Director Bruce
Jaffary.
68 means a stranger to the members. His outstanding direction of many Theatre Under the Stars productions,
and his long experience with the CBC have made his
name synonymous with sparkling musical entertainment. Mr. Pryce is expected to be with Mussoc for
many years to come.
E. V. Young has been 19 years with the Musical
Society, and has worked for many years with Mr. Pryce
in Theatre Under the Stars and on the CBC. "E. V.'s"
invaluable knowledge and technical skill brought his
student cast through one of their most difficult and
complex efforts without a serious flub.
Grace McDonald, as director of choreography, was
praised in the downtown review for her excellent work
in the rendition of the famous Drinking Song. The
chorus, composed of waitresses, town girls, and the
prince's classmates, was one of the highlights of the
show.
"The Student Prince" is a story of carefree student
life at Heidelberg University. Prince Karl Franz, tired
of the ceremonies and stringencies of court life, enrolls
at the university, and arrives on the campus with his
aged tutor Dr. Engel. Joining the local student corps,
which meets in a spacious inn, he becomes involved
with the innkeeper's niece, Kathy.
This affairs disgusts Lutz, the prince's private valet,
who cannot understand the prince's apparent love for
this plebian way of life. The prince is forced to leave
the university because of the pressure of state business,
and upon his return, he finds the court has decided to
marry him off to Princess Margaret.
The princess has been flirting with Captain Turnitz
of the Royal Guards, but finds no difficulty in switching her affections to the prince. Karl Franz returns to
Heidelberg to try and dispel his memories of Kathy.
Realizing that the prince must marry Margaret, Kathy
leaves the university area in order to make the rough
road easier for her lover.
The opperetta ends with this dramatic blend of
happiness and sadness, and with the fact well clarified
that, for a prince, duty comes before all things.
Kelvin Service played the part of Prince Karl Franz,
Milla Andrews was a fetching innkeeper's niece, Charles
Watt was the Prince's tutor, Dr. Engel.
Barbara Wither played Princess Margaret, John Yeomans was Captain Turnitz, Norman Young was the
Prince's valet, Lutz. Gerald Lecovin was Hubert, Marguerite Stanlow was Gretchen and Marion Crickmay
played the Duchess.
Mussoc secretary and club's hardest-working member, Milla
Andrews played lead role of Kathy. Kelvin Service had difficult
male lead as Prince Karl Franz; missed various high notes during rehearsal, but displayed fine tenor voice at public performances.
University of Heidelberg students raise silver beer mugs in rousing rendition of Romberg's famous Drinking Song. Excellent
tenor voice of unkown chorister shook the dust from stage
rafters, frustrated patrons who vainly searched for name on
programme.
• Mussoc Executive:
Back: John Rolfe, business manager; John
Yeomans, aJvertising;
Hal Harvey, president;
Neil Carlson, production
manager; Ken Bogas,
advisor. Front: Ruth
Done, vice-president;
Milla Andrew, secretary; Donna Leather-
dale, Glee Club president.
• Left: Stage crew technicians Lyle Bagent, Jack Devreaux, Gordon
Futcher.
• Middle: Backbone of Mussoc took the form of two prominent
local directors: Harry Pryce, musical director (left), and E. V.
Young, dramatic director.
• Right:   Make-up artist Keith Simpson work on Norm Dent. AMATEUR RADIO CLUB
'*
President John Moisey (seated) managed to put dying and
homeless Ham Club on its feet this year after few interested
members had packed valuable equipment from place to place
for two  years.
Ever since the catastrophic fire which completely
burned out the "Ham" quarters on the campus in 1950,
the members have been shunted from tiny hut rooms
to Engineering Building clothes closets. Late this year,
the club finally set up permanent quarters in the Electrical Engineering Building, and with shiny new equipment designed and constructed by club members, resumed contacts with ham operators all over the world.
Under the direction of an able and enthusiastic executive, code and theory classes were held for new members. Club membership this year dropped slightly from
the record high postwar years, but the energy of 20
competent operators and technicians made this year a
highly successful one.
The club's more proficient members took part in the
various international events sponsored by the American
Radio Relay League. The annual sweepstake competition, which tests operating skill, and the Field Day, an
international instructive event which is designed to prepare amateurs for emergency, were two of the more
outstanding events of the year.
SYMPHONY SOCIETY
In 1947, a group of UBC's foremost musicians not
content to spend the rest of their student days playing
exclusively for the Mussoc operettas, rebelled and formed
the University Symphony Orchestra. Under the direction of music professor Harry Adaskin, the orchestra
presented a concert which so impressed one connoisseur
Conductor Colin Slim stands on legless chair to lead small portion of Symphony Orchestra in rehearsal for annual Spring Concert.
that he donated a considerable sum of money to further
its growth.
In 1948, pianist Colin Slim took over the direction
of the orchestra, and he has held the position ever since.
The orchestra has steadily improved, and lately more
ambitious programs have been undertaken. Beethoven's
8th Symphony, Haydn's Clock Symphony, the popular
Tschaikowsky's B flat piano concerto, Greig's A minor
piano Concerto, Bach's Second Brandenburg Concerto,
were a few of the highlights of the Symphony Society's
five major concerts since the inception of the club.
This year, the Society was operating under many
disadvantages. The graduation of many of the orchestra's leading musicians and the subsequent lack of players in the most important positions in the orchestra cut
down considerably the scope of programmes that could
have been presented.
The Christmas concert in the auditorium was highl)
successful, and the late spring concert coming barely
a week before exams, was well attended by book-weary
students. Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, Fingel's
Cave Overture, Mendelsohn's famous mood piece and
Coreli's "La Folia", featuring Zena Zadoway, soothed
the throbbing heads of several hundred nerve-wracked
crammers.
Malcolm MacDonald headed the club executive this
year, and Frances Cameron was secretary-treasurer.
70 CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION
One of the most unique ideological clubs under the
jurisdiction of LSE, the Civil Liberty Union is concerned with the protection of racial and religious minorities and the qualification of the civil rights of all
persons. In the process of delivering its message to the
students, the club presented a full and varied programme
which placed it in a category with the most active clubs
on the campus.
Nearly every week during the school term, speakers
well qualified to voice an opinion on their subjects were
presented to further the aims of the club. Dr. Savery,
Professor Hunter Lewis, Reverend Richard Jones and
Mr. Max Schactman, the well-known European writer
and translator were among the speakers during the first
term. The spring programme was initiated with a talk
by President Mackenzie on the responsibilities of civil
liberties.
The winner of the Garnett Sedgewick Award this
year was Professor Hunter Lewis of the Department of
English. The award is presented annually to the person
who has done the most for civil liberties in British Columbia during the past year. Professor Lewis' extensive
investigation into the possibilities of a new Indian Act,
to allow reservation Indians more freedom and justice,
gave the club members adequate cause to choose the
popular professor winner of the coveted award.
Jack Scott, Salt Spring Island farmer and spare-time
newspaper columnist, and Reverend A. E. Cooke,
founder of the Sunday Forum, have won the award in
the past two years.
The award honors the late Dr. Garnett Sedgewick,
professor of English at UBC, and an expert on Shake-
• Raghbir Basi and Lawrence Lynds
read the latest name on the Garnett
Sedgwick Award plaque in Brock Hall.
• Publicity is the backbone of nearly every campus club. Here a CLU member does blackboard work
for a special speaker.
speare. Dr. Sedgewick was one of those responsible for
the creation of the UBC branch of the Canadian Civil
Liberties Union.
The CLU again this year offered a cash prize for
the best essay written by a UBC student on any aspect
of civil liberties.
Lawrence Lynds headed the club this year with
Walter Camozzi, vice-president; Nick Papove, treasurer;
Earnest Naccarato, secretary, and Raghibir Singh Basi,
Bob Green, John Meyer and Manfred Schmidt assisting
him on the executive.
• Teachers training student Lawrence Lynds headed the large CLU
executive this year; carried out ambitious policy of sponsoring two
or three speakers a month on campus.
Civil
Liberties!
Union
71 Music Appreciation Club
• Stan Cross and able executive presented an extensive program
designed to satisfy varied tastes of 30 club members. Bartok and
Hindemith were high points of year's listening activities.
Unlike most other campus clubs, whose programs
consist mainly of the vocal exchange of ideas and opinions, the Music Appreciation Club asks of its members
only the application of the out-moded faculty of listening.
Each Monday and Friday noon, 30 men and women,
interested in the works of the modern and standard
classicists, congregated in the Brock's Double Committee room and listened. To familiarize new members
with the purpose of the club, president Stan Cross
introduced such standard favorites as Bach, Handel,
Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms. After Christmas, the
club heard the experimental works of Bartok and
Hindemith.
One of the major projects of the club this year was
the search for a room in the Library suitable for the
playing of records during the long winter evenings.
Students working late would be able to wander into
the room, relax and have selections played by club members upon request. No soundproof room was located,
and the project was abandoned.
During the second term, the members of the club
piped the regular broadcasts of the Metropolitan Opera
into Brock Lounge, through the facilities of the Radio
Society.
Botanical Gardens Society
Members of the society, interested specifically in the
development of a Botanical Garden on the campus,
formed a President's Committee which recommended
plans for the enlargement of the scope of the present
garden.
An area beside the West Mall this year was set aside
for the display of exotic trees and plants. Native plants
of horticultural interest are distributed throughout the
grounds, making the entire campus a part of the Botanical Garden.
Through the contributions of members and others
on the campus, the society this year acquired twenty
magnolia saplings, which, when ready to leave the
nursery and face the deluges of a B. C. winter, will
brighten springtime on the campus with multitudes of
attractive flowers.
Meetings of the Botanical Society were held on alternate Fridays, and as special features of the club program, the members were taken on conducted tours of
the grounds and greenhouses. Dr. T. M. C. Taylor,
director of the Botanical Garden, pointed out plants of
interest.
When snow restricted outdoor plant studies, the
club moved into the Physics building for films and
slides on the flora of B. C, and talks on horticultural
practices and the scientific aspects of plant growth.
• With a critical eye set on the areas of prospective garden plots
on the campus, the president and executive of the Botanical Gardens
Society laid the groundwork this year for an intriguing horticultural
display in an extensive garden beside the West Mall.
72 e    Jassoc    executive    planned    programs,    sponsored'
prominent   local   jazz  artists,  held   long   gab  sessions.
Club   blossomed   this   year   under   inspirational   leadership   of   prominent   jazz-
connoisseur Bill Wynne.
JAZZ SOCIETY
The advent of the modern era of jazz music, employing many techniques of the modern classicists and new
techniques indigenous to jazz alone, has removed jazz
music from the sphere of novelty and has placed on it
a musical value that few serious appreciators of music
can afford to overlook. It followed that many strictly-
jazz listeners widened their musical tastes to accommodate the wider listening scope of jazz which demands
more than passive indulgence or acceptance.
This growth of jazz music and its enlarged acceptance moved the UBC Jassoc to open its doors to anyone on the campus, regardless of membership, and to
take jazz beyond the confines of club activities alone
and present concerts for campus approval.
Left in a sorry position at the beginning of the term,
with no president, or club space, and a small financial
budget, the club revived vigorously due to the hard
work of the small executive under club president Bill
Wynne. This year, the club enrolled its largest membership since its inception as a UBC organization under
LSE.
The fireball executive, led by jazz-extremist Wynne,
promoted four highly successful concerts, which featured such prominent artists as CBC's Ray Norris, and
Vancouver jazzmen Doc Randle and Doug Parker.
Some of Vancouver's leading jazz personalities gladly
gave their services and time to the club. Monty McFarlane, Bill Bellman, Bob Smith, Jack Kyle and others
gave noon-hour talks at regular meetings and emceed
all the auditorium concerts.
This year's executive looks to the 1952-53 edition of
the club as being even more active. Although this year
the club was badly hampered by lack of sufficient space,
it nevertheless gave all indications of becoming one of
the most important clubs on the campus.
The fanatic enthusiasm of 50 to 60 foot-tapping jazz-
cultists revived campus interest in America's only claim
to originality in the arts. The auditorium was jammed
for each concert; not merely by overflow from the caf,
or by people finding a convenient place out of the rain
to eat their lunch, but by serious students of modern
music.
This led to a great improvement in the financial
status of the club, and brought about a vast change in
its membership.
e One of biggest drawing cards was Lance Harrison, who racked
the auditorium with his cool and limped  renditions.
73 DANCE CLUB
Outside it was an olive-drab army hut, squeezed uncomfortably between a score of identical and equally
unprepossessing structures and flanked by the dust and
cinders of the East Mall.
Inside it came alive to the soft caress of old Vienna,
quickened to the hot pulse of the tropics, rocked to the
good nature of the frontier-pushing west of a half-
century ago.
They called it the Dance Club—a name which did
bare justice to its myriad activities.
Mostly, it was a place where awkward, gangling
youth could acquire the sure-footed charm of the ballroom expert.
Hard-bitten, well-pressed seniors whispered soft importances in the ears of exuberant freshettes who, almost
inevitably, displayed the alert aptitude which goes with
youth and a will. Polished upper-class women guided
stumbling freshmen with a sympathy and professional
expertness which ensured eventual success.
But, more than that, the Dance Club boasted an
inner core of showmen who practiced, practiced, practiced until the records wore out for their part in the
Film Society's program for the royal visit and for their
Dance Festival late in March.
A last minute switch in the royal program left them
sitting at the stage-door but they managed to squeeze
into the November Folk Festival.
Fridays at noon the noisy wild west took over and
the decaying building groaned under the stamps and
shouts of square dance enthusiasts.
The nucleus of the enthusiasts formed itself into a
demonstration team, invaded the Haney Square Dance
Festival and even put on a half-time show during basketball games.
Waltz devotees put in six weeks of hard work for
the MacMillan Waltz Festival where they earned the
plaudits of the crowd.
Best of all, perhaps, the Dance Club was a place to
munch a peanut butter sandwich in the company of
friends, indulge in a half hour's idle conversation, and
relax from the encumbered whirl of university life.
•   Small Latin-American styled combo played at many Dance Club
functions. From left, Ho Hit-Po, Benny Guilliams and Lawrence Iton.
74 FILM SOCIETY
The Film Society, largest service club on the campus,
from the point of view of number of students served,
has provided one of the most popular forms of entertainment at the University, with its varied programme
of Tuesday noon free shows, Comedy Film Revivals,
and Tuesday afternoon and evening feature presentations.
Through these activities, the club has enabled the
students of UBC to see the best in current movies with
the least possible drain on their pocket books.
In accordance with its policy of co-operation with
other campus groups, the society has brought to the
campus films of special interest to various specialized
study groups.
Filmsoc presented the Moody Bible Institute series
in co-operation with the Varsity Christian Fellowship,
drawing a capacity attendance, and the classic French
film "L'Eternel Retour" for the Le Cercle Francais.
There are few students that at some time or another
have not benefited from its services. The society,
through its system of projectionist training classes, supplied trained projectionists to the Faculty and outside
organizations, and to all University Clubs. It has also
given training classes to Teacher Training, so the student teachers will not leave the University without some
knowledge of projectors.
One of the major projetcs of the club is the traditional Annual Screen Dance, held in Brock Hall every
spring. This is always one of the outstanding dances of
the year. Students "Dance in the Dark" to the music of
the name bands that are projected on a giant screen
especially erected for the purpose.
During   the   past   year,   Filmsoc's   energetic   Social
• Bill Topping and live, promotion-minded executive ensured
Filmsoc's position as one of campus' top major clubs this year, with
a bi-monthly series of top-rate movies from downtown distributing
houses.
Committee has organized bi-monthly club parties. They
were all overwhelming successes, proving the society's
credo that members not only work hard, but on occasion, play hard.
Filmsoc is one of the few clubs that keep their
accounts in black ink. The weekly Tuesday features
have attracted so many students that the club this year
was able to pay off the major part of the loan acquired
from the A.M.S. three years ago. The 16mm. projectors,
bought with the borrowed money, are permanently
mounted in the auditorium. By means of the modern
projectors, the club is able to put on a show equal to
the standards of any downtown commercial theatre.
The quality of next year's presentations is guaranteed
by the large number of this year's executive who will
be back with the group next year.
e New projector, bought last year with AMS loan, enabled club
lo present non-stop shows up to a par with commercial movie-
houses. The intricate machines, costing over $2000, presented a new
problem to the club executive, who, after learning to use them
themselves, were faced with the task of teaching not only their own
club members, but a number of the students in the Teachers Training course. These latter students, it was felt, should have an
intimate knowledge of moving picture equipment, to meet the
growing  trend   toward   visual   education   in  the   grade  schools.
75 •    Weekly classes  in sculpture and  pottery began shortly after
Christmas in huge studio behind the Library stacks.
• Architecture Professor B. C. Binning, one of B.C.'s most respected
painters, lectured on sketching and oil painting in the popular Visual
Arts   Club  "Applied  Art"   Series.
Visual Arts Club
The Visual Arts Club's first and perhaps most organized appearance on the campus was on Club Day,
when Ron Kelly (who relinquished the presidency in
December) practised pipe-smoking in front of a handsome display of paintings and sculptures. The effect
was impressive enough to attract sufficient members to
keep the club alive.
By late November, classes in drawing, sculpture and
pottery were organized, and were held in the library
basement. B. C. Binning and Lionel Thomas were instructors in painting and sculpture, and except for a
month-long break at Christmas, the classes lasted all
year.
On the eve of Christmas exams, Kelly suddenly
went to England, and the club was dangerously close
to extinction. Without definite arrangements for spring
instruction classes, Pam Steele, who took over as prexy
early in January, hastily threw a tight schedule together-.
A new membership drive resulted in an unexpected increase in fees, enthusiasm and members.
Classes were only a part of the club's spring programme. A six-week lecture series was arranged for
February and March, featuring Mr. A. Morris, curator
of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Mr. Shadbolt, and Mrs.
Stewart-Galafres.
Lectures and films were presented in the auditorium
Friday noons, and during Open House Week, the
Visual Arts Club exhibits in the gallery and workshop
of the library basement attracted a great many visitors.
A great deal of the club's success was due to the
assistance of Mr. Hunter-Lewis, the club's faculty advisor.
• The products of the six-week course in sculpture were, for
the most part, astounding. Classics students modelled Greek
gods and Shakesperean heroes; modernists put on displays of
weird line sculptures which seemed to begin and end nowhere;
president Pam Steele, shown with a sample of the work in the
picture at the right, had produced a bust of her ideal man which
looked something like a slurred footprint In wet concrete.
76 FRENCH CLUB
At one time, French clubs on the campus were limited to senior students, and devoted solely to the study
and discussion of French literature. In 1947, a group
of first and second year students united the factions
and remodelled the result into Le Cercle Francais.
This extension of membership to include freshmen
and sophomores gave the senior students a larger and
more enthusiastic group to work with, and was, for
the most part, responsible for the renewed interest in
modern France and French customs.
A notable feature of the club this year was the
monthly soirees at members' homes. Guest speakers
talked in French on topics ranging from existentialism
to French cuisine. Members converse in French, sing
French songs, and play charades in French.
•    Elizabeth   Riley   (second   left),   and   energetic   executive   led   Le
Circle Francais through successful year.
•    Bruce Gifford and all-female executive  headed  largest German
Club of the post-veteran era.
SPANISH CLUB
Spanish enthusiasts have banded together to make
El Circulo Latino Americano one of the most active
minor clubs on the campus this year.
Most of the club's 62 members are Canadians, and
the necessary Spanish flavor is supplied by 12 Latin
American members, helping the club achieve its prime
aim of teaching the proper use of the Spanish language.
The club this year enjoyed visits from various South
American consuls, viewed films on Ecuador and Brazil,
and encouraged its members to become acquainted with
Latin American dance steps, A dinner at Henri's in
the first week of March was a huge success.
GERMAN CLUB
With a signed membership of thirty-five this year,
the German Club continued with its policy of providing a supplement to the courses of German Honor and
Major students. Social activities of various kinds highlighted the year.
The Friday noon meetings were held in the Brock;
faculty members spoke to the club on German culture
and national customs, showed slides, and carried on conversations with the club members in German.
Numerous evening parties were held at the homes
of members. The game of "Spiele" was one of the most
popular diversions, and humorous skits in German
made the parties adequately interesting.
German dinners, featuring the more digestible Teutonic foods were prepared and served by the female
members of the club at several functions.
Pat Hannon  (bottom  left), and  Latin-  American  enthusiasts  enjoyed  interesting and  informative year.
77 PROG.
CONSERVATIVE
CLUB
With a membership of twenty this year, the Progressive Conservatives quietly upheld the policies and
opinions of Her Majesty's loyal opposition.
The Mock Parliament was the centre of the club's
interest, and as opposition to the elected majority,
they fought for the extension of the North Atlantic
Treaty. Supporters of the government were allowed to
jump party lines, and the Tories found themselves with
several unexpected additions to their party ranks.
Major-General George Pearkes, V.C., was the most
popular speaker presented by the club to the noon-hour
critics in Arts 100. Pearkes is president of the B. C. Conservative Association, and attracted much attention during his hour-long stay on the campus.
• Opposition to Doug Steison's Liberal Club has never been keen
enough to pose a danger to their position among campus political groups. However, with death of provincial Coalition, the
year ended  on  a  note  of fiery enthusiasm.
CCF. CLUB
The most active and controversial of campus political groups, the CCF Club this year presented an impressive series of weekly noon-hour speakers, filling
Arts 100 every Wednesday noon, and presenting economic and social theories indigenous to the policies of
the Canadian CCF party.
Recovering from a serious split in the Club's executive ranks early last fall, which saw Bob Loosmore
and nearly half of the existing executive walk out after
a ideological rift, Jean McNeely quickly formed a
closely co-ordinated group.
CCF spokesmen sponsored on the campus during
the term included three MLA's, Harold Winch, Ernest
Winch and Arthur Turner, and MP Angus Mclnnis.
In the Mock Parliament, the Club brought in a bill
to bring the steel monopoly under social ownership.
Third-year Law student Mary Southin found very few rabid
Conservatives on campus; carried on with small executive and
twenty membes; sponsored George Pearkes as most prominent
Speaker of Pro-Con year.
LIBERAL CLUB
With political interest on the campus rapidly declining, the Student Liberal Club this year found that
co-operation and unity of policy was a greater factor
in the club's success than a large, boisterous membership.
All the club's activities are carried out in accordance
with the basic principles of liberalism, and the Canadian Liberal Party. Members of Parliament, professors
of philosophy, economics and political science, and professional men spoke to club members and interested
persons at regular noon-hour meetings.
The club takes an active part in the periodic Mock
Parliaments sponsored by the Parliamentary Forum.
The valuable experience gained from speaking on current political topics to an exact dummy of the Canadian
Parliament is perhaps the most attractive characteristic
of the club.
Jean McNeely took over after fall executive walked out on assumption that CCF Club was not following strict socialist line;
presented prominent speakers on average af once a week.
78 Engineering Institute
of Canada
As the major club of the Engineer's Undergraduate
Society, the student branch of the Engineering Institute
of Canada undertook another vigorous program of
special speakers and films this year.
One of the main purposes of the organization is to
make student engineers aware of the importance and
necessity of national engineering association which has
as its objective the unification and advancement of the
engineering profession.
The EIC executive was the major behind-the-scene
power in the EUS drive for the March of Dimes.
Eliminations for student speakers at the annual Vancouver Branch's Student Night ran until February 22.
Three finalists were chosen, and spoke on February 27
to the group of professional engineers in the Medical-
Dental Auditorium. The downtown branch presented
book prizes of 25, 15 and 10 dollars to the three finalists
for their interesting talks.
During the year, one field trip of the downtown
EIC branch was held on the campus allowed a good
portion of the student membership to join senior members to join senior members in inspection of the Fraser
River Flood Project.
Stan Wilkinson steered this year's EIC executive
through one of the most successful seasons in the history
of the organization.
• Stan Wilkinson led only Engineer's club under the jurisdiction of
LSE. EIC executive say that most important contribution made to the
campus this year was the promotion of the rousing March of Dimes
campaign.
Psychology Club
The Psychology Club, formed in 1947 after it had
split off from the Philosophy Club, has as its main program the discussion of the latest developments in the
science of psychology.
Open to major or honors students in psychology, the
club provides an interesting supplement to the formal
studies. Guest speakers are invited to the regular evening meetings to acquaint the members with the work
in applied fields as well as the new improvements in
psychological techniques. Other speakers give members an understanding of the problems which arise in
every-day psychological practice.
The exhibit for Open House was the most important
project of the year. The Psychology Club is playing a
leading and active role in the display planned by the
Department of Psychology. Featured in the exhibit
will be a "lie detector" designed to probe the emotional
control of the visiting public.
79
Al Schneider's active executive sat through many meetings comparing
their inhibitions; ran the famous "lie detector" which embarrassed
thousands at Open House. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Regular testimonial meetings, featuring the healing
testimonies of club members, and the maintenance of
the Christian Science Study Room, a feature of every
similar organization at the universities across the continent, were the main functions of the club this year.
One speaker, a member of the Board of Lectureship
of the Mother Church in Boston, delivered a lecture
during the year to the members and interested friends.
The purpose of the organization is to afford members of the University opportunity to learn the truth
about Christian Science as taught in the Bible and in
Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary
Baker Eddy, the Discoverer and Founder of Christian
Science.
HILLEL
NEWMAN CLUB
The Newman Club is a religious organization
established to serve the spiritual, intellectual and social
interests of Catholic students attending non-sectarian
Universities. The UBC chapter was founded in 1928.
The annual active membership ranges around 150.
This year the club's religious programme included
six Communion Breakfasts and four closed Retreats at
nearby Monasteries.
Besides intellectual discussions, the club sponsors
Study Clubs, speakers and an annual debate.
The Club participated fully in inter-mural sports
for both boys and girls, and finished in sixth place
in the final standing.
The Social Calendar provided entertainment
throughout the year. Social nights in the spring and
fall and the annual Spring Formal in February highlighted the club's social activities.
The club publicized all its activities through the
medium of its monthly newspaper, the "Newsman".
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, formed at UBC
to unite Jewish students on the campus, took an active
part in University affairs this year.
Two dances and an informal mixer opened the year,
and the second term social calendar featured Sunday
night house parties and a Leap Year Frolic. The club
rooms behind the Brock, decorated and furnished by
the club members, provided a common meeting place,
a fine lunch room, and a centre for all club activities.
Seminars on widely diversified topics of general interest were held every Wednesday afternoon. Several
lectures and films were presented to the general student
body.
Together with other religious and allied clubs, the
Hillel students assisted in the formal recognition of
Brotherhood Week on the campus.
The major project of the year was the production of
a three-act play, "Our Town".
80 VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
The program and activities of the University Christian Fellowship, aimed to fulfill the dictum of its motto,
"To know Christ and to make Him known", and were
centred around five separate Bible study groups.
The weekly Bible discussions were climaxed each
week by a general meeting on Sunday. A number of
Vancouver ministers and out-of-town speakers addressed regular Monday meetings.
Several "Moody Institute of Science" films were presented to capacity audiences in the auditorium.
The highlight of the year for VCF's large membership was a series of meetings addressed by Dr. Robert
Smith, well-known philosophy professor from University of Dubuque, Iowa. Dr. Smith's five-day series in
the auditorium was based on the general theme, "The
Relevance of Christ".
A fall conference of several university VCF groups
sent several lucky members to "The Firs" in Bellingham and the participation of eleven members in the
International Missionary Convention held on the
campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana, were the
highlights of the club's off-campus activities.
Closer to home, members of the group conducted a
number of services at local churches, and held a few
fireside and skating parties in the spring term.
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Large VCF membership took time out from afternoon discussion
group to smile broadly for Totem photographer. Posters on wall
in background are constitutional foundations of Fellowship
groups throughout Canada.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT
Keeping alive its tradition of balanced and widespread activities springing from the search for a true
Christian way of life, the Student Christian Movement
again presented a program of vital interest to the general student body. For the first time in many years, the
SCM carried out its vigorous program without a general
secretary.
Under President Doug Williamson's able leadership,
the members responded fully to the extra demands the
lack of a full-time secretary made upon their time and
efforts, and no curtailment of activities was found necessary.
The year began for SCM'ers with a resoundingly
successful Thanksgiving weekend camp at Ocean Park.
Early in October, the group launched into a full schedule of study groups, campus speakers, firesides, and
parties. At Christmas, sixteen students were sent to the
great Quadrennial Conference of the Student Volunteer
Movement at the University of Kansas, where they met
in fellowship with Christian students of all races.
Morning devotionals, held before the members
rushed to 8:30 lectures, were well-attended.
The SCM has a sizeable library of books, pamphlets
and periodicals pertaining to the history and modern
application of Christianity, which is open to any member. In its perennial campaign for new members, the
SCM offered seekers and confirmed Christians alike a
serious discussory group devoted to the search for a
truthful explanation of the divine power.
Student Christian Movement executive, headed this year by
President Doug Williamson, planned and presented full schedule
of speakers and study groups; added many grains of thought
lo endless controversy on  Christian  philosophy.
81 First  U.N.  Model  General  Assembly,  staged  in  conjuction  with  the downtown U. N. Association on the mock "Day at the U.N."  packed
the Brock Lounge; featured spirited debates and familiar Soviet walkout by AMS president Vaughn Lyon.
UNITED NATIONS CLUB
• Top: Spring Model Assembly, held March 3, debated the question of a World Police Force; failed to pass the resolution by
a two-thirds majority.
• Bottom: Fireball Club executive led 250 members through busy
year: left to right, Ann Hutchison, Ken Farris, Raghbir Basi,
Marny Wilson,  June  Stephens,  Ron  Con.
A dogged determination to bring U.N. to the grassroots brought more than 250 students together every
Tuesday noon this year.
Led by soft-spoken, energetic Raghbir Basi, who
wound up president-elect of the AMS, they organized
mass meetings, staged a model U.N. assembly, encouraged high school students to form a dozen student
clubs, spoke at downtown meetings wherever they
found a rostrum, and distributed bushels of pamphlets.
Early in the summer, they started their year's work
by sending three of their executive to Ottawa for the
annual conference of the U.N. Association of Canada.
To spark their membership drive, they dressed up
their mimeographed "U.N. Digest" with cardboard
covers bearing a printed U.N. emblem. A sharp letter
from the U.N. secretariat warning them that the emblem couldn't be used without special permission, dampened their enthusiasm a little, but they went ahead with
the publication and sat back and waited for somebody
to sue.
Nobody did.
Before Christmas, they banded together with the
downtown U.N. Association to stage a mock "Day at
the UN".
It started in the pouring rain with the raising of the
U.N. flag to the University flagpole, but warmed up
quickly with indoor afternoon and evening programmes.
In the afternoon, high school students presented a
"Security Council" debate and UBC students staged a
82 Right: Indian delegate to Model Assembly Raghbir Basi argues that money should be spent on aid to smaller countries, not development
of world armies. • Top left: Siamese representative John Poussett pointed out that national revenue of Siam is 28 cents; could not
support World Police Force. • Top right: Chinese delegate Ron Con asked U.N. to shed diapers, start wearing long pants; strive for
peace. • Bottom left: Peter Lowes, representative from United Kingdom, asked for Police Force; spoke for rearmament. • Bottom right:
Tom Franck, USSR delegate, threatened to write expose of U.S. Delegate Joe Nold, titled: "What I Know About Nold".
Model General Assembly meeting featuring Soviet walkouts (ably performed by AMS president Vaughn Lyon),
fiery debates, and no conclusions.
Invasion of the back-slapping precincts of downtown
service clubs started in the fall with a visit by Bob
Loosmore, Marnie Wilson, and Ann Hutchinson to
the Rotary Club. Arch-socialist Loosmore caused several staid Rotarians to lose their Hotel Vancouver
boiled turkey, but the presence of two pretty girls eased
the strain.
President Basi took a tram to the Northwest Regional YMCA Conference in New Westminster and
tried for two solid hours to explain that Christian social
work and world co-operation go hand in hand.
A visit from Polish author-in-exile Madame Luts-
lowski prompted some club members to ask whether
the club had been founded to help world peace or to
make war on the Soviet Union—but the meeting filled
Arts 100 and stirred up more lively discussion than any
in the year.
Professor Soward's "International Review of 1951"
was another post-Christmas meeting-packer and the
quiet expert's cautious optimism was a pleasant change
from the blaring headlines then being made by U.N.
session in Paris.
83
Top: View from general secretary's platform shows mixed moods
of delegates in front row, back of Ukranian delegate Roy Sadler.
Bottom: Joe Nold, American delegate, brushed off personal attacks of Russian Tom Franck; presented plans for International
Police Force. International  Students Club
Three years ago, in the spring of 1949, Frene Gin-
wala and Felicity Pope layed down the first plans to
organize the increasing number of foreign students on
the campus. With a goal set at establishing an International House on the campus, the ISC enrolled 120 members within three months of its inception. Today, the
main function of the club is promoting social contacts
and stimulating discussion between foreign and Canadian students.
The year began for ISC with a tea at the International House clubrooms. Professor Andrew, AMS president Vaughan Lyon, and ISC president George Rohn
emphasized the importance of the club, and praised
the work of the members during the previous year.
Shortly after, club members and guests attended an
International Masquerade in colorful, authentic national costumes.
At the regular parties in private homes, a speaker
started the evening, and afterwards the members sang
the songs of their respective homelands, and danced.
Several groups of club members visited the studios of
the CBC in Vancouver, and others spoke to service
clubs on subjects concerning their native countries.
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George Rohn headed fireball ISC executive. Most of club members were interested mainly in establishing and maintaining a
permanent International House, but found time to participate in
varied ISC program.
Alpha Omega
Alpha Omega Society was formed for the purpose
of promoting the study and appreciation of Ukranian
culture as a contribution to Canadian cultural development.
During the past year, the society has organized or
sponsored lectures on any phase of Ukranian life, held
concerts, and presented motion pictures, dances, and a
graduation banquet for its members. Through the
efforts of the society, several Ukranian books have been
added to the Library shelves.
Informal noon hour meetings were held every Wednesday and general meetings were held monthly at a
member's home. A liaison is maintained between Alumni, as well as Alpha Omega societies at other universities.
Lloyd Pelech presided over tiny Ukranian Society executive; managed to draw amazing crowds to various concerts, dances and
motion pictures sponsored by Alpha Omega.
India  Students
Founded to sponsor a series of lectures on the comparative study of Indian and Far-Eastern philosophies,
and to help bridge the differences of East and West,
the India Students Association is probably the most important club to be formed on the campus in the past
five years.
This year, it sponsored Swami Shivananda, an outstanding speaker and practitioner of Yoga culture and
philosophy. The Association also observed the second
anniversary of India's Republic Day, and invited prominent campus personalities as well as leaders of the local
East Indian community to their banquet in Brock Hall.
During the latter part of the year, the Association
undertook to help the East Indian community in Vancouver adjust itself to Canadian culture and living.
• With hard-driving, ambitious Raghbir Basi as one of its founding fathers, the India Students Association came into ts own
ths year with a steady schedule of parties, banquets, and sponsored speakers.
■
84 Above: French group "Le Cercle Francais" chose
a Moliere period play for its main project.
Left: UBC Brass Band seemed to turn up at
every campus promotion stunt. Here they march
into the Armouries during the spring blood drive
• Far left: One of the screwiest stunts of the year was
Filmsoc's monkey-in-a-wheei-
barrow gag, which saw the
club's Bill Day toted around
the campus inside a wooden
cage. It paid off in three full-
house audiences for "Kind
Hearts  and  Coronets."
• Left: Bearded Dick Lazenby
and Radsoc cronies took a poll
on whether they should break
record of "Little White Cloud
That Cried" . . . Johnny Ray
lost by a wide margin.
• Right: Humorist Eric Nicol's latest play,
"Brass Tacks" was premiered by the Players
Club early in November.
• Far Right: Hot saxophonist Lance Harrison,
one of Vancouver's more prominent jazzmen,
entertained an appreciative crowd in the auditorium for Jazzoc's  last concert in  March.  87 •    Les  Armour
THE UBYSSEY
Never before have one man's opinions aroused so
much violent dissension among so many people on the
UBC campus.
When John Leslie McKenna Armour slowly and
reluctantly eased out of the cramped and cluttered offices
of the Editor-in-Chief on April 5th, the Publications
Board lost one of its most controversial members. For
five years, he had raised the eyebrows of his readers
with his opinions on every subject from education to
comfort stations on the Engineering lawn. Through
his Ubyssey column "And All That", he had sharply
rapped the knuckles of national politicians, famous
theatrical personalities, professors, and faculty and student administrators. To many he was a political radical.
His sharp, insulting statements and bold defiance of
authority were the foundations for the hatred of many
campus thinkers, and his "leftist" meanderings caused
a perpetual flurry among University political groups.
But to 45 staffers of the student newspaper, he was
"E.I.C." and for three issues a week he scraped four
pages of copy and pictures out of an unintelligible
mass of "gobbledygook".
In September, the PUB put its first issue to press
with a staff of six. Allan Goldsmith, who had been
Editor-in-Chief for two weeks while Students' Council
thought over the Editorial Board's recommendations of
Les Armour for the top spot, was executive editor;
Elsie Gorbat and Danny Goldsmith were senior editors;
Alex MacGillivray took over the sports department;
John Brockington started the Literary Page and Sheila
Kearns fussed with hundreds of exchange issues.
During the first week, the Publications Board population increased tenfold, but by early October, only the
hardiest were left. The new staffers were barely settled
in their positions when the first "controversy" threatened to put them all on strike.
While covering a story on the birth of four kittens,
photographer Walt Sussel invaded the inviolate sanctity
of the Women's Dorms. The Administration severely
chastized the photographer and the girl reporter who
had allowed the picture to be taken, and the Ubyssey
leaped to their aid editorially.
•    Allan Goldsmith, Executive Editor.
•    Alec  MacGillvray,   Managing   Editor.
88 •    Senior Editors  Joe  Schlesinger,  Myra  Green,  Elsie Gorbat.
While the last shouts over the "kitten incident" were
dying away, editorials were appearing in support of a
Students' Council demand for elimination of this year's
thirty dollar fee increase. The Board of Governors remained silent, the "heat" increased. When editorials
questioned the integrity of the Board, the Senate suggested that the EIC might be open to a libel suit. Editorials explaining the financial statements were printed,
and the editors settled down, only to be confronted two
weeks later with the biggest controversy of the year.
The Kickapoo Club asked the Student Council to
charge the PUB with half the loss from a pepmeet,
which, they claimed, was not given enough publicity in
the paper. The motion passed, and the Ubyssey staffers
suspended publication. An emergency meeting of Students' Council rescinded the motion, but four members
abstained from voting confidence in the Ubyssey's news
policy. Editorials called the four "gutless wonders";
Council labelled Ubyssey policy irresponsible and they
fired the EIC.
•    Right: MacGillivray visits sports writers Edwards, Wharf, Drink-
water.   Below: Mike Ryan; right, work at the U-desk.
89 •    Producing   the   Ubyssey   meant   three   nights   a   week   at   press   for
pubsters.
The campus buzzed with the pros and cons of the
Armour controversy. When a petition bearing 180
names was presented to Council, the twelve student
representatives unwillingly called a general meeting.
Sensing the swing of student opinion toward the side
of Armour, the Council hastily called an emergency
meeting a half hour before the general meeting, and
Armour and Council agreed to a compromise.
Over 3,000 students poured into the Armouries. For
three hours, long lines of speakers fired thousands of
words back and forth on responsibility, freedom of opinion and the press, and the fundamental purposes of a
college newspaper. With time running out, a motion
of closure on debate was passed, and Les Armour hesitantly took over the microphone in his own behalf. In
a quiet speech on the responsibility of an editor to the
student body, he explained the difficulties of working
with a volunteer staff, and without mentioning his
editorial policy, completely won the crowd over to his
Al Fotheringham wrote
"Campus   Chaff."
Chuck Coon, Author of
"Up a Tree."
side. When the vote was taken, the "ayes" had it, and
Armour walked back into his tiny glass cubbyhole in
the Brock basement.
The only trace of the controversy still remaining was
the new city editor Mike Ryan, who was part of the
Armour-Students' Council compromise.
When Christmas exam results were known, the usual
staff reshuffles took place. Myra Green, Joe Schlesinger,
and Elsie Gorbat were senior editors. Pamela Steele became literary editor; Alex McGillivray moved to managing editor, with Barry Drinkwater replacing him as
sports editor. Laughing Vic (V. Fred) Edwards was
appointed news editor; Jean Smith, copy editor, and Flo
McNeil continued on as women's editor. Columnist
Chuck Coon, an exchange student from Western Ontario University, insistently chirped "Up a Tree", and
Alan Fotheringham pounded out "Campus Chaff" to
the tune of "I hate Engineers".
•    Pam  Steele,  Literary  Editor    •    Flo McNeil, Woman's Editor
•    Jean    Smith,    top    reporter,    and
Shelia   Kearns   and    Patsy   Burns Terry    Nicholls,    Student    Council
CUP Editors. representative.
90 •    Tommy Hatcher
•    Walter Sussel
•    Bruce Jaffary
Photographers
A new era in the Publications Board Photography
department began this year with the absence of nearly
all the experienced photographers.
Bruce Jaffary held the position of Director of Photography, and as the distributor of supplies and equipment, he was constantly between the fire of austerity
conscious pubsters and extravagant photographers.
Tommy Hatcher, the last of the "professional" photographers, worked on section pages for the Totem.
Walt Sussel, the COTC's only representative on the
PUB, was one of the most prolific lensmen on the
crew.
Newcomer Ron Meek became a competent news
photographer by the end of the year. Bill Welch, a
forestry student, worked on the Totem staff.
Joe Quan, one of the hardest workers in the group,
was always willing to give his time and advice, and
he was on call all hours of the day and night.
Top: Ron Meek, who took almost all the pictures in the
clubs section, was kept busy by the Totem staff.
Below: Joe Quan, almost always in the darkroom, was
called on constantly by Totem staff, who always ran
out of photogs.
Far Left: Bob Steiner worked on campus until Christmas,
left many of his negatives behind for use in the Totem.
Left: Bill Welsh came into the photography department
after Christmas.
91 •    Joan Fraser, Editor
•    Gerry Kidd,  Associate Editor
TOTEM
To the outside world it was Canada's biggest college
yearbook.
To Vancouver's printers and engravers it was a
coveted contract.
To a handful of students in the north basement of
Brock Hall it was a major headache—a year of sweat
and tears and, at times, a project that came close to
drawing blood.
But its biggest heartbreaks were always coupled
with more than the usual quota of horse-laughs—
a factor which probably accounted for its being produced at all.
Joan Fraser took over the Totem in the middle of
one of the hottest Julys in Vancouver's history. The
heat and the score of problems that immediately confronted her led her to conclude privately that hell
could not be far off.
First blow came from Treasurer Phil Anderson, who
noted gloomily that the last Totem dropped the AMS
$4,000 in the hole and swore loudly that this year's
edition would have to be designed to break even or not
be produced at all.
Rising costs and falling enrollment made the
demand next to impossible to meet without drastic
paring. The Editor did her best all summer—but
AMS commitments to publish pictures of every undergrad on the campus threatened to shoot engraving
costs into the stratosphere.
Hurried conferences with Editor-in-Chief Les
Armour and Treasurer Anderson led her to sign a contract for plastic engravings—a new and much less
costly process.
Then the engraver's union stepped in, pointed out
that plastic engraving was a process not governed by
the union, and intimated that they might declare all
plastic engravings "hot". Hurried meetings with union
leaders settled the problem—but new ones took its place
faster than the Totem Editor could count them.
•    Joyce MacPherson
•    George Stevenson, Business Manager.
92 •    Sally Heard, Fraternities Editor
Photographers found their lectures inevitably clashed
with times set for taking pictures, ad salesmen had a
rough time with their customers, staff ran into exams.
Undergrad pictures arrived from the photographers
in a dozen different head-sizes, and half the students
looked as if their pictures had been taken in a coal pit.
Undergrad Editor John Banfield, who later claimed
that work in a salt mine would have been easier,
sorted all pictures, attached appropriate names to most
of them, and then happily tried to forget them.
Soft-spoken Gerry Kidd, who dropped in to the
office to scoff, remained to become Clubs Editor and
Associate Editor in rapid succession. He was kept
busy hounding LSE for copy, declaring a minor war
on the photo department, talking fast to printers, and
keeping engravers hopping.
Sports Editor Bill "Hutch" Hutchinson drew up a
neat plan for 30 pages of athletics, then found that
photographers and athletes never met. Piece by piece
he fitted his giant jigsaw puzzle together, but he was
still working on it long after the rest of the book was
•    Elva  Plant,  Graduate Editor
on the press.
Greek Section Editor Sally Heard and Graduate
Editor Elva Plant ranted, pleaded, and cajoled students
into handing in pictures until their sections were filled.
Maureen Cromie handled write-up for all women's
pages, Joyce MacPherson frantically copied layouts,
captioned pix.
Al Goldsmith, the Ubyssey's Executive Editor, business manager, personnel director, and senior hatchet
man in conferences, moved into the Totem office, used
his car as a messenger service between editors and production men, tabulated copy.
Business manager George Stevenson made literally
hundreds of phone calls, tracking down late copy, and
arranging appointments for photographers.
Thanks to pixies, who were the backbone of the
book, everything was under control by late February.
Then Toronto cover manufacturers wired that their
plant was on strike — a delay that lasted six weeks.
Finally though, covers arrived, staffers relaxed, and pubsters marked "30" to another Totem.
•    Bill   Hutchinson,   Sports  Editor
•    John   Banfield,   Undergraduate   Editor
93 SPORTS  EDITOR:   BILL  HUTCHINSON 95 ADMINISTRATION
*
A  Reconstruction Year
e    Robin H. Robinett, Director of Athletics
"The important thing in athletic sport is not the
winning, but the taking part. The essential thing is
not conquering, but fighting well."
—De Coubertin.
The athletic department of the University of British
Columbia for this year directed its aims (1) to provide
for each student a program of wholesome and sound
physical activities which would meet his needs, desires, and interests; (2) to encourage participation by
each student in new activities from which he would
derive additional pleasure and benefit; and, (3) to afford
each student the opportunity to develop himself physically, socially, recreationally, and psychologically
through the medium of competitive sports activities.
It was guided by these ideal principles of providing
participation for all instead of a select few, and of
equalizing competition as far as administratively possible.
This has been a transitory year in the athletic
department, however, successful in light of the above.
And it has been a most encouraging year when one
stops to consider the groundwork that has, and is
being laid, to make the athletic program of the gallant Thunderbirds one of the finest in North America.
R. H. ROBINETT,
Director  of Athletics.
The Ostrum  Plan
Known as the Ostrum Plan, the "new deal" for
men's athletics provided sound financing and more
efficient organization of the men's athletic programme.
Its first year of operation saw Bob Robinett as athletic director, a position replacing Graduate Manager of
Athletics. A five man board of faculty and students
handled most of the administration details, while the
larger Men's Athletic Directorate met periodically to
decide major policy. Although it was not set up until
the end of the year, the Men's Athletic Council, a
student-faculty committee, governed financial policy.
The Ostrum Plan gave the MAD $3.25 per student
from the AMS fes.e but this was reduced for next year
at the Spring General Meeting when an anticipated drop
in student enrollment would have given athletics unbalanced proportion of student money.
Originated by former MAD president Brock Ostrum,
the plan has proved its worth in this year's more effi-
ent athletic administration. The plan is to operate on
trial for four years, after which a complete evaluation
will be made.
96 e    Men's   Athletic   Directorate
Back:    Ford,    St.    John,    Sparling,
Smithergale,  Springer,  Jones,
Brodie.
Front:   Plant,   Jaffray,   Prazlosky.
M. A. D.
The Men's Athletic Directorate underwent a complete revision this year as the Ostrum Plan was put
into effect. Headed by energetic Bill Sparling, the
Board was entangled in the new problems of policy
setting and reshuffling caused by the Plan. A student
vote of confidence at the general A.M.S. meeting in
March gave the controversial scheme another year in
which to operate and heartily endorsed the apparent
upsurge of UBC teams.
Mr. Robinette from his post as Athletic Director, coordinated the entire organization and smoothed out
functional wrinkles. The formulation of the Executive and Athletic Committees under the new set-up
assured the students of a greater control of finances.
W. A. D.
Led by efficient Joan MacArthur, the Women's
Athletic Directorate has come to the end of another
successful year. Its chief function was the administration of women's athletics, but the board was kept
busy with revising the awards system and smoothing
the many minor crisis that appeared.
The W.A.D. also sponsored a Homecoming float
and entered a princess candidate, assisted in the organization of the WUS-WAA banquet, the sale of football
regalia, a blood drive competition among girls athletic
teams, and co-operation in Frosh orientation week.
With the additional funds granted them this term,
the executive was able to carry on a much more varied
intra-mural program with a greater number of girls
participating.
• Women's Athletic Directorate.
Back row: Jan Crafter, Elanor Ny-
holm. Centre: Del Hartman, Dree
Stewart, Dorene Armour, Jean
Leaper. Front row: Esther Lear,
Cynthia Clark, Joan McArthur;
President Donnie Sparling, Jean
Hood.
97 AWARDS
• Maureen Bray, winner of nine big
blocks for hockey, badminton, and
swimming.
Basketball
BIG  BLOCKS
Adeld   Aselpine
Pat Donovan
Sheila  Moore
SMALL  BLOCKS
Bessie Sainas
Beverley Cook
Badminton
BIG  BLOCKS
Maureen  Bray
SMALL BLOCKS
Pat Burley
Joy Mosence
Hockey
BIG  BLOCKS
Elizabeth  Allen
Sheila  Moore
Elinor Cave
Dree Stewart
Dawn Thompson
Phyllis Leiterman
Barbara   Schrodt
Maureen   Bray
Doreen Armour
SMALL   BLOCKS
Marie   Harrison
Marg Robertson
Skiing
BIG BLOCKS
Tad Harper
Anne  Marie  Leuchte
Swimming
BIG BLOCKS
Maureen   Bray
SMALL BLOCKS
Peggy   Hinnigan
Esther   Leir
Dree  Stewart
Basketball
BIG   BLOCKS
1. Arthur Phillips
2. John  Southcott
3. Donald  Hudson
4. Bryan  Upson
NEW WIN
1. Daniel Zaharko
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Ronald Stuart
2. Gordon McLeod
3. Ralph Hudson
(4)
(4)
(2)
(2)
American Football
BIG  BLOCKS
1. David  MacFarlane  (4)
2. George  Puil (3)
3. Dick Mathews (2)
NEW WINS
1. Cal Murphy
2. Bob  Hindmarch
3. Jerry   Nestman
4. John  MacDonald
5. Bill  Stuart
FRESHMAN AWARD
1. Al Ezzy
2. John Hunt
3. Leo Sweeny
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Tom Barker
(Certificate)
2. Peter Gregory
3. Hugh McArthur
(Certificate)
4. Roy Saddler
Cricket
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Paul Jones
Fencing
BIG   BLOCKS
I. Charles Barnard
Loewen
Golf
BIG BLOCKS
1. Douglas  Bajus (5)
2. Robert Esplen (3)
SMALL BLOCKS
1. George Barnes
2. Gordon  Christopher
Grass Hockey
NEW   WINS
1. Gordon Jones
2. Hugh Buckley
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Peter  Coombs
2. Guy Hart Dyke
3. Andy Sutherland
4. Jawanda  Bugwan
Singh
Gymnastics
NEW WIN
1. John Letson
SMALL  BLOCKS
1. John Hodgins
2. Sev   Heiberg
Ice Hockey
BIG BLOCKS
1. Harrison Young      (4)
2. Alan Hood (2)
3. Stu Bailey (3)
NEW  WINS
1. James  McMahon
2. Steve Gryschuk
3. Malvin Hughes
4. Lome   Irwin
FRESHMAN  AWARDS
1. Charles Sanderson
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Roger Stanton
2. Rudolph Richer
3. Robert Peebles
4. Donald Anderson
Rowing
BIG  BLOCKS
I. Harry Costillou
NEW  WINS
1. Richard Kania
2. John  Drinnan
3. John Warren
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Andy   Smail
2. Malcolm   Matheson
(1)
Rugby
BIG BLOCKS
1. Doug  MacMillan    (2)
2. Giriard Kirby (5)
3. Gerald Main (2)
4. George  Puil (2)
5. Stanley Clarke        (5)
6. Ralph Martinson     (2)
NEW WINS
1. Raymond   Cocking
2. Danial Oliver
3. Bill Whyte
FRESHMAN AWARDS
1. Bill Mulholland
2. Charles  Brumwell
3. Frank Gower
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Bill Wamsley
2. John Newton
(Certificate)
3. David MacFarlane
(Certificate)
4. Stuart Clyne
5. Jim MacWilliams
6. Peter Grantham
Skiing
BIG BLOCKS
1. Garvin Robinson     (5)
2. Frank Willis (2)
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Ted Hunt
Soccer
BIG BLOCKS
1. Bill Popowich (2)
2. Bill  Walters (2)
3. Bud Dobson (2)
4. Ken Campbell (2)
5. Mike  Puhach (2)
6. John Fredrickson (2)
7. Don Renton (2)
NEW WINS
1. Irvin Knight
2. Doug Andrew
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Dick Mathews
(Certificate)
2. Stan  Glasgow
Swimming
BIG BLOCKS
1. Gordon   Potter (2)
2. Peter  Lusztig (2)
3. Don Smythe (2)
NEW WINS
1. Alan Borthwick
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Dick Clayton
2. Max Bertram
(Certificate)
Tennis
BIG BLOCKS
1. Lawrence Barclay
Dave MacFarlane, winner of the
Bobby Gault Trophy and the Dr.
Burke Inspirational Plaque for leadership.
SMALL BLOCKS
I. Bruce Jaffray
Track
BIG BLOCKS
NEW  WIN
1. Peter  Harris
2. Robert Piercy (5)
Cross Country
BIG BLOCKS
1. Max Bertram
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Garry Gibson
2. Jack Lowther
(Certificate)
Managerial   Awards
1. Ice Hockey—
Brian Prentice
2. Swimming—
Bob Walker
3. Basketball—
Peter Fowar
4. Cricket & Grass
Hockey—
Paul Harris Jones
SMALL BLOCKS
1. Ice Hockey—
Norman McLeod
2. Basketball—
Bob Kirkland
3. Swimming—
John Springer
4. Skiing—
George O'Brien
5. Soccer—
Peter  Prasloski
Honorary Award
HONORARY BIG BLOCK
I. Frank Reid
Service Awards
1. Diane Le Blanc
2. Bill St.  John
3. David Hall
4. Dick Stephens
5. Ann Willis
Honorable   Mention
Swimming
1. Palle Cardell
2. Torsten Bengtson
3. Olaf Olsen
98 FOOTBALL
It was a great football season.
Spearheaded by Dave MacFarlane, George Puil, Cal
Murphy, and Cece Taylor, the Jelly Anderson coached
Thunderbirds threw themselves whole-heartedly at the
boys from below the border and to the surprise of all,
managed to win two and tie one.
The Bird's success this year can be attributed to
three things: good coaching, better facilities, and the
Ostrom plan, all direct results of the strong student
interest in inter-collegiate competition. The fall camp,
held on the campus for three weeks prior to the opening of the term, was attended by thirty players, a
mixture of veterans and high school talent, who prepared for the season under ideal conditions.
Opening in Bellingham against the Vikings, the
Birds threw a scare into the Conference champions but
the UBC boys tired badly due to lack of strength.
Murphy scored the lone Varsity touchdown culminating a seventy yard drive.
First home game saw the boys come from behind
to tie Carrol College before four thousand spectators.
Late in the fourth quarter, two blocked kicks, followed
by sparkling off-tackle smashes by George Puil, knotted
the score. The Birds were camped on the College
one foot line as the gun went off.
Travelling on to Spokane the next week, the Birds,
after twenty-two hours on a battered bus, absorbed a
41-0 knockout punch from Whitman.
The next Saturday was smozzle day. The Vikings,
in anguish after dropping a previous contest, slaughtered
the all too inept Birds, 52-6—a UBC record.
October 13 was a red letter day in UBC football
history. Thrilled with the prospect of playing for
Royalty, the Thunderbirds pulled all stops to trample
Eastern Oregon 13-8.
A win! The first in two years. Spectators went
wild, tearing down the goal posts at the end of the
game. Unfortunately the Royal Couple arrived late
for the history-making contest. After the game, Dave
MacFarlane presented Prince Philip with the game ball.
Then came Homecoming. Nostalgic grads joined
with undergraduates to cheer the Birds to their second
straight win as they pummeled Central Washington
20-12.
99 •    Puil gallops—Central closes in.
•    Preseason work—Ugh!
e    Cal scores to culminate 40 yard push.
The Season's Record
Western Washington   41
Carrol College _   13
Whitman College   41
Western Washington   52
Eastern Oregon      8
Central Washington   12
Oregon College    20
Whitman College  21
UBC 6
UBC 13
UBC 0
UBC 6
UBC 13
r-
UBC 20
UBC 6
UBC 6
•    Confusion reigns as Bird's drive to win.
New Co-captains
Hindmarch
Murphy
100 FOOTBALL
In the Central game, the play of the Thunderbird
forward wall was tremendous, though it was outweighed
fifteen pounds to the man. This new line superiority
allowed the smaller UBC backs to shake loose, and Puil,
Stewart and Herb capitalized on this to score. The use
of the spread formation disconcerted the Yanks in the
first half but they recovered their bearings in the last
quarter and only sterling defensive play by such stalwarts as Barker and Nestman averted defeat.
Visiting Tacoma proved fatal for the injury riddled
Birds. The Loggers, showing superiority in every
department, ran and passed to a 41-6 victory. The lone
varsity score came in the second quarter when Cece
Taylor blocked a C.P.S. punt and Murphy ran it over
from the two. The Thunderbirds' biggest loss, however, was injury to captain elect Bob Hindmarch, who
broke a leg on a kick-off.
Returning home more battered than ever, the team
took on the undefeated Oregon College Wildcats, and
the visitors completed their perfect season by hammering the tired UBC hosts 20-6.
The season ended on a discordant note when the
Whitman College Missionaries literally finished off
the Birds 21-6 before the smallest crowd of the year.
Not too dismayed by the years' showing however,
Coach Andersen is looking for a better record next season as his predominantly freshman ball club has now
gained a little experience.
The loss of such reliables as Dave MacFarlane, Cece
Taylor, Jerry Nestman, Bill Stewart, John MacDonald
and Tom Barker will be felt next year, but the return of
Puil, Murphy and fifteen other regulars, along with a
new crop of high school and junior players, make prospects brighter.
• Top: All was not gravy—W. Washington scores in 52-6 rout.
• Bottom: Screaming, jubilant fans fans tore down goal posts from
field after the 'Birds won a game
Left to Right—Front Row: Gregory, MacFarlane, MacDonald, McNichol, MacArthur, Ewing, Nestman, Mathews, Elliot, Herb, Jonston.
Second  row:   Murphy,  Sweeney,   Ezzy,  Stewart,   Hutchinson,   Hunt,   Murphy, Glasgow, Pureed, Blackhall.
Third Row: Hindmarch, Ripley, Powers, Mitchell  (line coach), Anderson (coach).
101 RUGGER
Perennially one of the strongest rugger sides in the
province, Albert Laithwaite's Thunderbirds continued
this year to represent power and skill, sweeping the
McKechnie Cup from all competition.
Starting slowly, the club did not pick up steam until early December when after tying their first game,
they scored two resounding victories to tie for first
place with Victoria Crimson Tide.
Held from the playing fields by the unseasonal
snow fall, the Birds' first post-Christmas game produced
some of the best rugger of the year. Playing in Victoria
against the Crimson Tide, the forwards came up with
superlative aggressiveness and managed to draw 8-8
with the Island team.
After blanking Vancouver Reps 18-0, the lads were
prepped for the return game with the Tide, and playing before a screaming crowd of varsity adherents, they
did everything right, trampling the hapless Victoria
side 17-0.
In World Cup play, Varsity fared badly. Winning
the first game of the series with California on an 80-
yard run by George Puil, they dropped the second encounter 5-3 when California's All American Les
Richter kicked a winning convert. On the way home
the Birds met a mediocre Stanford fifteen on the soggy
Palo Alto pitch and dropped a heartbreaking 3-0 decision.
• Back   row:    Clarke,   Palmer,   Von   Hartan,   Brumwell,   McLaren,
Walmsley,   Ford,   Clyne,   Cocking.
• Centre:       Owen,      Mulholland,      Newton,      Main,      Martinson,
McWilliams,   MacFarlane,   Laithwaite   (Coach).
• Front  row:    MacMillan,  Oliver,   Puil,  Go we.,   Grantham,   Whyte.
•    Up Birds)
102 •   Newton goes down.
The home matches with the potent Bears showed
for the first time a glaring Varsity weakness as the
Americans outkicked the Thunderbird club at all
times. Scoring an 8-3 win in the third contest, the
Bears clinched the total-point series with an 11-6 victory in the finale.
Laithwaite's lads were captained this season by
Gerry Main, one of the team's defensive mainstays.
A potent three line of Clarke, Newton, and Puil
galloped with purpose, while the rugged pack featured such stalwarts as Martinson, Walmsley and Greenwood. Kicking ace was Mulholland, with football convert MacFarlane filling in well. Bill Whyte, of baseball
fame, punted well and turned in some sparkling tackling displays.
•   Crimson Tide three-line starts out fine but to no avail.
•  Take it, pack!
•  Acting  Captain  Martinson  receives the  McKechnie  Cup from  Dr.
McKenzie.
103 e    Lawrence  Barclay,  Tops.
•    Davison and Jaffray, Doubles team..
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•    Track boys pose on the bench,
e    Elimination   Finish.
TENNIS
U.B.C.
6 to 0 Seattle Pacific.
U.B.C.
6 to 0 Pacific Lutheran.
U.B.C.
5 to 1 Seattle U.
U.B.C.
4 to 2 Western Wash.
U.B.C.
4 to 2 Seattle U.
U.B.C.
5 to 1 Western Wash.
U.B.C.
4 to 5 Wash. State.
As the above scores indicate, the U.B.C. tennis team had
a most successful season, downing all but one of their strong
opponents. This loss came from one of the top tennis
schools on the west coast, Washington State.
Lawrence Barclay, ranked number 5 in Canada last year,
was the number one man and was undefeated in conference
play.
The second position was alternately filled by Bruce
Jaffray and Doug Davidson, both of whom competed in
local tourneys, while Nelson Fong ably filled out the last slot.
The team took one trip to Seattle and Tacoma and then
played host to their competition at Stanley Park. The prospects for the forthcoming season look bright with new talent
on hand and all the veterans back in the fold.
TRACK
1951 Season—Due to an injury jinx that laid low Cinits
and Harris just prior to the Evergreen Conference Meet, the
Varsity track squad fared badly. Placing third, the Birds did
not come up to expectations promised in warm-up contests
earlier. In three of the preliminaries, Peter Harris outran all
competition to take the mile in near conference record time
of 4.28 minutes. Sprinter Eddie Cinits ran a 10 flat hundred
to press the circuit champion Casey of St. Martins all the way,
and Irving Knight showed fine form in winning the 220 low-
hurdle sprint.
Bob Piercy, quadruple Big block winner and ace U.B.C.
distance man, wound up his brilliant track career last spring
when he placed second in the two-mile run.
Two newcomers, Jack Brummett and John Birch sparked
the Junior cross-country team while Max Bertram and Garry
Gibson carried the load for the Seniors. Bertram and Gibson
finished one-two respectively in the British Columbia championships.
Hopes for the 1952 season are high with the return of
six letter men including star distance man Jack Lowther.
There are many outstanding freshman prospects; dashman
Jack Maxwell and Bill Ewing, half-milers Fred Roots and
Don Knight, and ace weightchuckers Dan Pekovitch and
Ray Zindler. If the potential of these boys is realized, the
chance of winning the Conference meet is high.
104 •    Back Row:   McLeod, Brennan, Barter, McLeod, Stewart.
Front  Row:  Dick Penn   (coach),  Carter,  Bertram,  Taylor,  Frith,  Dempster.
Jay Wee's Basketball
The UBC Jayvees played to packed houses every
Thursday noon in one of the best seasons that this
team has had in many a year. Coached by Dick Penn,
the JV's finished the season with an eleven won, eleven
lost record, which included wins over the top Senior A
clubs in the city.
They defeated Clover Leafs three times, and split
a two-game series with Arctic Club. In a game with
the Provincial Championship Eiler team, they were defeated by eight points in a very close game.
The Jayvees played against Everett J.C., Mt. Vernon J.C., Western Washington J.C., College of Puget
Sound J.V., Seattle Pacific J.V., and California All-
Stars, losing a tight 45-44 decision to the latter team.
Against these teams, the Jayvee's had varying success,
but came out on the long end of the score in most
cases.
The scoring attack was led by John MacLeod, captain Gavin Dempster, and Bob Bone, but Doug Brin-
ham had by far the best scoring average until he missed
three weeks while he was working.   Phil Barter and
Herb Forward were also standouts.
This year's manager, Bob Kirkland, has done a
wonderful job. He was assisted by Keith Liddle.
The two top games in the Jayvees' schedule were
the California All-Star game and the Thunderbird
game. The California tilt was close all the way.
The Thunderbird game provided its share of thrills
and chills as the Bird's grabbed an overtime 67-65 win.
Again in this game it was John MacLeod and Herb
Forward who combined to lead the J.V.'s scoring attack. The junior varsity club took an early lead, but
after Coach Jack Pomfret had administered the Birds
with a stirring "do or die" pep talk, the senior club
came out fighting to outscore the J.V.'s in the last
quarters.
Team members were: Bob Bone, forward; John
MacLeod, forward; Phil Barter, centre; Gavin Dempster, guard; Herb Forward, guard; Hec Frith, guard;
George Seymour, Centre; Jack Herb, forward; Doug
Brinham, forward; Lou Murphy, guard; Laurie Iton,
forward, and Bob Humphries, centre.
•    Big  Phil
e    Beat  the  Birds
•    Tip off.
•    Gavin •    Southcott
Phillips
Thunderbirds
Seattle U. beat them, Eilers beat them, Alberta
Golden Bears beat them, but Coach Jack Pomfrets' boys
never gave up even when practically ridden to death
by grandstand coaches and sullen students.
The season of 1951-52 will long be remembered by
campus hoopsters as the "hard luck year". The record
showed the club to be a dismal failure, not a single
conference win and only two victories in thirty-four
starts. But who other than the players, recalls the seven
heartbreaking one-point losses, and the sensational calibre of the teams played?
Starting the year with four veterans, the first weed-
ing-out practice saw almost three hundred eager aspirants answer the call of mentor Pomfret for material.
Selecting three teams from this collection of the good
and bad presented a problem of huge proportions, but
within two weeks the chaff had been disposed of and
serious preparations were under way for the forthcoming season.
The pre-Christmas schedule gave the impression that
the Birds had finally returned to the form that swept
the conference in 1948 as they dropped two one-point
contests to the Eilers, touted to be Dominion championship material. But the American opponents after the
holiday soon squashed these hopes.
At home or away, the hapless basketballers couldn't
win a game. They dropped twenty-six straight games
before beating St. Martin's University before an awestruck crowd. But after this the club continued on in its
usual fashion.
The unprecedented success of the Junior Varsity
squad in its games made a Bird versus J.V. game a
necessity to fans on the campus. Throughout the season
the students had been debating whether or not Coach
Pomfret made a mistake in his Varsity selections, but a
noon-hour game convinced the sceptics that the big club
was composed of the best players at the University.
Starting late in the fourth quarter, the Thunderbirds
came up with a rally to clip the younger club 69-67.
With the addition of Bob Bone and Johnny McLeod,
the team started off on the Olympic trail, but Alberta
Golden Bears, led by lanky Ed Lucht polished them off.
The first game of the total-point series saw the prairie
lads take a 13-point lead as Bone and Philips played
strong ball. The second encounter gave the Birds hope
but they faded in the last quarter and the Bears swept
the series with a 62-57 win.
Backbone of the club for the third year was the outstanding bucket play of Art Phillips, who with his
deadly hook shot was always a threat. Don Hudson's
steady play combined smoothly with the superlative
shooting of Jeff Craig. Lean Dan Zaharko and diminutive Brian Upson were outstanding in the guard slots.
The three lads brought up from the Junior Varsity, Bob
Bone, "Gundy" McLeod and Garry Taylor strengthened the team, but they arrived too late to help in the
conference.
106 •    A tight squeeze-out, Eiler's 61, UBC 60.
•    Buzz leaps for jump ball.
BASKETBALL
•    Above: Back row:   Owen (trainer), Pomfert (coach), Hudson, Carter, Phillips, Seymour,
Matthews, Penn (assistant coach).
Front row: Southeall, Hudson D„ Upson, Desalniers, Lorrie, Zaharko.
•   Right: Thunderbirds battle Seattle-Pacific, but ail-American   Johnny O'Brien proves too
much.
107 HOCKEY
•   Haas
This year the Thunderbirds had a young hustling
club with a sprinkling of veterans to steady them.
Haas Young, a two-block winner and ex-Olympic star,
led the squad in scoring, though he was closely followed by rookie Steve Cryschuk. Al Hood and Gunner
Bailey, the other big block winners, figured well in
the league scoring and provided the needed extra punch.
Roger Stanton and Mac Carpenter patrolled the
wings for centerman Jim Todd, a potent rookie threat
from Edmonton.   Another Alberta boy, Richer, pivoted
the line of Hole and Bailey. The blue-line corps was
headed by Chuck Sanderson from Regina, with poke-
check artist Lome Irwin and reliable Jim McMahon
ably backing him up. The goal tending chores were
shared by ex-Calgary Buff, Don Anderson, and Bill
Olsen.
The team was coached this year by UBC graduate
Herman "Wag" Wagner, a protege of the grand old
man of Varsity hockey, Frank Fredrickson. Wagner
did a superior job as evidenced by the win record.
• Back Row:  Hole,  Carpenter, Young,  Bailey,  Hughes,  Devito,  Richer
• Centre: Manager Prentice, Coach Wagner, Peebles, Irwin, Todd, Hoo d, Gryschuk,  Sanderson, Stanton,  McLeod
• Front Row: Olsen, Anderson
108 The Thunderbird hockey team ran up an
impressive record in the ice-battles this season.
Entering the Vancouver Commercial Hockey
League for the first time in history, they finished
second, only two points behind the PNE Indians.
Sweeping their play-off series with the Burnaby
Beavers in straight games, the Birds tired badly
and dropped the championship round two games
to one.
Once again the squad made the trip to
Colorado and Utah. Meeting some of the top
college pucksters in the United States, the Birds
won two, lost two, and tied two in the six game
exhibition series. Taking on the Denver University Pioneers first, the boys dropped the opener
6-4, but tied the second 4-4. Against the highly
rated Colorado College Tigers, a club composed
largely of Canadian prairie boys, the results were
identical even to the scores. Travelling on to
Utah, the boys clobbered the Mormons 8-1 and
6-2.
The Hamber Trophy, unfortunately, was
again presented to the Alberta Golden Bears, as
the easterners built up a big goal lead in the
opening clash of the two-game total four point
series. Only good goal-keeping by bespectacled
Don Anderson kept the score down as the
Thunderbirds failed to solve the secret of the
free wheeling Albertan attack.
The second game was a different story as the
club conquered its stage-fright and began to roll
when Jim Todd punched home the first marker
at the 35 second mark of the first period. UBC
hopes died quickly, however, as the Bears countered with a tally of their own and held the eager
Birds to 4-4 standoff.
Prospects look bright for the re-winning of
the Hamber trophy next year. Many of the
members of this year's club will be returning to
the campus, and the experience from this season
will stand them in good stead.
•    Stanton Scores
•    Young Punches In Another
•    The Big Line, Young,
Bailey,  Hood.
109 Top row: left to right: Ivan Carr (coach), Mike Puhach (goal), Peter Proslosko (manager), Ken Campbell (left wing).
Front row: Bud Fredrickson, Don Renton, Dick Matthews, Doug Andrews, Bill Popowich (captain) Bud Dobson, Stan Glasgow, Bill Walters,
Irving Knight.
• Above: Wet weather didn't stop rugger boys.
• Pete Prasloski, team manager.
SOCCER
Varsity soccer had, generally speaking, a good year.
Although the locals started out poorly, the final two
months of play saw them return to the form which won
them the League's laurels last year.
The Varsity eleven, under Coach Ivan Carr and
Manager Peter Prasloski, opened the year with two
ties. They won game number three 3-2 over Dominions. Injuries suffered in that game left the team
short-handed, and as a result the boys dropped their
next two contests.
But a 7-2 win over South Hill put the UBC men
back into the pennant chase, and under a severe player
shortage they performed brilliantly.
Other wins in the year included those over Sapper-
ton and South Burnaby. Beaten by the Collingwood
team in the Anderson Cup playoffs, they made up
for the defeat by winning two later games with the
same club.
At time of press, the UBC Thunderbird soccermen
were anticipating the game with the Collies for the
championship of the Pacific Coast B Division.
High scorer throughout the season was centre forward Bill Popowich, whose uncanny accuracy in placing the ball won many 'Bird games. Bill was ably
assisted by Bud Dobson, Ken Campbell, Doug Andrews, Don Gleig, Mike Puhach, Bill Walters, Dick
Matthews, and Bud Fredrickson.
One big highlight of the year was the fullback rating Bud Fredrickson received—he is a possible All-Star
selection to play against the touring English team, the
Tottenham Hotspurs.
110 CREW
Part of the success story of UBC's Rowing
Club is its phenomenal expansion. Almost
overnight it grew from a minor position to
one of the major campus athletic clubs,
having one of the best win records of any
UBC sport.
The return of Frank Read, one of the
most highly regarded coaches on the West
Coast, drew a huge crowd of prospects in
the fall and thanks to rigid training and
superlative coaching the crew managed to
upset the strong Oregon State Shell at
Corvallis.
•    Mid-winter training was pleasant
This spring, with the assistance of the
M.A.D., the club was able to purchase a new
boat, thus assuring visiting crews of an excellent shell in which to compete.
In May there will be races against such
perennial American champions as University of Washington and University of Southern California to prep the Thunderbird
scullers for the Olympic Trials to be held in
St. Catherines this summer.
The stout-hearted work of such shellmen
as Stroke Dick Kania and Cox Gerry
Rendell have contributed much to the success
of season, while Jim Patterson as Senior
Manager smoothed financial difficulties for
the team.
•    Tight lipped coxie
e    Coach  Frank Read
•    A fast clip in the new shell brings out bugs in the boat's synchronization.
T^3m\^A SWIMMING
e    Co-captains,  Potter and Smyth.
Thunderbird splashers, coached by Doug Whittle,
again swept the Evergreen Conference and for the first
time competed as a guest in dual meets with Pacific
Coast Conference squads.
Though lacking the depth of previous years, the
team was potent enough to chalk up new records in
three-quarters of the events swum. The finmen tallied
seven wins in ten starts and copped the Conference
title for the third straight year. In the Canadian Inter-
Collegiate finals, the Birds took third place behind
McGill and Toronto.
The top point getter on the club was Palle Cardell,
the back-stroke ace from Goteborg, Sweden; while co-
captain Gord Potter, a prairie boy, proved the most
versatile as Canadian Individual Medley champ and the
team's top sprinter.
The diving was capably handled by two local boys,
Al Borthwick and Dick Clayton, while two loquacious
Swedes, Torsten Bengston and Pete Lusztig proved to
be consistent point-getters in the breast stroke events.
Torsten pulled the upset of the year when he beat
Washington ail-American Dick Magnuson in record
time.
Team captain Don Smyth alternated between back
stroke and the sprints, doing well in both. Olaf Olsen
of Sweden and Max Bertram both shone in the distances.
Olsen proved to be the top endurance swimmer here
since Jack Creedon and set four new records on the
books. Bertram, switching late in the season from track,
proved an inspiration to his mates.
The Junior Varsity, coached by Felix Walker, consisted of freshmen swimmers and of these Ted Roberts
proved the stand-out. He often travelled with the Varsity to round out the squad. The swimming team won
more events than any other Thunderbird group.
e    Springer (manager), Potter, Cardell, Bengston, Clayton, Smyth, Roberts, Olsen.
e    Front row: Borthwick, Lutzsig, Doug Whittle (coach), Sky, Walker (assistant coach).
112 <
•    Borthwick plunges.
•    Sprint, sprint!!!
•    Ready .
•    With pardonable pride.
113 •    Eleanor Cave
•    Nyholm leaps to sink one.
•    Where's   the   opposition?
THUNDERETTES
Exiled from the Vancouver Senior City League—
such was the fate of the University Thunderettes as
they practiced hard for the circuit opener. Due to an
overdose of red tape, their application was handed in
a day late and so the girls were forced to play nothing
but exhibition games during the season.
With no crown to cop or pennant to win, the
spirit of the team was vacillating. Lack of reserves did
not help the club but they managed to come up with
creditable record despite these handicaps.
Starring for the MacArthur-coached quintet were
Ellie Cave, Adele Aseltine and Sheila More. Against the
All-Star coloured team, the Thunderettes played one
of their best games of the year though they were defeated 54-25. This game did much to stimulate interest
in the girl hoopsters as the Roamers were a female
edition of the famous Globetrotters.
Del Hartman had the difficult chore of managing
both the senior and junior teams, while Elanor Nyholm
did an efficient job of coaching the Inter B's. Thus,
the UBC team, also suffered from stiff competition
and as many of its members were new to the game,
the club did not reach the finals.
• Top   left:   Joan  MacArthur,   coach;   Ellie   Nyholm,   Sheila  Moore,
Adele Aseltine, Del Hartman, manager.
• Middle: Bess Sainas, Bev Cook.
• Front: Pat Donavon,  Marion Bennett,  Marilyn  Russell.
• Bottom   left:   Shirley   Pollard,   Pat   France,   Ellie   Nyholm,   Anne
Willoughby,  Mildred  Storbach.
• Front: Gail McGarrigle, Sally Tannebaum, Bobbie Franks.
114 • Above:    Back row:    Bim Schrodt, Marie  Harrison,  Maureen  Bray.
• Middle   row:    June  Taylor,  Eleanor  Cave,   Phyllis   Leiterman.
• Front    row:     Dawn    Thompson,    Margaret    Robertson,    Doreen
Armour, Sheila Moore.
• Left:    Back   row:   Shirley   Pilce,   Jan   Crafter,   Maureen   Sankey,
Ann   Inglis.
• Front    row:     June    Ninette,    Janie   Wright,    Ann   Winter,    Nan
Lawerence.
Girls Grass Hockey
The University Women's Grass Hockey Teams
finished a successful season in the City League with
Varsity taking first place, and UBC winning a playoff position. An unfortunate accident prevented Dree
Stewart, Varsity's centre forward, from completing the
season, but Doreen Armour competently filled the
vacated position. Nine members of this team won
Big Blocks due to their excellent sportsmanship and
fine play.
Highlight of the year for the Varsity team was a
trip to Washington State College early in November,
where the girls took part in the Pacific Northwest
Hockey Conference sponsored by Washington State.
Eighteen teams from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho
took part in the conference, and all 248 girls were
housed in one large dormitory. Varsity, however,
came home unscored upon after playing Washington
State College, University of Oregon, and Oregon State
College.
The UBC team consisted mainly of newcomers,
but a few experienced oldsters sparked the team which
fought its way to fourth place in the league.
There was a good turnout for practises which were
held on Tuesdays and. Fridays, and both teams were
ably coached by Mrs. M. Brown of the P.E. Department.
Games were played every Saturday at Connaught
Park with the exception of the three games played
on the campus.
At the end of the season the Hockey Banquet was
held in the Brock and members from each team came
to this function. The Spalding Trophy was presented
to the top team in the league, Varsity, and the trophy-
donated for the best sportsmanship and all-round
playing was presented to UBC's own goalie, Lila
Scott.
Much of both teams' success is due to the untiring
efforts and able management of Doreen Armour,
hockey manager.
UBC team members were Janie Wright, Mary
Dowsley, Barbara Bethune, June Minette, Nan Lawerence, Janet Crafter, Ann Inglis, Anne Winter, Bosso
Shinder, Maureen Sankey, Shirley Pike, and Lila Scott.
Varsity team was made up of Dree Stewart, Doreen
Armour, Shelia Moore, Margaret Robertson, Dawn
Thompson, Liz Abercrombie, Phyllis Leiterman,
Eleanor Cave, June Taylor, Maureen Bray, Barbara
Schrodt, and Marie Harrison.
115 •    VOC'ers  take   time  out  during  a   tough   climb;   lunches   rapidly
diminish half way up the mountain.
•    Climbers saw spectacular sights such as this on their memorable
hikes.
V. o. c
When thousands of rubber-necking visitors passed
the Library on Open House Day they were astounded
to see several young men in Arctic garb hanging by
slender ropes from the roof of the building, casually
ascending the rough stone wall in their stocking feet.
The more extroverted members of the Varsity Outdoor
Club were presenting one of the feature attractions
of UBC's "greatest show of the year".
Rapelling off the Library Wall was mild excitement
compared to the every-day climbing trips of UBC's
inveterate cragsmen. During the summer, voc'ers
climbed Mt. Baker, Shuksan, the Lions, the peaks at
Twin Lakes and Diamond Head in Garibaldi. During
the Garibaldi trip, the chartered plane in which several
club members were riding crashed in one of the
meadows above the Diamond Head Lodge, shaking up
all those aboard, but injuring no one.
One of the major projects of the giant club for
the past five years has been the construction of a
skiing lodge on Mt. Seymour. Last Christmas, the
members celebrated the first birthday of the finished
lodge, and added a permanent sign on the front door
to the effect that this was the largest, and most completely equipped cabin on any of Vancouver's three
mountains.
Harry Stathers headed the club executive this year,
with Peter Girling as secretary-treasurer and Jack
Stathers, Chief Marshal.
• Centre:    A   string   of   mountainers   work   toward   their   snowy
goal.
• Opposite:     Photographers    had    a    heyday    with    magnificent
scenery like this on which to train their lenses.
• Above:   VOC members  relax  in their completed  $10,000 cabin
up Mount Seymour.
116 Thunderbird Ski Team
The UBC Thunderbird Ski Team proved itself an
ever powerful contender for top honours in the Pacific
Northwest again this year.
The team strength was seriously affected by several
injuries sustained during training in Banff. Gar Robinson, coach and number one man of the team, suffered
a dislocated shoulder on the third day of training, and
he was unable to ski for the remaining ten days. He
recuperated in time for the inter-collegiate meet at
Rossland, where he won both the slalom and downhill
events.
Frank Willis, steady and dependable, raced very
well in Banff and led the team in the cross-country
event at Rossland. Ron McRae and Bill Sellens turned
in consistantly good performances. Ted Hunt, UBC's
jumper-extraordinary, did very well at Rossland despite
a sprained ankle. Don Shore and Jack Gawthorne, who
also skied at the Rossland meet, were handicapped by
injuries sustained in training at Banff.
The International Collegiate Meet held in Banff,
February 2 and 3, was acclaimed one of the best ever by
the nine participating teams. Gar Robinson, in standout form, won the giant slalom and came fifth in the
downhill, copping top honours for Canadians in the
Meet. Frank Willis turned in an excellent performance, coming fourth in the downhill and sixth in the
slalom.
Ron McRae had an unfortunate spill in the very
rough slalom course but he did well in the downhill.
Narry Lovitt had bad luck in both these events but
his racing at Banff at Christmas proved the high
calibre of his skiing. Ted Hunt came eighth in the
jumping in his usual good form. Dick Anderson came
eleventh in the spectacular event, and Don Shore also
did well.
UBC finished fourth out of nine in the final team
standings, an unquestionably good performance. Washington State College and the University of Washington
finished first and second, and a newcomer, Wenatchee
Junior College, came third.
CHRISTMAS SKI TRIP
The UBC Ski Team sponsored its annual ski trip
to Banff this Christmas. The trip was arranged under
the direction of Coach Gar Robinson, Manager George
O'Brien, and Frank Willis.
Over forty enthusiasts participated in the trip, which
is open to all UBC students interested in skiing. The
group enjoyed excellent accommodation at the Banff
School of Fine Arts. Weather and skiing conditions
combined to make it a perfect holiday.
The team sponsors this two week trip annually as a
service to UBC undergrads.
•    UBC   Ski   team   members  at
Banff.
Left to right: George O'Brien,
Narry Lovitt, Ron McRae, Frank
Willis, Ted Hunt, Dick Anderson,
and Don Shore.
Front  and   centre:   Gar   Robinson,
coach.
117 •    The suspense is terrific.
Gym Club
"High bar", "double leg cut-offs", "giants", and
"upstarts"—these terms are an integral part of the conversation of the small but muscular group of physical
culture enthusiasts who call themselves the Gym Club.
Headed by Sev Heiberg, the Club went all out in
support of the Phys Ed Undergraduate Society's production of "The Sultan's Daughter". This show,
produced late in February, starred the adagio dancing
of Sev and Joy Judge, the disappearing rope act of
Morris Slutsky, the trampoline work of Al Borthwich
and Don Spenee, and the high-bar performance of
Johnny Hodgins and Bill Wilson.
Hampered by the lack of facilities in the incomplete
apparatus room of the new gym, the club was forced
to practise only sporadically until the end of January.
With a triangular meet against Washington and the
Vancouver Pro-Rec in the offing, the Club members
practised faithfully for weeks. Under the capable direction of Doug Whittle of the P.E. Department Staff,
the members' progress was excellent. The loss of
Morris Slutsky, who dislocated his elbow just prior to
the meet, was a severe blow, but the team put up a
creditable showing.
Borthwich, Hodgins, Gates, Hannah, and Wilson all
garnered points but the more intense practise and the
consequent superior skill of the American entrants
proved to be too much for the University Club.
This year was poor, as far as the results of competition go, but it is to be hoped that a sound groundwork has been laid for the establishment of intercollegiate gymnastics as a sport with spectator appeal.
•    Round  and  round.
•   Finale
The Sultan's
Daughter. •    Pix above show some of the women's intramural sports and their   stars,  who  enjoyed the  year's  full  programme.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
The Women's Intramural Programme this year has
been full and varied. The sports year began with tennis
doubles which were won by Liz Prentiss and Phyllis
McLorg. Ping pong, the only other individual event,
was won by Louise Fletcher. During the year the
teams participated in hockey, volleyball, basketball,
skiing, swimming, archery, bowling and badminton.
Director Jean Leiper, a teacher training student, and
her assistant, Janet Crafter, did a remarkable job of
organizing the women's sports and the Intramural
Athletic Board.
Over twenty clubs and faculties entered teams for
participation, but, surprisingly, the difference between
the two top teams was only fifteen points. A group of
first year Arts students who formed "Arts I Grey"
defeated second year P.E.
—P.E. II  triumphed over  the  residence girls in  the
basketball finals, with Arts I Grey taking third place.
—Pharmacy scored an upset by winning the bowling.
The team was sparked by high scorer Doreen Armour.
—The hockey trophy was divided between Arts I and
P.E. II.
—P.E. II won the swimming competition at the Crystal
Pool with Arts I Grey coming a close second.
—V.O.C. won the skiing meet up Mount Seymour.
—P.E. II won the archery by a good margin over all
other teams.
—Arts   I   Grey   won   a  closely   contested   battle   over
Pharmacy in the Badminton.
—Arts I Grey triumphed over P.E. II in the most highly
contested sport, volleyball.
119 ■
GOLF
The big event for the golf team in 1951 was the trip
south to the States. Competition was against six of
the top West Coast universities: Washington, Portland,
Oregon, Oregon State, California and Stanford. UBC
men spread goodwill along with some tough competition, winning one match, tying one, and losing
the others. The UBC team was picked from four
qualifying medal rounds.
The annual UBC match play tournament was played
over the University course in the fall. Medalists were
Gordon Christopher and Charlie Swanson, each with
74.
During the spring the club offered lessons in the
Field House. They were given by club members plus
starry guests. Bill Mawhinney was one who assisted
at these popular sessions.
PIPE BAND
Under the able instruction of Mr. Ken McLeod,
the UBC Pipe Band again stirred the Celtic blood of
athletic crowds with marches, strathpeys and reels, and
provided Highland atmosphere at Homecoming and
various Pep Meets.
The group, under the sponsorship of the M.A.D.,
consisted of eight pipers, two side drummers, a tenor
drum and a bass. The tartans, sporrans and tunics,
which lent so much color, were purchased from club
funds and were worn with careless abandon on state
occasions.
Ian Wallace, Pipe Major, and Pat Taylor, the University's, Rhodes Scholar, arranged for the invasion of
Tacoma by the band. The band was active in all
campus functions.
Scottish  Dance Club
UBC cannot compete with American colleges in
the field of baton-juggling majorettes and contorting
cheerleaders. It has, however, one attraction for football game intervals which is unmatched south of the
border.
When UBC's Scottish pipe band takes the field, the
lively skirl of the pipes and the measured beat of dancing feet erases momentarily the bitter thought of defeat
on the field.
These lads and lassies put in quite a few hours to
bring their rousing Scottish airs, highland flings and
sword dance to the pitch of perfection.
Thanks to the enthusiasm of the members of the
Scottish Country Dance Club under the leadership of
Pat Taylor, UBC's newest Rhodes Scholar, this university was able to show its visitors a sparkling kind of
entertainment unique in the North American collegiate
world.
120 GRASS HOCKEY
Taking the East Indian side by a 4-2 score, the
Varsity senior grass hockey team returned the O. B.
Allan Cup to the Point Grey campus for the first time
in seven years.
The UBC team ended at the bottom of the B.C.
Mainland league, but it showed spirit if not ability
throughout the year.
The success of the Varsity squad was due to its
teamwork, but outstanding goal-keeping by Harry
Preston, the top man on the Coast, and skillful stick-
work by Jawandar Singh on the forward line, helped
greatly.
Games against the faculty squad created interest
when the weather was poor. The club was coached
by Hugh Buckley and managed by Paul Jones.
FENCING
The UBC Fencing Club, small though it be, has
an ardent collection of foil artists in its midst. Chuck
Lowen, representing the university, won the Novice
Men's B.C. Championship, while club coach, Sam
Allman, entered the semi-finals.
The club met twice weekly in a gym hut. Here
Sam Allman and club president Harry Stastney instructed novices on the art of the parry and thrust.
Fencing, contrary to popular opinion, is one of the
most gruelling of sports. It requires the co-ordination
and aggressiveness of a boxer, plus speed and stamina
—these plus essential grace and rhythm seem a pretty
large order. But UBC's fencers, men like Walt Sussel,
Jerome Angel and Lyle Bagent, have proved that they
can deliver the goods.
KICKAPOOS
"Come to the Pep-Meet" was the familiar cry as the
hard working Kickapoos stirred tired students with
downtown and home grown talent.
To bolster football enthusiasm, the "Poos" arranged
three pep rallies, the Tacoma invasion, and to top it
off, the Home-Coming parade. The snake dance
through staid Vancouver's business district will be
long remembered by Chief Mulligan.
Sport movies at noon gave a few clues to philosophy
majors on campus athletics, but the club's big push
was the Blood Drive in the spring.
Eleanor of the CBC, along with female impersonators, and the Squamish band, put over one of the best
pep meets of the year and helped to beat Texas in
the "bloody" struggle.
Mainsprings of the hustling group were Bill St.
John, Ann Willis and Ken O'Shea.
121 • Men's Intramural programme, directed
by Dick Penn (right), was strenuous but
fully enjoyed even by the once-a-year
athletes who took part in it. Biggest
crowd-pleasers on the schedule were the
boxing and wrestling events and the intramural track meet, but participants caught by
Totem photog seemed to like other sports
too. INTRAMURALS
More  Participation  Than  Ever
Sweeping the boxing and wrestling, and entering
teams in almost every event offered, Physical Education
undergraduates took the Intra-mural Championship
with a total of 378 points even before the soccer results
were announced. They were closely followed by the
Betas and Kappa Sigs, but by eliminating the Betas
from the softball competition in a close game, they assured themselves of top spot.
Unofficial results show the standings to be: Kappa
Sigma and Betas tied for second; with Alpha Delts,
D.U., ex-Magees and Fijis behind. These organizations
are the top six out of a field of forty-three.
VOLLEYBALL—The Kappa Sigs, again displaying
the form that made them last year's champions, took
the Betas in a close final. Top points also went D.U.,
ATO, P.E. and Mechanical Engineering, who made it
to the round robin final.
CROSS-COUNTRY—Outdistancing a field of just
under two hundred, Jack Brumett, a galloping pre-med
student, set a new intra-mural record for negotiating the
2.6 mile course. With the points given for the winner,
Pre-Med took top honors in the event. P.E., V.O.C,
and North Burnaby, were also high scorers.
SOCCER—Still undecided as the book goes to press,
the final will be between the Betas and the defending
champion Kappa Sigs. The Betas were matched against
the Newman Club in the semis, while the Star and
Crescent lads downed Phi Delta Theta in a close contest. The outcome of this match will definitely decide
which fraternity is the top athletic group on the campus.
BOXING AND WRESTLING—It was in these two
competitions that P.E. picked up 105 valuable points.
With Bill Kusner winning the heavyweight boxing
championship and Dave Shunter emerging as king of
the light-heavies, the muscle-men assured themselves of
top ranking in the mitt sport. Charlie DeHeck and
Bill Popowich, also of P.E., grappled their way to top
honors in the wrestling events, the 150-pound DeHeck
winning the heavyweight crown. Del Black, winner of
the middle division, was judged the best boxer in the
first tourney and he was awarded the Varsity Boy
Trophy. DeHeck, who is in serious training for the
Olympic Games, was named the best of the wrestlers.
TABLE-TENNIS—The Lawyers came out of their
library for the event and took top honors, while Fort
Camp placed second, followed by the Betas and ATO.
BASKETBALL — This was most popular of the
intramural games. Director Dick Penn was swamped
with a record 56 entries when the call went out for
teams wishing to compete, and he was hard pressed to
find facilities for all the teams. The Alpha Delts, led by
hustling Tom Barker, emerged triumphant with a clear
cut victory over Beta Theta Pi. Runners-up included
Newman Club, Phi Delts, Agriculture, Kappa Sigs and
Engineering 1.
SOFTBALL—A powerful Medicine team, with one
of the best pitchers ever seen on the campus, defeated
PE 4, 3-2 in a close struggle to win the intramural
championship. It was not until the final game that the
Meds had a run scored on them, as they soared through
the schedule undefeated. They polished off PE 2 in the
semi.
SWIMMING — Swim meet eliminations brought
forth almost one hundred and fifty erstwhile fin-men
for the popular activity. The Kappa Sigs, headed by
Denny Dallas and Mike Smith, had the situation well
in control as they topped PE and the Zebes to grab top
place. The finals, held at night in Crystal Pool, were
not well attended, but they produced some of the most
exciting races in years.
TRACK AND FIELD—Beta Theta Pi won the
intra-mural track competition on its entry points, while
PE took most of the events. The most interesting event
was the 100-yard final which saw Frank Vaselanek finish in an almost dead heat with John Newton and
Bob Blackhall.
SKIING—A sunny day on Grouse Mountain drew a
small but enthusiastic crowd of timbermen for the
annual intramural downhill race. The Alpha Delt team
placed first, Aggies second and the Newman Club
third.
GOLF—Was won by a sharp-shooting ex-Maggie
team, while Alpha Delts and Fijis tied for second with
Betas third.
BADMINTON — This event also drew a record
number of entries and was run off on consecutive Wednesday nights. Betas took top honors, placing a team in
each of the final events. They were closely trailed by the
Redshirts.
123 BIG BLOCK CLUBS
Women's Club
The Women's Big Block, unlike the Men's Society,
is not a service organization. It is set up more in the
form of an honorary club whose function is purely
social.
This does not mean, however, that the girls do
nothing with their lunch hours but munch sandwiches.
They arranged for a well attended exhibition in which
the Canadian Badminton Champions, Darryl Thompson and Dave McTaggart, displayed drop shots and
smashes for the edification of Varsity shuttle fans; they
sold raffle tickets to help make the boys' ball a success.
They peddled hats, in UBC colors, to aid football spectators, and they sat as the awards council for women's
athletics.
The club was very proud to present to Joan Mac-
Arthur an honorary Big Block in recognition of her
excellent work in coaching Thunderette basketball
teams.
This year's executive consisted of Maureen Bray, president; Eillie Nyholm, veep; Doreen Armour, secretary,
and Jan Crafter, treasurer.
Men's Club
This organization, composed of those campus athletes who have won their Big Blocks in Varsity sports,
was one of the most active clubs this term.
Starting in September, the boys sponsored a "Frosh
Smoker" that was a howling success. The entertainment, consisting of Dick Penn's jokes, tumblers, a female singer and an exponent of the gentile art of exotic
dancing, sent the frosh away with some interesting
views on Varsity life.
Although its members sold tickets and acted as ushers
at all athletic events throughout the year, the Club did
not bestir again till after the Christmas vacation when
it sponsored the "Big Block Ball" at the Commodore.
With the approach of exams, the lads calmed down
a bit and concentrated on the selection of those outstanding athletes who should be awarded a sweater and Big
Block in recognition of their ability and achievement
on UBC teams. With these awards out of the way,
President Dave MacFarlane, Bill Popowich and Art
Phillips could settle down to work feeling quite proud
of the work done by the club this year.
• Back   row:   Eleanor   Cave,   Dawn   Thompson,   Pat   Donovan.
• Centre  row:  Maureen  Bray,   Eleanor Nyholm,  Adele Aseltine,   Margaret Cross, Janet Crafter.
• Front row: Dree Stewart, Tad Harper, Liz Abercrombie,  Phyllis Leitermann, Barbara Schrodt.
124 *
Mens Big Block
MAX BERTRAM
AL BYMAN
KEN CAMPBELL
STAN CLARKE
BUD DOBSON
BUD FREDRICKSON
DON GLEIG
DON HUDSON
JACK LOWTHER
PETE LUTSZIG
H. MacARTHER
D. MacFARLANE
DOUG MacMILLAN
GERRY MAIN
R. MARTINSON
JOHN NEWTON
BILL POPOWICH
JOHN PLOYHART
MIKE PUACH
GEORGE PUIL
DON RENTON
BILL SPARLING
DON SMYTH
BRIAN UPSON
_UaI
125 GRADUATE EDITOR:  ELVA PLANT 127 HONORARY
ACTIVITY
AWARDS
-•
Bill Anstis, honors student in politicol science,
co-ordinated displays for the Open House
Committee this year. His work saved the
committee many headaches, and earned him
the plaudits of the campus. He is a member
of Sigma Tau Chi.
Barry Baldwin, now in second year Commerce,
has been one of the most enthusiastic members of the Mamooks Club for the last two
years, holding positions of president and treasurer respectively.
Brigitta Bollo, third year Arts student, was
on the executive of the International Students
Service Club, and worked as publicity director
for  International  House Committee.
Stan Clarke, graduating this year in Arts, has
served for four years on the MAD executive.
A rugger and football player, Stan ployed on
both Thunderbird teams. He is also a member
of Sigma Tau Chi.
Ivan Peltham, first year Law student, chaired
the Open House Committee this year. His
excellent administration was fully proved by
the success of Open House Day.
Joan Fraser, graduating this year in Arts,
edited the Totem. She was Woman's Editor
for the Ubyssey last year, and is a member of
Delta  Sigma  Pi.
Allan Goldsmith, first year Law student, was
an executive member of Radsoc when he was
in first and second years. Past president of
IFC, Allan was elected to Sigma Tau Chi.
He was executive editor of the Ubyssey this
year.
Allan King, graduating from Arts this year,
was chairman of the LSE Special Events Committee. He arranged the most ambitious programme LSE has had to date, bringing most
interesting and unusual talent to the campus.
Dove MacFarlane, fourth year Commerce student, was one of the most outstanding athletes at UBC. Dave, a member of Sigma Tau
Chi, won almost oil athletic awards possible
on the campus.
Del Sharpe, graduating this year, has been
chairman of four blood drives on this campus.
His outstanding work on this year's B.'ood
Drive won him an Honorary Award.
Norm Young, honors English student, has
worked with the Players Club since he has
been on the campus, and has served as president of that organization.
128 •    Grad  Class Executive Danny Stankovich,  Bob Chattey, Stuart Mooney, and Newt Cornish take time out to pose for Totem photographer.
GRAD CLASS EXECUTIVE
Early in February, Engineers swamped the annual
meeting of the graduates and chose Civilman Stuart
Mooney to head this year's Graduation Class Executive.
With the election of Danny Stankovich as Social Convener and Newt Cornish as Secretary, the Engineers
completed their coup d'etat. For the Treasurer's position, however, the Commercemen beat the lobbying redshirts, and Bob Chattey rounded out the topheavy group.
Professor G. C. Andrew was asked to be Honorary
President of the Class, and Miss R. Morrison was Honorary Vice-president.
The Class Executive planned all the activities for the
group. The traditional Baccalaureate Service introduced
UBC's new graduates to the formal Graduation Exer
cises.
On Monday, May 12, grads thronged over to Bowen
Island on the annual moonlight cruise.
Class Day Exercises were held Wednesday, May 14.
The class gift of a scholarship and loan fund was presented to President MacKenzie, who accepted it on
behalf of the University.
George Meehan presented the Valedictory Address,
John Yeoman the Class Poem, Les Armour the Class
History, Joan Fraser the Class Prophecy, and Howard
Cook the Class Will.
•    Les. Armour, Class Historian; Howard Cook, Class Willmaker; Joan   Fraser, Prophet. George Meehan, Valedictorian; John Yoemann, Class
Poet; spoke a I Graduation Day Exercises.
129 AGRICULTURE
BLACKHALL, ROBERT
HERRING, STEPHEN
SNIDER, DOUGLAS
STEWART, J. E.
AGRONOMY
ATAMANENKO, GEORGE
BONIN, STEPHEN
BUSHEM, TESFA
HANNA,  MICHAEL
HANSEN, H. L.
ROUTLEY, D. G.
WHIPPLE, DAVID
ANIMAL  HUSBANDRY
BOSE, H. D.
BAWTREE, A. H.
BOWDEN, DAVID
DOORNENBAL, H.
EWERT, P. E.
HOPKINS, T. R.
MADRAMOTO, HARRY
MARTIN, FRANK
NEWALL, J. G.
PAYNE, ERNEST
PHILLIPS, J. C.
RYDER, J. C.
WONDAFRASH, A.
BIOLOGY
ADAMKIEWICZ, LESLIE
DAIRYING
ELLICE, JOAN B.
NIBLOCK, M. L.
SMITH, R. A.
ECONOMICS
ALSTON, G. B.
ESHETE, HABTU
MANZIES, E. C.
PERREN,   JOHN
SOON, DAVID
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
EVERIDGE, C. P.
LINDSAY, J. A.
HORTICULTURE
BURRIDGE, ANNE
CURBISHLY, N. G.
FILLIPOFF, P. F.
HARRIS, J. H.
HUTTON, F. R.
McGIBBON, MAXWELL
SALTING, C. P.
SWANTON, RICHARD
TAYLOR, O. M.
UNRAU, A. M.
WOODS, R. D.
MECHANICS
LONGSTAFF, CHARLES
PARKE, GORDON
SANDEMAN, ERIC
WESTOVER, GORDON
WILLIS, W. H.
130 _■■
>■
PLANT   BREEDING
ATKINSON, T. G.
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
BRYANT, L. P.
SMITH, R. F.
VERCHERE, F. E.
SOILS
ARCHIBALD, W. G.
PAYNE, HUGH
TALBOT, ROBERT
APPLIED SCIENCE
AGRICULTURE
BIRD, D. R.
DREIDGER, RICHARD
McKINLEY, HECTOR
ARCHITECTURE
BEST, JANE
COTTON, PETER
DENNIS, DONALD
ENG, GILBERT
GREENSWOOD, LEWIS
KERR, ROBERT
KING, ARNOLD
LUND, LEO
McTAGGART-COWAN, PAMELA
SAI-CHEW, DICK
SCOTT, FINLAY
SCOTT, PHILLIP
SIHOE, K. L.
TERRIC, KEN
WILSON, J. S.
CIVIL
ARENS, A.
BIANCO, E.
BRANDER, JAMES
BRAAMS, J. H.
BUTLER, ARTHUR
BUTTE, STEVE
CARSWELL, ROBERT
CHIN, WILLIAM
COBLENZ,  J.
COWLIN, JOHN
FINSAND, OMAR
FOXHALL, RON
FRANSEN, LEONARD
FRIEDEL, FRED
GREEN, ALTON
GUMMER, GEORGE
HAUSER, F. J.
HERMEN, JAMES
HERMANN, RICHARD
HOGARTH, GORDON
HOLBROOK, DOUGLAS
JAMIESON, R. K.
JONES, ARCHIE
JONAT, WARNER
KELSALL, H.
KESSLER, CLARENCE
LAMBERT, DOUGLAS
LUCAS, KENNETH
131 McCALLUM, BRUCE
McDONALD, ROY
McGregor, charles
MacKAY, DOUGLAS
MILLIGAN, A.
MORRIS, F.
MOSHER, WILLIAM
MYERS, RONALD
OLSEN, ERNIE
OXLAND, T.
PATTERSON, FRANK
PAUL, ROBERT
PELLS, FRANK
PEGUSCH, WILFRED
POMEROY, JAMES
PURDON, ARTHUR
POWLEY, GLEN
POWLAND, FRANK
ROBINSON, WILLIAM
SINEGIORGIS, M.
STEWART, GORDON
THOMAS, H.
THOMPSON, ALEXANDER
THOMPSON, HARVEY
THORNE, E.
WATKINS, W.
WILLIAMS,  C.
WOOD, JOHN
YOUNGER, J.
CIVIL (Cont'd)
CHEMICAL
*
BEDDOME, E. J.
CLEGG, DAVID
COULTER, WILLIAM
FIDDES, M.
GRANT, JOHN
HAMBURG
LARAMY, BARRY
McMARRE, RONALD
McKINNON, WILLIAM
MATTUCK, MORRIS
MILLER, PETER
PUGI, K.
SOUTHERLAND, CHARLES
VINCENT, ROBERT
WELCH, JOHN
WILTSHIRE, E.
YIP, J. W.
ELECTRICAL
ADAIR, ROBERT
ALEXANDER, LLOYD
ASHLEY, EDMOND
BATISTELLA, FRANK
BELLIVEAU, PATRICK
BENNETT, W.
BUTCHER, JACK
BURTON, W.
CARRICK, STANLEY
CARUTH, A.
CLAYTON, GEORGE
CRICKMAY,  COLIN
132 DECOCQ, LOUIS
DOUGLAS, JACK
EDDY, RONALD
EYLFSON, O.
FORRESTER, JAMES
GALE, W.
harding, n.
harrison, w.
hill, james
kebe, frank
knutsen, john
lambe, thomas
McAllister, donald
MacDONALD, WILLIAM
McDONALD, GRANT
McLENNAN, D.
MORGAN, JOHN
OVERTON, ANTHONY
PERDUE, JOSEPH
RUBENOK, ROY
RYLL, E.
SCOTT, KENNETH
SHAFLIK, R.
SNEDDON, WILLIAM
STOREY, JOHN
STANKOVICH, DONALD
TAYLOR, LAWRENCE
THOMPSON, ROSS
WILKINSON, STANLEY
WILLIAMSON, DENNIS
WINQUIST, DAVID
PHYSICS
BIBACE, B.
GRIFFIN, D.
HEFFRING, H.
SHIER, RICHARD
SMITH, DAVID
FORESTRY
BENNETT, ROBERT
COLLINS,   JAMES
CRAWFORD, STEWART
CROPPER, ROBERT
FAIRHURST, GEORGE
FOX, SELWIN
HIGGINSON, SAMUEL
JONES, GORDON
O'BRIEN, ROBERT
SMAIL,  ANDREW
THRILWALL, HAROLD
WALDIE, W.
WATTERS, R.
WEBSTER, ALEX
GEOLOGY
ATAMANCHUK, WILFRED
BEATON, R. H.
BROWN, D. H.
BROWN, R. B. M.
BULLIS, A. R.
HODGKINSON, N. S.
PHILLIPS, FRED
133 mk,htLm*m*AA<
■
GRANATH, J. A.
GRAHAM, JOHN
HALVORSEN, CLIFFORD
HARDY, W. J.
HARRISON, N.  A.
HERWYMEN, JACK
JORGENSEN, R. B.
LaCHANCE, JOHN
LAIRD, K. R.
LIGHTFOOT, H. D.
LOEN, E. J.
MAINER, G. T.
MARTINUSEN, N. J.
MILGRAM, ERNEST
MOORES, KEITH
MOONEY, S. D.
McCASKELL, NORMAN
McGOWAN, W. M.
PALMER, J. B.
RANTALA, VELI
SAWERS, N. M.
SMITH, D. H. P.
SUME, R. R.
TERRIC, JAMES
UMIKER,  J.  E.
VICKER, C. S.
WILSON, K. H.
WHITE, R. R.
WOOD, S. D.
ZELLINSKY, R. V.
SCOTT, A. M.
SMITH, W. R.
SOUTHERN, J. G.
SOLES, J. A.
TRENAMAN,  ROLAND
WILSON, E. M.
WITHERSPOON, A.
METALLURGY
FISHER, J. L.
FRIESEN, NICK
MAGNOLA, GUISEPPE
RUSSELL, DALTON
SHIROKOFF, GEORGE
SCOTT,  J.   S.
WEGLO, J. K.
MECHANICAL
BENGSTON, STANLEY
BERTOK, F. J.
BROSTER, D. E.
BURNIP, A. E.
CAR, I. J.
CONNOR, JOHN
COULTHARD, F. W.
CRANK, A. D.
DICKINSON, L.
DON, J. A.
DOWLING, G. F.
DUNCAN, D. K.
EWEN, W. A. B.
GARDNER, R. J. D.
134 .
MINING
APPS, G. E.
ANTONIOLLI, ROBERT
CHLOPAN, JOSEPH
CLARKE, W. G.
CORNISH, N. G.
HORSLEY, T. L.
MacCULLOCK, JIM
TRIGGS, W. A.
NURSING
ANGUS, ISABEL
ATKINSON, MARY
BIRTCH, MABEL
BANDING,  HEDWIG
BOLTON, MAXINE
BOURTON, PHYLLIS
BRAUND, ELIZABETH
BROOKS, DOREEN
CHOW, GRACE
CLIFFORD, DORIS
COLEMAN, MAVIS
CONN, MAE I.
CUSSON, MARGUERITE
DAMGAARD, AUDREY
DAVIES, MARIAN M.
FLETT, VERA
FULMORE, HAZEL
GOODALE, BETTY-JEAN
GOULD, CLARA E.
HUNTER, AUDREY
-k    m\W       km\:\
JACKSON, VIVIAN M.
KER, M. ALDRES
KERGIN, DOROTHY
KNOWLTON, GWYNNETH
LA RIVIERE, CATHERINE
LITTLE, MAUREEN
LONG, MARJORIE
MARSH, FLORENCE
MILL WARD, NORA
McDOUGALL, MARY I.
McMILLIN, MARY
OLSEN, ELIZABETH
PASK, ANNE
PULLEN,   BETTY
PUTMAN, E. G.
RIDEOUT, MARJORIE
RHYNES, MARJORIE J
RUTT,  GLORIA
SCHWOERER, PAULA
SPE1RS, MARGARET
STEVENC, RUTH M.
STRANG, SHIRLEY
TODER, MRS. C. A.
UPHAM, BETTY ANN
WALL, ANNA J.
WEIR, PHYLLIS
WILLIAMS, JANET B.
ARTS
ABERCROMBIE, ELIZABETH
AIRD, H. C.
135 i_^___i___t
ALGER, JULIANA
ANDERSON, D. C.
ANDERSON, J. M.
ANDERSON, W. J.
ANDREW, MILLA
ARNESON, M. E.
ANSTIS, W. A.
ANASTASIOU, CLIFFORD
AXENTY,   LLOYD
BAGSHAW, E. C.
BAHR, KATHRYN
BAKER, S. B.
BALMER, JOHN
BANCROFT, R. D.
BANCROFT, J. B.
BANDY, P. J.
BARNETT, R. D.
BARNES, B. E.
BARNES, REX H.
BARR, MARGARET
BARKER, ROBERT
BAJKOV, ALEXANDER
BAXTER, R. A.
BEARD, J. R.
BYRNE, B. P.
BYMAN, ALLAN
CALDATO, R. A.
CAMERON, JACK
CAMP, BENNETT
CARLSON, N. A.
CARMICHAEL, DONN
CAVIN, N. P.
CHADWICK, MARY
CHAVE, DOROTHY
CHRISTENSEN, PAUL
CHRISTENSEN, K. H.
CHRISTENSEN, GOLDIS
CHAMBERLAIN, MARGARET
CIRVANI, JOHN
CLOHOSEY, M. E.
CLARK, J. M. A.
CLYNE, VALENTINE COBBIN, A. D.
COLWELL, J. M.
CONNON, ISABEL
COOK,  FRANK
COOPER, BRENDA
COPE, SHEILA
CROMIE, M. A.
CRUICKSHANK, JUNE
CULLEN, JIM
DAKERS, RONALD
DAVIES, DOREEN
DEARING, ENID
DEMBOWSKI, P. F.
DENMAN, BERYL
DONALDSON,  JACQUELINE
DOROSH, A. I.
DOVEY, B. B.
DROSSOS, NICHOLAS
DUFF, RONALD
DUVERNET, MARY
EADES, G. V.
EASTERBROOK,  CLAVIN
EDWARDS, D. F.
ELVIN, MEMORY
EMMONS, K. M.
FARINA,  NORAH
FEATHERSTONHAUGH, PATRICIA
FEDYK, J. L.
FORSYTHE, D. A.
FOSS, C. J.
FORBES, A. R.
FRASER, D. S.
FRASER, JOAN N.
FROESE, CHARLOTTE
GALE, A. L.
CHARNELL, G. S.
GILLARD, GLENDA
GLASGOW, BEVERLY
GLOVER,  S. W.
GOOD, W. W.
GORDON, D. M. M.
GRAY,  C.  P.
GRANT, R. F.
GUILD, MAUREEN
GUNNING, K. S.
HALL,  BARBARA
HALLIS, P.
HALE, L.
HALL, T. L.
HAMILTON, D.
HAMILTON, M. E.
HAMILTON, JOAN
HANSON, K. M.
HARPER, ALDER-ANN
HARPER, BETTY
HARRIS, NANCY
HARRIS, CLIFFORD
HARTLEY,  F.  C.
HARDIE, JOAN
HARVEY, ANN
137 HARMSWORTH, H. P.
HERRON, R. P.
HESLOP, H. J.
HERBRIK, G. R.
HENDERSON,  JOYCE
HEWLETT, ISABEL
HILLMAN, M. E. D.
HILLMAN, V. L.
HOPKINS, MONA
HODSON, JOAN
HOFFLIN, FRANK
HORSEY,   JULIE
HORTON,   MARY
HUDSON, D. J.
HUTCHINSON, A. S.
IRVINE, DONALD
JAFFRAY, BRUCE
JAMES, SUSAN
JAWANDA, B. S.
JAY, ANITA
JEFFERYS, E. E.
JEFFREY, RUTH
JENKINSON, D. W.
JEROME, KELVIN
JOHNSON,  MARVIN
JOHNSON, R. D.
JOHNSON, ROSS
JOHNSON, P. C.
JOKANOVICH, S. V.
JONES, TREVOR
KAN, MO-CHING
KEENLEYSIDE,  MILES
KELBERT, M. T.
KELLY, MAUREEN
KENNEDY, A. E.
KENNY, S. G.
KENT, V. D.
KINLEY,  FRANCIS
KING, JOANNE
KOHSE, EDWARD
KOCH, PETER
LAMBE,  DOROTHY
LANCASTER, DIANE
LASH, SYLVIA
LEE, KENNETH
LEECH,  PAT
LEITERMAN, PHYLLIS
LETT, MARY
LePAGE, MICHAEL
LIM, WAH
LOWES, G. H.
LOCK,  HARRY
LUNNEY, W. J.
McADAM, K. A.
McAFEE, JEAN
McBRIDE, J. R.
McCOMB, D. R.
MacDONALD, W.  C.
MacDONALD, ANGUS
McDONALD, G. S. McDOUGALL( ANNE
McDAUGAL, SHEILA
McGRATH, DOROTHY
MacKENZIE, I. M.
MacKENZIE, SUSAN
McKEE, J. E.
McMillan, m. h.
McNEIL, A. M.
MacPHAIL, J. D.
MacPHERSON, E. D.
MacPHERSON,  JOYCE
MA INGOT, G. J.
MAKOVKIN, MRS. JOYCE
MALCOLMSON,  SHIRLEY
MANCHESE, IRENE
MEEHAN, G. J. E.
MERONIUK, ALEX
MEYERS, JOHN
MILLARD, M. P.
MOILLIET, DAVID
MOFFATT, J. G.
MOSHER, DOROTHY
NAPIER-HEMY, J. A.
NASTICH,  MILENA
NAYLOR, LOIS
NELSON, N. E.
NELSON, R. A. C.
NORTH, R. A.
O'BRIEN, G. W.
ODLING, DOREEN E.
PANKOSKI, ALICE
PARIS, R. P.
PARKER, N. M.
PAULINE, G. W.
PEET, G.
PELECH,   LLoYD
PETTERSON, GUNVOR
PICKFORD, J. H.
PHILIPPSON,  GERALD
PIDDINGTON, HELEN V.
PIERCY, R. A.
PINCHIN, R. A.
PITTS, SHARY
PLANT, P. ELVA
PLEUMAN, NAN
POLLOCK,   ROBERT
POTTER,  CAROL
POP, ALICE
POP, KATIE
POWLES, DOREEN
PRASLOSKI, P. F.
PRESTON, W. H.
PRICE, A. D.
PRINS, KITTY A.
PROKOP, E. D.
PUIL, GEORGE
QUAGLIA, TONY
RANKIN, E.  J.
REDDON, J. G.
REID, D. G. REGHENAS, RENALDO
RENTON, D. M.
REID, ALEXANDER
RICHARDS, J. B.
RICHARDSON, L. F. V.
RICHES, ELEANOR
RILEY, ELIZABETH
RITTICH, MARY T.
ROBERTSON,  ANNE  E.
ROBERTSON,   GORDON
ROBERTSON, MARGARET
ROBERTSON, RUSSELL
ROBERTS, BRIAN
ROLSTON, JOYCE F.
ROOTE, T. F.
SACHKO, G. S.
SARGENT, R. W.
SAWCHUK, STELLA
SAWYER, DIANE
SCHLESINGER, E.
SCHMIDT, MARGARET L.
SCHELLENBERG, G. S.
SCHOFER, R. C.
SCOTT, DOROTHY J.
SCOTT, EDITH
SCOONES, W. A.
SHEPPY, J. J.
SICK,  MARNEY
SLEATH, G. W.
SLIGHT, D.
_?
SMITH, DOROTHY
SMITH, FRANCES
STEKL, EVA M.
STEACY, N. C.
STEINSON,  DOUGLAS
STEVENS, G. D.
STEWART, I.
STEWART, SHEILA
STEWART, G. N.
STOKES, ROSEMARY
STONER/G. A.
STUART, S. B.
SUTHERLAND, HUGH
TAIT, J. M.
TALBOT SHEILA
TARLTON, JIM
TAYLOR, C. R.
TAYLOR, C. P. S.
TEICHROEB, JOHN
TEICHROEB, WILLIAM
THIRKELL, F. W.
THOMAS, GERTRUDE
THOMPSON, CONNIE
THOMPSON,   DAWN   H.
THORDARSON, T.
THORDARSON, LARA
TIDBALL, JUNE
TWINING, J. S.
USTINA, FREDERICK
VANDERLEUR, J. V.
V
140 VANSTONE, C. L.
WALMSLEY, LAWRIE
WATSON, B. C.
WARD, F. J.
WATSON,   KENNETH
WEBBER, ISHBEL A.
WEICK,  CARL
WEINSTEIN, LILIAN
WELLS, R. M.
WEST, D. R.
WHEATLEY, GERALD
WILSON, BETTY
WILSON, FRANCES
WILSON, SHEILA
WITHROW, DONALD
WHITE, DONALD S.
WOODCOCK,   LILLIAN
WONG, FLORENCE
WONG, JOHN
WORTHINGTON, MARJORIE
WRIGHT, D. A.
YEOMANS, J. W.
YORK, BETTY-JEAN
YOUNG, D. M.
YOXALL, EILEEN
ZABENSKY, REVA
ZENS,  CECILS
COMMERCE
ANDERSON, P. G.
ANDERSON,  T. E.
ASCOTT, A. T.
BLEACKLEY, C. E.
BRYN-JONES, DAVID
BUTTERWORTH, E. A.
CAMPBELL, K. M.
CARSON, R. S.
CHATTEY, ROBERT
CUBBON, BOB
DADSON, PHILLIP
DE LA GIRODAY, PHILLIP
DEVEREAUX,  JOHN
ELWORTHY, B. J. DIANE
FOTHERINGHAM, DAVID
GALLBRAITH, A. J.
GILBERT,  J.  L.
GILROY, S. W.
GUTHERIE, ARTHUR
GYLES, THEO
HENDERSON,  DOUGLAS A.
HENDRY, JAMES
HUME, A.
HUNTER, A. S.
HALL, N. A.
HARBOTTLE,  B.  E.
HODGSON, W. L.
HOLMES,  VINCENT
HORNER, L. K.
JOHNSON,  ROSS
JOHNSTON, L. H.
McFARLANE, D.  R. DEAN, SHIRLEY
GILBERT, ALLISON
HARSTONE,   JACQUIE
HOWORTH,   ANNE
HUGHES, NORA
JOE, HAZEL A.
LINDSAY, JULIA
McEACHERN, AILSA
McKINNON,  MARY E.
OXLAND, DAPHNE
PINSKY,  BERNICE
PAULS,  MARJORIE
PORTEOUS, MERLE
REDDITT, JEAN
RIDLEY, BETTY
SIMONSON, RUTH
SLINGER,  JOAN
STOWELL,   LORA
TUEY, THELMA
WITHAM,  MARGARET
YATES, HILARY E.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
BERTRAM, M. E.
CROSS,   MARGARET
DsHECK, C. S.
FEE, W. R.
GILBERT, J. R.
HAMMERSTOM, LOUISE
HODGINS, JOHNNY
HOLLENBERG,   MARILYNN
142
McGINLEY, FRANK
McKAY, B. E.
McKINNON, R. S.
MacLEAN, MARY C.
McLEOD, D. R.
MacPHEE,  RALPH
McPHEE, W.  B.
MITTEN, NORENE
NEWELL, GLORIA
PARKIN, D. R.
PEARSON, J.  E.
PETTY, J. A.
PLOYART, J. W.
PUHACH, MICHAEL
ROLFE, B. J. L.
SPARLING, WILLIAM
STEWART,  GLEN
TANEDA,   KAZUI
TOOLSON, A. R.
VAN ALLEN, ERIC W.
WADSWORTH,  ROBERT
WOO,  L.  S.
HOME ECONOMICS
ALBRECHT,   DOREEN
ASHWORTH, NELLIE
BARER, THELMA
BRADLEY, ROSALIND E.
BRODD, ELIN M.
BROWN, JOAN
COLQUHOUN,   MARGARET LEIR, ESTHER
McHARDY, IAN-
MARTINSON,  A.  R.
MITCHELL, H. B.
POPOWICH,   WILLIAM
POTTER,   GORDON
SMYTH, D. R.
WASSICK,   ROBERT
FORESTRY
GARDINER, A. E.
CLEFSTAD, R.  O.
CLEGG, T. E.
CUTHBERT, J. A.
DICKENS, R. B.
DUSTING, N. R.
GRADY, B. D.
HLADY, E.
JONES, P. H.
JUDD, P. H.
JOHNSTON, D. F.
KETCHEN, P. M.
LENKS, HENRY
LOCKARD, S. M.
LONGWORTH, G. A.
MacKINNON, J. A.
MURRAY, J. G.
PARTRIDGE, F. G.
ROBINSON, A. B.
ROBINSON, E. (nee Wetton)
SELLICK, A. B.
SHARPE, D. L. E.
SHARPE, W. G.   '
SHEPHERD, R. F.
SUTHERLAND,  F.  E.
WALTERS, W.
WELSH,  W.   J.
LAW
ADAMS,   RAYMOND  S.
ANGELL, R. D.
BARNES,   ROLAND
BECKINGHAM,  WILLIAM
BIRKS, F.  J.
BIRNIES, R. A. G.
BOND,  J.  A.
BOOTH, A. R.
BOWERING,   HAROLD
BLUNDELL,  L.  E.
BRANCA,   DELORES
BRISTER, D. E.
CAMPBELL, T. J.
CASTILLOU, H. C.
CHERTKOW, M.
COCKING, R. E.
COGHLIN, GORDON
COOK, H. G.
COOPER, W. E.
CORBETT, DONALD
CUNLIFFE,  D.  M.
CURRIE,   W.   G.
DERPAK, K. M. __$______   ' '< *A
DIXON, HANK
DRYSDALE, JOHN
DUDLEY,   LEONARD
EDWARDS,  DUDLEY
EDWARDS,   ROBERT
EVANS, H. A.
FAHLAM,  PATRICIA
FAYERS, K.
FRASER, W. H.
GATES,  J.   G.
GILL, W. G.
GILMOUR,   W.   A.
GOODWIN, J. R.
GORDON, W. D.
GORDY, W.
GOURLIE, R. N.
GREENE,  H.
GUILD,   HARRISON
HAGGMAN, JOAN
HEARD, LANCE
HINKSON,  ERNEST
HOGAN, P. E.
HOOD,  PATRICK
HORIGOREW, ANDRO
HUGHES, RAYMOND
HULL,  AIR COMMODORE  A.  H.
HUTTON, PETER G.
JARVIS,  H.  P.
JOE,   ANDREW
KARWANDY,  FRANK
KENNEDY, J. B.
KING, G. E.
KING, J. L.
KITCHEN, ROBERT
KOFFMAN,  MORLEY
KOOLE,   LEONARD
KRELL, THEODORE W.
LeBLANC,   RAYMOND
LESTER, R. C.
LYALL,  G.  C.
LEVIS,  S.  A.
McGAULEY,  EDWIN
McGOVERN, FREDRICK
MacDONALD, A. T.
MacDONELL, A. W.
MANSON, P.  A.
MILLER, J. M.
MILLER, CLIVE
MOFFETT, DAVID
MONTGOMERY, J. D.
NICHOLS, G. D.
NICKEL, WILLIAM
PEDRINI,   HARRY
POUSETTE, J. A.
PRICE, MANLY
PRATT, CECIL A.
QUINN,  W.   J.
REECKE,   ROBERT
ROBERTS, D. J.
ROGERS,   EDWARD
144 ROBERTSON, W.
RUSSELL, B. A.
RYAN, TERRENCE
SELKIRK, R. B.
SHARPE, RAY S.
SHERLOCK,  D.  G.
SNAPE, JOAN
SOUTHIN,  MARY
STONE, JOHN M.
SHEASLEY,  E.  G.
STEEVES, J. T.
STEVENS,   DONALD
THOMPSON, H. W.
TUCK, W. D. C.
WALKER, R. P.
WALKER,  W.  R.
WARDILL,  S.   H.
WEBBER, D. G.
WHIFFIN, E.
WINFIELD, S. H.
WOODCLIFFE, C.  J.
WYLIE, T. M.
YANOSIK, C. G.
YOUNG, ROD
PHARMACY
ADAMS, C. A.
BARKER, E. A.
BLOOMQUIST, H.
BRIGHAM, F. M.
CARRIGON,   DEREK
CLEARWATER, G. D.
COMMONS, K. C.
DALBY, G. J.
DOYLE, L. S.
DULLER, J. A.
EDGERTON, E. M.
FENTIMAN, RICHARD
FLYNN, P. H.
FRANKLIN, D. B.
GRANT,  JAMES
GUEST,  KEVIN
HALES, E. D.
HOSKINS, C. G.
HOY, ARTHUR
JACKSON,  J.  E.
JAMES, P. K. R.
LOCKHART,  ALLEN
LOGIE, M.  J.
McCARLEY, D. R.
MacKAY ,F. D.
MALYUK, PETER
PARK, J. K.
PENNER,   HENRY
READY, WILLIAM
SCHOPP, L. H.
SMITH, PEGGY
THIRSK,  F. W.
TREEN, ANNE
TROTTER,  ADELINE  J.
VATNE, JOHN
145 VAWDEN,  JOYCE
WILLS, F. H. E.
WILSON, JOAN
YOUNG, G. W. W.
ZAHARKO,  C. M.
EDUCATION
AYLORD, BRUCE
BARLOW, OLIVE M.
BRAY, MAUREEN
BRYSON, BEVERLY
CALDERWOOD, W.  G.
CAMERON, ALEXA
COOK, D. G.
DAVIES, GEORGE
DAWSON, DONALD
ESO, JOE
FARQUHARSON, R.  H.
FOX, S. H.
FREDERICK, EUGENE
FRIESEN, WILLIAM
GRAY, BETTY J.
HOUSE, GORDON
HUGGIN, W. P.
IRVING, C.
McAllister, mamie
McCUBBIN, ROBERT J.
McKEE, R. G.
McTAGGART,   AUBREY
MASON, A. G.
MILLER,  DOROTHY  L.
MOTTISHAW, H. C.
PEDERSEN, EDMUND
PERRY, E. B.
ROSCOE,  MICHAEL
SCHRODT, P. BARBARA
SCHUETZE, H.  L.
SOLES, A. E.
STEPHENSON, J. C.
TOEWS, V. D.
USHER, EVELYN
WILKS, E. J.
WILSON,   MARNIE
WRIGHT, J. H. E.
YOUNG, HARRISON
GRADUATE STUDIES
TRITES, R. W.
SOCIAL WORK
BOON, ELAINE
FLEMING, LORNA, A.
FOGARTY, PAT J.
MOLTER, EMILE C.
MOSLIN, R. S.
PEPPER, GERALD W.
WESTCOTT, AL C,
146 FALL CONVOCATION
For some, it is the end of years of study, research,
fun, labour, and for others it is only the beginning.
The new War Memorial Gymnasium was the scene
for the 1951 convocation on October 26, during Homecoming weekend. Over 350 students received their
degrees.
Brigadier Sherwood Lett was officially installed as
Chancellor of the University. Preceding Chancellor
Lett's installation, the Honourable Eric Hamber was
given the title of Chancellor Emeritus. He will act in
the capacity as an advisor, with an ex-officio position on
the Board of Governors.
Brigadier Lett, in his address, said that through the
continuous support of the returning alumni, the University could stand on a firm financial ground with a
strong outlook to the future.
The Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon Sir Alexander Clutterbuck, British High
Commissioner to Canada; the Honorable Milton Fowler Fregg, Canadian Minister of Labor; and the Honorable Stanley Woodward, American Ambassador to
Canada. These three men were the appropriate recipients of the honorary degree—they represented the three
powers: Britain, Canada, and the United States of
America.
Sir Alexander Clutterbuck, in the congregation address, spoke on "The Three Musketeers", symbolizing
the three countries represented at the convocation. He
stated the need for unity between these great powers at
this time of tension in world affairs.
Following the solemn ceremony of conferring degrees, the Honourable Stanley Woodward spoke of the
relationship between Canada and the United States, and
their work in the United Nations.
•    Sir Alexander Clutterbuck addressed the convocation
•    Brigadier Sherwood Lett was installed as UBC's Chancellor
•    The  Honourable Eric Hamber  received the  Degree of Chancellor
Emeritus.
147 UNDERGRADUATE  EDITOR:  JOHN  BANFIELD 149 NEW FACULTY-MEDICINE
&■
September 7, 1950, was a date which marked an
event of considerable interest and importance for the
University, for it was on this day that the first lectures
were held in the newly established faculty of medicine.
Much time and energy had been expended before this
new faculty was a reality.
The start of the medidal faculty was made by Dr.
Frank Wesbrook, during his term as the first president
of the University. He helped to establish a bacteriology
laboratory within the Vancouver General Hospital. Dr.
Wesbrook's untimely death prevented further immediate
progress.
However, in 1943, Dr. G. M. Weir encouraged the
B.C. Medical Association to expand its committee on
Medical Education. Early the next year this committee
submitted a brief to the University, and as a result, a
senate committee was appointed to study the situation.
In 1945, surveys were made in Canada and the
United States to determine existing trends in medical
education. It was also decided to invite a group of experts to Vancouver to study the local situation. As a
result of these discussions, it was felt a dean should be
appointed for the faculty, and in 1949 the University
appointed Dr. Myron M. Weaver to this post.
The appointment of Dr. Weaver set in motion building plans, the search for faculty, and the drawing up of
a curriculum. At the same time, during the year 1949-
1950, the first entering class was selected. Since then
negotiations have provided clinical facilities at the Vancouver General Hospital, and teaching facilities at many
other hospitals.
Thus a new Canadian Medical School has been
created at the University. In years to come, it will train
students who by their subsequent practice or research
will bring fame and honor to the University of British
Columbia.
• Top   right:    Med   students   conduct   experiment   to   record
heart action.
• Bottom  right:   Medical  Undergradute Society executive.
• Below:    Anatomy  students  examine  remains  of  med-boy
who flunked out last year.
150 *&
• Pre-Med executive
fought for USC recognition
and budget; sponsored big
spring formal, nearly broke
even.
• Pre-Meds confuse sexes
in turnabout dance.
• Second year Med students fuss with fluids.
• First year boys and
microscopes: "Hey, I saw
it move!"
• Pre-Med Homecoming
float won third prize.
PRE-MEDS
Under the guiding hand of president Jim Wong, the
Pre-Meds have made this a year to remember, despite
budget and undergraduate status trouble.
In educational activities, medical films and outstanding doctors have been sponsored throughout the year
to give the Pre-Meds an insight into their future profession.
Full participation in extra-curricular activities has
been the byword during the year. Early in the first
term, the Pre-Med creation, "Comparative Anatomy",
was awarded fourth prize in the float contest during
the homecoming game. As a feature of the October
mixer, the Pre-Meds and the Nurses witnessed the loss
of their very first patient in "Cat-astrophe".
In the intramurals sports, the Pre-Meds have been
particularly active this year, placing third in the stand
ings for the first term. A large share of the honors go
to the Pre-Med boys who completely dominated the top
positions in the cross-country race.
Early in January, many a Pre-Med could be seen
hurrying to a lecture with a paint-spattered face and
the aroma of an old-time turpentine still. The occasion
was "Operation Face-Lift" in the little office behind the
Brock.
Shifting into a Leap Year mood, the association then
sponsored the Pre-Med-Nurses "Turnabout" mixer.
The capacity crowd was treated to everything from
a male chorus line in grass skirts to female Engineers
and expert ballet dancers.
To finish the year in a more serious and appropriate
manner, the executive held a Pre-Med Ball at the Panorama Roof.
151 £%&
ADRIAN,    JOHN
ANDERSON,   DONALD   C.
BALLAM,   CHARLES   F.
BECKETT,    MATTHEW    C.
BOGGIE,    ALEXANDER
CARTER,  HAROLD  H.
CHRISTENSEN,   RALPH-.
CLARK,   NIGEL  H.
COX,   ALBERT   REGINALD
DOBSON,    MARGARET
DUDLEY,    JOHN    HOWARD
FOOLKES,    RICHARD   &
GALE,   HENRY   HAMON
GELL, GORDON WILFRED
GEREIN,   ALFRED   N.
HARTWELL,     LEAGH
W.
HENNINGER,   JAMES   R.
HEYDON,  GORDON   KEITH
HICKS,  GERALD F.
LEVIS,   WILLIAM   HUGH
MARTIN,   WILLIAM   R.   J.
MITCHELL,   WILLIAM  J.
NEMETZ,   ARNOLD   DAVID
PARKINSON,    RAYMOND
PAULS,   HENRY
PURKIS,   ROBERT   S.
ROBIN,   EDWIN   PETER
ROSS,   WILLIAM  C
SCHMOK, ARTHUR C.
TAYLOR,   JAMES   V.
THOMPSON,   BASIL,   H.  M.
THHORTON,  NORMAN M.
WARNER,   DONALD   L
WEBSTER,   HARRY   W.
WOODS, JOHN HAMILTON
YATES,   GERORGE    RALPH
AIKENHEAD,   DONALD   H.
ARNOLD,  JOHN   D.
ASPINALL,   ROY  J.
ATKINSON,   KENNTH   G.
BRACEWELL,   R.   GRANT
CAESAR,   JOHN  JULIUS
CAVE,   GEORGE   D.
COOPEER,    DONALD   ASHLEY
FLATHER,  L  W.   ELWOOD
FRACKSON, S.  HARRY
FUNG,   EDWARD  WING
GORDON,   MARY   ETHELWYN
HARLOS,   ROLAND   EDWIN
HENNING,   JAMES   NEWTON
HEWSON,   ROY   THOMAS
HUTCHINS,   E.   KEITH
KINAHAN,  PATRICK JOHN
KOOP,   WALTER
LE  HUQUET, J.  R.
LEWCHUK,   WILLIAM
MANDEVILLE,   ALEX   F.
MARKHAM,  WILLIAM  G.
MARTIN,   MATTHEW   JACK
MacDONALD,   WALTER   C.
McFARLANE,   WlUfAM  J.
MESHER,   F. S.
NAROD,  PHILLIP
NEWHOUSE,   ALAN   L.
POSTUK,   PETER
RADFORD,  HUGH  W.
RYE,   JOHN   H.   B.
SCARFO,  JOHN   R.
SLEIGH,  ALFRED  D.
SMITH,   DAVID   M.
STRINGER,    DONALD    W.
SZASZ,  GEORGE
TAM,   ENNIO  ANDREA
UNDERWOOD,    AUDREY    M.
WESTGATE,   HUGH   DONALD
WORTH,  ANN  JULIS
ZIMMERMAN,   HAROLD   W.
152 AGRICULTURE
Under the able leadership of Frank Martin, president, the "Sons of the Soil" completed another successful year.
Getting off to a good start on the first Friday of the
fall term, the Society held a Salmon Barbecue. In spite
of the rain, Professor Rand Young did an expert job of
cooking under a large smoke-filled tarpaulin.
October's activities were highlighted by the annual
Barn Dance at the White Rose Ballroom. Although
the evening was reasonably orderly, everyone had a
good time.
The fall banquet was held early in November at the
Commodore. Dr. Earl Birney, who spoke about the
joys of raising a crop of solid rock in the Creston Valley,
was the guest of honour.
Following short remarks by Dean Blythe Eagles,
President MacKenzie, and Mr. G. E. Clarke of Abbots-
ford, the crowd got down to the more serious business
of dancing. At one a.m., with the thought of 8:30 lectures before them, the farmers staged a mass exodus.
The remainder of the semester was relatively quiet.
The peace was broken, however, when one night a late
working farmer noticed that the Engineers had placed
an outhouse in front of the main entrance to the Aggie
Building. Quickly taking stock of the situation, the
Aggie students transfered the object to a more logical
location—in front of the Engineering Building. The
Engineers seemed not to have recovered from the incident for no retaliatory measures were taken.
At the beginning of February, the Farmer's Frolic
and the Aggie Apple Day awakened the campus to the
presence of the AUS. Apple eating students were contributing to a good cause, as the proceeds went to the
Crippled Children and Gym funds.
The Junior Agricultural Institute of Canada added
to the activities of the AUS by bringing many speakers
to the campus to give talks on different phases of Agriculture. Officers of the group were Jim Ryder, president; Lois Dunlop, Elliot Rive and Geoff Alston.
The Agassiz field trip and the Spring Banquet
rounded off another successful year for the most spirited faculty on the campus.
• Top: Agriculture Undergraduate Society sponsored many
successful events; raised ire of Engineers. • Aggies on
judging class.
• Bottom left: Aggie Homecoming Float.
• Profit from Apple Day went to Kinsmen Fund for
Crippled  Children.
e    Big  informal of year shook dust from Armouries'  rafters. RADFORD,  BRIAN T.
ASHFORD,   ROSS
BAILEY,   CHARLES   B.M.
BAYNES,   RAYMOND   A.
BIRKETT,    BEVERLEY   A.
BOUWMAN,    RALPH   C.
BRADSHAW,   RONALD   L.
CRAIG,   DONALD WM.
DALGLEISH,   DAWN   ANNE
DAUBENY,   HUGH   A.
DEPFYFFER,   ROBERT   L.
DUERKSEN,  JACOB
DUNLOP,    LOIS    ELAINE
EWERT,    PETER   EDWARD
FARIS,   DONALD   GEORGE
FLOE,   CARL
FORSYTH,    JOHN    ALLEN
GUBBELS,   CLEOPHAS   S.
GUTTERIDGE,    W.    THOMAS
HIGUCHI,    AUGUSTINE
JACK,    EVELYN   GRACE
KENT,   HENRY  DORRELL
KILLICK,   KENNETH   D.
KYNASTON,   DENNIS L.
LIGHTFOOT,   EDWARD  R.
McDIARMID,   WILLIAM   C.
McDONALD, J.  KENNELY
McFETRIDGE,   DONALD  G.
McRAE,  RODERICK   HAIG
MILLING, MAE  EVELYN
MILLS,   JOHN   ARMSTRONG
NORTH UP,  NANCY JOAN
PARKE,   ALAN   ARTHUR
PARKIN,   WILLIAM
PAYNE,   HORACE   WM.
PEPIN,  HERBERT S.
PIERCY, JACK EDWARD
PORTER,  WILLIAM   F.
POWELL,  JOHN   PETER
RILEY,   DONALD   NORMAN
RIVE,   CHAS.   ELLIOTT
SHAPIRO,  GEORGE
SHORE,   JOAN   CATHERINE
SILVESTRINI,  DENNY A.
SIMPSON,    MARJORIE    B.
SIZER,   WALTER   BRIAN
SMITH,  RAY  FRASER
STACEY,   DAVID   LEONARD
THORNE, JOHN  TREVOR C.
WESTLAKE, DONALD WM.  S.
WINTERINGHAM,    V,    DAVE
WONDAFRASH, AMDE
WONG,   RICHARD
YIP, WING WEI
ANDERSON,  NORMAN
BRUMWELL,   CHARLES   A.
CHESTER,  ALLAN   HENRY
CHIN,   LAWRENCE  KWOK  A.
CHOWN, RUTH  MARY
COE,   JOHN   EDWARD
COOPER, ANNA C.
CROSS, CHRISTINE H.
CROSS,   STANLEY WESTON
DAVIES,   RONALD   EDGAR
EBNER,  KURT  EUWALT
ELVIDGE, JOHN
FORD,   JAMES   MICHAEL
FORD,   RICHARD   REEVES
GILLESPIE,    SHEILA   C.
GLASGOW,   STANLEY   K.
GOSHKO,   ERNEST   M.
HARDY,   BRUCE   ARTHUR
HILTON,   GERALD   WM.
HOBBS,  EDWIN  ERIC
HOLOB,    CORNELLIOUS
HUMPHREYS,  ROBERT M.
JOHNSON,   RAYMOND  W.
KADLA,   FRANK   JOHN
KENDARICK,  ZELLA M.
KERR, JOHN ARMSTRONG
KRONTSTROM,  LAWRENCE  F.
MANTEN,  BETTY  JANE
NEILSON,   BARBARA  JEAN
POPLE,   KEITH   NEALE
RAE,  EWING WILLIAM
ROSE,   JOSEPH   GUY
SADOWSKI,   JOSEPH    JACK
STONES,   ROBERT   BARRIE
TOUCHBURN,  P, SHERMAN
TUCKEY,  RALPH  C.
VIAU, JOHN PHILIP
154 • Farmer's Frolic saw
Aggies cut loose with
square dances, reels, and
schottisches in a boisterous
evening.
• Lonely Aggie looks over
auction sale wares before
the rush cleared the table
of everything but a few
crumbs.
AYLARD,   GEORGE   R.
BAILLIE,   ARLENE   A.
BEGBIE,   PATRICIA   JEAN
BICE,   WILLIAM   CHARLES
B0SE,   ROBERT  JOHN
CHESTER G.  STANLEY
CLAMAN,  PETER  CHARLES
CLARKE, JEAN MARION
CLAYTON,  RICHARD  F. S.
CLAY,  LESLIE KENNTH
DALLYN,  JACK
DICK,   ROBERT    FRANCIS
DREW,   GRAHA   MARTHUR
DROSSOS,   JOHN   GEORGE
ELDER,   LOIS   M.
HAY,  KENNTH  ARTHUR
JACKSON,  DONALD  BARRY
JONES,  L.  TREVOR
KOVACS.  AUDREY   IRENE
KUIPERS,  RALPH  PETEER
LEE,   YET   HOW
MARLING,    KEITH    E.
MacGILLIVRAY,   EE.   MARY
MIDDELVEEN,   FREDERICK
MOLYNEAUX,  WILLIAM   E
RHODES,   CHARLES   THOS.
STEPHENSON,    KENNETH    J.
TAYLOR,  MARJORIE JUNE
TRUSCOTT,   CHARLES   D.
WONG, DANIEL
• Top: Door prize at the
Farmer's Frolic provided
this couple with an apple
a day for many months.
• Bottom: Aggie girls'
cooking was in big demand
at auction sale.
• Far right: Aggie girls'
tree reminded students to
contribute money to help
needy families celebrate
Christmas.
155 APPLIED SCIENCE
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•    Engineering Undergraduate Society Executive
•    Nursing   Undergraduate  Society  Executive
•    Architecture Club Executive
ENGINEERING SOCIETY
Under the leadership of red-shirted president Ron
Foxall, veep Al Hicks and secretary John Stovman, the
Engineering Undergraduate Society started the year
on a good footing with the rest of the campus.
EUS executive consisted of USC reps Geoff Pringle
and Rollie Ireneman, athletic rep Roger Hooten-Fox,
publicity rep Joe Bockhold, and professional relations
man Bill Inglis.
These men succeeded in making 1951-52 an outstanding year for the EUS.
Planning of social functions, including arrangements
for guest speakers, films, student talks, and dances, was
handled by the many engineering clubs which are also
part of the EUS.
NURSES' SOCIETY
Shortly before the commencement of the fall term,
the School of Nursing moved to its permanent location
in the new Wesbrook Building. This was the beginning
of a busy year for members of the Nursing Faculty.
The executive of this year's NUS consisted of Isabel
Angus, President; Maureen Little, First Vice-President;
Terry Rush, Second Vice-President; Diane Paterson,
Secretary; Gwen Knowlton, Treasurer; Betty Anne,
Upham, Social Convener; Joan Kingsbury, Publicity
Representative; Lila Gee, Sports Representative; Vivian
Jackson, Inter-faculty Reprsentative; Dot Kergin, USC
Representative; Ann Lennox, 2nd year Rep.; Ritsuko
Oka,  3rd  year  Rep.
Members of the NUS shared many activities with
fellow sciencemen, the Engineers, and the pre-meds.
ARCHITECTURE  CLUB
The Architecture Club was the predecessor of the
Architecture Department, for it was after the organization of the club, and in a great part due to its efforts,
that the Department of Architecture was founded.
The Club functions within both the EUS and the
Canadian Architectural Students' Association, an organization whose aim is to promote friendship between
students of the five Canadian schools.
In addition to campus activities, the club also contributes to the student issue of the Journal of the Royal
Architectural Institute of Canada.
In the Pacific Northwest, UBC's Club is working
with students at the University of Idaho to start a
magazine.
Membership has never been more than 100, but this
includes everyone in the school. With this support,
the Club should continue to function as successfully as
it has in the past.
156 ENGINEERS' ACTIVITIES
(Editor's Note: This copy was written by tiie Engineers'
Undergraduate Society who wished to present an unbiased
picture of life on the campus.)
This year the Engineering Undergraduate Society
carried out a new policy of co-operation and co-ordination with the main student body. The first step was
taken when the Engineers donned their red sweaters
and set out to help the frosh find their way about the
campus. Unfortunately, some of the freshmen still managed to wander off and fall into the lily pond.
Continuing their constructive policy, the EUS also
attempted to elect an executive for the EUS also
attempted to elect an executive for the Arst Undergraduate Society, and offered to help spend the Arts
budget.
Engineering unity could be seen at work with the
election of the Engineer's candidate, Mavis Coleman,
as Homecoming Queen; and the Engineers' float, complete with red banners, balloons and stirrup pumps, was
a main feature of the Homecoming Parade.
This year's EUS Smoker, held October 24, was bigger
and better than ever, with a professional floor show and
plenty of beer. With an attendance of over 500, Engineering spirit was very evident.
The smoked was followed, on November 14, by the
Engineers'-Nurses hard times mixer, held at the White
Rose Ballroom.
Other social functions—dances, films, guest speakers,
student talks—are provided by the many Engineering
clubs which are a part of the EUS.
March of Dimes
Each year the EUS sponsors a "March of Dimes"
campaign for crippled children, and this year they really
did it well. The Engineers took over the entire campus,
parading through the library, serenading students with
"Godiva's Band", and sponsoring a very special noon-
hour show whose main features were: a chariot race
(won by EUS), a spitting contest (won by EUS), and
a feminine tug-of-war (won by the Nurses, an EUS
affiliate, with only a little help from a tractor).
Squads of Engineers took over distribution points
of the Ubyssey and "free" copies were given to those
students who contributed to the cause.
Engineering spirit and student body support made
this a record year, with a collection of |600, the highest
per capita collection ever. Engineers felt their efforts
at class-breaking and pocket-breaking were well rewarded as the money paid to the crippled children
would be converted to rich dividends of happiness and
better health for the kiddies.
Engineers went all-out in both the blood drives at UBC as they
went around the campus collecting people to give blood. Here
pubster Alec MacGillivray is coerced  into donating.
d
11
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HI-     .«
•    Engineers at the smoker enjoyed the floor show and the refreshments, handed out in person by E.U.S. president Ron Foxall.
Nurses donned their freshest, whitest uniforms for the March of
Dimes Drive. They were entertained by a personal representative from the Crippled Children's Hospital.
157 Above: Amazed male spectators watch as hard-hitting
Nurses hold Frosh girls to no gain. Campus football
game introduced first year gals to rugged Varsity life.
Right: Old heave-ho by Nurses routed Home Ec girls at
March of Dimes Show. Tractor hidden in cheering crowd
provided extra pull for the gals in white.
• Left: Miniature Fraser Rives snakes way through Varsity's back yard to facilitate study of Valley flood control.
• Below left: One of the prize-winning architectural theses
illustrating a beach resort was displayed in UBC Art
Gallery this  fall.
• Below: Town planners of the future lovingly display
one  of  their  pet  projects.
158 M CKfl
___?'__
•    Engineers stormed into Law Building to get Lawyers to donate blood in February Blood Drive, while erstwhile redshirt climbs greased pole,
and others invade Wesbrook Building.
Engineers and Blood
The October Blood Drive proved again that the
spirit of the Engineers was the most compelling force
on the campus. Donating 110% of their quota, they
were by far the leaders of the drive.
In Del Sharpe's tremendous Drive-of-Drives in
February, the boundless energy of Foxall's snake-parading redshirts was nearly overshadowed by the spontaneous co-operation of every other faculty and student
organization on the campus. Forestry, the first faculty
to beat the Engineers in a UBC blood drive, shot over
its quota to an amazing 230%, well above the Engineer's 200%.
Stunts and funny-happenings award, however, went
to the Engineers for their famous piglet expedition.
Blood-crazed, screaming Sciencemen descended upon
the shining edifice of the Law-men, carrying a small,
loud and odoriferous pig, but they were quickly repelled
by the Lawyers' bright defensive counter-action, in the
form of a fire hose.
No resistance greeted the dampened redshirts at the
Library, where the pig roamed the quiet halls at will
for several hours, until a humane Artsman bundled it
into a briefcase and took it back to the Aggie barns.
• Above: Engineers' stunts for
the Dime Drive included forcing
the Pharmacy students to donate,
while spitting contest showed Engineers' prowess in unusual fields.
• Right: Sngineers' Clubs Presidents got lined up against a wall
for Totem  photog.
159 Top:   left to right:   First prize winning exhibit by Forestry boys.
Judges check the second  prize winner,  the  Architecture  model.
Girl    behind   the    Hydro-electric   display   doesn't   seem    to   be
interested   in  the  exhibit.
Magnesium magic displayed by bow-tied Engineer.
Camera-shy redshirt insisted on keeping back to camera.
Bottom row:   Table crowd enjoying the party.
Somebody's gal (far right) looks impressed with the Engineers.
160 ■-*-'*
• Crowd dances by head table.
Balloons hanging from ceiling
were spilled unexpectedly on
jammed dance floor. Girls spent
last half of evening picking bits
of  rubber out of spiked heels.
ENGINEERS' BALL
The gayest, loudest, most uninhibited two nights of
the spring term were claimed emphatically by the engineers, and in a hail of bursting balloons EUS President
Ron Foxall voted the Engineer's Highball the most
successful event on the crowded Sciencemen calendar.
Laying plans for the big party early in September,
Foxall and vice-prexy Al Hicks vowed that "the ball'
would be the best in history. In October, departments
in the Engineering faculty were asked to start plans
for their model projects; the Commodore was blessed
with a two-night reservation for 1,000 per night, and the
first-year boys started saving to buy tuxedoes.
First and fourth year men were given the first night,
in the hope that the maturity of the graduating class
would have a quieting effect upon the wild, diapered
initiates. Music was soft and slow the first night; the
results of the model project judging were met with
staid but enthusiastic applause; the Foxall-led sing-song
was loud but quiet unharmonious, and the giant Civil
gathering hardly asserted itself all evening.
The second night was boisterous. Second and third
year redshirts literally blistered the walls of the Commodore with songs and all forms of yips and kai-yi's,
danced to rousing square-dance fiddling and bone-crushing schottishes, and ended up red-eyed and bewildered
in Chinatown.
The Forestry department's model of a sawmill in
action, complete to the last grain of sawdust on the floor,
won first prize in the display judging. Architecture's
scale model of Frank Llyod Wright's famous "Falling
Water" home, won second prize. Civil's intricate model
of a cement-mixing plant, which on the afternoon of
the first night of the ball spread quick-drying concrete
all over the floor, came third.
• Sciencemen and dates
leap joyously for falling
balloons.
• Kissometer, one of most
popular attractions of the
evening, later prompted
battle between Engineers
and  its Artsman owner.
161 IIHL.    i
BOVING, PETER ARVID
BELL,   DAVID  JARMAN
CARROLL,  NUNRO  M.
CORDINGLEY,   JOSEPH   A.
HAMBLEY,     JOHN    BARRH
HARMAN,   P.    G.   W.
HATCH,   WILLIAM   R.
KRISTMANSON,   DAVID   D.
MocKENZIE,   RONALD   G
NEMETZ,  ALVIN  S.
PALMER,  RICHARD  M.
PAULS,   RONALD   EDGAR
PETROSKI,   HARRIS
REID,   DOUGLAS   ELLIOTT
RHYDDERCH, TREVOR J.
STRANGE,   WILLIAM   H.
THOMPSON,   GORDON   M.
ZELT, GORDON WILLIAM
BESTWICK,   NORMAN
BORESKY, WILLIAM  E.
BROOKS,  JOHN   ELLIS
CHRISTOPHERSON, RAY
COUROUBAKALIS,   DIMI,   G.
CRAIG,  JEFFREY  F.
DUDRA,  JOSEPH
ENDERSBY, STANLEY  A.
ENGLISH,   ALLEN, J.   M.
FARGEY,   DONALD   R.
GILLEY,  JAMES  C.
GLOTMAN,   MARTIN
GRANT,  BASIL   B.
HARRIS, MURRAY CARMAN
HICKS, ALAN
HODGSON, ALAN JAMES
HORNSTEIN,   HERBERT
INSLEY,   ALAN   EDWARD
JACOBS, GILBERT  FRANK
JONES,  ARTHUR  L.
MocKENDRICK,  WM.  G.
SMITH,   KENNETH  RONALD
SUNELL, JACK U.
TH I ESSEN,    HARRY   EDGAR
VICKERS,  T.   VICTOR   E.
WILLOX,   GEORGE   J.
BIRD,  THOMAS GEORGE
CHAMBERLAIN,   ROBERT
DRINNAN,   JOHN   H.
FRASER,  WILLIAM  L.
FRASER,   ROBT.   MURRAY
GOLDIE,   HUGH   JACK
HARRISON,    GORDON     REID
HAYWOOD,   RICHARD  W.
LAING, JACK FREMONT
LONG,  ALEXANDER
MAUSSER,   WILLIAM   J.
MILNE,  RICHARD VERNON
PALMER,   HAROLD
PARK, WM. KEITH  RAE
PRINGLE,   GEOFFREY   N.
SHEARER,   T.   CLARK
SMITH,   STANLEY  J.
STOVMAN,   JOHN   ANDREW
WATSON, ARTHUR JOHN
BURKE,  RICHARD
COLEMAN,    RICHARD    S.
LAWRIE,   DAVID   MURRAY
MOSHER,    C.     FRANKLIN
NORMAN,  ALVIN  OSCAR
DOWSLEY,   DONALD  A.
MocDONALD,   ROBERT   L.
PATRICK,   DENNIS   H.
PAUL,   ARTHUR  JAMES
TEREBETT,   JAMES   THOMAS
CARRICK,   DOUGLAS  A.
FABRO,   DONALD  JOSEPH
GAIRNS,   CHARLES   HENRY
PAUL, STEWART P.
WESTERLUND,  BRUNO  V.  W.
DONALDSON,  THORNTON   J.
HOGAN,    JOHN    WATERS
KRETZ,   RALPH  ALBERT
MARKLAND,   KENNETH   A.
NELSON,   WALTER   INNES
WILSON,   PHILIP   ROY
ANDERSON,    E.    EDVARD
ANDERTON,   JOHN   ERNEST
AYLARD, JOHN  DEREK C.
162 • Architects worked long
hours over drafting problems to complete projects at
the end-of-the-term rush.
" "NA  i
_.
BOCKHOLD,  LAWRENCE  L.
BRODIE,   ROBERT  GORDON
BROUGHTON,  WILLIAM   K.
BUNN,   EDMUND   ROBERT
CLOW,  WILLIAM   E.
COPE,   RAY   ROBIN
CROOCKEWIT,  JAN  H.
DAVIE,  RONALD  N.
DELANE,   HARVEY   H.
DELISLE,   NORMAN  A.
DUFTON,  WILLIAM C.
ENGELS, PAUL  F.
HANINGTON,   EARL   GEO.
HODGSON,   JOHN   HENRY
HUME,   FRANK  C.
JONES,   EDWARD   E.  S.
LEE,  DAVID
LUND, WILLIAM JOHN
McDONALD, VERNON
McLEOD,    DOUGLAS    H.
MacPHEE,   C.  ALLAN
MILLAR,   C.   ARNOLD
MITCHELL,   NEVILLE
MOORE,  KENNETH W.
NELSON,   RICHARD   IRWIN
RAE,  DOUGAL SPENCE
RENDELL,  HARRY   ROBERT
RENSHAW,    ROBERT   H.
ROSS, WILLIAM JAMES
RUSH,  ROBERT,  WM.
SELLENS,    WILLIAM   CHAS.
STELLIGA,   DONALD   JOS.
TOWGOOD,  ARTHUR WM.
TURNER,   WILLIAM   JOHN
WALE,  CHARLES THOMAS
WILLMON, GORDON J.
WIMPERIS,   ROBERT  L
WOLVERTON,  J.   LORNE
BISARO,   GENO
REID,   JOHN   HENRY
SIMARD,   J.  G.   CLEMENT
CAMPBELL,   THOMAS   S.
CHOW,   FRED
GREENAWAY,  JOHN   M.
HINDMARCH,   KENNETH   J.
LANCHESTER,   FRANK
ROBINSON, WM.   C.
STILES,   PETER   MARLATT
DORAN,   FREDERICK W.  E.
FORSYTHE, D.   DAVID
LEES, KENNETH  CYRIL
LEGG,  THOMAS  HARRY
MILLEY,   DONAL   D.
PALMER, JAMES F.
APPLIED   SCIENCE   2ND   YEAR
ANTLE, JOHN V. S.
ARNISON,   RONALD
BAILEY, CHARLES LARRY
BELOBABA,  WALTER
BENSON,   ROBERT   HEDLEY
BERGQUIST.   EDWARD   A
BRODER,   JOHN   PATRICK
BROSSARD,  DONALD  K.
BRYDON, JAMES ROBERT
BUTLER,  LAWRENCE  S.
CAMPBELL,  IAN  M.
CARLEY, C.  MORRIS
CARSTAIRS,  DAVID S.
CHALK,   RAYMOND
163 _..___.
___*
^Ml-l,
JrV-_B_i0^«_Mfe Jw
cook, philip thornton
crispin, george e.
darcovitch, jacob
davies, norman george
day, john wm. benning
deakin, thomas allen
duncan, david angus
ennis, keith
faulder, george a.
fenton, vasey charles
finlayson, malcolm j.
fiorentino, joseph s.
ford, lyman douglas
forrest, john allen
fraser, john allan
gaensbauer, h. t.
galloway, leslie r.
gane, frederick wm.
gardner, donald a.
girling, peter r.
greenwood, hugh jokn
grenon, oliver joseph
gruenthal, martin h.
guthrie, david alan
hardwicke,   gordon   b.
harvey, smith douglas
hillhouse, d. neil
hooton, fox roger f.
jack, donald william
johnston, hugh alex
jones, joseph alan
kelley, alan daniel
kelly, john donald
kevill, paul
knowles, edward e.
lacey, wallace keith
lake, lancelot c.
lawrence, edward f.
letson, john h. l.
lindholm, ward m.
madeley, j. bruce d.
manson, stewart alton
matheson, donald j.
mathews, stephen
Mccormick, william j.
MacDONALD,  ALEXANDER
McDORMAN,    LESIE   G.
McKAY, JOHN C.
MacKINNON,   DONALD   P.
McNISH,   JAMES   A.
MEEK,   JOHN   QUINN
MERCER,  EDWARD  NEVIL
METCALFE, C.   DOUGLAS
MIDDELVEEN, JOHHN W.
MILLER,   KEITH   JONES
MIRKO, JOSEPH  F.
NEILSON,  RONALD  WM.
NELMS,  GEORGE  LEROY   B.
NICOLLS,   ELLIOTT   F.
OATES,   GORDON  CEDRIC
OLLIVER,   LESLIE   R.
ORR,  ARCHIBALD  CHAS.
PARLEE, VICTOR  EARL
PAYNE,    FRANK   ALDEN
PINSON, WILLIAM  EDWIN
FLETCHER,   JAMES   HENRY
POOLE, E. GRAHAM
PORTER,   R.   STANLEY
PRINCE,   GEORGE   S.
RIDGERS,  ARTHUR   H.
RUTLEDGE,  WM.  JOHN
SANDHU,   JAGIR   SINGH
SMITH,  GORDON  FRED
SMITH,  JAMES  WILMER
SPINNEY,   RALPH   H.
STANDEN, PHILIP A.
STEVENS, GERALD DAVID
STEWART,  MORGAN A. R.
SWIETLICKI, STEFAN
THIRD,     DOUGLAS    GEO
THOMPSON,  S.   FORREST
TRIGG,   CHAS.   MURRAY
TURBITT,   RONALD   FRANK
WADE,   EDWIN   MILTON
WALTON,   NORMAN
WARD,   GORDON   VICTOR
WATTS,  DOUGLAS JAMES
WEBSTER,   DAVID   JAMES
WERNER,  JOSEPH
WESEEN, ARWIN POWELL
WILLIAMSON, DOUGLAS F.
AFFLECK,   ROBERT
ALLSEBROOK,  ALAN   ERIC
ATKINSON,  WALTER
BAILEY,    REGINALD    H.
164 • Engineers, as usual in
the Spring, remapped the
campus.
BALOGH,   MIKE
BARAD,   ALLAN
BELLMONT,    FREDERICK    K.
BELLOW,   DONALD
BENNETT, RONALD BRUCE
BLACKERY,  ANDREW  JAS.
BLEATHMAN,  ALAN   ROBT.
BOLTON,  RICHARD JOHN
BORISUK,   JAMES
BROOKS,   FRED  JACKSON
BROWN,   ROBERT   MORDEN
BURGESS,  ROBERT F.
CLARIDGE,  BARRY JOHN
CLISCH, DONALD FRED
COPLAND, GORDON  S.
CORMACK,   GEO.   D.
CORNISH, GEORGE HENRY
CROMIE, MICHAEL V.  A
CRUMMY,  RICHARD W.
CSEPE, ALEX HENRY
DARKE,   ERNEST   WILFRED
DARKE,  H.  KENNETH
DEETH,   FRANK   STEWART
DEMOPOULOS,     GEORGE
DEVLIN,   RUSSELL  JONES
DEW,  CHARLES   ROBERT
DICK,  GERALD  ROY
DIETIKER,  WALTER
DITTO.ROY ORIN
DONALDSON,  WM.   RUSSELL
DOUGLAS, IAN M.
EDMONDS,    ARTHUR
ELLIP,   HARRY
ELVIDGE, GEORGE
ESTELLE,   RALPH   A.
FALL,   STEWART   T.
FLYNN,   ROBERT   ALLEN
GONG,     NELSON
FORREST,  DAVID  B.
FOSTER,    JOHN    HAROLD
FUKUZAWA,   HIROSHI   ROY
GALE,   ROBERT   MELVIN
GIBSON,   GARRY   ANDREW
GIEGERICH, JOSEPH  D.
GLASSNER,    IRVING
GLEIG,   DONALD  B.   F.
GRANT,   DONALD   STEWART
GRIER,  BOYD  B.  A.
GRIFFIN,   JAMES   R.
GRUNO,   ROBERT  STANLEY
HARPER,  LAWRENCE M.
HOGG, CLIFFORD  CHAS.
HOUSTON, JOSEPH JOHN
HOWE,    LAWRENCE    MARTIN
HULSE,   JOSEPH   HUGH
JOHNSON,    CARL    ROBT.
JOHNSON,   RAYMOND   GEO.
JONES,   HAROLD   MERVIN
JUDYSKI,   NICHOLAS
KEELE,  KENNETH  DENNIS
KELSEY,   HARLEY  EDWARD
KITSON, MICHAEL  R.
KOMARNICKY,  WALTER
KOYANAGI,    MUTSUO
LARSON,   ERNIE   ANDREW
LEE, GEORGE
LITTLE,   WILLIAM   BLAIR
MAH,   EDWARD   JUN
MARANDA,   LAURIE  GENE
MARTIN,   HAROLD   CHAS.
McCANDLESS,  BRUCE  K.
McDONALD,   WM.   H.
H-lrfJL
_____
165
3_jl& MacGILLIVRAY, A   DEAN
McGRAW,   JAMES   JOHN
MacGREGOR,   EDWIN   ROBT.
McGUIRE,   JAMES   DANIEL
Mac I NTOSH,   DOUGLAS   A.
McKAY, J.  R.  MONTE
MELENKA,  ROY  EUWARD
MIDDLETON,   KEITH   J.     '
MORLEY,   GORDON   ARTHUR
MUSSIO SERGIO
MYKYTIUK,  LAURENTIUS
NEWSON,  EARLE  KENNETH
NIELSEN, KENT
SHIU   SAMUEL   DO   WING
SMITH,  ALLAN   ROBERT
SMITH,     ROBT.     WESLEY
SPEER,   EARL   WESLEY
SPINDLER,    GEORGE    BRAY
SPURGIN,   ROBIN   HUGH
STROTHER, ARTHUR JAS.
SULLIVAN,  JOHN  T.
TAYLOR,   WILLIAM    H.
TOWRISS,  CHARLES A.
TRACEY,   WILLIAM   ROSS
TREMAINE,   ALAN   W.
VEALE,   ALAN   DECOVERLY
VERESCHACK,   DAVID  P.
VIVIAN, GORDON   EDWARD
WALLIS,   GEORGE   GRAHAM
WALSH,    JOHN
WALTON,   RICHARD  J.
WATSON,   JOHN   A
WEIDMAN,   LAWRENCE  A
WEIR,  CLIFFORD   STEWART
WHITE,  DAVID  OLANDER
WILSON,   WM.   RICHARD
WOOD,   PATRICK   O'HARA
WOODHOUSE,   DALE   H.
YIP,  HOY  WING
YOUNG,  SOO GEE
ZELIKOVSKY,    ABE
NURSING
VERESHACK,  DAVID  P.
ATCHISON, MARGARET
BACON,  JANICE
CANT,  DAWN
CRAWFORD,  JOAN
CREHAN,  PAT
FISHER,  JOAN
GEL,  LILA
KINGSBURY, JOAN
MANZER,  MAVIS
MARSHALL, JANE
McKENZIE,   CAROL
PATERSON, DIANA
PERRY,  PAT
RUSSELL, PAT
WELTON, BETH
WRENCH,  MARY
166 ARCHITECTURE
RRONGER,   JOHN   T.
CAPLING,  ARTHUR  JAMES
GILMOUR, JAMES  F.
HALEY,   R.  WELDON
IREDALE,    WM.    RANDLE
JENKINS,   DAVID   L
McCOY,   DONAID   A.
RENNIE,   WILLIAM  W.
STUBBS,  GEORGE   EDWARD
WETHERILL,   EWART  A.
ARCHAMBAULT,    RICHARD
COULTER,   DONALD   W.
HOLLAND, ARTHUR M.
HORNE,    DAVID    ERNEST
LOUKES,  E.  PATRICK
MacDONALD   JOHN   BLAIR
MacLEOD,   ROBERT   K.
MIRKO,   IVAN    GEORGE
NEADS,  CHARLES  JOHN
NEKRASSOFF,   URY
PEARCE,   DONALD  R.
ROWETT,   CLYDE   DANCY
BARCLAY,   LAWRENCE   E.
BARNES,   A.    GEORGE
BERNARD,   DONALD   BRUCE
BOLTWOOD,   DENIS  F.
DODDS,   ARTHUR   H.   B.
EASTON,   CHARLES    H.
EWING,    ROGER    KEITH
GISKE,    RICHARD    CARL
HARTLEY   GORDON    D.
HOWARTH,   KENNETH   W.
JONES,    NORMAN    SIDNEY
KERR, MARY ELAINE
KUMERMAN,   PAL   JONAH
MANN,   DEREK   SPALDING
McLAREN,  JOHN  ALBERT
NELSON,   RONALD   KEITH
OSWALD,   JOHN   KENNETH
RAND,   BARRY  ALLAN
SMEETH,   ROGER   W.
WILES,    FRANKLIN    A
YOUNG,  CLIFFORD  M.
THIRD
YEAR
167 ARTS
After struggling to keep alive since the end of the
war, the Arts Undegraduate Society finally died a
natural death. The president decided to go into Law,
and other executive members abandoned Arts for other
faculties.
No one was willing to take their places, and the
largest undergraduate group on the campus was left
without an organization. The Engineers came to the
rescue and tried to revive their old rivals, but the Arts-
men still refused to be organized.
When the corpse was finally buried, there was a mad
scramble for the Arts two hundred dollar budget. It
finally went to women's athletics and to the clubs, in
spite of representations by the Engineers that they actually comprised the Arts Undergraduate Society.
Today the Arts Undergraduate Society is only a
name. On the following pages of the Totem are the
faces of those who refused to be regimented.
• Above: Although Arts students didn't have an Undergraduate
Society, its members participated in many of the affairs put on
by other organizations. The tea dances in Brock Hall were
popular.
• Left: Sorority pledges
wait in line to be officially presented during the
"Pledges on Parade"
formal.
• George and Bill supervised the behaviour of the
students who frequented
Brock Hall.
•    Above:  A  strenuous   game   of  table  tennis   keeps
Artsmen fit for higher mental process.
Left: The January snows gave many opportunity for new forms of outdoor sports.
Bill St. John and Ann Willis are the protagonists.
Sore feet from bookstore line-ups can be
cured by vigorous shuffling. Some wore
out a complete pair of shoes.
168 • Below: The Canadian Officers' Training
Corps and the University Naval Training Detachment  learn  the  essentials  of  military  logistics.
• Right: When the Brock totem pole was
removed for repairs, one of the human variety
was assembled to take its place. The "Thunderbird" soon tired of flapping its wings, however,
and only a large steel bar remained. Open
House saw the return of the legitimate resident,
in bright paint and new carving.
•    Right:     Some   worked   in   the
seclusion of their rooms.
• Below: Others preferred company in the Library.
• Lower right: Taking a chance
on safe transportation via the
Marine Drive speedway.
169 3RD   YEAR  ARTS
ACHTYMICHUK,    EDNA    F.
ADAMS,    BONNIE
ALEXANDER,   S.
ALEXANDER,  THOMAS  K.
ANDERSON,   FRERERICK   R.
ARCHIBALD,   EDWARD   M.
ARNAUD,  JOSEPH   FRANK
ARNOLD,   JACQUELINE   R.
AUERBACH,   D.   DOROTHEA
AUSTIN,  HAROLD AARON
AUSTIN,    JACOB
AVISON,    MARGARET   LYNN
BABCOCK,    DOUGLAS    ROBT.
BACON,  DENIS  F.
BADANIC,    JOHN    STEVE
BALABKINS,   ANTONIDA
BALDWIN,  MARION
BALLA,    BRIGITTA
BARRIEAU,   DONN   M.
BAXTER,   PETER
BAXTER,     MAUREEN     E.
BEACH,  ALAN  WINSTON
BEBB,    DOUGLAS    EVAN
BECKETT,   DANIEL C.
BEHM,   LEONA  MARY
BENNETT,   LOIS   ELLEN
BERRY,   KENNETH
BETTS,  GLEN  JARED       |
BIELY,  GEORGE GORDON
BINNS, BARBARA E.
BIRD,   MARY
BIRD,   JOHN   RODERICK
BISHOP,  PETER W.   V.
BLACK,   C.   ELIZABETH
BLAND,    ROBERT   C.    J.
BLOCK,   ARTHUR   JOHN
BOULDING,   WILLIAM   D.
BOWELL,  SHIRLEY  ANNE
BRADSHAW,  CHARLES  A.
BRAIDWOOD,   THOMAS   R.
BRAIDE,  PENELOPE  ANN
BREWER, SHIRLEY  L.
BROOKE,     PATRICIA     ANNE
BROST,  ELROY  RICHARD
BROWNE,   ELIZABETH   J.
BRUCE,   RONALD  P.
BRYANS,    DAVID   GARTH
BUCKINGHAM,    IAN    P.    B.
BURNS,   PATRICK   ARTHUR
BURR, JOHN BARTLETT
BURTON,   ALEXANDER   D.   K.
BUSH,   HAROLD  TIMOTHY
BUTLER,  PETER WOODS
BUXTON,  RICHARD B.
CALDER,    LOREN
CAMPBELL,   SHIRLEY   C.   J.
CAPLE,  F.  JANET L.
CARSTENS, PATRICIA J.
CASSADY,   GEORGE   P.
CATHERALL, GEORGE WILLIAM
CAUFIELD,    PETER   J.        ,
CAVETT,   RONALD   WM.
CHAMBERLAIN,   J.
CHIDDELL,   PHILIP   REX
CHONG  HENRY
CHOMA, ANNIE
CHRISTIE,    MARY    GRACE
CHRISTOPHER,  ROBERT  E
CIMOLAI,  BRUNO  PETER
CLARK, ALAN  MATHEW
CLARK, COLIN  W.
CLARK,   MARGERY  ANN
CLARK,   MICHAEL   D.
CLARK, DAPHNE
COCK,   ELIZABETH  JOAN
COLLINSON,  DONALD M.
CONNOLLY,   PHILIP   H.
CONSTABARIS,   JOHN
COOKSEY,   RALPH   DAVID
COON,   CHARLES   J.
COOPER,   BRENDA   B.
COUTTS,   DOREEN   MARY
COUSINS,  JAMES AYLMER
CRAWFORD,   DOUGLAS G.  M.
CREIGHTON,  DENIS  W.   H.
CRICKMAY,   MARIAN   C.
CROSSMAN,   AUDREY   E.
CROUTER,   RICHARD   A.
CUMMINGS,   DAPHNE   JUNE
CURR, ROBERT. J.
DANNER, WM.  EDWARD
DAVID,   ROBERT   JAMES
DAVIES,   JOAN   MARGARET
DAVIES,   WILLIAM    HUGH
DAVIES,   ISABELLE   F.
170 • Engineers graciously
offered to revive the defunct Arts Undergraduate
society and initiate its
members in the lily pond,
but nobody turned up and
crowds waited in vain for
the big event.
• Frosh received their
usual dunking in the lily
pond.
DAVIS, THOMAS WILFRED
DAY,   BREND   AMICHAEL
DAY,    HARRY    WALLACE
DEEBLE,   DOUGLAS   H.
DEVICK,  LOUISE
DICKIE, JOAN GRACE
DOBSON,   JACK  WALTER
DODEK,    SALLY
DODSON,   EARL   DAVID
DOERKSEN,  JAKE
DOLINSKY,   VERONICA  T.
DOWLING,   NORAH  JUNE
DRIVER,  SHIRLEY MAE
DUNCAN,   RICHARD   D.
DUNCAN,   EDWARD   DAVID
EDGAR,  JOHN   CHARLES
ELVIN,   MEMORY   P.   F.
ENDERTON, STEWART WM.
ENGMAN,   HENRY ESKO
ERRICO,  ROBT.  THOS. G.
ESSELMONT,   PATRICIA   A
EVANS,   TEGWIN   JACK
FARMER,   GEOFFREY   HORN
FARNCOMBE, SCOT
FAULKNER, DONALD A
FERA,  RONALD GABRIEL
FERGUSON,   CHAS.  WM.
FILER,  RODERICK  G.  M.
FINNEMORE, BRIAN  I.
FLATHER,  BARRIE C.
FLETCHER,  S.   LOUISE
FORBES,    ELIZABETH    J,
FORBES,  WILLIAM  G.
FORMAN, ALLAN  GUY
FORTESCUE,   JOHN   A,   C.
FOURNIER,   CYRIL
FOXGORD,  ALFRED   N.
FRASER,   WM    PHILLIP
FREDRICKSON,   JOHN   M.
FREEMAN,  MARGARET  B.
FRITZKE,  ARTHUR  CHAS.
FROST, RAYMOND H.
FURNISS,  PATRICIA  K.
GAIN,   DONALD   B.   M.
GALBRAITH,  L.  T.  CRAIG
GALBRAITH,  GEORGE WM.
GAYNER,   ROBERT   H.
GEORGE,   DONALD   HALL
GIBBARD,  KENNETH  CHAS.
CLIFFORD,   BRUCE  C.
GILL,  GERALD  A.
GOLDING,   RICHARD   H. T.
GOLDSMITH,   DANIEL
GOWER,  FRANK W.
GRAY,   ROBERT   S.I
GREEN,   MYRA   LEE
GREYSON,  RICHARD  I.
GROVE,   EDWARD   W.
GRUBB,  E.  MARGARET
HALL,  JOHN  VERNOIN  GEO.
HALL,  RICHARD TOMAS
HALLAM,   HUGH  TREVOR
HALLIS,  PAMELA   ELYNOR
HAMILTON,   PATRICA   A
HANCOCK,  RONALD JOHN
HARDWICK, WALTER G
HARNETTY,  PETER
HARRIS,  DAPHNE J. G.
HARRISON,   ESTHER
HARTMAN,  GORDON   F.
HARVEY, EVELYN  F. A.
HATCHER,   FRANK S.
171 i___i
HATT, HAROLD ERNEST
HENDSBEE,   LYLA   LEE
HENSLOWE,  PETER J. L.
HERBERT,  DOROTHY C.
HODGERT,  R.   LORRAINE
HOOD,  ALAN   BRUCE
HORN,   JAMES  THOMAS
HORSFIELD,   BARBARA   ...
HOSHOWSKI,  EUGENE
HOWARTH,  ALAN  FIRTH
HUGH,  REES  L.
HUMBER, GORDON  LESLIE
HUTCHINS,   DONALD  JOHN
IMAI, GORDON SHOZO
INOUYE,   KIYOKO
JACKSON, WILFRED K.
JACOBSEN, WILLIAM A.
JAMES, LAURA MARGARET
JOHNSON,   ARTHUR   R.
JOHNSON,   C.   A   DOUGLAS
JOHNSON,  ROSS  A.
JONES,   GEORGE   HERBERT
JONES,  GARTH
JONES,   ROBERT  ARTHUR
JONES, WILLIAM CHAS.
JULIUS,  ROBERT S.
KALICHACK, ANTHONY,  A.
KEENAN,   ARTHUR   JOSEPH
KENYON,   WALTER   ANDREW
KERRIGHAN,   DONNA   RUTH
KILLAM, G.  DOUGLAS
KING,  ROBERT  DANIEL
KIRK,  ORIS J.
KLAPSTOCK, KENNETH
KNOERR, DONALD ALFRED
KUNEKEN, JULIA T.
KYLE,  LESLEY J.
KYLE,  JOHN   DAVID
LAMM, MAGDA  ELIZABETH
LANGBEIN, SHIRLEY A
LARSON,  RICHARD A.
LAURIE,  KENNETH  ALAN
LAURSEN,   AUDREY   P.   H.
LAWRENCE,   ELIZABETH   A
LAWRENCE,   WILLIAM   J.
LAY,  WOO   POK
LEE,  EDWARD  GRAHAM
LEIGHTON,   KENNETH   H.
LERVOLD,  SOLVEIG  K.
LESAGE,   THEODORE   WM.
LIGGINS,  M.   DIANE   -
LOGIE,  ROY
LOMAS,   BRUCE
LOOSMORE, T.   ROBERT
LOVEGROVE,   GEORGINA   M.
LOWES,  H.  ANN
LOWTHER,  JOHN   JEROME
MAH,   JEANETTE   E.
MARCUZZI,   LILLIAN  J.
MASON, GEOFFREY  P.
MATHESON,  M.  C.   MURRAY  .
MATTHEWS,   G.   RICHARD   R.
MAYOH,   HELEN   MARGARET
McAFEE, NINA JEAN
McAfee, mary natalie
McAllister, jean a.
McAllister, carey d.
McArthur, Hubert g. '
Mccormick, lindsay l.
McCRAE,  JOHN
MocDONALD,   A   EDWARD
MacDONALD,   M.  A.
MacDONALD,   NORMAN   G
McGHEE,   JOHN   JAMES
McGIVERIN, SHEILA F.
McGregor, john c.
MaclNTYRE, JAMES D.
MacKAY,  ALISTAIR  R.
McKAY,   C.   HEATHER
MacKENZIE,    SHEILA     E
MacKENZIE,    IAN    M.
McLACHLAN,  DONALD C.
MacLEAN,  NORMAN  M.
McLEAN,  EDWARD  HARRY
MacLEOD,   ROSEMARY M.
MacLEOD,  EVANDER F.
McNEIL,  FLORENCE  ANNE
McRAE,   MARILYN   JOAN
MacRAE,   CATHERINE  D.
McRAE,   MARIE   MARGARET
MERSON,  STANLEY  RAE
MIDDLEON,  ROBERT  M.
MILLMAN,  JOHN  EARLE
MITCHELL,  ANDREW  D.
MOEN,  JULIAN  B.
MOISEY,   JOHN   ALEX
172 • Majorettes looked pert
and purty all year; worked
hard to get routines perfect for the many parades
in  which  they  appeared.
• UBC cheerleaders put
some pep into the cheers
during the football season.
MOORE, SHEILA G.
MORGAN,   JOHN  HERBERT
MORGAN, VICTOR 0.
MORLEY,  ELLEN  MARIE
MORONEY,  JAMES   K.IJ.
MORRIS,   LOIS  ALETA
MOSCOVITZ,   AARON
MUGFORD,    RICHARD    N.
MULHERN,   MAURICE  P.
MUNN,  ROBERT  E.  D.
MUNDAY,   JENIFER   GRACE
MUNRO,  MARY   FRANCES
MURRAY,   DORIS   ARDEN
NACCARATO,   ERNEST   N.
NAMIESIOWSKI,  CONRAD
NANN,   RICHARD
NAYLOR,  LOIS RUTH
NELSON,  BEVERLY ANN
NETTLETON, DOREEN
NEWSTEAD,  JAMES  D.  M.
NICOLLS, GEO.  RICHARD
NORTHCOTE,   KENNETH   E.
NYLANDER,   CLIVE   V.
O'CONNOR,   GERALD   F.
OGILVIE,   ROBT.  TOWNLEY
OKABE,   HITOSHI
ORMAN,  ANDREW   R.
PALMER,  GERARD  MORGAN
PANKRATZ,  HARRY E
PARTRIDGE,  JANET  D.
PASHNIK,   VICTOR   THOS.
PAUL, YVONNE PATRICIA
PEARCE,   WILLIAM   G.
PEARKES,  JOHN  ANDRE
PEARSON,  SHIRLEY  J.
PEEBLES,   MARJORIE   H.
PERETZ,   DWIGHT   IRVING
PERRON,  GEORGETTE  M.
PHILLIPS,   BRIAN   F.
PHILLIPS,   A.   M.
PISAPIO,  LLOYD M.   W.
PITCAIRN,  ALICE  ANN
PLUM,  ROBERT  COOPER
POUND,  KATHLEEN  L.
POUSETT,   GORDON   H.
PRICE, STANLEY JAMES
PROKOP,   EDWIN   JOSEPH
PUIL,  GEORGE  JOHN
QUENVILLE,   NOEL   F.
RAPANOS,  GEORGE PETER
RATZLAFF,  JOHN
RAY,   MARTIN   HUGO
RICHARDSON,   RUTH   D.
RIDLEY,  JOHN  CHAS,  T.
RISK,    JAMES    BERRYMAN
RITHALER,  EDWARD  P.
RITCHIE,   INA   J.
ROBERTSON,   MARY   C.
ROBERTSON,   RUSSELL  B.
ROGERS,   ROGER   HAYWARD
ROHLOFF,   ROBERT  JOHN
ROOTMAN,   MANUEL
ROSE,  SHELAGH  ANN
ROSS,   JANET   ELIZ.
ROTHERY, J. MICHAEL
ROWAN,   JOHN   FREDERICK
RUTHERFORD,   TERRENCE  F.
RYBKA,   TED   WESLEY
RYE,   ROBIN   TILLEY  B.
SANFORD,   PETER   L.
SARGENT,   RICHARD   WM.
SAWYER, JACQUELINE  P.
173 SCHELTGEN, ELMER
SCORGIE,   JAMES   T   .
SCOT, JOHN ALFRED
SEARS, CHARLES JOHN
SEDLACK,   RONALD
SERL,   VERNON   CLAUDE
SHANAHAN,  PATRICIA M  «
SHEWCHUK,  WILLIAM
SHLAFMITZ, JANET  RUBY
SIMONETTA,   LUIGI   R.
SIMPSON,  ADELHEID D.
SMITH,  BENJAMIN   F.
SMITH, JEAN MARY
SMITH,  MARION  ANN
SMITH,  PETER  LAWSON
STALKER,    MARGUERITE
STANLEY,   VERA   MARIE
STANSFIELD,   NOEL   KARL
STANTON,   RODGER   CYRIL
STARK,  MARVIN
ST.  CLAIR,   HARRY  W.
STEPHENS,   ELLEN   MARY
STEVENS,   JOHN   OLIVER
STEWARD,   MARY   E.
STEWART, ALAN  EDWARDS
STEWART,  CHAS.  NEWBY
STEWART,   GORDON   A.
STEWART,   KATHLEEN   E.
STICHNEY, SARAH  ANNE
STOBART,  PATRICIA ANNE
STONE,    SHEILAGH   S.
STRACHAN,    ROBERT    A.
SUNDHER, W.  BOSSO
SUSSEL, WALTER HENRY
SUTHERLAND, SHIRLEY A.
SUTHERLAND,  SHIRLEY  A.
SWANSON,  MAX
TAIT,  WINIFRED  G.   M.
TAMBOLINE,   BEVERLEY   L.
TAYLOR,   DON   NEWMAN
TAYLOR,   MARY  CAMPBELL
TEMPLEMAN,   PETER   N.
THYGESEN,  JOHN
TKACHUK,   RUSSELL
TOBAN,  SHEILA   ESTELLE
TOPPING,  WILLIAM   E.
TRAFTON,   WALTER   DAVID
TRESIZE,   DAVID   K.
TRIMBLE,   MURIEL   GRACE
TROTTER, JOHN  M.
TSUMURA,   EDNA
TUNBRIDGE, VICTOR  H.
TURPIN, J.  E. HARTLEY
UNDERHILL,   W.   RICHARD
UNWIN, CLINTON,   L.  R.
URQUHART,    ROY    KEITH
VALENTINE,  G.  DOUGLAS
VANDERVLIET,   EDWARD   L.
VANSTONE,  CLARENCE  L.
VAUGHAN,  JACK  STEPHEN
VOGEL,   BETTY  LOUISE
WALKER,  CARL   IAN
WALKER,    FREDERICK    JAS.
WALKER,   GLEN    HARRIS
WALKER,   JOANNE
WALL,   DAVID   E.
WALLACE,   WILLIAM   K.
WALLICK, CAROLE ANN
WATT, JOHN
WEINSTEIN,   LILLIAN
WHITE,  ANNIE   ISABELLE
WHITTAKER,   JOHN   N.
WHITFORD,   DOUGLAS V.
WIENS,  JOHN  HAROLD
WILLIAMSON,   LOIS
WILLIS,  ANN  DORCAS
WILLINS,   ROSEMARY   M.   J.
WILLOUGHBY,  JOHN  A.
WILTSE,  ELIZABETH J.
WILTSE,   PATRICIA   ANN
WOLSTENCROFT,  JOAN   E.
WONG,  JOSEPHINE  C.
WOODWARD,   ROBERT  S.
WOOSTER,  SHIRLEY   H.
WRIGHT,  DOUGLAS  A.
WYNNE,   WILLIAM  E.
YIPP,   FLORENCE   H.
ZINDLER,   RAINER
2ND  YEAR  ARTS
ABBOTT,  JOHN  MELVYN
ABRAMS, KENNETH DON
ADAMS,  AUDREY  MARILYN
ALSTON,   ROBIN   CARFRAE
ANDRERSEN,   RICHARD
ANDERSON,  JOHN  ALEX
ANDERSON,   MICHAEL   E.
174 • Brock loungers became
bridge addicts a few weeks
after  lectures   started.
• Leading campus personalities took time out for
coffee in the Brock Hall
snack bar.
ANGEL,  JEROME   HARVEY
ANTROBUS,   JOHN   S.
ARCHER,   DOROTHY
ARMSTRONG,  JOHN   E.
AULD, IAN JAMES M.
BABCOCK, PATRICIA A.
BABCOCK,   MARY   ELLEN
BAKER,  GLEN  WORSFOLD
BANNO,   MASAKAZU   PAT
BANNING,   DAVID   A.
BARCLAY,   ESTRUP JAUL
BARRIE,   IRENE  J.
BARTLETT,  ARTHUR  WM.   F.
BASFORD, STANLEY R.
BASTED,  ROBERT M.
BAXTER,    MARGARET    B.
BAYLIS,   ALBERT   GUY
BEKETOV,   NADIA   ELENA
BELL,   CAMPBELL   BRIAN
BELL,   WM.   ROBINSON   B.
BENINATI,  GLORIA  KAY
BIRKINSHAW,   BEVERLY   L.
BLEDSOE,   M.   YOLANDE
BONIFACE,    R.    A.
BOON,   THELMA   MARLENE
BOREYSZA,  BOLESLAW
BOULTON, JOHN THOMAS
BOWERING,  WM.   DAVID S.
BOYD,   THOMAS   HENRY  H.
BRANDT,   OTTO   JAKE
BREEN,  HARVEY
BROCKINGTON,  DAVID
BROWN,   BERNARD   JOHN
BROWN,   JOAN    ELIZABETH
BROWN,   SALLY   DIAMOND
BRUMMIT,   JOHN   R.
BRYDSON,   JOHN   GORDON
BULLIS,   RICHARD   H.
BURCH,   BARRY   JOHN
BURKE,  RAY  EDWARD
BURY,   MARY   GWENNYTH
BUSCOMBE,   ROBERT    D.
BUTLER,   DAVID
BYBERG,  EDWARD
BYRNE,   CLAIRE   ANNE
BYRNE,   PETER
CABELDU,   H.   ANNETE
CAILLET,  DAVID  G.
CAMERON,   HAMISH   C.
CAMERON,   ANN
CANT,   ISOBEL  ADAIR
CARFRAE, JAMES D.
CARLILE,   COLLIN
CARLSON,   CARL   GLEN
CARLSON,   HARRY   E.
CARLYLE,   JAMES   W.
CARROLL,  J.  FRANKLIN
CARTER,   RICHARD   JAMES
CASPERSON,   RALPH   M.
CASSELLS,  S.   HERBERT
CAVIN,   RONALD  GORDON
CAVEN,    GWENDOLYN    M.
CHARPENTIER,   MAURICE
CHERAMY,    JOHNNY    A.
CHRISTIE,   MARTIN
CHRISTOU,   CATHERINE   F.
CIEBIEN,   THOMAS   JOHN
CIPRICK,  WILLIAM JOHN
CLARKE,  CYNTHIA ANNE
CLYNE,   JOHN   STUART   S.
COCKBURN,   SANDRA   MARY
COHEN, ABRAHAM D.
/_*_£_■ _*k&_ri i../4:,i
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MIfLS.
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175
^   ^  Ok COLTART,  DUDLEY W.
CONNELL,   RAE   ELINOR
COOPER,   C.   KENNETH
COSGROVE,    THEODORE    J.
COX,  RAYMOND  LEE
CRAIN, FINLAY ROSS,
CRANMER,    GLORIA
CREE,  GLADYS  H.
CROSS,  WILLIAM  CHAS.   F.
CUMMINGS,   JOHN   MARTIN
CUTLER,  KEITH   HUGHES
DACK,    DAVID    BARRY    F.
DACHI,  STEVE  FRANK
DATTNER,   SYLVIA   RUTH
DAVENPORT,   DAVID  C.
DAVIES,   JAMES  W.
DAVIS,   MURDOCH   R.
DAVID,  PATRICIA  AUSTIN
DAY,  EPHRIAM  ARTHUR
DAY,   WILLIAM   L.
DICKINSON,    ROBERT
DILLABAUGH,  VERNON W.
DODSON,   FLORENCE   MAY
DONALDSON, WM.  ROBT.
DONE,   RUTH   EILEEN
DONG,   GORDON
DRAPER,   JAMES   ANSON
DUDLEY.   J.    ELIZABETH
DYCK.    HAROLD   JACOB
EASTERBROOK,   AUDREY   H.
EBERTS,   ANTHONY   B.
EDGETT,   WARREN   S.
EGGEN,   FREDERICK   GEO.
EINARSON,    WALTER
ELKINS,   FRANK   GEORGE
ELLERGOT,   GLENNYS   M.
ELLIP,   MAIMO
ELLWOOD,  THOMAS   DONALD
ENDICOTT,   ORVILLE   R.
ENNS,  GEORGE  DONALD
EPP,   WALTER   PETER
ESKO,   SANDFRID   I.
ESSON,   WILLIAM   ARTHUR
FARIS,   KENNETH   H.
FERGUSON,  ISABELLE M.
FINGARSON,  LORNE A.
FLATEN,    BARBARA    ANNE
FLETCHER,     DONA    LOIS
FORD,   FREDERICK  JOHN
FORREST,  DOUG   ELLIOTT
FORWARD.   ALAN   DOUGLAS
FOTHERINGHAM,   M.   ALLAN
FOX. CYLDE F.  D.
FREEMAN,  GEORGE  C.
FRITH,   CLIVE   DONALD
FRITH,   HECTOR   GEE   N
FRODSHAM,  STANLEY  A.
FROESE,    JANS    HERBERT
FULTON,  SYDNEY  BUDWIN
FYFE,  RICHARD  WILLIAM
GALLAGHER,     ROBER    TM.
GARTSIDE,    HELEN   CLARE
GATES,   ALAN   FREDERICK
GELL,   MARIAN  LOUISE
GERWING,   HOWARD  B.
GIBSON,   WILMA   MARY
GILCHRIST,   ALUIN   G.   F.
GILL,    GURDEV    SINGH
GILLARD,    HOWARD    E
GILLIS,   AUSTIN   CHAS.
GODFREY,   RAYMOND   C.
GOLDBLOOM,    THEODORE
GOODALL,   ROGER   C.
GORDON,   MOSES
GORDY,   PETER   LAWRENCE
GOSHKO,   ALEXANDER  W.
GOUGH,    JOAN    ELIZABETH
GRAHAM,  HAROLD  EARL
GRANT,   RICHARD   ALLEN
GRANT,   ELIZABETH  A.
GRANT,   HUGH   JOSEPH
GRANTHAM,    PETER    ROBT.
GREBSKI,  EDWARD S.
GRIFFIN,   SHIRLEY   ANNE
GRIMSTON,  J.  GEORGE
GUILE,   ROBERT  HENRY
GUSTAVSON,    CLARENCE    S.
HAERING,  RUDOLF   R.
HAKSTIAN,    ROBERT   W.
HALFORD,   DAVID  THOMAS
HALL,   K.   MARGARET   L.
HANCOCK,     RAYMOND     H.
HANNA,   ROBERT   A.
HARDWICK,   DAVID   F.
HARDY,   JAMES   EDWARD
HARPER,   JAMES  LEITH
176 HARRIOTT,   ROSALIE   K.
HARRIS, CHARLES G.
HARTMAN,  FAY  HERBERT
HARVEY   ARTHUR   ERIC
HEAL,    DOUGLAS   WALTER
HEDGECOCK,   NIGEL   E.
HEFFERNAN,   DOUGLAS   D.
HEHIR,   PATRICIA   DAWN
HEIDE,   EDMUND
HELLAM,  NEVILLE
HENDERSON   DUNCAN   LEE
HERDMAN   JOHN   R.
HEWISON,  TIMOTHY JOHN
HIBBERD,   JOHN   CYRIL
HICKERNELL,   JEAN    E.
HIKICHI,   MITSURU
HINKE,   JOSEPH   ANTHONY
HOLLOWAY,   BARBARA J.
HOLTBY,  MONICA  S.
HORI,  AIKO
HORNE,   PATRICIA   A.
HOUSTON,    ELIZABETH    L.
HOWARD,   ANNE   BERTHA
HRUSHOWY,  ERNEST .'OS.
HSU,   HSING   CHEN
HUANG,   MONA
HUROV,   HELENE  SHARON
JACKSON,   JOHN   WALTER
JENSEN,   LOIS  AUDREY
JINNOUCHI,   DONALD   M.
JOHNS,   DAVID  GARRET
JOHNSON,   ROBERT S.
JOHNSSON,    ESKIL    L.
JONES,   KENNETH   W.
JONES,   ROBERT   EVANS
KAETHLER,   JAKOB   ADOLF
KARL,  EDMUND ALOIS
KARLSON,    HARRY
KEARNS,   SHEILA   ANNE
KEMP,   FLORENCE   C.
KENAL,   ROMEO
KENNEDY,  JAMES  HENRY
KENT,  GERALD   SPENCER
KERR,   MERVYN   GEORGE
KEW,  JOHN   E.   MICHAEL
KIDD,    GERALD    GORDON
KILLEEN. GERALD  THOS.
KILLAS,    HARRY   JAMES
KILLEEN,    JAMES    WM.
KILPATRICK,   ALLAN   E.
KING,   LAWRENCE  ALAN
KLASSEN,    GERALD    A.
KLASSEN,  JOHN
KLASSEN.   MARGARET
KNIGHT,   IRENE   M.
KONRAD,   DANIEL   B.
KONKIN,   KENNETH
KRAMER,   LOUANNE  C
KREUTZ,   JOHN   JERRY
KUIJT,   JOB
LAHAY,   WM.    DOUGLAS
LEE,   ANNE   ELIZABETH
LEE,  JACK
LEITERMAN,   ALISON    C.
LEUCHTE,   ANNEMARIE   F.
LEVINE,  SEFTON   LEWIS
LIDDLE,  LAURIE   KEITH
LIPTROT,   FRANCES   MARY
LIU,  TZE  TONG
LOEWEN,  CHARLES   B.
LOVETT,  ERIC  TUPPER
LOZOWSKI,   PETER
177
• Exam pressure forced
some students down to the
library basement to gripe
and smoke; others kept at
crowded desks in desperation, since that seemed to
be the only way they could
hold a seat.
_d_7_!__tf I_JI_
i> «_r
_-_f__l. jWm\ •
4 •
n. jj
______?/_
mtu
LUCAS,   BARRY   G
LYNCH,    BARBARA   JOAN
MADDEN,   WILLIAM    K.
MAHRER, EUGENE
MAIR, KENNETH  RAFE
MAKAR,   TARAS
MALKIN.   TOBY
MARKS,  SIEGFRIED      MANHAS, MARY
MARSH,   F.   MICHAEL
MARSHALL,    RONALD    H.
MARTIN,   WENDELLA   JOAN
MARTINKOVA,   HELENA
MATCHETT,    MARILYN    F.
MATHESON, EARL ROGER
MATHESON,    M.    A.
MATHEWS,   ROBIN   DANIEL
McALPINE,   MARY   ALICE
McARTHUR,   JOAN   VELMA
McCAULEY,   DAVID   A   N.
MocBEY,   HELEN   E.
McCOMBER,    GEORGE    C.
McCONVILLE, JOHN M.
McCURRACH,    HELEN     I.
MacDONALD,  HUGH ALLAN
McDONALD,  KENNETH   G.
McDONALD,   JOHN   JEROME
MacFARLANE  GEORGE
McFARLANE,   ROBERT   JAS.
MacGILLIVRAY,    CLARE    A.
McGINNIS,   SHIRLEY   R.
McGONIGAL,   B.   A.
MclLWRAITH,   MARGARET
MaclNTOSH,   JOHN   JAMES
MaclNTYRE,   JAMES   M.
MacKAY,   RAYNER   JOHN
McKINNON,   ALEXANDER
MacLAREN,  ANNE
McLENNAN,    PATRICIA    A.
MacLEOD,  N.  WM.  R.
MacLEOD,  CHAS.   GORDON
McMAHON,   JAMES   P.
McNAMEE,   JAMES   PAUL
McNEELY,    MARGARET    J.
McVICKAR,   ROBERT   H.
MEACHEM,    GWENDOLEYN    S.
MEADOWS,  PHILIP  H.  R.
MENDOZA,   LEON   CHAS.
MERCER,   BARBARA   L.
MERRICK,   FRANCES   E.
MEYERHOFF,  JOHN  W.
MIACHIKA,   ANTON
MILLAR, ALLAN  GREIG
MILLER,   LLOYD   SAMUEL
MILLER,  M.   ELINOR
MILLHAM,    MAXINE    M.
MIMOTO,   MICHIHO
MITAREWSKI,  WALTER  WM.
MITCHELL,   JOAN   E.
MITTON, CHARLES  ROBT.
MITSUSHIO,   MINATO
MIYAGAWA,   MICHIO   M.
MONTGOMERY,   CHAS.    R.
MOORE,   SYLVIA    E.
MORGAN,   JOHN   FRANCIS
MORGAN, WM. WALTER
MORLEY,  CLIFFORD   L
MORRISON,   JACK   HILTON
MORROW,   ANN    BYRON
MORROW,   LORRAINE   E.
MOUNCE,   JOYCE   A.
MOUTRAY,   ANNE   M.
MUIRHEAD, C.   ROBERT
MURRAY,  NANCY JEAN
NABATA,  ATSUSHI
NAGAI,   MARTHA
NAKASHIMA,   ROSALIE
NEEN,    JOHN    JACOB
NELSON,   BARBARA   A.
NELSON,   CLAIRE   LOUISE
NEUMANN,   JOHN   B.
NEWTON,  LINNEA   ANN
NILSON,   VERNA
NISHIZAKI,   HIDEAKI   H.
NORDMAN,   VOLMAR
NORTON,   ROBERT   EDMUND
NOVAKOWSKI,    MARION    R.
O'BRIEN,   P.   BARNEY
OLIVER,   ELIZABETH   J.
OPECHOWSKI,   SYLVIA   M.
PALMER,    FRANK    EDWARD
PARKES,   FRANCIS   A    H.
PETERSON,   DONALD   HUGH
PATTERSON,   CHARLES   A.
PATTERSON,  F.  JAMES  B.
PEARSE,   PETER
178 r:f__
e Caf and Campus Cupboard — where the elite
meet to talk about last
night's date, and to drink
gallons of coffee.
PEARSON,  SHIRLEY   E.
PEASE,   HELEN   CALDWELL
PHIPPS,  JILL   BARNARD
PILON,    BEATRICE   D.
PLECASH, JAMES  MYLES
POTTER,   ROSS  CARSON
PROUD,   BRUCE
PURVIS,   DAVID  G.   S.
QUISTWATER,   JACQUES   M.
RANGER,   AGNES    BETTY   L.
READ,    DALE   WELTON
REE,   GAIL   ALDYEN
REES,   PHILIP   DAVID
REID,   LEWIS   WELDON
REMESZ,  LOUIS  CONRAD
REMPEL,    THEODORE    A.
RENNIE,    JOAN    ANN
RENWICK,   DAVID   WILSON
RESTALL,  LAWRENCE  A.
RIDINGTON,   JOHN   F.
RIDLEY,   WM.    DOUGLAS
RIOPEL,  JEAN   PAUL
RIVETT, JOHN FREELAND
ROBERTS,   THEODORE   A.
ROBERTS,    RICHARD   HUGH
ROBERTS,   W.   TERVELYAN
ROBERTSON,   A.   CHARLES
ROBERTSON,   MARGARET  A.
ROBLIN,   ROBERT  F.
ROSS,   JOHN   KENNETH
ROWLES,   GWENDOLYN   A.
RUNDLE,  HOWARD  N.
SALTER,  MARGARET  C.
SAUL,   BEVERLY  JOAN
SAVORY,   GERALD   NEWTON
SAY,  B.  MARGARET JILL
SCATCHARD,   LAWRENCE   D.
SCHAFFER,  SUSAN
SCHLESINGER,    JOSEPH
SCHOEN,   WALTER   J.    P.
SCHUETZE,   GIDEON   S.
SCOTT,   BARRY   ALISTAIR
SCOTT,   PETER   GILLMAN
SHADBOLT,    IRIS   D.
SHARPE,  ELAINE ALICE
SHAW,   DUNCAN   WELD
SHEARER,    RONALD   A.
SHEPHERD,    BARBARA   J.
SHEWARD,   DOROTHY  M.
SHOBROOK,   LENORA  J.
SHORTHOUSE,   THOMAS   J.
SINGH,   HARPUJAN  JOHN
SINCLAIR,   WM.   GROVER
SKELTON,   CHARLES   PETER
SLACK,  WILLIAM   E.  C.
SLEEMAN,   KENNETH   J.
SOLLOWAY,   RONALD   E.
SOMMERFELDT,   KEITH   D.
SORENSEN,   VIVIAN   D.
SOUTHWELL,    JOHN    R.
SPARLING, A.   DONALDA
STANDFIELD,    DEREK    H.
STANOWSKI,    JAN
STANLOW,    MARGUERITE
STARLING,   CHARLES   E.
STARR,   LEONARD
STATHERS,  JACK   K.
STEELE, PAMELA A.  E.
STEPHENS,  VICTOR  A.
STEWART,   CHARLES
STEWART,    DAVID    JAMES
STEWART,  DONALD G.
179
{ft! _i JL ^'•'___ftH&
STEWART,   PAUL   ROY
STOBBS,  RUTH  E.
STOBBE, LESLIE HAROLD
STOBART,   RODNEY
STOREY,   ROBERT   M.
STRACHAN,  DORIS  ELSIE
STRALENDORFF,  SHIRLEY
STRIDE,   TERENCE   L.
STROHAN, RUTH  PAULINE
STRONG,  ROBERT DENNIS
SUDERMAN,  JACOB  H.
SUTTIS,   J.   A.   PATRICK
SYEKLOCHA,     DELFA
SYMONDS,    JOHN    GARY
TAIT,  BARBARA ANNE
TANAKA,   TSUGIO
TATE,  WILLIAM   HARMAN
TAYLOR,   JEAN   DAVIDSON
TAYLOR,   STEPHEN   W.   A.
TAYLOR,   SYBIL   MARION
TEASDALE,   DONALD   N.
TENENBAUM,   SALLY
TERPENNING,  JOHHN   G.
THOMAS,    MEREDITH    R.
THOMPSON,   ROBERT  C.
THORSTEINSON,   K.  V.
THRASHER,   DOROTHY   ANN
TINKER,   ROBERT   PERCY
TOBLER,   ERIKA  SYLVIA
TOMKINS,   EVELYN   M.
TOMBOSSO,    ALEXANDER
TOPOROWSKI,    JEAN     P.
TORTORELLI, RALPH L.
TOWGOOD,  JAMES GORDON
TOWNSEND,  EARL
TRAPPITT,   NANCY,   L.  A.
TRUNKFIELD,    CHRIS    J.
TSE,  YU  TIN
TUPLING,   GEORGE   D.
TURNBULL,    IAN   MARR
TWAITES,   BEVERLEY  JAS.
VTITMAA,   ERNA
VALE,   LORNA
VERMA,    BEHARI    LAL
WADDEN,   MAUREEN   E.
WAJNRYB,   SERGE
WALKER,   ROY   FRANCIS   P.
WALKER,   TERENCE    R.
WALLACE,   WM.   CLARKE
WANJOFF,   PETER
WASSICK,    DOROTHY    E.
WATT,  CHARLES  A.
WELSH,   HELEN  ANNE
WHITE,  GORDON  ALLAN
WHITTAKER,   DAVID   NEIL
WIEDRICK,   MERLE  V.
WIGEN,   VERNON   RAE
WILBEE,  G.   STANLEY
WILLFORT, AGNES LORNA
WILLIAMS,    DOUGLAS   L.
WILSON,   RICHARD   FLOY
WILSON,   WALTER   G.
WITT,  MARION  GAIL
WONG,   GEORGE  T.
WOOD,  CONNLA  THOMAS
WORRALL,   WILLIAM   JOS.
WRIGHT,   JANIE   DIANE
WRIGHT,   ROBERT   LESLIE
WRIGHT,   VALERIE
YAMNY, JACK WILLIAM
YIP,   HANEY  WING
YOUNG,   ENID   D.   ANNE
ZAKLAN,   GEORGE   L.
ZELONKA,  ANNA  JEAN
ZILKE,   EDWARD   RUDOLPH
ZLOT,   THOMAS   A.
AARON,   BARBARA   SHARON
ADAMSON,   ROBT.  SIDNEY
ALBERS,   CARL   HARRY
ALDER,   DOROTHY  ELAINE
ALDEN,   ROSEMARY  SELMA
ALLAN,  BEVERLEY  ANN
ALLAN,   BARBARA   MUIR
ALLEN,   ELIZABETH   LYNE
ALLEN,   JAMES   B.
ALLEN,    ROBERT   J.    E.
ALLMAN,  SAM ALLISON,    DONALD    E.
ALLWOOD,   PATRICK   V.
ANDERSON,  H.   SHELAGH
ANDERSON,  HENRY  WM.
ANDERSON,   JUSTINE   M.
ANDERSON,   KENNETH   WM.
ANDERSON,   SHIRLEY   E.
ANDREEN,  PEGGY LOU  E.
180 • Frosh took the first prize
award in the Homecoming
Parade with this float
showing babies in a playpen.
Frosh executive,     ably
led    by Jim    MacDonald,
planned activitits for the
year.
ANDREW,   DOUGLAS   FRED
ANTHONY,  ALAN   GERALD
ARCHER,   LEONARD   T.
ARMSTRONG,   A   GORDON
ARNET,    EDWARD,   JOHN
ARROWSMITH,   H.   JILLIAN
BACK,    JOAN    BROOK
BACON,   TERENCE   C.
BAIKIE,  WILLIAM   E.
BAIRD,   BEVERLEY ANN
BAIRD, MacLEAN  DUGALD
BAKER,  LOOE  ADELE
BALDWIN, RICHARD WM. W.
BALL,   DAVID   EDWARD
BANFIELD,  JOHN ALLEN
BARCLAY,    DONALD    H.
BARLEE, JOHN WILLIAM
BARRON,   DAVID  WALLACE
BARRY,   JOHN   HARVEY
BATES,   DAVID   NEVILLE
BAXTER,  CATHERINE  A.
BAXTER,   ALLEN
BAYES,   MELVILLE   ROY
BECK,   HOWARD   L.
BEECHER,   DENYS   LYMAN
BENNETT,   ARTHUR   L
BENSON,   MARILYN   ANN
BERNSTEIN,   LAWRENCE  A
BERRY,   RUTH   LILLIAN
BERSON,  HAROLD  R.
BERTELSEN,    ELLEN   M.
BERTELSEN,     ESTHER     K.
BEST,  WILLIAM  ALBERT
BIASUTTI,   DICK
BIRCH, JOHN ALFRED
BISHOP,   JANET   V.
BJARNASON,   WILLIAM   M.
BLACK,   JOYCE   BEVERLEY
BLAKE,   DENNIS  GEO.
BOE,   KENNETH   INGE
BOLTON,  MARJORIE A   .
BONE,  ROBERT MARTIN
BORG,   RONALD   PETER
BOTH AM,   LYNN   NINA   P.
BOUCHLA,    EFF'E
BOUCHLAS,   THALES   P.
BOURNE,   ROBERT   K.   T.
BOULDING, JOHN  DAVID
BOURNS,   CHAS.   DAVID
BOWKER,   ARTHUR   JAMES
BOYD,  ROBERT
BOYLE,  ERNEST   EDWARD
BRADY,   EDWARD  C.
BRANCA,   RICHARD   FRANK
BRANTON,   KENNETH   GEEO.
BRASSO,    HENNING    P.
BRETT,   CONRAD    PAUL
BREZDEN,  JESSIE  PEARL
BRIDGES,   J.    HARVEY
BROCK,   PATRICK   W.   G.
BROWN,  BARRY  FRANCIS
BROWN,   ELEANOR   MARIE
BROWN,   HUGH   A.
BROWN,    JOHN    MELVIN
BROWN,   PHYLLIS  JOAN
BROWN,  KENNETH  GRAHAM
BROWN,  OWEN  ROBERT
BROWN,   RITCHIE   W.   J.
BROWN,    VILMA    JOAN
BRUNDETT,    ELEANOR   L.
BUCKLEY,   GLEN   JAMES
BUCKLAND,   HAROLD   C.
»l W*_4 S
l__tti_ ;:«tfl
181 i*it«
BUECKERT,    LAMBERTINA
BUNBURY, ALEXANDER C
BURLEY,   RONALD   N.
BURLEY,    PATRICIA    B.
BURROWS,   MARJORIE   L.
BURTON,   WM.   DONALD
BUSH,    PATRICK,    GEO.    S
BUTT,  DONALD  GRANT
BUTTERFIELD,   ELIZABETH
BYBERG,    ROBERT
BYRNE,    KATHLEEN   P.    D.
CADELL,  THEODORE  E.
CAINE,   MARY   NANETTE
CALDWELL,   CHAS.   BRUCE
CAMERON,   EDNA   E.
CAMPBELL,  DENNIS
CAMPBELL,  JOYCE A.
CAMPBELL,   DOREEN   L.
CAPLE, RODERICK B.
CARLSON,   ROBERT   IVAR
CARNSEW,  THOS.  NEILL
CAROLAN,   HEATHER   B.
CARPENTER, SHARON M.
CARR,   MARILYN   C.
CARSWELL,  HENRY THOS.
CARSTENS,   BETTY ANNE
CARTER,   FLORENCE   E.
CARTER,   JOHN   HERBERT
CASS,   RICHARD   VINCENT
CASSELLS,    DOROTHY    E.
CATES,    SUZANNE   A
CAVE,   DONNA  MARY  P.
CHADWICK,   NORMAN  G.
CHAMBERLAIN,   JOS.  A
CHANG, EARL
CHAPMAN, CLIFTON WM.
CHAPMAN,   MORAG   AGNES
CHARLESWORTH,   JAMES   D.
CHARTERS,   SHEILA   RUTH
CHASTER, GERALD  D.
CHESS,    RUTH    SADIE
CHESS,   MARTIN   RAYMOND
CHILLCOTT,   DORIS  J.
CHRISTIE,   HELEN W.
CIARNIELLO, DOMINIC
CINITS,  EDDIE
CLARIDGE, RONALD WM.
CLARK,  GLENN A.
CLARKE,  BETTY  MARION
CLARKE, THELMA MAY
CLAYTON,   JAMES   W.
CLIFF,  JOSEPH   HAROLD
COLEMAN,  LYMAN  R.
COLLETT,   BRUCE   RILEY
COLLINS,     PETER    R.
COLLS,    JOHN    MICHAEL
CON,   RONALD  JONATHAN
CONLIN,    PATRICIA   ANN
CONSTABARIS,  PENELOPE
COOK,   ROBERT   LEIGHTON
COOK,   T.    BEVERLEY   J.
COOKE,   ROLAND   HARVEY
COOPER,   A.   MILDRED
COOPLAND,    ASHLEY    T.
CORNER,   IAN  JAMES   R.
CORNISH,   ELIZABETH   M.
COULTAS,   HELEN   LOIS
COX,  ARTHUR  GRAHAM
COX,  BRIAN  DOUGLAS
CRANE,  TERRANCE   P.
CROKER,  PATRICIA ANN
CROY,    JANIS
CROWE,   CLAYTON   THOS.
CROWTHER,   JOHN   WM.   F.
CUMMING,    JEAN    E.
CUMMING,   STUART  BRUCE
CUMPSTON, SALLY M.
CURRIE,    ARCHIE    P.
CUSTOCK,    JOSEPH    JOHN
DALGLEISH,    NEIL    S.
DANARD,   MAURICE   B.
DAVIDSON,   DAVID   GEO.
DAVIDSON,  ALAN   THOMAS
DAVIDSON,   JOHN  COOPER
DAVIDSON,   LAWRENCE   A
DAVIDSON,   PATRICIA   A.
DAVIES,  ALLAN   HOWARD
DAVIS FRANCES ANN.
DAVIS,   KENNETH   BRIAN
DAWSON,   ROBERT   MUIR
DAWSON,   BEVERLEY   JUNE
DECOURCY,   DONALD   E.
DECAIGNY,  STEVENS   R.
DEMPSTER, GEO. GAVIN
DEVITT,    W.    JOHN    BRUCE
DEVITTO,  LEONARD J.
182 • Artsmen gathered ori
muddy field in front of
Engineering Building to
help swell the March of
Dimes proceeds during
loud, boisterous promotion
campaign. Although Arts-
men overshot their quota
by about 50%, the rollicking redshirts came through
with over 200% of $100
limit.
DEVLIN,  ANDREW JOHN   R.
DEWEST,   IVAN   FRANCIS
DEWEY,   FLORENCE
DICK,   ROBERT   COSGROVE
DICKINSON,   PAUL   GEO.
DODWELL,   GARY  SCOTT
DOMINIQUE,     HARRY     P.
DONNELLY,     HELEN     A.
DONNELLY,   RICHARD   F.
DONG,   LILY
DONOVAN,   PATRICIA  MAY
DOREY, LAWRENCE S.
DORMAN,    RODERICK    N.
DOWSLEY,   MARY
DRAB,   ALLAN   JULIAN
DRENNAN,    JOSEPH    A.
DRUMMOND,  KENNETH  JAS.
DUCKWORTH,  MURIEL J.
DUDLEY,  ELIZABETH A.
DHFF,   MARIANNE   ELLIS
DUKELOW,  CECIL  ANGUS
DURANTE,  ROY  GILBERT
DUTTON,     ROSE    WILSON
DWYER,     LORETTA    A.
EAST,   RONALD   AUSTIN
ECKERSLEY,   WM.   G.
EDGELL,   DRUSELLA  JOAN
EDWARDS,  VICTOR
EISENHUT,   DORIS
ELDER,    LORNE    EVERETT
ELVIN,   FAITH   A.   ANN
ERICKSON,   H.   GRANT  P.
ERICKSON,  JOHN  ERIC
ESTABROOKS,    NELSON     R.
ESTRIN,   LAWRENCE
EVANS,    JONATHAN    W.
EWING,  NANCY  LEE
EWING,   WILLIAM   F.
EZZY,   ALBERT   ROLAND
FAIRWEATHER,    FRED    H.
FARLEY,   JACK
FARQUHAR,  DONALD JAS.
FASHOWAY,   JOSEPH
FAULKNER,  BEVERLEY J.
FEATHERSTONE,   HAROLD
FEISTMANN,  JOHN  GEO.
FENWICK,    CHARLES    H.    J.
FENWICK,     THOMAS     L.
FINKELSTEIN,    NORTON
FINGARSON,   FAYE   E.
FINLAY,  ANN   HUNTER
FLAHIFF,    FREDERICK   T.
FLEMONS,   GORDON   F.
FLETCHER,    ELIZABETH   J.
FLETCHER,   V.   JOAN
FORBES,   LYLE   PETERSON
FORSENG,   EVAN   GERALD
FOSTER,  ANTHEA  W.
FRAME,   EVELYN   C.   M.
FRANCE,   PATRICIA   M.
FRANCIS,   ROBERT   S.
FRIESEN,    JOHN
FULGHAM,   EDWARD
FUNK,  PETER JOHN
FURUKAWA,    EMI
GAHAN, RONALD BERNARD
GALBRAITH,   DONALD   S.
GARNER, JOHN   OGILVIE
GARSTIN,   VALERIE
GARTSIDE,  WILLIAM   M.
GARTLEY,  MARY V.
GARTELL,    BEVERLEY
183
J^mt'tmm r
GAVAN,   FRANK  MOORE
GEMMELL,  WM.   STEPHEN
GIBSON,   GEORGE    B.   F.
GIBSON,   JOAN   E.
GIBSON,   WM.   GARNET
GILCHRIST,   STUART   A.
GILLESPIE,    DONALD   k    .
GILSON,    MURRAY ■■'
GINSBERG,   LOIS   C.
GLASGOW,   DAVID   LAWSON
GODDARD,   WILLIAM   P.
GOLD,  IRIS BEULAH
GOLDRICK,   MICHAEL   K.
GORDON, JOANNA E.
GORWILL,   JAS.   RICHARD
GORMAN,    EDWARD   LEO
GOSSE,    DONALD    ARTHUR
HUNT,  JOHN   E.
GRAHAM,     GORDON     R.
GRAY,  PAMELA ADELAIDE
GREAVES. FREDERICK T.
GREENE,   ROBERT   EDWARD
GRISMER,   ELIZABETH   I.
GRISEDALE,   MARY  C.
GROUNDWATER,   WM.   BRIAN
GRYSCHUK, STEVE
GUICHON,  ALFRED PAUL
GUISE,   JACQUELINE   M.
GUILLIAMSE,   BERNARDUS
GUSTAFSON,   ELAINE   H.
HALL,    DOUGLAS   GRAHAM
HALL,   HELEN   MARIE
HALL,  SUSAN   DIANE
HALLETT,    REGINALD    D.
HALTALIN,   KENNETH   C.
HANNA,   JOHN   EDWARD
HANSEN,    RONALD   MARK
HANSEN,   JOHN   INGE
HANSSEN,  LOUIS  J.
HARDY,   CHARLES   G.
HARNETT,  KERRY  B.
HARRIES, GWYNNE
HARTSTONE,   CAMPBELL   J.
HART,   JOYCE   LILLIAN
HARVEY,   PETER
HASTINGS,    DAVID    ERIC
HAWKINS,   ARTHUR   JOHN
HAY,    DAVID    GEORGE
HAY,   BARBARA   HELEN
HAYWARD, HERBERT M.
HEATHER,  ROBIN
HEMPHILL,  H.  DAVID
HENDERSON,    DON N ETTA
HENDERSON,   MARGARET   M.
HENDERSON,   MATTHEW    H.
HENDERSON,   WM.   T.
HENRION,    YVONNE
HENSCHEL,    PATRICIA   H.
HESHKA,  WILLIAM
HIK,   WILLIAM
HILL,   JOSEPH    ROYSTON
HILTON,  RUTH   ETHEL
HINKE, MARGARET  C.
HIPP,  THOMAS  MICHAEL
HOLDEN,  DOUGLAS
HOLLAND,  FRED  CHARLES
HOLMES,  ALAN   DONNAN
HOUGHLAND,  L.  JOAN
HOWARD, RONALD V.  B.
HOYOS,  WENCKHEIM  H.
HUBERMAN,   MORRIS
HUDSON, RALPH  EDW.
HUGHES,   DAVID  MARTIN
HUGHES,   DONALD
HUGHES,  WM.  VERNON
HUME, PHILIP GREY
GOURLAY,  ROBT.  BRUCE
HUNT,  W.   TED
HUNTER, MARY CORDINER
HUNTINGTON, M. J.
HURLSTON,  HELEN W.
HUSBAND, MARY ALICE
HUSBAND,  JOHN   KIMBALL
HUVA,   JOHN
INGLIS,   C. ANNE
INSKIP, VIOLEN MAY
ISMAN,   ERLA FAE
IWATA,   ARTHUR   M.
JACKSON, ALAN WILLIAM
JACKSON,   ROBERT WYATT
JAMIESON,  EDWARD R.
JANZ,   LESLIE   BLAKE
JEFFERS,  CHAS. WILLIAM
JEFFREY,   ROBT.   JAMES
JENKINS, JOHN ALAN
JIM,   HARVEY
184 • Spring hit the campus
all too close to exams as
usual — and as usual,
students studied (?) on the
lawns, went down the
1000 steps to the beach.
JOHNSON,  ANNE C.
JOHNSTON,  CATHERINE  S.
JOHNSON,  GAYLE M. M.
JOHNSON,  JOHN  R.
JOHNSTON,  BRIAN  M.
JOHNSTON,  M.  JUNE Y.
JOKANOVICH,   STANLEY
JONES,  GRAEME   H.  E.
JONES, GEORGE  F.
JONES,  KENNETH  STUART
JONES, MARILYN E.
JUSTICE,  BEVERLEY G.
KALUTICH, KOS KENNETH
KAMIMURA,  SHOICHIRO
KAMAR,  ASTA
FATZEL,  FREDK. G. W.
KEMBEL,  JOHN  MAXWELL
KEMPER, M. VERLIE
KENDRICK, ROBERT W.
KENMUIR,  BRENDA MAE  L.
KENNY,  BRENTON  D.
KETTLEWELL,  H.  DON
KEZIN, GEORGE A.
KIDD,  MAUREEN  E.
KILBOURN, GARRY D.
KIMURA,  EDMUND
KINCAID,  ALAN  DOUGLAS
KING,  MICHAEL JAMES
KING,   SHIRLEY   ELLEN
KING,  TERESA  ANN
KIRKLAND,  ROBERT W.
KIRWAN, JOHN M.
KITOS,  RALPH  MARTIN
KLAPKIW, JOHN
KLASSEN, ALFRED
KNOX,  MARY  HELEN
KOCH,  FRANK GEORGE H.
KONYK,   ERNIE
KOUACH,  GERALDINE  A.
KRAFT,   MARION   IRENE
KRONQUIST,   ROGER  A.
KUCIEL, MICHEL
KUCH,   MERNE   RUSSELL
KULES,  CHARLES  ERIC
KYLE, SAMUEL A.
LAFLECHE,   ELEANOR  M.
LAING,   EMMA  LOUISE
LAIDLAW,  THOMAS  H.
LANGFORD,   DULCIE  W.
LARSEN,  RAYMOND S.
LARSON,  C. YVONNE
LATHAM,  ELEANOR MARY
LATSOUDES,  KOULA
LAU,  GAU  SHIU  KEI
LAUK,   LEONARD   EDWARD
LAVIS, CHAS   EDWARD
LAWRENCE,   NAN  M.
LAZOSKY,   DANIEL   E.
LAZENBY,   GEOFFREY  J.
LAZENBY,   HUGH  STEPHEN
LECKIE,  W.  MERRILL
LEE, BARBARA LOUISA
LEE,  DAVID  MANUEL
LEE,  ROBERT
LEGG,  EDWARD  ROWLAND
LEGER,  RODNEY F.
LEGGE,  GERALDINE JUNE
LEONG, FAYE QUEN
LERET, MARG IT
LESIK, MICHAEL DAVID
LEVERIDGE,   DONNA   RAE
LEVEY,  S.  MERIELLE
)!__.__ °
Jta ML-HE,
185 ' ________
LEWIS, K   SUZANNE
LEWIS,  SALLY  LARKIN
LIEBELT, ALVIN
LIGHTFOOT, MARGARET D.
LIGHTBODY,  MILFORD  A*
LIND,   STANLEY
LIPINSKI,  EDWIN
LITRAS,  CHRISTINE  D. *
LITTLE,   EDWARD  BRIAN
LLOYD, EDNA N. MARIE
LODGE,  TERRENCE  OWEN
LOGAN,   PATRICIA  RUTH
LOHIN,  NICHOLAS
LOMAS, GERALD WALTER
LONG, ALFRED
LONG, JANET M.
LONGRIDGE,  ELIZABETH
LONGLEY, WALTER  F.
LOOMER,   HERBERT   MYER
LOUGHEED,  RUTH  ANN
LOURIE,   SUZANNE  E.
LOVETT,  HARRY ALMON
LUCAS, JOHN  NEIL
LUMSDEN, R.  E. J.
LUNDBERG,  ERIC  H.
LYALL, WILLIAM  RONALD
LYMAN, EVA GEORGIA H.
LYNCH,  WILLIAM  WAYNE
MADDEN, SHEILA C.
MADILL,   FRANK  MICHAEL
MALOWNEY,   JOSEPH   S.
MANNING, JOHN  D.
MANSON, KARNA C.
MAR, JOHN
MARSHALL,  E.  LOIS
MARTIN,  ALEXANDER
MARTINUSEN,  HENRY H.
MASON, GRENVILLE ROBT.
MASON,  KENNETH  ROY
MATTERSON,   B.   DALL
MAWHINNEY, PAMELA J.
MAWHINNEY, ANNE MARIE
MAWHINNEY,  DONNA  G
MAYNARD,   JOHN  KERR
McCADAM,  E.   MARILYN
McALPINE,   EDWARD   A
McAllister,  dixie m.
McCALLUM,  J.    DONALD
McCALLUM,  DOUGLAS  F.
McCONVILLE,  PATRICIA
McDERMID, JOHN  C.
McDONALD,   DANIEL   L.
MacDONALD,  DONALD D.
MacDONALD,  JAMES   C
MacDONALD, WENDY   M.
MacDONALD, M. M.
MacDONALD,  LUELLA  M.
MacDONALD,   NORMA A
MacDONALD,  PETER A.
Mcdowell, Kathleen v.
McEACHRAN,  DAVID J.
MeFEELY,   D.   PATRICIA
MacGILLIVRAY, A JOHN
McGINNIS, JAMES  C.
MacGREGOR,   ARTHUR  JOS.
McGregor, agnes c.
MeHENRY, PATRICK
MaclNNIS,   DONALD   JOS.
MclNNES,   DOUGLAS   N.
MaclNNES,   MARYLOU
MaclNNES,  IAN MICHAEL
MoclNTYRE,   J.    McEWAN
MacKEY,   EDWARD L.
McKAY,  MARY  CAMERON
MacKAY,   MARTHA  JOAN
MacKAY, DONALD ALAN
MacKENZIE, MARY  HELEN
MacKENZIE, GORDON R.
MacKINNON,  GEORGE  E.
MacKINNON,   SHEILA   J.
MacKINNON,  EVAN D.
McLEAN, TERRANCE W.
McLEAN, HELEN  ETHEL
MacLEAN,  DUART S.
McLEAN,  LYNNE JUNE
McLEAN,  DONALD JAMES
MacLEAN,   IAN  ANGUS
McLENNAN,   KENNETH  A
McLEOD, GLEN  DONALD J.
McLEOD,   KENNETH  G
McLEOD, JOHN TAYLOR
McLEOD,  ISABEL ANN
MacLEOD,  ROBERT  V.
McLORG, PHYLLIS ANNE
McNAB,  NANCY ISABEL
McNISH,  GORDON  HUGH
186 • Homecoming Committee
planned all arrangements
for the Homecoming Weekend festivities.
MacPHERSON,   ALASTAIR
MacSORLEY,   CHAS.   CLARE
McWilliams, bruce w.
mead, james stafford
meadows, beverly joan
meagher, michael  d.
meek,  ronald charles
meekison, h. h.
meredith, ronald m.
merrill, dorothy jan
metcalfe, shirley d.
middleton, judith d.
middleton, arthur g.
mikki, ichio
miller, j. dawn
milne, john b.
mitchell, douglas a.
mitchell, donald h.
miyazawa, jean
mjos, margaret e. m.
moir, lewis ernest
mond, i. l. julie
montaine, lorne a.
montgomery, b. t.
montgomery, mabel l.
montgomery, roger f.
moore, jane ann
morris, darryl glyn
morris, gerald david
morris, rae ford
morrow, boswell r.
MORROW,   Wm.   JOHN
MOUNTAIN,   CHARLES  GEO.
MULGREW,   FRANCES  P.
MULBERRY,  GORDON
MULHERN,  MAUREEN   P.  A.
MULLA,  G   ELIZABETH
MULLARD,   MARILYN   RUTH
MUNRO,  JACK  ALLAN
MURPHY,   B.   L.
MURPHY,   LOUIS JOSEPH
MUTZ,   DELMA  MARGARET
MYERS,  JAMES  GARRY
NAKATANI,   SAM
NAKAMURA,   JOE
NASH,   ALBERT   ERNEST
NASH, MARTIN ALLEN
NELSON, G W.
NELSON,  NORMAN
NEWHOUSE,   GORDON   H.
NEWITT, EVE MARGARET
NEWTON,  KENNETH  C.  G.
NICHOLS,   VIOLET   BELLE
NIMI,   ROBERT  KOJI
NORDSTROM,   VERA   D.   L.
NORRISH,   HAROLD   E.
NORTHROP,   DAVID   LEROI
NOVAK,  SYLVIA  JOY
OBERHOFER,   MATTHEW
OLSEN,  WILLIAM  CHAS
OLSON,  VIRGINIA  MAE
OLSON,   WILLIAM   EMIL
ORNES,   WILLIAM   JOHN
ORROCK,   MARVIN   G.
ORTNER,  EDITH JOAN
O'SHEA,  MIMI   SHIRLEY   E.
OWENS,   EDWARD   L.
PAGE,   JONATHAN   DAY
PALMER,  ALLAN   HERBERT
PARFITT,  ALLYN   FRED
PATERSON,   NORMAN   R.
PATCH,   GORDON   S.
187 fAiftS
PATTERSON,   SHIRLEY   A.
PAYZANT,  KEITH, W.
PEARMAN,  JAS.   DOUGLAS
PEARSON, GEORGE E.
PEARSON,   WALLACE  JOHN
PEATFIELD,  MARY  P.
PEDERSEN,   ERNEST   N.
PEDERSEN,   JOHN    ERIC
PENDYGRASSE,   JOHN   S.
PETERS,  TERENCE  DAVID
PETERSEN,   PETER   BRYAN
PETRIE,   MARY  ANNA
PHILLIPS,  DOROTHY
PHILLIPS,   GORDON   H.
PHILPOTT,  STUART   B.
PtCKETT,    THOS.    G.
PIEDMONT,   LEO   PETER
PIERRON,   PAUL  L
PINEO, PETER CAMDEN
PISAPIO,  ALBERT   HENRY
PLATT,   KATHLEEN
PLATT,   MARGARET
FLETCHER,    FERDINAND   T.
PLECASH,   JOAN    E.
PLOYART,  MARJORIE  J.
POWER,   DONALD   CHAS.
POWERS, JAS.  BERNARD
PRENTER,  PATRICIA M.
PREFONTAINE,   J.   MARCEL
PRENTICE,   ELIZABETH   R.
PRESTON,   HENRY   M.
PRICE,   EVAN   OWEN
PRIEGER,  JOHN  STEPHEN
PURDY,  PETER JOHN
PURCELL,  WM.   BARRY
RACINE,  JOAN   ELLEN
RAMAGE,  THOS.   EDWARD
RAMSDEN,   RICHARD  A.
RAMSLIE,   SOFIE   DAGNY
RAMSBOTHAM,   ALEX
RANAGHAN,  MARY  ROMA
RAPTIS,   HELEN
RAYER,   JOHN
RAY,   PHILLIP  WILLARD
REEVES,   LINDA  VIVIAN
REID,  LORNE JAMES
REMPEL,    PATRICIA   ANNE
RENWICK,   MERCEDES   F.
RENSHAW,   L.   FRANCIS
RICKSON,   DOUGLAS   E.
RICORD,   JULIO  ALFREDO
RILEY,   PETER  JULIAN
ROBERTSON, DONALD GEO.
ROBERTSON,   DIANA   DON
ROBERTSON,  GORDON T.
ROBINSON,   BETTY  J.
ROBSON,   DONALD   H.
RODGERSON,   JAMES   S.
ROHRER, JOYCE  KATHRYN
ROLFE,   M.    HAVELOCK
ROSEN,   LORALYNN
ROSS,   FRANK   ROY
ROSS,  PETER ALAN
RUDKIEWICH,   LILLIAN
RUMBLE,   KATHARINE  ANN
RUSSELL,   AUDREY   E.
RUSSELL,   KENNETH   ROBT.
RUSSELL,   KENNETH   G.
RUTLEDGE,   SHIRLEY   K.
RYLEY,   FRANCES   DIANE
SAITO,   YOSHIHISA
SAMSON,    BRIAN    ROSS
SAMBOL,  MATHEW
SANKEY,  MAUREEN   L
SANDFORD, MERLE JAS.
SANTOS,  CARL A.
SAVAGE,   JOHN   KENNING
SAWATZKY,   RONALD   KURT
SCALES,   ALLEN   ALEX
SCARROW, HART R.
SCHIBILD,   DONALD  A.
SCHIBILD,  MARJORY  L.
SCHUETZE,  ELIZABETH  A
SCOTLAND,   GORDON   H.
SCRATCHLEY,   EDWARD   WM.
SEEDS,    ROBERT   WILSON
SEEMUNGAL,   FRANK
SETTERFIELD,   G.   A.
SEXTON,   NORMAN  WM.
SHANNON,   PATRICIA  C.
SHANNON,   RONALD   C.
SHARP, WILLIAM   B.
SHEARS, SUSANNE M.
SHEASGREEN,   DAVID
SHEARER,  ALISON  JEAN
SHEPPARD,   L.   BARRY
188 • News and views of the
Publications Board were
grabbed from the quad
Tuesday, Thursday, and
Friday  noons.
• Armoured car visited the
Administration Office, no
doubt it was to pick up
the late fees of ten dollars
which forgetful students
were  charged.
SHERRIN,  DARRELL  A.
SHIELDS, JOHN   HENRY
SHIELDS,   PETER  A
SHIPPOBOTHAM,  JOHN   P.
SHORTER,   THOMAS  A.
SCHRUM,   LAURNA   JANE
SHUNTER,   MARJORIE   E.
SINGER,   DAVID  S.
SINCLAIR,   ROBERT   S.
SIRLIN,   IRVING   ROBERT
SKINNER,   H.   PATRICIA
SKOKO,   NORMAN   MARK
SKY,   MILTON
SMILLIE,   HOWARD  A.   G.
SMITH,   ALLAN
SMITH,  CHARLES  WM.
SMITH,   DAVID   HARRY
SMITH,   DAVID   LORIN
SMITH,   FREDERICK  A.
SMITH,   KATHRYN   MARION
SMYTH,  NEIL  PATRICK
SOMMERS,   MONTROSE   S.
SORTWELL,   EDWIN   T.
SPARE,   GORDON
SPIRO,  PHILLIP GRANT
SPRUNG,   PHILIP  DAVIS
STANDELL,  VALERIE  M.
STANHOPE,  JOSEPH   R.
STAVELEY,  WILLIAM   W.
STAUGHTON,    DOUGLAS    A.
STEELE,   PATRICIA   A.
STEIMAN,   S.   R.   CHERIE
STEPHENS,  JUNE A
STERNE,  RONALD  ALFRED
STEVENSON,  A.  DOROTHY
STEWART, IAN  HUGH
STEWART,  RONALD   HUGH
STICKLAND,   MICHAEL   H.
STORBACK,   M.   MILDRED
STRALENDORFF, J.
STRATTON,  SHEILA  M.
STRUTT,  GERALD C.
STUBBS, CAROLE  ROSE M.
STUCKEY,   WILLIAM   THOS.
STURDY,  SANDRA  JOAN
STYFFE,  WIULIAM  T.   E.
SULTAN,  RALPH  GEO.   M.
SUMMERS,   NORMA   I.
SUSSEL,   HANNAH  G.
SUTHERLAND,  JOHN   P.
SUTHERLAND,  K.  ANN
SUTTON,  WENDY   K.
SWANSON,  WM.   MILTON
SWEENEY,  LEO   PAUL
SYEKLOCHA,   MILAN
TAMNEY,  SYLVIA  L.   i.
TAYLOR,   THOMAS   M.
TELFORD,  KATHLEEN  A.
TERRIEN,  ARLETTE   E.
TESAN,   S.   STANLEY
THOM,  GORDON  A.
THODESON,  JOHN   CONRAD
THOMSON,  MARGARET  A.
THORNE,   NORMA   L
THRASHER,  PETER   D.
TIMBERLEY,   DARIEN   M.   K.
TITMUSS,  A.   DAVID
TOMLJENOVICH,   MATTHEW
TONKINSON, PHILIP
TRAFFORD,  JACQUELINE
TRIBBLE,   CLAIRE
TROTTER,   HELEN   E.
L'
■4/fK- ff
_ •
.
-Ur
s
i^M
189
J<">f> TROUSDALE,  VALERIE  D
TUCKER,   GORDON W.
TUFTS,  FRANCIS  CHAS.
TUOMALA,   MAURICE   F.
TURNER,   GEOFFREY  W.
TURPLE,   FLORENCE   MYk.-c
TYSOE,   ELIN   RUTH
UNDERHILL,   N.   E.  S.
URBANOVITS,  ANNIE   I.
VANDERVOORT,   STANLEY
VASEY,  JOSEPH  STEELE
VENNELS,  SALLY ANNE
VERCHERE,   DAVID   G.
WAGNER,  WILLARD W.
WAKELYNN, CAROLE
WAKHRONCHEFF,    D.
WALMSLEY,  WM.   JOHN
WARD,  DOUGLAS  REID
WARE,   RONALD   PAUL
WARN,   NORMAN   HERBERT
WASEL,   LAWRENCE   D.
WATERS,   DOUGLAS
WATSON,  A.  JOHN
WATSON,    EDWARD
WATSON,   DOREEN  F.
WATTS,   LOUISE   DIANNE
WEAVER,   O.   KENNETH
WEBBER, WILLIAM A.
WEBBER,   BARBARA   JOAN
WEBSTER,   MARGARET  A.
WELSFORD,   DAVID   E.
WERTMAN,    MICHAEL
WHALEN,   WILLIAM   PETER
WHEATON,   NORMAN   WARD
WHIPPLE,   ELDEN   COLE
WHITE,   MARILYN   ANN
WHITE,   RICHARD  D.
WHITE,   ROBERT   CARLEY
WHITTLE,   DONALD   JAS.
WIEBE,   M.   ANN
WILCOX,  GEORGE  L.
WILD,  ALEX
WILKES,   RICHARD   ASTON
WILLIAMS,   BRYAN
WILLIAMS   ROBT.   ARTHUR
WILLOUGHBY,  ANN   D.
WILSON,  JUDITH  ANNE
WINBIGLER,   H.    E.
WINDER,   NANCY   LEE
WING,  WALLACE  GERALD
WOOSTER,   ANTHONY   KING
WRIGHT,   NORMAN   ROSS
WRIGHTMAN,   GORDON   M.
YEE,   HARRY   THOMAS
YIP,   GERALDINE   KAY
ZICKMANTEL,   HANS   J.
ZIPURSKY,   IRVIN
190 COMMERCE
It was a full year for all the Commerce students,
who found themselves taking on new activities and
improving on the old.
The start of the year was marked by the first annual
Commerce Smoker, which featured gaming wheels,
dancing girls, and professional entertainment.
In October, a group headed by Ken Rosenberg built
an impressive float depicting the typical success story
of a Commerceman. Although the judges were not
completely taken with the float, they enthusiastically
picked Louis Morris, representing Commerce, as runner-up in the Homecoming Queen Contest.
The Commerce Informal in November, beset conflicting parties, rained on by a thoughtless deity, and
forgotten by the AMS co-ordinator, turned out to be a
rather exclusive party.
In December, the Commercemen played landlord
and evicted the lawyers out of their huts. This action
provided more office space for the hard-working staff,
and a common room for the bridge-playing students.
After Christmas, the senior students, painfully aware
that they were about to be pitched out into a world in
which monopoly money didn't count, organized a series
of noon-hour lectures by local businessmen. These talks
were arranged by Gerry Main, who brought many top
notch speakers to the campus.
Nothing less than the Panorama Roof was good
enough for the annual Formal, which was enjoyed by a
capacity crowd. Partly to publicize this dance, the Commerce edition of the Ubyssey was put out. This marked
the first time in years for a Commerce paper.
Finally, the Commerce Banquet was held in March.
Noel Hall was in charge of this function which attracted
almost 200 commercemen and 300 businessmen. Marsh
Porter, Q.C., noted Calgary lawyer, was the guest
speaker.
All these activities were guided by the Commerce
Bob Wadsworth as vice-president, Anne Henderson
taking minutes, Phil Giroday making sure of a profit,
• Top: Commerce Undergraduate Society Executive
• Study Room for conscientious Commercemen.
• Bottom left: Time out for a picturel
• Right: Hard-working Commercemen
Noreen Mitten representing- the Commercewomen, and
and Sally Heard and Lyle Ahrens as executive members. Ten energetic and capable class representativs
rounded out the council.
191 Im 1, 3Jk
AHRENS,   LYLE   GORDON
ALAIR,   RONALD   PATRICK
BLEWETT,   PATRICK
CAMPBELL,   DAVID   C.
COATES, PETER
COHEN,   MANLY   MORTON,
COX,  DIANA   E.
CREASE,  STEPHEN  C.
DESBRISAY,   IAN   GORDON
DIBBLEE,   GEORGE  M.
DONG,   BILL
FERRIE,   W.  MICHAEL
FIRUS,   ERIC   KARL
FLEMING,   KENNETH   E.
FLEMING  JOHN  THOS.
FOOTE,  JOHN   CALVIN
FORWARD,   PETER   CARMAN
FOWLER,   ARTHUR   GORDON
GAUER,  LIONEL  PHILIP
GRANHOLM,  CLARENCE  J.
HACKETT,  ALAN   F.
HAMILTON,   NEIL   ALFRED
HEARD,   SALLY   K.
HENDERSON,   DOUGLAS   A.
HENDERSON,   ROSE  ANNE
HILBORN,   WILLIAM   H.
HUGGETT,   RICHARD   G.
ISAAC,   STANLEY   R.
JENKINSON,   THOMAS
JEUNE,   ROBERT   EDWARD
LILLY,   ARTHUR   WM.
LIVINGSTONE,  GRANT  H.
LOUTIT,  JAMES   IRVINE
MAIN,  GERALD  CLAPHAM
MARTINDALE, W.   MURRAY
McKAY,   DONALD   HUGH
McKINNON,   ROSS  C.
MOFFETT,    DONALD   JOHN
NAGLER,   MELVIN   A.
NEILLY,   EDWIN   M.
PEARSON, J.   KENNETH  W.
QUISTWATER,  GEORGE  WM.
WONG, W.   C.   NORMAN
RICHMAN,   HARVEY   E.
ROSS,   JOHN   BETHUNE
RUDD,   KENNETH   F.
RYAN,   MICHAEL  M.
SHEPARD,  GARY  LEE
SHEPHERD,  C.   HERBERT
SOUTHCOTT,  JOHN   C.
SPRIGGS,   CHARLES   WM.
STANLEY,   HAROLD   ROBT.
SUCHY,  ALOIS
TAPP,   ROBERT   C.
TAYLOR, JOAN  P.
VALENTINE,   EDWARD  J.
VANCE,  JOHN  VERNON
VIGAR,   NEIL  W.
WALPOLE,   RICHARD  A.
WICKSON,  R.   ROGER J.
WILSON,  JAMES   GREST
WRIGHT, DAVID JOHN
ADAM,   FREDERICK  W.
ALEXANDER,   RONALD   L.
ALLAN,  CHARLES  RALPH
BALDWIN,   CHAS.   BARRY
BALLANTYNE,   DAVID   J.
BARNSLEY,   J.   RICHARD
BATTY, MARGARET L.
BAUER,  GEORGE  H.
BEAIRSTO,   ROBERT   E.
BLAINE,   ROBERT   EARL
BOOTH,   ELIZABETH
BULMER,   JOHN   PATRICK
BUTLER,  AUDREY  EDITH
CARPENTER,    MARVIN    A.
CHOWNE,   GODFREY   H.
CLARKE,   J.   ALFRED
COUTTS,  ARTHUR  F.
DAY,   PETER   LAHORE
DESBRISAY,  A.   GEORGE
DEWIS,   GEOFFREY
DUCLOS,   GERARD   GEORGE
EADIE,   DESMOND  A.
EDWARDS,   JACK   L.   T.
ERICKSON,   JOHANN
ESHLEMAN,  VALDEN  M.
FAST,  VICTOR   HAROLD
FEARNSIDE,   GWYNNETH   J.
FITZPATRICK,   HUGH   D.
FLETCHER,   ARTHUR   ROBT.
GARDINER,  WINFIELD   A.
GILMORE,   ROBT.   CURRIE
GLADSTONE,    SYDNEY
192 • Here are some Commercemen
looking  for executive  positions.
• Commerce students look serious
in class; perhaps they're wondering what to do at noon.
HARRISON,  JOHN   PERRY
HEIMBECKER,   GRANT   C.
HONG,   EDWARD
HORNSTEIN,  JOHN   W.
JOFFE,  JAY  LIONEL
KENT,   RICHARD   F.
LAIRD,    DONALD   GORDON
LEAR,    HOWARD    FRANK
LENEC,   ALEXANDER
LEVY, JOSEPH   R.  D.
LEW,   CHUCK
LUSZTIG,   PETER   ALFRED
MAIR,  ALEXANDER   IAN
MALKIN,  PHILIP  LLOYD
McCABE,   ALEXANDER   K.
McGINLEY,   MAURICE   G.
MacKAY,   KENNETH   R.
MacKENZIE,   CECIL  ALEC
MacMILLAN, JOHN  W.
MacRAE,   DAPHNE  JANE
MILLER,   ARTHUR   E.
MILLER,   ELMER   P.
NELSON,   WM.   CAMERON
NICHOLLS,   TERRANCE
NIVEN,   JAMES   LESLIE
OHASHI, GENICHI
OLAFSON,   I.   BENNETT   0.
O'ROURKE,   WM.   GARRY
PATERSON,   RICHARD   G.
PATTERSON,   COLIN   GEO.
PEGG,  SIDNEY  LAWRENCE
PHILLIPS,    ARTHUR
POWELL,  FRANK  ERNEST
RESTON,  JOHN   CAMPBELL
RIDLEY,   ROBERT   MURNEY
RITCHIE,  JOHN  C.
ROBINSON,   RONALD   THOS.
ROSENBERG,   KENNETH   J.
SALTER,  WILLIAM  JACK
SCOTT,   VERN   H.   K.
ST.  JOHN,  DOLWAY WILSON
STUART,   WILLIAM   DAVID
THOMPSON,   LORIMER S.
THOMSON, WILSON  BRUCE
TURNER,   JAMES   FRANCIS
VEAR,  GWENDOLYN   L.
WEATHERALL,   WM.   A.
WEEKS,  GRAHAM  G.
WICKSON,  MALCOLM   C.  J.
WONG,   DING  MING
YORKE,   DENNIS  0.
ATKINS, GLEN CHARLES
ATKINSON,  JOHN  LYLE
BAARDSEN,   ARNOLD   P.
BADOVINAC,  GEORGE
BARTLETT,   ROBERT   E.
BASI,   BHAGAT SINGH
BLACK,   WILLIAM   A.
BROWN,  JOHN  JOSEPH
BULMAN,   PETER  RALPH
CAMPBELL,   JANET   EMILY
CAMPBELL,   NORMAN   S.
CAREW,   N.   DARRELL
CHOW,   KAM   WING
CHRISTIE, VALENTINE A.
COOK, THOMAS  ARTHUR
COOPER,   BRIAN   ALISON
CVETKOVICH,   JOSEPH
DIXON,  RAY  SPENCER
DIXON,   ROBERT   TRENT
DYKE, LORNE D. R. ECCOTT,  JAMES   ELIOT
EGAN,   JOHN   BRUCE
ELLIOTT,  GORDON   A.
EMERY,   EDWARD   H.   ALAN
FIRUS,   ROBERT   LEO
GIBBS,   JAMES   RONALD     .
GORDON,    CHARLES   ATHOL
GREGGOR,   ROBERT   E
GUGLIELMIN,   ALFRED   A.
HAACK,  FRED   EARL
HALL,   DLEAP   S.
HALL,   DAVID   ALBERT
HAMILTON,  JOHN  F.
HOWL,   FRANK   EDMUND
JANDA,   KVETOSLAV
JONES,   KENNETH    F.
JORDAN,   E.   KENNETH
JOYCE,   MURRAY  RUSSELL
KILBOURNE,  CHARLES   H.
KIRKLAND,  IAN  A.
KNIGHT,   DONALD    IAN
KNIGHT,   EDWARD   HOWDEN
LAANEMAE,   TOIVO
LECKIE,  PETER  D.
MACIEJEWSKI,   MARYAN
McCAMEY,  W.   LAFAYETTE
MacDONALD,   DAVID  A.   V.
MacDONALD,   SOMERLED
MaclNNES,   DUNCAN   C.   E.
MocLAREN,   GLEN
MacLAREN,  ANGUS
MocLAREN, GRANT W.
MacLEOD,  ARTHUR   ROBT.
MacMILLAN,   DOUGLAS   T.
MEEKER,   HENRY   CLEMONS
MEYER,   RICHARD   BURTON
MORRIS,  KATHRINE   L.
MURDOCH,   WM.    RALPH
NEIL,  RUPERT C.
NEISH,   WM.   JAMES
NELSON,  JOHN   HOWARD
NEWTON,  JOHN  FARADAY
NORRIS,   MACAULAY  C.
O'SHEA,   JOS.   KENNETH
PARKER, WARWICK  H.  T.
PEDERSON,   GARY
PEW,   COLIN   GIBSON
PHILPOTT,   DALE   C.
PIPER,  ROBERT GEORGE
PUNT,   ALBERT  CHARLES
POLLARD,  SHIRLEY   JEAN
QUON, JOE
RAE,  BASIL ALLEN
RICHARDSON,  GORDON
SALTER,   KATHRYN   M.
SCHULTZ,    RONALD    F.
SIMPSON,  MARY   LOUISE
SLIGHT,   GORDON   PETER
WONG,   PAUL
STANDERWICK,  THOMAS  W.
STERLING,  TOMMY  CHAS.
STEWART,   WILLIAM    R.
SWARTZ,   FREDRIC
TAYLOR,   GEORGE   H.
TESSLER,  DAVID
THOMAS,  JOHN   MALDWYN
THORPE,   FRED   DAVID
TYSON,  E.  DOUGLAS
UNDERHILL,  J.   GERALD
USHER,   DONALD   GEORGE
VERCHERE,  ARTHUR  WM.
VOLKER,  RUSSELL JAS.
WALLEY,   PETER   THOMAS
WILSON,   MARY   LOIS
WOLRIGE, ALAN  F.
194 »
HOME ECONOMICS
Tucked away in the new Home Economics Building is the headquarters of one of the most unique clubs
on the campus, the "Hec Club". This club does not
not ask fees but grants membership automatically to
all undergrads of the faculty, and it has a programme
varying from social services to parties.
Every student registering in Home Economics is
automatically a member of the "Hec Club". At the
monthly meetings the club prsented films, guest speakers, and discussion groups, all designed to attract girls
intending to make a career of Home Economics, be
their goal dietetics, journalism, nutrition, research,
teaching or marriage.
The largest project undertaken each year is one of
charity. This year the girls of the "Hec Club" presented
a Fashion Show where a silver collection was taken
for  the  "Save  the  Children  Fund".
But the year was not all work and no play ... In
the fall the club sponsored a Frosh Tea and an Exchange Dance with the boys at Fort Camp. Spring saw
the highly-successful Fashion Show and the highlight
of the year, the Home Economic Formal. Then came
the third and fourth year banquet, during which the
graduating class presented their advice and old notes
to   next   year's   class.
But all these activities could not have been realized
without an efficient and hard-working executive. Leading of the executive and setting the example for all,
was the president, Doreen Albrecht. Working with
her were Lora Stowell, Mardy Witham, June Kirk,
Hilary Yates, Anne Challenger, Judy Slinger, Stephany
Notzel, Marg Coe, Ann Howarth, and Rene Miles.
■    Top:   Home   Ec  Club  Executive
• Below: Modern Home Ec Build-
plans activities for its members,
ing   facing   Chancellor   Boulevard.
• Right: Practical courses include
cooking, cleaning, weaving, for
all home economics students.
ACORN, GERALDINE, M.
ANDERSON, BETTY  R.
BAILEY, MAUD F.
BAIN, MAVIS AUDREY
BARTRAM,   FRANCES  ANN
BERRY,   DONNA  PHYLLIS
CHALLENGER, M. ANNE
DEBRECEN,  JULIE  I.
DE  PFYFFER,  E.  HELEN
DIXON,  DIANE  MARIE
DOBSON, FAY LORAINE
GREEN, PATRICIA S.
GWYTHER, BARBARA F.
HACK, JULIA MARY
HOBSON,  ISOBEL MARY
THIRD
YEAR t
KERRY,   ELIZABETH  ANNE
KILBORN,   BARBARA JOAN
KIRK,  JUNE   EVELYN
LILLIE,  JOAN  MARJORIE
LINFOOT,  HELEN  K.
MONTALBETTI,   DORIS   I.
NOTZEL,   M.   A.  S.
POLLOCK,   JEAN   M.
SMOLENSKY,   CLARISSE   M.
SPARLING,   CAROL  JANE
TUFF,  FLORENCE  JEAN
WALDEN,   PATRICIA   FAYE
WALKER,   DOROTHY   ANNE
AMSKOLD,   RUTH   M.
ANNESLEY,   E.   PATRICIA
BANERD,  BLANCHE   B.
BENNETT,   RUTH    ELOISE
BIGELOW,  CYNTHIA  ANN
BUSHELL,   DORIS   EVELYN
CAMERMAN,   ESTHER
CHU, VIVIAN GEORGINA
EYFORD, MARGRET A.
GAETZ,  ELIZ.  RAE
GRANT,  JOAN   PHYLLIS  D.
GRAYSON,   NORMA  JEAN
JACOBSEN,  MARY  ANN
JOHNSON,   KATHLEEN   P.
LEDGERWOOD,    PATRICIA
McCALLUM,   IRENE   ETHEL
MacDONALD, LILLIAN  L.
MEREDITH,   LENORE  J,
MILES,   EDITH   IRENE
MILLER,   LILLIAN   NINA
MILLER,   MARILYN  JUNE
MUNRO,   CATHERINE  A.
NEWMAN,   CONNIE   P.
PENDRAY,   ELIZABETH   M.
PHILIP,   ISABELLA MARY
ROSENBAUM,    FLORENCE
ROY,   UNA   DOROTHY
SLINGER, JUDITH EDEN
USHER,   MARGARET   I.
VANDERHOEK,   NELLY
WARREN,   DOREEN  A.
WILKINSON,   BERNICE   G.
ALLAN, MARY THERESA
ARMITAGE,   SHIRLEY  ANN
AULD,  VERONICA DOREEN
BORAKS,   LILLIAN   JAGNA
BRACHER,   ANNE   H.
CAIRNS,   RUTH   LILLIAN
CAPLE,  H.   ELAINE  G.
COE.   MARGARET   ALICE
CROFT,   MARION   E.
DARLING.   VALERIE   ANN
FOOTE. JUDITH JANE
FORRESTER.   NORMA  GAY
FRANKSEN,   ELEANOR  P.
GILES,  DEIRDRE  ANNE
GILMOUR.  MARY A.
GOUDY,    KATHARINE    ROSE
GREEN,   MAXINE  W.
HARPER.   P.   DIANE
HAWKINS.  SHIRLEY  JOAN
HIGGINBOTTOM,   LOUISE
JACKSON,  BEVERLY ANN
JAGGER,   BARBARA JOAN
JOHNSTONE,   MARY   ANNE
KENNEDY,   MARGARET  A.
MANSON,    BARBARA   J.
McLEAN,  MARY JANE
MocLENNAN,   MARY
McPHERSON,   ELSPETH   J.
MEADOWS,   SYLVIA   M.
MIYAGISHIMA,   LORRAINE
MOLSON,   MARGARET   E.
NEAVE,   A.   ELIZABETH
OVERAND,  G.A.
PARK,   FRANCES  EVELYN
PENTLAND, ANN  McGILL
ROBERTSON,   LOIS
SHARP,  J.   KATHLEEN
SMITH,   DONNA   ROSE
SORENSEN,   SONJA
TOWNSLEY,  M.  ANNETTE
WEIR,   E.   CHRISTINE
WEST,   SUSAN
WINSKILL,  CAROL   E.
WOLVERTON,   BERNICE   E.
ZACK,   JACQUELIN
196 *
f
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The popularity of the Physical Education course on
the campus has been greatly enhanced by the opening
of the new War Memorial Gymnasium and the recent
establishment of the department as the School of Physical Education. The PE Undergraduate Society has also
created much enthusiasm for the course through its
varied activities and functions on the campus.
The homecoming weekend was the date for the third
annual golf tournament between the graduating class
and the staff. It was a repeat performance for the staff
when they walked away with the championship, but
it was reported that many of them had spent long hours
practicing.
Later in the fall term, the society sponsored the
"Hoboes' Hop", which was held in the women's gymnasium. The second year class handled all the arrangements and the proceeds are to help complete the
common room for the society.
The post-Christmas activity centred around the preparation and presentation of this year's annual Physical
Education Variety Show, "The Sultan's Daughter".
Playing to good crowds for three performances, the
show featured many fine gymnastic displays that set
off the well acted plot of the play itself. A traditional
"after party" celebrated the completion of the show.
The proceeds from the show will help to buy furnishings for the proposed common room. This project
has been given a great deal of consideration by the student body who wish to wall off one of the unfinished
rooms. This will provide a general purpose room, suitable for meetings, study and recreation.
The graduation banquet concluded the activities of
the society. The members of the graduating class gathered together to bid good-bye to the members of the
staff, under whose guidance they had received their
Bachelor of Physical Education degrees.
Top: P.E. Undergraduate Society Executive.
P.E. class chalk talk.
Bottom left: Swimming class held at the Crystal Pool. Centre:
Hand stand on high bar for P.E. 300 course. Right: back flip
on trampoline. ASELTINE,   ADELE   ROSE
BERRY,   ALAN   KEITH   R.
BORTHWICK,   ALAN   H.
BRADSHAW,   JOHN   HOWARD
CAMPBELL,   KENNETH
COVEY,   ELLIOTT   JOHN
CRAFTER,   JANET   R.
1
;if
HOOD,   JEAN   AUDREY
KENNEDY,   HELEN   LOUISE
KIRCHNER,   GLEN
LEAH,   AUDREY  MARION
MELLISH,   KATHLEEN   F.
SHUNTER,  DAVID  ERNEST
UPSON,    GEO.    WM.    BRIAN
ZAHARKO,  DANIEL S.
ADE,   BETTY   UINA  MAY
ALDERMAN,  RICHARD  B.
CARDELL,  PAUL WILHELM
COLE,  DOUGLAS   EUGENE
CROSETTI,   EBERT   JOHN
ELLIOTT,   GERALD   B.
FORNEY,  PAUL JULIUS
GORWILL,   RUTH   JEAN
HARRISON,   MARY   LOY
HARTMAN,  DOLORES  E.
HUTCHINSON,  WILLIAM   E.
IRWIN,   F.   LORNE
KENYON,   GERALD  SIDNEY
LAWSON,   STANLEY   DAVID
LEVERSAGE,   RONALD   G.
MAXWELL,  JOHN  JAMES
McKELVIE,   ROYDEN   W.
Mcquillan, patricia m.
mitchell, william p.
nyhaug, ernie omar
pekovich, daniel
ramslie,  gunnar  john
robinson, james a.
rourke, wm. harold
sclater, shirley b.
seymour, george w.
sheridan, margaret m.
skinner, donald wm.
slutsky, morris bert
smith, enid elizabeth
strange,  patricia m.
tahara, michitaka
thompson, donald roy
todd, james stewart
warnock, joseph h.
whyte, william arthur
wilson, william blyth
winter, evelyn anne
BECK,  RAY  BERNARD
BRINHAM,   S.   DOUGLAS
DAWSON,  DAPHNE  JOAN
DRISCOLL,  DIANE   I.
GAWTHORN,   HAROLD   JACK
GNUCCI,  JOSEPH   PETER
GOLDIE,   ROBERT ALAN
GOODSHIP,    JEFFREY    L.
GRISDALE,   DENIS   A.
HARRISON,   MARIE   ORLA
HENNIGER,   MARGARET   A.
KARADIMAS,   RONNIE   L
KENT,   STEPHANIE   JOAN
KNIGHT,   JOSEPH   IRVING
KUSHNIR,   WILLIAM
KYASHKO,   WILLIAM
MocFARLANE,   REGINALD
McGARRIGLE, GAIL  L.
MoclNNIS,  J.   RONALD
McLEAN,   ROBERT   HUGHES
MOFFAT,   W.   GORDON
MORRISETTE,    PATRICIA
MURPHY,   CLARENCE   P.
PEARSON,   MARY   JEAN
PIKE,   SHIRLEY  JOAN
ROOTS,   FREDERICK   F.
RUSSELL,   MARILYN   R.    E.
SCHAFER,  MABEL JEAN
SHORE,   DONALD  JAS.   B.
SMITH,   WILLIAM   H.
198 .
FORESTRY UNDERGRADS
•   Above:  Forestry Undergraduate Society.
Below:   Forestry students work on microscopes.
Forestry undergrads do not have a separate undergraduate society, but all members of the faculty belong
to the Forest Club. Bill Sharpe acted as Club president
for '51-'52, while Sel Fox was vice-president and Alf
Cuthbert and Jim McWilliams were treasurer and
secretary respectively.
The Forest Club Executive planned the many activities of the group this year. Early fall saw the "Slashburn
Stag" held at Spanish Banks. Members of both under-
199
graduate and faculty attended the bonfire affair. Inspired men of the woods entered a logging truck in
the Homecoming Parade in October. Foresters turned
out in droves to the Club's Frolic, held at the Gai Paree
in November.
Like most other faculties on the campus, the Foresters heralded the approach of spring with a big dance.
Later on in March, the annual banquet was the big
feature on a forest man's calendar.
Forestry Engineering men are particularly proud of
their displays this year—their working model sawmill
won them first prize at the "Engineer's Highball" and
copped top honors in awards class two at Open House.
Tony Robinson, who arranged the Forestry Undergrad issue of the Ubyssey, edited the Club's annual
"The Forester". Norman Godfrey, Dave Wallinger, and
Neil Hood assisted him in producing the 80-page slick
magazine, which hit the campus late in April.
One of the unique features of the course is the required training period spent at the University Research
Forest north of Haney. The calendar, which states that
the area is well suited for "research in forestry and related sciences", doesn't quite capture the atmosphere of
a combined stag party and beard-growing contest that
prevails when the foresters literally hit the trail .
•    Forestry students at work in classroom.
1          >#k   **
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BOYD,   KENNETH   GEORGE
BRUELS,  WILMOT FLINT
CRUICKSHANK,   GEO.    F.
GODFREY,   JOHN   NORMAN
GRANT,   DONALD   T.
HOUGH,   WILLIAM   S.
LITTLE,   JAMES   DOUGLA.
MclNNES,   DAVID   LESLIE
MocQUEEN,   JOHN   ROBT.
McWilliams, james f.
moore, richard s.
robson, peter elliott
sturgeon, john a.
armit, ian david m.
blagg, neil anthony
desaulniers, victor n.
dixon, nuttall m. f.
gilbert, richard d.
hood, neil leroy
muri, glen allen
myers, john graham
scholefield, a. j.
wood, robert s.
bellamy, chas. peter
campbell, lloyd allan
duffy, patrick james
harris, peter
hope, laurence andrew
kelly, emerson boyd
kemp, david burnett
kun, steve peter f.
marshall, donald geo.
marshall, james e.
maxwell, william f.
MacRAE,   RONALD   D.
PELTON,   NORMAN   RALPH
PORTELANCE,   J.   H.
SUTTON, WILLIAM  GRANT
VAUCHER,  RAYMOND J.
• Left: Practical work in Forestry provided many fresh air classes away from
stuffy lecture rooms.
• Rugged Foresters ready for a hard
day's work.
• Right: Students show off home away
from home.
• Bottom left: Diesel Juggernaut provided Forestry with impressive homecoming display.
• Right: Elizabeth Wetton Robinson,
only girl Forester.
200 #.-
LAW
Mushrooming from a tiny 1947 class in an army
hut to one of North America's top schools housed in
$300,000 worth of glass and concrete, UBC's law faculty
dominated campus political activity, staged moot courts,
published a magazine, and probably put in more studying time per student than any group in the university.
Presided over by Dean George Curtis, an energetic
Rhodes Scholar from Dalhousie, the school has become
a carefully integrated part of legal life in B.C.
Three senior students were appointed during the
year to offer legal advice to the Alma Mater Society.
Their efforts helped keep the Society out of court.
Scholastic effort included the preparation of a dozen
thick case-books, mimeographed and distributed (9000
copies of them) to universities across Canada. The
law library expanded to include 20,000 books worth
more than $100,000. All of them were moved from the
old law huts to the new building in less than two
hours by energetic undergrads who refused to suffer
the delays of professional moving.
The undergrad magazine "Legal Notes", a slick
paper job turned out twice a year, expanded circulation to include downtown lawyers. It provided and
outlet for students with strong views on legal affairs
and served as a training ground for those who hoped
later to write for legal journals.
The Law Undergraduate Society, link between
faculty and students, was this year headed by Gus
Coughlin. LUS is responsible for the setting up and
operation of the Moot Courts before which first and
second year students argue while third year students
judge. It is an integral part of the law school's training.
Late in November a stone fragment from the Inner
Temple of London was laid by the entrance to the
new law building. A gift from the B.C. Law Society,
the stone was presented in an official ceremony by W.
H.   Haldane,   Q.C.
• Top: Law Undergraduate Society Executive New
Law Building
• Bottom   left:   Reception   Desk   in   Law   Building
• Moot Court.
• Center:   Moving   the   Law   Library   to   the   New
Building
• Ri_ht: Laying the Stone from the Inner Temple 8122SL
CALLAGHAN,   HOWARD  A.
CAMPBELL,  J.   A.   GRANT
CAMPBELL,   GEORGE   THOS.
CHEFFINS,   RONALD   IAN
COUPAR,   ROBERT   BROUGH
DUDLEY,  LEONARD  C.
FALCONER,   ROBT.   J.
FEDYK,  JOHN  JOSEPH
FEE,  THOMAS   PHILIP
FLADER,  STELLA
FRANCK,   THOMAS
GEE, MARGARETE JEAN
GILCHRIST,   ROBT.   WM.
HERBERT,  FREDERICK  H.
HUMMEL,  D.   M.   W.
JONES,   DARRELL   DONALD
KENNEDY,  WILLIAM  J.   J.
KORICAN,   TOMMY
LAWRENCE,   JAMES  W.
LINDHOLM,   LOUIS    F.
MocPHAIL,    DONALD    ROSS
NOLD,   JOSEPH   JULIAN
PHILPOTT, WM.  E.
REE,   ANGUS   C
RHODES,  THOMAS  ALFRED
ROBERTSHAW,   HECTOR   E.
TURNER, GEO. GODFREY
WALKER,  CLARENCE A.
WALKER,  G.  WILLIAM
WOOTTON,  A.   FRANCES
YOUNG GORDON W.
ANFIELD   S   DAVID
BANFIELD,   C.   JANE
BLACK,  DELBERT  ERROL
BOUWMAN,    ROLAND    J.
CAMPNEY,   ALAN   F.
CHAPMAN, GEORGE G.
CHICHURA,    EDWARD    M.
CHRISTIE,  NORMA  BELL
CHRISTOPHER,  GORDON  A.
CLARE,   LORNE   P.
CLARK,   SIDNEY   GEORGE
CORBETT,   LORNE   RAE
DENT,    NORMAN   GARETH
DROST,    IAN    LOUDEN
FELTHAM,   IVAN   REID
FLADER,   CHARLES
FRASER, JOHN  ALLEN
GOLDSMITH,  ALLAN
GOULT,   JOHN   B.   EAMER
GREEN,  STEPHEN   H.
HAAPALA,   ROY
HAMILTON,   HOWARD   J.
HANNAN, A.  K.
HARVEY,   RONALD   BRUCE
HELGASON,   G.   ALLAN
HILLMAN,   KEITH   A.   L.
HUNTER,  JOHN  WILFRED
INDRIDSON,  ALVIN
IVENS,  JOHN  BOYD  M.
JONES,  JOHN  C.
KEFFER,   JAMES   L
LEE,   BRUCE  ALEXANDER
LOWES,   PETER   DONALD
MAWHINNEY,   DONALD  J.   S.
MacDONALD,   JOHN   A.
McGEER,   MICHAEL   G.
McLELLAN,    HELEN   JANE
McLEOD,   SHIRLEY   E.   KAY
MOIR,   REGINALD   J.   S.
MULHOLLAND,  WM.  H.
NEEN,   WILLIAM   ADAM
PEACOCK, JOAN  S.
PERRY,   KENNETH   LUCAS
PRENTICE,   THOS.   BRIAN
PYNE, MELVILLE  R.
SCHACHTER,   BERNARD
SCOTT,    GEORGE    E.
SHAW,   JAMES   KEITH
SHEPPARD,   ROBERT  F.
SIER,    HERBERT    NORMAN
SINCLAIR,   ROBERT  A.
SMITH,   GLENN   ELWIN
SWEET,   DAVID   GEORGE
THOMPSON,   WILLIAM   S.
WATSON,   JOHN   BEYETT
WHITEHEAD,   FRANK   E.
WISMER,  JAMES   STUART
WITHRINGTON,   GEORGE   P.
YOUNGSON,   DAVID  L.
202 ■
t
PHARMACY
The Pharmacy College at UBC is now in its sixth
year, and although young in comparison to the other
faculties on the campus, it has developed since its inauguration.
This year the Undergrad Society had a young lady as
its president, and in this capacity Miss Pat James aptly
conducted all pharmacy affairs. The other committee
members were Bob Alexander, vice-president; Peggy
Smith, secretary-treasurer; Jack Duller, publicity; Ray
Counsel., sports; Gordon Dalby, social convener; Doug
Fraser and Peter Malyik, USC Reps.; Louanne Davies,
WUS Rep.
Pharmacy activities started on the second week of
the school term with the Annual Pharmacy mixer at the
Alma Academy. Doug Franklin, master of ceremonies,
added to the evening's enjoyment by giving out spot
prizes and lucky tickets. Due to the efforts of the
organizer, Gordon Dalby, the party was a great success.
In the intramurals, Pharmacy made quite a name
for itself. They won all soccer games played, gave stiff
competition in volleyball and badminton, fielded an excellent team in basketball, and readily participated in
the softball tournaments. All this was drawn from a
faculty totalling 136 students, of whom 27 were the so-
called weaker sex.
The activities of Pharmacy reached their climax in
March, when the 4th year students had their Graduation Banquet and Ball at the Panorama Roof of the
Hotel Vancouver.
• Top:   Pharmacy  Undergraduate  Council
• Pharmacy Student marking  Lab  Preparations.
• Bottom Left: 4th year Organic Chem. Lab.
• Right: Pharmacy Lab. ALEXANDER,  ROBERT B.
ALLEN,  DAVID CLIFFORD
AQUA,  NITA JUDITH
ARMOUR,   B.   DOREEN
BASS,   PAUL
COUNSELL,   RAYMOND   E.
DAVENPORT,   HAROLD   L. '
DAVIES,  LOUANNE   C.
DIEBEL,   HARRY  K.
ELSDON,   DIANA  JANE
FAST,  ARTHUR  C.
FRASER,   DOUGLAS   H.
FRYKLIND,   VERNON T.
HATCHER,   THOMAS   G.
HENZIE,   WM.   JACK
HOLLINGER,   ROY   HESLA
KOVRCHIK,  JAMES C.
McCARLEY,   DEAN   R.
MocEWAN,  JOYCE  LUELLA
McKIM,   DENNIS  C.
NIGHTINGALE,   FRANK   H.
NORDLUND,   LLOYD   G.
PICKERING,   WILF.   E.
ROCHE,  EVELYN   BLANCHE
ROWELL,   HEDLEY   J.
ROWE,  WILLIAM  HILEY
SANCHIONI,   CARLO
SAUNDERS,   VERNON  A.
SCOTT,   ROSS   ALEXANDER
SHARP, JAMES
SMITHERS,   DOROTHY  M.
STAIGER,   GEORGE   WM.
STALEY,   NORMAN   E.
STATHERS,   HAROLD   E.
THIBAUDEAU,   DENIS   U.
THOMAS,   NORMAN   S.
THOMSON,   ROBERT   B.
WELLS,   CHARLES   C.
WILEY,   FRED.   WM.
WILSON, JOAN
YZWA, ADAM  LEONARD
ANTOSZ,   PAUL   PETER
ASHLEY,   R.   CALVIN
BEKOS,  JAMES   BASIL
BLAKE,   ELIZABETH   H.
BRYDEN,  MARJORIE  A   B.
BUCKHOLZ,  HENRY
BURDOCK,   BRYAN   B.
COOPER,  PHYLLIS  M.
CORY,   ALLAN   M.
DARLING,  JAMES   R.
DEERING,   IRMA   K.   N.
DELMAS,   FRANCIS   C.
DEROO,   HENRY  W.
FARRIS,   WALTER   HENRY
GAWIUK,  MICHAEL   N
KELLEY,   DORA   E.
KLASSEN,  ABRAHAM
LESAGE,  VERONICA  M.
LINBURG,   JACK  GEORGE
MocLEAN,   JAMES   A
MORROW,   BLAKE   E.
NELMES,  THOS.   G.   OWEN
NOEL,  ROSS  NORMAN
ROBINSON,   DAVID   NEIL
SMITH,   CYRIL   BEE
SMITH,   GLENN   WILLIAM
SPENCER,   ALFRED   JOHN
TADMAN,   B.   BLOOMA
WARD,   KENNETH   L
WARNE,  JAMES ARTHUR
WICKMAN,  THOMAS
WONG,  WING  SUNG  JACK
WOOD,   K.   CLAIRE  C
YUSKOU,   WALTER
204 • Left: Dorm girls pretend to study while listening to friends tell of day's
adventures on campus.
• Above: AMS presidential candidates stand on their platforms (?)
• Above  right:  Chem.  students only contribution  to the field of drama:
"Denatured  Boy". FRATERNITIES:  SALLY HEARD w
207 Anderson, Phil
Anstis, William
Armour, Les
Basi, Raghbir
Clarke, Stan
Farry, Gerrard
Feltham, Ivan
Franklin, Doug
Goldsmith, Alan
Lyon, Vaughn
McFarlane, Dave
Nold,  Joe
Ostrum, Brock
Patterson, Frank
Sparling, Bill
Tennant, John
Taylor, Pat
Westcott, Al
Sigma Tau Chi
Carlson, Irene
Chave, Dorothy
Choma, Anne
Donaldson, Nonie
Fraser, Joan
Gyles, Theo
Heard, Sally
Hutcheison, Anne
James, Susan
Lett, Mary
McArthur, Joan
Scott, Lila
Southin, Mary
Stewart, Shiela
Wooton, Anna
Delta Sigma Pi
208 PAN-HELLENIC ASSOCIATION
INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
209 FIRST ROW: Adamson, Nan; Barnes, Barbara; Birkinshaw, B.; Branca, Dolores; Byrne, A.
SECOND ROW: Coutts, Doreen; Challenger, Ann; Crossman, A.; Dalgleish, D.; Dodson, F.
THIRD ROW: Driver, Shirley; Ellergot, G.; Fetherstonhaugh, P.; Holtby, M.; Kerry, B. A.
FOURTH ROW: Kramer, Louanne; Lancaster, Diane; Marshall, Jane; Newell, G.; Pinsky, B.
FIFTH ROW: Riches, Eleanor; Simpson, Ruth; Stevens, Vickie; Stowell, Lora; Wilson, S.
SIXTH ROW: Wooster, Shirley, Yates, Hilary.
MISSING: Banfield, Jane; Crumb, Pat; Mosher, Dorothy; McLeod, S.; Simonson, I.
Alpha Delta Pi
210 •_ i -»
FIRST ROW: Abercombia, Elizabeth; Albrecht, Doreen; Bain, Mavis; Connell, Rae; Davies, D.
SECOND ROW: Easterbrook, Audrey; Fletcher, D.; Griffin, S. A.; Harrison, M.; Letherdale, D.
THIRD ROW: McKinnon, Mary; McRae, Marie; Matchett, Marilyn; Naylor, L.; Nettleton, D.
FOURTH ROW: Notzel, Stephanie; Rose, Shelagh; Schrodt, Barbara; Sheppard, B.; Stewart, A.
FIFTH ROW: Tamboline, Beverly; Yurich, Mary.
MISSING: Cummins, D.; Lervold, S.; Moore, S.; Sparling, D.; Spring, Pat; Wolstencroft, Joan.
Alpha Gamma Delta
211 FIRST ROW: Berry, Donna; Bigelow, Cynthia; Booth, Elizabeth; Brodd, Elin; Cockburn, Sandra
SECOND ROW: Hobson, Isobel; Home, Eleanor; Home, Trisha; Kelly, Maureen; Kirk, Ada
THIRD ROW: King, Joanne; McAlpine, Mayli; McMillan, Muriel; Metcalfe, S.; Richardson, R.
FOURTH ROW: Stalker, Marguerite; Thomas, Gertrude; Vear, G.; Walker, A. Windebank, C.
FIFTH ROW: Woodcock, Lillian.
MISSING: Achison, M.; Marshall, P.; McLean, Mary; Shankland, Beryl; Simonsen, Ruth.
Alpha Omicron Pi
212 FIRST ROW: Batty, Margaret; Boon, Elaine; Bray, Maureen; Butler, Audrey; Byrne, P.
SECOND ROW: Campbell, Shirley; Clohosey, Mary; Feamside, Gwyn; Grady, P.; Hall, M.
THIRD ROW: Hammarstrom, Louise; Hodson, Joan; James, Patricia; Jay, Anita; Leir, Esther
FOURTH ROW: Lewis, Shirley; Lynch, Barbara; Kearns, Sheila; Kolle, Phyllis, MacDougall, S.
FIFTH ROW: Millard, Patricia; Moore, Sylvia; Muir, Daryl; Nelson, Claire L.; Northrop, N.
SIXTH ROW: Pitcaim, Alice; Porteous, Merle; Rolston, Joyce; Saul, Beverly; Seymour, S.
SEVENTH  ROW:   Smith,  Marian;  Stevens,  Marilyn;   Sutherland,  Shirley.
MISSING: Derry, Elizabeth; Hack, Julie; Pauls, Marjorie; Ross, Mary; Smith, Peggy.
&-\
Alpha Phi
213 FIRST ROW: Andrew, Milla; Baldwin, Marion; Bissett, Ann; Bissett, Connie; Binns, Barbara.
SECOND ROW: Boniface, Rosemary; Colquhoun, Peggy; Cox, Diana; Eades, G.; Fletcher, L.
THIRD ROW: Furniss, Pat; Glasgow, Beverly; Grant, Phyllis; Gyles, Theo; Hood, Jean.
FOURTH ROW: Hopkins, Mona; Horsey, Julie; James, Susan; Lett, Mary; McDougall, Anne.
FIFTH ROW: McKee, Jean; Mellish, Katy; Miller, Marilyn; Munro Cathy; Murphy, Joan.
SIXTH ROW: Murray, Nancy; Novak, Marion; Plant, Elva; Ritchie, Ina; Sclater, Shirley.
SEVENTH ROW:  Smith, Frances; Taylor Pat; Welch, Joan; Wilson, Marilou; Wrinch, M.
Delta Gamma
214 FIRST ROW: Dattner, Sylvia; Dodek, Sally; Green, Myra
SECOND ROW: Hallis, Pamela; Hollenberg, Marilynn; Rosenbaum, Florence
THIRD ROW: Shlafmitz, Fran; Smolensky, Clarisse; Srolovitz, Sarah
FOURTH ROW: Tadman, Blooma; Toban, Sheila; Weinstein, Lilian
FIFTH ROW: Zabensky, Reva
MISSING: Aaron, Barbara; Aqua, Nita; Camerman, Esther.
Delta Phi Epsilon
215 FIRST ROW: Boulter, Pegge; Corbett, Barbara; Cree, Hugheen; Dean, Shirley; Denman, B.
SECOND ROW: De Pfyffer, Helen; Dixon, Diane; Dobson, Fay; Elworthy, Diane, Forbes, B.
THIRD ROW: Forrester, M.; Gilchrist, J.; Graham, S.; Hall, B.; Henderson, A.
FOURTH ROW: Holloway, B.; Kennedy, E.; MacCorkindale, M.; MacKenzie, S.; McLennan, P.
FIFTH ROW: Malcomson, S.; Marchese, Irene; Munro, Mary F.; Murray, Arden; Pleuman, Nan.
SIXTH ROW: Ridley, B.; Shannahan, Pat; Stewart, Kay; Taylor, Mary; Thompson, Connie.
SEVENTH ROW: Usher, E.; Willis, Ann; Wilson, Betty; Wiltse, Betty; Wiltse, Patricia.
Gamma Phi Beta
216 FIRST   ROW:   Arneson,   Molly   E.;   Bagshaw,   Carolyn;   Bloedel,   Eulalie;   Browne,   Betty
SECOND ROW: Chadwick, Mary; Flaten, Barbara; Graham, Jane; McCurrach, Helen
THIRD   ROW:   McEachran,   Ailsa;   McGiverin,   Sheila;   McLaren,   Ann;   Martin,   Wendy
FOURTH ROW: Olsen, Janice; Rittich, Mary; Say Jill; Stewart, Sheila
FIFTH  ROW:Strachan,  Doris;   Stralendorff,   Shirley;  Yoxall,  Eileen
MISSING: Jan Caple
Kappa Alpha Theta
217 FIRST ROW: Anderson, Deidre; Blois, Sheila; Bowell, Shirley; Braide, Penny; Brown, Sally.
SECOND ROW: Cameron, Anne; Cooper Brenda; DuVernet, Mary; Fraser, Joan; Gell, M.
THIRD ROW: Glanville, Rosalie; Guild, Mareen; Harris, Daphne; Harwood, H.; Heard, S.
FOURTH ROW: Houston, Elizabeth; McDonald, P.; Millham, M.; Nelson, B.; Partridge, J.
FIFTH ROW: Pitts, Shary; Pop, Alice; Pop, Katy; Potter, Carol; Ross, Betsy.
SIXTH  ROW:   Scott,  Edith;   Sick,   Marney;   Thatcher,   Joan;   Wright,   Valerie.
Kappa Kappa Gamma
218 ■ ■-
*
Anderson, R.
Baker, R.
Barker, T.
Barter, Phillip
Blair, Huch
Chowne, Godfrey
Clyne, Stuart
Dawson, Robert
Dixon, Ray
Eccott, J.
Ferrie, Michael
Foxall, Ronald
Fraser, W.
Fredrickson, J. M.
Gray, Patrick
Green, Alton
Grimston, George
Hamilton, J.
Herb, Jack
Hilborn, W.
Hopkins, T.
Hutchins, Kier
Insley, Alan
Macleod, Charles
MacMillan, J.
Main, Gerald
Mathews, R.
Millham, H.
Nelson, William
Newton, John
Palmer, Gerald
Peritz, D.
Ray, Martin
Ridley, Robert
Rosenberg, G.
Rosenberg, Kenneth
Ryler, James
Sellens, W.
Shalman, Denis
Sinclair, Grover
Stavey, David
Stanfield, D.
Templeman, Peter
Thomson, J. H.
Wickson, Malcolm
Wilkinson, Kenneth
Willis, W.
MISSING:
Matheson, Roger
Emary, Allen
Alpha Delta Phi
219 FIRST ROW: Berquist, E. A.; Booth, A.; Clark, A.; Cockling, R. E.; Coe, J. E.; Constabaris, John
SECOND ROW: Craig, Jeffray; Davies, J,; Dickenson,  B.; Emerton, W. R.; Falconer, Robert; Fee, Phil
THIRD ROW: Fransen, L.; Gilchrist, R.; Gilroy W.;   Hogan,   Dick;   Holmes,   Vincent,   Indridson,   Alvin
FOURTH ROW: Jephson, Ross; Le Blanc, Raymond;  Lilly, A.; Long, John; McAllister, D.; MacDona.ld J.
FIFTH ROW: McDonald, Vern; McMwnn, J.; Middleton, R. M.; Mawhinney, J. D.; Neen, W.; Potter, J.
SIXTH ROW: Ppyer, I. G.; Reddon, J. G; Reston,  John; Robertson, R.; Savage, Ronald; Stanley, Harold
SEVENTH  ROW:   Stathers,  H.;   Thompson,   W.;   Trunkfield,  Chris;  Tufts,  Ivan;  Vigar, Neil, Wilks,  E.
EIGHTH ROW: Wismer, J. Stuart
Alpha Tau Omega
220 J.
FIRST ROW: Bancroft, John; Bodlak, S.; Baker, G.; Cassady, G; Clark, Jim; Creighton, D.; Deeble, Doug.
SECOND ROW: Desaulnier, N.; Duncan, Ted; Engman, H.; Ewing, B.; Feltham, I.; Franklin, D.; Gardner, D.
THIRD ROW: Granthem, P.; Gunning, K.; Gutteridge, T.; Hudson, D.; Jaffary, B.; Johnson, D.; Ketchen, P..
FOURTH ROW: Kringhaug, O.; Larsen, D.; Lee, T.; LePage, M.; Little, B.; McGhee, J.; MacGillivray, D.
FIFTH ROW: McGinley, F.; McGinley, G.; McRae, R.; McWilliams, J.; Martindale, M.; Mills, J.; Olson, H.
SIXTH ROW: Parke, Al; Parke, G.; Pearce, D.; Reid, D.; Ritchie, J.; Ross, J.; Sharpe, Delbert
SEVENTH ROW: Sherlock, Douglas; Southcott, J.; Taylor, P.; Walton, Norm; Webster, Alex; Webster, H;
Whitworth, Doug.
EIGHTH ROW: Yorke, Dennis
Beta Theta Pi
221 FIRST ROW: Bianco, Ernest; Burge, C. W. M.; Day, Ephriam; Dolan, Owen
SECOND ROW: Eso, Joe; Evans, Hugh A.; Everidge, C. P.; Fitzpatrick, Hugh
THIRD ROW: Frederick, Eugene; Gallbraith, A. J.; Gray, Donald S.; Gregory, George
FOURTH ROW: Horcoff, Mike; Horner, Lyle M.; MacKenzie, Ian; McLaren, Angus
FIFTH ROW: Nelson, Rodger; Nichols, Douglas; Thorne, Trevor; Wood, Jim
Delta Kappa Epsilon
222
_ Anderson, Phil
Bouck, John
Carson, Dick
Carter, Jim
Christopher,  Bob
Cobbin, Alex
Cobbin, Allan
Davies,   Bill
Edwards, Doug.
Edwards, Bob
Epp, Walter
Fawcus, Ken
Fee, Rae
Flather, Barrie
Flather, Elwood
Forbes, Bill
Giegerich, Henry
Godefroy, David
Hamilton, Neil
Hannan, Pat
Hindmarch, Bob
Levy, Dan
Lusztig, Peter
Jenkinson, Ton-
Johnson, Ross
Larsen, Dan
MacDonald, John
MacDonald, Ted
Nelson, Ron
Nold, Joe
Parkin, Doug
Pearce, Ted
Reid, John
Rowan,  John
Rudd, Ken
Shephard, Herb
Smyth, Don
Stewart, Jim
Taylor, Gregory
Valentine, Doug
Valentine, Ted
Watts, Doug
Weatherall, Bill
Weeks, Graham
West, Michael
Westlake, Don
Riley, Bill
&b
Delta Upsilon
223 •
FIRST ROW: Anfield, David; Angell, Doug.; Bell, Wm. J.; Blackhall, Robt.; Borthwick, Alan
West, Donald
SECOND ROW: Burgess, Robert; Byman, Allan; Castillou, Harry; Coates, Peter; Dallas, G. D.
THIRD ROW: DeLuca Earl; Grauer, L. P.; Gill, Gerald; Harris, Don; HoIIingon, Victor.
FOURTH ROW: Homstein, Herbert; Johnson, Ross; King, L. A.; Lundy, Deane; McArthur, H.
FIFTH ROW: MacFarlane, David; McLeod, D. R.; MacMillan, D.; Markham, W.; Miachika, A.
SIXTH ROW: Milley, D. G.; Moirett, Robert; Morrie, L. F.; Mottishaw, Henry; Nestmman, J.
EIGHTH ROW: Smith, M. D.; Stanway, Ross; Tarlton, Jim; Tanner, W. H. R.; Vance, J.
Kappa Sigma
224 FIRST ROW: Bajkov, Alexander; Baldwin, Barry; Cullen, David; Fedyk, John.
SECOND ROW: Harrison, John P.; Harrison, William F.; Hood, Alan; Jack, Don.
THIRD ROW: Jenkins, D. L.; Kerr, Robert; Laramy, Barry; Macleod, Norman.
FOURTH ROW: Moisey, John; Patterson, Frank; Rendell, Jerry; Riopel, Jean Paul
FIFTH ROW: Roberts, Brian; Steacy, Newton; Stephens, Victor; Stewart, Robert
SIXTH ROW: Taylor O. M.;Vance, E. Rod; Wade, Edwin; Wall, David.
MISSING: Biehl, Norman; Bekos, Jim; Bird, John; Campbell, David; Clarke, Colin; Dawson.F
Dawson, John; Holland, Mickie; Knight, Don; Loukes, Pat; McDorman, L.; Marshall, R.
Morrison, J.; Noble, K.; Pattison, J.; Razzell, B.; Stonier, P.; Towriss, A.; Wallace, C.
Watson, Ken; Wylie, Douglas.
Lambda Chi Alpha
225 Abercrombie, Robin
Alair, R. P.
Anderson, John
Atkinson, John
Bradshaw, John
Cook, P.
Cook, T. A.
Filer, Roderick
Fowler, Gordon
Gilley, Jim
Grady, Dickson
Harbottle, Bert
Hendry, James
Hodgson, W. L.
Hogarth, Gordon
Jackes, Robert
Jensen, Colin
Kelly, B.
Kennedy, J. B.
Kennedy, William
Lambert, Douglas
Loutit, James
Lyall, G. C.
Mair, Ian
Morrison, J. H.
McKay, Bruce
MacKendrick, W. G.
McLeod, Doug.
McNaughton, John R.
McNicol, J.
O'Brien, G. W.
Ostrosser, D.
Park, J. K.
Paterson, R. G.
Phillips,  Art
Ployart, John W.
Rae, Allen
Ridley, Jack C.
Roberts, J. L.
Rush, Robert
Shaw, Duncan
Stuart, W. D.
Turnbull, I.
Underhill, Dick
Van Allen, Eric
Walker, W. R.
Whitbread, J.
Willis, Frank
Phi Delta Theta
226 FIRST ROW: Blewett, P.; Clare, L.; Cotherall, G.; Coulthard, W.; Dean, K.; DeLaGiroday, Philip
SECOND ROW: DesBrisay, G.; DesBrisay, I.; Drost, I.; Eadie, D. A. (Goug); Elliott, G.; Forward, Herb.
THIRD ROW:Forward, P.; Haack, F.; Hackett, Al; Hibberd, J. C; Isaac, Russel; Lockheart, I.
FOURTH ROW: Lowther, J.; Johnston, H.; Killam, G.; Macdonald, D.; MacDonald, W. C; Mackay, John
FIFTH ROW: Mackenzie, Pat; Morgan, John B.; Munn, E.; Neal, C; Nelson, B. C; Nelson, P. W.
SIXTH ROW: Nelson, I.; Pearkes, John; Plant, A.; Pulos, Andy; Purvis, David; Ross, J. Kenneth
SEVENTH ROW: Selkirk, Bob; Stephens, R.; Wadsworth, Robert; Walmsley, L.
A
$.r.A,
au)ur\
Phi Gamma Delta
227 FIRST ROW:   Bettershill,  John;  Bethune,  Jim;  Culkin,  Bud;  Harvey,  Art
SECOND ROW: Harvey, Bruce; Jones, Don; Kidd, Gerry; Kirkpatrick, Bob
THIRD ROW: Laidlaw, Bill; MacDonald, James; MacKrow, Jack; McPhee, Bruce.
FOURTH ROW: Malo, Paul; Parkin, Bill; Ramsden, Rick; White, Don
FIFTH   ROW:   Younger,   Bob;   Thordarson,   Ted
MISSING: Alderman, B.; Broski, S.; Bruce, R.; Davis, R.; Hutchinson, B.; Macdonald, Alex;
Marsh, Mick; Mullholland, Bill; Riisk, Jim; Walley, Peter.
Phi Kappa Pi
228 FIRST ROW:  Aird, Cameron; Anstis, William;  Bockhold, Lawrence, Clarke, Jim
SECOND ROW: Dennis Donald D.; Jefferys, Edward; Preston, William; Puil, George.
THIRD ROW:  Roote, Trevor F.; Scott, Philip; Taneda, Kazui; Thompson, Harold
FOURTH  ROW:   Wassick,  Robert
a4l
w
Psi Upsilon
229 I
FIRST ROW:  Harold Austin;  Jack Austin;  Paul Bass
SECOND ROW:  Ken Berry; Mike Bernstein; Saul Cohen
THIRD ROW: Harry Frackson; Howard Gerber; Gerry Kemp
FOURTH ROW: Dave Youngson
Sigma Alpha Mu
230 i
FIRST ROW: Antle, John; Archambault, Richard; Barnett, Douglas; Brealey, Laurie
SECOND ROW: Carew, Derry; Cubbon, Bob; Dixon, Bob; Donaldson, Robert
THIRD ROW: Fentiman, Richard; Fotheringham, David; Frost, Ray; Gleig, Don
FOURTH ROW:  Gorges, Kevin;  Grant, James;  Gustavson, C;  Harvey,  Harold
FIFTH ROW:  Kelsey, Harley; Lloyd, Tony;  Manson,  Peter;  Miller, Clive
SIXTH ROW:  Morgan, Victor;  Nekrassoff, Ury;  Piper,  Robert;  Prasloski, Peter
SEVENTH ROW: Strang, R. I.; Tcrris, James
MISSING: Ades, L.; Canova, J.; Cooper, K.; Danner, E.; Duncan, D.; English, A.; Fraser, D.;
Hatcher, T.; Herbert, F.; Jones, J.; O'Neill, L.; Vatne, J.; Wood, C.
Sigma Chi
231 FIRST ROW: Anderton, John; Bird, Tom; Beddome, John; Bishop, Dick
SECOND ROW: Christopherson, Ray; Couroubakalis, Dimi; Diespecker, Rick; Finlayson, M.
THIRD ROW: Galloway, Les; Hogan, John; MacKenzie, Gordon; McCormick, Bill
FOURTH ROW: Nemetz, Alvin; Renshaw, Bob; Stewart, Morgan; Strain, Jim
Sigma Phi Delta
232 immltL
FIRST ROW: Angel, Jerome; Baker, Stanley; Barad, Al; Cohen, Manly; Finkelstein, Norty
SECOND ROW: Flader, Charles; Gladstone, Sydney; Glassner, Irv; Goldbloom, Ted; Golden, M.
THIRD ROW: Goldsmith, Danny; Groberman, Joel; Joffe, Jay; Koffman, Morley; Laven, David
FOURTH ROW:Lecovin, Jerry; Levine, Sefton; Sky, Milton; Nagler, Melvin; Tessler, Dave
FIFTH ROW: Wolfe, Jack
MISSING: Goldsmith, Allan; Starke, Marv
Zeta Beta Tau
233 FIRST ROW: Barnsley, Richard; Bishop, Peter; Brodie, Robert; Buscombe, Robert; Carroll, F.
SECOND ROW: Christopher, Gordon; Claman, Peter; Corbett, Donald; Dewis, G.; Gilmour, W.
THIRD ROW: Gault, John; Houlton, Harold; Jones, Darrell; Jones, Ken; Lee, Bruce
FOURTH ROW: Harris, John; Letson, John; McComb, Donald; MacMinn, George; Mair, Rare
FIFTH ROW: Martinson, Ralph; Norris, Mac; Patey, William; Romer, Richard; Rose, Barry
SIXTH ROW: Sterling, Tom; Sweet, David; Teviotdale, David; Wright, Douglas; Sparling, W.
MISSING: Adam, William; McDonald, Peter; Mclnnes, Duncan; McPhail, Donald; Sandoe, John;
Turner, Rod; Warren, John; White, Richard; Wright, David; Young, Norman.
Zeta Psi
234 • Left: Janie Shrum, Phrateres candidate, won
the coveted Sweetheart of Sigma Chi title.
• Upper   Right:   The   beginning   of   fraternity
row.  Figi and  Phi Delt houses lead the way.
• Lower Right: "Sammy" kidnappers broke an
exchange party on Hallowe'en.
Below: Second annual Pledges on Parade
Dance sponsored by Delta Phi Epsilon introduced sorority initiates.
• Upper Left: The Miami Tried Ball saw Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Delta Theta, and Sigma
Chi men join together to celebrate their founding.
• Below Left: Beta Theta Pi carried away top honours in campus songfest; copped top
North Western Conference title as well.
• Below: Kappa Kapp Gamma—Gamma Phi Beta Cabaret had nautical theme; Totem
pixie caught chorus line practising.
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Before natural resources become wealth, there is a lot to be done.
In British Columbia, the forest industry has transformed stands
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A comparison of our living standards with those of other
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Just how important is the lumber industry to British Columbia?
—the forest industry payroll accounts for almost 25% of the
total British Columbia payroll.
Alaska Pine & Cellulose Limited is proud to be a part of the
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Operations
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242 FREE-WHEELING SUN WRITERS
INTELLECTUAL RAINMAKERS
FEW newspapers in Canada, or anywhere for that matter, offer their
readers the daily product of a more sprightly group of staff writers
than the Vancouver Sun. Differing widely in makeup and outlook, these
writers have one thing in common; they are the stimulators of much
intellectual activity and discussion among those who peruse and ponder
their comment on the news of the day . . . somewhat as the cloud-
seeding fellows are said to be the cause of much rain in adjacent
acreage. Sun writers give their readers plenty to talk about . . .
another of the many excellent reasons why The Sun is counted among
North America's more lively newspapers.
BARRY MATHER has gained
a solidly based reputation
as Canada's most entertaining practitioner of ironic
understatement, in his Page
One "Nightcap" column.
PENNY WISE's readers have
the time of their lives following her daily forays
among markets and stores,
unearthing special values
and amusing things to buy.
CLYDE GILMOUR reviews
movies and records for Sun
readers and his conclusions
are gratefully received by
thousands of average readers  as   being  sound   sense.
JACK SCOTT is considered by many who are knowl-
edgable in such matters to be Canada's outstanding
daily columnist. Certainly his "Our Town" on the
"Second First Page" has been for many years the most
closely read and discussed  feature of The Sun.
THE CAUSE OF THOUGHT IN OTHERS
ELMORE PHILPOTT's special field is
politics and international affairs. His
intelligence and competence in his field
is testified to by his thousands of attentive readers and by the steady demand
for his services as lecturer and radio
commentator.
MAMIE MOLONEY eschews the madding
roar of the city and lives in the country,
coping with the madding roar of a
growing family and attendant household
duties. Between times she hammers out
her observations, wise and warm-hearted,
of life in her column, "In One Ear . . ."
It wouldn't be natural, or indeed interesting, if a reader's
agreement with one Sun columnist weren't likely to be
followed by his hearty disagreement with the next. The
consequent mental ferment is good for readers and good
for the columnists, too; teaches them that there's two or
more sides to every question ... a belief firmly held
by The Sun for a long time.
LLOYD TURNER is The Sun's
Business Editor and in that
capacity has many a sharp
and pertinent thing to say
about trends in trade and
finance, shedding light on
a complex subject.
VERA KELLEY pilots the sections of the paper devoted
to social activities and
women's affairs; her articles
are a staple eagerly looked
forward to by many devoted   readers.
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245 DAIRYLAND
goes to U.B.C.
Dairyland is proud of its long association with
University ot British Columbia. Not only does
Dairyland go out daily to the campus, supplying
faculty and students with top-grade dairy products,
but it has worked in close co-operation with
the Departments of Agriculture and Science for
many years. This co-operation and
our UBC-trained staff of Bacteriologists have helped
immeasurably in the achievement and maintenance
of Dairyland's high standards.
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Jrigh School Conference
Delegates to the Fifth Annual High School Conference had ample opportunity to see the campus on a
normal day during their tour on the Friday before
Open House. The time they spent at Open House
the next day was another story.
The Conference luncheons and dinners were held
in various campus eateries to give the visitors basic
training in varsity ways.
The whole program was designed to help the prospective freshmen find their way around.
The program committee, headed by Jack Scott,
enlisted the aid of Phrateres, the Phys Ed. students,
the Teachers Training class, USC and WUS.
The Conference was started five years ago by the
Teachers Training Association. This year the Conference was sponsored by the Alma Mater Society under
the direction of the Public Relations Officer, Terry
Nicholls. General chairman for the Conference was
Arc Fletcher, second year Commerce student.
246 WESTERN PLYWOOD COMPANY LIMITED
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The billeting committee, under Don McCallum,
contacted schools, Parent-Teacher groups and University students in order to arrange accommodations for
the 164 delegates who came from points outside the
Greater Vancouver area.
Private homes in Vancouver opened their doors to
60 out-of-town representatives. Other delegates from
distant points stayed with friends and relatives or
were placed in the Youth Training School on the
campus.
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Since the Massey Report made several recommendations closely affecting Canadian universities, it was no
surprise that the University of British Columbia should
take the lead in seeing that the suggestions did not go
unheeded.
During the last week of February, the Fine Arts
Committee and the Literary and Scientific Executive
sponsored a series of discussions by prominent university and cultural leaders.
President Norman A. M. MacKenzie, a member of
the five-man Royal Commission on the Development of
the Arts and Sciences in Canada, opened the talks with
a discussion on the purpose and scope of the report.
AMS President Vaughan Lyon, and Personnel
Director Major John MacLean stressed the need for a
system of national scholarships would enable one
thousand students to attend UBC each year on government scholarships and bursaries.
In the third talk, movie critic Clyde Gilmour,
humorist Eric Nicol, Vancouver Film Society president
Stan Fox, CBC's Robert Allen, and CJOR's Dorwin
Baird discussed the future of radio, film, and television
in Canada. Much to the delight of the large audience, the symposium evolved into a verbal tussle
between the private radio stations and the CBC. The
CBC came out on top, thanks to CBC men Nicols,
Allen and Gilmour.
The setting up of a Canada Council for the Encouragement of the Arts, Letters, Humanities, and
Social Sciences was advocated by the speakers at the
final meeting. Poet Earle Birney, Drama Director
Dorothy Somerset, Painter B. C. Binning, and LSE
president John de Wolf showed how Canadian creative
artists could benefit from grants-in-aid from the government issued by the Canada Council as suggested in
the Massey Report.
Chairman for the four meetings was Prof. G. C.
Andrew who called upon UBC students to write to
their Members of Parliament and other government
officials asking for support of the scholarship system
and the setting up of a Canada Council,
Since that time, Student Council has passed two
resolutions, one asking that the government institute
the scholarship system, and the other urging the formation of the Canada Council. Both resolutions were
heartily endorced at the annual Alma Mater Society
meeting, March 20. Copies of the resolutions have been
sent to all student councils across Canada together
with the suggestion that they sponsor discussions and
study groups on the Massey Report similar to the
UBC series.
The UBC library staff placed a petition in one of
its halls calling for the establishment of the scholarship
system, the Canada Council, and the National library
as recommended in the Massey Report. Close to 1500
signatures were obtained to the letter which was addressed to the Prime Minister, Louis St. Laurent.
The Ubyssey carefully followed developments. It
printed an appeal to all students to write letters to
their MP's. Names of all local Members of Parliament
and B.C. cabinet members were also published.
Meanwhile the government gave a half million dollar grant to UBC, part of a seventeen million dollar aid
program for Canadian universities. Recent press reports indicate that the Prime Minister has promised to
set up the scholarship system.
248 IN BRITISH COLUMBIA . . .
Education is the key to success in all lines of endeavour. Manufacturing,
Logging, Lumbering and Mining, Agriculture and Fishing, all need their
technicians ... all call for minds capable of close research and intelligent
analysis, or careful marshalling of the facts upon which industry moves
forward.
Through our demand for BRITISH COLUMBIA
PRODUCTS we encourage further investment and
plant expansion, thereby providing additional British
Columbia payrolls and greater opportunities for
British Columbia's youth in the industrial and
commercial fields.
BUY
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The Department of Trade and Industry
E. G. ROWEBOTTOM,
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Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B. C.
HON. A. D. TURNBULL,
Minister.
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249 HARRISON
is the place for tun!
Just two hours' drive from Vancouver, one of the continent's most fabulous
resorts is waiting to welcome you to summer fun!   Harrison Hot
Springs Hotel has everything — a spectacular mountain setting   .   .   .
luxurious surroundings . . . two heated swimming pools . . .
a sporty golf course   .   .  .  tennis courts   .   .  .  nearby lakes and streams
where   fishing   is   at  its   best.    You'll  enjoy
dancing in the exotic Copper Room, and
delicious food in the unique Gardenia Room or
Harrison's Coffee Shop.   Make  Harrison
Hot Springs Hotel the spot for that well-earned
vacation . . . come for a wonderful weekend
... or drive to Harrison for a day of fun
and relaxation.
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• Ladies, too! will
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Hundreds of eager students packed the Auditorium
at noon, April 9, to hear the poetry readings of Dylan
Thomas, noted British poet.
The visit was sponsored by the Literary and Scientific Executive in conjunction with the Fine Arts Committee of the University. It was Mr. Thomas' second
visit to the campus.
Professor Earle Birney introduced Mr. Thomas as
". . . the finest reader of poetry I have heard ... the
most original and creative poet of our generation. . . ."
Mr. Thomas made no comment on the poetry he
read, but the spellbound audience felt that comments
would have been superfluous. Poems of Hardy, Auden,
Edith Sitwell, Yeats, de la Mare, and Robert Graves
were read before Mr. Thomas read some of his own
poetry.
"In Country Sleep", "Poem", "The Hunchback in
the Park", 'In Country Sleep" and "Do Not Go Gently
Into That Good Night" thrilled the enthusiastic
students who vigorously applauded the Poet when his
reading was finished.
It was largely through the efforts of Hunter Lewis
that the visit to the campus was arranged.
250 JUDGE IT BY
THE WORK IT DOES
Watch the NEW MARCHANT FIGUREMASTER
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The Undergraduate Societies Committee lost its
biggest single unit this year when Students' Council
suspended the Arts Undergraduate Committee for one
year.
The AUS went into liquidation after Don
Mawhinney, its own president, admitted that "the
continuation of the AUS would be a complete waste
of $270."
Although the suspension of AUS meant a loss of
27 percent of USC membership, the committee still
managed to function effectively under the chairmanship of Bill Neen.
The activities of USC were manifold. Quite apart
from the obvious function of coordinating the activities
of the individual undergraduate societies, Bill Neen also
found himself saddled with the many referendums and
elections held throughout the year.
Neen fought for the rights of the Undergraduate
Societies in Students' Council and managed to obtain a
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PA. 9367
7ft6^&eUvce
concession whereby the individual Societies were given
the right to publish one issue of the Ubyssey each per
year.
However, the committee still found itself in the
midst of a crusade to hold the Ubyssey to the exact
letter of the contract which it had signed.
USC was also burdened with the impossible task of
helping collect all the Gym pledges. It is to their
credit that two-thirds of the pledges were collected.
The Committee, ably aided by their henchmen from
the Engineers' Undergraduate Society, also participated
in the Red Cross Blood Drive and the March of Dimes
campaign.
USC also showed its interest in future generations
of UBC students by taking an active part in Frosh
Orientation Week and the High School Conference.
Throughout the year, members of the committee
have shown that even an organization whose powers
and duties are quite nebulous can contribute towards
university life.
A good banking
connection is a
"must" for success
in any profession or
business.
Bank or Montreal
Canada's First Bank
Your Bank on the Campus—In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
working with Canadians in every walk of life since 1817
253 FOR   LABORATORY   CHEMICALS'
^W/y NICHOLS _^4/
C.P. Acetic Acid
C.P. Ammonium Hydroxide
C.P. Hydrochloric Acid
C.P. Nitric Acid
C.P. Sulphuric Acid
*
Complete line of Baker &
Adamson Laboratory Reagents and Fine Chemicals
for educational, research and
industrial uses.
Ihe NICHOLS CHEMICAL COMPANY. Limited
MONTREAL • TORONTO • VANCOUVER... Executive Offices, Sun Life Bldg., Montreal 2
254 "THE SYMBOL OF BUSINESS EFFICIENCY"
Cash  Registers     •     Accounting Machines      *      Adding Machines
The National Cash Register Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
501 West Georgia St. Vancouver, B.C.
Specialists in . . .
LADIES' and MEN'S
• Slacks
Suits
MADE ON THE PREMISES FROM
THE FINEST BRITISH AND
AUSTRALIAN   WOOLENS
TWO STORES TO SERVE YOU
49 E. HASTINGS
VANCOUVER
424 COLUMBIA STREET
NEW WESTMINSTER
With the Compliments of
CONTRACTORS TO
THE AMATEUR AND
PROFESSIONAL
STAGE
LIMITED
Theatrical Costumiers
and
Costume Manufacturers
COSTUMES   FOR   MASQUERADE,
OPERAS, PLAYS AND TABLEAUX
Men's Formal Wear, Tuxedos.
Cutaways. Tails
831   HOWE STREET PAcific 7620
VANCOUVER, B.C.
255 May we have an appointment with you in 1952?
Seems strange, doesn't it, to be talking about your Retirement
already! But it's a fact that the end of a man's career ought to be
planned from the beginning . . . making full use of the Service,
Security and Savings that only Life Insurance can give him. The
younger you are, the less it costs you to get started! We are a
friendly Company to do business with — our rates give you really
low-cost protection along with a savings program you'll always be
thankful for — and your friendly Agent will look after your
interests all the way. Too, if you want to make Life Insurance your
career, you'll find we are a friendly and progressive Company to
work for.
INSURANCE
COMPANY
Kingston
Ont.
CLUB
MAYLING
FAMOUS    FOR
• SOUTHERN   FRIED CHICKEN
• CHOP SUEY AND ALL CHINESE DISHES
S_E__B
ORCHESTRA 6  DAYS  PER WEEK
DINNER   SERVED   7   P.M.   TO  5   A.M.
SUNDAYS   FROM   5   P.M.   TO  4   A.M.
Concrete 0/
Vienna Sail
One of the social highlights of the University year
took place on Friday, March 21, when the International
House Committee sponsored the "Congress of Vienna"
Ball. From nine until one, the Brock lounge took on
an entirely new appearance. Under the stern and
majestic gaze of cleverly caricatured dignitaries of the
Europe of 1815, well over two hundred students, faculty
members, and downtown friends of International House
participated in the dances of a past era as well as those
of the present. Flags of all nations draped the walls,
while the "portraits" were suitably set off by authentic
baroque decorations. Costumes of the East mingled
with period dress of the West and the formal clothes
of our own time in a gay composite of colors as the
guests danced to the music of the Mazurka, the Spanish
Circle Waltz, and other more familiar measures.
Variety and additional entertainment were provided
by the Dance Team, which executed a demonstration
Viennese Waltz, and the Latin American Band from
Acadia Camp, which brought the music and dancing
of the New World into the Old-World atmosphere
of the Congress.
256 Choo&e your
. . . from a
Jia&ter
(i      .    »
irurrier
2706 GRANVILLE (at 11th Ave.) BA. 2829
COMPLIMENTS
General  Equipment
Limited
Eq
jipment for
•  POWER PLANTS
•  HEATING and VENTILATING
• PULP and PAPER MILLS
PA.
5932                                        1230
GRANVILLE ST.
CONGRATULATIONS   AND   BEST  WISHES
TO THE STUDENTS OF U.B.C.
CONSOLIDATED FINANCE
CO. LTD.
785  HORNBY
MArine  0264
An unusual feature which evoked much comment
was the candle-light which pervaded the dining room
during the intermission, affording a pleasant relief from
the brighter lights of modern times.
The affair was organized and carried through by
the IHC Ball Committee, headed by Brigitta Balla.
Other members of this hard-working Committee were
Anne Choma, Pat Crehan, Bob Dowling, Anne Harvey,
Bob Loosmore, and Lukia Michas. Much valuable
assistance was given to the group by both the faculty
and the alumni.
F00 HUNG CO., LTD.
IMPORT DIRECT FROM CHINA
BAMBOOWARE,   CHINAWARE,   LACQUERWARE,
TEAKWOOD,  STRAW MATS,  CURIOS,
ORIENTAL NOVELTIES,  ETC.
LOCATION
HASTINGS ST.  EAST
PENDER ST. EAST
129-131   E. PENDER ST. PHONE PA. 6635
Between Main and Columbia St
VANCOUVER 4, B. C.
257 PMTU IS OUR BUSINESS
We  have  served  your Alma  Mater  during   your  collegiate  years.       May  we
have the pleasure of serving you in your Business or Professional years ahead.
Call us at CEdar 3111
cAnderZon Printing, Company, J^imited
12th AVENUE AT ARBUTUS STREET
Speedwritlng.
— SHORTHAND —
EXCELLENT FOR  UNIVERSITY NOTES
Cheaper     •     Easier    •     Faster
100 WORDS PER MINUTE
Day School 2 months — Night School 4 months
DUFFUS
522 W. Pender
SCHOOL
PA. 7567
For the Best In . . .
• SERVICE
•  DINNERS
•  LUNCHES
NICK'S GRILL
YOUR     CAMPUS
FAVOURITE
5700   UNIVERSITY   BOULEVARD
AL.   1679
Une Scarlet J\ing,
An organization to eliminate the "evils of the
Greek Letter Societies" aroused interest on the campus.
The Scarlet Ring, as the group is called, was formed
in competition to the present fraternities with discriminatory clauses.
A resolution to ask the Senate to withdraw recognition of all fraternities with discriminatory clauses was
defeated in Student Council. Therefore president
Vaughan Lyon, vice-president Phil Dadson and
Ubyssey head Les Armour formed the new fraternity
for the purpose of "fellowship, stimulation of thought,
and furthering the interests of the university."
The Scarlet Ring raises no racial, religious or financial barriers. Admission to membership is determined by 50 per cent vote instead of by blackball.
258 * Tailcoats
* Tuxedos
• SUITS
Bench Tailored on the Premises using
British Woolens
PRINCIPE & ALTO
CUSTOM    TAILORS
TA. 3543 632 HOWE ST.
&n<j4*teesil . . .
When you graduate to problems
involving high grade sand and
gravel, True-Mix concrete and
other building materials . . .
consult
DIETHERS LTD.
Granville Island - TA. 4281 - Vancouver, B.C.
COAL
NANAIMO-COMOX
McLEOD RIVER
BEST
WISHES.
GRADS /
THE KEYSTONE PRESS LTD.
Printers Lithographers
860 Kingsway    Vancouver    FAirmont 1238
MEN'S AND  LADIES' SLACKS
MADE TO MEASURE . . . OUR SPECIALTY
ON  WO TAILORS
MEN'S  AND    LADIES'     SUITS
WITH   DISTINCTIVE   STYLING
11 West Pender
TA. 3740
COMPLIMENTS
[SI    ftjl   •-v   V5__      MM
GRANVILLE at SMITHE
HEADQUARTERS FOR FINE LADIES'
WEAR
259 LAB. EQUIPMENT
BAUSCH  &  LOMB
MICROSCOPES
ERNST LEITZ
MICROSCOPES
And Other Equipment
OHAUS SCALES
VOLAND & SONS
BALANCES
MALLINCKRODT
AR CHEMICALS
BRITISH LAB. GLASSWARE
BURTON LAMPS
WELSH PHYSICS
APPARATUS
Enquiries  Invited
J. S. HUDSON
Offices and Showroom
631   HORNBY ST.    •    MA.  1357    •    VANCOUVER
FINE FURNITURE
FOR THE OFFICE
•
a complete  line of wood and
metal desks and chairs;
files; filing supplies;
visible   equipment;   safes  and
vault doors;   lockers,  shelving
and partitions.
Office SpecialtyMfg.(5.
Head Office •  Factories  •  Newmarket, Ont.
VANCOUVER BRANCH:
536    HOWE   ST.,    MArine    5274-5
After July  1,  1952 932  Howe St.
-National tnowUna & MllllaraA J^td.
BOWLING & BILLIARD INSTALLATIONS
Office    -    Showroom
1756 E. Hastings HA. 6253
B.C.   DISTRIBUTORS   FOR
BURROUGHES & WATTS
(CANADA)   LTD.
COMPLIMENTS
DICKSON
IMPORTISG
CO. LTD.
PAcific 7451
157 West Cordova
Spring Qeneial Meeting,
Except for the Armour Controversy, the spring
general meeting was the scene of the hottest battle witnessed all year. Over one half the student body sat
through three hours of oratory on a cut in athletics, a
USC bid for power, and a Student Council motion to
pay off the Gym debt, in expectation of a debate on
fraternities and sororities.
In spite of a plea by the LSE that coming austerity
would practically wipe them from existance, the
students cut athletic monies only slightly.
The treasurer then explained that the AMS was a
year overdue on a ninety day note to the Bank for
47,000 dollars, and appealed for a fee increase for the
Gym fund to pay off the debt.
Already gaining in strength, the Undergraduate
Societies Committee asked for three seats on Student
Council, but they were defeated by a slim majority.
At nearly 4:00 p.m. weary students finally passed
a motion requesting the Faculty Council to remove all
campus     organizations     maintaining    discriminatory
260 *
COLUMBIA
PAPER CO.  LIMITED
Wholesale Paper Merchants
Manufacturers of
"TOTEM" BRAND SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Vancouver, B. C. - Prince Rupert, B. C. - Victoria, B. C.
Complete
Automotive
• BUICK
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• PONTIAC
Service
•
• VAUXHALL
Bowell McLean Motor Co. Ltd.
615 Burrard St.
PA. 9111
Stocks — Oils — Mines
Bonds — Grain — Commodities
James Richardson & Sons
Established   1857
955 W. HASTINGS ST.      -      VANCOUVER
PHONE MA. 8511
Fourteen  Offices from Montreal  to  Victoria  Connected
by Direct Private Wire
clauses in their constitutions "within a reasonable period
of time."
Aimed at the Greek Letter Societies, the motion
originally was to ban fraternities who had not removed
their descriminatory clauses by the next fall. After
numerous amendments and discussion by nearly every
student notable, a changed motion finally went through.
An attempt to continue the business of the meeting
failed completely as students, fed up with the endless
talk, dragged themselves back to the serenity of their
studies.
•  RESIDENTIAL
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•  INDUSTRIAL
By
FLOOR CRAFT LIMITED
Using
ARMSTRONG'S ASPHALT TILE
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CEdar 6210
Your South Granville
RECORD
Centre
THOMSOJV & PME LTD.
Radios — Appliances — Service
Granville at 13th
CHerry 5144
261 Setting their cAlma Matex . . .
The
U.B.C. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
(Permanent Organization of former students)
Sponsors of the
i - U.B.C. Development Fund
(An annual giving programme to help U.B.C. and students)
Publishers of the
U.B.C. Alumni Chronicle
(Quarterly magazine by and about grads)
Please address your enquiries to Frank J. E. Turner, the Association's Executive Director,
Alumni Office, Room 201, Brock Hall, U.B.C. (ALma 3044). There are Branch Groups in many
major cities in Canada.
Woolcraft J^td.
IMPORTED ENGLISH KNITTING WOOLS
IMPORTED CASHMERE, NEW LAMBS WOOL
AND BOTONY SWEATERS AND
CHILDREN'S WEAR
PETIT POINT AND NEEDLE POINT
626   HOWE PA.   4935
Wool Samples and Petit Point Catalogue on Request
During  the   Past  Year
FAMOUS PLAYERS CANADIAN
CORP. LTD.
Gave You the Ultimate in Fine Motion Picture Enjoyment
in  1951
FAMOUS PLAYERS AGAIN WILL PRESENT
ALL THE
OUTSTANDING  CONTENDERS  FOR  TOP
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Watch  for Them at
CAPITOL-ORPHEUM-STRAND
CINEMA - DOMINION
BROADWAY - STANLEY - KERRISDALE - ALMA
GRANDVIEW -  KITSILANO -  REGENT
VICTORIA -  WINDSOR
com tm/
ORDER YOUR
WINTER SUPPLY NOW
CALL
MArine      3171
North       3020
262 Compliments
of a
Friendly
Firm
To the Student Body   .   .   .
OUR  CONGRATULATIONS AND
BEST WISHES
Bell & Mitchell Agencies
641   Richards Street
•  INSURANCE
Vancouver,  B. C.
MArine 6441
With the Compliments of
THE
ROYAL  TRUST
COMPANY
Executors and Trustees
OFFICES  IN CANADA FROM COAST TO COAST
VANCOUVER  BRANCH:   626 WEST PENDER ST.
George O.  Vale, Manager
Compliments of
The
Vancouver Supply Company
Limited
Wholesale Grocers
PITHAN BUSINESS COLLEGE
Vancouver's Leading Business College
Since  1898
Secretarial Training Typewriting
Stenography Dictaphone
Accountancy Comptometer
DAY & NIGHT CLASSES—Enrol at Any Time
BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
VIOLET   A.   FERGUSON,
P.C.T.,   G.CT.
Principol
GERTRUDE  M.  SAVAGE,
B.A.,   P.C.T.
Ass't Principol
AVAILABLE IN 132 CUSTOM COLORS
PLUS STANDARD TINTS
MADE IN VANCOUVER
BY
General  Paint Corporation
OF CANADA   (1950)   LIMITED
263 StuleA 3or young Jten
c4na Jten Who Stay, young
PTPHS
M-M-MM-M
4444 W. 10th
301 W. HASTINGS
For Week-end Snapshots . . .
That you'll be proud to say you took yourself
-ir.eient developing,
..,reotyoorselMo our effK- aboUl
those pictures you took on nt.   You II
c^r——
be delighted you
"blow up
or two.
You'll
B favorite ^^^."p^mpl
-*»r*r*. of course.
"        that our enlargements are t,ec
^onP-ssingco.orf^-
service
__&>■
EASTMAN PHSI?fR^lc LTD.-sGTR-rLE
ANGLO - CANADIAN
SHIPPING COMPANY
Steamship and Chartering
Agents
955 W. Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
spring,
And spring came to UBC, bringing with it the usual
things—more rain, windblown skirts, exams, cheating
papers. . . .
The fresh spring sunshine burst through the overhanging clouds and pushed its way through the new
buds and leaves of the trees, through the windows of
Brock Hall and down into the south basement where
Totem editors were beating their pointed little heads
against their typewriters in frustration as they tried to
select material from the reams and reams and reams of
copy which overwhelmed them.
Spring also brought the intra-mural track meet
with all its glory of flat feet, pulled muscles and once-
a-year athletes.
It brought the weak-kneed fraternity ban, Dylan
Thomas, the California (ruff) rugger boys, and the
new council.
It brought "Much Ado About Nothing", the death
264 •   LABORATORY SUPPLIES
ASSAY,   INDUSTRIAL  AND   EDUCATIONAL
LABORATORY SUPPLIES CHEMICALS
Cave & Company Ltd.
567 Hornby St.
Vancouver, B.C.
CONGRATULATIONS   AND   BEST   WISHES
TO THE  STUDENTS  OF  U.B.C.
Qr^SO
FIRBANK'S  JEWELERS
599 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE:  PAcific 4364
With the Compliments of
GORDON FARRELL
CHAIN
MANUFACTURERS
Established 30 Years
Canada Chain & Forge Co. Ltd.
Granville Island VANCOUVER
of LSE, the stay of execution to the Ostrom Plan and
the horsetail hairdo.
And it brought the lovers.
Ah, the lovers. They emerged from the dim dark
regions of the caf and exposed their pool hall pallors
to rich, invigorating air of the library stacks.
Hand in hand, eyes flashing, laughing merrily,
they descended the Thousand Steps.
Hand in hand, eyes flashing, panting merrily, they
come back up the Thousand Steps.
Although they couldn't distinguish a dandelion
from a wallflower, they faithfully inspected every
specimen in the Botanical Gardens.
They hibernated at library tables and ran up their
father's gas bills and blood pressure by frequent jaunts
to Spanish  Banks.
They gazed into each other's eyes with a rapture that
only spring or a French exam could bring.
They were the very essence of spring at UBC.
Spring, with all its beauty, its freshness, its flowers,
its hayfever.
WESTERN   CANADA'S   LARGEST
MODERN WOODWORK FACTORY!
rtji*5?
: <b^&:
. VANCOUVER.
265 We, Your 'TOTEM' Photographers
extend out
BEST WISHES  &  CONGRATULATIONS
to the QxaduateA o/ '52
ALL NEGATIVES ON FILE AT
CAMPBELL STUDIOS
581   GRANVILLE
LIMITED
MArine   3625
Challenger Watches
are  known  throughout
Canada for
dependability and
long service
SELECT    YOUR    CHALLENGER
a*
Jewelers
BIRKS
Vancouver, B.C.
Silversmiths
SMART
DRESSERS
APPRECIATE
BETTER
Quality with Style
*
ALWAYS A SAFE INVESTMENT
•
NOW! a complete line oi
Men's Haberdashery
You Will Like Our Personal Service
EDDIE R. DEEM
534 Seymour Street (right at Bus stop)
266 

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