UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The 1942 Totem 1942

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubcyearb-1.0119021.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubcyearb-1.0119021.json
JSON-LD: ubcyearb-1.0119021-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubcyearb-1.0119021-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubcyearb-1.0119021-rdf.json
Turtle: ubcyearb-1.0119021-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubcyearb-1.0119021-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubcyearb-1.0119021-source.json
Full Text
ubcyearb-1.0119021-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubcyearb-1.0119021.ris

Full Text

Array I
i*
m
tX
&
rni^
j
VA^«A^-'   --.^IWA*''
I   1
PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA, VANCOUVER, CANADA
LIONEL H. SALT, Editor
DOUGLAS    MALONEY,   Business   Manager AFFIRMATION
ACTIVITIES
Totem goes behind scenes to rover .
ILss -^afc
0|>      "   ^-m%T"
*\: 1
I.—-C>| I
: _ _ ..                                                 1
ADMINISTRATION
Something happened to the University of British
Columbia this year.
It changed colour.
For years, the pride of U.B.C. has been its verdant
campus. Sheltered by the snow-peaked mountains of
the North Shore, the luxurious grass of the campus
grounds have presented a picturesque background,
on which the University has slowly been constructed.
But in 1941, the green of the grass, and the white
of the snow were supplanted by a more dominant
tone—khaki.
The session 1941-42 was a true Khaki Session. Six
days out of seven, there was khaki on the campus—
worn by the 1500 U.B.C. students and graduates of
the C.O.T.C.
Back in the days of World War 1, there was no
University in British Columbia. Then, in 1915, a
charter was issued and McGill College, a western
adjunct of the famous Quebec institution, McGill,
became B. C.'s own, individual university.
To commemorate the fact that it was born during
a world war, the khaki cording was chosen to adorn
the graduating gowns.    It was put there to remind
Page Four UNDERGRADUATES
ATHLETICS
. . . candid views of khaki session
students of the sacrifice which Canadians had made
—many of them U.B.C. students—to save a world
for democracy.
Now, in World War 2, that same sacrifice is again
being made. Every day, during the terms, enrollment
at U.B.C. has steadily declined, as students quietly slip
away from the campus to answer the call to arms.
They wear the khaki or blue of active service.
Meanwhile, though, on the campus, there are 1500
men wearing the khaki of a Reserve Unit—the Canadian Officers training Corps.
Spontaneity of action on every front has characterized the 1941-42 Khaki Session. War charity drives
have met with astounding success. Pennies have been
collected for the Milk Fund, Victory Bonds have been
purchased, blood has been donated.
Khaki was an important colour for the co-eds too.
They wore no khaki uniforms. Rather, they gathered in the Red Cross room with khaki wool to knit
sweaters, socks, and helmets for the men of the army.
Whether marching or knitting, students of U.B.C.
are khaki-conscious. Affirmation is their quiet boast,
victory is their firm belief.
ORGANIZATIONS
Page Five Something new was added to the story of student initiative on the campus of the University of
British Columbia, when, on November 22, a colourful ceremony was enacted which officially
opened the new University Contingent C.O.T.C.
Armoury.
Built at a total cost of $50,000.00, six-sevenths
of which was raised by the students themselves,
the Armoury marks the fifth contribution of the
students to the building scheme of the University.
Credit for promulgating the idea of an Amoury
on the campus goes to Lt.-Col. H. T. Logan. Ever
since 1928, the members of the C.O.T.C. at the
University have voluntarily waived the 15-day
headquarters pay to which they are annually en
titled. This money was put into a fund which
rapidly accumulated until, in 1941, with the aid
of a grant from the Provincial government, it was
possible to start work on the structure.
Need for the Armoury can be seen when it is
understood that the wartime strength of the Corps
is as high as 1500 men who must be given ample
means of training. The training of this many
men, too, necessitates a complex administrative
system, which, under the old plan, was too decentralized to be efficient.
Now, with the Armoury, the Corps has at its
command ample space for indoor parade grounds,
a convenient indoor rifle range, a centralized
administration, and storage room for the Corps'
two "jeeps".
On Saturday, November 22, then, 1500 members  of the University  Contingent marched on
parade, in the khaki of a Reserve Unit, up the
Mall from the Stadium to the Armoury which is
situated on the parking lot.
In an impressive ceremony, Lt.-Col. W. C.
Woodward presented the keys of the building to
Lt.-Col. G. M. Shrum, officer commanding the
Corps, who in turn presented the keys to Chancellor R. E. McKechnie, thus officially making the
Armoury a University-owned building.
Now, with istaff officers centrally located in
roomy quarters, and floor space ample enough
for the drilling of platoons, lights burn in the
student-built Armoury every night until a late
hour, as students quietly train, not in the science
of aggression but rather in the art of defense of
ideals.
Page Six  Cold and austere stands the Science Building,
one of the three permanent buildings on the
campus, and, perhaps, the most important part
of the University insofar as it is directly concerned
with the Government of Canada's war effort.
For behind the masonry of its exterior lies the
heart of Applied Science. Here, students, some
500 strong, work day after day in laboratories
and lecture rooms, preparing themselves for a
future profession as trained technicians and
engineers.
Working in conjunction with the Minister of
National Defense are 25 graduate chemical engineers, who under the guidance of Dr. Robert H.
Clark are carrying on, amid necessary secrecy,
vital experiments in explosive and incendiary
bombs.
Facilities of the Science building, and the
faculty of Applied Science have been enlarged
and put at the disposal of the R.C.A.F. who are
conducting a training centre for recruits in Radio
Detection.
Meantime, acting under advice of the Minister
of National Defense, Applied Science students are
carrying on their studies, assured by the War
Department that there will be no wastage of
trained technicians this time as there was in the
last World War.
In 1922, what is now a monumental edifice,
was then just a steel skeleton, for the building
had been started in 1915 and, because of the
financial pressure of World War  1, had never
been completed. When, however, crowded conditions made it imperative that facilities for
science students be enlarged, the undergraduate
body started a vigorous petition. Working all
summer, students were finally able to persuade the
Provincial legislature to vote enough money to
finish construction of the building.
Then, in what remains the greatest spontaneous
ceremony ever seen in Vancouver, the triumphant students marched from the scene of the old
site in the downtown district out to where th«
gaunt steel skeleton raised its unfinished frame.
Now a finished structure of stone and masonry,
the Science Building is repaying the money invested in it by the people of British Columbia.
Page Eight  Flanked on either side by the Gymnasium and
the Stadium, both student-erected buildings,
Brock Hall stands as an impressive monument to
student courage and initiative. Erected as it was
in loving memory of one of the University's most
beloved characters, Dean Reginald W. Brock,
Brock Hall has proved to be one of the most
unifying factors in campus extra-curricular life.
On July 30, 1935, students lost two of their most
active friends when Dean and Mrs. R. W. Brock
were killed in an aeroplane crash. Dean and
Mrs. Brock had, for years, lent active support to
all the various student campaigns for raising
money, and although taken from U.B.C. in death,
their spiritual aid continued, and in the following
year it was decided that the building, when complete should be dedicated to their memory.
Now, with the democratic way of life which
supports such institutions as the University of
B.C. threatened with extinction, Brock Hall is
proving itself invaluable as focal point of the
students' drive to raise monies for the various
war charities.
In the offices of the Alma Mater Society,
accountants work to count and tabulate the
money taken in every Wednesday by the Self-
Denial day campaigns. Here, too, accounts are
kept of all receipts obtained by the various functions which students sponsor to raise funds for
war charities.
Off the main social lounge, upstairs, co-eds
labour daily in the Red Cross Room, a room orig
inally slated for club meetings and which has now
been turned into a thriving centre for women's
war work.
The great social lounge of Brock Hall is, perhaps, the greatest asset to the raising of money for
war charities. Here, dances are held, the proceeds
of which are turned over to such organizations
as the Canadian Red Cross. Here, too, the women
stage dances to which members of the active
forces are invited.
Not a day passes but what somewhere in Brock
Hall some student organization meets to discuss
plans for raising money which will go directly into
the fight being waged against the powers of
aggression and intolerance.
Page Ten ■                      ;
j
-
lil
It 1
1
I  I Student soldiers affirm allegiance
Through   the   shadows   of   the   Mall,
khaki-clad University of B. C. students
march to dedicate  the opening of the
Armoury
Page Fourteen Canada has called upon every citizen within its
boundaries to aid in the vast struggle being waged
against the powers of aggression.
That call, but a whisper in the September of 1939
that saw the first outbreak of the war, has steadily
grown, until today it is a full-throated roar crying
out "Victory."
Today, in 1942, there is a harmony in the answering call that comes from every Canadian throat, a
harmony conceived in the democratic way of life,
slow to start, it must be admitted, yet undeniable,
determined, insistent, true.
Seven thousand miles away from the peaceful serenity of the University of British Columbia, an Austrian paranoic stood in the Berlin Sports Palace and
screamed "WAR." That was 1939, and being 7,000
miles away, that scream did not carry over the Rocky
Mountains to the campus of U.B.C. It filtered through
in a whisper that was all but meaningless.
Canada was far removed from the theatre of war;
British Columbia was even farther away. Students
were too concerned with being students to pay much
attention. Oh, they scanned the headlines with academic concern, some of them left to join the active
services, others swelled the ranks of the Canadian
Officers Training Corps to a new all-time high.
Lt.-Col. G. M. Shrum
Ojjicer  Commanding,  C.O.T.C.
co-operate with officers, instructors
But the war was 7,000 miles away, in Europe, not
in Canada, not at the University of British Columbia.
Then, in the summer of 1940, while University of
British Columbia students were scattered throughout
the province, earning money in summer occupations
for the continuance of their education, the world read
of the collapse of mighty France, the hell of Dunkirk.
A Canadian government found itself faced with
the gigantic task of building a vast Canadian war
machine, a machine that, on short notice, would have
Lt.-Col. G. M. Shrum, Brig. D. R. Sargent, Major-Gen.  W'. A. Griesbach
Major J. MacLeod, Chief Instructor
Page Fifteen attend two-week summer army camp...
The boat docks at Nanaimo
to be geared to the intensive speed of blitz warfare
lest all Canada, all the democratic world, lay crushed
beneath the heel of the Nazi dictator.
There were 2,650 students at the University of
British Columbia, just as there were thousands of
students in universities all over the country. What
was to be done with them? What could these institutions do towards winning the war? These were
the questions that a Canadian government, and a
Canadian people asked.
Those questions were answered in 1941 by the
universities themselves. Girding their loins in the
same cloth that millions of Canadian were using, the
universities donned the khaki, hurled themselves into
the gigantic struggle of whipping a war machine
into shape.
Preparedness became the watchword of 2,650
U.B.C. students, for not only the men, but also the
women of the campus realized the threat of complacency. Then, too, the war effort at U.B.C. encompassed more than just the undergraduate body.
Graduates, students of a peacetime era, came back
to the campus, not to a Homecoming celebration, but
to a military training camp.
Said the Canadian War Department: "We need
1,500 officers-in-training from the ranks of the CO.
T.C. We ned these 1,500 university trained men as
officers in the active service; we need them desperately."
That was 1941, and they got their 1,500 officers.
All through the 1940-41 session, the University
area echoed to the thud of 1,500 pairs of boots as
1      ■■■ -■■ ■ .-..'■ 1       ■ 1   ■  ■.-'-' l
f
■
?-f^*gf&
rfif.
^**» **■
—*■
r
■Ma*---' ■■'•' n*?'-?**
j.— „                           mWWW    mm                         M
%.*&
>J£>
\
m
mW.
{
ml
' 1            ",'»*>*
H
-mm
i
_
Officers survey camp from overlooking bluff
Sun-helmeted soldiers at ease
Platoon off on dusty route march
Page Sixteen the U.B.C. Reserve Army went through its weekly
manoeuvers. They were a pretty ragged group at the
first. Divided into two groups, officers training for
upperclassmen, and basic training for lowerclassmen,
the contingent presented a motley crew for the edification of curious Vancouver burghers who travelled
from their homes to witness the Saturday afternoon
parades.
Only the officers training group had uniforms,
there was a decided lack of officers and instructors—
but the spirit was there. You cannot fight a war on
spirit alone, but with the spirit that was daily manifested by these students and graduate students, the
U.B.C. contingent began to take shape as a potent
arm in Canada's vast, expanding war machine.
With students as cadets, and students as officers,
the contingent went through the intricacies of army
manoeuvers on the Stadium grounds. Before deserted
grandstands that had, but a year before, been filled
of a Saturday afternoon with a civilian audience
gathered to watch the Canadian football and English
rugby teams of U.B.C. do athletic battle, this student
army now drilled.
Except for those exempted because of physical unfitness, every male undergraduate of the University
of British Columbia became a member of the Corps.
Swelled by the addition of many hundred graduates,
anxious to do their share in the war effort of their
Alma Mater, these men gave up six hours weekly to
the task of equipping themselves to defend the principles of democracy.
Three hours of the six were devoted to parade
ground  drill  on  Saturday  afternoons.     This  meant
that a rigid curtailment of campus athletics had to
be enforced. For the Basic group, the other three
hours consisted of an hour of physical education,
an hour lecture on military tactics, and an hour lecture in some optional subject such as signalling or
first aid. The officers' training group did their three
hours parade ground drill on Saturday, too, but
much of their other time was spent in instructor's
drill, or lectures on military strategy.
For the officers training group, stiff examinations
were set by the War Department, and 174 members
of the Corps qualified for the rank of second lieutenant in the Reserve Army by passing the three sets
of examinations: the Common to Arms, the Special to
Arms, and the Practical.
Passing the Practical examination entailed going
to army camp. It was necessary, too, for many other
students to attend army camp in order to comply
with Defense of Canada regulations concerning civilians between the ages of 21-24. In May, then, the
quiet Vancouver Island hamlet of Nanaimo was
transformed into a U.B.C. Contingent encampment.
For the first two weeks, Artsmen and Aggies forsook
the comforts of home for the rigorous discipline of
the Canadian Army, were back on the campus in
time for the graduation ceremonies. Immediately
after graduation, the Sciencemen, who had missed
the initial camp because of survey camp duties, left
for Nanaimo.
The discipline they had met with on the parade
ground, at the University, and at the hands of their
student instructors was nothing to the regimentation
they encountered at camp.    Staffed by typical army
learn meaning of rigid discipline .
l/'ffidMmTmX
^^SmmW^m^mm
Pf       l
1
.4
ft
Back from a long route march up Island hills, these student
soldiers rest—just rest
More ambitious are these men who relax in their tent with
a deck of cards
Page Seventeen carry on rifle shoot practice, drill .
Returning to the campus in September, maiy students got first look at their Armoury
sergeant-majors and instructors fresh from active
service outfits, the camp became "army" in all senses
of the word.
All were unanimous, at camp's end, in their praise
of the magnificent spirit displayed by the students in
their acceptance of the strict discipline. Fallen into
sedentary practices because of the press on time by
academic pursuits, these scholars soon found that
physical fitness was a necessary adjunct of the trained
Canadian.
They found that out the hard way . . . physical
training periods in the cold, bleak dawn of 700 hours
(7.00 a.m. army time), long, dusty route marches
over the hills surrounding Nanaimo in the hot afternoon sun, and a back-breaking route march of fifteen
miles duration in the depths of the night.
A welcome relief from the tedium of parade ground
drill and route march was the rifle range, where
students lay prone on the ground, aiming at distant
targets. The camaraderie of university students being, as it is, irrepressible, side bets were often placed,
rivalry ran high as the scholarly marksmen contested
for top shooting honours.
The  Canadian  Red  Cross  benefited  greatly  from
the efforts of the women who spent many hours weekly
in the knitting  and  sewing  room  allotted them  in
Brock   Hall.     The   women   instigated   "Self-Denial"
days on the campus, wherein students were asked to
deny themselves of a luxury everv Wednesday, donate
Lt.-Lolonel Shrum turns over Armoury to university ' J • J
Lt.-Governor Woodward and Chancellor McKechnie
Page Eighteen the money to the Red Cross,
raised in this manner.
A sum of $350.00 was
Shrum, officer commanding, addresses Corps
Fraternities and sororities on the campus gave the
benefit of their closely-knit organization to the sponsorship of a monster Red Cross Ball which successfully raised over $2,000.00. A vast proportion of
the students waived their claim to returnable caution
money, donated the proceeds to the Red Cross.
There is little need to refresh our minds on the
horrible events that the past year has seen. The loss
of Crete, the battle in Lybia, the heroic battle of the
Russians, the back-stabbing of the Japanese: all of
these stand out in bold relief, irrefutable indications
that the war, now a world conflict, is rapidly reaching a climax.
Everywhere in Canada, talk centres around the
proposed plebiscite in which the government is asking the people of Canada to release it from an election promise of "no conscription." Everywhere, in
Canada, there is heated discussion over the plebiscite
issue. But what is important is that what looks on
the surface to be the petty squabbling of a disunited nation is nothing of the kind. Rather, the focal
point of every argument, pro and con, is whether it
is necessary to have the plebiscite or not.    That is:
Sun shines as student army marches to the opening ceremony
. . in their student-financed Armoury
Page Nineteen take war seriously with gas drill .
In perfect formation, platoons march off the parade ground, split up to engage in specialized drill training
Canadians everywhere are not denying conscription.
Like the willing patient, they are ready to swallow
any medicine, be it pleasant or distasteful, if it promises to pay off—in victory. This is the spirit which
now pervades the campus of the University of British
Columbia.
When students of the University came to the
campus in September, 1941, to enroll, they did so
with trepidation, for events were moving so swiftly
in Europe, that no one dared prophesy as to whether
or not the University session would be completed.
They found that their government had entrusted
in them the responsibility of continuing their education. Anxious not to repeat the mistake of World
War I which saw trained and educated students
wasted in the trenches when they could have been doing much more useful work in war industry, the government has been strong in its recommendation to
students that they complete their education before
enlisting in the armed forces.
The need for trained men, engineers, chemists,
mathematicians, business leaders (the list is unending) is as great as is the need for soldiers and
finances. Despite the fact that victory is not yet
ensured, governments must look to the future, and
to post-war reconstruction. During wartime, a long-
range view seems criminal, yet it is necessary, and
it is typical of the democratic way of life which
Canada loves.
It is not easy to stay at college while others leave
for duty overseas.    It is not easy to concentrate on
Serg.-Major Henderson and Sergs. Mullins and Heffernan,
affable instructors
Serg. Ross details bayonet thrust
Page Twenty . Bren guns. bayonetSm route marches
An important element of warfare—hand-to-hand bayonet drill
The sergeant instructs a Bren gun crew in speed, accuracy
studies when, outside the window, news vendors are
shouting that Hong Kong has fallen. There were
Canadians fighting at Hong Kong! Yes, and at
Singapore, too. And when a Japanese submarine
pushes its snub-nose through the waters of the California coast and shells an oil field, the war is no
longer 7,000 miles away.
This is 1942, and the war is on Canada's doorstep.
The Canadian government says: "Students of
U.B.C.—we need you. We need your training, your
youthfulness, your clear minds. Yours is a great
responsibility. Those of you who must fight owe us
those qualities. You must train as officers. Those
of you who have technical ability are becoming skilled
at a craft, are made responsible for finishing that
training, and of then offering your services. This
is your responsibility."
From the campus of U.B.C, across the Rockies,
has gone the answer: "We affirm your trust in us.
We are ready to serve."
This year, the students of U.B.C. have done more
than just sit and wait for the government to call
them. They have stepped out and vigorously supported every government-sponsored campaign in
sight.
The change on the campus was visible overnight.
Unlike the former session, which was a "Khaki Session" only in the sense that student-worn khaki uniforms were seen every Saturday, this term of 1941-42
become completely khaki-minded.
The change was caused by the fact that, this year,
every member of Corps was issued a uniform. This
meant that 996 uniforms were given to men of the
Air force students get Morse code signalling from Dr. Duff
Lined up on the parade ground, this platoon is ready
Page Twenty-one Officers' Training group, and another 489 uniforms
given to men of the Basic training group. And
1,500 students found that the good old army days of
"spit and polish" had not been done away with
entirely.
Lectures, although the hourly requirement was not
altered, were moved from noon-hour and given in the
afternoon and evening. Too, instead of being merely
lectures, often they were coupled with drill routine
and route marches, or rifle drill. Then, to compensate students who could not find time on Saturday
afternoons to parade (many Varsity students find it
necessary to accept Saturday employment in order to
defray the costs of a university education) parades
of a three-hour duration were scheduled in the evenings.
This meant that no day passed on the campus but
what some of the students could be seen, wearing
their uniforms. Into lectures they marched (often
the professor in charge was garbed in his officer's
uniform), in the Library they studied, in the Caf or
Brock Hall they lounged, in the khaki uniform of the
Canadian army. Day after day, this fact kept pounding home the war to the students. Day after day
they became more conscious of the responsibility resting on their shoulders. Day after day, their acceptance of that responsibility, their affirmation became
clearly more visible.
On the parking lot by the Auditorium building, in
a space once filled with automobiles that are now
stationary in garages, stands mute testimony to the
seriousness of the students' intent. It is the Armoury,
a building erected through the sacrifice, and farsightedness of students, to house their war machine.
It is proving itself to be an integral part of the University's war effort.
Located in the Armoury is the Orderly Room, the
Officers' and Sergeants' mess, the instructors' offices,
and a drill floor and rifle range 112 ft. x 45 ft. With
the Armoury, centralization of the complex administrative set-up of the Corps could be achieved. Rifle
practice, something unknown to the Corps, except for
those who attended summer camps, was possible.
Evening drills were held inside the Armoury, instead
of on the muddy playing fields.
The Corps was no longer dependant upon the
clemency of the weather.
A familiar sight on the campus became the seeing
of student soldiers marching down the Mall like men
from Mars, clad in gas masks, and capes.    Incon-
Out at the Ford plant, these co-eds studied the complexities
of the modern motor
p -
■™  \}/'-i'*j
With rubber rationed, proper care of tires was stressed to the
serious young class
No sissies, the girls pitched in, changed tires, ignored grease
while women sacrifice spare time . . .
Page Twenty-two Red Cross knitting and sewing occupies these co-eds'
spare time
f   \
i
-
L            m^k
*A
i
w'                                               f       m\W\
The women carried their knitting everywhere—gossiped and
knit for the Red Cross
gruous though it may have looked, it was but another
indication of the increasing effectiveness of the University training scheme.
One sore spot on the year's training program was
the Air Force course which had promised to be so
popular but which collapsed early in February
through lack of support promised the C.O.T.C. by
the R.CA.F.
Successful in many other colleges, the scheme proposed to teach interested students the program given
recruits of the Air Force known as initial training.
It was required that students enrolling pledge their
word to go on active service in the Spring.
Lectures were given (six hours weekly) in Air
Navigation by Prof. Walter Gage, and in Morse Code
by Dr. Duff. The Air Force, however, failed to supply other instructors, and in February the scheme
was abandoned.
A small class of eleven had been taking the course.
The possibility of air raids, which had seen the
blacking out of the University during Christmas
exams., was handled adroitly, with A.R.P. stations
being erected at strategic spots, a two-toned air raid
siren stationed in a prominent location, and several
test air raids called. When the siren screamed its
warning, students walked in orderly fashion to the
shelter of the near-by woods waited quietly for the
"all clear." Many took their books along, studied
while they waited.
The students' war charities drive, established the
previous year, proved to be a whopping success.
Lacking organization in its initial appearance, the
drive   this   year   established   a   field   of   endeavour,
Two   husky   students   are   caught   by   the   glamour—sign
Blood Donors pledge.
-
J-SUl
^HH^V^^^^Hj^yc
f
'"   .
'■F \m\\    Infl
£*MjE$^£«29ua                                                            9V«bI
fMfH&'^Smm^m^^^                                 ^^™
Anxious to aid Red Cross, students double normal intake
of "coke"
e . . to auto mechanics, knitting, sewing
Page Twenty-three air raid sends students scurrying . . .
Past Brock Hall to safety of bushes
No loss of time—these boys study
Tight little groups talk of air raids
Impatient, they wait for "All Clear" klaxon
organizing a War Aid Council, a central body to
handle all charity drives.
First succes of the War Aid Council was the Mile
of Pennies Drive, held under the sponsorship of the
Kinsmen's Club of Canada, who launched a wide
campaign to buy milk for the babies of Britain.
A week-long campaign was instigated by students
who sought to collect a mile of pennies. Hampered by
poor weather, but bolstered by high spirits, the campaign committee was able to turn over to the Fund
enough money to purchase more than 5,000 quarts of
milk.
Flushed by this triumph, the War Aid Council
inaugurated a campaign to raise money for the International Student Service, an organization formed
to help refugee students continue their education, and
to supply reading material to prisoners of war in internment camps.
A pep meet was held, receipts from the weekly
self-denial day turned over, and a Mixer staged. All
in all , the drive netted over $300.00 for the "barbed
wire" collegians.
In conjunction with the second Victory Loan Drive
of the Dominion government which successfully
floated a loan of more than $600,000,000, the War
Aid Council sponsored a drive for funds, purchased
six $50.00 bonds.
Waivers were again signed by the students, which
means that all returnable caution money will go to
swell the coffers of the Red Cross.
Also, in conjunction with the drive for blood
donors, the War Aid Council publicized the drive
among students, were swamped with replies from
students eager to donate their blood to the bank.
Once again, fraternities and sororities on the
campus united to stage a most successful Red Cross
Page Twenty-four ... collect 50,000 pennies for Milk Fund
Ball. With a chorus of thirteen glamorous co-eds,
a raffle, and a dance, the Greeks were able to turn
in over $2,000.00 to the campus war charities fund.
The women on the campus again proved a most
valuable asset to the war effort of the University.
'Displaying a spirit that was as generous as it was
vigorous, the co-eds spent long hours in the Red
Cross knitting rooms where they fashioned afghans,
kitbags, night gowns, socks, sweaters, and helmets
for the forces.
With the co-operation of the Ford Motor Company,
more than 20 co-eds enrolled in the Motor Mechanics'
course before Christmas, passing their examination
with honours.
Many others preferred to take the first aid course
offered by Miss Kerr, of the nursing department.
In the hands of the women were the weekly self-
denial days. Handled by sorority girls in the Fall,
and Phrateres in the Spring, the drives proved to be
doubly successful over last year's effort, with more
than $600.00 being collected.
The women took it upon themselves to entertain the
R.C.A.F. boys, stationed on the campus studying
Radio  Detection, in  several informal dances.
Everywhere, in lectures, in the Caf, on the buses
and street cars, co-eds were to be seen, busily knitting garments for the Red Cross or for the armed
forces.    Their busy fingers never stopped.
The outcome of the war may be uncertain for most
people, but to the 2,650 students of the University of
British Columbia, victory is ultimate. They have
caught the spirit of victory, in every action they display it.
They live, breathe victory. To them it is irresistible.
It is this offensive spirit, which all democracy needs
to catch, that has pervaded the campus of U.B.C. this
year. It speaks well for the future of Canada and
for the future of the world, for what is true at
U.B.C. is true in universities all over Canada.
It can be seen making its appearance in colleges
in the United States. It has already proved its existence in Britain.
The youth of U.B.C. is ready to do its part in the
victorious drive of the democracies. As students at
U.B.C. we command the government of Canada to
call upon us.
We affirm our allegiance to Canada.
In aid of the Kinsmen's "Milk for Britain" fund, students
dropped donations into bottles
In the Quad they collected a mile of pennies, held faculty
competitions
Down go two co-eds with contributions under watchful eye.
Total collected: 5,000 quarts
Page Twenty-five Campus Greeks aid war charity fund with
Page Twenty-six can-can chorus at .
Red Cross Ball
(1) The can-can chorus; (2) Sitting one out; (3) High
kicking for charity; (4) Doreen Ryan accepts corsage; (5)
Connie Dierssen in solo; (6) Co-eds "sell" raffle tickets; (7)
Pat Cunningham wins fur coat; (8) Dancing interlude; (9)
Waiting for the raffle; (10) Phi Kappa Sigma table; (11)
Annabel Sandison—a kicker.
Page Twenty-seven   Freshettes register in Brock Hall, draw their regalia: aprons, hair ribbons
Freshmen don regalia
On Friday, September 19, 1941, two years after the
declaration of war, 600 young men and women filed
into the Auditorium on the campus of the University
of British Columbia, received the blessing of President L. S. Klinck, a blessing intermingled with sober
words of caution, and emerged as freshmen and
freshettes.
Fresh from the whirl of high school, they had piled
into B.C. Electric buses, or borrowed father's car,
talking somewhat more boisterously and quickly than
usual as befitting the occasion of a Great Adventure.
Fresh-eyed, receptive, they waited for words of
welcome. It came (President Klinck: "I welcome you
as students to the University of British Columbia
. . . ") but with it came much more.
Eager to understand, yet still more eager to be
freshmen, they left the Auditorium that September
morning looking for Tradition (sophomores). The
sophomores ignored them. The Freshmen broke
rules (smoked in the buildings, whistled in the halls,
removed regalia).
Sophomores, bored with the seriosity of war,
organized, lured the freshmen onto the playing field
with the guise of playing push-ball (a monstrous hay-
filled ball to be pushed through opponent's goal).
The ball came apart, became an arena as Tradition
took over.
The stage was set for the Frosh Reception.
Held in Brock Hall and the Gymnasium, this dance
saw freshmen hurled through the archway, symbolic
of entry into the University. Saw, too, freshmen,
revolting from sophomore manhandling, and a mild-
mannered brawl ensue as President Klinck watched
from the balcony ("what is more inane—those who
instigate or those who participate in initiations . . .")
Inane or no, the 600 discarded the green of the
frosh—became Arts '45 of U.B.C.
Page Thirty Left to right:    Student bliss: dancing cheek to cheek; Johnny   Tarbox   seeks,   finds   same   bliss   in   "cheeking";   Councillor
Charlie Nash showers famous personality on freshette; her "Big Sister"  task  over, Bunny Arm relaxes at Frosh Reception.
. . . pitch battle against hated Soph
Page Thirty-one Students, freed from military training early, take co-eds
to see Varsity-Grizzly game.   Here they cheer a
Thunderbird advance
Students mingle freely with grads . .
Johnny Farina sustains minor injury
Thomas Wolfe to the contrary, they did come home
again—our graduates of U.B.C, and they came from
all corners of the globe to walk again the campus
green, smell the mustiness of corridors, mingle in
the Caf, and cheer in the Stadium as their Alma
Mater staged, for these graduates, the 1941 Homecoming Celebration.
Homecoming is one of those traditional things that
means much to U.B.C. graduates, but that has, in
the past held little interest for the undergraduates.
This year, though, Homecoming came home to students. There were many graduates missing the Celebration for the first time.
Most of them were away—serving in the armed
forces, unable to get leave. Some of them were
away—lying on some foreign field. Many visiting
grads were in khaki or blue of the services.
Over in the parking lot, the skeleton framework
of the students' latest contribution to the building system, attracted much interest. It was the Armoury,
built by students to house their military training program. Graduates of peacetime looked on it with
pride.
Page Thirty-two Grizzlies and Thunderbirds clash near goal-line.   Varsity
showing was  creditable  considering it was their
only game of the season
at annual Homecoming ceremony
Lead-off to Homecoming celebrations was the banquet held in Brock Hall Friday, October 24, when
graduates met to listen to Lt.-Gov. W. C. Woodward
score the attitude of snobbery adopted by so many
university graduates.
On Saturday, former and contemporary athletes
renewed acquaintances at the Big Block luncheon,
then filed over to the Stadium to watch Maury Van
Vliet's college football team meet Vancouver's professional Grizzlies. Playing their only game of the
season, the Varsity gridders put up a magnificient
display before being beaten 12-5.
Climaxing the two-day program a Mixer was held
Saturday night with skits, radio shows, barber shop
quartettes, and Noel Coward.
Coach and players mirror gloom as time fades
Page Thirty-three War-conscious, These Students Worked Many Hours Devising Means by Which the War Aid Council Could Raise Funds.
Campus War Aid Council raises $6,000
Students of the University of British Columbia will
make an outright donation of $6,000.00 to war charity this year. The result of the most intensive drive
for money seen since the days when they campaigned
for their student union, this amount was made possible through the cohesive organization known as the
War Aid Council.
Last year, when students turned over $4,000.00 to
war charities, there was, withal, much dissatisfaction
on the campus, because it was felt that the effort
could  have  been  better  handled.
In answer, then, to criticism tendered by the
Ubyssey, campus newspaper, Students' Council set-up
an organization whose purpose it was to correlate all
the activities staged to raise money.
Known as the War Aid Council, it was composed of
two bodies: an Inner Council of seven members, and
an Outer Council comprising about thirty students,
important in club and organization circles.
To initiate its program the W.A.C instigated
Waiver Week, asking students to waive all returnable
caution money (a sum paid to care for breakage in
labs., etc.). Then followed the successful "Mile of
Pennies Drive" in aid of the Kinsmen's Milk for
Britain Fund, International Student Service week,
variety radio show, salvage campaign, self-denial
days, mixers, and many other activities.
Largest single donation came from the Red Cross
Ball, when sororities and fraternities raised $1,900.00.
The Milk Fund raised $535.00, self-denial days netted
$850.00, I.S.S. got $391.00, Victory Bonds to the
value of $300.00 were purchased; waivers brought
in $1,500.00, and other drives netted $500.00.
Most of the money raised will go to the Canadian
Red Cross which society has been "adopted" by the
students. Having increased their donation by almost
$1,000.00 over last year's total, the Council is sure
that in 1943, the figure will be even higher.
Page Thirty-four . . .Aggie Barn Dance
1—No formality here. 2—Only the cracker barrel
is missing. 3—The sign on the door is misleading.
4—Dancing is definitely athletic. 5—Hmmmm . . .
6—Refreshment (liquid) is Capilano-clear. 7—
Pleading for "one more dance."
Page Thirty-five Revellers at Winnie-poc
Chuck McNeely
Al Farrow
Never pooh-pooh the idea that two faculties can
unite to stage a successful dance, and hold faculty
rivalry in check. Every year Artsmen and Aggies
hook up to present the now traditional Arts-Aggie Ball
—and every year the dance gets bigger and better.
This year, as a matter of fact, the idea was Winnie-
the-pooh'ed, when executives in charge of the Ball
decided to use a Winnie-the-pooh theme, based on the
immortal teddy bear character of child nursery-storyist
A. A. Milne.
AH through the Commodore, scene of the dance,
Winnie the P. was in joyous evidence. To the girls
were given teddy bear favours. The hall was decora-
ter with Pooh cartoons, and each dance, marked on
the teddy bear program, was named after one of Milne's
ingenious characters.
Heralding the advent of the ball was a gigantic pep
meet staged in the Auditorium to the music of maestro
Ole Olson, and the skirting of Agros who staged a
risque burlesque. Sciencemen, although much in evidence, were silenced by the combined swell of Arts-
men and Aggies who strained throats to drown out
the hated engineers.
Executives in charge of the arrangements were
Chuck McNeely, Doug Hume, and John Carson of the
Artsmen's and Al Farrow, Ian McSwain, Lorraine
Thomson, and Jack Merryfield of the Aggies' Undergrad Societies.
Page Thirty-six rts-Aggie
1—Dean F. M. Clement, Agriculture's Patron. 2—Jim Campbell, Jack
Merryfield and Escorts Surround Dean Buchanan. 3—Spenee Wallace,
No Need for Food. 4—Jack McMillan dates Helen Nowlan and Phyllis
Wayles for Dancing. 5—Mildred Nairne Stops for Cameraman—Stan
Copp Gets in by a Nose.
Page Thirty-seven Joe Weed, Don Bannerman and Their Escorts Watch as Happy Mixer Dancers Go Through Intricacies of "Heel and Toe."
Social barriers collapse before .
Bill Houson and Muriel Whimster in the French Minuet
Victory bonds, dollars for imprisoned scholars, and
a lot of informal fun and merriment—that was the
legacy established by this year's set of Brock Hall
Mixers.
The Mixers were started last year in an attempt by
the Arts Men's Undergraduate Society to provide an
inexpensive means of getting University students to
know one another. Held on alternate Saturday
nights, in the student-built Brock Hall, these dances
were as informal as could be conceived.
The price set: two bits.
The war charity drive was aided by one mixer
last year that raised $125.25 in war savings stamps.
This year, the worth of the Mixers in helping the
drive for money was increased. The International
Student Service,  formed to  raise funds to  aid  im-
Page Thirty-eight Disqualified Entrants Watch as Other Mixer Dancers Vie for Honours in Spontaneous Elimination Contest.
informality of Brock Hall Mixers
prisoned or refugee students continue their studies
got a $200.00 contribution from a Saturday night
mixer dance and carnival.
The campaign to purchase four $50.00 victory
bonds went away over the top in its quota when
a mixer gained them $300.00, enabling them to purchase six bonds.
Music for the various mixers was supplied by
George Reifel and his Varsity orchestra. The fact
that not only was the band good, but also that they
were University students, all counted in making the
mixers inspired spirit-rousers.
Members of the A.M.U.S. executive in charge of
Mixers were: Chuck McNeely, Doug Hume, and John
Carson.
Tired Jitterbugs Light for a Rest and a  Coke.
Page Thirty-nine Joe Stalin leads Engineers' Red Army in
Engineers take time off from dancing to pay respects to guests at head tabl
Mack Buck,  famed Scienceman M.C. rips off another of those
infamous Science jokes
The vagaries of modern warfare that see nations
allied with strange bedfellows was mirrored this year
in the traditional hi-de-ho of the Science Ball, when
a dominant Russian theme was adopted, and Joseph
Stalin chosen patron of houour.
Particularly fitting, though, was the choice for the
red of Communism blended well with the red of
Applied Science, and the organization of the Ball befitted the best of Russion organizing genius.
Ijnside the Commodore, the theme of Russia was
ingeniously carried out, with pictures of Stalin, and
other Russian commisars dotting the walls. All the
branches of Applied Science vied for the honours of
having the most decorative table. Electrical engineers
toyed with a "kissometer," civil engineers erected a
collapsible bridge, while the mechanicals answered
with a humanized robot.
In charge of the dance were executive members of
the Science Men's Undergraduate Society: Rod Morris,
Sandy Buckland, Harold Graham, and Campbell Williams.
The exhibit catches the attention of a jew; while to others food is the mail
attraction
Cam McKenzie and escort peer at each other at Civil Engineers' table
Page Forty militaristic-moded Science Ball . . .
Hazel Swanson and Bill Gait stop dancing long enough to  chat
One happy party was this mixture of Councillors and Pubsters  -at rest
4
^  ^a
|'
*
5j
4>
wmam.
II    MP: 41
ff 1              i%a         *i 1
?
1
ffiJ
■A_aHak >^^^B                           Jl
\, ^
1
»                       . -"
/"      . • '
^
^•^mj
U  ^
- Ni '•■•'•   <•
i    ;'     f • ■
J*&
mr.mmm''-^- ~"      A
S' ikJE
3?         BB^H
an /. H. Finlayson and other patrons are caught here with S.M.U.S.
prexy, Red Morris
Frankly not impressed by the display of engineering artistry are these dancers
Not Sciencemen,  these students  marvel at  the ingenious  device
erected  by   the Civils
She says "Yes, I'd love to dance with you"—the others are just posing
Page Forty-one Juniors Crown their Prom Queen
McGowan, Brandt, Lister, Ritchie, and Harvey, Prom,
executives
Nobody likes to fail their year, and be forced to
face the shame of being in the same class two years
running—except the Juniors.
For Juniors are those priveleged few who have the.
opportunity of attending, as a pass feature, their own
Junior Prom; and everybody knows that the Junior
Prom is THE dance of the social year.
Nor was this year's Prom a disappointment.
Set in the familiar surroundings of the Commodore
ballroom, seven lovely ladies, Juniors all, paraded
around the dance floor before perplexed Juniors, who
scratched heads, cast ballots. Then the lights dimmed, and a brilliant spotlight picked out, etched in
white, the lovely Queen of the Junior Prom, Marg
Gardiner, brunette Alpha Gam.
Members of the Queen's retinue, defeated candidates, were: Bette Anderson, Betty Harvey, Mary
Drury, Vivian Dilger, Mary Farrell, and Pat Meredith.
Seated on her regal throne, diademmed in flowers,
Queen Margaret accepted the felicitations of her subjects, was presented with a silver bracelet by Hugh
Ritchie, president of the Junior Class, and executive
head of the Prom arrangements.
Lending their patronage to the Prom were: President and Mrs. L. S. Klinck, Dean Dorothy Mawdsley,
Dean and Mrs. Daniel Buchanan, Dr. and Mrs. A. W.
Currie.
Page Forty-two 1—The patrons' table. 2—President Klinck and Dr.
J. W. Currie. 3—Time out for talk. 4—Carson and
Hebb. 5—The "March Past" ceremony. 6—Zetes
and balloons. 7—Queen Gardiner and attendant
Dilger. 8—"Wotta party!" 9—The Commodore was
crowded.    10—Queen  Margaret  accepts  her  crown.
Page Forty-three 1—Fio Rito's vocalist chirps. 2—Swinging lightly at Mixer. 3—Tea dance attracts crowd. 4—Mus. Soccers at formal.
5—Young love dancing in a corner. 6—Archie Bath and Jean Nicholson. 7— Lou Nicholson and Marg Haggart discuss music
with Dr. Kania.   8—Marjorie Usher discovers cameraman at M us. Soc. Formal.
Page Forty-four . . . Words and Music
Page Forty-five President, Shirley MacDonald
There is an old tradition in the theatre that "the
show must go on."
There's another tradition in U.B.C. dramatic circles:
When a war is being waged, the mummers pitch in,
help the war effort whenever possible.
This year, the Players' Club carried on that tradition by lending invaluable support to the War Aid
Council. Last year, they revived a previous performance, gave the proceeds to the fund.
This year, carrying on this idea, the thespians
staged a revival of "Candida," George Bernard Shaw'3
sparkling play, were able to turn over $350.00 to the
Canadian Red Cross.
The original cast was enabled to appear in its
entirety through the co-operation of John Glen, who
returned to Vancouver from Seattle, where he is
associated with the Seattle Repertory Players.
Other contributions of the Players' Club were a
radio drama enacted by several members on the
Varsity Varieties program, and the noon-hour show
"A Scienceman's Lover," written by Jabez, Ubyssey
columnist, and enacted by Shirley MacDonald, Nancy
Bruce, Mary McLorg, Lister Sinclair, James Powell,
Norman Campbell, and Ted Spiers.
Still focal point of the thespians' activities, however, this year was the annual Spring production.
The Club follows a policy of selecting a period play
one year, and a contemporary play the next.
This year, they selected Richard Sheridan's witty
"comedy of manners," "The Rivals," putting it before
Vancouver audiences on four consecutive evenings.
After much preparation and competition, the cast
for "The Rivals" was chosen to consist of Lister Sinclair, as Sir Anthony Absolute; Arthur Hill, as Captain Absolute; Ronald Heal, as Acres; Eleanor Atkins, as Mrs. Malaprop; Doreen Dougan, as Lydia
Languish; Shirley Kerr, as Julia; Mary Buckerfield,
as Lucy; Norman Campbell, as Fag; Tom Mayne, as
David; and Peter McGeer, as Thomas.
The Advisory Board, which included Professor
F. G. C. Wood, Mrs. Wood, Miss Dorothy Somerset,
Dr. Dorothy Mawdsley, and the Club's honorary
president, Professor Walter Gage, has given the executive much invaluable assistance in this year's programme.
The executive of the Players' Club this year consisted of: President, Shirley MacDonald; Vice-President, Lester Sugarman; Secretary, Mary McLorg;
Business Manager, June Hewiston; Treasurer, Michael Young; Committee Members, Lister Sinclair, Dick
Bibbs, and Mary McTavish.
Drama thrives as Players' Club enact...
Lester Sugarman, Mary McLorg, Mike Young, Mary McTavish, Lister Sinclair
Page Forty-six 1—Anne du Moulin Fixes Shirley Kerr's Costume. 2—Lister Sinclair, Veteran Actor. 3—Ronald Heal, Eleanor Atkins,
Lister Sinclair in Riotous Moment. 4—Mary Buckerfield Coaches Doreen Dougan on "Lines". 5—Mary Buckerfield and
John Seyer in Amorous Scene. 6—Mary McTavish makes up John Seyer in Green Room. 7—Doreen Dougan Trying to
Choose Between Ronald Heal and Foster Isherwood, Who Appears to "two time" with Shirley Kerr, 8.
. Shaw for charity, "The Rivals
5?
Page Forty-seven Musical Society turns beef-eaters . . .
President,  Duncan  McFayden
When the curtain fell in the University Auditorium,
Saturday, February 28, bringing to an end the
Musical Society's production, "Yeomen of the
Guard," an enthusiastic last-night audience acclaimed
it the best product heard in many years.
This saga of beef-eating England was by far the
most difficult attempt made by the Society in recent
years, being Gilbert and Sullivan's nearest approach
to grand opera.
Stand-out in the large "Yoemen" cast was Margaret Haggart, senior soprano singing her last role
for the Society.
Another superlative performance was that of
Doreen Grant's, soprano, who sang the female second
lead with much charm. Difficult, indeed, was the role
handed Max Warne, who as "Colonel Fairfax," had
to adapt his naturally baritone register to the tenor
role of "Colonel Fairfax."
Comedy relief was well handled by John Allen,
singing the role of the head jailer, and Bob McWilliams, as the strolling jester.
Others in the cast included Keith Simpson, as Sir
Richard, Vera Delamount, as Dame Carruthers, Bob
McLellan, as Serg. Merrill, and Wally Marsh, as Leonard Merrill.
Again, this year, the musical production was under
the capable direction of C. Hayden Williams. Mr.
William's efforts each year seem almost superhuman,
Margaret  Haggart
Gwen Teljer
Brenda Goddard
Tom Robinson
Lorris Selkirk
Ronald White
Page Forty-eight 1—Back Stage with the Chorus.    2—Bob McWilliams Sings  to Chorine.   3—Even in Those Days—Soldiers Were Soldiers.
4—Skullduggery with the Jailor.   5—Two "Yeomen" Act as bodyguard.
>et he has being doing so for the past fifteen years.
The dramatic part of the operetta was under the
guidance of E. V. Young and Professor Walter Gage.
An old friend of the Society, Dr. W. L. MacDonald,
for more than 20 years Honourary President, was
forced to sever official connections.
In appreciation of his work on past productions,
Dr. MacDonald was made the first honourary life
member of U.B.C.'s Musical Society.
A great loss to the Society, this year, was Duncan
McFayden, president, who left early in January to
join the R.C.A.F. McFayden had done invaluable
work on previous productions, and his absence was
greatly felt.
Stepping  into  the  shoes  of McFayden  was  Mar
garet Haggart, club vice-president, who carried on
the difficult task of producing the show, and singing
the lead role.
Others aiding in executive positions were: Gwen
Telfer, secretary; Brenda Goddard, production manager; Lorris Selkirk, business manager; Tom Robinson, Music Appreciation; and Ron White, advertising
Holmes Gardiner was again foreman of the back
stage crew, while Kathie Paterson, Kay Augustine,
Renee Leblanc and Vera Radcliff rendered valuable
assistance in costuming.
The "Yeomen of the Guard" will long rank in the
annals of Musical Society history as a sterling performance. It remains a tribute to the perseverence
and hard work of every member.
.for tuneful "Yeoman of the Guard
55
Page Forty-nine Archie Paton, Editor-in-chief of Publications
Student journalists stalk campus . . .
Jack McMillan, Friday Editor
If writing about people is difficult, then writing
about people who write about people is doubly difficult, especially when those people are the men and
women who go to make up the Publications Board—
Ubyssey branch.
As usual, the year did not slip by without first
having seen a radical change in the format of the
Ubyssey. Last year, the paper set an example for
college papers throughout Canada by adopting the
new streamlined "make-up", cutting out margin rules,
made for easier reading.
This  year, the  change  was not  so  much  new  in
Leslie Bewley, Tuesday Editor
Page Fifty Bill Gait and Jack McKinlay, Sport Co-editors
Andy Snaddon
in search of hot news for U. B. C.
Marg Reid, Jack Ferry, Lucy Berton, Associate Editors
Eric   ("The Mummery")   Nicol
college journalistic circles, nor even new for the
Ubyssey itself, but was, rather, a triumph of persistence. For years members of the Publications Board
had bemoaned the fate that kept the Ubyssey down in
size to six columns. This smallness, they argued,
cramped their style, and they dreamed of a seven
column paper.
But the staff of 1941-42 did more than  dream
they went out and got themselves a seven-column, four
page,  bi-weekly  University  paper.     Now—now they
want eight columns!
Extremely conscious of the responsibility of editing a university paper was this year's editor-in-chief
(nickname: God)  Archibald T. Paton.
Mr. Paton (the faculty always mispronounces it:
Patton), set about early in the year to inform the
student body just what they should and should not
do—and usually won his case. Notable successes
scored by Mr, Editor were the establishment of a
course in Air Navigation for students anxious to
enter the Air Force, and the setting up of a War Aid
Council to co-ordinate the war effort on the campus.
Reward for his untiring efforts came from the student body who awarded him his tuition fees.
Something which had been lacking in Publications
Board administration for the past few years suddenly
came to life again this year when there was found a
capable News Manager, able to cope with the whims of
temperamental reporters.
Page Fifty-one Doris Filmer-Bennett, Lorna McDiarmid, Directory and
Tillicum Editors
Andrew Snaddon (from Calgary) supplied a necessary correlation between editors and hirelings, his
being the task of interpreting editorial policy into
news stories, teaching the tricks of the trade ("Miss
Smith . . . always end your stories with '30' . . .")
to the neophytes. His, too, was the idea of securing
guest columns from members of the faculty.
As usual, extremes in personality were mirrored in
the persons of the senior editors, Leslie Bewley and
Jack McMillan. Theirs is the job of editing the copy,
seeing that the paper goes "to bed" usually at a
time when they, themselves, should be.
Bewley, calm, immobile, soft-spoken, pipe-smoking —
McMillan, jittering, facile, fast-talking, teetotailing- •
news makers, and reporters. Schooled in patience.
Bewley expended no excess energy (the paper came
out on time). Atuned to a more swiftly-moving world,
McMillan helter-skeltered (the paper came out on
time).
An unfortunate set of circumstances upset the calm
workings of the Pub late in January when Bewley
was forced to leave the University (and his beloved
Ubyssey and Parliamentary Forum). This necessitated a shift in personnel which saw news manager
Snaddon move to Bewley's vacated desk, and Jack
Ferry, erstwhile associate editor promoted to the news
managing spot.
Jack McKinlay, sports editor, returned to school
late, finally settled down to work when he found a
willingly co-worker, one Bill Gait. More as co-editors,
than as chief and assistant, McKinlay and Gait ground
the grist of sport, abetted by a staff composed of Chuck
Claridge, Bill Welsford, Art Eaton, Jack Mathieson,
Harry Franklin, and co-eds Shirley Willcocks and
Doreen Taylor.
Associate editors who bore much of the brunt of
news writing and editing were: Lucy Berton, Marg
Reid, and John Scott.   Potential editors, this trio was
groomed throughout the year, finally were allowed to
edit one copy each. Distribution of the papers was
again entrusted to Circulation Manager, Bob Menchions.
Again, this time from the lofty heights of a graduate, spoke the oracle of Eric Nicol, author (perpetrator
really) of the column "The Mummery" (pseudonym:
Jabez). "The Mummery" which made anything
(including our army) the butt of its biting humour,
became, in the two years of its existence, the most
widely read column to appear in the Ubyssey, being
reprinted in college papers throughout Canada.
Nicol's contribution to morale was recognized by the
L. S. E. who stepped out of the bounds of club life
to award him one of their valued honourary shields.
Other columnistic journalists were: Andrew Snaddon ("One Man's Opinion"), Lionel Salt ("The Gatepost"), Jack McMillan ("U. B. Seeeing"), and Lucy
Berton ("Mary Ann", "Joseph Joseph").
A strong triumverate were the cameramen of this
year's Ubyssey: Allan Coe, Dave Lawson, and Hugh
Aikens who kept the campus posted pictorially on
news of the day.
Also under the aegis of the Publications Board
(and Mr. Editor Paton) are two other publications:
the Tillicum and the Student Directory. This year, in
the hands of Doris Filmer-Bennett, were these two
estimable and useful journals: the Tillicum, crammed
with advice to freshmen, the Directory, crammed with
the names, addresses and phone numbers . . . ("a
blind date bureau") of every registered undergraduate. Assisting on the tortuous task of proof-reading
was Lorna McDiarmid.
Behind the scenes as ever was Morris Belkin, former
student (Arts '39), who was serving his fourth term as
advertising manager, and his second term as owner
of the print shop wherein is conceived the Ubyssey.
To Morris, as to Fred, Don, Walt, and Ralph goes
much of the credit for technical perfection.
Morris Belkin, Publisher and Advertising Manager
Page Fifty-two Closed for the duration . . .
For the past two and one-half years, that phrase
has become too familiar to Canadians. As the war
has steadily progressed, as fighting has reached
fever pitch with every iota of producing strength
being mobilized, businesses all over the country have
been forced to close down for the "duration of the
war."
The closed for duration sign now hangs from the
door of the Totem office. The Totem, official yearbook of the University of British Columbia's 2,650
Totem Editor, Lionel Salt
Capsule-size staff works overtime
students, has voluntarily decided to cease production
for the duration, and thus, in some small measure aid
the Canadian war effort.
Thus the war, and more especially the application
of the war to the University student, has become the
main "theme" of this year's Totem. The staff has
attempted to reproduce every aspect of campus military training, and the student war charity drive.
Because of military training the burden of production fell upon few shoulders this year.    Chief among
Sports Editor, Jack Ferry
Features Editor, Les Bewley
Page Fifty-three Faculty Editor, Edna  Winram
Women's Editor, Honoree Young
to labour over production of Totem .. .
those assuming responsibility for Totem production
was this year's editor, Lionel Salt, a junior in Arts,
a veteran Publications Board member, former sports
editor and news manager of the campus paper, the
Ubyssey, and last year, associate editor of the Totem.
Starting out the year with a capsule-size staff, Salt
managed to coerce work out of several associates, just
slipped under the press deadline, brought out the
Totem in April to the campus where it was distributed
to more students than ever before.
Dismayed at the small percentage of University
students purchasing a year book last year, the staff
concentrated much of its efforts in boosting sales,
conducting a slogan contest, and staging an "all-
University" pep meet.
Winning slogan: "Join the Totimmortals." Nobody
got the point, but in their bewilderment, students
were talked into buying a book. ,
CAMERAMEN:    Dave Lawson
Allan Coe
Hugh Aikens
Page Fifty-four Aiding Editor Salt on the editorial staff were
Honoree Young, Edna Winram, and Les Bewley.
Miss Young, who was in charge of class write-ups
last year, handled most of the liaison work this year,
spending countless hours on the telephone, making
dates for pictures, getting lists of names typed, and
class and club write-ups in.
Miss Winram, herself a veteran Ubyssey staff
worker, having been senior editor the previous year,
was pulled away from her scholarship studies long
enough to do invaluable work in collecting and compiling information on the campus war effort, especially that of the faculties.
Bewley, who had agreed to add the Totem to his
ever-increasing list of extra-curricular activities
(Ubyssey and Parliamentary Forum) was lost to the
staff early in the Spring term when he left the University.
Although the campus athletic program was necessarily curtailed this  year,  sports  was  still  a major
Business Manager, Doug Moloney
Canada's finest college year book
activity,  and nowhere could a better Sports Editor
have ben found than in Jack Ferry.
Ferry, pinch-hitting sports editor of the Ubyssey,
and later appointed news manager, assumed the office
tendered him by the Totem, performed a quiet, efficient job of reporting the year's athletic highlights.
Aiding him, was Bill Gait who gave invaluable assistance in the copy writing department.
Advertising Manager, Jim Boughton
Photography was a worry this year to the editors
who found themselves in September minus their
three veteran cameramen of last year, all of whom
had graduated. Then, suddenly, there loomed the
squat figure of freshman Allan Coe, and the problem
was  solved—temporarily.
Coe and his flash camera covered much ground
until Christmas, when the press of scholastic and
military studies, forced him to slow down the tempo
of his work. Out from the engraving company came
red-headed Hughie Aikens to perform indispensible
work, pinch-hitting for Coe. In the Spring, yet
another amateur photographer was unearthed in the
person of Dave Lawson. Between the three of them
these men covered every major event on the campus.
Even the business staff felt the blow of the war.
Bill Gilmour, business manager, left early in November for the Navy. This necessitated the promotion
of Doug Maloney to the position, and the appointment of Jim Boughton as advertising manager in
which office Maloney had started. Together Maloney
and Boughten sold advertising, juggled accounts, and
balanced budgets.
No Totem story is complete without mention of
the work done by the engravers and printers whose
interest in the year book goes beyond mere professional pride. To Harold Kent, and the gang down at
Cleland-Kent, and Charlie Phillips, and the boys of
Ward and Phillips, go prayers of thanks from the
entire staff.
Page Fifty-five Cl^ r>
In four western Canadian cities on Friday, January 16, four chairmen rapped on the rostrum for
silence, judges bent heads together . . . and the news
flashed over the wires: U.B.C. had won the McGoun
Cup!
No athletic contest this, for it was the annual
Western Canada inter-collegiate debating competition
in which teams from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba had been entered. For sixteen years, teams from U.B.C. had competed—only
once, in 1938, had their team been successful.
This year, U.B.C. debaters Bob Morris, Arvid Back-
man, Arthur Fouks, and Bob Bonner captured the
unanimous decision, scored eight points out of a possible eight to sweep to victory.
In Vancouver, defeated Manitoba debater Sam
Breen wired home:   "We were unanimously skunked
President, Leslie Bewley
Forum debaters capture McGoun Cup
Triumphant Forum Debater, Bob Bonner receives  McGoun Cup from A.M.S. President, Ted McBride
Page Fifty-six Victorious U.B.C. Debaters: Bob Morris, Arthur Fouks, Arvid Backman, Bob Bonner
From Edmonton, home of the University of Alberta,
came the wire from Art Fouks, veteran U.B.C. man:
"Thumbs up.    Three way our way ..."
And the McGoun Cup came back to British Columbia.
This was a triumph indeed for the Parliamentary
Forum, since the Forum is spawning ground of
U.B.C. debating teams. Head of the campus forensic front, the Forum is the executive group that
chooses  representatives  to   debate  against  the  other
couver Speakers' Club, they failed to register a win.
Placed in charge of arranging details of the intercollegiate competition was Les Bewley, who assumed
the office of Forum president. Working against
difficulties, which, as late as a month before the date
set for the debate threatened to cancel the traditional
affair, Bewley expended much time and effort, was
aided by a committee composed of Elspeth Munro,
Len Korsch, and Bob Bonner.
To Alberta arguing the negative of "Resolved, that
in inter-collegiate competition
Western Canadian colleges, grooms them for the contest by staging many local debates, panel discussions,
symposiums.
Debating has been one of the minor activities in
the extra-curricular scheme at British Columbia. In
the first place, the University is handicapped because
it has no Faculty of Law. This means, of course,
that a valuable field of debating material is lost.
Many U.B.C. students who plan to enter the field
of law leave for Eastern colleges after their first year
or two on the campus. Other B. C. students go east
immediately upon graduating from high school.
Thus,  debating  at U.B.C.  has been  handicapped.
First, several veteran members were lost. Arvid
Backman was forced to resign from the post of president of the Forum, through the press of other activities. Although his services for the inter-collegiate
debate were secured, the lack of his driving executive
ability was felt in Forum activities.
Others lost included Austin Delany, a former McGoun Cup man, Stuart Chambers, and Ken Ward-
roper, all now serving in the armed forces.
Then, too, although U.B.C. entered the City Debating League again this year, staging debates against
teams from the Junior Board of Trade and the Van-
after the war Canada should adopt a policy of extensive immigration" went Fouks and Bonner. The
result: a unanimous decision.
In the University Auditorium in Vancouver, stayed
Morris and Backman, to argue the affirmative side of
the same resolution. The result: a unanimous decision.
Total result: eight points and the McGoun Cup.
Heading the Parliamentary Forum this year was
Les Bewley. Others aiding in arrangements were
Elspeth Munro, Len Korsch, and Bob Bonner.
Committee: Elspeth Munro and Leonard Korsch
Page Fifty-seven IN RHYTHM:   Wally Reid, Jim McCulloch, Bill Harrison, Ken   Almond,   George   Reifel   in   the   Back   and  Byron   Estey,
Len Korsch, Phil Nimmens and Denny Leong in Front.
Orchestra celebrates great season .. .
Drummer-Leader, George Reifel
This year they swung it hot and solid.
Twelve men and a girl, the Varsity orchestra
entertained at dances this year with "righteous" jazz,
the music of modern America. Under the leadership,
first of Sid Poulton, and later, of George Reifel, the
band attracted more rave notices this year than in
any of the previous years of its existence.
Composed mainly of University students, with one
or two outside men added, the band played for all
types of attractions: Mixers, co-eds, class parties, and
barn dances.
They started out in the Fall under the baton of
Sid Poulton, featured alto sax and clarinet man,
playing under Poulton until Christmas. Then, Poulton left the band and the University, and George
Reifel, band drummer, took over its leadership.
About this time, too, Leo Foster, slap bass, dropped
out, in favour of his engineering course.
To replace Poulton in the reed section, Reifel
secured Phil Nimmons, sophomore saxaphonist. To
slap bass went Pat Lane, a non-University student.
Then the band began to "ride."
Featuring a four-man brass section that is the
equal of any in the city, the Reifelmen began to play
Page Fifty-eight Rhythm Singer, Connie Dierssen, Leader of Greek Red Cross
Chorus.
from the heart, and their infectious rhythms reached
their dancing audiences. Everywhere, they played,
the dancers yelled for more—and got it.
Never were the musicians loath to play.
When George Reifel took over the band, he realized that he had, essentially, a group of musicians
that loved to play "hot". Consequently, he took the
wraps off, let them play the way they wanted.
The powerful brass section was headed by Kenny
Almond, on trumpet, and Jim McCulloch, on trombone. Rounding out the section on second trumpet
and trombone were Bill Harrison, and Wally Reid.
Powered by Phil Nimmons' alto sax and clarinet
work were the reeds: Denny Leong, tenor sax; Len
Korsch, second alto, and Byron Estey, second tenor.
Supplying a driving rhythm for the band's many
"sock" arrangements was the rhythm section headed
by Reifel on drums, with Carl Bingham, piano; Pat
Lane, slap bass, and Bill Peterson, guitar.
Winner of a competition staged to choose the
band's vocalist this year was lovely Jean Folkard.
Not a rhythm singer, Jean displayed a nice voice
quality, was featured in the band's sweet arrangements. Her voice, coupled with a charming personality, proved to be a definite crowd pleaser.
Band's   Vocalist,  Jean  Folkard,   Winner  of  Campus
Popularity Poll.
Phil Nimmons Takes Off on a Hot Clarinet Break with
the  Band.
The "Band Within the Band", McCulloch, Nimmons and
Almond.
Page Fifty-nine Bob Wilson, Sheila MacKay, Louis Monasch, Ted Speers,Phyliss NeMetz, Don McMillan, Grouped Around Microphone
Radio Society rides the air lanes . .
fvrpfc
Technical Staff at Radio Studio
i
ffT
^^mml
m%    ^*r
m&^
mmj
1
■HVL
ft           ffji
Based on changes made last year when a policy
change shifted the concentration of members upon
technique and voice cultivation, the Radio Society, this
year, experienced a banner year.
Saturday nights, over Station CKWX, the Society
presented to the public "News from the Campus" in
which members of the staff gave comprehensive coverage to campus news in the manner of a newspaper
office just before deadline.
Something new was added to the Radio Society-
roster this year when Al Miller and Harry Franklin
teamed up on Thursday's to present campus sports
highlights over Station CJOR.
In aid of the student war air drive to raise money
for the Red Cross, the Society presented an hour-long
variety hour over CKWX, featuring music by Tevor
Page and the Musical Society, a drama by the Players'
Club, and a quiz by downtown and campus journalists.
Under the direction of Phyliss NeMetz, the Society
consisted of: Don McMillan, Al Miller, Bob Wilson,
Ted Speers, Harry Franklin, Louis Monasch, Al McMillan, Marygold Nash, Peggy Reid, Bill Wilbur, and
Sheila MacKay.
Harry Franklin, Al Miller, Sports Editors
Page Sixty These are the Members of Mamooks,  the  Official Spirit-rousers  of  I .B.C.
... Mamooks: masters of all ceremonies
Sherry, Connie, Don,  Terry and Eileen
"Elan vital" of nearly every Varsity function is
an organization that works behind the scenes, doing
the unheralded but nevertheless invaluable work of
publicity—-the Mamooks.
Although the athletic program at the University
was curtailed this year because of military restrictions,
the Mamooks were behind the megaphones at every
contest.
Big attraction in cheer-leading this year was the
co-ed section composed of Connie Dierssen, Sherry
Willcocks, Terry Taylor, and Eileen McKillop who
supplied the glamour for Don Sutton's vocal efforts.
Mamook duties started with the opening of University, will not be over until Graduation. In part,
their activities consisted of helping with the Frosh
reception, with Homecoming, co-operating with the
A.M.U.S. at mixers, with the Greeks at the Red Cross
Ball, the Junior Prom, and the War Aid Council.
The executive of the Mamooks this year consisted
of: Honourary President, Dr. J. A. Harris; President, Hugh Hall; Secretary-Treasurer, Jack Cunningham; Yell Kings, Al Dean, Don Sutton.
Yell King, Al Dean
Page Sixty-one Harbingers of Law Faculty .
Donald Ross, Hugh Ritchie, Doug Hume, Charles Cotterall
Re-incarnated last year, after a lapse of some time,
the Law Society, this year, pursued a conservative
policy, under its president Hugh Ritchie, and faculty
advisor Dr. Brocklebank.
The endeavour of the Law Society has been to lay
the foundations on which the future activities of the
society shall be built.    During the past two years of
activity, the objectives as laid down in the preamble
to the Constitution have been clarified.
As it now stands, the two objectives of the Society
are to work towards the establishment of a Law
Faculty at the University of British Columbia, and
to establish direct contact betwen student-lawyers and
the Bar Association and its members of the legal profession.
The establishment of a law faculty on the campus
would prove a great boon to the province which
annually loses a fair-sized crop of promising legal
students to Eastern colleges.
The Law Society is attempting to show the people
of B. C. that there are enough students interested in
the legal profession to warrant the founding of such
a faculty here.
Meanwhile, association with downtown lawyers has
been carried on through visits of Law Society members to various law offices, the interviewing of prominent solicitors and the bringing of guest speakers to
their meetings.
The executive of the Law Society this year consisted of: President, Hugh Ritchie; Vice-President,
Charles Cotterall; Secretary-Treasurer, Doug Hume;
Educational Director, Donald Ross.
The screen is silent, but alive .
Jack Creighton, Jean Beveridge, Holmes Gardiner, Ray Foster
Playing to an audience-total of over 5,000 students
is no idle boast on the part of the Film Society, who,
this year, presented its most varied and interesting
program, despite the restrictions of war conditions.
Much of the credit for this year's splendid effort
must go to Ray Foster who, for the second successive
term, headed the Society, worked industriously to
ensure a varied program.
Drawing extensively from the libraries of the
National Film Society, and the National Film Board,
the Film Society presented an unusual documentary
film, "The City." In co-operation with Applied Science students and clubs, they also showed such films
as "Trees and Homes," and "Travelogue of Wild Life
in the Indian Jungle."
Other attractions included "Barbier de Seville,"
and, in serial form, the wild west's own "The Indians
Are Coming."
In co-operation with the War Aid Council, the
Film Society put on a special noon-hour show, the
proceeds of which were turned over to the Kinsmen's
"Milk for Britain Fund."
The executive of the Film Society this year consisted of: Honourary President, Dr. D. 0. Evans;
President, Ray Foster; Vice-President, Jack Creighton; Secretary, Jean Beveridge; Treasurer, Holmes
Gardiner.
Page Sixty-two Students at the University got treated to some of
the finer things in life this year, when a three-man
committee, formed for the first time, brought culture
out to the campus in the form of visiting artists.
Each year, a certain sum of money is set aside by
Students' Council to provide noon-hour entertainment
for students. Last year much of this sum lay untouched, so to re-vitalize noon-hour program events,
this committee was formed to watch for visiting artists and secure their services.
Five features were presented by S.E.C this year:
Ted Fio Rito, popular orchestra leader; Kenneth
Spsncer, negro basso; Ross Pratt, talented Canadian
pianist; Reah Sadowski, internationally noted pianist;
and a joint recital by Arthur Benjamin and William
Primrose,   world's   foremost   viola   virtuoso.
So popular were these artists with the students that
it is planned to widen the scope of the Committee
next year, in order to facilitate the securing of an
even more comprehensive program of fine art.
S.E.C:  John Carson, Doug. Maloney, Gordon MacFarlane.
Special committee imports culture
Ted Fio-Rito Entertains at Piano.
Arthur  Benjamin, Noted Australian  Conductor-composer.
Page Sixty-three   Chancellor R. E. McKechnie and President L. S. Klinck listen  to  annual Fall  Convocation  address  with  faculty  members
L. S. Klinck heads administrative body
When a student first comes to the campus of U.B.C.
he is usually piloted around by some experienced
friend who takes it upon himself to show the freshman the "most important things on the campus."
Consequently, the newcomer becomes acquainted
with the "Caf," with the spacious lounge of Brock
Hall, with the Library (usually introduced as a show
place) and, as a matter of course, with the buildings
wherein  are to  be housed his lectures.
Then, after everything else has been covered, the
freshman is introduced to the Administration Building. "You have to register in here, and pay your
fees," he is told.
Thus, some students come to the University, study
for four or five years and graduate knowing only
that the Administration Building is where "you register and pay your fees."
What they would find, if they were but to take
trouble and time enough to look would be a complex,
yet smoothly running, business and administrative
system, set up for the one purpose: that of ensuring
that the University of British Columbia stays, in
every way, an institution of higher learning, a proud
fountainhead of knowledge for the entire province.
Few students realize that the money they pay in
tuition fees each year represents less than fifty per
cent of the total annual expenditure of their University. Few students realize that this places a burden
on the citizens of B. C whose taxes it is that keep
the University doors open.
Care must be exercised in the administration of
these funds to ensure the people of B. C a proper
return on their investment. Wartime, when so much
money must be diverted from other channels into
those building a war machine, necessitates increased
efforts to prove to the people the value and worth
being  obtained  from  such   an   expenditure.
Consequently there is housed in that oft-neglected
and little known Administration building the machinery that has been established to administer as representatives of the people of the province to the needs of
the students.    Biggest spoke in the wheel, the man
Page Sixty-six Faculty members file into Convocation
who heads the organization, is Leonard S. Klinck,
President of the University.
Since 1919, when he assumed office, President
Klinck has made it his job to ensure personally that
the University of B. C. answered the trust placed in
it. He has never stopped working in its interests. A
keen educator, Dr. Klinck knows the problems of
student and faculty alike. He, himself, was a student
in a Canadian university, having obtained his doctor's
degree in Agriculture.
He is intimate with the problems of teaching, too,
for, prior to his appointment as president, he headed
U.B.C's faculty of agriculture.
In his twenty-four years as president, Dr. Klinck
has gathered about him, one of the most compact,
well-organized, and brilliant faculty in Canada. No
idle boast, this fact is echoed in the praise that has
been given to the high scholastic standing established
at U.B.C. and which is recognized throughout Canada
and the United States.
On the position of the University in wartime, President Klinck is most definite in his belief that the
training afforded students in leadership and craftsmanship justifies for the student exemption from
active military duties.
Addressing a banquet held in connection with a
drive students were holding to raise money to help
imprisoned and refugee scholars continue their education, the President decried the "shortsighted policy
during the last war of encouraging young university
. . . of University, cares for students
Dr.   G.   C.   Sedgwick   leads   graduating   class   into   Convocation   exercises
Page Sixty-seven Dean D. Buchanan
Faculty heads of Arts and Science . . .
men to join up, irrespective of aptitude."
"The number of men at the University are insignificant, military speaking," he stated, adding, "The
technical staff is an important part in the University
organization for training men for the basic war effort,
and any depletion of such staff at this time would be
a serious matter.
The federal department of labour, Dr. Klinck
added, "says that university men can serve the
national interest by practising their professions,
whether in war industries or the armed forces."
Thus, then, although the University has been
acknowledged to be a most necessary adjunct to
Canadian and British Columbia life, the administration and faculty, under the leadership of President
Klinck have not been content with merely turning out
trained professional men and women.
Since the outbreak of war in 1939, the University
has been geared to aid, materially, in the government's war effort. In this respect, the work of the
Senate and of the Bursar's office has been increased.
Seeing the need for maintaining the stream of trained
men, the Dominion government has been most generous in establishing a fund on which deserving students may draw, if they have the need and the potentiality, in order to complete their university training.
M. A. Cameron
Education
W. A. Clemens
Zoology
Page Sixty-eight C. E. Dolman
Bacteriology and Preventive
Medicine
D. 0. Evans
Modern Languages
J. A. Irving
Philosophy and Psychology
A. H. Hutchinson
Botany
The Senate, a group of faculty and administration members, decide upon the worthiness of students
who aim for scholarships, bursaries, and loans. The
Bursar's office has increased the scope of its complex financial set-up to care for increased allotments.
Also in the Administration building on the campus
is the Registrar's office, where every one of the 2,650
students must go to register. The addition of several courses, the changing of requirements, and the
increase in applications for scholarships and bursaries which go first to the Registrar have greatly
increased the burden of work here.
Still another branch of Administration has seen its
work increase. The Board of Governors, a group
of ten private citizens, headed by the Chancellor of
the University, Dr. R. E. McKechnie, who have the
authority to appoint or dismiss any or all of the
entire staff of the University, have felt the need for
streamlining the curriculum to war needs.
At the present time, the most important point on
their agenda is discussion of the proposal to keep the
University open all year round, speed up graduation
of students to help the war effort.
There are three faculties at U.B.C: Arts and Science, headed by shock-haired, eye-twinkling Dean
Daniel Buchanan; Applied Science, in charge of practical-minded Dean John Finlayson; and Agriculture,
under the charge of friendly, down-to-earth Dean F.
Clement.
Training men and women to lead the post-war
world is the primary objective of Dean Buchanan's
Faculty of Arts and Science. Here statesmen, teachers, doctors, and economists of the future are among
those who receive elementary training in their chosen
fields.
Here,  pre-medical  students  are  studying  zoology,
W. N. Sage
History
E. H. Morrow
Commerce
H. F. Angus
Economics
G. G. Sedgewick
English
Page Sixty-nine Dean J. Finlayson
Applied Science faculty aids war . .
bacteriology, and preventive medicine, preparing to
fill the wartime gaps in the medical profession. The
Department of Economics offers courses in such subjects as international trade and government finance,
educating men to solve problems of government administration. For its graduate statisticians, there is a
steady demand from war-geared Ottawa.
Chemists, physicists, mathematicians, and geologists
are also trained for employment in war industries.
Commerce students learn corporation finance and industrial management in preparation for filling executive positions during the period of Canada's post-war
reconstruction.
In the Chemistry, Physics, and Geology and Geography departments the faculty and graduate students
are engaged in research to help the war effort.
Valuable faculty members have ben granted leave
of absence for the duration of the conflict to do government work. Notable among these is Professor
H. F. Angus, head of the Economics Department, who
is now in Ottawa. Dr. A. M. Crooker and Dr. K. C.
Mann of the Department of Physics have also been
freed from the University, the former to aid in the
designing of optical instruments for Research Enterprises Ltd., the latter to do radio work with the
National Council of Research.
Giving  special  training  to  the  general  public  to
R. H. Clark,
Chemistry
F. M. Knapp,
Forestry
Page Seventy H. J. MacLeod,
Mechanical and Electrical
G. M. Shrum,
Physics
J. M. Turnbull,
Mining and Metallurgy
M. Y. Williams,
Geology and Geography
meet the nation's war needs is a function of the Department of University Extension. Courses in plastics, in the physical properties of metals, and in
marine navigation in coastal waters have been added
to the Department's agenda during the past two years.
Throughout the province, study groups on post
war reconstruction have been organized. Lectures
on wartime economics are given shipbuilders, instruction in wartime nutrition is given housewives. Educational films are distributed to the army, navy, and
airforce; pictures of the "Canada Carries On" series
are sent to theatres in the interior.
Dr. G. M. Shrum, head of the Extension Department, is also British Columbia and Alberta chairman
for the Canadian Legion War Services. From this
organization men in the armed forces can obtain
correspondence courses in Junior Matriculation subjects, in commerce, and in languages.
At the outbreak of war, U.B.C's Faculty of Applied Science wired Ottawa, offering its services to
the government. That this was no empty promise is
shown by the accomplishments of the University's
engineers in the past two and a half years.
In the fall of 1939, several advanced Applied Sci-
led by brilliant department heads
Dr.  J.  Allan  Harris  lectures  to  Chem.  3  class
Page Seventy-one Dean F. Clement
Agriculture heads speed research . . .
ence courses were altered. Metallurgy I was changed
to deal directly with the metallurgical aspects of
strategic minerals necessary to the prosecution ot
the war. In the Department of Mechanical and
Electrical Engineering, emphasis was placed on radio
work and short wave studies. Civil Engineering
courses now give increased instruction in the surveying and mapping necessary to armies in the field.
Water power development is also being studied in
anticipation of Canada's special industrial needs.
If the Federal government requests it, the Faculty
of Applied Science is prepared to telescope its
courses, graduating students ahead of the present
schedule. Lack of funds, meantime, need no longer
keep engineers away from college. Special bursaries
are being granted through the Wartime Bureau of
Technical Personnel, and questionnaires are being
filled out by undergraduates who desire advantageous
summer employment.
War research is constantly in progress at the University. Almost all these in the sciences are now on
subjects connected with the war's prosecution. Students passing along the third floor of the Science
Building have become familiar with the Laboratory
doors labelled "Keep Out," and "No Admittance
Except by Special Permission." Behind these doors
undergraduates, graduates, and professors are doing
A. F. Barss
Horticulture
B. Eagles
Dairying
Page Seventy-two H   M. King
Animal Husbandry
E. A. Lloyd
Poultry Husbandry
G. G. Moe
Agronomy
work which may help to win the war. Almost fifty
students who will graduate this year in Chemical
Engineering or Chemistry have applied for work with
the National Council of Research at Ottawa, and will
have positions waiting for them when they graduate.
Among the new University Extension courses given
this year is one on plastics, used in making airplane
parts, given by Dr. R. H. Clarke, head of the department of Chemistry. Professor F. A. Forward, of
mining and metallurgy, is conducting research in the
recovery of cobalt. Under the control of a special
committee composed of Dr. H. J. MacLeod, Dean
Finlayson, and Dr. G. M. Shrum, a four-months'
radio technicians' course was initiated for the R.C
A.F. Instruction is given in the detecting of attacking aircraft by means of shortwave devices.
Possibly the largest single contribution the Applied
Science faculty has made this year to the war effort
came in January. Professor J. A. Liersch, in office
only two weeks as head of the Forestry department,
was taken by the Dominion government for the work
of increasing B. C's output of Sitka spruce in the
Queen Charlotte islands.
At least 150 of U.B.C.'s graduate engineers are in
the armed forces or doing special war work. One of
the most outstanding of these is Major-General H-
Letson, until 1936 a professor in mechanical engineering. Another former M.E. professor, Captain
J. F. Bell is now with the Royal Navy. H. R.
Christie, one-time head of the Forestry department
is also among those in the services.
Many graduates are employed by the National
Council  of  Research,  while  U.B.C.   geologists  have
Professor Ralph Hull Lectures In Applied Calculus to
Engineers
to replace exhausted food supplies
Page Seventy-three Dr. D. Mawdsley
Every department co-operating too .
been instrumental in the locating of mercury and
tungsten in B. C, in the enlarging of the Cariboo's
mercury mine, and in the discovery of molybdenum
deposits.
Playing its part in educating men to aid in the
war effort is the Faculty of Agriculture. U.B.C.
graduates on Dominion Experimental Farms throughout Canada are doing research on the food production important to the nation in wartime. Canada,
replacing England's former sources of many raw materials, is faced with complicated problems of surpluses and shortages. It has the additional necessity
of producing agricultural commodities in places never
formerly considered suitable.
The Agronomy Department, under Dr. G. G. Moe,
has experimented with flax production in the Fraser
Valley. It has demonstrated that flax can be grown
here to replace, partly, the Irish and Central European
supplies cut off by the war. Also, pure seed acreage
has been expanded, that the high quality of Canada's
grains may be maintained.
After the war, trained agriculturists will be needed
to restore the country's normal economic life. With
this in view, the Faculty has already been consulted
Dr. Kaye Lamb,
Librarian
Page Seventy-four Charles B. Wood,
Registrar
. . . creates smoothly-run government
by the Government's General Advisory Committee on
Demobilization and Rehabilitation.
Individually U.B.C's Aggies are also doing their
part. Since the outbreak of the war about ten per
cent of the undergraduates and five per cent of the
graduates have joined the armed services. Included
among these is a former co-ed, Kay Milligan, now in
the W.A.A.F. Charles Hardwick, a graduate evacuated from Dunkirk, is doing technical agricultural
work in Britain.
Since the outbreak of war in the Pacific and the
fall of Singapore, special anxiety has been felt for
six of last year's students sent to Malaya to manage
rubber plantations. But it is certain that these men
—Reg Brown, Harold Poole, Stanley Weston, Eugene
Lopatecki, Bernard Rogers and Douglas Christie—
will always be worthy of the high reputation of the
University's Faculty of Agriculture.
A new appointment to the staff this year was that
of Dorothy Mawdsley, as Dean to Women to succeed Mary L. Bollert who retired last year after
twenty years of faithful service.
Taking up where her predecessor left off, Dr.
Mawdsley became the haven of refuge for many
co-eds on the campus. A gracious hostess, Dean
Mawdsley did much to ensure out-of-town girls decent
lodgings in respectable boarding houses, made them
feel at home by entertaining them at tea.
Taking a vigorous interest in the co-eds' war work,
Dean Mawdsley also expended much time in the establishing of an employment agency (Buttercup Enterprises, Inc.) to help place girls in positions during
the summer months, and to aid those who were in
need of part-time work to continue their education.
The war found yet another man prepared to meet
its many contingencies. Dr. Kaye Lamb, monarch
of the University Library,' suddenly found an increased demand for modern, up-to-the-minute texts
relating to all phases of warfare, had to revise his
book budget to meet these demands.
Also the seriousness which students pursued their
studies increased the housing problem within the
cramped Library quarters, required much dexterity
on the part of Dr. Lamb and his staff to cope with
this difficulty.
Page Seventy-five Department of Agricultural
Economics
F. M. CLEMENT, B.S.A'., M.A.
Department of Agronomy
G. G. MOE, B.S.A., M.Sc, Ph.D.
D. G. LAIRD, B.S.A., M.S., Ph. D.
VERNON C. BRINK, M.S.A.
Department of Animal Husbandry
H. M. KING, B.S.A., M.S.
STANLEY N. WOOD, B.S.A., D.V.M.
J. C. BERRY, M.S.A., Ph.D.
Department  of Bacteriology and
Preventive Medicine
C. E. DOLMAN, M.R.C.S., M.B., B.S,
M.R.C.P., D.P.H., Ph.D.
D. C. B. DUFF, M.A., Ph.D.
LAWRENCE E. RANTA, M.D., D.P.H.
D. GORDON MATHIAS, B.A.
Department of Biology and Botany
ANDREW   H.   HUTCHINSON,   M.A.,
Ph.D., F.R.S.C.
FRANK DICKSON, B.A., Ph.D.
JOHN DAVIDSON, F.L.S., F.B.S.E.
JOHN    ALLARDYCE,    M.A.,    Ph.D.,
F.A.A.A.S.
E. MIRIAM ASHTON, B.Sc, M.A.
Department  of  Chemistry
ROBERT   H.   CLARK,   M.A.,   Ph.D.,
F.R.S.C.
E.    H.    ARCHIBALD,    B.Sc,    A.M.,
Ph.D., F.R.S.E. & C.
W.   F.   SEYER,   B.A.,   M.Sc,   Ph.D...
M.A.,I.Ch.E.
M. J. MARSHALL, M.Sc, Ph.D.
WILLIAM     URE,     M.A.Sc,     Ph.D.,
F A A A S
J. ALLEN HARRIS, M.A., Ph.D.
Department of Civil Engineering
JOHN N. FINLAYSON, M.Sc, Ll.D.,
M.E.I.C., M.Am.Soc.C.E.
ALLAN H. FINLAY, B.A.Sc, M.S. in
C V
A. LIGHTHALL, B.Sc.
J. FRED MUIR, B.Sc
EDWARD    S.    PRETIOUS,    B.A.Sc,
M.Sc
ARCHIE    PEEBLES,    B.A.Sc,    B.A.,
M.Sc
ALEXANDER   HRENNIKOFF,   M.A.
Sc, ScD.
J. B. ALEXANDER, M.Sc
Department of Classics
0. J. TODD, Ph.D.
LOUIS A. MacKAY, M.A., B.A.
PATRICK GUTHRIE, B.A., M.A.
GEOFFREY RIDDEHOUGH, M.A.
JEAN M. AULD, B.A., M.A.
Department of Commerce
ELLIS H. MORROW, B.A., M.B.A.
ARCHIBALD CURRIE, B.A., B. Com.,
M.B.A., Dr. Com. Sc.
FREDERICK FIELD, C.A.
REGINALD TUPPER, Ll.B.
Department of Education
GEORGE    M.    WEIR,    B.A.,    M.A.,
D.Paed.
MAXWELL CAMERON, M.A., Ph.D.
D. H. RUSSELL, B.Sc, M.Ed., Ph.D.
FREDERICK   TYLER,    B.Sc,   M.A.,
B.Ed., Ph.D.
Department of Dairying
BLYTHE EAGLES, B.A., Ph.D.
LOIS CAMPBELL, B.S.A.
Department of Economics, Political
Science, and Sociology
HENRY   F.    ANGUS,    B.A.,   B.C.L.,
M.A., F.R.S.C.
G. F. DRUMMOND, M.A., M.Sc
C. W. TOPPING, B.A., S.T.D., A.M.,
Ph.D.
JOSEPH   A.   CRUMB,   B.B.A.,   M.S.,
Ph.D.
Department of English
G. G. SEDGEWICK, B.A., Ph.D.
W. L. MacDONALD, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
FREDERICK WOOD, B.A., A.M.
THORLIEF    LARSON,    M.A.,    B.A.,
HUNTER'LEWIS, M.A.
DOROTHY BLAKEY, M.A., Ph.D.
EDMUND   MORRISON,   B.A.,   A.M.,
Ph.D.
F. E. L. PRIESTLEY, M.A., Ph.D.
DOROTHY MAWDSLEY, B.A., M.A.,
Ph.D.
JOHN H. CREIGHTON, M.A.
RODNEY POISSON, M.A.
Department of Forestry
J. E. LIERSCH, B.A., B.A.Sc, M.F.
B. G. GRIFFITH, M.A., M.F., Ph.D.
THOMAS G. WRIGHT, B.F., M.F.
R. M. BROWN, B.ScF.
J. H. JENKINS, B.A.Sc
L. B. DIXON
WILLIAM BYERS
Department  of  Geology and
Geography
M.    Y.    WILLIAMS,    B.Sc,    Ph.D.,
F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C.
C. 0.   SWANSON,   M.A.Sc,   Ph.D.,
F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C.
H. C. GUNNING, B.A.Sc, M.S., Ph.D.,
F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C.
H. V WARREN, B.A., B.A.Sc, B.Sc,
D.Phil., F.G.S.A.
GORDON  DAVIS,  B.A.,  M.A.,  Ph.D.
Department of History
W.    N.    SAGE,    B.A.,    M.A.,    Ph.D.,
F.R.Hist.S., F.R.S.C.
F. H.  SOWARD, B.A., B.Litt.
A. C. COOKE, B.A., M.A.
SYLVIA THRUPP, M.A., Ph.D., F.R.
Hist. S.
Department of Mathematics
DANIEL   BUCHANAN,   M.A.,   Ph.D.,
11 n   v r s c
F. S. NOWLAN,' B.A., A.M., Ph.D.
RALPH HULL, M.A., Ph.D.
L. RICHARDSON, B.Sc
WALTER H. GAGE, M.A.
MAY L. BARCLAY, M.A.
S. A. JENNINGS, M.A., Ph.D.
Department of Mechanical and
Electrical Engineering
HECTOR J.  MacLEOD, B.Sc, M.Sc,
A.M., Ph.D., M.A.I.E.E, M.E.I.C.
F. W.  VERNON, B.ScEng., Wh.Sch.,
A.M.I.M.E., A.F.R.A.S.
S. C. MORGAN, B.Sc, M.Sc, M.S.M.
A.I.E.E.
W.  B.  COULTHARD,  B.  Sc,  M.A.I.
E.E., A.I.M.E.E.
W.   O.   RICHMOND,   B.A.Sc,   M.S.,
A.S.M.E.
H. M. McILROY, M.Sc.
D. W. THOMSON, B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc.
Department of Horticulture
A. F. BARSS, A.B., B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
G. H. HARRIS, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D
FRANK E. BUCK, B.S.A.
Department   of  Mining   and
Metallurgy
J. M. TURNBULL, B.A.Sc.
GEORGE GILLIES, M.Sc.
FRANK FORWARD, B.A.Sc
Department of Modern
Languages
DAVID  0.   EVANS,  M.A.,  Ph.D.,  D.
Lett.
A. F. B. CLARK, B.A., Ph.D.
ISABEL MacINNES, M.A., Ph.D.
JANET T. GRIEG, B.A., M.A.
DOROTHY DALLAS, M.A., D. Lett.
JOYCE HALLAMORE, M.A., Ph.D.
RONALD HILTON, M.A.
C. E. BORDEN, M.A., Ph.D.
MADAME Y. DARLINGTON
Department of Nursing and
Health
CE. DOLMAN, M.R.C.S., M.B., B.S.,
M.R.C.P., D.P.H., Ph.D.
MABEL F. GRAY, R.N., Cert.P.H.N.
MARGARET KERR, R.N., B.A.Sc,
M.A.
GERALDINE HOMFRAY, R.N., B.A.
Sc, M.A.
Department of Philosophy and
Psychology
JOHN ALLEN IRVING, M.A.
T. G. HENDERSON, M.A., Ph.D.
J. E. MORSH, B.A., Ph.D.
FREDERICK   TYLER,   B.Sc,   M.A.,
B.Ed., Ph.D.
ALEXANDER MASLOW, A.B., A.M.,
Ph.D.
Department of Physics
GORDON  M.   SHRUM.   M.A.,  Ph.D.,
F1 R S C
A. E. HENNINGS, M.A., Ph.D.
A. M. CROOKER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
HAROLD SMITH, M.A., Ph.D.
KENNETH MANN, B.A., Ph.D.
G. M. VOLKOFF, M.A., Ph.D.
J. M. KELLER, B.Sc, Ph.D.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
E. A. LLOYD, B.S.A., M.S.A.
JACOB BIELY, M.S.A., M.S.
Department  of Zoology
W.  A.  CLEMENS, M.A., Ph.D., F.R.
S.C.
G. J. SPENCER, B.S.A., M.S.
IAN McT. COWAN, B.A., Ph.D.
Department   of   University
Extension
GORDON  M.  SHRUM, M.A.,  Ph.D.,
ROBERT T. McKENZIE, B.A.
DOROTHY SOMERSET, A.B.
LEONARD CHATWIN
University Health Service
STEWART MURRAY, M.D., D.P.H.
J. S. KITCHING, B.A., M.D., D.P.H.
C. H. GUNDRAY, M.D.
G. T. CUNNINGHAM
MURIEL UPSHALL, R.N., B.A.Sc.
Physical Education
GERTRUDE MOORE
MAURICE VAN VLIET, M.S.
Page Seventy-six . . . By, of, for, the people
Page Seventy-seven Student President, W. Edward McBride
Democratic principles hold sway .
Nothing is more important in a Canadian university than that the spirit of free and democratic
government should flourish, and receive from everybody the fullest of support.
It is a tribute both to the students and to their
government that during the term 1941-42, these ideals
of governing were efficiently translated into action.
During the many years that a system of student
government has existed at the University of British
Columbia, many have been the controversies raised
in the attempts to correlate the scope of control of
student over student, with administration over student.
At times, these controversies have resulted in open
breaks, which time and much discussion could only
mend. This year, however, was a perfect example of
how two administrative bodies, one formed of under-
Treasurer, R. Keith Porter
Secretary, Mary-Frank Atkin
Page Seventy-eight Democracy in Action: Backman Argues Point Against Councillors Who Sit Listening
in student government of U.B.C.
graduates elected by their fellow students, another of
local citizens, chosen by the provincial parliament,
could operate smoothly, and without opposition.
In 1941-42, the Khaki Session of U.B.C, students
bent every effort to the fight against aggression.
Nowhere was this more apparent than in the operating of the various organizations set up to give
students a measure of autonomous government.
It was to be found in the actions of the Students'
Council, which is the highest student organization on
the campus. Composed of nine undergraduates elected
to office the previous Spring, it is the duty of Students' Council to control all campus undergraduate
activity.
It is in this  Council that the highest democratic
principles of government are found to be present.
All the duties which traditionally belong to Council
have been assumed and accomplished with great dispatch. What is more important, though, is that, this
year, Council has taken on so much additional work
as to double the demand on their spare time.
Chief task of these nine student-politicos was the
correlation of the student war effort. The organization necessary for carrying out a concerted drive to
raise money for war charities, which had been lacking in previous years, was formulated in the shape of
the War Aid Council.
The need for a wider scope in the presenting of
pass fund features was recognized this year by Students'   Council  who   immediately   formed   a   Special
Lois Nicholson,  W.U.S.; Charles Nash, M.U.S.; Bob Morris,  L.S.E.;   Mack Buck,  Jr.  Member;  Evann Davies, M.A.A.  Jean
Eckardt,  W.A.A.
Page Seventy-nine MEN'S  UNDERGRAD:   Al  Farrow,  Charlie Nash,  Chuck  McNeely,  Rod  Morris
Nine councillors head executive . . .
Events Committee, the purpose of which was to keep
a' look-out for prominent artists visiting Vancouver,
and attempt to secure them for presentation on the
campus.
A drive, sponsored by the Junior Board of Trade,
to get blood donations met with the full support of
the Council, who put machinery into operation to
secure a campus-wide support of the scheme.
Again, this year, a special Alma Mater Society
meeting was called early in the term, at which the
councillors explaining the need of the Canadian Red
Cross for any and all contributions, urged the students to waive their returnable caution money,
donate it to the Red Cross fund.
Students were unanimous in their support of the
plan, and for weeks Council was busy sorting out the
signed waiver forms.
When it became apparent that some male students
on the campus were desirous of having an Air Training Scheme course given at U.B.C, Students' Council
did  much  invaluable  work  in  helping  with the  ar-
WOMEN'S  UNDERGRAD:   Amy Hackney, Marion Murphy, Mary Phillips, Lois
Nicholson, Mary Mulvin, Pat MacKenzie
Page Eighty President of Students' Council, Edward "Ted"
McBride proved to be invaluable in maintaining the
high standards of undergraduate government, took
courses in summer school in order to have more time
to devote to duty. McBride was, in part, responsible
for winning the support of President Klinck in allowing the formation of a Canadian football team.
The task of handling the intricacies of student
budgets was capably handled by treasurer, Keith Porter.    Porter, who found time to get his commission
IfiL. lililil Mill!
Pat MacKenzie, Lois Nicholson, Dean Dorothy Mawdsley and Marion Murphy  at W.U.S. Tea.
. . . are aided by specialized bodies
To students at Mount Allison University, situated
in New Brunswick, the Council sent $100.00, proceeds from a basketball game, to help in the rehabilitation of students at that college who had lost personal effects in a dormatory fire.
The Mile of Pennies Drive and the Victory Bond
campaign were two other Council activities which
aided the students' war aid fund. Over $500.00 was
raised to buy milk for Britain's babies in the former
campaign, while the latter made possible the purchase
of six $50.00 Victory bonds.
Another Victory bond was accepted from the B. C.
Rugby Union as payment for an outstanding debt
owing to the Alma Mater Society for some years.
An advisory council was formed to consist of the
president and treasurer of Students' Council, five
past presidents of the Council, and the A.M.S. accountant to consider matters of an advisory capacity.
Continuity on Council was obtained by advancing
the election date for president and treasurer, and
allowing them to attend several meetings at the end
of the year.
Indicative of the skill of this year's Council was
the smooth way in which the Alma Mater Society
functioned. The A.M.S office, which was the focus
of a great student controversy last year, secured,
once again, the services of Southerland Horn as
accountant, and, although losing Hilda Fox, were fortunate in having Tess Rader and Betty Clugston to
augment Horn in handling the complexity of student
business. Portrait of Former Dean of Women, Mary Bollert, Dedicated
Page Eighty-one DISCIPLINE  COMMITTEE:  Al  Farrow, Lois Nicholson,  Charlie Nash,  Rod Morris,
Chuck McNeely
as second lieutenant in the Army Service Corps,
advanced many important changes in bookkeeping,
efficiently curbed student spending urges.
Mary-Frank Atkin, glamorous secretary, found herself appointed to more committees than she could
remember, spent much time writing minutes, determining which ones should be read, and where.
Bob Morris did more than just act in advisory
capacity to the fifty campus clubs, in his position of
president  of the  Literary  and  Scientific  Executive.
Taking active part in several himself, Morris was a
member of the victorious McGoun Cup debating
team.
One of the two Applied Science students on Council this year, and serving his second term in executive office, was Charlie Nash, president of the Men's
Undergraduate Society, who acted as over-seer to all
the faculty executives, to the freshman initiation program, and to elections.
His countrepart among the women was Lois Nichol-
ARTS MEN'S UNDERGRAD: Chuck McNeely, Doug. Hume, John Carson
Page Eighty-two SCIENCE MEN'S UNDERGRAD: Rod Morris, Sandy Buckland, Bunny Graham, Campbell Williams, Al Narod
. . . that administer political needs
son, calm, staid president of the Women's Undergraduate Society who revitalized the women's war
work program, raised interest of co-eds to fever pitch.
Success of Miss Nicholson's plans are only partly told
by the fact that this year, Self-denial days raised
more than twice the sum raised the year before.
The athletic front came under the control of Evan
Davies and Jean Eckardt. Although drastically curtailed by the press of military duties, the athletic
program was run off with much success this year.
Red-headed Davies teamed up with President McBride
in the fight for Canadian football. Miss Eckardt, a
championship badminton and tennis star, established
some form of record by furiously knitting on the
same sweater at all Council meetings, becomes star
seconder-of-motions, pursued a vigorous intra-mural
program.
The other representative of Applied  Science  was'
Mack Buck, acting in the capacity of Junior Member.
Buck's main duties had to do with making all the
arrangements for the Homecoming celebrations.
Non-voting member of Students' Council, but a
power in his own right was one Archibald T. Paton,
editor of the campus newspaper. The power of the
press, in the person of Paton, was a silent guest at
every meeting.
This was Students' Council in 1941-42.
If   Council   was   the   motor   that   supplied   power
to the student political machinery, then the next two
important cogs were the Men's and Women's Undergraduate Societies—M.U.S. and W.U.S.
Under the guidance of its president, Charlie Nash,
and his committee composed of representatives from
the three faculties, Chuck McNeely (Arts), Rod
Morris (Applied Science), and Al Farrow (Agriculture), M.U.S. performed a vital function in the government of 2,650 students.
No soner had M.U.S. laid plans for welcoming this
year's bumper crop of freshmen than they heard
University President, L. S. Klinck, decry the "inanity"
of freshman ritual. A little dismayed by the President's attack in view of the fact that they had greatly
modified the program, Nash & Co. nevertheless put
on a good face, went out to welcome the frosh.
In the Spring, with the entire campus agog over
forthcoming elections, M.U.S. had to handle all the
details in the electioneering program. Charlie Nash
acted as chairman at the numerous campaign
speeches, he and his troupe surveying all arrangements, measuring posters for size, patrolling voting
booths.
The war moved in on the program of the Women's
Page Eighty-three of Arts, Aggie, Science, and Nurses.. .
Undergraduate Society this year, and, in fact, almost
took it over completely. Headed by Lois Nicholson,
the co-eds plunged headlong into a full year of
women's war work, proved to be of great service to
the War Aid Council.
Self-denial days, started last year, became whopping successes this year, as each Wednesday co-eds
stationed themselves at strategic spots, coerced students to sacrifice luxuries. In this way, over $700.00
was raised.
A war work committee was formed, chairmanned by
Brenda Phillips, and composed of Bunny Arm, Amy
Hackney, Jean Clugston, Dorothy Hird, and Jane
Cox to correlate the work done in the Red Cross
Room, situated in Brock Hall.
Here, gloves, socks, caps and sweaters for the
armed forces were knit, skirts, nightgowns, diapers,
and kit bags for refugees sewn. Machines hummed,
needles clicked as the co-eds worked for the Canadian
Red Cross.
Freshettes are taken in tow by W.U.S. members in
September, each one having a "Big Sister" whose job
it is to acquaint the Little Sister with the rules and
regulations of the University.
Heading the successful W..U-S. executive this year
was Lois Nicholson, who operated the extensive program with the aid of: Honourary President, Dean
Dorothy Mawdsley; Vice-President, Pat Mackenzie;
Secretary, Amy Hackney; Treasurer, Marion Murphy;
War Work Chairman, Brenda Phillips; Phrateres
Representative, Mary Mulvin.
Also important cogs in the machinery of student
government are the four undergraduate societies
whose task it is to deal with faculty affairs, not
handled by M.U.S. and W.U.S.
The Artsmen's Undergraduate Society (A.M.U.S.)
carried on their program of re-vitalization started
last year, staged another set of popular Saturday
night mixer dances, with informality the key note.
These mixers helped the war aid drive by collecting
money for the Victory Bond drive, and for the I.S.S.
Week.
The executive for A.M.U.S. this year consisted of:
President, Chuck McNeely; Secretary, Doug Hume;
Treasurer, John Carson.
Long the fountain-head of "spirit" is the Science-
men's Undergraduate Society (S.M.U.S.) who allegedly attempt to curb the effervescence of engineers,
by organizing their extra-curricular affairs.
Although the press of their heavy timetables forced
them to ask for military lectures at noon-hour, the
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRAD: Al Farrow, Ian McSwan,  Lorraine  Thompson, Jack Merry field, Sandy Hay
Page Eighty-four NURSES' UNDERGRAD: Mona Macdonald, Margaret Campbell, Margaret Duncan
S.M.U.S. was still able to keep alive the tradition of
pep mets, at which were featured the usual Science
songs and humour.
Close to 400 red-shirted engineers crowded the
Commodore one night in the Fall for the annual
Science banquet ,and to hear Prof. F. H. Soward
lecture on the "Evolution of the Soviet Foreign
Policy." (Whatever Mr. Soward's influence was on
S.M.U.S. is not apparent—suffice to say that "Russia"
was later chosen as the theme for the Science Ball.)
The executive of S.M.U.S. this year consisted of:
Honourary President, Prof. H. M. Mcllroy; President, Rod Morris; Vice-President, Campbell Williams;
Secretary, Sandy Buckland; Treasurer, Bunny Graham; Athletic Representative, Al Narod.
The fastest growing faculty on the campus—Agriculture had its undergraduate society, too, the A.U.S.
This year, with spirit running high, the Aggies took
over the brunt of the labour involved in staging the
annual Arts-Aggie Ball, made it a whacking success.
Somewhat dismayed at the lack of interest shown
by Arts students, the A.U.S. held a hasty conference,
decided to attempt a liaison with Science.
The result was an hilarious Aggie-Science mixer in
Brock Hall.
The executive of A.U.S. this year consisted of:
President, Al Farrow; Vice-President, Ian McSwan;
Secretary, Lorraine Thompson; Treasurer, Jack Mer-
ryfield; Athletic Representative, Sandy Hay.
With war casualties becoming heavier as the days
progress, the need for trained nurses has been brought
home to a complacent public, and, although Nursing
is not a separate faculty at the University of B. C,
the importance of those students studying for their
degree as nurses has doubled.
The aim of the Nurse's Undergraduate Society
(N.U.S.) is to promote a comradely spirit among
the co-eds, and to offer some means of relaxation
that won't encroach upon their studies.
Teas and firesides are given, and, in the Spring,
the Nurse's Ball is staged by N.U.S. officials. This
year, a donation of $20.00 was turned over to the
British Nurses' Relief Fund, proceeds from a corsage sale.
The executive of N.U.S. this year consisted of:
President, Mona Macdonald; Vice-President, Margaret Campbell; Secretary, Norah Rendell; Social
Convenor, Michiyo Uyeda; Treasurer, Margaret Duncan.
Naturally, where there is government there must
also be law. It is a tribute to the students of U.B.C.
that the Law—the Discipline Committee—is hardly
known, has little to do. Student leaders act on the
committee as voluntary policemen--their verdicts are
just as voluntarily accepted by violators. This year,
the committee, composed of Charlie Nash, Lois
Nicholson, Chuck McNeely, Al Farrow, and Rod
Morris, did little more than check up on campus
"litter-bugs."
At no time was there any need for strict action.
. . . all groups functioning smoothly
Page Eighty-five   Arts '42
Four years ago they wore green dunce caps.
Today, three times smaller, Arts '42 wears the cap
and gown of graduation.
That interval of four years has seen many changes,
many startling events. Four years ago, there was no
war, and Arts '42 was the freshman class, dunce-
capped, splashed in the lily pond, victorious over the
sophomores at the last Bonfire.
They filed into their first Alma Mater Society
meeting, during those early days on the campus, and
voted an additional three dollars to the A.M.S. fee.
Eighteen months later, they moved into the sumptuous
setting of Brock Hall, constructed in part by the
money they had voted to contribute.
In 1939, they were sophomores, and Canada was
at war. That meant that responsibility for curbing
much inane ritual connected with freshman week fell
upon Arts '42.
This year, as seniors, they have done notable work
in the extra-curricular field, especially with regard to
co-ordinating the campus war charities drive.
Under the capable leadership of student president
Ted  McBride,  the  senior  class has  been  the  focal
President, Gordon MacFarlane
Mary McClory, Stuart Maddin, Elizabeth Hebb, Doreen Ryan
point in the organizing of the many charity drives on
the campus. A tribute to their seriousness of intent,
their desire to pursue knowledge and aid their government in all respects, can be found in the fact, that this
year less friction resulted between student and administrative bodies than in previous years.
Now, on the threshold of graduation, the two hundred and fifty members of Arts '42 face a world at
once bewildering and complex. Trained to take their
place in the community, with the potentiality of leaders, male members of the class are faced with the
problem of the war. Are they more valuable to their
government as members of the community or as
members of the armed forces?
With the women, the problem, too, is a weighty one.
These are problems the force of which have never
before been so great upon graduating classes of
U.B.C That these students will solve them in the
best way can be assumed from their record as undergraduates.
The executive for Arts '42 this year consisted of:
Honourary President, Dr. J. A. Crumb; President,
Gordon Macfarlane; Vice-President, Doreen Ryan;
Secretary-Treasurer, Margaret McClory; Women's
Athletic Representative, Elizabeth Hebb; Men's
Athletic Representative, Stuart Maddin.
Page Eighty-eight ALEXANDER, ATHENA—Victoria
History, English; V.C.U.
ARAI, KIMIMICHI—New Westminster
Chem., Physics; Japanese Students'
ARMSTRONG, JOHN J.—Victoria
Honours in Chemistry; Chemistry Club
ASKEW, WILLIAM E.—Moose Jaw, Sask.
History, English; Letters Club;
Badminton, Tennis, Track
AUGUSTINE, KATHLEEN   New Westminster
Hist., Eng.; Musical Society; Delta Gamma
BELL, GORDON D. -Vancouver
Physics, Maths.
BISHIP, GEORGE D.— Victoria
Hist., Political Sc.  (Honours) ;  S.C.M., C.S.A.
BONNER, ROBERT W.—Vancouver
Honours, Political Science; fcorum;  Delta Upsilon
BROWN, ELLEN L. -Vancouver
BROWN, IRENE R.—Vancouver
English, French, History
BROWNING, GEORGE V.—Duncan
Honours, Chemistry; Phi Kappa Pi
BULGIN, MARY MINTA— Vancouver
French, German; La Canadienne;
Alpha Omicron Pi
BURNEY, JEAN E.—New Westminster
English, History; Alpha Gamma Delta
CALVER, WILLIAM IL—Salmon Arm
Chem., Math.; Badminton
CAMPBELL, MARY-£6ui-7ie
History, Economics
CARLSEN, ALFRED E.— Vancouver
Phil., Economics;  S.C.M.;  Pari. Forum
CARTER, EILEEN V.—Vancouver
Bacteriology; Kappa Kappa Gamma
CAVERS, JAMES K.—West Vancouver
Chemistry, Mathematics
CAWLEY, SHEILA F.—Victoria
Honours, Latin, French; Cercle Francais, Phrateres
CICCONE, LEO D.- Vancouver
History   (Honours) ;   Hist.  Society,  I.R.C.
CLARK, ROBERT M.—Vancouver
Econ.; Letters Club, Pari. Forum, S.P.C.
CLARKE, CHUMMER B.—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma
CLERY, PATRICK M.   Parksville
Hist. (Honours); Hist. Society, Alpha Delta Phi
CLEVELAND, EDWARD M.—Vancouver
Economics;  Newman Club
COLEMAN, WILLIAM A.—Vancouver
History (Honours) ; Hist. Society, I.R.C.
COLLINS, THOMAS L.— Vancouver
Math., Physics (Honours) ; Players Club, Physics Club
CORBOULD, BETTY H.— W. Kamloops, B.C.
French  (Honours) ; French Club,
Cercle Francais, Public Speaking, Badminton
CULL, RITA J.— Victoria
Biology,  Chemistry
Co-eds take time off in Caf for lunch
Arts '42
Page Eighty-nine CUNNINGHAM, MARGARET-Vancouver
Bacteriology, Biology; Delta Gamma
DARLING, DENISE—Vancouver
Econ., Government;  Players Club, Golf, Delta Gamma
DeBECK, NEDRA M.— Victoria
Psychology, Sociology;  Outdoor Club, Golf
DONNELLY, CHARLES W.—Vancouver
Zoology, Chem.; Newman Club, Monro
DUNCAN, DONALD G.-Vancouver
Math;  (Honours); Math.; Players, Musical Society,
Basketball, Kappa Sigma
ECKARDT, JEAN—Vancouver
Math., Eng; W.A.A., Alpha Gamma Delta
EDMONDS, DAVID F.—Vancouver
Chem., Bac;  Chem. Society, Badminton
ELLIS, DOROTHY I.—Vancouver
French, Math.; Phrateres, Cercle Francais
ELLIS, PHYLLIS B.—Vancouver
English; Alpha Gamma Delta
EVANS, HARRY M. -Duncan
Math., Physics  (Honours) ; Math.; Physics
EWING, MARGARET    Vancouver
English; Kappa Kappa Gamma
FIERHELLER, GORDON M.—Vancouver
Bac. and Pre-Med.  (Honours) ; Mus. Soc.
FINCH, MARGUERITE L.—Penticton
English, French; Alpha Delta Pi
FINLAYSON, ANNA-RUTH -Vancouver
Psych., Soc; Psych. Club, Badminton, Gamma Phi Beta
FISHER, HAROLD E.—Prince Rupert
l'LEMING, KELVIN 0.—Vancouver
Chem., Zoology; Rugby, Beta Theta Pi
FORD, ROBERT W.—Victoria
French, English; Golf, Ice Hockey
FOSTER, RAYMOND E.—Vancouver
Botany; Pres. Film Society, Badminton
FOTHERGILL, AMY H.    Vancouver
French Honours; La Canadienne
FOWLE, CHARLES D.—Vernon
Honours Zoology; Biol. Discussions
FOWLER, FRANCES—New Westminster
Econ., Eng.; Golf, Badminton, Delta Gamma
GALE, ROBERT A.—Victoria
Chemistry Honours
GALLOWAY, JOHN G.—Duncan
Economics
GARDINER, WILLIAM  M.-Vancouver
Econ.; Canadian Football, Alpha Delta Phi
CEORGE, MARGARET S.—Agassiz
GOLDMAN, FLORENCE R.—Edmonton, Alta.
Psychology; Menorah
GRAHAM, AILEEN  F.—Victoria
Bac;   Outdoor Club,  Golf
GRAY, ANNE—Vancouver
English, French
Arts '42
The best part of Army camp life—rest period
Page Ninety GROSS, EDWARD—Vancouver
Psych., Phil.; Menorah, Psych.; Kappa Theta Rho
GUNN, J. STRUTHERS— Vancouver
Zoology, Monro
HACKNEY, AMY L.—Rossland
Eng., Math.; Phrateres, Alpha Delta Pi
HAGGART, MARGARET M.—Vancouver
Eng., Hist.; Letters Club, Musical Society
HAMILTON, DOROTHY H.—Vancouver
English, Philosophy, Psycho^gy
HAMMOND, GWENDOLIN M.—Vancouver
Soc, Psych.; Phrateres, Psych.; Musical Society
HARRY, KENNETH F.- Port Hammond
Chemistry, Physics
HEBB, ELIZABETH K.— Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma
HENDERSON, DOREEN— Vancouver
Psychology;  Musical Society, Phrateres, Psych.
HEWETT, MARGARET H.— Victoria
History, English
HILL, CHARLES J.—Mission City
HILL-TOUT, EDWARD A.—Victoria
HIRD, DOROTHY M.—Vancouver
Bac, Zoology;  Gamma Phi Beta
HOGGAN, ISABEL— Vancouver
English, History;  Phrateres
HOLMES, GWENDOLYN A.—Vancouver
English, French; French Club
HOOD, JAMES A.—Vancouver
French Honours; Phi Kappa Pi
HOWIESON, MARGARET—For* George
Psych., French; Cercle Francais
JOHNSTON, SHIRLEY K.—Vancouver
Eng. Honours;  Letters, Historical, I.R.C.
JOINER, WILLIAM M.- Vancouver
JONES, AUDREY—New Westminster
Psych., Eng.; Badminton;
Gamma Phi Beta
KIDD, JAMES M.—Vancouver
Zoology; Monro; Grass Hockey
KLOEPFER, JACQUELINE— Vancouver
Eng., History; Players, I.R.C; Newman;  Coif;
Kappa Kappa Gamma
LARSEN, ANTHON A.—Cloverdale
Zoology, Chemistry
LENNIE, DORIS C— Vancouver
Eng., French;  Cercle Francais;
Alpha Gamma Delta
LENNIE, MARGARET L.— Vancouver
Psych., Soc; Psych. Club; Alpha Gamma Delta
LESHGOLD, DOROTHY E.—Vancouver
Phi Sigma Sigma
LISTER, MARY E.—Vancouver
MADDIN, W. STUART— Vancouver
Zoology, Botany; Track; Phi Delta Theta
Arts '42
Student-soldiers get instruction in Bren gun firing
Page Ninety-one MARGESON, JOHN M.—Trail
Honours Classics, Eng.;
Letters Club, V.C.U.; Publications; Zeta Psi
MARTINOFF, IVAN—Steveston
Bac, Psych.; Monro, Chem. Qub
MATHESON, CLAUDIA—Vancouver
Eng., Econ., Soc; Alpha Gamma Delta
MATTHEW,  BEVERLEY R.—Vancouver
Eng., Psych.; Alpha Gamma Delta
MAYNE, THOMAS W.—Victoria
History, English;  Players Club
MEREDITH, OLIVE M.—Vancouver
English, History;   S.P.C., I.R.C.
MORRIS, JOAN I. -North Vancouver
Eng., French;  Badminton;  Alpha Gamma Delta
MORRIS, ROBERT J. -Nelson
Honours   History;   Rowing,   S.C.M.   Pari.
Forum, Ubyssey;  Beta Theta Pi
MORTON, BETTY H.   Wen; Westminster
Bio., Zoology Honours; Monro, Phrateres
MUNRO, ELSPETH -Vancouver
Hist. Honours;  Hist. Society, S.P.C., Forum
MURDOCH, AGNES J.—Vancouver
Eng., Hist.; Tennis, Alpha Gamma Delta
MURPHY, MARION E.—Vancouver
Psych.,  Soc;   Newman, Golf, Badminton;
Gamma Phi Beta
McCarthy, m. Frances—Campbell River
Zoology, Alpha Gamma Delta
McCLORY, MARGARET I.—New Westminster
Eng., French;  Letters, French; Alpha Gamma Delta
McCORKELL, BEVERLY G.—Vancouver
Math., Eng.; Kappa Alpha Theta
McDIARMID, BETTY M.—Vancouver
Hist., Eng.; Delta Gamma
McDONELL, DOROTHY M.—Vancouver
Ger., French, Eng.;  Psychology, Cercle Francais
McEACHERN, FLORENCE— Vancouver
Math., Eng.;  Phrateres, Outdoor Club;   Alpha  Phi
McGHEE, WILLIAM P.—Port Alice
Botany; Forestry Club, Football; Beta Theta Pi
MacKAY,  SHEILA  T.    Peachland
Eng., Hist.; Letters, I.R.C, Radio
McKENZIE, GEORGE J.—Vancouver
Zoology
McKENZIE, Lloyd G.—Victoria
Eng., Phil.  (Honours);  Letters Club; Zeta Psi
MacKENZIE, RODERICK  D.-Vancouver
History, English
McKINLAY, JOHN A.—Vancouver
Geo.,  Hist.;   Ubyssey;   Phi  Delta Theta
McLAGAN, MURIEL G.—Vancouver
Psych., English; Alpha Delta Pi
MACLEAN, CHARLES A.—Vancouver
Zoology, Chem.; Alpha Delta Phi
McLEOD, R. RAYMOND—Rossland
Math., Physics, Honours;
Cosmopolitan, Physics, Maths.;   Badminton
McLORG, MARY A. - Vancouver
Players Club, Radio Soc;Kappa Kappa Gamma
Arts '42
Women, too, do war work: here, they sew for refugees
Page Ninety-two McMILLAN, JACK L.— Vancouver
Hist., English; I.R.C. Ubyssey, Letters
McNEELY, CHARLES ].—Vancouver
Eng., Econ.; Rowing, Skiing
NASH, MARYGOLD—Lynn Valley
NICHOLS, DAVID R.—Vancouver
Econ.;  Canadian Football;  Psi  Upsilon
NICHOLSON, LOIS A.—Hollyburn
History  (Honours); W.U.S.; Kappa Alpha Theta
NISSEN, HANSI— Vancouver
French; La Canadienne
NOGUCHI, KIICHI— Vancouver
Zoology;  Monro; Japanese Students'
OASTLER, JOHN W.—Vancouver
French  (Honours) ; French; Musical Soc
PATON, ARCHIBALD T.— Vancouver
Hist., Eng.; Publications; Phi Delta Theta
PHILIPS, MARY E.— Vancouver
Eng., Hist.; Psych. Club; Alpha Delta Pi
PROUD, M. GERALDINE—Beaver Lodge, Alta.
Econ., Psych.; Alpha Omicron Pi
RALSTON, KEITH-Victoria
History; S.P.C, Historical
RITCHIE, DAVID M.- Vancouver
Economics;  Phi Delta Theta
RIVERS, DAVID E.—Vancouver
English  (Honours)
ROBINSON, DORAMAY—New  Westminster
Latin, History;  Musical Society
ROBINSON, MARIAN -Esquimalt
Chemistry
ROSS, R. GORDON- Nanaimo
Economics   (Honours)
ROWELL, FLORENCE V.-   Vancouver
English, French; Phrateres, French;  Basketball
RUARDI-WICHERS, MARIA W.—Vancouver
Mod. Lang., English; La Canadienne
RUSHWORTH, EILEEN—Calgary, Alta.
Bac; Basketball, Badminton, Delta Gamma
RYAN, DOREEN E.—Vancouver
History, English; Kappa Kappa Gamma
SHAW, DOROTHY A.—Victoria
Chem.,  Zoology;   Phrateres,  Monro;   Golf
SHEELEY, RALPH G, -Mission City
History, English
SHIMO-TAKAHARA,   KATHERINE   S.— Vancouver
Zoology
SHINOBU, ROY— Vancouver
Chemistry; Monro
SHORTREED, GRACE—Burnaby
French  (Honours) ;  S.C.M.
SILLERS, JEAN E. M.—Stowlea, Sask.
Eng., Hist.; Hist. Society
SINCLAIR, LISTER S. -Vancouver
Math., (Honours) ; Math., Letters, Players
SKELHORNE, GORDON P. -Vancouver
Psychology
SKINNER, LOUISE— Vancouver
Econ., English; Kappa Alpha Theta
SLEATH, G. EDWARD- New Westminster
Biology  (Honours) ; Monro
SMITH, BARBARA -Bowen Island
Psychology;  Kappa Kappa Gamma
Arts '42
Page Ninety-three SOROCHAN, JOHN—Edmonton, Alta.
History, Philosophy;  S.C.M.
SPENCER, BARBARA E.—Lytton
Eng., Phil.; Kappa Kappa Gamma
STAMATIS, DOROTHY M.—Vancouver
Bacteriology; Gamma Phi Beta
SUGARMAN, LESTER C, -Vancouver
Zoology,  Psychology;
Players Club;  Golf;  Kappa Theta Rho
SULLIVAN, CONSTANCE M.—Victoria
History, English; Alpha Gamma Delta
SUTHERLAND, ERNEST J.— Vancouver
Chemistry   (Honours)
TAKIMOTO,  KIMIKO—Vancouver
French  (Honours) ;
Japanese Students', La Canadienne
THOMAS, GEORGE P.-Vancouver
Botany, Forestry Club;   Ski, Cricket
THOMSON, DOROTHY  -Vancouver
Latin, Math.; Phrateres
THURSTON, AUDREY E.—Chilliwack
Chem.; Phrateres; Alpha Gamma Delta
TOMKINS, DOROTHEA M.—Calgary, Alta.
Psychology; Alpha Phi
TOWNSEND, JOHN  A.—Vancouver
English, History
TWEED, LORNA G.— Vancouver
English, History; Phrateres
UNDERHILL, ANNE B.—Vancouver
Chem., Physics  (Honours)
Varsitv Band, Math., Physics
VAN OSTRAND, MORT—Palo Alta, Calif.
VENINI, MARY J.-  Vancouver
Bacteriology; Kappa Alpha Theta
VERNON, ERNEST K.- West Vancouver
English, History
WALKER, DOUGLAS L.—Vancouver
Pol. Science; Law Society;  Beta Theta Pi
WALLACE, WILLIAM S. C.—New Westminster
Physics, Math.; Big Block; Soccer
WARRACK, BERYL E.—Ladner
Chem., Zoology
WATTS, MILDRED F.—Ladner
French  (Honours) ;  Cercle Francais; Phrateres
WEBB, EVA—New Westminster
French, German; Cercle Francais; S.C.M.
WELDON, MARGARET I.—Vancouver
Psych., Econ.; Psych. Club;  Alpha Phi
WESTWOOD, MARY J.—Vancouver
Latin, French  (Honours) ;
Cercle Francais, Phrateres;  Archery
WILKIE, JACK C—Vancouver
Hist., Geog., Math.;   Swimming
WISMER, SHIRLEY— Vancouver
Psych.; Badminton;  Gamma Phi Beta
WOODCROFT, HELEN—Victoria
French, English; Kappa Kappa Gamma
WOODSIDE, LLOYD A.-  Vantouver
Zoology, Biology;  Musical Society
WORTHINGTON, ELIZABETH L.-Vancouver
Bacteriology  (Honours) ;  Gamma Phi Beta
YAMADA, PETER F.—Vancouver
Japanese Students';  Law Society;  S.C.M.;  S.P.C
Arts '42
Two pre-Med. students do complex experiment
Page Ninety-four Commerce '42 . . .
(Back)—Hall,  Susaki,  Inman,   McBride
(Front)—Mercer,  Moxon,   Hall,   Goyer,  Korsch
With a swollen enrollment that approached the 200
mark this year, Commerce students on the campus
cried: "lebensraum."
And the Commerce Club was born.
Commerce is the faculty that is not a faculty.
Three years ago, commerce was but a minor part of
the Arts and Science course given at the University.
Then, the need for re-vitalization having been seen,
the Commerce department set about to modernize
its courses, streamline its approach, concentrate on
establishing connections between students and local
business men.
The result was that interest in Commerce suddenly
sprung up, until it is now the most rapidly developing
department in the faculty.
Now, the Commerce department is rapidly assuming the importance of a faculty, is agitating to break
away from Arts, attain the autonomy of a separate
faculty.
If P'l
And if they keep progressing, there'll be no stopping them.
Paralleling academic success, the Commerce department re-organized their extra-curricular set-up this
year, doing away with "class executives" and forming a Commerce Club.
The advantage of this club was that all commerce
students could be represented, for members of the
executive were chosen from second, third, and fourth
year commerce. Under the old system, second and
third year students had no representation under Commerce, but were included in with second and third
year Arts students.
Formation of the club gave Commerce the chance
to display its spirit. Commerce men and women
blazoned forth on the campus in the new blue and
oo
Drawing up balance sheets, charting sales is no easy job.
Commerce puzzles over complexities of Comptometers
white Commerce sweaters.    Also, they had their own
distinctive class pins.
In February, the class held an informal party with
a "soft shirt and short skirt" motif at the Stanley
Park Pavilion.
Several times throughout the year, Commerce
luncheons were held to which guest speakers were
invited. As a wind-up to the year's proceedings, a
monster dinner was held in Brock Hall to which
over sixty local business men were invited.
The executive of the Commerce Club this year consisted of: Honorary President, Prof. Ellis Morrow;
President, Jack Moxon; Vice President, Bill Mercer;
Secretary, Len Korsch; Treasurer, Harry Home;
Fred Sasaki, Gertrude Goyer, Hugh Hall, Ron McBride, and Bill Inman were on the minor executive.
Page Ninety-five ADAM, JOSEPH— Vancouver
ASHWORTH, FRANCES E.—Invermere
ATKIN, MARY F.- Vancouver
Students'  Council    Delta  Gamma
BROWNELL, ROSS—Vancouver
BRYSON, GERALD S.—New Westminster
CLUGSTON, JEAN E.—Vancouver
Delta Gamma
.COX, JANE E.—Rossland
Phrateres, Commerce, Badminton
CURWEN, GUY R.—Chilliwack
Rowing Club, I.F.C.; Basketball; Beta Theta Pi
DAVIES, EVANN— Vancouver
M.A.A.; Big Block; English Rugby; Phi Kappa Pi
DAYKIN, VICTOR A.—Vancouver
EATON, ARTHUR R.    Vancouver
Publications, Badminton
ELLIS, ROBERT L.—Vancouver
FOUKS, ARTHUR—Vancouver
Musical Society, Pari. Forum, Law Society
FOURNIER, LIONEL J.—Pincher Creek, Alta.
Big Block, Newman; Can. Football, Track; Psi Upsilon
GULICK, MARGARET S.—Calgary, Alta.
Delta Gamma
HALL, ORMONDE J.- Vancouver
Golf, Track, Rugby; Phi Gamma Delta
HARPER, DAVID A. -Victoria
HORNE, HARRY J.—New Westminster
Big Block, Newman; Hockey
HUGHES, P. ELIZABETH—Penticton
Newman, V.O.C;  Phrateres
JEFFRIES, JAMES G.—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Pi
KORSCH, LEONARD S.—Vancouver
Menorah, Forum, Orchestra; Badminton; Kappa Theta Rlio
LYLE, DONALD F.    Vancouver
Delta Upsilon
MALONEY, DOUGLAS W.—Vancouver
Totem, I.F.C.;  Phi Gamma Delta
MANNIX, LVELLA-Vancouvcr
Gamma Phi
MATHIESON, JACK R.—Kamloops
Basketball, Badminton, Golf; Delta Upsilon
MELVIN, JAMES T.—Vancouver
S.C.M.
MENCHIONS, ROBERT G.—Vancouver
Players Club, Ubyssey
MOXON, JOHN 0.—Vancouver
Commerce, Golf, Hockey;  Psi  Upsilon
Commerce '42
Glamour sells coke for Red Cross drive        Motor Transport grads practise art
Page Ninety-six MURRAY, ROBERT N.—Yahk
Orchestra, Golf; Beta Theta Pi
McBRIDE, W. EDWARD—Vancouver
Pres. Students' Council;  Phi Delta Theta
McCALL, GRAHAM— Victoria
Basketball; Psi Upsilon
McMAHON, PATRICIA— Vancouver
Phrateres, Badminton;  Alpha Phi
MacQUARRIE, ALEXANDER  B.— Vancouver
NAMBA, AKIRA—Honey
Japanese Students'
NOSE, ROY H.—Vancouver      <
Japanese Students'
OKUNO,  SHIGEKAZU—Vancouver
Japanese Students'
I z/vz
PERFITT, ARTHUR E.- Victoria
PERRY, LORNE G.—West Summerland
Forestry Club;  Delta Upsilon
PICKFORD, JOHN W.—Victoria
Phi Kappa Pi
PORTER, R. KEITH— Vancouver
Treasurer, Students' Council;
Beta Theta Pi
ROSE, ROBERT H. M.—Vancouver
Players; Zeta Psi
RUMBALL, DALE L.  - West Summerland
Mamooks; Delta Upsilon
SASAKI, FREDERICK Y.-Vancouver
Japanese Students'; Big Block;  Soccer
SELKIRK, LORRIS E.—Tranquille
Musical Society
SHIOZAKI, DAVID F.—Vancouver
Cosmopolitan Club;  Japanese Students'
SNYDER, RUSSELL P.—Vancouver
Psi Upsilon
TUCK, M. DENIS— Vancouver
Delta Upsilon
WALLACE, GORDON G.—Vancouver
Kappa Sigma
WARNER, HARRY L.—Eburne
Mamooks, Boxing, Kappa Sigma
WUEST, W. ELMER—Stetelu, Alta.
YAMASHITA, GEORGE S.-Vancouver
Japanese Students';  Basketball;  Soccer
Commerce '42
McBride welcomes pianist-leader Ted Fio Rito to campus
Page Ninety-seven Ken McGowan, Helen Branat, Mary Lister and Betty Harvey
President, Hugh Ritchie
Arts '43. . .
"One year to go—then we'll be seniors."
That was the reaction of 350 Juniors as they
returned to the campus last September for their third
year at U.B.C. Yet, once back, they settled down to
the job of being Juniors, forgot about all else—after
all they had the Junior Prom.
For three years this class of Arts '43 had weathered
the storms of education, been buffeted about, until
their ranks had been depleted by some two hundred.
Three years ago was 1939 . . . and the war.
War broke out the same month that Arts '43 came
for the first time to U.B.C. Today, 1939 seems to be
far away, and best forgotten, yet to our Juniors,
impressions gained that year will last for many
decades.
The war was far away from us all, here at the
University, in 1939. We were too interested in Brock
Hall, our student social building. That was one of
the things willed to Arts '43 by past student classes.
Half-way through their freshman year they were able
to share in the enjoyment of the building. This year,
Arts '43 payed their third installment into the fund
created to retire the bond issue contracted for the
construction of that building.
Today, with the war moving closer to British
Columbia, the responsibility which will be that of
Arts '43 next year, that of being U.B.C's senior class,
grows greater. Growing greater, too, is the difficulty of these students to concentrate on academic
pursuits.
Biggest event in the year for Arts '43 was, of
course, their beloved Junior Prom. Staged, as usual,
at the Commodore, the Prom was ruled over by its
lovely queen, Marg Gardiner, chosen by popular vote.
Corsages for the Prom were banned, and rosettes sold,
the profits of which were turned over to the University's war aid drive to raise money for the Canadian
Red Cross.
The executives for Arts '43 this year consisted of:
Honourary President, Dr. A. W. Currie; President,
Hugh Ritchie; Vice-President, Betty Harvey; Secretary-Treasurer, Mary Lister; Men's Athletic Representative, Ken McGowan; Woman's Athletic Representative, Helen Brandt.
Page Ninety-eight ADES, AUDREY I.
ANDERSON, ELIZABETH D.
ANDERSON, JOHN J.
ANDERSON, V. YVONNE
APPLEBY, JOHN
ARM, J. MARJORIE
ARMITAGE, MARIAN H.
ASHE, GEOFFREY T. L.
ASZKANAZY, C LEONORE
ATTREE, PATRICIA W.
BAKONY, EDWARD G. J.
BALL, PATRICIA E.
BARLOW, C. VERNON
BARNETT, JOAN R.
BARSS, ELIZABETH M.
BARTHOLOMEW, GILBERT A.
BEAUMONT, ELIZABETH N.
BELL, MAUREEN F.
BENNETT, JOHN N.
BERTON, LUCY F. B.
BERTRAM, FRANCIS E.
BEVERIDGE, E. ISABEL
BEWLEY, ALBERT L.
BOOND, DOROTHY L.
BOULTBEE, M. ELIZABETH
BOYD, MARY E.
BRADLEY, MARY E.
BRANDON, JAMES R.
BRANDT, HELEN K.
BROADHEAD, RONALD  L.
BROWN, HARRY
BUCKERFIELD, MARY I.
BULLER, MARGARET H.
BUNTING, ROSAMUND G.
BURCHELL, SHERIDAN
BURKE, CORNELIA C.
BURRIS, DONALD S.
BUTLER, LILIAN M.
BYROM, JUNE A.
CARSLEY, JULIE W.
CARSON, JOHN J.
CHENOWETH, JOCELYN D.
CHRISTOPHERSON, KATHLEEN
CHURCH, EDWARD J. M.
CLARIDGE, CHARLES A.
CLARK, KATHLEEN D.
CLEMENS, ANN M.
CLYNE, NORVAL S.
Arts '43
Four members of the Red Cross chorus pose in can-can costume
Page Ninety-nine #'# #
COREY, D. RUTH
COSTELLO, MARY J.
COY, FILMER R.
CREIGHTON, JOHN D.
CROSBY, MARJORIE E. L.
CULLINANE, THOMAS R.
CURRY, ROBERT M.
DALIN, WINIFRED H.
DALZIEL, JOYCE E.
DANIELL, JOCELYN M. D. B.
DAVIES, LLEWLYN B.
DEAR, WALLACE
DeBECK, HOWARD D.
DesBRISAY, MARY E.
DesBRISAY, RUTH M.
DICKIE, BETTE F.
DILGER, V. VIVIAN
DIXON, HELEN B.
DONOVAN, BASIL G.
DRAYTON, LESLIE E.
DRURY, MARY A.
DRYSDALE, NORMA K.
DUNCAN, MARGARET W.
DWYER, MELVA J.
EADIE, CHARLES McA.
EDWARDS, DAIMA
ELLIOTT, JEAN
ELSDON, WALTER D.
ERICKSON, NORMA A.
FAIRALL, WALLACE H.
FARINA, ALFRED J. 0.
FARRELL, F. MARY
FILMER-BENNETT, DORIS
FISHER, E. BRIAN
FLYNN, MARGARET J.
FRANCIS,  MARGARET V.
FREEMAN, VIVA F.
GARDINER, GLORIA E. L.
GARDINER, MARGARET H.
GIBBS, MARGARET G.
GILLARD, S. MEGAN
GRAHAM, EVELYN F. M.
GRIEVE, KENNETH E.
HALSTEAD, JOHN G. H.
HAMILTON, ISOBEL B.
HAMILTON, ROY J. A.
HANSON, DON McK.
HARVEY, ELIZABETH  E.
Arts '43
Officers watch  Varsity ruggers in Stadium.
Page One Hundred HEISE, JACK K.
HIBBERSON, ROBERT J.
HIRANO, TOSHIO
HITCHCOCK, JOHN H.
HOAG, AUDREY
HOBDEN, FRANCES E.
HOLLAND, KATHLEEN A.
HUME, DOUGLAS D.
HUNTER, HARRY I.
HUTCHINSON, HAZEL H.
ISHERWOOD, T. FOSTER
JACKSON, DOUGLAS L.
JACKSON, FRANCES C.
JENKINSON, ELIZABETH
JEUNE, RONALD F.
JOHNSON, EVA C
JOHNSTON, DONALD W.
JUKES, JOAN
KEITH, KENNETH L.
KITSON, C. EDITH
KNOTTS, WALTER E.
LANSDOWNE, ROSEMARY L.
LARGE, RUTH M.
LAWRIE, FRANK D.
LEACH, GWENDOLYN D.
LEE, JEAN-CAROL
LEE, RUTH
LIGHTSTONE, ROBERT
LIPSETT, C. MARY
LOCK, VIVIAN E. R.
LONG, CHARLES F.
LOW, GEORGE A.
LUCAS, COLIN R.
MABEE, JEAN M.
MANES, JOHN D.
MANNING, HELEN B.
MARR, K. MAVIS
MARSHALL, RUSSELL H.
MATHESON, BERYL A.
MATHESON, HELEN R.
MATHESON, IAN D.
MATTHEWS, CHARLES A
MEREDITH, PATRICIA M.
MESSENGER, GEORGINA A.
MICHAS, SOPHIE
MILLAR, DOROTHEA F.
MILLIGAN, PHYLLIS H.
MILLS, LAURA E.
£M^
Arts '43
Coke sends milk to Britain's babies
Air raid precautions
Page One Hundred and One MOE, BARBARA M.
MORGAN, PHYLLIS G.
MORLEY, MONA R.
MOYLS, AMY C.
MOYLS, MARGARET L.
MUIR, ELIZABETH A.
MULHERN, MERRIE N.
MUNDELL, PERCY M.
MURRAY, ROBERT McK.
McAllister, james a.
McDIARMID, LORNA M.
McDONAGH, JACK E.
MacDONALD, DONALD J.
MacDONALD, JOHN L.
MACDONALD, MARY J.
MACDONALD, SHIRLEY
MacDONALD, W. H. K.
McKAY, DONALD  M.
McKELVY, MARY E.
MacLEOD, ROBERT A.
McMAHON, VERNON H.
MacMILLAN, DONALD J.
McPHEE, MAURICE D.
McQueen, Barbara m.
McTAVISH, MARY
McWilliams, helen c.
McWilliams, Robert w.
nash, marygold v.
nelles, thelma m.
NeMETZ, PHYLISS R.
NEVISON, JAMES H.
NEWMAN, BARBARA
NEWTON, JUNE
NOBLE, DAVE A.
NORTH, GEORGE A.
OAKES, LILA M
ONLEE, LILAC L.
ORCHARD, ETHEL J.
OSLER, THOMAS R.
OTSUKI, SHIGEYUKI
PALLAS, THEODORE
PARFITT, DAVID
PARSONS, LESLIE S.
PAUL, RACHEL M.
PENDLETON, WAYNE S.
PENNY, HARRY L.
PETERSON, MARYAN A.
PETHICK, DEREK W.
Arts '43
Even at army camp you rest—after a 15-mile route march in the sun.
Page One Hundred and Two PEYMAN, D. ALASTAIR R.
PHILLIPS, BRENDA
PICKERING,  MARY G.
POULTON, SIDNEY A.
PRONGER, RALPH  C.
PROUDFOOT,  AGNES  E.
PROVEN, NETTIE  I.
PROWD, LAWRENCE W.
REID, MARGARET McD.
RICHARDSON, SIDNEY L.
RICKETTS,  DONALD   B.
ROBERTSON, DONALD A.
ROBERTSON, GEORGE
ROBINSON, GRANT T.
ROCHE, ROBERT  G.
ROSS, DONALD  H.  MacR.
ROWEBOTTOM, HOWARD G.
ROWEBOTTOM,  LORNE   E.
RUSSELL, ROSAMOND A.
RYAN, JOHN G.
SALT, LIONEL H.
SAVITSKY, SONIA
SCHOFIELD, WILLIAM
SEWELL, VINCENT N. R.
SEYER, JOHN F.
SHEWAN,  ROBERT  G.
SHOLUND, ALVIN L.
SINCLAIR, ELEANOR W.
SINCLAIR, R. MEADE
SLATER, MARY A.
SMITH, H. PAUL
SMITH, HERBERT S.
SNADDON, ANDREW W.
SOUTHIN, ELEANOR
SPARKS, JOHN E.
SPEARS, DOROTHY H.
SPEERS, EDWARD A.
STEVENSON, THEODORE  K.
STRAIGHT, BYRON W.
SULLIVAN, LUCY JANE
SWAINSON,   JOHN
TAIT, JEAN
TATROFF, DANIEL P.
TELFER, GWENDOLYN D.
TEMPLE, VIVIAN E. M.
THOMAS, J. ALAN
THOMSON,  HELEN
TINDLE, MURIEL A.
Arts '43
Editor Salt goes bashful with band vocalist Jean Folkart al pep meet.
Page One Hundred and Three TUCKER, NORMA McC
TWISS, MARY H.
TWIZELL,  MARGARET  S.
UGLOW, ELIZABETH R.
UYEDA,  MARIKO
VANDT,   DAVID
VAUGHAN, DAVID L.
VEY, ALBERT G.
WALKER, GOLDIE  E.  C.
WALKER,  PHYLLIS   M.   S.
WALL, MURIEL N.
WALLACE, BETTY
WALLACE, ROBERT B.
WARNE, R. MAXWELL
WARNER,  MARY  E.
WATSON, WILFRED
WEBBER, STUART C.
WHITE,  SADIE   M.
WILSON, KATHLEEN M.
WITTER, BEVERLY M.
WOO, ANNE M.
WOOD, BETTY R.
WOOD, GEORGE A.
WOOD, JUANITA E.
WYBOURN, EDBROOKE S.
YOUNG, THOMAS McL.
BARTON, ARTHUR  S.
BEDDOME, ANNE C.
BLUNT, JOYCE E.
BOLLANS, FRANK L.
BRETT, CECIL C.
BROWN, GEORGE G.
CARMICHAEL, H. ANGUS
COTTERALL, CHARLES L.
FIELDS,  DONALD B.
FRANCIS, IDA  C
GOURLAY, JOHN  L.
GOYER, GERTRUDE E.
GRIGG, VERNON H.
HALL, HUGH  U.
HILL,   CLIFFORD  J.
HORTON,  KENNETH   G.
HUTCHISON, GEORGE T.
JAMES, DOUGLAS A.
KAWAHARA, HIDEO
KELLER,  CORNELIUS W.
LLOYD, MOIRA C.
LOGAN, KENNETH T.
Arts '43
Rifles at the slope
Close-up of camp.
Page One Hundred and Four LONG, ELIZABETH B.
MAHOOD, BRIAN H.
MANN, WILLIAM T.
MERCER, WILLIAM M.
MORRISON, J. LEE
MORRITT, JACK B.
MacCOWAN, KENNETH 0.
McMASTER, WILLIAM J.
PAISLEY, JOHN K.
PLOMMER, ROBERT D.
PUNTER, WILLIAM F.
RITCHIE,  HUGH J.
ROBINSON, ERIC W.
ROUSSEL, DAVID M.
SCOTT, J. C. MELVIN
SHIGEI,  HIDEO
SMEDLEY, JACK V.
WELSFORD,  WILLIAM  D.
WILSON, JAMES H.
WINRAM, EDNA E.
Sun-helmetted they rest; Officer surveys position; Orderly Room-keepers of records; Two
army instructors detail "shun"; The long and
short of army camp; The men like to practice—■
the "at ease"; Do we seem like this to Hitler.
Arts '43
Page One Hundred and Five Arts '44 . . .
What a change can come over a person in the
short year of university life, in that short time during
which the freshman sheds his skin and becomes—a
Sophomore!
Last year, six hundred strong, they were the freshman class of Arts '44. Now, a year later, and whittled down to a more compact five hundred, Arts '44,
the sophomore class of 1941-42 looks forward to the
day when they will become the upperclassmen of
U.B.C.
It was to a much more sober campus that the class
of Arts '44 came in September, 1940, for the war had
become too vital to be disregarded in favour of
freshman initiation frivolities. Arts '44 became the
first freshman class in the history of U.B.C. to engage
in compulsory military training.
It is a tribute to their ability to adapt themselves
that Arts '44, last year, maintained the tradition of
high academic standards of U.B.C. Now, as sophomores, they are well on their way to bringing further
laurels to Alma Mater.
President, David Housser.
Dusty Rhodes, Allison McBain and Penny Runkle
When the freshman class stepped on the campus
green this year they were not met by a conquering
horde of Sophs intent on destruction. Instead, everywhere could be seen members of Arts '44 counselling
the newly arrived on the duties and responsibilities of
academic and military study.
The Victory Loan Drive, too, came in for support
from Arts '44 who offered to relinquish their annual
Class Party, using the Council grant for the purchase
of a bond. However, it was decided to follow the
precedent set last year of combining the parties of
the freshmen and sophomores, and a successful party
was staged on March 19 in Brock Hall.
At press time, however, the Sophomores had still
not" abandoned the idea of purchasing a bond, and
plans were under way to purchase one in conjunction
with the Freshman Class.
The executive for Arts '44 this year consisted of:
Honourary President, Dr. Ralph Hull; President,
David Housser; Vice-President, Penny Runkle; Secretary-Treasurer, Allison McBain; Woman's Athletic
Representative, Evaline Morton; Men's Athletic Representative, Dusty Rhodes.
Page One Hundred and Six ADAMS, BEVERLEY J.
ADCOCK, ZELLE
ALLAN, BETTY L.
ALLAN, JOHN N. M.
ALLEN, GEORGE
ANDERSON, SYLVIA L.
ATKINS, ELEANOR
ATTRIDGE, MARY L.
BAILLIE, GRAHAM C. B.
BAKONY, LIONEL I.
BALDERSTON, RONALD B.
BANKS, JACQUELINE A.
BATCHELOR, MYRA I.
BEAVO, WILLIAM A.
BENDER, WILLIAM G.
BENNETT, 0. KENNETH
BERESFORD, L. GRACE
BISHOP, MARION L.
BLIGH, HILDRED N.
BLOCH, INEZ E.
BOOTHE, LILLIAN B.
BOWELL,  EVELYN  E.
BOWIE, JACK W.
BOYD, RUTH M.
BRADLEY, EVELYN E. M.
BROWN, EANSWYTHE
BRUCE, MONA L. C.
BUCHANAN,  JAMES  B.
BUDD, JOAN
BURKE, HAROLD H.
BURKE, STANLEY L.
BURNS, DAVID
CAMPBELL, CHARLES G.
"CAMPBELL, JEAN A. K.
CAMPBELL, NORMAN K.
CANTELL, E. THOMAS
CAREY, AGNES M.
CAREY, AMY C.
CARROTHERS, A. BRIAN B.
CARSELL, ROBERTA W.
CHECOV, LOUIE
CHONG, YOKE
CHRISTIE, JEAN
CODY, JOHN T.
COLES, JOHN M.
COLQUHOUN, PATRICIA M.
CONKEY, ELIZABETH E.
CONWAY, LORRAINE C.
ffff I I f ' *
Arts '44
Johnny Farina does "The Evils of Drink" for Red Cross Ball pep meet.
Page One Hundred and Seven COOKE, HUGH A.
COOPER, JOHN B. G.
CRAIG, MARY P.
CRUISE, GEORGE T.
CURRAN, HARRY A.
CURRIE, JOHN F.
DAWE, ELIZABETH R.
DAWE, FRANCES E.
DAY, JOAN I. L.
DELLERT, ALBERT
DENNISON,  A.   SPENCER
de PENCIER, E.  AUDREY
DIERSSEN, CONSTANCE M.
DRENNAN, G. ALEXANDER
DuMOULIN, P. ANNE
ELDRIDGE, KENNETH A.
ELLINGHAM, JOAN  C
ERRICO, ERNEST
ESTEY, BYRON T.
FAIRNIE, LOUISE L.
FALCONER, LORNA M.
FARINA,   CHARLIE   0.      •
FARR,  DAVID  M.
FAULKES, FRANCES
FERGUSSON, OTWAY C.
FERRY, JACK A.
FINLAY, MARY B.
FISHER, H. DEAN
FLEMING, NORMA W.
FOLEY, FREDERICK R.
FOLKARD, JEAN L.
FORSTER, JOHN H.
FOSTER, J.  ELIZABETH
FRANCIS, DONALD W.
FRANCIS, JOSEPH
FRASER, GORDON C
FREEMAN, RUTH
FRIZELL, R. NOEL
GALL, ROBERT G.
GALLAGHER, BERTRAM E.
GALT, WILLIAM T.
GANSNER, NINA M.
GIBSON, DONALD A.
GIDNEY, EILEEN
GIFFORD, ROSS J.
GILLIES, BARBARA
GILLIS, GLENN A H.
GLOVER, NELLES H.
Arts '44
H 9M   "* Mfc
Twenty men learn the intricacies of firing Bren puns.
Page One Hundred and Eight GODDARD, P. BRENDA
GODFREY, BARBARA E.
GOGAIN, MARION F.
GOODWIN, NORMAN L.
GORMAN, RAY T.
GOYER, MARGARET E.
GRANT, DOREEN M.
GRANT,  GORDON B.
GRANT, W. G. HYLAND
GRAYSTON, IRENE K.
GREER, PAULENE F.
GRIFFIN, FREDERICK P.
GUMMOW, JOHN B.
HAMMITT, VIRGINIA
HAYES, JAMES A.
HEATHER, GEORGE  E.
HEATHER, JUNE A.
HENRIKSON,  ARNE
HERBERTS, E. DAVID
HERBERTS, LEWIS T.
HERN, ELIZABETH D.
HESTER, KENNETH D.
HEWITSON, JUNE M.
HIBBERT,  BARBARA  Z.
HIKIDA, HIDEAKI R.
HIGCINS, RUTH E.
HILL, ARTHUR E.
HODGE, MURIEL
HOFFMAN, PEARL
HOOSON, WILLIAM
HOPKINS, JOHN A.
HOURSTON, WILLIAM R.
HUGHES, EDWARD N.
HUNTER, DORRIE M.
HUNTER, SYLVIA J.
INKSTER, JOHN D.
IVEY, DONALD G.
JARVI, HELGA
JESSOP, HARVEY C.
JOHNSON, ARTHUR C.
JONES, J. ERIC
KADOTA,  CHARLES  H.
KAGETSU, AKIKO
KAWAGUCHI, JACK S.
KAZUN, WALTER J.
KENDALL,  RICHARD  A.
KENNEDY, JOHN W.
KENT, NORMAN S.
Arts '44
Co-eds kick 'em high, Dierssen does "splits in Red Cross can-can chorus.
Page One Hundred and Nine KIDD, MARY H.
KILBANK, ALFRED C.
KIRKLAND, STANLEY W.
LaFLEUR, P. MILTON
LAKE,  JUNE F.
LAKIE, HELEN E.
LAMBE, AUSTIN C.
LANGDON, JOAN M.
LAPWORTH,  PHYLLIS
LARGE, LORRAINE D.
LAZZARIN, FIORETTA
LEE, DOUGLAS H.  T.
LEE, FREDERICK S. D.
LEES, DORIS M.
LEONG, DANIEL T. Y.
LIGHTSTONE, JACK
LIND, FRED  O.
LOCKE, ELIZABETH  M.
LONG, KATHERINE R.
LOWTHER, ROY A.
MANLEY, JOHN R.
MANN, J. HOWARD
MANSON, G. GORDON
MARGOLUS,   SHIRLEY
MARSHALL, DORIS P.
MARSHALL, M. E. KAY
MARTIN, CAROL M. S.
MARTIN, TOM A.
MATHESON, IAN
MATHEWS, FRANK S.
MATSUI, RICHARD
MATTHEW, ROBERT D.
MENZIES, DORA K.
MERCER, E. FLORENCE
MIKKELSON,  PHYLLIS  M.
MONTADOR, ROBERT E.
MONTGOMERY, WM. R.
MORAN, CATHERINE
MORAN, JOHN W.
MORRIS,  DESMOND
MORTON, EVALINE A.
MORTON, JAMES W.
MORWOOD-CLARK, L. L.
MOTTISHAW, HENRY C.
MUNRO, DAVID A.
MURRAY, R. ELAINE
McBAIN, M. ALLISON
McDIARMID, MURIEL A. I.
Arts '44
f-Z&M^
A Bren gun-team practice loading and firing technique on campus grass.
Page One Hundred and Ten McDONOUGH, DONALD
McDOUGALL, ALEXANDER D.
McEWAN, ROBERT R.
McGARRY,  KATHLEEN
McGEER, J. PETER
MacINTOSH,  L.   JEAN
McINTOSH, MARY B.
McKEOWN, ROBERT J. E.
McKIE, AUDREY E.
McKINLAY, WILLIAM D.
MacKINNON, GEO. L. C.
McLEAN,   ELISABETH    M.
McLEAN, ROBERT E.
McLEOD, JOHN M.
MacMILLAN, MARY A.
MACNAB, PHOEBE J.
MacPHERSON,  ALLAN   D.
MacPHERSON, JOHN   P.
NAGATA, SHINKO M.
NAIRNE, MILDRED M.
NEIL,  E.  MARGUERITE
NEILSON, J.  STEWART
NELSON,  CATHERINE  M.
NELSON, JACK -IS.
NICHOLLS, JOHN W.
NIKAIDO, TAKAKO
NIMMONS, PHILLIP R.  ■
NISHIOKA, GEORGE
NOGARR, FRANK 0.
NORTON, WILLIAM A.
NOSWORTHY, FRANK M.
NYGARD, HOLGER 0. V.
OBOKATA, ARTHUR
OGILVIE, SHEILA M.
OLIVER, HUBERT G.
O'NEILL, MARGARET M.
OUGHTON, J. MELVIN
OUGHTRED, AULAY M.
PALLOT, MARGARET E.
PANTON, WILLIAM D.
PARKER, C. WILLIAM
PARKER, HORACE V.
PASTINSKY, BELLE
PATON, WILLIAM S.
PAUL, MARY E. C.
PAULSEN, EDMOND J. A.
PEARSON, GWENNETH L.
PEARSON, WILLIAM E.
Arts '44
Honoured guests watch army rugby game at Armoury opening.
Page One Hundred and Eleven PEDLOW, ALAN LeR.
PEDLOW, DOUGLAS S.
PHILLIPS, DAVID B.
PHILLIPSON, MURRAY
PIDERMAN, J. PIERRE
PIERCY, MARY J.
PIKE, GORDON C.
POLLOCK, J. MURDO
RAE, ELIZABETH B.
RALSTON, DONALD C
RAWLINGS, PHYLLIS T.
REDLICH,  BERTA  B.
REED, KENNETH W.
REID,  MARGARET  McD.
REIMER, NICHOLAS
REYNOLDS, A. St. L. B.
RHODES, JOHN A.
ROBINSON, J. W. DAVID
ROBINSON, VALERIE J.
ROSE, JOHN 0.
ROSE, JOSEPH D.
RUNKLE, PENELOPE A.
RUSH, GEORGE E.
RUSSELL, MARJORIE M.
RYAN, DAPHNE M.
SANDERSON, ALAN L.
SANDERSON, LLOYD G.
SANDERSON, PHYLLIS A.
SANDISON,  ANNABEL  M.
SAUNDERS,  MARJORIE  A.
SCHIEDEL, NANCY
SCOTT, ELIZABETH A.
SCOTT, NORMA E.
SCRIVENER, JACK V.
SEYMOUR, E. AILEEN
SHIELDS, MERYLE E.
SHILLABEER, JOHN A.
SHIMO-TAKAHARA, L. Y.
SHKWAROK, WILLIAM F.
SIBLEY, JOHN C. A.
SIMPSON, KEITH B.
SINCLAIR, R. ELMER
SLARK, GORDON A.
SMITH, DOUGLAS S.
SMITH, WILMA G.
SMYTHIES,  CHARLES  0.
SPARKES,  CLIFFORD   S.
STEVENS, WILLIAM B.
Arts '44
Ready to combat gas attack at army camp. Irresistible combination
Page One Hundred and Twelve STRAITH, JOAN M.
SUTTON, DOUGLAS M.
SUZUKI, GOJI
SWEATMAN, HENRY C.
SWINTON, A. HANS
TAWSE, KENNETH J. P.
TAYLOR, ARTHUR E.
TAYLOR, BRUCE E.
TAYLOR, DAVID
TAYLOR, EDWARD R.
TAYLOR, JUNE C.
TELFORD, ROBERT B.
THICKE, DOUGLAS A.
THICKE, JOAN C.
THOMPSON, DORIS L.
THOMSON, ALEXANDER
THUMM, WALTER D.
THURGOOD, MERVYN F.
TOGURI, SAMUEL G. T.
TOUHEY, THOMAS B.
TUFTS, AILEEN
TURYK, MICHAEL D.
UNDERHILL, ISABELLA G.
UYEDA, LILY Y.
VAN de BOGART, HELEN
VEREGIN, THOMAS A.
VILLIERS-FISHER,  JOAN   R.
WALSH,  HELEN  M.
WARDEN, JOHN  G.
WARWICK, WILLIAM  E.
WATE, WILLIAM S.
WATSON, MARY V.
WEAVER, JUNE M.
WEBB, JOAN M.
WEBER, VIRGINIA
WEINS, ELVIRA
WELCH, HELEN P.
WELLS, JAMES H.
WEST, ENID A.
WHIMSTER,  MURIEL  F.
WHITE, FRANCES C.
WHITE, WILLIAM A. T.
WICKSTROM, NILS A. T.
WIDDESS, EDWARD H.
WILKIE, GAVIN G.
WILLIAMS, BERNICE M. S.
WILLIAMS,  L.  JUNE
WILSON,   CHARLES  L.
Arts '44
Students give "Mile of Pennies" for milk.
Page One Hundred and Thirteen WILSON, RAYMOND H.
WOO, MARY M.
WOOD, GORDON A.
WOOD, MARY A.
WOODS, JOHN R.
WRIGHT, S.  COURTENAY
WYNESS, ELEANOR J.
YAMASHITA, THOMAS I.
YIP, CECIL E.
YOSHIOKA, EDWARD S.
YOUNG, MICHAEL G.
COMMERCE
ALLAN, JAMES G.
ARMSTRONG, DOUGLAS A.
BALLANTYNE, WILLIAM G.
BICKERTON, EARLE C.
BISHOP, PHYLLIS D.
BOYD, NORA  E.
BROMLEY, GORDON F.
CARMICHAEL, ANDREW J.
CAWLEY, GUY P. S.
CHONG, PETER
CHUTTER, S. DONALD C.
CLARK, BETTE G.
COUTTS, JAMES W.
CROFT, MARGARET
CUNNINGHAM, JACK R.
DEAN, ALAN W.
DEILDAL, BRUCE E.
DICKENSON, JOHN  E.
EDWARDS, A. DOUGLAS
ELLIS, BARBARA
FLADER, SAMUEL
FRIESEN, EDWARD P.
FRISKEN, JAMES  R.
GIURIATO, LINO
GLOVER, PERCY C.
HANDLING, MARY J.
HARADA, TERUO
HEBB, DOROTHY M.
HIGH, ROBERT L.
HOUSSER,  DAVID
INMAN, WILLIAM VAN N.
JAMES, RALPH B.
JOHNSTONE, ALAN D.
KILET, CYNTHIA M.
KNOWLES, ROBERT A.
KOENIGSBERG, IRVING N.
LANGDALE, A. LESLIE
Arts '44
Pubsters battle Council at basketball.
Page One Hundred and Fourteen LAWSON, DAVID A.
LEIGH-SPENCER, G. L.
LOCKHART, KEITH
MANZER, CARSON G.
MARHULL, ALLEN
MILLINS,   BETTY  P.
MORRISON, IAN C.
MYERS, FRED C.
McBRIDE, RONALD T.
MacKENZIE, MURDO G.
MacLEAN, J. HARRIS
MacMILLAN, ALAN U.
MACPHERSON, PETER McA.
NICKERSON, D'ARCY G.
ORR, THOMAS F.
PICKIN, BARBARA H.
QUANCE, VIOLA V.
RAHO, RALPH G.
REMNANT, PETER
RENWICK, H. MIRAM
RICKABY, JOHN D.
RUSSELL, J. HECTOR
SAUNDERS,  RICHARD  G.
SHORT, JOHN W.
SNYDER, EDWARD W.
SOUTH, DON
STAMATIS, GEORGE
TODHUNTER, S. CASWELL
TREEN,  GERALD  B.
WAKELYNN,   MORRIS
WALDIE, ADAM C.
WALKER, JOHN A.
WARNER, WILLIAM L.
WATT, EVELYN W.
WHITELAW, GLENN R.
WILSON, W. LAIRD
WOOD, D. HUNTER
YEASTING, ALICE M.
Arts '44
Pub-Council game goes mayhem.
Henderson inspects gun crew.
Page One Hundred and Fifteen Don Kurtz, Jean Esplin, Doreen Dougan, and Charles Moore.
President, Don Sutton
Arts '45 . . .
FROSH!—the word that used to be spelt in capital
letters in the annals of class history at U.B.C. dwindled
to a very quiet, lower case whisper this year, when in
September, 1941, six hundred graduates from British
Columbia's high schools came to the campus to continue their education.
They came to pursue knowledge, firm in the belief
that theirs was a grave responsibility. They came
from the regimentation of academic study at high
school to the regimentation of military training at
University.
They stepped into a new world, a privileged world,
of university students equipping themselves for service to a country locked in the death grapple with an
education-hating foe. They accepted the responsibility
of that privilege quietly, unassumingly, and with little
noise, slipped off the traditional regalia of freshmen
to become—Arts '45.
Although they accepted the sobriety of war-time
students, Arts '45, while still Frosh (green be-rib-
boned, stocking-less) established the fact that they
were on the campus with a rousing first week round
of initiation events.
A comprehensive orientation system was launched
by upperclassmen to acquaint the freshmen with the
rules and traditions of U.B.C. The largest attendance
ever recorded appeared at the annual Cairn Ceremony
where British Columbia students pay homage yearly
to those who have gone before. Every co-ed freshette
was given a Big Sister whose task it was to pilot the
young miss around the campus for a week.
The climax of initiation came when a monster ball
was staged in Brock Hall to the music of Dal Richards
at which freshmen and freshettes were paraded through
an archway, then welcomed by upperclassmen as official members of the University    as Arts '45.
On March 19, Arts '45 and Arts '44, the freshman
class of 1941-42 and the ex-freshmen class of 1940-41
combined efforts at the now traditional Frosh-Soph
class party, held in Brock Hall. At press time, plans
are under way for the two classes to join in buying a
Victory bond which will be turned over to the Alma
Mater Society.
The executive for Arts '45 this year consisted of:
President, Don Sutton; Secretary, Doreen Dougan;
Treasurer, Charles Moore; Woman's Athletic Representative, Jean Esplin; Men's Athletic Representative,
Donald Kurtz.
Page One Hundred and Sixteen ADAMS, GERALDINE
AIREY, FRANCES M.
AITKEN, THOMAS
ALLAN, JEANIE, H.
ALMAS, GABRIEL
ANDERSON, DOUGLAS A.
ANDERSON, ELIZABETH M.
ANDREWS, STEWART J.
ANTHONY, ANDY J.
APPLEBY, LYON H. T.
AQUA, HARRY
ARCHIBALD, FRANK M.
ARCHIBALD, ROY W.
ARMOUR, DOUGLAS L.
ARNELL, M. JENEVIEVE
ATHERTON, E. DOROTHY
BACON, HARRY W.
BAILEY, DORA J.
BAKER, JOCELYN
BALL, MARGARET A.
BANFORD, NORMAN M.
BARLTROP, JOHN A.
BARRETT, L. JOAN
BARROW, GORDON
BASIL, DOUGLAS C.
BEALE, MARGARET F.
BECK, RICHARD E.
BEGERT, H. KENDALL
BELL, BARBARA A.
BELTZ, JOHN E.
BENNETT, ANNE L.
BENNETT, BEATRICE R.
BENNETT, CYRIL J.
BENSON, RUSSELL R.
BERSON, MORRIS J.
BEVAN, RHYS D.
BEVERIDGE, JEAN F.
BEVERIDGE, JOHN W.
BIRD, JOHN Mel.
BIRD, S. FREDERICK
BLACK, ALLAN P.
BLUMENAUER, JOHN G.
BONNEY, DAVID A.
BOUGHTON, JAMES E.
BOWDEN, EVELYN M.
BOWELL, STEPHEN T.
BOYD, ALAN W.
BRADNER, GILBERT G.
BREMNER, DONALD J.
BRINE, RALPH H.
BROADLAND, ROBERT T.
BROWN,   ERIC   W,
BROWN,  GILBERT G.
BROWN, M. JUNE
BROWN,   NORMA   M.
BRYANT, ELEANOR H.
BUCKLEY, ALBERT M.
BULLEN, DENNIS C. T.
BULLEN, E. LESTER
BURNETT, BRUCE K.
BURNEY, ROSS H.
BUSHFIELD, ROY E.
CALDER, FRANK A.
Even in wartime, the Frosh get dunked.
Arts '45
Page One Hundred and Seventeen CAMERMAN,  MARGARET
CAMERON,   B.   BETH
CAMPBELL, MARGARET A.
CAMPBELL,  THOMAS   C.
CARBERT,  LESLIE
CARMICHAEL, DONALD B.
CARNCROSS,   RUTH   E.
CARTER,   HAROLD  R.
CHAMBERS,   EDWARD J.  S.
CHANG,  ZOE
CHERNIAVSKY,  JOHN  R. D.
CHEW,  VERNOR B.
CHOWN, CARO E.
CLARK,  DOUGLAS   P.
CLERIHUE, W. RANDOLPH
COCKFIELD,   SHIRLEY  H.
COCKING,   BETH
COE,  ALLAN
COLBOURNE,   JAMES   C.
COLCOMB,  RICHARD   McO.
CORBETT, LORNE R.
COTTINGHAM, RICHARD R.
COVENTRY,   WILLIAM   V.
COWAN,   JOHN
CRAIG, J. DOUGLAS
CRAWFORD,  WILLIAM  M.
CRBELMAN,   JOHN   R.
CREIGHTON,   KENNETH   D.
CRIGHTON,  M. JOYCE
CROLL,  MARGARET  F.
CROSBY,   T.  BOYD
CUNNINGHAM,  PATRICIA M.
CURNOW,   T.   BERNICE
CURRY,   MARGARET   A.
DARLING, BRUCE D.
DAVIDSON,   MARJORIE   A.
DAVIES, FRANCES K.
DAVIES, SPENCER R.
DAVIS,   MARCIA  S.
DAWSON,   JAMES  F.
DECOCK,  MARGARET  F.
DELAMONT,   VERA   L.
DICKSON,   PETER
DICKSON,  WILLIAM  A.
DIETHER,   BARBARA   M.
DIETRICH,   R.   LORRAINE
DIMOCK,   ARTHUR   C.
DONNELLY,   STEPHEN   J.
DOUGAN,   M.   DOREEN
DOWDING,  CHARLES W.
DUNCAN, LESLEY M.
EADIE,  HELEN I.
EDWARDS, T.  HARVEY
ELLIOTT,  CLARICE   I.
ELLIS,   GORDON   McL.
ENG,   PHILIP
ESPLIN,   M.   JEAN-
EVANS,   WILFRED   M.
EWERT,  VAUGHAN   A.
FAIREY,  VIOLET J.
FAIRHEAD,  NORMAN  C.
FAIRLEIGH,   DOROTHEA   C.
FALK,   WILLIAM   A.
!im
Arts 45
"Heads, I dance with her"
Traditional Cairn Ceremony
Page One Hundred and Eighteen FARRELL, K. WILLOUGH
FENN,  JOHN  E.
FIELD, RALPH I.
FISCHER,   JOAN   G.
FISHER,  DONALD C. M.
FISHER,  RALPH  E.
FLANAGAN, JOHN R.
FLECK,  NANCY  H.
FORBES, M. LOUISE
FORDYCE,   DAVID  B.
FOSTER, WILHELMINA M.
FRANCIS,   JOHN   I.
FRASER,   FRANK   S.
FRASER-GOSSE,   RICHD.   A.
FRIPPS, JOAN K.
FRITH,   PATRICK  V.
FROST, JOAN
GARDNER,  CLAUDE  W.
GIBSON,   MARGARET
GILLANDERS,   SHIRLEY  L.
GOLDIE,  D.  MICHAEL  M.
GOLDING, BARBARA
GOMERY, L. DONNA
GORDON,   DONALD    W.
GORDON, JAMES S.
GORDON,   MERRITT E.
GOW, FRANK J.
GREENE,   PHILIP   S.
GRIEVE, ANNIE C.
GRIFFITHS,   DAVID   A.
GUSTAVSON, STANLEY E.
GUY,   BEVERLY   E.
HALL,   EDITH   W.
HAMILTON,   DRUMMOND  G.
HAMMOND,   MARY   E.
HANNA, JOSEPH L.
HANSEN, HARRIS T.
HARKNESS,  WESLEY McK.
HARRIS,   RICHARD   C.
HARRIS,   ROBERT   G.
HARRISON,  J.  E.  SUZANNE
HARRISON,   THOMAS    G.
HARRISON   WILLIAM W.
HAYWARD,   DAVID  F.
HEADRICK,   OLIVE
HEAL,   DOUGLAS   G.
HENDERSON,   ROLAND   J.
HERRING,  STEPHEN  H.  E.
HICKS,  E.  SHEILA
HILBORN,  MARGARET G.
HILTON,   H.   BRIAN
HODGSON,   MARGARET  A.
HODSON, GORDON R.
HOLE,  LEONARD W.
HOLROYD,   LOUIS   V.
HOOD,   MARJORIE   H.
HOWATSON,   MARY
HUNTER,   THOMAS
HUNTINGTON, ROBERT
HUSBAND, WILLIAM H. W.
IDE,   GEORGE   R.
IKATA,  LUCY M.
INCH,   BEATRICE   E.
% »© *? «S
9R3
Arts '45
Frosh-Soph Rivalry Breaks Loose.
Page One Hundred and Nineteen INKMAN, C. CRAIG
INOUYE,   JOHN   S.
IRELAND,   ALDYTHE   M.
IRWIN,   I.   ELEANOR
JACOBSON,   BEDA   A.
JAMIESON,   F.   CLAIRE
JARMAN,   ERNEST   A.
JARVIS,  RALPH M.
JEMSON,  ROBERT  A.
JINKS, GORDON  McM.
JOHANSON,   CHARLES
JOHN,   THOMAS   W.
JOHNSEN,   HANS   P.
JOHNSON,   GEORGE   A.
JOHNSON, ROBERT
JOHNSTON,  BEATRICE M.
JOHNSTON, JOAN
JOHNSTON, ROY  F.
JOLLY,  ROY  D.
JORDAN-KNOX,    TREVOR
JOSEPHSON,   GILBERT   M.
JULIAN,  WILLIAM  E.
KEATING,   DOREEN   J.
KEEVES,  MOIRA  E.
KELLER,  ELMA C.
KENDALL, MARIE J.
KENMUIR,   JOHN   A.
KENNEDY,   GLADYS   R.
KENNEDY, LONIA  H. J.
KENNY, WILFRID
KERR, SHIRLEY A.
KETCHESON, HELEN R.
KILBURN,  JAMES  H.
KINGSTON,  JOHN   S.
KIRKPATRICK,   SHEILA   W.
KNIGHT, R. GORDON
KOBAYASHI, JACK H.
KOCHER,  PAUL E.
KOFFMAN,   THELMA
KORNER,   BEATRICE
KORSCH,  STANFORD
KOSTMAN,    PHILIP
KUDO, ALICE C.
KURTH, BURTON O.
KURTZ, DON F.
LAKES, MIKE J. R.
LANE,  MARJORIE  C.
LANE,   WILLIAM   T.
LATIMER,   NORMAN   H.
LATTA, GORDON E.
LATTIN,  E.  GEOFFREY
LAWRENCE, BLAIR G.
LAWSON,   BASIL  S.
LE COUTEUR, MARGARET
LEE,  FRANCES
LEITH,   ANNA  R.
LEWIS, L. ALLEN
LEWIS,  ROBERT  A.
LIM, MAN YOU
LIVINGSTON,   GERTRUDE   H.
LOGIE,   ROBERT   W.
LONG,   G.   ROY
LONG, JOSHUA
Arts '45
In perfect formation, students march.
Page One Hundred and Twenty LORD, BRUCE S.
LORT,  PHYLLIS M.
LOTZKAR,  EVA
LOUIE, EDWARD
LYLE,   WALLACE  E.
MABEE, GERALDINE D. J.
MABEE,   GORDON  E.
MACKEND, VALERY G.
MAGEE, WILLIAM H.
MAHOOD,  ERNEST A.
MAI.EY,  MAVIS
MANN,   DONALD   E.
MANNING, DAVID J.
MANSON,   MARION   McT.
MARGESON, RUTH C.
MARKLAND,   IRENE
MARPOLE,   SHIRLEY   J.
MARSH,   WALTER  C.
MARSHALL,   HENRY   J.
MARTIN,   JAMES   P.
MATHERS,  JOHN   H.
MATHESON, WILLIAM D.
MAXWELL,   NOEL  R.
METCALF, R.  HUGH
MICHAS, LUCAS
MILLER,   IAN   McK.
MILLIGAN,  M.  BARBARA
MILLS,   ROBERT   M.
MILNE,   JACK   E.
MILTON,  JOSEPH  J.
MITCHELL,  JAMES  G.
MITTEN,   DOUGLAS   S.
MODELAND,   CLARENCE   E.
MONTADOR,  DAVID R.
MOONEY,   HENRY C.
MOORE, CHARLES A.
MOORE,  DONNA M.
MORGAN,   HELEN  E.
MORGAN,  H.  WILLIAM
MORGAN, MARGARET E.
MORIYAMA,   HISATOSHI
MORRIS,   FRED   S.
MURDOCH,   W.   GEORGE  M.
MURPHY,   GLORIA   M.
MURRAY,   BERNICE   V.
MURRAY,   BRUCE   McD.
MYHILL-JONES,   WILLIAM  R.
McBAY,   ROBERT   R.
McCarthy,  albert
macaulay, donald j.
McCLOSKEY, KEITH P.
McCONACHIE,   ROYDEN   M.
McDONALD,  ALAN  T. P.
MACDONALD,   GORDON  E.
MacDONALD,    HAROLD    M.
McDONALD,    L.    MARION
MACDONALD,  MARY J.
McDONELL,  D.  JEAN
MacFARLANE,   B.   ROY
McFARLANE, HELEN E.
McGEER,   MICHAEL   G.   S.
McGHEE,  MARGARET G.
MacGILLIVRAY,   JACK   0.
Arts '45
Grizzlies just scored another touchdown—gloom.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-one MacKENZIE,  ALEX
MacKENZIE,  D. MUNRO
MacKENZIE,   HUBERT   N.
MacKENZIE,   KENNETH   R.
McKILLOP,   EILEEN
McLAREN,  ADA  L.
McLAREN,   JAMES   B.
MacLEAN,  EIAN D.
McLEAN,  FRANCES  M.
MacLEAN,   J.   ROSS
McLEISH,   SHEILA   A.
McLELLAN, ROBERT N.
Mclennan, donald m.
MacLEOD,   H.  ELISABETH
MacLEOD, MARGARET H.
MacMILLAN,  GRACE  S.
macpherson, barbara
Mcpherson, Charlie j.
McRAE,   HELEN   E.
MacRAE, JEFFERY W.
NAGATA,   FUSAKO   R.
NAKASHIBA, MITSUO G.
NASH, MORLEY E. B.
NEWSON, DONALD A.
NICHOL, JOHN L.
NICHOLS)   DOROTHY
NICOLLS,   JOAN   G.
NISHIO,   NORI-KAZU
NOBBS, WILLIAM H. L.
NOEL, J. GORDON
OHLSEN, RAY C
OKADA,  HENRY  Y.
OKUMURA,   SHIGEHARU
OLDERSHAW, C.  G.   (PETER)
ORE,   ELIZABETH   J.
OSHIRO, ROY
OSTLE,  BERNARD
OSTROM,  E.  MARGARET
OWEN,  MARGARET G.
OWEN,  ROBERT J.
PARKINSON,   GEOFFREY   V.
PATERSON,   KATHLEEN   M.
PATRICK, SHEELAH E.
PAULIN,   M.  ELIZABETH
PAYSON,   DOROTHY  B.
PEARSON,   DONALD   E.   T.
PEATFIELD,   JOHN   H.
PELLICANO,   JOHN   P.
PENZER,  JOHN   N.
PERRIS,  GEORGE
PHILLIPS,   BARBARA   B.
PHILPS, FRED M.
PINTON, MARJORIE F.
POLLINGTON,  VERA
POOLE,   DISNEY   B.
POP,  SYBIL  M.
POSTLETHWAITE,  GWYNNE
PRATT,  A. ELIZABETH
PRONGER, IVY R.
PROVERBS,   R.  ADELE
QUAN,   MARY
QUEBEC,   MONA   B.   G.
RADCLIFFE,    ROLAND    W.
Arts '45
Intricate problem is illustrated by professor.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-two RAPHAEL, CLEMENT D.
RAPHAEL,  LESLIE  A.
RAVVIN,   ALBERT
RAY,  NORMAN J.
REID,  LOIS C.
REID,   WILLIAM   W.
REKSTEN,   ARVID   L.
RENWICK,  F. ELIZABETH
RESTON,   MARY   McD.
REYNOLDS,   M.   ELIZABETH
RICHARDS,   FRANCES
RIFE,   JOSEPH  C.
ROBERTSON,    DONALD    W.
ROBERTSON,   JAMES   D.
ROBINSON,   W.   LESLIE
RODGERS,   M.   JOAN
ROSE, MARY E.
ROSEBOROUGH,   EVELYN   I.
ROSS,  BERNARD  F.  J.
RUTQUIST,   FRED  E.
RYAN,   LAURA   L.
RYAN,  MARGARET C.
SASAKI, MITSURU
SCOONES,  ANN E.
SCOTT,  ANTHONY, D.
SCOTT, JOHN T.
SCOTT,   MARGARET   C.
SEXSMITH,   WILLIAM   B.
SEYER,   ANTHONY   W.
SHANNON,   JOYCE   H.
SHAW,   RONALD   S.
SHELLING,  ANNE  M.
SHERBORNE,   PATRICIA   M.
SHERRATT,   MONA  M.
SHIMO-TAKAHARA,    LLOYD    H.
SHIOZAKI,   FUMIHARU   R.
SHOUL, ALBERT  L.
SIMMONS,   PATRICIA
SINCLAIR,   DONALD   A.
SMALLEY,   ROBERT  C.
SMITH,   P.   ANNE
SMITH, ROBERT E.
SMITH,  ROGER  C.
SOLUM,   BERNA   E.
SPEIRS, HAROLD M.
SPREULL, ELIZABETH B.
STAMATIS,  D.  PATRICIA
ST. CLAIR,  VIVIAN I. I.
STEELE,   JOHN   A.
STEELE, ROBERT G.
STEUART, KENNETH M.
STEVENS,  J.  EARL
STEVENSON,  MARGARET E.
STEWART,  ANN M.
STILL,  CONSTANCE  L.  B.
STONHOUSE,   ALICE   H.
STORMONT,  AUDREY  K.
STREET, WILLIAM A.
SUTHERLAND,  GORDON M.
SUTHERLAND,   HERBERT   W.
SUTHERLAND, JOHN   H.
SUTTON,   DONALD   A.
SWEENY,   D.    MOIRA
Arts '45
The Library—everybody's study hall.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-three TAILLEFER,  WARREN  R.
TAYLOR,  DOREEN   M.
TERRACE, JAMES R. W.
THICKE, RONALD B.
THOMAS,  JOHN  W.
THOMAS,  WALLACE  J.
THOMPSON, B. DORENE
THOMPSON, DAVID D.
THOMPSON,  ROSS  S.
THORSTEINSON,   JOHN   W.
TIERNEY, LETITIA M. A.
TOOPE,  MARY   L.
TRUMBULL,  MARY  F.
TURKO,   MICHAEL
UNDERHILL, C. DAVID
VAN de PUTTE, MADELINE L.
VAN GORDER, C. JULIA
VAUGHAN, ANNIE J.
VESTERBACK,   GRETA   A.
VINCENT,  VIVIAN  A.
WADMAN, HAMILTON G.
WALDRON, BENJAMIN  H.
WALKER, D.  URSULA
WALKER, THOMAS W.  H.
WALKER, WILLIAM G.
WALLACE,   DAVID   E.
WALTER,  BRUCE   H.
WARK, BRUCE E.
WEBB, CHARLES J.
WEBBER,  DONALD  G.
WEBSTER, ROBERT J.
WELDON, D. NONA
WEST,  JAMES  T.
WHELAN,  PATRICIA  R.
WHITE,  E. JEAN
WHITE, LOISE A.
WHITE, RUTH L.
WILKINSON, BARCLAY R.
WILLCOCKS. F. SHIRLEY
WILLIAMS,  DAVID  R.
WILLIAMS,  FRANCES  M.  D.
WILLIAMS, MARGERY S.
WILLIAMS, W. JAMES
WILSON, ATHOLL L.
WILSON,  EWING  S.
WILSON,   FLORENCE  M.
WILSON.   FRANK  D.
WILSON, ROBERT G.
WISMER,  JACK
WITHLER, FREDERICK C.
WONG.  WILLIAM
WOOD.   NORMAN  M.
WOOD, STANLEY C.
WOODSWORTH, RICHD. W.
WOODWARD, CHARLES
WRIGHT, GLORIA D.
WRIGHT. KENNETH McK.
WRIGHT, KENNETH T.
WYRZYKOWSKI.  JOHN  D.
YANO, FRED S.
YATES.   NORMA   M.
YELLOWLEES, ROBIN A.
YIP, STANLEY D.
YORKE, BRUCE
YORSTON,   SHIRLEY
YOUNG,  VICTOR M.
YOUNG. WILLIAM M.
BEHNSEN. THELMA
FRANKLIN,  HENRY J.
JOHNSON. VICTOR W.
HORNE, PAULINE
Arts '45
Sciencemen watch in safety.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-four
Aggie re-dons pants. Science '42 . . .
Into the bosom of a Canada hard at war went young
men, this year's crop of graduates from the Applied
Science faculty of U.B.C. They left the campus to
enter a Canada beset by aggression, pitifully in need
of trained technicians, with the assurance of their
government that their training will not be wasted this
time as it was in World War 1.
In the past, these graduates of Applied Science have
gone out to the mines, the survey camps, the construction firms, and the forest developments of Canada, merely as men schooled in the science of construction and extraction, intent on keeping alive the
vast Canadian industry which has grown up around
the country's natural resources, and of securing for
themselves a livelihood.
The future of these young men is, this year, vastly
different from what it would have been three years
ago. Today, theirs is a future of work, essential to
the preservation of a democratic world, and although
hardend by the task of five years of concentrated
study and shy of political ideologies, these young
technicians appreciate the difficulty of the task that
lies ahead.
Into government war research, and essential war
industries then, go these, the members of Science '42,
President, Donald Parham.
Howard Bennett, Earl Johnson and Harold Fargey.
equipped with a technical skill obtained in five years
of class room and laboratory study, combined with a
practical knowledge gained through summer employment in mines, forestry, construction camps, and
engineering firms.
The sense of this grave responsibility, did not, however, weigh so heavily on their shoulders that all else
was forgotten.
Members of Science '42 took a particularly active
part in the life of student government and extracurricular affairs this year, as evidenced by the work
of the Science Men's Undergraduate Society, the executive of which largely consisted of Science '42
students.
Co-ordinator of all applied science activities, S.M.
U.S. this year staged a most successful Science Ball in
February, Science '42 again playing a large part in
the annual edition of the college paper, the sponsoring
of a class party, and Fall banquet, and the arranging
of and performing at pep meets.
Adjuncts of their classroom and laboratory work
are the many clubs of Applied Science, most of which
are under the control of the men of Science '42.
The executive for Science '42 this year was: Honourary President, Dr. Smith; President, Donald Parham; Vice-President, Harold Fargey; Secretary-
Treasurer, Howard Bennett.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-five ANDERSON, THOMAS T.—Westview
Chem. Soc, Chem. Eng. Soc.
ANGLEY, WILLIAM F.—Regina, Sask.
Chem. Eng. Soc.
BENNETT, REGINALD B.—Vancouver
Chem. Eng. Soc.
BUSHELL, CHARLES H.—Vancouver
CAVERS, STUART D.—Vancouver
Chem. Soc, Chem. Eng. Soc.
DICKSON, FRANK A.—Vancouver
FARGEY, HAROLD T.—Vancouver
Chem. Eng. Soc.
GRAY, DENIS H—Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta
HAMMERSLEY, ROBERT C—Vancouver
HARVEY, BRUCE F.—Revelstoke
HOPPER, DAVID A.—Vancouver
Basketball, Track
MUSSALLEM, PETER M.—Haney
Chem. Eng. Soc
McGOWAN, JOHN—Vancouver
MacKENZIE, JOHN  S.—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta
McLELLAN, DONALD E.—Vancouver
Chem. Eng. Soc.
ORR, OSCAR F.—Vancouver
Canadian Football; Phi Gamma Delta
PARHAM, DONALD S.—Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta
POTKINS, ROBERT A.—Vancouver
Chem. Soc; English Rugby; Kappa Sigma
POULSON, J. HOWARD—Saanichton
Phi Delta Theta
RUSH, IAN C—Hollyburn
Delta Upsilon
SMITH, ERIC L.—Vancouver
Chem. Eng. Soc; Kappa Sigma
WHITE,  CHARLES E.—Vancouver
Chem. Eng. Soc.
BELL, HARRY R.—Ladner
DOUGLASS, MARTIN K.—New Westminster
HARDING, JOHN H.—Nelson
McKENZIE, WILLIAM C—New Westminster
Science '42
Soward, Morris, and Finlayson at Science Banquet.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-six STEWART, JAMES N.—Vancouver
Zeta Psi
THORSON, VICTOR—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta
BASTIN, DOUGLAS Vl.-V ancouver
BRADFIELD, ALBERT W.—Nanaimo
A.I.E.E.
BUNDY, LEONARD P.—Vancouver
CASSON, VINCENT H.—Victoria
A.I.E.E.; Sigma Phi Delta
CHU, GAN D.—Vancouver
Chinese  Students
COLLINS, JOHN A.—North Vancouver
A.I.E.E.; Track; Sigma Phi Delta
DAVIE, HUGH S.—Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
HILLS, JOHN F.—Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
JAMIESON, FRASER
A.I.E.E.; Phi Kappa Pi
RICH, ROYCE— Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
WALTON, ERNEST N.—Vancouver
Outdoor, A.I.E.E.
ZITKO,  LUDORIC—Vancouver
BOSS, NORMAN H. -Nelson
BUCKLAND, DONALD C.-Vancouver
Biol. Disc. Club; Biol. Council; Forestry Club
BYERS, ARCHIE M.—Vancouver
Forestry;  Golf, Canadian Football;
Phi Kappa Sigma
FLYNN, JAMES E.—Vancouver
Forestry  Club
FRASER, ALAN— West Vancouver
Forestry;  Skiing
KAGETSU, HAJIME— Vancouver
S.C.M.;  Japanese Students', Cosmopolitan, Forestry
MATHESON, CHESTER R.—Lang Bay
Forestry
MacFAYDEN, ROBERT D.—Vancouver
Musical Society
RICHARDS, IAN T.—West Vancouver
Forestry; Eng. Rugby; Phi Kappa Pi
SPROTT, EDGAR R.—Vancouver
THOMPSON, ELMER A.—New Westminster
Forestry
Science '42
Science can-can for Red Cross dollars.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-seven iWM
ABRAMS, JACK H.—Nanaimo
G. M. Dawson
CARLISLE, DONALD—Vancouver
DARLEY, HARRY P.—Delta, Colorado
G. M. Dawson, Outdoors Club
DRUMMOND, ALAN S. -Victoria
Football, Boxing; Psi Upsilon
GROSS, WILLIAM H.—Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta
HILCHEY,  GORDON  R—Vancouver
G. M. Dawson
KERMODE, EDWARD J.—Vancouver
LEECH, GEOFFREY B.—Salmon Arm
G. M. Dawson, Outdoors Club
RENSHAW, RODNEY E.—North Vancouver
G. M. Dawson, Mamooks, Rugby
SHEPHERD, A. FRASER—Victoria
G. M. Dawson, Rugby
BARTON, EDWARD S— Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta
BRUCE, NORMAN C—Golden
A.S.M.E.
CURRAN, HENRY M.—Vancouver
Newman;  A.S.M.E.
GRANGER, JOHN  M.—Vancouver
HUNT, WILLIAM R.—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta
JOHNSON, EARL W.—Vancouver
A.S.M.E.; Rugby; Sigma Phi Delta
JOHNSON, WILLIAM J.    Vancouver
LOGAN, JACK D.— Vancouver
A.S.M.E.
NASH, CHARLES W.—Vancouver
Newman Club; V.C.U., A.S.M.E.; Pres. M.U.S.
NASMYTH, PAN H.—North Vancouver
ROONEY, SIDNEY C. -North Vancouver
V.O.C;  Skiing, Sailing, Hiking
SHELDON, STANLEY W.—New Westminster
TARBOX, JOHN W.—Vancouver
Skiing; Phi Kappa Pi
BELL, GORDON M.—Vancouver
G. M. Dawson, Skiing, Hiking
HAYWOOD-FARMER, ROBERT-^Sauona
Science '42
Engineers satisfy appetite at Banquet.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-eight MORRISON, BERNARD H.—Nelson
apROBERTS, G. EVAN—Vancouver
Football, Track, Zeta Psi
BENNETT, JOSEPH H.—Vancouver
G. M. Dawson; Sigma Phi Delta
DAVIES, KENNETH R.—Kimberley
G. M. Dawson
EDWARDS, DONALD M.—Cranbrook
Sigma Phi Delta
FAIRBAIRN, DENNIS W.—Vancouver
Basketball, Badminton; Phi Kappa Pi
GATENBY, LISLE B.—Vancouver
G. M. Dawson; Rugby
McARTHUR, JOHN P.—Vancouver
Hockey, Rugby; Phi Kappa Pi
SNOW, JAMES C.—Creelman, Sask.
TUCKER, JACK N.—Vancouver
Rugby, Football, Boxing; Delta Upsilon
WOOD, DAVID G.—Prince Albert, Sask.
(1) Coke for Red Cross. (2) Mechanical Engineers. (3) Infamous Science ball. (4) Major
Clowes. (5) Soward at Science banquet. (6)
Lt. Klinckhammer.    (7) Aggie gets "depanted."
Science '42
Page One Hundred and Twenty-nine Science '43 . . .
Over one hundred strong, the class of Science '43
moved into their fourth year of Applied Science,
their first big year of specialized work. For it is in
fourth year that engineers split up to go into the
chosen fields of Chemical, Mechanical, Electrical,
Mining, Forestry, Civil, Geological, or Metallurgical
engineering.
There can be no doubt but that the members of
Science '43 back the government's war effort wholeheartedly, since the class, as a whole, has gone on
record as favouring, if desired, the scheme to continue their studies throughout the summer months in
order to graduate five months earlier.
The government needs engineers, they reason, and
if by sacrificing a few months of summer holidays,
the class of Science '43 can help win the war, then no
sacrifice is too great.
Besides preparing themselves for positions in Canada's defense industries, the members of the class
took an active interest in the armed services. At least
eight per cent of the class have left their studies to
take up arms, in the active forces. In the campus
O.T.C, Science '43 has two commissioned officers,
and fifteen N.CO.'s.
All the work in connection with fourth year Applied
Science, and military training, did not dampen the
P^^^|-»-»-»-^"
:«P
S                                                                                                                       *   Tb^.                               ff                     m%r
P^\\\\\m\\\m. W    '^^\m\\                             '^/^mWm^mWmm
n m
' 1                                         H
1
M
\*
Many  are  the  long,   complex  lab.   experiments
Doug Jessup, Stan Patterson,  Walter Green
ardour of Science '43 in extra-curricular affairs. Four
members of the class were on the executive of the
Science Men's Undergraduate Society that was responsible for the revival of noon hour science pep
meets.
President of S.M.U.S., diminutive Rod Morris,
received terrific support from the entire faculty in
A.M.S. elections, was elected to the post of president
of Students' Council for the following year.
Another prominent member of the class, Arvid
Backman, lumbering Forestry student, contested the
post of treasurer of Students' Council, and won. Back-
man was also president of the Undergraduate Engineering Society, and one of the Parliamentary Forum
debaters that brought the McGoun Cup back to the
campus.
Campbell Williams, Harold Graham, and Sandy
Buckland were Science '43 men on S.M.U.S., Ernie
Mason was president of the Ski Club, Sandy Buck-
land, Ian Schiedel, and John Stewart councillors of
the Outdoors Club. Nearly all other applied science
clubs had members of the class on their executives.
The executive for Science '43 this year consisted
of: President, Stan Patterson; Secretary-Treasurer,
Doug Jessup; Athletic Representative, Walter Green.
Page One Hundred and Thirty BUCK, F. A. MACKINNON
BUCKLAND, JOHN A. C
CAMPBELL, GEORGE C.
COCHRAN,JOHN
DAY, ALVIN A.
GRAHAM, HAROLD M.
GREEN, WALTER C.
HOLE, JOHN S.
HORNE, LESLIE R.
KING, A. DAVID
MANN, CLARENCE W. J.
MILLER, DOUGLAS G.
MILLER, JOSEPH G.
McCAY, JAMES
McLEOD, ALEXANDER A.
PRIEST,JACK
PYLE, R. GORDON
STEEL, WILLIAM E. J.
STUSIAK, MICHAEL
SWEENEY, MAXWELL P.
TABATA, MINORU
TAYLOR, HUGH J.
TSUJIMURA, KOICHI
WEINER, HARRY S.
WHITE, RONALD J.
WILLIAMS, F. CAMPBELL
ZABINSKI, JOHN
BAKER, D. LEACROFT
COPP, STANLEY S.
THOMPSON, JAMES  V.
Science '43
Science at work and play; pep meets and drafting
Page One Hundred and Thirty-one BALDWIN, JOHN H.
BARTHOLOMEW, BEN
BOURNE, EDWARD A.
CARTER, RONALD B.
ELLIOTT, ALBERT H.
FRASER, GEORGE B. R.
GARDINER, A. HOLMES
GORDON, FRANCIS J.
GRAY, JOHN S.
HANDFORTH, VICTOR
HUGHES, R. B. CHALMERS
JESSUP, G. DOUGLAS
LEONG, DENNIS T. S.
LEPSOE, CHRISTIAN H.
PATTERSON, LAWRENCE A.
PATTERSON, STANLEY G.
' ROBERTS, STANLEY C.
STEWART,  ALLAN J.
BACKMAN, ARVID H. V.
FORRESTER, A. GLEN
KULLANDER, MARVIN 0.
SCHIEDEL, IAN H.
BLANCHET, PETER H.
DeLEEN, JOHN L.
MORRIS, HARRY R.
MacRAE, HECTOR R.
McTAGGART, KENNETH C.
BANNERMAN, DONALD K.
Science '43
Science eats
Science attacks Aggie
Page One Hundred and Thirty-two BLAKE, DONALD H. R.
CARLYLE, DAVID G.
CHARLESWORTH, F. H. B.
COVERDALE, HAROLD M.
COX, LEONARD
DUNELL, G. ERIC
GOODWIN, WALTER H.
HADDAD, MICHAEL A.
HAMMOND, JOHN S. N.
HARRISON, JOHN S. M.
HUTCHINSON, BRUCE
LEAR, HAROLD K.
MASON, ERNEST
MILLER, JAMES W.
ROACH, STEWART W.
ROGERS, JOHN S.
SMITH, FRANK F.
SPAETGENS, THEODORE W.
SUTCLIFFE, E. DOUGLAS
WEED, JOSEPH D.
BENSON, EDWARD
LIVINGSTONE, HUGHIE
BELEY, JOHN P.
GILL, NORMAN A.
SMITH, WILLIAM R.
Science '43
The practical end: machine shop and lab.
Page One Hundred and Thirty-three Science '44 . . .
September, 1941: Students of Applied Science
moved into their third year as students at U.B.C, their
second year in Applied Science.
April, 1942: those same students had, in seven
months, established a fine scholastic, and extra-curricular record which ppoke well of the future of the
Applied Science faculty and of Science '44.
Although not yet segregated into the various
branches of applied science to which they were to
expend many hours of toil the class of Science '44
threw themselves into their work with an added vigour
inspired by the fact that their government, and more
especially, the War Department of that government,
had urged them to continue their studies, graduate,
and then offer their services.
Nor was Science '44 lacking in that spirit of camaraderie which has distinguished Applied Science
classes at U.B.C. for so many years.
Never were its members overshadowed by upperclassmen in the various extra-curricular activities of
Science. Unshirkingly did they accept the burden of
military training, which, coupled with their extremely
heavy timetable accounted for so many of the few
spare hours in every week.
President,  Bob  Davidson
Jim Scott, Blair Anderson
Not only notable, but also somewhat of a rarity,
was one member of Science '44, Edna Clarke.
Edna, the only girl enrolled in Applied Science at
U.B.C, progressed steadily on the way towards a
degree in mechanical engineering, and, later, aeronautical engineering.
Others who distinguished themselves academically
were Stan Beaton, Carl Pearson, and David Rose who
passed examinations with averages close to ninety
percent.
Busy were the members of Science '44 on the
athletic front, curtailed though it was. Paul Cote gave
up much time in the Fall, gained a place on the Canadian Football squad. Al Narod, Paul Jagger, Frank
Ehman, and John Hicks were among the many English
rugby enthusiasts, Narod being chosen as a scrum
man for the McKechnie Cup and C.O.T.C. rugger
teams.
Rowing obtained the services of Barry Sleigh, who
acted as the club's vice-president, John Slater, and Mel
Johnson, the latter two gaining positions in the first
"eight". Science '44 was well represented on the ice
hockey team. Alf Bonutto and Jim Goodman turning
out for the blademen, and Jack Carlile acting as team
manager.
The executive of Science '44 this year was: Honourary President, Major A. H. Finlay; President, Bob
Davidson; Secretary-Treasurer, Blair Anderson;
Athletic Representative, Jim Scott.
Page One Hundred and Thirty-four ABBOTT, HUGH M.
ANDERSON, BLAIR W.
AUCHINLECK, GILBERT F.
BEATON,  STANLEY  J.
BENNETT, ORVAL W.
BENTALL, ROBERT  G.
BLEZARD, ROY J.
BONUTTO, ALFRED L.
BOURNS, JOHN D.
BURTON, JOHN A.
CAINE, GEOFFREY R.
CALDWELL,  JOHN   R.
CARLILE, JACK C.
CARNCROSS, CHARLES A.
CARROTHERS, PERCIVAL J. G.
CHESTNUT, R. GLENN
CHRISTIE, A. S. HUGH
CLARKE, EDNA A.
CLAY, CHARLES H.
CONFORTIN, JOHN C.
COOPER, ALEXANDER C.
COTE,  PAUL  T.
CURRIE, ALLAN
DAVIDSON, ROBERT A.
EKMAN, FRANK 0.
FILMAN, NORMAN J.
FROST, PAUL J.
GAGNON, BERNARD U.
GALL, LOUIS J.
GITTERMAN. LOUIS  H.
GODFREY, GERALD F.
GOODMAN, JAMES E.
GUSH, JOHN B.
HAILE,  ISAAC
HAUSCH, ROBERT C.
HICKS, JOHN B.
HOOD, JOHN A.
HOOKINGS, PAUL H. H.
HOOPER, PERRY McF.
JAGGER, PAUL  S.
JULSON, 0. MELVIN
KATO,  YOICHI
LaBELLE, EUGENE P.
LANGENEK, FREDERICK
LEA, EDGAR R.
LEGEER,  RONALD  J.
LIVINGSTON, DONALD A.
MANNING, RICHARD C.
mW       ^^bM       ^Br     j ^^Lm
wm 6f
Gas drill in afternoon
Bren gun carrier crew
Science '44
Page One Hundred and Thirty-five MARZOCCO, ALDO
MOSHER, ALLISON F.
MOSHER, VAUGHAN L.
MURRAY, JOHN M.
McADAM, J. CLIFTON
McCARTER, DONALD C.
MacKAY, RONALD N.
McLEAN, DONALD
McLEOD, DONALD F.
McLORG, TERENCE W.
McNAUGHTON,  JAMES  H.
NAROD, ALVIN J.
OLES, JACK E.
ONTKEAN, ORVILLE M.
PEARSON, CARL E.
PORTER, JAMES A.
ROBINSON, DENNIS E.
ROME, ALEXANDER II.
ROSE, DAVID J.
SAUNDERS, HAROLD L.
SCARISBRICK, RICHARD   G.
SCEATS, HUGH B.
SCOTT, H. JAMES
SCOTT, WILLIAM B.
SHAW, ALEXANDER J.
SHUMAS, FRED
SIMPSON, JOHN D.
SLATER, JOHN S.
SLEIGH, EDWARD B.
SMALL, FREDERICK
SMITH, H. LESLIE
SOULSBY, ALAN  St.G.
STEELE, IAN McL.
STEWART, HAROLD C. E.
SWERDFEGER, JOHN H.
SYME,  THOMAS D.
TAYLOR, NORMAN E.
TAYLOR, R. DOUGLAS
THOMPSON, C. H. A.
THORSON, EM1L
TIEDJE, JOHN L.
TOOMBS, E. HAROLD
WALLACE, JOHN M.
WATSON, STAPLETON A.
WILDING, MALCOLM M.
WILLOX, GEORGE J.
WINTEMUTE, JOHN R.
WORKMAN, ALLAN B.
YIP, ROY W.
Science '44
Rifles piled, this quintet enjoys "break"
Page One Hundred and Thirty-six Science '45 . . .
Erasing the stigma of a year spent as freshmen in
Arts, and acclimatizing themselves to Applied Science
has been the consuming passion of almost two hundred new redshirts, the men of Science '45.
Sciencemen have an everlasting contempt born of
years of faculty competition, of the men of Arts and
Science. Whenever a new class is accepted into the
ranks of the Engineers, they are taught, by the senior
members, to carry on this spirit. Never, in the entire
year, did Science '45 show any signs of weakening.
So wholeheartedly did they enter into the spirit of
Science, that they threatened to overshadow the
sleeker seniors in vehemence.
No easy job was it, either for these two hundred to
accustom themselves to the rigorous timetable, the
long laboratory hours, which they were meeting for
the first time.
In the first place, an initial requirement imposed
upon them by the Applied Science faculty is that they
must graduate from their freshmen year with an
average of sixty percent. This, though, is but a harbinger of the hazards that lie ahead.
As members of Science '45 they are given their first
real insight into the tortuous road down which they
must journey  (. . .no hitchhiking here)   before be-
President, Bruce Baker
Howard Shadwell, Bill Bell
coming full-fledged engineers. Usually after travelling
the first leg of the trip, many of the students change
their mind, transfer to Arts or Aggie, or leave University for jobs.
Nor was Science '45 lacking in individual stars on
the extra-curricular front. Although sciencemen find
little time for diversion, especially now with military
training absorbing so much of what used to be "spare
time", several members made history.
Harry Kermode, beanpole basketball player, won
a Big Block in his first year of Senior "A" basketball.
Another class member, Howard Shadwell, caught a job
with the team in the capacity of assistant manager, and
will be slated to take over the post of senior manager
next year.
The lone Canadian football game of the year, staged
as part of the Homecoming program, saw two Science
'45 men in action in the persons of Bill Bell and Bud
Fairgrieve, while Al Gillespie (now in the Navy) was
a first string man on the McKechnie Cup rugger squad.
Only sad note in the year for Science '45 was the
death of David Jones, one of the class' most popular
members, during the Christmas holidays.
The executive for Science '45 this year was: Honourary President, Professor A. Peebles; President,
Bruce Baker; Secretary-Treasurer, Howard Shadwell;
Athletic Representative, Bill Bell.
Page One Hundred and Thirty-seven ANDERSON, J. DOUGLAS
AVIS, STANLEY
BAAL, G. GILBERT
BAKER, F. BRUCE
BARER, RALPH D.
BARRY, FRANK W.
BAYLY, LEMUEL J.
BELL, S. WILLIAM
BERRYMAN, DAVID J.
BIBBS, RICHARD  M.
BINNIE, ROBERT F.
BISHOP, PHILIP E.
BLAKLEY, HERBERT A.
BLUMENAUER, GEO. H.
BODNAR, MICHAEL W.
BOYLE, FREDERICK A.
BRAMALL, BRIAN L.
BRANDON,  GEORGE F.
BRERETON, GILBERT W.
BRYANT, JAMES L.
BUNNELL, FRANK R.
CARLYLE, ALLAN  M.
CARMICHAEL, HARVEY A.
CAULFIELD,   WILLIAM   J.
CHALLIS, LESLIE A.
CHALMERS, W. ROBERT
CHECKO, ANDREW
CHRISTOPHERSON, CHAS. J.
CLIFTON, EVERARD H.
COCHRAN, EDWARD 0.
COCHRANE, JAMES A.
COLEOPY, NORMAN
COOKE, NORMAN E.
CROCKER,  CHARLES  B.
CURTIN, F. JERRY
DAWSON, JOHN A.
DAYKIN, PHILIP N.
de MACEDO, J. BERNARD
DENNIS, LESLIE
DENNISON, JAMES A.
DIXON, HUGH C.
DRAKE,   EDWARD   A.
DREW, J. SYDNEY
DUNELL, BASIL A.
EDDLESTONE, JAMES A.
ELLIS, HARRY  McP.
EYRE, ALAN M. L.
FAIRGRIEVE,   WILLIAM   C.
Science '45
Members of the faculty chat with Rod Morris at Science Banquet
Page One Hundred and Thirty-eight FEDOROFF, BORIS
FINNIE, J. DOUGLAS
FITCH, HANDLY F.
FLEISCHER,  EDWIN P.
FLEMING, BRYCE H.
FORSTER, JOHN A. B.
FOSTER, LEO W.
FRANCIS, FRANK M.
FRARESSO, VENANZIO
FRASER, D. ARTHUR
GALBRAITH, D. EWEN
GALLAGHER, JACK  L.
GARDNER, MELVIN T.
GOLDING, JOHN W.
GORDON, GEORGE A.
GRAVES, HAROLD B. R.
GREGORY,  EDWARD   S.
GRIFFITHS, DONALD F.
GRIMBLE, WILFRED G.
GUICHON, LLOYD J.
HANDA, ROY
HANEY, D. FRANCIS
HATTE, ROSS
HEALEY, ALBERT J.
HETHERINGTON, JOHN D.
HOLE, FREDERICK R.
HOWIE, HENRY J.
HRYNCHUK,  WALTER
HUDSON,   WILLIAM   H.
ISHERWOOD, .SIDNEY  D.
JOHNSON, LEONARD C.
JONES, DAVID J.
JONES, HUGH C.
JONES, MICHAEL J.
KELLS, OWEN C.
KERMODE, HARRY D.
KERR, ROBERT G.
LAM, MATHIAS
LEAN, ALF H.
LEBEDOVICH, STEPHEN
LeBUS,  GEORGE  H.
LEEDHAM,  DAVID  A.
LEFEAUX, STUART S.
LEITH, JAMES A.
LIGHTHALL, WILLIAM D.
LINDSAY, J. RODERICK A.
LLOYD, GEORGE A.
LONG, JOSEPH D.
Science '45
Science is indejatigible in producing pep meet skits
Page One Hundred and Thirty-nine LYTLE, DENNIS D.
MARTIN, R. LIONEL McC
millar, douglas a.
miura, j. hideo
mohr, frank k.
montador, andrew j.
moore, donald c.
morrison, robert j.
morton, roy e.
munroe, lawrence r.
murray, george
macdonald, iain a.
McDonnell, basil
McGregor, f. chris
McGUINNESS, DAVID
MacKAY, WALLACE I.
MacKINNON,   DONALD  F.
McLENNAN,  JOHN  A.
MacMILLAN, DONALD G.
Mcquillan, Murray r.
nairne, ronald s.
newberry, gordon e.
newbury, eddie w.
nuttall, david e.
oates, rowland c. j.
olsen, j. norman
olson, e. robert
orskog, arthur g.
parliament, j. harvey
parnum, ewart
payne, harold r.
piercy, earle w.
powell, john r. p.
pratt, christopher g.
ritchie, arthur g.
robinson, clifford
robinson, donald b.
roos, albert e.
roots, e. fredrick
roper, austin j.
ruck, william
sexsmith, roderic f.
shadwell, howard j.
shoji, henry n.
smith, herbert s.
smith, jack
smuin, eugene g.
speakman, george
Science '45
Student instructor details ambush technique
Page One Hundred and Forty STAMFORD, GORDON W.
STEFANELLI, JOHN
STORY, JACK W.
STRATTON, DONALD K.
STUART, WILLIAM B.
TARRANT, E. HARRY
TAYLOR, LEONARD H.
TIMMONS, ANTHONY
TOWNSEND, JAMES B.
TURLEY, FRANCIS E.
WALKER, WILLIAM M.
WALTON, HOWARD  W. G.
WANNOP, LEONARD G.
WATANABE, SABURO
WATE, GEORGE K.
WEICKER,  CHARLES M.
WIGEN, SYDNEY 0.
WILLIAMS, THOMAS G.
WILLIS, CHARLES N.
WOO, JOHN S.
WOODCROFT, JOHN F. D.
WOODMAN, THOMAS
YIP, CHUCK W.
YUNGER, ANDREW H.
Science '45
(1) Ready for gas drill. (2) Junior Member Buck
slopes arms. (3) Bren guns fire at target. (4) Squad
gives "eyes right" to reviewer. (5) Phyllis Ellis aids
Milk Fund. (6) Student soldiers rest 'neath Vimy
Ridge memorial.
Page One Hundred and Forty-one Aggie '42 . . .
With the war getting more complex every day,
with every corner of the globe directly concerned
with its outcome, with the growing feeling in informed circles that the war will last for a good many
years, the importance of Agriculture increases.
Nations must eat to wage wars. No soldier, no
matter how equipped or mechanized, can fight on an
empty stomach. For every man in the munitions
factory, there must be a man in the fields.
And Canada is short of trained agriculturists.
Even more, Canada is short of students training
in agriculture. This year, the enrollment in every
faculty except Agriculture increased. Not only does
this mean that every graduate in Aggie this year,
a member of Aggie '42, assumes a position of unusual
importance in the country's war effort, but also, that
upon him depends much of the encouraging of young
Canada to follow the same profession.
Foreshadowing of the spirit with which these members of Aggie '42 will accept the burden is to be
found  in the  fact that they have  given  themselves
President, Douglas Hunter
Secretary, Jean McMullan
over to industrious pursuit of their academic work,
engaging in much research work, and taking extra
courses which they do not need for their degree.
Too, they have played a major role in seeing that
the extra-curricular clubs of agriculture were kept
going. With their Junior Canadian Society of Technical Agriculturists, the first of its kind on a Canadian university campus, they established valuable
contacts with business men in the field.
Even with the burden of military training over their
head, these men and women of Aggie '42 did not
become totally submerged in their work. When they
took time off to play, they displayed a spirit so rabid
as to make the men of Applied Science seem but
weaklings.
The feature of the year was the traditional Arts-
Aggie Ball, when the two faculties unite for an evening. To foster a better understanding between
students and faculty, a tea was staged at which professors and their wives met and conversed with the
undergraduates.
The executive of Aggie '42 this year consisted of:
President, Douglas Hunter; Secretary, Jean McMullen.
Page One Hundred and Forty-two BENTLEY, ROBERT  0.—Vancouver
Major: Animal  Husbandry;  Beta Theta Pi
BROWN,  KENNETH R.—Vancouver
Major:  Agronomy
Agric.   Disc.   Club;   Kappa   Sigma
CAMPBELL, JAMES M.—Vancouver
Major:  Agronomy;  Jr. C.S.T.A.
CHANG,  JUNE—Vancouver
Major:   Hort.;   Chinese   Student   Club
CLEMENT, JOHN  W.—Vancouver
Major: Dairying;
Rugby; Phi Delta Theta
COHEN, THEODORE—Vancouver
Major: Chemical Nutrition;
Menorah;  Kappa Theta Rho
CUTHBERT, WILLIAM J.—Agassiz
Major: Animal  Husbandry
DAVIES,   JOHN  C—Vancouver
Major:  Agronomy
FARROW, FRANCIS  A.—New  Westminster
Major: Agronomy; Psi Upsilon
FERGUSSON, DONALD N.—Vancouver
Major: Agronomy;   Beta Theta Pi
FOLEY, RICHARD B.—Vancouver
Major:  Animal   Husbandry
GRAHAME,   RICHARD   W — Vernon
Major: Dairy Bacteriology
GRAY,   NEIL  T.—North  Vancouver
Major: Dairy Bacteriology
Phi Kappa Sigma;  Rugby
HUNTER,  DOUGLAS  R.—Hazelton
Major:  Animal   Husbandry;   Pre-Med.
LORD, TERENCE M.—Vancouver
Major:  Agronomy
MARSHALL,  ROBERT  A.—Calgary,  Alta.
Major: Agronomy; Mamooks; Bad.; Kappa Sigma
MAXWELL, JOHN C—Vancouver
Major:   Agricultural   Economics
MYLROIE, ROBERT L.—Vancouver
Major:  Poultry  Husbandry
McMULLEN,  MARGARET J.—Salmon Arm
Major: Horticulture, Agronomy
MacSWAN,   IAIN   C.—Port  Mellon
Major:   Horticulture
NEILSON,  NORA E.—Vancouver
Major: Dairy Bacteriology;
Outdoor Club; Class Manager
NOVIKOFF, MORRIS—Vancouver
Major: Dairying;  Bad.;  Kappa Theta Rho
PEARCE,   JOSEPH   MACDONALD—Vancouver
Major:   Animal   Husbandry,   Agronomy;
Badminton;  Phi Delta Theta
SALISBURY, ROBERT L.—Vancouver
Major: Dairying, Chemistry
THOMSON,  J.  LORRAINE—Vancouver
Major: Horticulture, Agron., Bot.;
Jr.  C.S.T.A.;   Gamma  Phi   Beta
TOWNSEND.  GEORGE C—Vancouver
Major:   Soils
WAINWRIGHT,   PHILIP   R. -Vancouver
Major:  Agronomy;  Delta Upsilon
GOODWIN,  C.  REX
HO, THOMAS K. K.
STROYAN,  WILLIAM  A.
TURNER, DAVID R. H.
acne
Junior Prom queen candidates at pep meet
Aggie '42
Page One Hundred and Forty-three Aggie '43
Forty young men, the class of Aggie '43, prepared themselves this year for the task of stepping
into the role of senior Agriculture students, firm in
the belief that in continuing on with their education
they will be lending material aid to the government's
war policy.
Agriculture has suffered heavily in enrollment
owing to the recruiting drive, and the prospect of
having but a meagre senior class next year, worried
both University and government officials.
However, through a system of enlightened discussion, in which was shown the necessity for having
trained agriculturists, most of Aggie '43 are prepared
to return next Fall to complete their course.
Aggie '43 is not, however, oblivious to the war,
for many of their courses have been altered to have
a direct bearing either on the conflict itself or upon
the vital necessity, a planned program of post-war
rehabilitation.
With disease and famine the usual outcome of major
catastrophes, it is the duty of universities to instruct
in all possible ways the means of combating these
evils. Aggie '43 students have devoted much time to
research, have entered vigorously into the extracurricular, yet important, field of discussion, being
prominent members of the Junior C.S.T.A.
Aggie '43 in the laboratory
Joy Walker, Stuart Turner
It was inevitable, though, that Aggie '43's ranks
should be depleted through men joining the active
forces. Bob Lloyd's joining of the Air Force necessitated a by-election in the class executive. Others
leaving for flying duty were Drew Ripley, Art Rip-
pon, and David Young. Bob Buerk left at Christmas
to go with the Navy.
Despite the fact that most Aggie '43 students take
as many as two extra courses not necessary for their
degree, and that this means a full timetable, members
of the class distinguished themselves individually in
campus extra-curricular affairs.
On the sports front, two Aggie '43 men took part
in soccer. Jim McCarthy was senior team manager,
while Laurie Young played consistently for the first-
string eleven.
Lynn Sully again played for the Senior "A" basketball team, and was elected to the post of president
of Men's Athletics on Students' Council for the next
year. Phil Fitz-James was again prominent in rowing club circles.
A very successful Aggie '43 class party was staged
in the Fall.
The executive for Aggie '43 this year was: Honourary President, Dr. Blythe Eagles; President,
Stuart Turner; Secretary-Treasurer, Joy Walker.
Page One Hundred and Forty-four BRADNER, FRANK E.
BUERK, ROBERT C.
CLAYDON, GEORGE
COOK, DOUGLAS T.
FARLEY, KENNETH F.
FERGUSSON, CONRAD N.
FITZ-JAMES, PHILIP
GOODWIN, MARTIN B.
GREEN, CHARLES A.
GUICHON, URBAN J.
HAMMOND, PAUL L.
HOLDER, RONALD M.
HUNTINGTON, ARTHUR R.
KLINKHAMER, THOMAS L.
LETHAM, WILLIAM H.
LOURIE, MARIANNE
LUI, CHAK F.
MERRYFIELD, JACK W.
MOYLS, ADRIAN W.
MULVIN, MARY L.
MacCARTHY, JAMES A.
McDONALD, IAN J.
MacLEAN, DONALD W.
NOBLE, S. ROY
RIPLEY, THOMAS A.
ROE, JOHN A.
SANDALL, FRANCES W.
SHORE, ALAN W.
SMITH, ALEXANDER F.
SULLY, LYNN  K.
SWACKHAMER, DAVID
TAMBOLINE, FLORENCE R.
TURNER, JACK H.
TURNER,  STUART  W.
VAN HORNE, H. BIRCHAM
VAUGHAN, RODERICK
YOUNG, SIMEON L.
Aggie '43
Aggie Frolic
Science-Aggie Clash Moving Orderly Room
Page One Hundred and Forty-five Agriculture '44 . .
A year spent in the faculty of Arts and Science,
while not considered a waste of time, can now be well
forgotten in the minds of thirty-three young students
who this year went to make up the enrollment of Agriculture '44.
With minds set on entering the field of Agriculture,
these students endured a freshman year of Arts, only
because they knew it would lead them, ultimately, to
their beloved laboratories, and fields. Now, after a
full year of concentrated study on problems agricultural they little bemoan the choice that led them thus.
The swiftness of events, especially the shift in the
theatre of warfare to the Pacific Coast, has brought
home to these students the realization of the necessity
for trained men and women, capable of handling the
technical difficulties which have arisen in wartime, and
which will increase with the coming of peace.
Although some of those thirty-three who entered
Agriculture '44 together have seen fit to join the
active service, others have felt that their presence in
the laboratories would prove of equal service to their
government.  Consequently, those with a bent towards
President, Paul Buck
Secretary-Treasurer, Kathleen Lacey
research have applied themselves directly to science
courses, others have pursued the equally complex
question of commercial agriculture, while still others
have concentrated on the purely practical problems of
farm and field.
This was evidenced by the way in which the whole
class threw themselves into the task of making the
Aggie Fall Field Day a complete success The banquet,
which followed the day's judging, saw many prizes
awarded to members of the class.
In January, members of the class turned out en
masse to the faculty get-together at the Deluxe bowling allies. The following month climaxed the social
season for Aggie '44 with the Aggie Barn Dance and
the class party being extremely well attended by class
members.
Big event for Aggie '44, however, big event for the
whole faculty of agriculture for that matter, was the
annual Spring Field Day, held at the experimental
farm at Agassiz, when members of the entire faculty
travelled up the Fraser Valley to take part in a mammoth judging contest.
The executive for Agriculture '44 this year consisted of: Honourary President, Dr. J. Berry; President,
Paul Buck; Secretary-Treasurer, Kathleen Lacey.
Page One Hundred and Forty-six ASH, ARTHUR B.
AWMACK, JOSEPH W.
BLAIR, ROBERT C.
BUCK, PAUL A.
CARSON, DOUGLAS J.
EAKINS, JAMES J.
COODMAN, MARTIN If.
HAGGART, DOUGLAS A.
HAY, DONALD A.
HOOPER, FREDERICK H. S.
KEENLYSIDE, THOMAS R.
KILLICK,  STANLEY  R.
KING, JAMES D.
LACEY, KATHLEEN M.
MARSHALL, REXFORD  S.
MATHEWS, GEORGE C.
MACFARLANE, JOHN A.
McLEAN, ALASTAIR
McMANUS, GERALD F.
McMillan, robert ii.
neilson, james a. s.
pinchin, victor l.
reid, james a.
reifel, george h.
rippon, arthur w.
robinson, john
swinton, william a.
woods, wilfrid e.
wright. norman s.
young, david b.
Sgt. Haggart  barks orders—but soldiers prefer to sit.
Aggie '44
Page One Hundred and Forty-seven Agriculture '45 . .
Agriculture '45 is a strange mixture on the campus
of U.B.C. for it consists of Arts students who desire
to be agriculturists, and agriculturists who have no
desire whatsoever of associating with the Arts faculty.
A great majority of the students enrolled in Aggie
'45 are freshman Arts students, who are taking a split
course in both both agriculture and the liberal arts,
before specializing in the more technical work of
agriculture. There is, however, a smaller group enrolled in the Occupational Course, which is open to
those not desirous of securing a graduating degree
but rather, through pure choice, lack of time and
money, or required schooling, prefer to enroll in a
course offered by the faculty which affords them two
years of concentrated study into practical farm problems.
Enrollment in this freshman course, which reached
a peak of sixty last year, slipped back in 1942 to the
total of forty-five, evidence that a great majority of
high school students, who might have considered
entering the University   in  agriculture,  have  either
President, Walter Oliver
Secretary-Treasurer, Jessie Scougall
joined the armed forces or else found work in essential industries.
Greater this year, however, is the enrollment of co-ed
students, and of Arts students who have transferred to
the more technical branch of learning.
Members of the class also participate in the big
social event of the season, the Aggie Barn Dance, and
like other classes, stage a class party in the Spring.
The Spring Field Day, held at the Agassiz Experimental farm, also draws the students of Aggie '45
together with the rest of the aggie classes, and members of the class manage to cop their share of the
prizes awarded at the end of the judging day.
Naturally enough, with the newness of the work,
the heaviness of the academic timetable, and the
presence of military training, Aggie '45 has little to
offer in the way of outstanding stars in campus
extra-curricular affairs. A name to be mentioned
however, is that of Norm Tupper, who gained a place
on the Varsity soccer team in his first year at the
University.
The executive for Aggie '45 this year consisted of:
President: Walter Oliver; Secretary-Treasurer, Jessie
Scougall.
Page One Hundred and Forty-eight ABEY, HAROLD K.
BELL, RALPH R.
BROWN, IVAN T.
BURTON, MARGARET 0.
BUTLER, AUDREY
CHUTTER, PAUL W.
COOK,  FRED   D.
DAVIDSON, A. JOHN
DAVIDSON, GEORGE A.
DAY, CATHERINE D.
DUNBAR, MARGARET J.
FLEMING, ORMOND W.
FRASER, CHARLES A.
HANSON, ANGUS A.
HEAL, RONALD R.
HILL, ROBERT W.
HUTCHINSON, J. MARIE
IKEBUCHI, Y. NORMAN
KITTS, WARREN D.
LOURIE, HELENE
MADDIN, CAMERON A.
MENZIES, VERNON H.
McCRADY, ELWOOD R.
McKELLAR,  ROBERT  C.
McLEOD, MELVILLE C.
NAUGHTON, CHARLES J.
OLIVER, WALTER J.
OLLIVER, MURIEL A.
OLSON, PHILIP E.
PATENAUDE,   WILFRED
PEARSON, HAROLD H.
REAGH, DENNIS H.
RICHARDSON, W. BRUCE
ROBSON, MABEL G.
SCOUGALL, JESSIE E.
SHORTREED, JAMES F.
SIMPSON, CARL
THOMSON, M. GERALD
TODD,STUART
TUPPER, NORMAN
UYENO, TEISO J.
WEIR, JOHN
Crowd Mills Around Entrance at Aggie Pep Meet
Aggie '45
Page One Hundred and Forty-nine Austin Frith, Ruth Wilson, Dora Combolos, Tom Robinson  (President)
Class of Teacher Training .
Sixty-two students, already graduates with B.A.
degrees, continued their studies this year as members of the Education  Class.    This means that the
Vice-President, Nancy Carr
University of British Columbia's contribution to the
will be just over sixty.
This in the year of greatest need.
Never before in the history of the province has
there been such a shortage of high school teachers.
So great has been the call to arms, that almost every
high school in B. C. is operating short-handed.
So great was the need this year, that several students
got excellent experience, acting as substitute teachers
for regulars on the sick list, while three left in the
middle of the term to take up permanent posts.
Alma Snyder went to Prince Rupert, Francis Cooke
and Doug Todd going to Cobble Hill.
The class held many informal get-to-gethers, including a visit to the School for Deaf and Dumb, an
auto and bus trip through Fraser Valley schools, a
banquet and class party, a picnic, and a faculty-
student tea. Born during the term, David H. Russell,
Jr., son of Prof. D. H. Russell, was presented with a
silver mug by the class.
The executive for the Education Class this year
consisted of: Honourary President, Dr. M. A. Cameron; President, Tom Robinson; Vice-President,
Nancy Carr; Secretary-Treasurer, Theodora Combolos; Athletic Representatives, Ruth Wilson, Austin
Frith.
Page One Hundred and Fifty apROBERTS, E. RUTH
BODGER, ELIZABETH McN.
BAIN, ARCHIBALD C.
BALL, ENID D.
BOLDUC, BETTY D.
BROWNE, EDITH M.
BRUCE, JOAN I.
BRUCE, NANCY L
CALDWELL, I. FRANCES
CARR G. A. NANCY
CLARK, E. JEAN
COLLIER, ARTHIR C.
COMBOLOS, THEODORA
COOLS, EVELYN M.
CRUTE, MARGARET C.
DAEM, ROSE F.
DANIELS, DOROTHY M.
DEARING, INA
DIER, ORMOND W.
DOBSON, G. NORMA
DOCKER, GERALDINE P.
DUNCAN, MARJORIE E.
DUNLOP, ELIZABETH M.
EVANS, MAUREEN E.
EWEN, JOHN S.
FRITH, AUSTIN F.
GLEED, DORIS E.
HENDERSON, MARY E. P.
HOPWOOD, VICTOR G.
IZEN, BENJAMIN
LARONDE, HARRY D.
LAUGHLAN, LORRAINE A.
Teachers
. . . No Excess  Wordage Here
Page One Hundred and Fifty-one LEPSOE, GUNNAR
MACKIE, WILLIAM H.
MARCHANTON, EILEEN 0.
MEREDITH, JOHN R.
MIDDLETON, FREDERICK T.
MORRIS, MARGARET C.
McCAMMON, DOROTHY
MacDONALD, MARGARET H.
MacKAY, HECTOR R.
NICHOLS, ALVA E.
PICKERING, EUNICE F.
PREVOST, GERALD F.
PROVEN, ANNA M.
PULLEN, M. ELIZABETH J.
RIDDELL, MARJORIE E.
RIDLAND,  MARGARET  E
ROBINSON, THOMAS J.
SCHOFIELD, MARY-LENORE
SHEFFIELD, J. OWEN
SNYDER, ALMA M.
SOUTHIN, ADRIENNE R.
TAYLOR, M. ELIZABETH
THOMSON, JEAN I.
THOMSON, VIVIAN D.
TODD, DOUGLAS
TWEEDDALE, J.  CONSTANCE
USHER,  MARJORIE  V.
VESTERBACK,  BRITA  H.
Teachers
Overflow Crowd  Witnesses Season's Lone Football Game
Page One Hundred and Fifty-two AGNEW, DOREEN E.
ARCHIBALD, DOUGLAS
BIBBS, PATRICIA G.
BOWMAN, FRANCES  E.
CAMPBELL, MARY Y.
CHRISTIE, HUCH C.
DELLERT, GUNHILD H.
GRACE, ALICE M.
HOLLENBERG, SHIRLEY F.
KATO, KIYOSHI
MacINNES, G. ELISABETH
PARKINSON,   ROBERT   H.
PHYSICK, ARTHUR T. J.
SCOTT, HAZEL D.
SHANNON, BARBARA J.
SMITH, NANCY MacK.
STEVENSON, HELEN M.
WEBB, FRANCES E.
Social Service . .
To many students of the University of British
Columbia, the biggest moment of their university
career is the day they receive their cap and gown,
are admitted  into  the hallowed  ranks  of graduates.
To most students, Graduation means the end of
University education.
Not so, however, to eighteen students who received
their diplomas last year, for, this year, they form the
class of Social Service.
Social service is a little known department of the
U.B.C. curriculum. But the war is promising to
make the Social Service class one of the most important on the campus.
For when the war is over, and peace restored, the
problem of rehabilitating the returning soldiers, sailors, and airmen will be a heavy one.
On top of the ever-present question of handling
slum conditions, and caring for underprivileged chil
dren, the difficulties of re-adapting the returned men
to a peace-time environment is a serious study, involving much time and great labour.
The courses in social work are of a professional
character and are designed for graduate students with
a B.A. degree or its equivalent.
The scope of their field work is great, the students
finding time to visit such institutions as: Alexandra
Fresh Air Camp, Alexandra Neighbourhood House,
Children's Aid Society, Child Welfare Branch, Department of the Provincial Secretary, Provincial Psychiatric Services, Divisions of T.B. and V.D. Control.
Family Welfare Bureau, Industrial School for Girls,
John Howard Society, Social Service Department of
City of Vancouver, Vancouver General Hospital,
Y.M.C.A., Y.W.CA.
As a part of the social activity the Social Service
class met for tea in March.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-three k  m ■
ABERNETHY, MARGARET J.
ABRAMS, BETTY N.
ATKINS, ROMA J.
AUGUSTINE, BETTY-VALERIE
BOYES, MARGARET M.
DOBSON, MARION P.
FOSTER, MARY L.
HAZLEWOOD, MARY-GORDON
HUMPHREYS, MARJORIE E.
JENKINS, MARGARET R.
LANE, RUTH A.
MARTIN, SALLY V.
MORISON, JOAN D.
RENDELL, NORAH J.
TAYLOR, JEAN E.
TAYLOR, JOYCE M.
WILKINSON, MARY H.
ADAM, J. KIRSTINE
ARMSTRONG, JEAN E.
BAKER, M. ANNE
GULLOCH, ENNIS
HAWKINS, MARY E.
HICKS, MARY N.
MORRIS, DOROTHY R. A.
McLEAN-BELL, J. M. G.
SORENSON, MARIE
YAMAMOTO, NANA
AVIS, MARGARET L.
BALL, MARGARET L.
BOLTON, NANCY
COFFEY, DORIS M.
CROSS, JOSEPHINE
FLECK, JANET S.
HYSLOP, MARY
MANN, ALISON M.
MUNRO, MAE E.
ROWE, PHYLLIS S.
Nurses
March into Victory.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-four STEWART, ELIZ. J.
THOMPSON, JOAN M.
BANFORD, PAULINE E.
CHIPPERFIELD, NORA J.
COCHRANE, RUTH C.
COBLE, MARGARET A.
JAMIESON, DOREEN L.
JENKENS, A. ELIZABETH
JOHNSON, SHIRLEY H.
JONSON, RUTH M.
LADNER, DOROTHY M.
MacKAY, JEAN C.
PEPPER,  DORIS  B.
ROBERTSON, MARGARET
TROUT, M. FERNE
WALKER, J. MARIE
WRIGHT, LEORA R.
CAMPBELL, MARGARET M.— Vancouver
Phrateres, S.C.M., Alpha Omicron P.
EDDIE, MARY—Sardis
Badminton
GIOVANDO, LUCILLE—Ladysmith
MacDONALD,  MONA V.— Vancouver
MACLEAN, MARY C.
UYEDE,   ALICE   M.—Vancouver
BOND, AILEEN M.
DI NSTAN, MARGERY
ELLIS, KATHLEEN V.
HOWIE, MARY F.
JEFFERY, ELIZABETH
LIGHTHALL, ELIZABETH M.
PALLISTER, JANET C.
QUAYLE, ANN J.
REEVE, PHYLLIS E.
SKINNER, GLADYS W.
WILLIAMSON, EVA M.
Nurses
The C.O.T.C. on an Armistice Day march.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-jive Top: Theologs Gather For Fresh Air; Relax In Their Reading room.
Bottom: Informal Study At Ease; Magazines, Easy Chairs and Fire-place   Ah!
Anglican College
Tree-sheltered Stands Anglican College
"Vita erat lux hominum."
"Life is the light of man"—no truer homily than
this, the motto of the students of Anglican Theological Callege, situated but a stone's throw from the
buildings which go to make up the University of
British Columbia proper.
Affiliated with U.B.C. in 1922, Anglican College
offers courses in Theology leading to the diploma of
Licentiate in Theology and the degrees of B.D. and
D.D.
These theologs have their own "Lit. and Ath." club,
an organization formed to ensure them enough relaxation to spell off the tedium of long hours of
study. This is an active student society which organizes athletic and literary contests between the
theologians. An Oratorical Contest is the major
attraction of its calendar.
With the war coming closer to the Pacific Coast,
the need for a seriousness of outlook and purpose,
and the spirit of devotion which is engendered by
the students of Anglican College speaks well for the
future of the Church.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-six Outside the Door of the College, these future Theologians gather to chat informally   far from the quiet of the Chapel
Union College . . .
Union College Towers Skyward
There is something solid and comforting about
Union Theological College.
There is something solid and comforting, too, about
the history of the present College, and its humble
origins. For Union College represents the merging
of three seperate theological colleges, which date
back as far as 1893.
At that time, Columbia College which was the name
given to the institution, was under the sponsorship of
the Methodist Church. The Presbyterian Church
founded their own college in 1908. The Congregational church founded their own college in 1914.
By 1927 a successful amalgamation of these three
separate, distinct theological colleges had been effected
which has, ever since, operated under the name of
Union College. Although emphasizing the serious
pursuit of religious knowledge, the College manages
to instill in its students a feeling of friendship, and
freedom of thought and discussion.
Principle of Union College again this year was the
Rev. Dr. J. G. Brown, M.A., D.D.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-seven   Khaki-clad Students and Officers throng to Stadium to witness lone Canadian Football Game of Year
"The old order changeth .
95
Another year, and another period of recession of
"big-time" sport.
This was a war recession. Although the actual
time of military training per week was not increased,
the regulations concerning interruption of C.O.T.C.
activity had to be drawn closer as the enemy drew
closer.
Canadian Football felt the blow first because it
involved much practice and Saturday afternoon
games. The Thunderbird grid machine appeared in
splendour at Home-coming then disbanded.
English rugby struggled to carry out a four-game
McKechnie Cup series and in early 1942 almost
ceased altogether when lack of condition and the loss
of several players because of poor military attendance
left the team shorthanded.
The Canadian Championship basketball squad,
weakened by enlistment of top men, was in no shape
to hold its title.
So it went in nearly every major sport. Only the
soccer team, which could play in mid-week, managed
to maintain regular strength.
With major sport thus restricted, other outlets were
devised to give vent to the resulting surplus energy
among male students. The military physical training
was increased for basic trainees and an attempt made
to stage a full season of intra-murals. Lack of interest thwarted the plan for intra-murals and after
Christmas the fraternities took over the setup on a
larger scale.
And now comes the new plan of M. L. Van Vliet
for the full organization of campus athletics on the
intra-mural system.
Perhaps 1941-42 may not be a recession, but merely a marking time during a great change. For now
the question may be seriously asked—"Will 'big-
time' sport now give way to the intra-mural system?"
Page One Hundred and Sixty Men's Physical Education Director, M. L. Van Vliet
... Miss G. Moore. M. L. Van VlieL and
On the shoulders of the members of the numerous and inter-locking athletic executives falls the burden of adapting 1941-42 camps sport to a world of
war.
As the battles rolled on in other parts of the world,
U.B.C. tried to maintain its athletics as one means
of preparing its men and women for the struggle it
knew all must face.
In firm control of final athletic policy is the Coun
cil on Physical Education and Athletics. Composed
of President L. S. Klinck, Col. Victor Spencer, Mr. J.
Fyfe-Smith, Mr. George Cunningham, Col. G. M.
Shrum, Dr. Harry Warren, Mr. M. L. Van Vliet,
Miss Gertrude Moore, Dr. A. H. Hutchinson, M.A.A.
President Evann Davies, and Council President Ted
McBride, this body decided early that "athletics and
sports should be encouraged as an important factor
contributing to the physical and mental health of the
Women's Physical Education Director. Gertrude Moore
Page One Hundred and Sixty-one Ted McBride, Gordon MacFarlane, Evann Davies, M. L. Van Vliet, Dr. F. Dickson, Norm Burnett, Dr. M. Cameron—the Mens
Athletic Directorate
student officials run athletics . . .
students during a period of special stress" . . . with
the understanding that military training should
always take first place.
And it was M. L. Van Vliet, Men's Director of
Physical Education, who had the lion's share in this
job. First he was in direct charge of all physical
training for the basic section of the C.O.T.C. This
involved supervising two half-hour periods each week
for over 800 men.
He found himself as coach for no less than six
sports: Senior "A" basketball, Canadian football,
English rugby, boxing, golf and track.
Then Mr. Van Vliet went out and organized an
inter-faculty set-up. When this flopped, he immediately reorganized the intra-murals on the inter-frat
system. Supervising the Greeks in all their varied
sports, he brought about the most successful sports
program ever held at U.B.C.
Occupying a similar position in the women's half
of the system is Miss Gertrude Moore, Women's Physical Education Director since 1936.
Working very closely with the Women's Athletic
Association officials, the very popular Miss Moore
was in charge of all intra-murals.
In contrast to men's physical training, all women's
activity in the Gymnasium is entirely voluntary. So
in the first place, Miss Moore has to design her
classes with an eye to popular appeal.
In January, Miss Moore brought a team from her
Alma Mater, Margaret Eton College, to meet U.B.C.
coeds in a tourney of her favourite sport, archery.
In this indoor event, Varsity came out on top.
Controlling body in men's sport is the Men's Athletic Directorate. Presiding this year was M.A.A.
President Evann Davies. Faculty members were Dr.
M. Cameron, Dr. F. Dickson, and Mr. M. L. Van
Vliet. Other student members were Brud Matheson,
Gordon Macfarlane, and Ted McBride. When Matheson left for Gordon Head in December, Norm Burnett took his place.
Student members ex-officio were Council Treasurer
Keith Porter and the Sports Editor of the Ubyssey.
They too found their main task that of fitting in
sports with the C.O.T.C. timetable.
Reason for pride was their completion of the fund
to provide a Memorial Plaque for Howie McPhee.
This done, the plaque was placed in the Stadium and
dedicated by Colonel Harry Logan at the Homecoming Game.
Another achievement was the fight for Canadian
Football, which was led by the M.A.D. Not only
did the solution of this controversy settle the issue
for the grid sport but it also cleared up the position
of men's sport for the whole year.
As the year drew to a close and more and more men
could be seen hobbling around on crutches as a result
of their athletic endeavours, the M.A.A. officials
sought to bring about a system of accident insurance
Page One Hundred and Sixty-two Practically an honourary society this year was Women's Big Block Club
... W.A.A. and Big Blocks head co-eds
Control of Women's Athletics rested with Gertrude Moore,   Joyce Orchard, Jean Eckardt, Mary Phillips, Dean Dorothy
Mawdsley and D r. Joyce Hallamore
Page One Hundred and Sixty-three Once, glamorous athletes, these members of the Men's Big Block Club became, this year, campus cops
Male Big Blocks are cops too .. .
for athletes. At any rate this year's executive laid
the groundwork for such a plan.
Led by W.A.A. President Jean Eckardt, officials of
the Women's Athletic Association were Dr. Dorothy
Mawdsley, Miss Gertrude Moore, Dr. J. Hallamore,
Brenda Phillips, Nora Neilson, and Joyce Orchard.
Coed undergraduates in 1941-42 also found their
time going more to war activities, thus explaining
their decreased interest in major sport. So W.A.A.
officials tok up the task of revitalizing the women's
intramural program.
Early in the fall, playoffs were held to choose members for the various teams in volleyball, ping-pong,
and badminton. It was felt that these trials raised
the standard and spirit for the year's play.
Apart from watching over these intramurals and
assisting the feminine members of mixed athletic clubs,
the W.A.A. executive handled arrangements for grass
hockey and basketball. For these respective games,
the services of Mr. C White and Mr. R. Osborne were
secured.
The most popular pastime among the coeds was
reorganized in the form of an Archery Club. Charter
members hope now to raise U.B.C. standards to a
second-to-none position on this continent.
Almost an entirely honorary society now is the
Women's Big Block Club.
Near the end of the term the girls held a tea at
which all feminine award receivers were entertained.
Meeting ground for old and new members will be the
post-exam annual picnic, which has almost become
the "raison d'etre" for the Club.
Helen Matheson was the president.
Demands for their services kept the Men's Big
Block Club from being entirely an honorary association.
Called upon to usher at all functions, especially
those uproarious Pep Meets, the boys in the blue
sweaters with the golden "B.C." soon became known
to all freshmen as the "cops."
In October the 36 active members got together
and staged their fourth annual successful Homecoming Luncheon. Over in Brock Hall gathered all
past Big Block winners to renew old acquaintances
with their friends and their Alma Mater. Highlight
of the event was the appearance of the Class of '14
led by Major "Dutch" Eckardt.
Other activities included the boys' services in the
Mile of Pennies, and continuation of the complete
mailing list of all Big Block holders.
The executive included Honourary President M. L.
Van Vliet, President Gordon Macfarlane, Treasurer
Charlie Long, and Secretary Harry Home.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-four .. . Sports in War
Page One Hundred and Sixty-five The Thunderbird Senior "A" basketballers had
rather an unlucky season this year. The team got
off to a dismal start and it was not until their eleventh
game that they were able to boast a win. In mid-
February the Thunderbirds sparked by brilliant playing on the parts of Kermode, Ryan, and Johnson,
managed to snatch their first win from Stacy's.
It was hoped that Doug Pedlow and Brud Matheson, both stars of last year's great team, would become eligible to play after Christmas. Both boys,
however, joined the Army just before Christmas.
The "Birds" defeated the Stacy five once more in
the season in a thrilling overtime game, to tie the
downtown team for third place in the league. Their
next game was against the strong Victoria Dominoes
who defeated them after a game struggle. They
were now faced with a sudden death game with
Stacys to find which team would enter the playoffs.
This was one of the season's best games. Leading
by two points at the half, Varsity was cut down in
the third period by a one-man rally by Lucas of
Stacy's, to lose the game 31-36. Lefty Barton and
Harry Kermode showed up well in this game, netting
11 points apiece.
The Harlem Globe-Trotters paid their annual
Campus visit in mid-January. Many students opined
that the Varsity cagers played their best ball of the
season against the Southern experts.
Coach Maury Van Vliet with Howard Shadwell
Depleted Senior Hoopers . .
BACK:   Shadwell, Dean, Mottishaw, Sully, Johnson, Van Vliet
FRONT:   Hay, Franklin, Barton, Ryan,  Kermode  (inset), Manager, Tom Cantell
Page One Hundred and Sixty-six Lefty Art Barton
Harry Franklin
Jack Ryan—"Jocko" was the steady little guard
whose deceptive dribble and shooting highlighted
every game.
Sandy Hay—The husky winner of last year's freshman award proved his worth this year by playing
expertly every position on the team.
Lynn Sully—Still a favorite of the crowd, Lynn
played his second year of Senior "A" ball this year.
Harry Franklin—Fresh from San Diego State College, Harry was the team hustler. The lively guard
ended up in eighth place in the league point competition.
Art Johnson—Besides being the fastest ball player
in the league, Art has coached two fairly successful
junior cage teams this year.
Al Dean Always at his best in the pinches, Al's
concrete enthusiasm has started many a rally for the
hoopers.
Hank Mottishaw—Long shots are Hank's specialty.
He is the only player on the team over twenty-one.
Walt Julien—A hard, clean player, Walt was unable to play most of the year because of poor health.
. . lose all their titles
In spite of their gloomy record, the boys were a
spirited, well-conditioned basketball crew. Their lack
of height, and the fact that six of the ten men were
playing their first senior "A" ball were their only
shortcomings.
Only four of last year's Canadian championship
squad returned to the game. They were Art Barton,
Jack Ryan, Sandy Hay, and Lynn Sully.
The other six men of last year's wonder team have
all revoked the U.B.C. courts. Captain Pat Flynn is
now with the Air Force. Brud Matheson and Doug
Pedlow are officers in the Army. Wally Johnson did
not return to the Campus. Jack Ross graduated.
Jim Scott, save for one memorable game, stuck to
his studies all year.
The team was coached by M. L. Van Vliet, who
led the team to the championship last year. Tom
Cantell was senior manager, and Howie Shadwell his
associate. Dr. Dickson was faculty representative
and president of the basketball club.
THE TEAMS:
Art Barton—The team captain ended up third in
the league scoring race, and proved to be the best
defensive player on the team.
WwSm\
^Lmm                                          ^^^H                      '    WWW          a^H
W&L"~ m\\
W i»
^   -
Jr4^ i
.-.X
(html
1/1
IT. * * *V
V
a T [■.i j.^m
7^
r VV
■
Harlem's men of black magic have fun with Hermode
Page One Hundred and Sixty-seven Varsity's "three" line outspeeds Victoria Garrison to chalk up their only win of the season
McKechnie Rugby fifteen . .
Major-General R. 0. Alexander "kicks off" at Army contest
The pressure of military training again forced the
Thunderbird Rugby Club to abandon Miller Cup
competition and again to enter only the McKechnie
Cup series. Even then, the injury jinx came along
to make it all but impossible to complete the four-
game McKechnie round. There was no time when
some player was not on the injured list.
Both these drawbacks were present from the beginning of the season. These reasons, plus the fact
that there was little intra-mural competition, made it
difficult for first term coach, Tom Stewart, to get a
team together.
He did, though, in time to meet Vancouver Reps
on November 11. Varsity lost this sloppy first cup
encounter 11-16. Blonde Jack Turner starred on the
wing. He scored one try, freshman Bud Spiers
added another, and Orme Hall completed the scoring
with a try and a convert.
The Blue and Gold travelled to Victoria to play
and lost 5-9 to the Crimson Tide. Tucker got a try,
and Orme Hall bagged two more. A few students
journeyed with the squad and the basketball team
on the same trip, producing a grand time reminiscent
of former "invasions."
But it was in that game that veteran star scrum
Page One Hundred and Sixty-eight man Evann Davies received a broken ankle, thus
making a sad departure from Varsity rugby.
On February 28, Vancouver Reps came up to the
Stadium to hand the Thunderbirds their third Cup
defeat 13-3. Hunter Wood got our only try. Varsity
had previously been weakened by losing Orme Hall,
who had broken his collar bone playing for Ex-Byng.
In the fourth game, Varsity met Victoria Reps at
the Stadium on March 14. This was by far their
best effort, and the Thunderbirds lost out 8-11 after
a spirited battle. Graham Harrison scored one try,
and Ian Richards contributed a try and a penalty
goal.
As if it wasn't enough for Manager Charlie Cotterall to have to worry about Hall's and Davies' injuries, he also was confronted with minor injuries
to many others. At various times Tom McLaughlin,
Gordie Sutherland, Bud Spiers, and Frank Eckman
all were casualties.
Apart from those already mentioned, the names
of forwards Mack Buck, Boyd Crosby, Al Narod,
George Lane, Bob Owen, Bill Orr, and Wally Reid,
and backfielders Al Gillespie, Gerry Brown, and Don
Carmichael can be added to the elastic lineup.
Player-coach,  Evann Davies    Team Manager, Charles Cotterall
lose all four encounters
No  dressing room rest at half-time;  instead lemons and a berating from the coach
Page One Hundred and Sixty-nine Never daunted, the team lines  up for cameraman immmediately after bowing out of the league's cup-tie series
Soccer rises as major .
Manager, Jim McCarthy —Coach, Charlie Hitchens
„-„ Ainrir>% -
It has ben a fairly successful season for the Soccer
Club. At the time of writing, the soccer team was
holding second place in the Wednesday afternoon
soccer league. Other teams entered in the league
were Pro-Recs, Woodsonias, and Police, the leaders.
The season was not without its hitches. Dave
Thompson, the team's burly halfback, who had
played on several city rep teams, left the campus before Christmas and is now with the Army.
The biggest blow, however, fell in January when
it was learned that the famous brothers Doug and
Stu Todd were leaving the club. Doug left to teach
and Stu to join the Air Force.
This necessitated a reshuffling of the entire team.
The captaincy of the squad, which had been held by
Doug "Toodie" Todd was reverted to Fred Sasaki,
a senior member of the forward line.
High scores of the season were the freshman sensation Norm Tupper, and brilliant Fred Sasaki. Other
aggressive point chasers were Denny Leong, the Todd
brothers, and flashing Quan Louie.
Much of the credit for the year's -good record must
go to clever Herbie Smith, the Varsity goal-keeper,
who has been rated one of the best ever to wear the
Gold and Blue.
A strong fullback defense was maintained in all
Varsity games by Stu Roach, Mel Oughton, Laurie
Young, and Bill Walker.
Page One Hundred and Seventy Doug.  Todd
Fred Sasaki
Spencer   Wallace
. . . outdoor Varsity sport
The brilliant Gold and Blue halfbacks for the
season were Al Todd, Dave Thompson, Doug Todd,
Spenee Wallace, Quan Louie, Walt Greene, and
Gordie Johnson.
The goal-getting forward line was composed of
Jimmy Morton, Stu Todd, Fred Sasaki, Norm Tupper,
Bob Shewan, Ed Louie, George North, and Dennis
Leong.
The team was co-ordinated and coached by veteran
Charlie Hitchens, who is responsible for the team's
good showing this year.   Handling managerial duties
was smiling Jim McCarthy, who also served as press
liaison man. Dr. Todd was the team's faculty representative.
With the longest season of any campus sport, soccer was the game to follow this year, being the least
hit by military regulations. Its games were played
on paradeless Wednesday afternoons.
In these uncertain times, predictions are, as a rule,
unreliable, but it is safe to say that the coming years
will see the rise of soccer to far greater degrees of
campus popularity than it has enjoyed in the past.
Varsity on the defense—and offense in Cambie ground clash
Page One Hundred and Seventy-one The benchwarmers huddle to peer through mist at play
Manager, Gordon MacFarlane
Gridders stage one game season . .
Grizzlies and Varsity sprawl for fumbled pig skin
Most of the battling this year in Canadian Football circles took place in committee.
This popular and spectacular pastime, restricted in
1940-41 to four games, was the first last fall to come
up against the more restrictive athletic regulations.
Coach Maury Van Vliet's squad played, however,
but once—in the traditional Home-coming Game.
In that tilt, the enthusiastic Thunderbirds ran up
against the tough Vancouver Grizzlies. Led by back-
fielders Ray Gorman, Johnny Farina, and Bud Fairgrieve, and lineman Hunter Wood, Bob Curry, and
Jack Tucker, the Blue and Gold staged a last-half outburst that brought them out on the short end of a
12-5 count. Farina got the touchdown on a pass
from Gorman.
These men plus Jack Zabinski, Bill McGhee, Mack
Buck, Austin Frith, Lionel Fournier, Gus Carmichael,
and Paul Cote comprised the advance guard of Manager Gordy MacFarlane's wards. Bud Spiers and
Bud Horton were the pick of the freshmen.
On March 7, Gus Carmichael brought out most of
the U. B. C. team, added them to his Prince of Wales
high school team, and lost 1-3 to the Kitsilano High
gridders in a "Games for Guns" special feature.
Page One Hundred and Seventy-two Muriel  Whimster and Hugh Hall in "doubles" play
Blessed with the best and most convenient facilities
of any campus organization devoted to sport, the
Badminton Club still found it difficult to come up
with a good year.
Like other campus athletes, the racquet-wielders
found themselves faced with the fact that men and
women were confronted with too many other wartime activites.
Nevertheless, the racqueters carried on, playing two
nights a week. Out of these Monday and Thursday
evening sessions came two teams to represent Varsity
in local league play.
The first team was entered in the "B" Division of
the Vancouver and District Badminton League. But
a shortage of members forced this group to withdraw
bv Christmas.
The other team, entered in the "D" Division of
the same league, carried on throughout the year. But
sad to relate, they won none of their ten encounters.
Veteran co-eds to participate were Joan Morris,
Jean Thompson, Mary Alice Wood, Ida Francis, Ann
Clemens, and Muriel Whimster. Freshettes included
Lois Reid, Nancy Fleck, and Pat Cunningham.
Veteran male players included Frank Pidgeon,
Denny Thompson, Kennedy MacDonald, Howard
DeBeck, Jack Bowie, and Hugh Hall. Newcomers
were Jack Kenmuir, Bills Nobbs, and Al Gillespie.
The 1941-42 executive was: President, Howard
DeBeck; Vice-President, Stuart Burris; Secretary-
Treasurer Mary Alice Wood; and Team Manager
Kennedy MacDonald.
Shuttlers play under difficulty
Having no successful season like last year's, the racqueters nevertheless carried on a vigorous playing schedule
Page One Hundred and Seventy-three Spirited Frat athletes . . .
: ^^    i>-.   — —  mm                                                  ( ^W^»™
bbbb^^   ^faM                        bM^bH                                                                                                                                 L.^H
w a .^m jm\    ^^>T                       KsiiiiV  \m
bbbbb^bbbbB                    bbbbbbL      R                                                                                                                              Wfffc.           J|
(1)   Basketball proved most popular of intra-mural athletics (2)  Sigma Phi Delta and Phi Kappa Sigma battle for points
(3)   Something new was added—Softball—won by Phi
Kappa Pi
With the more far-reaching restrictions on intercollegiate and outside sport this year ever increasing
attention was turned to intra-mural sports.
Still something of a dead issue before Christmas,
intra-murals blossomed out in January when it was
announced that a vast inter-fraternity program had
been arranged. The new program was to take the
place of the inter-faculty system of intra-murals which
had been used previously and which had been found
inadequate.
A basketball tournament involving over sixty
games was immediately started, and at the time of
writing Kappa Sigma had just been nosed out by Phi
Delta Theta who won the mural competitions.
(4)  Here the Phi Delta team gets in some welcome practice
Aggregate point leader at the date of publication
was Kappa Sigma with 1030 points and Delta Upsilon with 1010 points. These scores represented
points granted for each of the competitions or tournaments played up to that time.
This, however, was before final score had been
received from competitions in golf, basketball, soft-
ball, or from the inter-fraternity track meet.
The first of the special events was the popular
swim meet held in mid-January at the Y.M.C.A. pool.
The Psi Upsilon group, led by Bob Curry, had little
trouble winning the meet. Eighty-four fraternity,
men participated and there were 150 spectators. Half
that number were turned away because of insufficient
seating capacity.
Page One Hundred and Seventy-four . . . take over Intra-Murals
The next special event was a table tennis tournament held early February in the Armoury. Fifty contestants participated in a round-robin series. When
the smoke had cleared Tom Keenleyside of Beta
Theta Pi was declared champion.
Another event which caught intra-mural fancy was
the snooker meet. Ken McBride of Phi Delta Theta
emerged victorious from this competition, edging out
Chummer Clark of Phi Kappa Sigma.
Probably the most popular of all the intra-mural
events was the inter-fraternity cross-country run held
late in February. Smiling Doug Lee of Delta Upsilon romped in at the head of a field of almost 100
entries. Bob Davidson, a Sigma Phi Delta man was
behind him, and Jack Tucker, another D.U., ran
third.
The success of the inter-fraternity sports was contagious.      In   February   an    inter-sorority   bowling
League was established and a tournament was run off.
The Alpha Gamma Delta girls easily won the league,
followed by the girls of Alpha Phi.
Early in March an intra-mural supplement was
published in the Ubyssey. In it a new intra-mural
program for 1942-43 was outlined. A new plan
whereby any group of 30 or more might be eligible
for intra-mural competition was presented. Plans for
a new playing field north of the Gym, and the conversion of the Armoury into an intra-mural sports
centre were also proposed.
Intra-mural sport this year was handled by M. L.
Van Vliet, Director of Physical Education, and his
student assistant, Harry Franklin. Every Tuesday
representatives from each fraternity met in Mr. Van
Vliet's office to discuss and propose the organization
which made the successful intra-mural season the
greatest the Campus has known.
(5)  Ping pong—or table tennis, as the experts would have it
(6)  The Sigma Phi Delta team copped the doubles, but Beta
Keenleyside  (left)  took singles honours
(7)  An eager crowd breaks away at start of gruelling crosscountry
(8)  Red-headed Doug Lee, Delta Upsilon, comes home a
winner
Page One Hundred and Seventy-five This year, the girls dropped
down to the Intermediate basketball ranks—with still no luck.
Co-ed sports feature freshettes .
With most of their top players graduated or preoccupied with other work, the co-ed athletes played
with much more spirit than success this year.
Many freshettes were introduced to league play,
however, and it can be safely said that a good time
was had by all.
Although they had eight big block winners in
basketball registered on the campus, the girls could
get only two of these to turn out. So they entered
but one team, in the Intermediate "A" League.
That quintet did reach the city finals, only to lose
out three straight to Nelsons. Two veterans, Helen
McWilliams and Helen Matheson, and two freshettes,
left-handed Eileen McKillop, and West Vancouver's
Pauline Greer led the team that far.
Unperturbable Bob Osborne proved a popular
coach. He was ably assisted by energetic manager
Marguerite Neil.
Women's grass hockey also suffered from the fact
that few veteran players returned to the fold. Another
blow was star Betty Muir's rib injury last fall.
This was the big chance for freshettes, but left the
team unorganized to meet the stiff competition of the
Lower Mainland League, where they finished fourth
in the five-team setup.
Individually, the girls were a great success. In
December, critics chose Jean Handling and Helen
Matheson, both old hands, and freshettes Beth Cocking, Bea Inch, and Eileen McKillop for All-Star
rating.
Freshette stars abounded on the
weakened grass hockey squad—
but no victory.
f VA f
itirw* 11
Page One Hundred and Seventy-six TOP—Eight men and a girl; Sunday morning outing.    BOTTOM —Last minute check-up;  Ruth  Wilson's  embarkation.
. . . Co-ed coxswain bosses rowers
■Jl      4
Carlyle, McNeely, Slater, Hooper, and Fitz-James
The lads from "Blenheim-on-the-Fraser" made the
headlines when they became the second group in
North America and the first in Canada to secure the
services of girl coxswains. Several attractive coeds
turned out on those frosty fall Sunday mornings but
the only one to carry on for any length of time was
brave Ruth Wilson.
The executive comprised: President Phil Fitz-
James; Vice-President Barry Sleigh; Secretary Chuck
McNeely; Treasurer Fred Hooper; and Equipment
Manager Allan Carlyle.
Veteran member John Slater acted as Crew Captain and Coach.
Page One Hundred and Seventy-seven Team Coach, Art Johnson; the Frosh line-up; individual team stars: Dave Hayward, Don Mann, and Bruce Yorke
Frosh Basket Squad reach finals . ..
For the first time in many a year the Frosh Basketball squad reached the playoffs. Finishing second in
the Intermediate "A" section of the Community
League, the boys laced the third place Y.M.C.A. entry
in two straight semi-final contests.
After upsetting the leading Sparling team, the Blue
and Gold dropped three (31-27, 26-36, 29-45, 23-29)
games and the title.
Wih the Senior "B" team dropping out of their
league this year, the Frosh hoopers, all under 21,
alone remained to provide new material for the future
Senior "A" squads.
By the end of the year Coach Art Johnson could
point to Bill Matheson, Bruce Yorke, Don Mann, and
Dave Hayward  as  all  potential hoop  "greats".
Quiet Dave Manning handled the team's managerial
duties.
—W. T. G.
Page One Hundred and Seventy-eight No Fyfe-Smith shield winners, the cricketers nevertheless enjoyed a successful season
"Fore-look out!" and "Four-not out!
55
Since inauguration  of the  Cricket  Club  in  1938,
.the group has enjoyed a bigger membership each year.
Last summer, with a record enrolment, the Club
Golfers: Hans Swinton, Ormie Hall, Bob Plommer, and
Bob Ford
again entered the Mainland. Cricket League. Though
unable to bring back the Fyfe-Smith Shield, the
cricketers had a successful season and brought forth
many individual stars.
Between them, Geoff Robinson, Jack Rush (Captain), Dr. Harry Warren, and Basil Robinson ran up
a season's total of 1,000- runs.
Bowling honours went to Basil Robinson, Bob
Morris, and Charlie Pillar, who took a combined
total of 125 wickets.
The Club looks forward to next summer's play
with great hopes. Besides having on hand many experienced performers, including Jim Brandon, John
Golding, Jim Chatwin, Doug. Jackson, Noel Bracher,
Hugh Jones, Dick Gosse, Dave Lawson, and Dave
Housser, there are many promising freshmen.
Jim Brandon was president during 1941-42.
The Golf Club is another sport organization that
carried on pretty much as usual.
As well as holding their annual Tourney, the divot-
ers, minus the top-flight U.B.C. Golf Team members,
also were active in the inter-fraternity contests.
From October, when Bob Plommer's 77 took the
medal in the qualifying round, to December the golfers held their tournament. Early upset was the defeat
of reigning champ Ken McBride by a freshman, Bob
Ford, in the second round.
Eventually, the semi-finals brought together Bob
Ford vs. Hans Swinton, and Orme Hall vs. Bob
Plommer. Plommer and the surprising Ford emerged
victorious to meet in the finals, Ford winning.
The executive included President Hans Swinton
and Vice-President Jimmy Allen.
Page One Hundred and Seventy-nine Schuss-Inn, snow-bound retreat of Ski Club; time out for a rest, and a smoke  (centre) ; skiing in the snow—and much else.
Mountain-climbing certainly improves the appetite; Outdoors Club prepares to take off for Britannia—and Sky Pilot.
Outdoor and Ski clubs . .
Two campus clubs, the Ski and Outdoor Clubs, successfully invaded local mountains throughout the past
year.
Looking back on a successful college year, Varsity
Outdoors Club members recall their Thanksgiving
weekend climb to Mount Sky Pilot. From Britannia
Beach more than 50 members hiked to the base
camp, and despite difficulties with sliding snow, 15
men reached the peak.
Later in the fall a group of prospective members
climbed Crown Mountain from the club cabin on
Grouse, and were taught the rudiments of rock
climbing and rope work. A party of girls hiked to
the peak of Goat Mountain.
Seven of the Outdors Club climbed Garibaldi in
the Christmas vacation. Throughout the winter,
V.O.C  members  have  been   invited  to  join  Alpine
Club trips to some of the larger mountains. Plans
have been made for the annual spring trip, held
immediately after exams. This year Mount Wrot-
tesley will be climbed.
The executive included: Honourary President, Dr.
Vernon C. Brink; President, Sandy Buckland; Vice-
President, Betty Hughes; Secretary-Treasurer, Ian
Schiedel; Marshall, John Stewart; Archivist, Edna
Winram.
Handicapped in past years by lack of a meeting
place at their base of operations, the Varsity Ski
Clubbers got themselves together this year and purchased Schuss Inn in the Ski village on Grouse
Mountain. After much ambitious arranging by the
executive during the past two years, a $350 grant
was secured from the Council to buy this long-famous
mountain retreat.
Page One Hundred and Eighty All thoughts of war recede as these two students are silhouetted against a panorama of still whiteness.
. conquer local mountains
Hiking helped to get the Club in shape for the more
graceful art of skiing. The first organized tramp
was the work hike in early November. This was only
a prelude to the big Garibaldi trip during the Christmas holidays.
Charlie Woodward and Stanley Burke passed up
the Garibaldi venture to travel to a Ski Tour at Banff,
from which they returned to help in the ski instruction.
Fred Wood represented the Club in two slalom
meets on Seymour Mountain, placing first and third.
Sam Parnum, Otaway Ferguson, Bill Houston, and
Jim Linde carried Varsity's colours in the springtime Viski Classic on Hollyburn.
Heading a membership of about forty undergraduates of both sexes were Ernie Mason, president; Charlie Woodward, vice-president; Stan Burke, secretary;
and Doug. Taylor, treasurer.
Avid   picture-takers,   skiers   are   never   without   cameras—or
willing subjects.
Page One Hundred and Eighty-one Individual stars emerge from .
(1)   Mack Buck welcomes Major-General R. 0. Alexander to
U.B.C.
(2)     Van Vliet coaches Ken McBride in golf class
(3)   Charlie Hitchens advises surprising soccer team at
hali-time
(4)  Bill Husband in upset, second-place run in cross-country
Page One Hundred and Eighty-two . . . U.B.C.'s curtailed sports program
(5)   Art  Johnson—freshman  coach  of Frosh Hoopers  and
Senior "A"  player
(6)   Bill Matheson—one  of Johnson's  outstanding  freshmen
hoop stars
(7)   Best entertainment of the season: the cage game against (8)   Varsity's own Tommy Syme, North West Golden Gloves
Harlem's Globetrotters champion
Page One Hundred and Eighty-three   Inter-Fraternity Council. . .
President, Doug  Maloney and Secty.-Treas., Jim Jeffries
Inter-Fraternity Council, the organization by which
campus Greek organizations control local fraternity
policy again this year conducted its business in much
the same manner as in previous years.
The drive to raise money for war charities again
received active and vigorous support from I.F.C.
the Council teaming up with Pan-Hellenic to produce
the popular Greek Red Cross Ball in aid of the Canadian Red Cross.
An extensive publicity campaign was pursued,
and the fraternal groups were able to turn over
$1,900.00 to the War Aid Council.
The sing-song, when fraternities and sororities
enter choirs in a contest staged on the campus, proved
again to be a successful affair. For the second consecutive time, the Beta Theta Pi entry took top honours.
For several years now fraternities have been carrying on a desultory program of sports competitions,
which have not amounted to much. This year, however, under the guidance of Athletic Director, Maury
Van Vliet, and with the full support of I.F.C, the
fraternities launched into an extensive athletic program.
Although the program was ostensibly intra-mural,
only fraternities entered teams this year. Emerging
as winners were the men of Phi Delta Theta, run-
ners-up being Kappa Sigma.
Drastic revision was given to the I.F.C. rushing
regulations this year. Restrictions were placed upon
the expense of rushing functions, contact with the
rushee during a function, and the clashing of these
functions with scholastic demands.
One of the main changes made was to the effect
that a rushee can attend rushing functions of only
four fraternities, must state the four of his preference, in alphabetical order, when he registers for the
rushing season.
The executive of the Inter-Fraternity Council this
year consisted of: President, Doug Maloney; Vice-
President, Dale Rumball; Secretary-Treasurer, Jim
Jeffries.
Two men represent each fraternity on I. F. C, gather together at regular meetings to discuss policy
Page One Hundred and Eighty-six ADAM, JOSEPH
BALDWIN, JACK
BALLANTYNE, GEORGE
BURRIS, STEWART
CLERY, PAT
GARDINER,  WILLIAM
MACDONALD, JOHN
MACLEAN, CHARLES
PANTON, WILLIAM
RHODES, ALAN
SUTCLIFFE, DOUG
WICKSTROM, TACE
WILLOX, TONY
Alpha Delta Phi was founded at Hamilton College, Ohio,
in 1832, and there are 26 active chapters. Phi Epsilon was
installed at U.B.C. in 1926. The Alpha Delts were the
pioneer fraternity in eleven colleges, and the second or
third in eight others.
Each chapter is visited every year by delegates from
some other chapter.
The pin is an oblong slab with rounded corners, displaying on a shield of black enamel, a white crescent bearing
the Greek letters. Above the crescent is a green star with
a gold centre, and below it the date "1832" in gold.
Colours are emerald green and white, the flower a lily-
of-the-valley.
President of Phi Epsilon this year was Bill Gardiner.
Alpha Delta Phi
Page One Hundred and Eighty-seven avis, stan
barlow, vernon
bentley, robert
binnie, robert
burke, harold
carlile, jack
carncross, charles
cote, paul
cotteral, charles
coutts, jim
cunningham, jack
curwen, guy
eyre, alan
fergusson, donald
fields, donald
fleming, kelvin
frith, austin
haggart, douglas
jackson, douglas
james, douglas
johnstone, alan
keenlyside, thomas
keith, kenneth
keller, neil
livingstone, hugh
low, george
morris, robert
morton, james
murray, robert
McCarthy, james
McDONAGH, JACK
MacKAY, RONALD
PARKINSON, ROBERT
PORTER, KEITH
ROSS, DONALD
RUSH, GEORGE
SHEWAN, ROBERT
SINCLAIR, MEAD
SPARKS, JACK
STEVESTON, TED
WALKER, DOUGLAS
WALLACE, JOHN
WATE, WILLIAM
WELSFORD, WILLIAM
WILSON, LAIRD
Beta Theta Pi
Beta Theta Pi was founded at Miami University, Ohio,
in 1839, and there are 89 active chapters. Gamma Omicron was installed at U.B.C. in 1936. The Betas were the
first fraternity to establish a chapter west of the Alleg-
henies.
The pin is an eight-sided shield, the sides of which curve
inward. On a field of black enamel are displayed three
stars of gold, a wreath of greenish gold, encircling a diamond, below which are the Greek letters.
The fraternity has a complete heraldic system, with
national arms being quartered for each chapter.
The colours are light shades of pink and blue, the
flower a rose.
President of Gamma Omicron this year was Keith Porter.
Page One Hundred and Eighty-eight BENDER, WILLIAM
BLAIR, WILLIAM
BONNER, ROBERT W.
BUCK, F. MACKINNON
COLLYER,  JAMES
GRAHAM,  HAROLD  M.
HARPER, DAVID A.
HERT, WILLIAM
HOOPER, FRED
LEA, EDGAR
LEE, DOUGLAS J.
LYLE, DONALD F.
MATHIESON, JOHN R.
MITTEN, DOUGLAS S.
MOSHER, ALLISON F.
PERRY. LORNE G.
ROACH, STUART W.
ROBINSON, DAVID
RUMBALL, DALE L.
RUSH, IAN C.
SHEFIELD, J. OWEN
SLEIGH, BARRY E.
STEELE, IAN McL.
TAYLOR, DOUGLAS
TUCK, M. DENIS
TUCKER, JOHN N.
WAINWRIGHT, P. ROD
II
Delta Upsilon was founded at Williams College, New
Jersey in 1834, and there are 61 active chapters. The B. C.
chapter was installed in 1935. Originally founded as an
organized protest against the secret societies, Delta Upsilon
finally evolved until today, in its aims, objects, purposes,
and methods, it closely resembles these other groups.
It still retains the antisecret principle, and its meetings
are open.
Missing from the picture are three men pledged in the
Spring, Ken McGowan, Ken Clark, and Bill Gait.
The pin is a monogram of the Greek letters. The colours
are old gold and sapphire blue.
President of the B. C. chapter this year was Bob Bonner.
Delta Upsilon
w
Page One Hundred and Eighty-nine ALLAN, JAMES G.
CARSON, JOHN J.
CLEMENT, JOHN W.
CROCKER, CHARLES B.
CRUISE, C. TED
DE BECK, HOWARD
DREW, SIDNEY
ESTEY, BYRON T.
FISHER, BRIAN
FLEMMING, BRYCE
GIFFORD, ROSS
GRAY, D. SHAD
GRIFFIN, F. PAUL
GROSS, WILLIAM H.
HATCH, NORMAN J.
HOUSSER, DAVID
LAWSON, DAVID A.
LYNN, JAMES F.
MADDIN, STUART W.
MATHESON,  ALEXANDER  M.
MACDONALD, KENNEDY
MACLEAN, DONALD W.
McBRIDE, RONALD T.
McBRIDE, W. EDWARD
MacBRIDE, KENNETH G.
McCARTER, DONALD C.
McKINLAY, JOHN A.
McKINLAY, WILLIAM D.
MACPHERSON, PETER M.
PATON,  ARCHIBALD  T.
PEDLOW, ALAN L.
PEDLOW, DOUGLAS
POULSON, J. HOWARD
RITCHIE, HUGH J.
RYAN, JOHN G.
SHORE, ALAN W.
TAYLOR, TED R.
TURNER, JACK H.
WOOD, DAVID
Phi Delta Theta
Phi Delta Theta was founded at Miami University, Ohio,
in 1848, and there are 106 active chapters. B. C. Alpha
was installed at U.B.C. in 1930. Total membership is
48,000.
The fraternity maintains a general headquarters at
Oxford, Ohio.
The pin consists of a shield with a scroll bearing the
Greek letters in the lower part of the field, and an eye in
the upper part. A sword is attached to the back of the
shield by a chain.
The colours are argent and azure, the flower a white
carnation.
President of B. C. Alpha this year was John Carson.
Page One Hundred and Ninety BARTON,  EDWARD
BOUGHTON, JAMES
BROWN, GORDON
CA1NE, GEOFF
CANTELL   THOMAS
CARMICHAEL, ANGUS
CARMICHAEL, ANDREW
DRAKE, TED
GALBRAITH,  EWAN
CILMOUR, CAMPBELL
GORMAN, RAY
CRAY, JACK
HALL, ORMONDE
HAY, DONALD
HILL, CLIFF
LINDSAY, ROD
LIVINGSTONE, DONALD
MALONEY, DOUGLAS
MANN, CLARENCE
NAIRNE, RONALD
NAYLOR, JOSEPH
ORR, OSCAR
PARNAM, SAMUEL
PENDLETON, WAYNE
PLOMMER, ROBERT
REID, KENNETH
REID, WALLY
REIFEL, GEORGE
RIPLEY, DREW
SCEATS, HUBERT
SCOTT, JAMES
SMEDLEY, JACK
SWACKHAMMER, DAVID
WILLIAMS, CAMPBELL
Phi Gamma Delta was founded at Washington and Jefferson University in 1848, and there are 73 active chapters.
Pi Gamma was installed at U.B.C. in 1929.
A nationally known basketball player, Pi Gamma Ralph
Henderson, is a prisoner of war in a German concentration
camp.
The pin, known as the founder's badge, is lozenge-
shaped, having a black background, and displaying the
Greek letters. Above the letters is a single, five-pointed
star in white enamel.
The colour is royal purple, the flower purple clematis.
The pledge button is a five-pointed white enamel star.
President of Pi Gamma this year was Douglas Maloney.
Phi Gamma Delta
A
$.r.A.
Page One Hundred and Ninety-one BENSON, EDWARD
BRIDGE, THOMAS
BROWN, IVAN
BROWNING, GEORCE
CARTER, RONALD
CLAYDON, GEORGE
DAVIES, EVANN
DIER, ORME
FAIRBAIRN, DENNIS
GILL, NORMAN
HOOD, JAMES
JAGGER, PAUL
JAMIESON, FRASER
JEFFRIES, JAMES
KILLICK, STANLEY
LANE, GEORCE
LEEDHAM, DAVID
LEIGH-SPENCER, GERALD
LONG, CHARLES
McARTHUR, JACK
PATTERSON, LAWRENCE
PATTERSON, STANLEY
PENNY, HARRY
PICKFORD, JOHN
RICHARDS, IAN
SALT, LIONEL
SHORTREED, JAMES
SNADDON, ANDREW
STEWART, MICKEY
SULLY, LYNN
TARBOX, JOHN
WALLACE,  JOHN
Phi Kappa Pi
Phi Kappa Pi was founded at the Universities of Toronto
and McGill, when, in 1913, two campus locals united.
Alpa Iota was installed at U.B.C. in 1924.
Alpha Iota became the first fraternity chapter on the
U.B.C campus, and remains the only Canadian national
group at the University. The local chapter was formed
first in 1919, and arose out of friendship struck up during
the war days of 1914-18.
The pin is of rectangular shape, with the Canadian maple
leaf in all four corners in gold. The Greek letters are in
gold on a blue enamel background. Fraternity colours
are blue and gold.
President of Alpha Iota this year was Dennis Fairbairn.
Page One Hundred and Ninety-two BELEY, J. PAT
BENTALL, ROBERT G.
BLAKE, DONALD H.
BONUTTO, ALFRED L.
BOURNE, EDWARD A.
BRADNER, FRANK E.
BURNETT, NORMAN H.
CLARKE, CHUMMER B.
COPP, STANLEY S.
EDWARDS,  A.  DOUGLAS
FARINA, A. JOHN
FARINA, C. OBIE
FOSTER, LEO
HORTON, KENNETH G.
HUME, DOUGLAS D.
LAWRIE, FRANK D.
LEAR, HAROLD
LUNDE,  EDWARD
MANN, WILLIAM T.
MERCER, WILLIAM M.
MONAHAN, ARTHUR R.
MORRISON, J. LEE
McCARRY, JAMES
McLEOD,  MONTY
PAYMAN, D. ALASTAIR
PHYSICK, ARTHUR
PRONGER, RALPH C.
REID, JAMES A.
ROBERTSON, DONALD A.
SINCLAIR, R. ELMER
SMITH, JACK
STROYAN, WILLIAM A.
WALKER, JOHN
WARWICK, W. ELMER
WATT, DOUGLAS C
WINTERMUTE, JACK R.
Phi Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of
Pennsylvania, in 1850, and there are 39 active chapters.
Alpha Omega was installed at U.B.C. in 1936.
The skull and crossed bones on the pin has earned them
the nick-name, the "Skulls."
The pin is a gold maltese cross with a black enamelled
border, the skull and crossed bones being displayed in the
centre. In the upper arm of the cross is a six-pointed star,
while on the other three arms are the Greek letters.
The colours are old gold and black. Jewelry on the
pin is prohibited.
Presidents of Alpha Omega this year were Don Blake
and Ed. Bourne.
Phi Kappa Sigma
Page One Hundred and Ninety-three BOWIE, JACK W.
BRYSON, GERALD S.
CURRY, ROBERT M.
DRUMMOND, ALLAN S.
FARROW,  FRANCIS  A.
FOURNIER, LIONEL J.
JESSUP, GEORGE D.
JEUNE, RONALD F.
LEWIS, ERIC E.
LIGHTSTONE, JACK
LIGHTSTONE, ROBERT
LOGAN, KENNETH T.
MEREDITH, JOHN R.
MOXON, JOHN 0.
McCALL, GRAHAM E.
McDONALD, IAN J.
MacFARLANE, GORDON B.
McMASTER, WILLIAM J.
McPHERSON, JOHN P.
NICHOLS, DAVID R.
NICKERSON, D'ARCY G.
ORR, THOMAS F.
BAYNE, HAROLD  R.
PIDGEON, FRANK H.
RIPPON, ARTHUR W.
ROWEBOTTOM, HOWARD F.
ROWEBOTTOM, LORNE E.
SMITH, ALEX. F.
SYNDER, RUSSELL P.
STAMATIS, GEORGE
SWAINSON, JOHN
TELFORD, ROBERT B.
THOMPSON, DENNY
Psi Upsilon
Psi Upsilon was founded at Union College, New York,
in 1833, and there are 27 active chapters. Zeta Zeta was
installed at U.B.C. in 1935.
A memorial plaque in the Stadium keeps alive the memory of Zeta Zeta Howie McPhee, late popular U.B.C. athlete.
The pin is in the shape of a lozenge, displaying across
its short diagonal the emblem of the clasped hands, with
one Greek letter above, and the other below.
The colours are garnet and gold.
President of Zeta Zeta this year was Gordon MacFarlane.
Page One Hundred and Ninety-four ANDERSON, BLAIR
BAKER, BRUCE
BANNERMAN, DONALD
BARTHOLEMEW,  BEN
BEATON, STAN
BENNE'IT, HOWARD
CAMPBELL, GEORGE
CASSON, VINCENT
COLLINS, JOHN
DAVIDSON, ROBERT
EDDLESTONE, JAMES
EDWARDS, DONALD
ELLIOT, ALBERT
GAGNON, BERNARD
GODFREY, GERALD
GORDON, FRANK
HUNT, WILLIAM
JOHNSON, EARL
MOSHER, VAUGHN
McADAM, CLIFF
MACKENZIE, JOHN
NAROD, AL
OLSEN, NORMAN
ROXBOROUGH, MALCOLM
SHAW, JOHN
SMITH, LESLIE
STEELE, WILLIAM
THORSON, VICTOR
TOOMBS, HAROLD
WEED, JOSEPH
ZAB1NSKY, JOHN
Sigma Phi Delta, an international professional engineering fraternity, was founded at the University of Southern
California in 1926, by a combination of a society established at that university in 1924, and Delta Pi Sigma, established at the University of South Dakota in 1922.
Government is by a supreme council consisting of grand
president, vice-president, secretary-treasurer, and two others.
Biennial conventions are held. Additional chapters were
established at Texas, Illinois, North Dakota, and Tulane.
Sigma Phi Delta
Page One Hundred and Ninety-five ABBOTT, HUGH
apROBERTS, EVAN
BUERK, ROBERT
CAMPBELL, CHARLES
CARROTHERS, JOHN
EADIE, CHARLES
FITZ-JAMES, PHILIP
FRISKIN,  JAMES
GILMOUR,  WILLIAM
GOURLAY,  JOHN
HALL, HUGH
HALSTEAD, JOHN
LUCAS, COLIN
MANES,  JACK
MARGESON,   JOHN
MATHEWSON, PETER
MILLER, RICHARD
MITCHELL, FRANK
MYERS, FRED
McCAY, JAMES
McKENZIE, LLOYD
OUGHTRED, AULAY
PAISLEY, JOHN
PROWD,  LAWRENCE
RALSTON, DONALD
ROSE, ROBERT
RUSSELL, HECTOR
SHILLABEER, JOHN
SMITH, FRANK
STEWART,   NORMAN
SWINTON, HANS
WHITELAW, GLENN
WOOD, HUNTER
YOUNG, MICHAEL
Zeta Psi
Zeta Psi was founded at New York University in 1847,
and there are 29 active chapters. Sigma Epsilon was installed in 1926. Although the fraternity has a reputation
for conservatism, it was the first one to establish a chapter
on the Pacific Coast.
Zeta Psi was also the first fraternity established in a
Canadian university.
The pin is formed of a monogram of the Greek letters.
Under the upper bar of the "Z" is an "o", and on top of
the lower bar is an "a". The Greek letter "Z" is set in
pearls.
The colour is white, the flower a white carnation.
President of Sigma Epsilon this year was Peter Mathew-
Page One Hundred and Ninety-six ANGLEY, WILLIAM
BARTON, ARTHUR
BENNETT, JOHN
BROWN, KENNETH
DEAN, ALAN
DUNCAN, DONALD
ELSDON, DOUGLAS
FAIRGRIEVE, WILLIAM
FRANCIS, FRANK
GOODWIN, MARTIN
GRASSIE, VERNON
HAMMOND, PAUL
HOLDER, RONALD
HOLLAND, GEORGE
HOOPER, PERRY
HOOSON, WILLIAM
KERMODE, HARRY
KING, DAVID
MAHOOD, BRIAN
MARSHALL, ROBERT
MORAN, JOHN
MOYLES, ADRIAN
McLEOD, BUD
NORTON, WILLIAM
PALLAS, TED
PARSONS, LESLIE
PINCHIN, VICTOR
POTKINS, ROBERT
SHADWELL, HOWARD
SHAW, KENNETH
SMITH, ERIC
STREET, WILLIAM
WALLACE, GORDON
WARNER, HARRY
YOUNG, DAVID
Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of Virginia in 1869, and there are more than 100 active chapters.
The B. C. chapter was installed in 1941.
Last year, a local called the "Semper Club," the Kappa
Sigs received and accepted a bid from Kappa Sigma, went
international this year, becoming the youngest fraternity
on the campus.
The pin is a crescent of chased gold with points turned
down and holding suspended a five-pointed star enamelled
in black, with a narrow border of white enamel and gold.
The general surface is convex. Within the star are the
Greek letters, surrounded by a circle of jewels. The colours
are scarlet, white and emerald green, the flower lily-of-the-
valley.
President of the B. C. chapter this year was Art Barton.
Kappa Sigma
Page One Hundred and Ninety-seven BARER, RALPH
CHECOV, LOUIS
COHEN, TED
FLADER, SAMUEL
GITTERMAN,  CHARLES
GROSS, EDWARD
JAMES, RALPH
KOENIGSBERG, IRVING
KORSCH, LENORD
NOVIKOFF, MORRIS
WEINER, HARRY
Kappa Theta Rho
Students count ballots at elections
Page One Hundred and Ninety-eight Beverley Matthew
Marion Murphy
. . . Pan-Hellenic Council
Central governing body of the eight Greek sororities on the campus is Pan-Hellenic Council, with membership consisting of two representatives from each
sorority who elect an executive group.
Purpose of Pan-Hellenic Council is to correlate the
work of the sororities, and keep close watch over
their activities.
The sorority bowling competition run off as an
adjunct to Miss Moore's intra mural program proved
to be one of the biggest events in Pan-Hell history.
With every sorority entering a team in the meet,
competition ran high, the girls from Alpha Gamma
Delta finally emerging victorious.
The Scholarship trophy, donated to inter-sorority
competition by Delta Gamma passed from the hands
of Alpha Omicron Pi and into the hands of Alpha
Phi this year.
Much work was done by Pan-Hellenic Council in
connection with the Greek Red Cross Ball, Interna
tional Student Service, and self-denial days, which
they took over for the Fall term. Each Wednesday
until Christmas, four sorority girls patrolled "beats"
collecting money for the Red Cross.
At the final meeting of the year, the rushing rules
for sororities underwent considerable change, the
Council abolishing Spring teas and Christmas rushing.
Instead of Spring teas, pamphlets containing information on the sororities are to be mailed in the
Spring to girls in first year at U.B.C and to all girls
at Victoria College.
To replace Christmas rushing, a program of "open
bidding" will be instituted from January 15 - February 1.
The executive of Pan-Hellenic Council this year
consisted of: President, Beverley Matthew; Vice-
President, Marion Murphy; Secretary, Mary Phillips;
Treasurer, Joyce Orchard.
Mary Phillips
Joyce Orchard
Page One Hundred and Ninety-nine BISHOP, PHYLLIS
BOOTH, BERNICE
CHENOWETH,  JOYCELYN
CROFT,  MARGOT
DESBRISAY,   RUTH
FINLAY, MARY
FINLAYSON, ANNA RUTH
GILLIS, SHEILA
HARVEY, BETTY
HEWITT, KATHERINE
HIRD, DOROTHY
JONES, AUDREY
LAKE, JUNE
LEACH, GWEN
LISTER,  MARY
MANNIX, LUELLA
MUIR, BETTY
MURPHY, MARION
ORCHARD, JOYCE
RAE, BETH
ROBSON, MABEL
RUNKLE, PENELOPE
SHIELDS, MERYLE
STAMATIS, DOROTHY
TAIT, JEAN
THOMSON, LORRAINE
WALLACE, BETTY
WISMER, SHIRLEY
WORTHINGTON, BETTY
WYNESS, ELEANOR
Gamma Phi Beta
Gamma Phi Beta, this year, concentrated much of its
spare time efforts on the men of the youngest service, the
Airforce. Affiliated with the Women's Auxiliary of the Air
Force, they spent much time in knitting garments for air
crew work.
Each member of the chapter also put in one hour a week
at the campus Red Cross room. A program of regular
purchases of war savings certificates was carried out, and
the annual donation was sent to the Vancouver Welfare
Fund.
Gamma Phi Beta was founded at Syracuse, New York,
in 1874, and there are 49 active chapters. Alpha Lambda
was installed at U.B.C. in 1928. The colours are fawn and
seal brown, the flower a carnation.
President of Alpha Lambda this year was Betty Worth-
Page Two Hundred ball, patricia
boyes, margaret
burney, jean
conkey, elizabeth
eckardt, jean
edwards, daima
ellis, phyllis
gardiner, margaret
hazelwood, mary-gordon
handling, jean
johnson, eva
lee, jean-carol
lennie, doris
lennie, margaret
matheson, claudia
matthew, beverley
millins, betty
morris, joan
morton, evaline
murdoch, jane
McCarthy, Frances
McCLORY, MARGARET
MURRAY, ELAINE
McDIARMID, LORNA
McQUEEN, MAE
PROUDFOOT, AGNES
REID, MARGARET
RYAN, DAPHNE
SANDERSON, PHYLLIS
SOUTHIN, ADRIENNE
SOUTHIN, ELEANOR
SULLIVAN, CONNIE
THURSTON, AUDREY
TWIZELL, PEGGY
UNDERHILL,  ISABEL
WARNER, MARY
WEAVER, JUNE
WILLIAMS, JUNE
WILSON, RUTH
Members of Alpha Gamma Delta dug down deep into
their sinking fund this year, and came up with a $300.00
Victory Bond as part of their contribution to the government's war effort.
Besides spending a required hour a week in the campus
Red Cross room, knitting for the Red Cross, the Alpha
Gams did work for the Merchant Marine, and played
hostess to the Air Force at several informal parties.
Alpha Gamma Delta was founded at Syracuse University
in 1904, and has 45 active chapters. Delta Zeta was installed
at U.B.C. in 1930. The colours are rose, buff, and green,
the flowers red and buff roses.
President of Delta Zeta this year   was Frances McCarthy.
Alpha Gamma
Delta
Page Two Hundred and One ATKIN, MARY-FRANK
AUGUSTINE, KAY
CLUGSTON, JEAN
COOLS,  EVELYN
COSTELLO, JOAN
CRAIG, PATRICIA
CUNNINGHAM,   MARGARET
DALZIEL, JOYCE
DARLING, DENISE
DILGER, VIVIAN
DRYSDALE, NORMA
DU MOULIN, ANNE
FLEMING, NORMA
FOWLER, FRANCES
GULICK,  MARGARET
HAMMITT,   VIRGINIA
JUKES, BUNTY
LEES, DODIE
LOCKE, ELIZABETH
McDIARMID,   BETTY
PAUL, RACHEL
RUSHWORTH, EILEEN
WELCH, HELEN
WHITE, SADIE
Delta Gamma
The navy, pioneer service of the armed forces, received
much needed support this year from the girls who wear
"the golden anchor," members of Delta Gamma.
Besides their knitting for campus Red Cross work, the
D.G.'s knitted as a chapter for the Merchant Marine, that
oft forgotten but invaluable group of brave seamen, and,
in co-operation with their alumnae, knit for the North Sea
Patrol.
Delta Gamma was founded at Lewis School, Mississippi,
in 1874, and has 49 active chapters. Alpha Phi was installed at U.B.C. in 1928. The colours are pink, blue, and
bronze, the flower a cream-coloured rose.
President of Alpha Phi this year was Frances Fowler.
Page Two Hundred and Two ANDERSON, SYLVIA
BERTON, LUCY
BIBBS,  PATRICIA
BRANDT, HELEN
DANIELL, JOYCELYN
DRURY, MARY
MOE, BARBARA
McEACHERN, FLORENCE
McMAHON, PATRICIA
NAIRNE, MILDRED
NEWMAN, BARBARA
SAGE, MARGARET
SMITH, NANCY
THICKE, JOAN
TOMPKINS,  DOROTHEA
UGLOW, ELIZABETH
WATT, EVELYN
WELDON, MARGARET
WOOD, BETTY RAY
WOOD, MARY ALICE
Alpha Phi
All three services received benefit from the nimble fingers
of members of Alpha Phi this year, as the girls busied
themselves knitting for the Army, Air Force and Navy.
The campus war effort came in for much of their time,
with members spending much time in the Red Cross knitting and sewing room in Brock Hall.
The girls also busied themselves providing entertainment for the girls of the Alexandra Neighbourhood Home.
Alpha Phi was founded at Syracuse University, New
York, in 1872, and there are 39 active chapters. Beta
Theta was installed at U.B.C. in 1928. The colours are
silver gray and bordeaux.
President of Beta Theta this year was Margaret Weldon.
Page Two Hundred and Three BELL, MAUREEN
BOULTBEE, ELIBAZETH
BROWN, PEGGY
BULLER,  MARGARET
CARTER,  EILEEN
DESBRISAY, MARY BETH
DICKIE, BETTE
EWING, MARGARET
FARRELL,  MARY
GILLIES,  BARBARA
HEBB, DOROTHY
HEBB, ELIZABETH
HOLLAND, KATHLEEN
LARGE, LORRAINE
LECOUTEUR, MARGARET
MILLIGAN, PHYLLIS
MACDONALD, JOAN
MACDONALD, SHIRLEY
MACKENZIE, PAT
McLORG, MARY
McQUEEN, BARBARA
McTAVISH, MARY
RAWLINGS, PHYLLIS
RENDELL, NONIE
ROBINSON, VALERIE
RYAN, DOREEN
SCOTT, ELIZABETH ANN
SMITH, BARBARA
SPENCER,  BARBARA
STRAITH,  JOAN
THOMPSON, DORIS
TWISS, MARY
VILLIERS-FISHER, JOAN
WOODCROFT,   HELEN
Kappa Kappa
Gamma
Aiding a sorority sister who is now in England doing
much work among the wounded, the local chapter of
Kappa Kappa Gamma again this year sent a donation to
Nora Wain, to help care for Britain's war victims. Each
member of the chapter is required to spend at least two
hours each week in the Red Cross room.
In addition, philanthropic work is carried out by the
girls for students at Seymour school, supplying clothing
and glasses, and weekly entertainment.
Kappa Kappa Gamma was founded at Monmouth College, Illinois, in 1870. Gamma Upsilon was installed at
U.B.C. in 1929. The colours are light and dark blue, the
flower a fleur-de-lis, the jewel a sapphire.
President of Gamma Upsilon this year was Doreen Ryan.
Page Two Hundred and Four ABERNATHY, MARGARET
BEDDOME, ANNE
BLUNT, JOYCE
BURKE, CORNELIA
CAMPBELL, MARY
CLEMENS, ANN
DANIELS, DOROTHY
DUNCAN, MARGARET
FAIRNIE, LOUISE
FINCH, BUNNY
FOSTER, MARY
HACKNEY, AMY
HIBBERT, BARBARA
HOBDEN, BETTY
JACKSON, FRANCES
MESSENGER, GEORGINA
MORGAN, PHYLLIS
McLAGAN, MURIEL
PHILLIPS, BRENDA
PHILLIPS, MARY
SINCLAIR, ELEANOR
SPEARS, DOROTHY
TINDLE, MURIEL
WHIMSTER,  MURIEL
Feeling that the essence of charity was to be found in
sacrifice, the girls of Alpha Delta Pi, this year, aided the
war effort by sacraficing their Spring Formal, usually the
big affair of the season.
Instead of their Formal, the girls purchased a $100.00
Victory Bond, each member donating the money that would
ordinarily have gone for the dance.
Kntting and sewing was carried on throughout the year
in aid of the U.B.C. Red Cross campaign, and the National
Alpha Delta Pi victory campaign. Needy children in the
west end area of Vancouver were supplied with donations
of milk.
Alpha Delta Pi was founded at Wesleyan College,
Georgia, in 1851, and there are 55 active chapters. Beta
Kappa was installed at U.B.C. in 1931. The colours are
pale blue and white, the flower, a single purple violet.
President of Beta Kappa this year was Mary Phillips.
til.£
Alpha Delta Pi
Page Two Hundred and Five ANDERSON, BETTE
BOLD, MARY
BOYD, RUTH
BROWN, EANSWYTHE
FRANCIS, IDA
GIBBS, GWEN
WIGGINS, RUTH
HUTCHINSON, HAZEL
LACEY, KAY
MERCER, FLORENCE
McBAIN, ALLISON
McCORKELL,  BEVERLEY
NICHOLSON, LOIS
SANDISON, ANNABEL
SULLIVAN, LUCY
VENINI, MARY
Kappa Alpha Theta
In conjunction with the Lions' Gate Riding Club, members of Kappa Alpha Theta expended many hours this
year in aiding the war effort. Knitting, making baby
clothes, selling needle guards, and calendars for the Red
Cross were but a part of the program.
The Theta Cabaret, a product of both the active and
alumnae chapters, raises much money each Spring which
is donated to the Red Cross. In addition, each chapter
member is required to spend one hour each week in the
campus Red Cross room.
Kappa Alpha Theta was founded at DePaw, Indiana, in
1870, and has 63 active chapters. Beta Upsilon was installed at U.B.C. in 1930. The colours are black and gold,
the flower a black and gold pansy.
President of Kappa Alpha Theta this year was Mary
Boyd.
Page Two Hundred and Six ATTREE, PATRICIA
BEAUMONT, BETTY
BULGIN, MINTA
CAMPBELL, MARGARET
COREY, RUTH
CROSBY, MARJORIE
FRANCIS, MARGARET
GOYER, GERTRUDE
GOYER, MARGARET
MEREDITH, PATRICIA
MOYLS, PEGGY
McKELVY, MARY
PROUD,  GERALDINE
YOUNG, HONOREE
Entertaining the R.C.A.F. became an integral part of the
activities of 'Alpha Omicron Pi this year, the first of a
series of parties for the airmen being staged during the
Christmas holidays.
Success of the initial venture, prompted the girls to continue the policy throughout the Spring term. At the weekly
meetings, the girls knit for the C.W.A.A.F., and, since the
alumni are affiliated with the W.A.A.F. the girls did much
knitting for them.
Alpha Omicron Pi was founded at Barnard College, New
York, in 1897, and has 50 active chapters. Beta Kappa
was installed at U.B.C. in 1931. Colours are cardinal and
white, the flower, red rose, the jewel, ruby.
President of Beta Kappa this year was Minta Bulgin.
Alpha Omicron Pi
Page Two Hundred and Seven 1
■
k>-X^-B
JM
^^^^H          mWL
^mm
1
BBBBBBBB^BBBBi
i
bbbb!             ^b>
k
mW'     %   ■
■«■
L^
WL'mm
^
^
r4
i  ^y —
*N
. ""L
1 ^^^
.  \   -
*
,^
The largest single organization on the campus was Phrateres, unlimited girls  sorority,  headed  this  year   by  Mary  Mulvin.
Phrateres . .
An international "grin-stitution" that is Phrateres,
whose slogan "famous for friendliness" has become
the watchword among co-eds on the campus of U.B.C.
The largest, single, organized club on the campus,
Phrateres is a vast sorority-type club with unlimited
membership. Many of its members wear the pin of
a Greek sorority but have joined Phateres because of
the opportunities offered that their own organization
cannot afford them.
The object of the club is to promote social intercourse and a spirit of friendliness among the women
students of the University.
Under the guidance of the Dean of Women, Dr.
Dorothy Mawdsley, Phrateres attempts to acquaint
co-eds with the rules and regulations of the campus.
One of the most important functions of Phrateres
is that it sets at ease the out-of-town girls coming to
University for the first time, who tend to find life in
a strange city somewhat bewildering.
A direct contribution to the war charities drive
was tendered by Phrateres this year when they took
over the handling of self-denial days after Christmas.
Much of the success of self-denial days, which this
year more than doubled the total set last year, can
be given to Phrateres members who stood for hours
coercing students donations.
The first function of the Fall term was a banquet
which was followed by an impressive initiation ceremony, when new members were pledged to Phrateres
in a candle-lit procession.
In November a formal was held in Brock Hall.
Christmas charity work this year took the form of
a party for the "Beavers," a group of small boys at
the Alexandra Neighborhood House.
The Spring Term opened with a surrealist party
which was staged at the Peter Pan ballroom, Phrateres members coming in the most fantastic garb
imaginable.
In March, a dance was held in honour of the Radio
Technicians Corps, a group of R.C.A.F. men stationed
in training on the campus. A tea for the women
members of the faculty ended the activities of the
season.
The executive of all-Phrateres this year consisted
of: Honourary President, Dean Dorothy Mawdsley;
President, Mary Mulvin; Vice-President, Dolly Ellis;
Secretary, Muriel Tindle; Treasurer, Peggy Moyles;
Social Service Chairman, Buny Arm; Initiation and
Awards, Bernice Williams; Sub-Chapter Chairman,
Daima Edwards.
Sub-chapter heads were Julie Carsley, Frances
Sandall, Mary Warner, Jane Cox, Dorothy Speers,
and Pat Ball.
Page Two Hundred and Eight L. S. E
1941
1942
Professor Thorlief Larsen
Exercising executive control over more than fifty
campus clubs and organizations has been the full-
time job of Bob Morris, this year's president of the
Literary and Scientific Executive.
This year, the system of arranging pass features
was extended to permit clubs and organized groups
to present entertainment which was of particular interest to the groups as well as general interest on the
campus.
Features thus presented included Madame Lilavati.
exotic East Indian dancer, with the co-operation of
the Radio Society and the Cosmopolitan Club, and
the showing of engineering films through the cooperation of the Film Society and the various campus engineering societies.
To extend the operations of the pass fund committee, a Special Events Committee was formed which
was responsible for presenting such artists as Ted
Fio Rito, Kenneth Spencer, Reah Sadowski, Ross
Pratt, William Primrose, and Arthur Benjamin to
campus audiences.
Continuing a policy set four years ago, the L. S. E.
again awarded Honourary medallions to club members whose contributions to extra-curricular affairs
were considered outstanding. Twelve students and
one faculty member were thus honoured.
Bob   Morris,   Lester  Sugarman,  Lister   Sinclair.
Duncan McFayden, Margaret Haggart, Arvid Backman.
Jim Melvin, Harry Home, Sheila MacKay.
Ray Foster,  Louis  Monasch, Eric Nicol.
Page Two Hundred and Nine American Society of Mech. Engineers
NEED for trained mechanical engineers who have
not only the technical skill required but also the experience in public speaking on technical subjects, makes
this organization of fourth and fifth year mechanical
engineering students of prime importance.
Throughout the year, a definite program of education in mechanical engineering is followed, either by
presentation of papers or by the showing of films.
Films of general interest are shown by the club to all
applied science students once monthly. This year, at
the conclusion of examinations, the U.B.C. branch
will play host at a North West conference..
This year's executive consisted of: Honourary
President, Prof. H. M. Mcllroy; President, Sid Roon-
ey; Vice-President, John Logan; Secretary-Treasurer,
Henry Curran; Librarian, Earl Johnson.
Faculty and Students  of Mechanical Engineering.
Junior Canadian Society of Technical
Agriculturists
Doug. Hunter, Nora Nielson, Jim Campbell, Birch Van Home.
INTERESTING to watch this past year has been
the successful thriving of what promises to be one of
the most practical organizations on the campus, a
society of Technical Agriculturists.
Conceived last year, the C.S.T.A., which has a
membership composed of senior students in all
branches of Agriculture moved far forward in its
second year towards the goal of closer co-operation
between students and faculty, and the promotion of
active discussion of technical agricultural subjects.
In a post-war world, sorely in need of new methods
of production and conservation, this society, the first
of its kind at a Canadian university, will be greatly
appreciated.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Jim
Campbell; Vice-President, Bircham Van Home; Secretary-Treasurer, Nora Nielson; Curator, Doug
Hunter.
. . Biology Discussions Club
USEFULNESS of trained biologists in a post-war
world was brought forward this year by the activities
of the Biological Discussions Club which seeks to
further the interests of biology, a fast growing science
whose potentialities no one dare predict.
Of prime importance in the society's work was the
assistance given the War Aid Council in the drive
sponsored by the Red Cross for blood donors. Early
in January, a most provocative paper was presented
on the possibilities of substitutes for the dwindling
supplies of vital fish oils. Film showings, and other
regular panel discussions rounded out the club's
agenda.
This year's executive consisted of: President, David
Fowle; Vice-President, Ann Clemens; Secretary,
Mary Murphy; Curator, David Munro.
Dave Fowle, Ann  Clemens, Mary Murphy, Dave Munro
Page Two Hundred and Ten * PROMOTION of understanding of world events by
a rational study of current affairs forms the foundation of the International Relations Club, which is
sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment Fund. With
the doctrine of war so rampant in Europe today, the
club's work in studying and understanding the worth
of international peace and goodwill becomes even
more pertinent than when a nominal peace is being
enjoyed.
Speakers to the group included Dr. D. H. Russell
on "Propaganda," Dr. E. Harris on "France," Prof. J.
A. Irving on "Democracy in U.S.A." A conference
was held in Seattle of the Pacific Northwest members
to which several members journeyed.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Jack
McMillan; Vice-President, Shirley M. Johnston;
Secretary, Sheila MacKay.
International Relations Club
Jack  McMillan,  Sheila  MacKay,  Shirley  Johnstone.
PROBLEMS confronting young Chinese students at
the University and their solution form the basis for
the activities of the Chinese Students' Club, which
has, since its inception in 1930, increased its membership fivefold.
Among the useful activities of the society is the
annual Matric Social, held in the Spring, at which
Chinese high school graduates who plan to enter University are acquainted with the rules and regulations
and given helpful advice on the choosing and planning of courses. The furthering of international
goodwill absorbs much of the interest of the club's
monthly meetings.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Roy
Yip; Vice-President, Ruth Lee; Secretary, Mary Woo;
Treasurer, Thomas Ho; Social Convenors, Lilac Onlee,
Joseph Kent.
Chinese Students Club
Roy Yip, Thomas Ho, Joseph Kent, Lilac Onlee, Mary Woo,
Ruth Lee.
INTEREST in French language and culture, threatened by oblivion as it has been in Europe by the terrible turn of events, is still alive on the campus of the
University of B.C., some 7000 miles away, parti}
through the activities of La Canadienne, a club composed of students of French anxious to keep the
French spirit alive.
Bi-monthly meetings were held throughout the
term at which the club heard many interesting papers
presented by guest speakers. Highlights of the talks
were those given by Dr. D. Evans, Dr. A. F. B. Clark,
Mme. Dupuis, Miss Boyles, and Mme. Darlington.
This year's executive consisted of: Honourary
President, Dr. Dorothy Dallas; President, Amy Fother-
gill; Vice-President, Melva Dwyer; Secretary, Hansi
Nissen; Treasurer, Goldie Walker.
. La Canadienne
Dr.   Dorothy  Dallas  and  La   Canadienne  Executive.
Page Two Hundred and Eleven Newman Club
John Seyer, Harry Home, Joan Costello, Terry McLorg,
Ray Cullinane.
STUDENTS of the Roman Catholic faith, anxious
to correlate their religious beliefs with their educational advance, made this year's Newman Club activities a great success. Organization of the club, and
spontaneity of its activities was greatly helped this
year by the inception of Newman House which proved
to be the focal point of the society's various meetings.
Active, unofficial support was given by the members to the campus war effort, and semi-monthly
meetings, socials with the Alumni group, communion
breakfasts, and discussions on current religious subjects rounded out the agenda.
This year's executive consisted of: Honourary President, J. M. Coady; Chaplain, Rev. Father Hill; President, Harry Home; Vice-President, Joan Costello;
Treasurer, Terry McLorg; Corresponding Secretary,
Ray Cullinane; Recording Secretary, John Seyer.
Student Christian Movement
FORMED in 1920 as a desire on the part of university students who had taken part in the first World
War to co-ordinate the work of the Y.M.C.A. and the
Y.W.C.A., the Student Christian Movement, now an
international organization, celebrated its twenty-first
year of helping students to think out the relationship
of their religion to the world about them.
War work of the organization this year sprang
chiefly from the activity of the War Aid Council to
whom the club introduced the International Student
Service, and from work done on the "Milk for Britain
Fund". As usual Fall and Spring term camps were
held.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Jim
Melvin; Vice-President, Kala Clark; 2nd Vice-President, Frank Bertram.
Members of the Student Christian Movement.
Japanese Students Club
Japanese Members of Student Club  Gather for Picture.
NISEI—"New Canadians"—is the humble boast
of seventy Japanese students at the University who
this year carried on a varied program despite the
difficulties of a bewildering and complex international situation.
Although forced to curtail their activies somewhat
this year, dispensing with the annual debate against
Japanese students from the University of Washington,
and the oratorical contest for Japanese high school
students, the club continued to meet regularly, holding
a successful parent-student gathering at which vocational and social problems of the New Canadians were
discussed.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Ha-
jime Kagetsu; Vice-President, Kimi Takimoto; Treasurer, Roy Nose; Recording Secretary, Katherine
Shimo-Takahara.
Page Two Hundred and Twelve DEMANDS that modern warfare make on the forest reserves of Canada, and especially those of British
Columbia, make it imperative that the training of men,
not only in the art of logging but also in the science
of reforestation, and conservation be carried out by
the universities.
As a supplement to work possible in the class room
and laboratory, the Forest Club dedicates its efforts
to these ends, including in its membership all students
proceeding to a degree in forestry. In an effort to
bring students into closer contact with men in the
forest industry, guest speakers were invited to visit
the campus and present briefs on important phases
of the industry.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Jim
Flynn; Vice-President, Marvin Kullander; Secretary,
Al Thompson; Treasurer, George Thomas.
Forestry Club
'■£'■ \   3
En Masse, After a Meeting, Are These Men of the
Forestry  Club.
VENERABLE, but far from decadent, is this oldest
discussions club on the campus, the Letters Club, a
group, limited in membership to upperclass men and
women with a common, keen interest in all things
literary.
Kept compact, the club meets fortnightly to hear
discussed some aspect of literature, ancient or modern,
by a student member. Upon conclusion of his remarks,
the meeting is turned over to an informal criticism
both of the paper heard, and the field of literature
which it encompassed. Once yearly, an "Original Contributions Night" is held at which members bring
forth short stories, poems, plays, of their own, which
are read out anonymously, and then adjudged.
This year's executive consisted of: Honourary
President, Prof. Thorlief Larsen; President, Jack Mar-
geson;   Secretary-Treasurer, Sheila MacKay.
Letters Club
Jack Margeson, Sheila MacKay
FIFTY-EIGHT students of the University who are
studying to enter the profession of medicine organized
again this year to familiarize themselves with the problems of a medical education, and to afford themselves
a preliminary insight into the work which will confront them upon completion of their university
studies.
As a member of the War Aid Council, the society
did much invaluable work in sponsoring the drive for
voluntary blood donors for the Red Cross Blood
Bank. Surveys of city hospitals, addresses by prominent medical doctors, the showing of educational
films rounded out the club's activities.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Kenneth Keith; Vice-President, Ted Stevenson; Secretary,
Muriel Whimster.
. . . Monro Pre-Med. Club
f
■
7
*                       ft
-..mm                   _
^K
*S
1   w-4
 a
■
Ken Keith, Muriel Whimster,  Ted Stevenson.
Page Two Hundred and Thirteen Cosmopolitan Club
Ranjit Singh-Hall and His Executive.
Psychology Club
Gordon Skelhorne,  Dorothy  McDonell, Margaret  Lennie,
Edward Gross.
Historical Society
b^hT^ J^B
■
g
f1
\
AIM of the Cosmopolitan Club is to promote better
feeling and understanding among the different racial
groups on the campus. Special guests this year have
been Mme. Lilavati, East Indian dancer, Mr. Slo-
gowski, Polish violinist; Beatrice Loo, Chinese musician, and Kenneth Spencer, Negro basso.
Weekly noon-hour discussions were, for the first
term, on general racial problems, and for the second
term on immigration in Canada. In October, the
Club co-operated with the Radio Society in bringing
Mme. Lilavati to the campus for a recital.
The executive of the Cosmopolitan Club this year
consisted of: President, Ranjit Singh-Hall; Vice-President, Hajime Kagetsu; Secretary, Anne Woo; Treasurer. Ray McLeod.
FAST-GROWING science, the importance of which
is being emphasized in these days of strife, is the complex study of Psyschology. Now an adjunct of Philosophy, the study of psychological methods and
research bodes well to becoming a seperate department should interest in this field expand.
The purpose of the Psychology Club is to stimulate
an extra-curricular interest in psychology for its
members. It gives them a chance to hear speakers
prominent in the various fields of psychological study.
Membership ia the club is restricted to students who
are honouring or majoring in Psychology.
The executive of the Psychology Club this year consisted of: President, Gordon Skelhorne; Vice-President, Edward Gross; Secretary, Dorothy McDonnell;
Treasurer, Margaret Lennie.
TAKING the cue from the impending war clouds
that were gathering over the world in September, the
Historical Society this year concentrated its studies
on two fields, the Orient, and Latin America.
Opening the fall term, Dr. Dahmi, Indian philosopher, presented a paper to the Society on the problems   of   India.
In the Spring, attention was turned to Latin
America, with Society members presenting papers on
natural potentiality, racial structure, social and cultural institutions, political and economic development,
and Pan-Americanism.
The executive of the Historical Society this year
consisted of: Honourary President, Dr. Sylvia
Thrupp; President, Aubrey Coleman; Vice-President,
John Seyer; Secretary-Treasurer, Elsepth Munro.
Elspeth Munro and Aubrey Coleman.
Page Two Hundred and Fourteen PRAYER, often forgotten by students busily
engaged in absorbing knowledge, is the fundamental
upon which these students of the Varsity Christian
Union build their education.
With the aim of correlating their educational and
devotional studies, the members met at weekly prayer
meetings, held lively discussions, and Sunday firesides. A week-end conference at the Burrard Bible
Camp was held early in the year. The result was the
spending of many hours of comradeship with fellow
students in the worship of God.
This year's executive consisted of: President, David
Phillips; Vice-President, Hope Hewitt; Secretary,
Athena Alexander; Treasurer, Maurice McPhee;
Librarian, Phyllis Walker; Advertising, Don Gibson.
Varsity Christian Union
Don Gibson, A. Nother, Dave Phillips, Hope Hewitt, Athena
Alexander, Phyllis  Walker.
SOCIAL Change and the War, problems which confront every thinking student at any democratic institution formed the basis for a series of weekly discussions at regular meetings of the Canadian Students
Assembly Discussions Club this year.
Also keyed to the present conflict was the Fall term
panel discussion at which many members of the Faculty presented their views on the difficulties and
dangers, problems and possible solutions to the great
question mark: Post-War Reconstruction. Membership in the club is loose, since its program attempts
to be as broad and all-inclusive as possible.
This year's executive consisted of: President, George
Bishop; Secretary, Viva Freeman; S.C.M. Representative, Ed. Wyburn; S.P.C Representative, George
North; Historical Society Representative, Keith
Ralston.
Discussions Club
Ed.  Wyburn, George Bishop, George North, Viva Freeman.
DISCUSSION of pertinent problems, relevant to
the struggle throughout the world for the principles
of racial and religious tolerance, formed the basis of
the activities of the Menorah Society, an organization
comprised of young Jewish students on the campus.
Many guests speakers were heard throughout the
year including Dr. J. A. Crumb and Prof. G. F. Drummond of the Economics department, Drs. G. G.
Sedgewick and F. E. Priestly of the English department, and Rabbi Glatt. Money was raised for the
Canadian Red Cross by means of a series of socials.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Ted
Cohen; Vice-President, Albert Miller; Secretary,
Belle Pastinsky; Treasurer, Marianne Lourie; Social
Convenor, Florence Goldman; Culture Convenor, Len
Korsch; Frosh Representative, Morrie Berson.
Menorah Society
Al Miller, Len Korsch, Belle Pastinsky, Marianne Lourie,
Ted Cohen, Morrie Berson.
Page Two Hundred and Fifteen Chemical Engineering Society
New Engineering group on campus
SOMETHING new was added to the L.S.E. roster
this year when senior chemical engineering students
organized to form a society, the need for which had
been felt for some years, and which dedicated itself
to the fostering of an interest in the profession of
chemical engineering.
Monthly meetings were held throughout the term
at which student members, who are in fourth or fifth
year Chem. Engineering, presented papers in competition for book prizes, listened to guest speakers, witnessed many interesting technical films. The society
sponsored a film showing of its own, thrown open
to the public, on the vital war need, "Oil".
This year's executive consisted of: Honourary
President, Dr. W. F. Seyer; President, Eric Smith;
Vice-President, Harry Weiner; Recording Secretary,
Roy Selby; Corr. Secretary, Howard Poulson.
Undergrad Engineering Society
r
\
Ii i
4H|                               "^^5f
>T   M-
6 -J'
%ju
1 ftW1-
*S*
■
Keith Douglas, John Rogers, Arvid Backman
GOVERNING body of all engineering clubs on the
campus is the task of the Undergraduate Engineering
Society which seeks to correlate the activities of the
various, variegated science clubs.
Taking a new lease on life this year, the society
presented for the first time a well-balanced film program consisting of shows of general interest for all
students, and those of a technical nature which were
restricted to applied science students. Guest speakers
were brought to the campus, also, to present to future
engineers some of the problems, and their solutions,
which would be theirs upon graduation.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Arvid
Backman; Vice-President, Gordon Rogers; Secretary-
Treasurer, Keith Douglass; Faculty representatives,
Don Carlile, Jim Flynn, Sid Rooney, Bob Potkins,
John Collins, and Cameron MacKenzie.
Women's Public Speaking Club
NEED for a society to train co-eds in the art of
public speaking precipitated the formation this year
of the Woman's Public Speaking Club, an offshoot of
the more masculine Parliamentary Forum.
With membership comprised solely of women students, the society aimed vocal guns at co-eds timid and
speechless before audiences, by the end of the year
had developed many highly skilled feminine debators.
Biggest event of the club's year was the symposium-
style debate staged in Brock Hall between a two-girl
team from U.B.C. and a lone representative from the
University of California. A similar debate was held
against a Victoria College team later in the term.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Viva
Freeman; Vice-President, Wilma Smith; Secretary,
Betty Corbould.
Adjunct of Parliamentary Forum
Page Two Hundred and Sixteen Co-operatives grow in popularity .
Enterprising students desiring reasonable room and
board and good companionship at a short distance
from the campus, have in the past two years built
up quite a system of co-operative boarding, and
find that it pays them well.
This year, there have been forty student members
of the Student Co-operative Association. Under this
central management were three houses, one for co-eds,
two for male students. They are now officially registered at Victoria as a co-operative group.
The governing bodies include the General Meeting,
consisting of all members who have the final "say"
in all matters, a Board of Directors, composed of
three faculty members and five students, the Executive, consisting of the chairman, vice-chairman, and
house managers. The House Committees administer
the business of the individual houses, and consist of
house manager, purchasing agent, and treasurer.
Each residence has a house mother who looks
after the management of the house, and of the cooking. Large-scale buying allows them to keep the cost
well down, and this year the houses were able to
offer board and room at a maximum of $25.00
monthly, even in spite of the rise in the cost of
living.
The co-ed co-op is the newest venture. Started last
year, the co-eds got a real boost at the beginning of
the term this year when the Women's Faculty Club
gave them a donation of $90.00 for furnishings.
Later in the year, the girls entertained their benefactors at a tea, showed off their purchases. Here,
with the girls, the spirit of co-operation has spread
even to wearing apparel, with everything from hairpins to evening wraps making the rounds.
The co-operatives have as few rules as possible.
There is no curfew. Everyone is assigned approximately thirty minutes work each day. Tasks are
rotated at the end of the month to avoid monotony.
Everyone does his share, and harmony is achieved.
The success of the venture, controlled and operated
by the members themselves, rests upon co-operation
of everyone. Turnover this year amounted to
$6,000.00, of which $550.00 was set aside for payment of shares, reserves, and dividends. Each student, upon joining, is obliged to buy ten shares of
stock at $1.00 per share. These shares provide the
capital necessary for the proper running of the system.
The co-operative boarding house system has been
proved a success at U.B.C, and stands as a harbinger
to the day when Varsity will have dormitories on
ihe campus.
No Believers  in  Superstition  are  These  Thirteen  Co-oppers.
House   No.   2   Also   Produces   Thirteen   Representatives.
Newest Venture is the Girls' Co-op. House.
Page Two Hundred and Seventeen Musical Appreciation Club
MUSIC, one of the fast-growing arts on the campus
of U.B.C, received a definite stimulus this year with
the formation of the Music Appreciation Society.
Weekly noon-hour recorded programs were arranged with Lister Sinclair, Society chairman, lecturing on the music and the artists presented. Bill Blis-
sett and Mark Buckerfield conducted Friday afternoon "request" programs. Modern music received
treatment by Lionel Salt who staged a program of
Negro blues records.
The executive of the Music Appreciation Society
this year consisted of: Chairman, Lister Sinclair;
Mary Buckerfield, Tom Robinson, Fred Middleton,
Bill Blissett, Frank Bertram, and Lionel Salt.
Frank Bertram, Mary Buckerfield, Lister Sinclair, Bill Blissett,
Lionel Salt, Tom Robinson.
Le Cercle Francaise
1 J [r>   i
lj£ Mf^^k       m^m\              tfmtml
'   ^/v*.l *9    apn
I
Betty Corbould, Mary Westwood, Ann Other, John Oastler.
One of the two clubs on the campus devoted to
the study of French language and culture, Le Cercle
Francais this year enjoyed a deversified program,
carried on in spite of the fact that they lost their
sponsor, Professor Ronald Hilton to Stanford University at Christmas.
Speakers for the year included Dr. A. F. B. Clarke
who lectured on French music, illustrating his lecture
with records, Dr. Joseph Crumb speaking on French
economics and sociology, Professor H. Jennings, on
French mathematicians, and Dr. D. 0. Evans, on
modern France.
The executive of Le Cercle Francais this year
included: Honourary Presidents, R. Hilton, and Mile
de Courbille; President, Betty Corbould; Vice-President, John Oastler; Secretary, Mary Westwood;
Treasurer, Sheila Cawley.
Page Two Hundred and Eighteen .ITllTmiC
• ••••••• Page Two Hundred and Twenty Index. . .
Abbott, Hugh  M..  135, 196
Abey, Harold K.  149
Abernethy, Margaret J..     154, 205
Abrams, Betty M.  _  154
Abrams, Jack  H  128
Adams,  Beverley  J  107
Adams, Geraldine   117
Adam,  Joseph     96, 187
Ades, Audrey  99
Adcock, Zelle   107
Agnew, Doreen  E  153
Aikens, Hugh  54
Airey, Frances  M  117
Aitken, Thomas   117
Alexander,  Athena    89
Allan,  Betty L  107
Allan, James G..   190
Allan,  Jeanie  117
Allan, John N  107
Allen,   George  107
Almas,   Gabriel   117
Anderson, Blair W   134, 135
Anderson, Douglas A _  117
Anderson, Elizabeth D  99
Anderson,   Elizabeth   M..        117
Anderson, John D  138
Anderson,  John  J       99
Anderson, Sylvia L.            107
Anderson, Thomas T    126
Anderson, Vera Y  99
Andrews,  Stewart  J.  117
Angley, William  F  126, 197
Anthony, Andy J  117
apRoberts, Guilym Evan  129, 196
Appleby, John    99
Appleby,  Lyon  H        117
Aqua, Harry  117
Arai,  Kimimichi    _  89
Archibald, Douglas   153
Archibald, Frank M  117
Archibald, Roy W    117
Arm, Jean  M     31,    99
Armour, Douglas   117
Armstrong, John J  89
Ash, Arthur  B        147
Ashe, Geoffrey T  99
Askew, William E. ..   89
Aszkanazy, Clarisse L —  99
Atherton, Dorothy   117
Armitage, Marian H   99
Armstrong, Douglas A.  114
Armstrong, Jean E  154
Ashworth,  Frances  ...  96
Atkin, Mary F     78,    96
Atkins, Eleanor  107
Atkins, Roma J  154
Attree, Patricia W -  99
Attridge,  Mary  L _  107
Auchinleck,  Gilbert  E _  135
Augustine,  Betty-Valerie  154
Augustine,   Kathleen     89
Avis, Margaret L  154
Avis,  Stanley F  138
Awmack, Joseph  147
Baal, George G  138
Bacon, Harry W  117
Backman, Arvid    57, 79, 132
Bailey, Dora J.
Baillie, Graham E.
Baker, D. Leacroft
Bakony,  Edward
  117
    107
  131
    99
Baker, Frederic B.  137, 138
Baker, Jocelyn L   117
Baker, Margaret A.   154
Bakony, Lionel I  107
Ball, Margaret A  117
Ball, Margaret L  154
Ball, Patricia E     99, 201
Balderston,  Ronald  B        107
Ballantyne,  W.  George    114, 187
Baldwin, John    132, 187
Banford, Norman  M.  117
Banford, Pauline E  155
Banks,  Jacqueline  A  107
Bannerman,   Donald   K  38, 132
Barer,  Ralph  D  138
Barlow, Vernon  99
Barltrop, John A.    117
Barnett,  Joan   R  99
Barnett, Joan  117
Barrow, Gordon  117
Barry, Frank W  138
Barss,  Elizabeth  M.   99
Bartholomew, Ben   131
Bartholomew,   Gilbert   A  99
Barton,  Arthur  S  166, 167, 197
Barton, Edward S   128
Basil,  Douglas C  117
Basketball   (Women's)    176
Bastin, Douglas H  127
Batchelor, Myra I.      107
Bayley, Lemuel J 1  138
Beale, Margaret F  H7
Beaton,  Stanley   135
Beavo, William A  107
Beaumont, Elizabeth N  99
Beck, Richard E _  117
Beddome, Anne C  205
Begert, Henry K  117
Beley, John P  ...   133, 193
Belkin, Morris  52
Bell, Barbara A  117
Bell, G. Douglas   89
Bell, Gordon M  128
Bell,  Harry  R  126
Bell,  Maureen F     99, 204
Bell, Ralph R  149
Bell, Samuel W    137, 138
Beltz, John E.  117
Bender, William  G.  107
Bennett, Anne  L  117
Bennett, Beatrice R  117
Bennett, Cyril J. ...   117
Bennett,   John     99, 197
Bennett, J.  Howard    -   125, 129
Bennett, Orval W  135
Bennett, O. Kenneth   107
Bennett, Reginald B. ...   126
Benson,  Edward   .—  133
Benson, Russell R.   117
Bentall, Robert G -  135, 193
Bentley, Robert 0  143
Beresford, Lillian  G    107
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-one KNOWLEDGE   IS   POWER"
—Francis Bacon
Intelligent individual thinking leads to intelligent community action. Prompt,
accurate knowledge of current events has never been
more important than today.
To  be  well   informed   read
The Vancouver  Daily  Province
Berryman, David J.  138
Berson, Morris J    117
Berton, Lucy F     51,   99
Bertram, Francis E  99
Bevan, Rhys D  117
Beveridge, E. Isabel     99
Beveridge, John W  117
Beveridge, Jean F.          117
Bewley, A. Leslie   50, 53,   56,    99
Bibbs,  Patricia  G               153
Bibbs, Richard M  138
Bickerton, Earle C.        114
Big Block Club  (Men).... 164
Big Block Club  (Women)     163
Binnie, Robert F  138
Bird, John M.  117
Bird, Stuart F  117
Bishop,  George  D.                   89
Bishop, Marion L  107
Bishop, Philip E        138
Bishop, Phyllis D  114, 200
Black, A. Patrick  117
Blair, Robert C  147
Blake, Donald H           133, 193
Blakeley, Herbert A  138
Blanchet, Peter H  132
Blezard, Roy J  135
Bligh, Hildred N.  107
Bloch, Inez E  107
Blumenauer, G. H  138
Blumenauer, John G.  117
Blunt, Joyce E  205
Bodnar,  Michael  W  138
Bolton,  Nancy     154
Bond,  Aileen  155
Bonner, Robert W  56,   57,   89
Bonney, David A       117
Bonutto, Alfred L  135, 190
Boond, Dorothy L  99
Boothe,   Bernice  107, 200
Boss, Norman H.  127
Boughton, Jim     55, 117
Bourne,   Edward     132, 193
Bourns, John  D  135
Boultbee, Marian E  99, 204
Bowden,  Evelyn  M  117
Bowell, Evelyn E  107
Bowell, Stephen T  117
Bowie, Jack W  107
Bowman, Frances  E.      153
Boyd, Alan W.     117
Boyd, Mary   99
Boyd, Nora   114
Boyd, Ruth M.   107
Boyle, Frederick A  138
Boyes, Margaret M  154, 201
Bradfield, Albert W  127
Bradley, Evelyn E.        107
Bradley, Mary  E  99
Bradner, Frank  E  145, 190
Bradner, Gilbert G.    117
Bramall, Brian L    138
Brandon, George F.  138
Brandon, James R -  99
Brandt, Helen K  42,   98,   99
Brereton, Gilbert W.  138
Brine, Ralph H  117
Broadhead,   Ronald   L  99
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-two "EFFICIENT   BUSINESS   TRAINING PAYS    DIVIDENDS   ALL   THROUGH   LIFE"
College of Business
The new type, High Standard College tor those who
appreciate superior efficiency and modern methods.
Students of this progressive College find that they master the courses
more thoroughly and in much less time because we have
—The latest methods
—The latest Office Machines
—And more Teachers in proportion to Students than is customary
SHORTHAND SIMPLIFIED
The new Willis System of Shorthand is so much simpler and speedier
than the old systems that Students save both time and expense and have
a much more satisfactory system for practical use because they can read
their own notes with greater ease and accuracy.
(We still teach Pitman to those who desire it, or who began it elsewhere and wish to
profit by our advanced methods and modern facilities.)
We teach Bookkeeping as actually practiced in business—the practical
way.    No time wasted.
We give the Complete Dictaphone Course as prepared by the Dictaphone
Company.
Special Comptometer Course as arranged by the Comptometer Company.
University graduates and students are specially invited to visit this High Grade College
to inspect our up-to-the-minute  Facilities  for Successful   Business  Training.
STEPHEN T. WILLIS
President
INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION
OPEN ALL YEAR
ENTER ANY TIME
NIGHT SCHOOL ON
MONDAY AND  THURSDAY
EVENINGS
'It is better to have attended Willis College than to wish you had."
Ask for the Catalogue.
Credit Foncier Building
College of Business
Telephone:   PA cific 0327
850 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-three Broadland, Robert T  117
Bromley, Gordon F  114
Bremner, Donald J.  117
Brown, Eaiiswythe   107
Brown,  Ellen  L  89
Brown, Eric W. ..._  117
Brown, Gilbert G  117
Brown,   Harry                   _ 99
Brown, Ivan T  149
Brown, Irene R  89
Brown, Kenneth R.                          143,197
Brown, June                           117
Brown,  Norma  M          117
Brownell, J. Ross                               96
Browning, George V             89
Bruce,  Mona  L  107
Bruce,  Norman  C  126
Bryant, Eleanor H  117
Bryant, James L    138
Bryson,   Gerald   S _  96
Buchanan, James B  107
Buck, F.  A.  Mackinnon  40, 79, 131, 182
Buck, Paul A                                 -. 146, 147
Buckerfield, Mary I.               99
Buckland, Donald C -  127
Buckland,   John   A                                      .. 83, 131
Buckley, Albert  M  117
Budd,   Joan     107
Buerk,  Robert    145, 196
Bulgin, M. Minta  89
Bullen, Dennis C  117
Bullen, E. Lester  117
Buller, Margaret H  99, 204
Bundy, Leonard P  127
Bunnell, Frank R  138
Bunting, Rosumund  G.    99
Burchell,  Sheridan  99
Burke, Cornelia  99,205
Burke,  Harold  H  107
Burke, Stanley   107
Burnett,  Bruce  K .  117
Burnett, Norman H.  162, 193
Burney, Jean E  89,201
Burney, Ross H. ..            117
Burns,  David      107
Burris,  Donald   S                   99, 187
Burton, John A  135
Burton, Margaret 0  149
Bushell,  Charles  H _                                126
Bushfield, Roy E -  117
Butler,   Audrey    „.- 149
Butler, L.  May    99
Byers, Archie  M  127
Byrom,  June  A  99
Caine, Geoffrey R  135
Calder, Frank  A  117
Calver,   W.   Howard  89
Caldwell, John  R  135
Cameraman,  Margaret    118
Cameron, Barbara B  118
Campbell,  Charles  G  107
Campbell, George C.            131, 196
Campbell, James  M  143
Campbell, Jean A             107
Campbell, Margaret A  118
Campbell, Margaret M  85, 155
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-four THIS     PHOTOGRAPH     BY     CLELAND-KENT We are proud...
to have so large a part in the production of this
Totem and hope to serve you in the future when
you need
PHOTOGRAPHS
in your business, professional or social life.
AntosuL Stadia
833 GRANVILLE STREET
PHONE MARINE 3932
Campbell, Mary I.  ,   89, 205
Campbell, Mary Y    153
Campbell, Norman K  107
Campbell,  Thomas  C  118
Cantell,  E.  Thomas     107, 166
Carbert,   Leslie             118
Carey, Agnes M _  107
Carey, Amy C                 107
Carlile,   Jack     135
Carlisle,   Donald     128
Carlsen,  Alfred    — 89
Carlyle, Allan M  138
Carlyle, David G                   133
Carmichael, Andrew J  114
Carmichael, Donald  G.           118
Carmichael,  Harvey A  138
Carncross,  Charles A.                                           135
Carncross, Ruth E  - - U8
Carrothers, A.  Brian                                        107
Carrothers,  Percival   J _  - 135, 196
Carsell, Roberta A  107
Carter,  Eileen  V  204
Carter, Ronald                                             132
Carsley, Julie  99
Carson, Douglas                 147
Carson,   John   J    63, 82,   99, 190
Carter,   Eileen                                            89
Carter, Harold R  118
Casson, Vincent H.  127
Caulfield, William J  138
Cavers, James K  89
Cavers, Stuart  D  126
Cawley, Guy S  114
Cawley, Sheila F. ...
Challis,  Leslie A	
Chalmers, William R. ..
Chambers,   Edward	
Chang, June   .	
Chang,   Zoe   .
Charlesworth,  Frederick   B..
Checko,  Andrew       	
Checov,  Louie   	
Chenoweth, Jocelyn  D	
Cherniavsky, John R. ...
Chestnut,  Robert  G.   ..
Chew,   Vernor   B	
Chipperfield, Nora J. ..
Chong,  Peter   	
Chong,  Yoke	
Chowne,  Caro  E	
Christie, A.  S. Hugh.
Christie,  Hugh   G	
Christie,   Jean   	
Christopherson, Charles J.
Christopherson,  Kathleen   .
Chu,   Gan   	
Church, E. John 	
Chutter, Paul  W	
Chutter, S. Donald	
Ciccone,  Leo  D	
Claridge, Charles A	
Clark, Bette  G.  ..
Clarke,  Chummer B	
Clark,   Douglas   ....
Clark, Kathleen D	
Clarke, Edna A.	
89
138
138
118
143
118
133
138
107
99, 200
118
135
118
155
114
107
118
135
153
107
138
99
127
99
149
114
89
99
114
89, 193
118
99
135
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-six WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE AGAIN BEEN ENTRUSTED WITH
THE PRODUCTION OF THE TOTEM.    THE PRINTING AND
BINDING WERE EXECUTED IN OUR PLANT, AND WE PRE
SENT THIS WORK AS EXEMPLIFYING THE HIGH STANDARD
OF CRAFTSMANSHIP THAT PREVAILS AT WARD & PHILLIPS
LIMITED,   318   HOMER   STREET,   VANCOUVER,   CANADA.
Clark, Robert  M  89
Clay, Charles H  135
Claydon,  George      146
Clemens, Ann M    99, 205
Clement, John W  143, 190
Clery, Patrick M     89, 187
Clerihue, W. Randolph   118
Cleveland,  Edward  M.      89
Clifton, Everard H  138
Clugston, Jean E.  96
Clyne, Norval S  99
Cochran,  Edward  0  138
Cochran, John    131
Cochrane, James A  138
Cochrane, Ruth C  155
Cockfield, Shirley H  118
Cocking,  Beth  118
Cody, John T  107
Coe, Allan      54,118
Coffey, Doris M. ..   154
Cohen, Theodore   143
Colbourne, James  C  118
Colcomb, Richard M  118
Coleman, William A.  89
Coles, John M  107
Coleopy,  Norman  138
Collins, John A „._  127
Collins,  Thomas   L  89
Colquhoun,  Patricia  M  107
Confortin, John  C  135
Conkey,  Elizabeth   E.  107, 201
Conway,  Lorraine    107
Cook, Douglas T  145
Cook, Fred D  149
Cooke, Hugh A  108
Cooke, Norman E               138
Cooper, Alexander C /..  135
Cooper, John  B  108
Copp, Stanley S  ,.. 131, 193
Corbett, Lome R  118
Corbould,  Betty  H  89
Corey, D. Ruth  100
Costello,  Mary J  100
Cote, Paul T  135
Cotterall,  Charles             169
Cottingham, Richard  R  118
Coutts, James W  114
Coventry, William V    118
Coverdale,  Harold  M  133
Cowan,  John     118
Cox, Jane E  96
Cox, Len   133
Coy, Filmer R  100
Craig, John  D      118
Craig, Mary P  108
Crawford, William M  118
Creelman, John R  118
Creighton, John D  100
Creighton, Kenneth  D  118
Crighton, Joyce    118
Crocker, Charles B       138, 190
Croft, Margaret  C  114, 200
Croll, Margaret  118
Crosby, Marjorie E. ..     100
Crosby, T. Boyd  118
Cross,  Josephine  ..     154
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-s-ven s
1 O the men and women of the University of British
Columbia who carry on the noble scholastic tradition
which is the light of Western civilization, our good
wishes:
WuucMWtr
\
VANCOUVER'S   HOME-OWNED  NEWSPAPER
\
/
Cruise, G. Theodore ..  108, 190
Cull, R. Joyce  89
Cullinane, T. Raymond   100
Cunningham,  John  R.     114
Cunningham,  Margaret    90
Cunningham, Patricia M     27, 118
Curnow, T.  Bernice   118
Curran,  Harry A _ 108
Curran, Henry M  128
Currie,  Allan    135
Currie, John F  108
Curry, Margaret A _  118
Curry, Robert  M  100
Curtin, Francis J  138
Curwen, Guy R  96
Cuthbert,  W.  James      143
Dalin, Winnifred H  100
Dalziel,  Joyce  E  100
Daniell,   Jocelyn  100
Barley, Harry   128
Darling, Bruce  -  118
Darling,  Denise  90
Davidson,   Allan     149
Davidson,  George A  149
Davidson, Marjorie        118
Davidson,  Robert  A.    134, 135
Davie, Hugh S  127
Davies,  Evann    96, 79, 162, 169
Davies, Frances K.             118
Davies, John C  143
Davies, Kenenth  R  129
Davies,   Llewelyn     100
Davies, Spencer R. ..        118
David,  Marcia    118
Dawe,   Elizabeth       108
Dawe, Frances E   108
Dawson,  James  F.         118
Dawson,  John  A  138
Day, Alvin  A _  131
Day,  Catherine  D  149
Day, Joan I _  108
Daykin,   Philip                    138
Daykin,   Victor       96
Dean, Alan   61, 114, 167, 197
Dear,  Wallace     _  100
DeBeck,   Howard     100, 190
DeBeck,  Nedra   ..      90
Decock,  Margaret    118
Deildal,  Bruce  114
Delamont,  Vera  118
DeLeen, John  132
Dellert, Albert   108
Dellert, Gunhild   153
Dennis,  Leslie    138
Dennison,   Allan           108
Dennison,  James  108
Dennison,  James    138
deMacedo,   John     138
dePencier, Audrey  108
Desbrisay,  Mary  E.      100,204
Desbrisay, Ruth M.             100, 200
Dickenson,  John    114
Dickie,  Bette  100, 204
Dickson,  Frank    126
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-eight Tumum
Acoopsmr
I.  Take     one     innocent
student, dress and a
low  it to rest for  10
or 12 years then move
gently into the U.B.C.
4. Bright and new our carefully
groomed protege jumps into
one "jalopy" (new or old)
and proves his wisdom by
buying  HOME ETHYL.
2. Here "Men with Minds"
prepare a choice beverage
known as "wisdom", this is
carefully prepared and scientifically brewed.
With a tank full of Home
Ethyl Gas and a mind full of
wisdom he's away to a flying
start on the road to success!
3. The resulting delicacy is
gently injected into the prepared "student". When this
is completed . . . behold we
have a citizen!
HOME OIL DISTRIBUTORS LIMITED
The Independent 100% B. C. Company
S. Home Gas Dealers are bright
lads too . . . they can really
keep your car at the head of
the class . . . just give them
a chance to prove it!
~/r you w**. Dcwm a v^ WmT?
WOULO Bt YOU* PMC   CONVOCATIONS
9
MEMO- JENKINS VRLVES
HRVE BEEN DESIGNED
RND BUILT FOR OVER. 75
     YEftRS WITH JU5T THOSE.
C0N5IDERATIONS RS
PRIME FPCTORaS
Page Two Hundred and Twenty-nine Department of Education
SUMMER SCHOOL
of
EDUCATION
VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
JULY 6th to AUGUST 7th
FEATURES FOR 1942
Enterprise or Activity Education, Remedial Education,
Arithmetic in the Primary Grades, Workshop in
Education, Home, School and Community Relations,
Mental Hygiene in the Class-room.
Write  for  bulletin  to
SUMMER  SCHOOL OF  EDUCATION
Department of Education
Victoria,  B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
W.&J.
H
Importers of Fine British Woollens
HOTEL VANCOUVER
Sweaters from Braemar of Scotland
Coats and Suits from Jaeger and
Chester Barrie of London
Shirts, Socks, Ties, etc., from
well-known Old Country Makers
Dickson, Peter 	
Dickson,   William	
Dierssen, Constance  _  26,
Diether, Barbara  	
Dietrich, Lorraine	
Dilger,  Vivian   	
Dimock,   Arthur	
Dixon, Helen B	
Dixon,   Hugh   	
Dobson,  Pauline	
Donnelly,  Charles —	
Donnelly,   Stephen 	
Donovon, Basil      	
Dougan, Doreen	
Douglass,  Martin  K	
Dowding,  Charles  ...        	
Drake,   Edward	
Drayton,  Leslie  	
Drennen, George 	
Drew,   Sydney   	
Drummond,   Alan	
Drury, Mary 	
Drysdale, Norma     	
DuMoulin, Anne    	
Dunbar,   Margaret   	
Duncan,   Donald   	
Duncan,  Lesley  	
Duncan,  Margaret  85,
Dunell,  Basil   	
Dunell, Eric  	
Dunstan, Margery	
Dwyer,   Melva	
Eadie, Charles 	
Eadie,  Helen	
Eakins,  James	
Eaton,  Arthur   	
Eckardt,   Jean     79, 90,
Eddie, Mary 	
Eddleston,   James    	
Edmonds,  David   	
Edwards,  Daima        	
Edwards, Donald   	
Edwards, Douglas 	
Edwards, Harvey 	
Eldridge,  Kenneth   	
Ekman, Frank  	
Ellingham, Joan 	
Elliott, Clarice   	
Elliott, Jean 	
Ellis,   Barbara   	
Ellis,   Dorothy     	
Ellis,   Gordon   	
Ellis,  Harry	
Ellis,   Kathleen       	
Ellis,  Phyllis   	
Ellis,   Robert   ..     	
Elsdon,   Douglas   	
Eng, Phillip 	
Errico,   Ernest	
Esplin,   Jean	
Estey,   Byron   	
Erickson,   Norma   	
Evans, Harry 	
Evans,   Wilfred        	
Ewert, Vaughan	
Ewing, Margaret  	
Eyre,  Alan  	
Fairall, Wallace
118
118
59, 108
118
118
100
118
100
138
154
90
118
100
116, 118
126
118
138
100
108
138, 190
128
100
100
108
149
90, 197
118
100, 205
138
133
154
100
100, 196
118
147
96
163, 201
155
138
90
100, 201
129
114, 193
118
108
135
108
118
100
114
90
118
138
155
90, 201
96
100, 197
118
108
116, 118
108, 190
100
90
118
118
90, 204
138
100
Page Two Hundred and Thirty FRANK UNDERHILL
Manager
J-lte <^&j\ • • •
still boasts the same informality
. . . although Frank's new Brock Lunch
Room is getting some of its business. Eat in either place, depending on the
mood you're in . . . but don't forget to patronize Campus merchants. Your undergrad idiosyncrasies will be understood and overlooked.
The University Book Store
The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium Building, was established for the convenience of
the Students and has effected a considerable saving to
the students in time and money. It is prepared to supply all the Text Books required for the various courses
offered in the University, also such articles as Note
Books, Loose-Leaf Sheets, Fountain Pens, Drawing
Paper and Instruments.
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-one For Lunches, Dinners
or After Theatre Snacks
It's The
Silk Hat
Famous for its Fruit Salads
*
897  GRANVILLE (At SMITHE)
Opposite  Orpheum Theatre
JACK  R.   PARKER, Arts  '30
Enjoy the BENEFITS—of Shopping
the "CASH-WAY" at Arnold & Quigleys.
We Do Save You Money.
"Chesterfield" Quality
MEN'S SUITS
and TOPCOATS
Arnold & Quigley
Limited
"The Store That's Always Busy"
540    GRANVILLE
^ Eyes
to see require every care. This care, painstaking and
exacting, is written into your Eye-Physician's Prescription for glasses. This same individualized,
precise treatment is offered you, when our services
are utilized to interpret these findings to the finished
eyewear.
Just remember—
(Est. 1924)
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL,
CO. LTD.
424
VANCOUVER. BLOCK,.
Fairbairn,  Dennis       129
Fairey, Violet   H8
Fairgrieve,   William     138, 197
Fairhead, Norman   118
Fairleigh, Dorothea      118
Fairnie,  Louise    _  108, 205
Falconer,   Lorna  108
Falk, William   118
Fargey,  Harold     125, 126
Farina,   Alfred      32, 100, 193
Farina,  Charles  108, 193
Farley,  Kenneth     145
Farr,   David  108
Farrell, F. Mary   100, 204
Farrell,   Kathleen     119
Farrow,  Alfred                          -36, 80, 82, 84, 143
Faulkes, Frances   108
Fedoroff,   Boris           139
Fenn,   John                           119
Fergusson,  Conrad       145
Fergusson,  Donald     143
Fergusson, Otway    108
Ferry,   Jack                    51, 53,108
Field, Ralph                              119
Fierheller,  Gordon         90
Filman,  Norman    135
Filmer-Bennett,   Doris                                 . 52, 100
Finch, Marguerite           90, 205
Finlay,  Mary             108, 200
Finlaysson, Anna Ruth  90, 200
Finnie, Douglas  .  139
Fischer, Joan    119
Fisher,   Donald     119
Fisher,   Brian     100, 190
Fisher,  Dean     108
Fisher, Harold        90
Fisher,   Ralph     119
Fitch,  Freeman  139
Fitz-James, Philip                                       - 145, 196
Flader,   Samuel   -  H4
Flanagan,  John    H9
Fleck,   Janet     154
Fleck,  Nancy    119
Fleischer,   Edwin     139
Fleming,  Bryce   -  139, 190
Fleming,   Kelvin     90
Fleming,  Norma  108
Fleming,  Ormond     149
Flynn, James    127
Flynn,  Margaret      100
Foley,  Frederick         108
Foley,   Richard     143
Folkard,   Jean                                                                      - 59, 108
Forbes,   Louise     H"
Ford,  Robert                                          ■ 90, 179
Fordyce,   David                                    H9
Forrester,   Andrew     132
Forster,  John  H  108
Forster, John                    139
Foster,   Jean         108
Foster,   Leo     - 139, 193
Foster,    Mary      154, 205
Foster,   Raymond     90
Foster,   Wilhelmina      119
Fothergill, Amy     90
Fouks,  Arthur  -    57,   96
Fowle,   Charles   -                              90
Fowler,   Frances  90
Francis, Donald                   108
Francis,   Frank     139, 197
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-two Francis, John              119
Francis,   Joseph    _  108
Francis,   Margaret     100
Franklin,  Harry    60, 166, 167
Fraresso, Venanzio	
Fraser, Alan _	
Fraser,   Charles   	
Fraser,   Donald   	
Fraser,   Frank   	
Fraser,   George   . 	
Fraser,   Gordon  	
Fraser-Gosse,  Richard  	
Freeman,  Ruth   	
Freeman, Viva 	
Friesen,  Edward   	
Fripps,   Joan     	
Frisken,   James     - H4, 196
Frith,   Patrick     119
Frizell, Noel   108
Frost, Joan    119
Frost,   Paul   	
139
127
149
139
119
132
108
119
108
100
114
119
135
Gagnon,   Bernard   	
Gale,   Robert	
Galbraith,  Ewan	
Gall,   Louis   	
Gall, Robert 	
Gallagher,   Bertram   	
Gallagher,   Jack   	
Galloway,  John	
Gait,  William     41,
Gansner, Nina  	
Gardiner, A.  Holmes ..
Gardiner,  William   	
Gardiner,  Gloria  	
Gardiner,  Margaret    —  42,
Gardner,  Claude  	
Gardner,  Melvin    	
Gatenby, Lisle ... 	
George,  Margaret	
Gibbs,  Margaret     	
Gibson, Donald   	
Gibson,   Margaret   	
Gidney,   Eileen   .     	
Gifford,  Ross  	
Gill,  Norman  	
Gillander,  Shirley	
Gillard,   Megan	
Gillies, Barbara 	
Gillis,   Glenna	
Gitterman,   Louis   . 	
Giuriato,  Lino   ..      	
Glover,  Nelles   	
Glover,   Percy   ..
Goddard,   Brenda    -	
Godfrey, Barbara 	
Godfrey,   Gerald    -	
Gogain,  Marion 	
Goldie,   Michael   	
Golding,   Barbara      	
Golding,  John	
Goldman, Florence 	
Gomery,   Donna   	
Goodman,   James   	
Goodman,  Martin  	
Goodwin,   Clive   	
Goodwin,   Martin	
Goodwin, Norman 	
Goodwin,   Walter   	
Gordon,   Donald	
135
90
139
135
108
108
139
90
51, 108
108
132
90
100
43, 100
119
139
129
90
100
108
119
108
108
133
119
100
108
108
135
114
108
114
48, 109
109
135
109
119
119
139
90
119
135
147
143
145
109
133
119
We thank you for
YOUR PATRONAGE DURING    THE    YEAR    PAST.
During that time it was our
pleasure to present for your
entertainment and enjoyment—the most outstanding motion pictures including all the Academy Award
winners as well as the ten
best pictures of the year.
Now—Another   Year   of   Hits!
CAPITOL   —   ORPHEUM
STRAND    —    DOMINION
Famous   Players   Canadian   Corp.
TO   REACH YOUR GOAL
Every graduate when he
leaves University has an objective he would like to
reach. No matter what he
decides his life work will be,
regular Savings deposits of
even small amounts, accumulating at compound interest, lead step by step to
security and to the attainment of his goal.
THE
ROYAL   BANK
OF    CANADA
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-three COMPLIMENTS OF
GORDON FARRELL
Union Steamships Ltd.
Offer An Unrivalled Series of
SUMMER VACATION TRIPS
From a day to a week
Between May   1st and September 30th
Illustrated   Folders  and   information   at   City   Office,
793 Granville Street, Phone MArine 5438; or Union
Pier, foot Carrall Street, Phone PAcific 3411
Chief   Contributor   to   Vancouver's
Beautiful Gardens is
"Uplands Special"
Fertilizer
Acknowledged by Greenskeepers and
Professional   Gardeners   to   be
THE BEST
AT YOUR FLORIST, HARDWARE STORE
or for Prompt, Free Delivery
PHONE HIGHLAND 5400
Buckerfield's Ltd.
Gordon,   Francis   ...
Gordon,   George   ...
Gordon,   James   	
Gordon,   Merritt   ...
Gorman,  Ray  	
Gourlay,  John   	
Goger,   Gertrude   ...
Grace,   Alice   	
Graham,   Harold   ...
Graham,   Aileen   ...
Graham,  Eileen  	
Grahame,   Richard
Granger,  John  	
Grant, Gordon  	
Gray,   Anne   	
Grey,   Neil   	
Gray,  Denis  	
Gray, John  	
Grayston,   Irene   ...
Green,   Charles   	
  132
  139
  119
  119
  109
  104
  104
 -„  153
  131
  90
 -  100
    143
  128
  109
  90
  142
  126
  132
  109
  145
Green,   Walter       130, 131
Greer,   Pauline   	
Grieve, Kenneth ...
Griffin, Frederick .
Griffiths, Donald ...
Grigg,  Vernon  	
Grimble,  Wilfred   .
Gross,   Edward   	
Gross,  William   	
Guichon,  Lloyd  	
Guichon, Urban ...
Gulick,   Margaret   .
Gummow, John  	
Gunn,   Struthers   ...
Gow,  Frank   	
Greene, Philip 	
Grieve,   Annie
Griffiths, David 	
Gustavson,  Stanley
Guy,   Beverley	
109
100
109
139
104
139
91
128
139
145
96
109
91
119
119
119
119
119
119
Hackney,   Amy     91
Haddad,   Michael     ... 133
Haggart,  Douglas    147
Haggart,  Margaret      48,   91
  135
  119
  104
  100
  96
  91
  119
  100
  100
126
109
133
91
119
145
 7  139
132
  114
119
  149
  139
  119
  100
  114
  119
Haille, Isaac 	
Hall, Edith	
Hall, Hugh 	
Halstead, John	
Hall,   Ormonde	
Hamilton,  Dorothy    ...
Hamilton,   Drummond
Hamilton, Isobel 	
Hamilton,   Roy   	
Hammersley, Robert ...
Hammitt,  Virginia   ..
Hammond,  John   	
Hammond,   Gwen   	
Hammond,   Mary   	
Hammond, Paul 	
Handa,  Roy  	
Handforth, Victor  	
Handling,   Mary   	
Hanna, Joseph 	
Hanson,  Angus  	
Haney,  Daniel 	
Hansen,  Harris   	
Hanson,  Don  	
Harada,   Terew   	
Harkness, Wesley  	
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-four Sole Agents for Dr. Wild's new DK2 Transit,
made by Kern & Co., Switzerland
FREDERICK GOERTZ, LTD.
Certified  Scientific   Instrument  Makers
PHONE MA 3822
Specialists in Repair Work on Instruments of Any Make for
Engineers, Surveyors, Navigators and Aviators.
All Work Guaranteed.
INSTRUMENTS FOR RENT
Instruments Bought and Sold or on Commission Sale
569 HOWE STREET VANCOUVER, B. C.
Harding, John    126
Harper,  David  96
Harry,   Kenneth    .. 91
Harvey,  Bruce      126
Haywood-Farmer,   Robert  128
Harris, Richard  119
Harris,   Robert  119
Harrison,   John     133
Harrison,   Suzanne  119
Harrison, Thomas  ..  119
Harrison, William  119
Harvey,   Betty     42,   98 100
Hatte,   Ross     139
Hausch,   Robert       135
Hay, Donald   147
Hayes,   James     109
Hayward,  David                                119
Hazelwood,  Mary-Gordon     154
Headrick,   Olive    -  119
Heal,  Douglas     119
Heal, Ronald   - - 149
Healey,   Albert     139
Heather,  George    -  109
Heather,  June     109
Hebb,   Dorothy     114
Hebb,   Elizabeth     .   88,   91
Heise,   Jack     101
Henderson,   Doreen     91
Henderson,   Roland     119
Henrikson, Arne                       109
Herberts,  Edward       109
Herberts,   Lewis     109
Hern,   Elizabeth  109
Herring,   Stephen     119
Hester, Kenneth ....     109
Hetherington,   John 139
Hewett,   Hope     91
Hewitson,  June  109
Hibbertson, Robert       101
Hibbert, Barbara    109
Hicks,  Sheila     119
Hicks,  John  135
Higgins,  Ruth      109
High,  Robert  114
Hikida,   Hideaki  109
Hilborn,   Margaret     119
Hill, Arthur                                               109
Hill,   Charles                                         91
Hill, Cliff      104
Hills,  John    127
Hill-Tout, Edward   91
Hilton, Herbert  119
Hirano,   Toshio  101
Hird,   Dorothy  91
Hitchcock,  John     101
Ho,  Thomas    143
Hoag,   Audrey         101
Hobden,  Betty                  101
Hodge, Muriel _  109
Hodgson,   Margaret  119
Hodson,   Gordon  119
Hoffman,  Pearl    109
Hoggan,  Isabel   ..  91
Holder,  Ronald     145
Hole,  Fred    139
Hole,  John    13]
Hole,  Leonard  ..  119
Holland,   Kathleen     101
COMPLIMENTS OF
Commodore Cabaret
COMPLIMENTS OF
O. B. ALLAN LTD.
JEWELLERS
Diamonds   -   -   Watches
Granville at Pender
Vancouver
Page Tivo Hundred and Thirty-five in the new FLAV-O-TAINER
"JheBuagJAat does, t
not have tfrfedated"
THE SAME FAMOUS FLAVOR
IN BOTH CONTAINERS
KELLY, DOUGLAS & CO. LIMITED
VANCOUVER, B. C.
BUY BRITISH
Gestetner Duplicators
are made only by
D. GESTETNER LTD.
at
TOTTENHAM, LONDON, N. 17
Used by hundreds of educational  institutes
for the speedy reproduction of
MAPS — EXAMINATION PAPERS — BULLETINS
REPORTS—MUSIC   CHARTS—FORMS,   Etc.
A complete range of models to meet every
duplicating requirement
D. Gestetner (Canada) Limited
660 Seymour Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Halifax, St. John, Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto,
Hamilton, London, Regina, Windsor
Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton
Hellenberg,   Shirley
Holmes,  Gwen 	
Holroyd,   Louis   ...
Hood, James 	
Hood,   John   	
Hood,  Marjorie  ... ..
Hooking, Paul
Hooper,   Fred   	
Hooper,   Perry    	
  153
  91
  119
  91
  135
                             119
  135
  147
  135
Hooson,  William   ,     38, 109
  109
  126
  96
  131
  104
  109
Hopkins, John  	
Hopper.   David   	
Home, Harry  	
Home, Leslie	
Horton, Kenneth  	
Hourston,   William   	
Housser,  David   - 106, 114
  119
139
  91
  139
  139
  109
  96
  132
Howatson,  Mary    	
Howie,   Henry   	
Howieson, Margaret  	
Hrynchuk,   Walter	
Hudson, William 	
Hughes,  Edward  	
Hughes, Elizabeth 	
Hughes,   Robert	
Hume,  Douglas      82, 101
Humphreys, Marjorie  154
Hunt, William   128
Hunter, Dorrie  109
Hunter, Douglas      142, 143
Hunter,  Harry  	
Hunter,   Thomas   	
Huntington, Arthur .
Huntington, Robert
Husband, William .
Hutchinson, Bruce .
Hutchinson, Hazel .
Hutchinson, Joy ...
Hutchinson,  George
Ide,   George   	
Ikata, Lucy 	
Ikebuchi,   Norman
Inkman,  Charles  	
Inch,  Beatrice   	
Inkster,  John  	
Inman,   William   	
Ireland,  Alduthe  	
Inouye, Jack 	
Irwin, Eleanor 	
Isherwood, Sidney ..
Isherwood,  T.  Foster..
Ivey, Donald 	
Jackson,   Douglas
Jackson, Frances 	
Jacobson,  Beda  	
Jagger,   Paul   	
James,  Douglas  	
James,   Ralph   	
Jamieson, Claire  	
Jamieson,   Fraser   .
Jarmen,   Ernest   	
Jarvi, Helga  ..
Jarvis, Ralph 	
Jefferies, James  	
Jemson,  Robert	
Jenkins,   Margaret   ...
Jenkinson,   Elizabeth
Jessop, Harvey 	
101
119
145
119
119
133
101
104
104
119
119
149
120
119
109
114
120
120
120
139
101
109
101
101
120
135
104
114
120
127
120
109
120
96
120
154
101
109
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-six Jessup, Douglas  130, 132
Jeune,  Ronald  	
Jinks,   Gordon   ..
Johanson,  Charlie
John, Tom 	
Johnsen,   Hans   	
Johnson,   Arthur   	
Johnson,   Earl   	
Johnson,  Eva  	
Johnstone,   Arnold
Johnson,  George  	
Johnson,  Leonard  	
Johnson,  Robert   	
Johnson,  William   	
Johnston, Beatrice 	
Johnston,   Donald
Johnston, Joan 	
Johnston,  Roy  	
Johnston, Shirley ..
Joiner, William 	
Jolly, Roy 	
Jones,  Audrey  	
Jones,   David   	
Jones,  Eric  	
Jones, Hugh 	
Jones, Michael	
Jordon-Knox,  Trevor
Josephson,   Gilbert    ..
Jukes,   Joan   	
Julian,  Walter  	
Julson, Melvin 	
Kadota, Charles .
Kagetsu, Akiko ...
Kagetsu, Hajime .
Kato,   Kiyoshi   	
Kato,   Yoichi   	
Kawahara, Hideo .
Kawaguchi,   Jack
Kazun, Walter  	
Keating,   Doreen   .
Keeves,  Moira  	
Keith,  Kenneth   ...
Keller,   Elma   ..
Keller,   Elma   ...
Kells,  Owen  	
Kendall, Marie ....
Kendall, Richard .
Kennedy, Gladys .
Kennedy, John 	
Kennedy, Lonia
Kenmuir,   John   ....
Kenny,  Wilfred  ...
Kent,  Norman  	
Kermode, Edward
Kermode, Harry .
Kerr,  Shirley  ..   ..
Kerr, Robert 	
Ketcheson,  Ruth  ..
Kidd,   Mary   	
Kidd, James 	
Kilbank, Alfred ....
Kilburn,  James  ....
Kilet,  Cynthia  	
Killick,  Stanley  ....
King,  David  	
King, James  	
Kingston, John ....
Kirkland,  Stanley
101
120
120
120
120
109
128
101
104
120
139
120
128
120
101
120
120
91
91
120
91
139
109
139
139
120
120
101
120
135
109
109
127
153
135
104
109
109
120
120
101
120
104
139
120
109
120
109
120
120
120
109
128
139
120
139
120
110
91
110
120
114
147
131
147
120
110
This new Studio of Furs features smart fur
coats and jaunty jackets priced to college budgets. You are invited to drop in any time and
inspect this fine collection of quality pelts and
latest styles.
II. J. POP Ltd.
Furrier
GRANVILLE at FIFTEENTH
BAyview 8311
You may do better
with
KEYSTONE
BRAND
Loose Leaf Sheets
and Binders
Choose Keystone Brand for all
your class and study work.
Smith Dauicfoon
&UhiqhtCtd.
VANCOUVER - VICTORIA - EDMONTON
CALGARY
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-seven For a better snapshot season . . •
LOAD YOUR CAMERA WITH
THE CROFTON  (left)
Casual, smart, youthful—this new Jantzen pullover is a soft
luxurious English botany. In gorgeous English Heathers and
lovely new spring pastels.   Either Vee or crew neck $3.95.
THE ELM HURST (right)
Smartly and precisely tailored—in the new long straight styling—
typically Jantzen in its faultless fit. Grosgrain ribbon trim. |n all
the new colors of spring  $5.50.
JANTZEN KNITTING MILLS OF CANADA LTD: Vancouver, B.C.
Kodak
fericirome
Film
Let our careful photo finishing help, too.
You'll find your spring and summer snapshots better than ever.
EASTMAN phm°att°^aa^ic Ltd.
610 Granville Street Vancouver
STATIONERY
LOOSE LEAF SUPPLIES — DRAWING
INSTRUMENTS   —   SLIDE   RULES  —
SCALE RULES — FOUNTAIN PENS
Let us do your printing for your Fraternity
and Sorority Organizations
The Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
STATIONERS and PRINTERS
550 Seymour Street Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
BEGG MOTOR CO. LTD.
1062 West Georgia Street                   Vancouver,
B.C.
Telephone PAcific 2242
Kirkpatrick,   Sheila  120
Kitson, Charlotte   101
Kitts, Warren   149
Klinkhamer, Thomas  145
Kloepfer,  Jacqueline     91
Knight,   Cordon     120
Knotts, Walter   101
Knowles, Robert  114
Kobayashi, Jack    120
Kocher, Paul  -.. -  120
Koenigsberg, Irving    114
Koffman,  Thelma   ..        120
Korner, Beatrice  _  120
Korsch, Leonard     57,   96
Kostman,  Philip    120
Kudo, Alice  120
Kullander,  Marvin    132
Kurth,  Burton   „  120
Kuru, Don  116, 120
Labelle,  Eugene  135
Lacey,  Kathleen   146, 147
  110
  110
  120
  110
  139
  110
  120
  154
.-._  120
  114
  135
LaFleur, Philip 	
Lake,  June  	
Lakes,   Mike   	
Lakie,  Helen	
Lam, Mathias 	
Lambe,   Austin   	
Lane,   Marjorie   	
Lane, Ruth 	
Lane, William  	
Langdale, Leslie  	
I^ngdon, Joan 	
Langenek, Frederick
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-eight Lansdowne,  Rosemary
Lapworth, Phyllis
Large, Lorraine  	
Large,  Ruth  	
Larsen,  Anthon  	
Latta,   Gordon   	
Lattin, Geoffrey 	
Latimer,   Norman   	
Lawrie,  Frank   	
Lawrence, Blair ...
Lawson, David  	
Lazzarin, Fioretta 	
Lawson,   Basil   	
Lea,   Edgar   	
Lean, Alfred 	
Lear,  Harold   -.	
LeBus, George     	
Lebedovich,   Stephen   .
Leach,   Gwen	
LeCouter,   Margaret
Leedham,   David	
Lee, Douglas 	
Lee, Frederick 	
Lee,   Frances   	
Lee, Jean-Carol   	
Lee,  Ruth 	
Leech,  Geoffrey  	
Lees, Doris 	
Lefeaux,  Stuart  	
Legeer,  Ronald    	
Leigh-Spencer,  Gerald
Leith,  Anna  	
Leith,  James   	
Lennie,   Margaret
Lennie, Doris	
Leong,  Daniel  	
Leong, Dennis	
Lepsoe,  Christian   	
Leshgold,   Dorothy   	
Letham, William  	
Lewis,   Robert    	
Lewis,   Allen   	
Lightwall, William  ....
Lightstone,  Robert  	
Lightstone,  Jack  	
Lind,   Fred	
Lindsay, Roderick
Lipsett, Mary 	
Lister, Mary    	
Livingstone, Donald ..
Livingstone, Gertrude .
Livingstone,   Hughie   .
Lloyd,  George     	
Lloyd,  Moira  .. 	
Lock,   Vivian   	
Locke,  Elizabeth  	
Lockhart,   Keith   	
Logan, Jack  	
Logan,  Kenneth   	
Logie,   Robert   	
Long,   Charles   	
Long,   Roy	
Long,   George   	
Long,   Elizabeth   	
Long, Joseph 	
Long,  Katherine   	
Long,   Joshua   	
Lord,  Bruce 	
Lord, Terrence     	
Lort,   Phyllis     	
54,
91,
101
110
110
101
91
120
120
120
101
120
115
no
120
135
139
133
139
139
101
120
139
110
110
120
101
101
128
110
139
135
115
120
139
91
91
110
132
132
91
115
120
120
139
101
110
110
139
101
98
135
120
133
139
104
101
110
115
128
104
120
101
120
139
105
139
110
120
121
143
121
S$^ttzdua&PB
SMARTLY STYLED-DEPENDABLE
AND ACCURATE
More Watch Value
Ladies' Watch, iOkt. gold-
filled case, 17-jewel Challenger movement - 35.00
Men's Watch, yellow case, with
stainless steel back, full-jewel
Challenger movement - 35.00
These watches are serviced in
our stores from coast to coast.
MJrfa
jEWELlCRS
mARUICLL
CONSTRUCTION CO. LTD.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
540 Howe St., Vancouver
Booking and Presenting World Famous
Attractions throughout Western Canada
HILKER ATTRACTIONS
LIMITED
VANCOUVER     -     VICTORIA     -     CALGARY
Page Two Hundred and Thirty-nine Ask
For
FELIX
irs tops
In Ginger Ale
or Club Soda
Students are more than welcome at
Duff's Dining Rooms
619 W. Pender—PA 0913
*
Dine and Dance in a friendly atmosphere to the Music
of Bud Simms and his Astorians every Saturday
Education   Through  Entertainment and Public Information
IS OUR JOB
CJOR
600 KC
1000 WATTS
Lotzkar,   Eva 	
Louie, Edward	
Lourie, Helene 	
Lourie,   Marianne   	
Low,   George   	
Lowther, Roy	
Lucas, Colin	
Lyle,   Donald      	
Lyle,   Wallace   	
Lytle,  Dennis  	
Mabee,  Gordon   -	
Mabee,   Jean	
Mabee,  Geraldine   	
Maddin,  Cameron   _	
Maddin,  Stuart  	
Magee,   William     	
Mahood,   Brian   	
Mahood, Ernest 	
Maley,   Mavis   	
Maloney,   Douglas       55,
Manes,   John   	
Manley,   John   R	
Mann, Clarence .. 	
Mann,  Donald   	
Mann,   Howard	
Mann,   William	
Manning,   Helen   	
Manning,   David   	
Manning, Richard 	
Mannix,  Luella  	
Manson,   George   	
Manson,  Marion  	
Manzer, Carson    	
Margeson,   John   	
Margeson,   Ruth   	
Margolas,  Shirley   	
Martin, Lionel  	
Marr,  Kathleen         	
Markland,  Irene   	
Marpole,   Shirley	
Marsh,   Walter   	
Marshall,  Doris	
Marshall,   Henry	
Marshall,   Rexford	
Marshall, Robert	
Marshall,  Russell	
Martin, Carol	
Martin,   James	
Martin,   Tom   	
Marzocco, Aldo  	
Mason,  Ernest  	
Mathers,  John	
Matheson,  Beryl	
Matheson,   Chester      -	
Matheson,  Claudia   	
Mathison,  Helen  	
Matheson, Ian D	
Matheson,   Ian   	
Matheson, William  	
Mathieson,  Jack   	
Mathews,   Frank   	
Mathews,   George   	
Matthew, Robert 	
Matsui,  Richard	
Matthew,   Beverley   	
Matthews,   Charles	
Maxwell,   John	
Maxwell, Noel  	
Mayne,   Thomas   	
Melvin,  James	
121
121
149
145
101
110
101
96
121
140
121
110
121
149
88, 91
121
105
121
121
63, 96
101
110
131
121
110
105
101
121
135
96
110
121
115
90
121
110
140
101
121
121
121
110
121
147
143
101
110
121
110
136
133
121
101
127
92
101
101
110
121
96
110
147
110
110
92
101
143
121
92
96
Page Two Hundred and Forty Menchions,   Robert   ...
Menzies,   Vernon   	
Menzies,   Dora   	
Mercer, Florence 	
Mercer, William 	
Meredith, Olive _	
Meredith,  Patricia   ....
Merryfield,   Jack   	
Messenger,   Georgina
Metcalf, Hugh 	
Michas,   Lucas   	
Michas, Sophie  	
Mikkelsen,  Phyllis  ....
Millar, Dorothea 	
Millar, Douglas	
Miller,   Albert   	
Miller, Joseph 	
Miller, Douglas 	
Miller, Ian 	
Miller,   James   	
Milligan, Muriel 	
Milligan, Phyllis 	
Millins,   Betty   	
Mills, Laura 	
Mills,   Robert   	
Milne,  John   E.   	
Milton, Joseph 	
Mitten,   Douglas   	
Miura, John 	
Modeland, Clarence  ..
Moe,  Barbara  	
Mohr, Frank	
Montador, Andrew  ....
Montador, David 	
Montador,  Robert   	
Montgomery,  William
Montgomery, William
Mooney,   Henry   	
Moore,   Charles   	
Moore,  Donald   	
Moore, Donna  	
Moran,  Catherine  	
Moran,  John   	
Morgan, H. William
Morgan,  Margaret   ...
Morgan,   Phyllis   	
Morley,   Mona
Morris,  Joan
Morris,   Desmond
Morris, Fred
Morris, Rod    82,
Morris,   Robert   	
Morrison,  Ian  	
Morris,   Robert   	
Morrison, Bernard  	
Morrison,   Lee   ...
Morritt,   Jack   	
Morton,  Betty  	
Morton,  Eveline   	
Morton,  James   _ ,
Morton,  Roy  	
Morwood-Clark,  Lawrence
Mosher,  Allison   	
Mosher, Vaughan  	
Mottishaw,   Henry   	
Moxon, John  	
Moyls, Adrian 	
Moyls, Amy 	
96
149
110
110
105
92
101
84, 145
101
121
121
101
110
101
131
60
131
140
121
133
121
101
115
101
121
121
121
121
140
121
102
140
140
121
110
110
110
121
116, 121
140
121
110
110
121
121
102
102
92
110
121
83, 132
57, 92
115
140
129
105
105
92
110
110
140
110
136
136
110
96
145
102
LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S
TAILORED
SUITS     *     TOPCOATS     •     SLACKS
JACKETS
IN     STOCK    OR    MADE    TO    MEASURE
"It's the Cloth and the Cut that counts"
»ecb
*•» ««atr*AV
TAILORED   CLOTHES   FOR   MEN
655 HOWE STREET
KEITH  PORTER       ...       -       Campus Representative
Best Wishes
To the Student Body Of U.B.C.
for Success in
19 4 2
McLennan, McFeely &
Prior Ltd.
VANCOUVER - VICTORIA - NEW WESTMINSTER
British   Columbia's   Pioneer   Hardware  Supply   House
Established 1859
102
102
145
102
102
Moyls, Margaret   „	
Mulhern,   Merrie   	
Mulvin,   Mary	
Mundell,   Percy   	
Muir,   Elizabeth	
Munro,   Elspeth    57,   92
  110
  140
 I  92
  121
.__  121
Munro,  David	
Munroe,   Lawrence	
Murdoch, Jane ., _	
Murdoch, George   ,	
Murphy, Gloria	
Murphy,   Marion    _    81,   92
Murray,  Bernice     121
Murray,   Bruce     121
Murray,  George  140
Page Two Hundred and Forty-one COMPLIMENTS OF
Canadian  Broadcasting
Corporation
MACAULAY, NICOLLS,
MAITLAND & CO. LTD.
Insurance,  Financial  and  Estate Agents
435 Howe Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone
PAcific 4111
Murray,   John     136
Murray, Robert McK - - -  102
Murray, Robert N  97
Murray,   Elaine   ..   41, 110
Mnssellem, Peter    126
Myers, Fred  115
Myhill-Jones,  William    121
Mylroie,   Robert     143
McAdam, James    136
McAllister,  James     102
McArthur,  Jack  129
McBain,   Miriam     106, 110
McBay,  Robert  121
McBride,   Ronald  115
McBride,  W.  Edward      56,   97
McCall, Graham  97
McCarter,   Donald    ,.  136
McCarthy, Albert  121
McCarthy, James   145
McCarthy,   Frances  92
McCay,   James       131
McClory, Margaret        88,   92
McCloskey,   Keith     121
McConachie, Royden   121
McCorkell,   Beverley     92
McCrady,   Elwood    „  149
McCulloch,   James    59
McDiarmid,   Betty     92
McDiarmid, Lorna K  102
McDiarmid, Lorna M  52
McDiarmid,  Muriel  110
McDonagh,   Jack  102
MacDonald,   Donald     102
McDonald, Alan T. .   	
                      121
MacDonald,   Gordon   	
                         121
MacDonald,  Harold  	
McDonald,  Ian   	
MacDonald,   Iain   	
                     140
MacDonald, John L	
                      102
McDonald,  Marion 	
                      121
MacDonald,   Mary   J.
Macdonald, Mary Joan 	
Macdonald,   Shirley   	
MacDonald, W. H. K	
           102
           121
                            102
McDonell, Donalda 	
McDonell,   Dorothy   	
MacDonnell,   Basil
          121
            92
                      140
McDonough,  Donald   	
111
McEachern,  Florence   	
McEwan, Robert
            92
                  Ill
MacFarlane,  Brampton  	
McFarlane,   Helen   	
                  121
Macfarlane,   Gordon	
MacFarlane,  John  A	
McFayden,  Duncan  	
..-    63,   88
           147
    48, 127
McGarry, Kay 	
                                    Ill
McGhee, William  	
                                  92
McGeer,   James   	
                           Ill
McGeer,   Michael  	
                      121
McGhee,  Margaret  	
                         121
MacGillivray, Jack 	
                                    121
McGuinness,   David  	
                 140
McGowan,  John   	
                                  126
Macgowan, Kenneth   	
McGregor,  Christopher	
 42,   98, 105
                         140
Maclnnes,   Elizabeth
                      153
Macintosh,   Laura
Mcintosh,   Mary  ..
McKay,   Donald	
           Ill
              102
MacKay,   Ronald	
                      136
MacKay,   Sheila   	
    60,   92
          140
McKellar,   Robert	
                            149
McKelvy,   Mary	
          102
MacKenzie,   Alex   	
          122
MacKenzie, Munro 	
          122
McKenzie,   George  .... 	
                      92
MacKenzie,   Hubert  	
          122
          122
           126
McKenzie, Lloyd           	
                    92
MacKenzie,   Murdo   	
                      115
McKeown,  Robert	
                    Ill
MacKenzie,  Roderick    ....
92
McKenzie,   William    „	
McKie,  Audrey 	
111
McKillop,   Eileen   	
                       122
41, 51   92
McKinlay,  William   	
                                 Ill
MacKinnon, Donald  .	
                       140
MacKinnon,   George   	
McLagan, Muriel 	
           Ill
92
McLaren, Ada 	
                     122
MacLean,   Charles   	
McLean,  Alastair      	
           122
            92
147
McLean,   Donald   	
                      136
MacLean, Donald W. 	
                      136
MacLean,   Eian    	
122
McLean,  Elisabeth  	
             HI
          122
Page Two Hundred and Forty-two MacLean,   Harris  115
MacLean,   Ross    _  122
McLean, Robert    Ill
McLeish,  Sheila    122
McLellan,   Donald     126
McLellan, Robert    122
McLennan,   Donald  122
McLennan, John  140
McLeod, Alexander  131
MacLeod,   Elizabeth     122
McLeod, John  HI
MacLeod, Major J. ,  15
MacLeod,  Margaret    122
McLeod, Melville   149
MacLeod,  Robert    102
McLeod, Raymond   ^2
McLorg,   Mary        »,   92
McLorg, Terence   136
McMahon,  Patricia    97
McMahon,  Vernon    102
McManus, Gerald   147
McMaster,   William  105
MacMillan, Alan „_ 115
MacMillan,  Donald    140
MacMillan, Donald J    60, 102
MacMillan,   Grace     122
McMillan, Jack 37, 50, 93
McMillan,  Mary    Ill
McMillan, Robert  _  147
McMullan,  Jean    142, 143
Macnab,   Phoebe    .  Ill
McNaughton,  James  136
McNeely,  Charles    36, 82, 93
McPhee, Maurice  102
MacPherson,   Allan     Ill
MacPherson,  Barbara    122
McPherson, Charles  122
MacPherson, John P  ijj
MacPherson,   Peter     115
MacQuarrie, Alexander   97
McQueen, Barbara   102
McQuillan,   Murray  140
MacRae,  Hector    132
MacRae, Jeffrey   122
MacSwan,  Iain     84, 143
McTaggart, Kenneth  132
McTavish,  Mary   102
McWilliams,   Helen  102
McWilliams,  Robert     102
Nagata,   Fusago   122
Nagata, Shinko  Ill
Nakashima,   Mitsuo      122
Nairne,   Mildred  37
Nairne,   Ronald        HI, 140
Namba,  Akira  97
Narod,  Alvin      83, 136
Nash,  Charles   31, 82, 93, 128
Nash,   Marygold    102
Nash, Morley   122
Nasmyth, Pan    128
Naughton, Charles    149
Neil, Eileen   Ill
Neilson,  James  147
Neilson, James S  Ill
Neilson,  Nora   143
Nelles,   Thelma  102
Nelson, Catherine   Ill
Nelson, Jack     Ill
yjlte Jltifh&it 3>e$AeeJ
From the time Dairyland products leave
the verdant Fraser Valley till they reach
your home—rich, safe and clean—the
highest degree of care and protection is
afforded by "Canada's Most Modern
Dairy".
ASSOCIATED DAIRIES LTD.
Telephone FAirmont 1000
/
WOODWARD'S
GREATER VANCOUVER'S
SHOPPING CENTRE
You  can   save  money on  all   the  new  Fashions  for
Campus   and   Social   Activities   from   the   complete
selection at Woodward's.
Misses' Fashions—Floor 2
Men's Fashions—Main Floor
Mademoiselle Ltd.
Fashions For Feminity
and
Individuality
•
643 HOWE STREET
Page Two Hundred and Forty-three DUffUS
SCHOOL OF  BUSINESS
High Standards Make Competent
Graduates
Special Summer Courses
Individual Attention
SEYMOUR AND PENDER
Day and Night
STUDENTS ENJOY BANKING
at the
Bank of Montreal
Established   1817
A Bank Where Small Accounts are Welcome
WEST POINT GREY BRANCH
10th and Sasamat
E. ). SCHIEDEL, Manager
FOR THE SMARTEST
IN FUR STYLES . . .
O. <z^4-hJL
et^on
FURS
PA 7654
653 Howe St.
NeMetz,   Phyliss   .
Nevison, James  	
Newberry,  Gordon
Newbury,   Edward
Newman,   Barbara
Newson,  Donald  ...
Newton,   June   .......
Nichol,  John  	
Nichols,   David   	
Nichols,   Dorothy   .
Nicholls, John 	
Nickerson,   D'Arcy
Nicholson,  Lois   ....
Nicol,   Eric   	
Nikaido, Takaho  ...
Nishio,   Nori   	
Nishioka, George
Nimmons,   Phil   	
Nissen,   Hansi   	
Nobbs, William 	
Noble, Dave 	
Noble,   Stanley   .....
Noel,   Gordon   	
Nogarr, Frank  —
Noguichi, Kiichi ...
North,  George  	
Norton,  William  ..
Nose, Roy	
Nosworthy, Frank
Novikoff, Morris ..
Nuttall, David 	
Nygard,   Holger   ..
Oakes,   Lila   	
Oastler, John  	
Oates,   Rowland   	
Obokata, Arthur 	
Ogilvie, Sheila 	
Ohlsen, Ray 	
Okada,  Henry  	
Okumura,  Shigeharu
Okuno,   Shigekazu  ...
Oles, Jack 	
Oldershaw, Charles ...
Oliver, Hubert 	
Oliver,   Walter   	
Oliver, Muriel 	
Olsen,  John   	
Olson,   Eric   	
Olson,   Philip   	
O'Neill,   Margaret   ...
Onlee, Lilac 	
Ontkean,   Orville   	
Orchard,   Joyce   	
Ore,  Elizabeth  	
Orr, Oscar 	
Orr, Thomas 	
Orskog,  Arthur  	
Oshiro, Ray  	
Osier, Thomas  	
Ostle,  Bernard 	
Ostrom,   Margaret   ..
Otsuki,   Shigeyuki   ..
Oughtred, Aulay 	
Owen, Margaret 	
Owen,   Robert   	
Paisley,  John   	
Pallas, Ted 	
Panton, William  —
 81
60, 102
102
140
140
102
122
102
122
93
122
111
115
, 82, 93
51
111
122
111
59, 111
93
122
102
145
122
111
93
102
111
97
111
143
140
111
102
93
140
111
111
122
122
122
97
136
122
111
148, 149
149
140
140
149
111
102
136
102
122
126
115
140
122
102
122
122
102
111
122
122
105
102
111
Page Two Hundred and Forty-four Ofnfitvited
GamfiuA,
GlotUel
by
George Sfraith Ltd.
"Always the Finest in Quality"
905 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Parfitt,   David   	
Parham,  Donald  .... 	
Parker,  William  	
Parker, Horace  _ ,
Parkinson, Geoffrey 	
Parkinson,   Robert   	
Parliament,  John  	
Parnum,  Ewart     	
Parsons,  Leslie  	
Pastinsky,   Belle     .     	
Paterson, Kathleen 	
Patenaude,  Wilfred   	
Paton, Archibald 	
Paton,  William	
Patrick, Sheelah	
Patterson,  Lawrence   	
Patterson,   Stanley  ... 130, 132
Paul,   Mary   	
Paul, Rachel 	
Paulin, Elizabeth	
Paulsen,  Edmond	
Payne, Harold 	
Payson,  Dorothy    	
Pearce,  Joseph	
Pearson,   Carl	
Pearson, Gwen	
Pearson, Donald	
Pearson,  Harold     _	
Pearson, William	
Peatfield, John	
Pedlow,   Alan	
102
... 125, 126
111
111
122
153
140
140
102
111
122
149
.41, 50, 93
111
122
132
111
102
122
111
140
122
143
136
111
122
149
111
122
112
Pedlow, Douglas    112
Pellicano, John   122
Pendleton,  Wayne  102
Penny,   Harry  102
Penzer,  John     122
Perris,  George  122
Perry,   Lome   .,  97
Peterson,   Maryan  102
Pethick,  Derek  102
Peyman, Alastair    103
Phillips,   Barbara      122
Phillips,  David     \\2
Phillips,   Mary         93, 103
Phillipson, Murray   \\2
Physick,  Arthur     153
Philps,   Fred  122
Pickering,  Mary  103
Pickford,   John          97
Pickin,   Barbara     115
Piercy,   Joseph  \\2
Piderman,   John  \\2
Piercy,  Earle  140
Pike,   Gordon  112
Pinchin,   Victor     147
Pinton, Marjorie ..                  122
Plommer,   Robert  105
Pollington,  William    122
Pop, Sybil   122
Pollock,   John  \\2
Poole,   Disney                     122
Porter,  James  136
Page Two Hundred and Forty-five Qet Ready
fa-
SUMMER
Smart Clothes
—for Vacation
Time!
Styled    for    beach —
picnic — playtime  and
travel wear.
0 Slack Suits
0 Play Suits
£ Swim Suits
# Shorts
0 Sweaters
0 Sports Clothes
A Summer  Frocks
Choose your
vacation
wardrobe
from—
mm he
564 GRANVILLE
Porter, R. Keith  	
Potkins,   Robert   	
Poulson, Howard 	
Postlethwaite,   Gwynne
Poulton,   Sidney   	
Pratt, Audrey 	
Proud,  Geraldine  	
Pratt,   Christopher   	
Priest, Jack 	
Pronger,   Ivy   	
Pronger,   Ralph   	
Proven,  Nettie 	
Proud, Lawrence	
Pyle,   Gordon   	
Quan,   Mary   _
Quance, Viola
Quebec, Mona
Rae, James	
Raho,   Ralph    _	
Ralston,   Donald   	
Ralston,   Keith	
Raphael,   Clement    -.	
Raphael, Leslie  	
Ravvin, Albert     	
Ray, Norman  	
Radcliffe,  Roland	
Rawlings,   Phyllis _	
Reagh, Dennis 	
Redlich, Berta _	
Reed, Kenneth	
Reid, James  	
Reid,   Lois    ,.	
Reid, Margaret McD 41, 51, 103, 112
Reid,  William  123
Reifel, George    57, 147
97
126
126
122
103
122
93
140
131
122
103
103
103
131
122
115
122
112
115
112
93
123
123
123
12,'i
12'
112
149
112
112
147
123
Reimer,  Nicholas   ..
Rekston, Arvid 	
Remnant, Peter 	
Renshaw, Rodney  	
Renwick,  Frances  	
Renwick,   Helen   	
Reston, Mary  	
Reynolds,   Aingelds   .
Reynolds, Margaret
Rhodes,   John   	
Rhodes, Hugh  	
Rich,  Royce   	
Richards,   Frances   ...
Richards,   Ian   	
Richardson, William
Richardson,  Sidney
Rickaby,  John  	
Ricketts,   Donald   ....
Rife, Joseph 	
Ripley,  Thomas   	
Rippon,   Arthur   	
Ritchie,   Arthur   	
Ritchie, David 	
  112
  123
115
  128
  123
115
  123
  112
  123
  112
  106
  127
  123
  127
  14!*
  103
 -  115
  103
  123
  145
  147
  140
  93
Ritchie,   Hugh    42, 97, 105
Rivers,   David   	
Roach, Stewart  	
Roberts,  Stanley  	
Robertson, Donald A.
Robertson,  George  ....
Robertson, James  	
Robinson,  Clifford    -
Robinson,  Dennis  	
93
133
132
103
103
123
140
136
If this
Totem
has been
success
help
us
by buying
it
immediately
and
if
you have
friends
or parents,
or
something,
show
the book
to them . . .
Page Two Hundred and Forty-six Robinson, Donald  B.
Robinson,   Donald   	
Robinson,  Doramay  	
Robinson, Eric 	
Robinson, Grant	
Robinson, David   ...
Robinson, John 	
Robinson, Marian 	
Robinson,   Valerie   	
Robinson, Leslie 	
Robinson,  Thomas    	
Robson,  Mabel	
Roche, Robert 	
Rodgers, Margaret  	
Roe, John 	
Rogers, John 	
Rome,  Alexander   	
Rooney,   Sidney   	
Roots, Fred 	
Roos,  Albert   	
Roper,  Austin	
Rose, David 	
Rose, John 	
Rose, Joseph	
Rose,   Mary	
Rose,  Robert  	
Rose-Borough. Evelyn ...
Ross, Bernard 	
Ross,  Donald	
Ross,   Gordon   	
Roussel,   David   	
Rowebottom,  Lome   . ...
Rowebottom, Howard
Rowell,   Florencn   	
Ruardi-Wicjers,   Maria
Ruck, William 	
Rumball, Dale 	
  140
  123
  93
 _  105
  103
  112
  147
  93
  112
  123
  48
  149
  103
  123
  145
  133
  136
  128
  140
  140
 -  140
  136
 -  112
 .._  112
  123
97
  127
  123
  103
  93
  105
  103
 _  103
93
  93
  140
  97
Runkle, Penelope   106, 112
Rush, George    112
Rush, Ian  126
Rushworth,  Eileen  93
Russell, James  ..  115
Russell,  Marjorie    112
Russell, Rosamond   103
Rutquist, Frederick  123
Ryan,  Daphne  112
Ryan, Doreen  26  88, 93
Ryan,   John     103
Ryan, Laura  _  123
Ryan,   Margaret  123
Salisbury, Robert   .
Salt, Lionel  	
Sandall, Frances ...
Sanderson, Alan ...
Sanderson, Lloyd .
Sanderson,   Phyllis
143
53, 103
145
112
1.12
112
Sandison, Annabel    27, 112
Sasaki, Frederick 	
Sasaki,   Mitsura   	
Saunders, Mariorie ...
Saunders, Harold ...
Saunders,  Richard  ...
Savitsky, Sonia  	
Scarisbrick,  Richard
Sceats, Hugh  	
Schiedel, Ian  	
Schiedel,   Nancy   	
Schofield,  William   ...
97
123
112
136
115
103
136
136
132
112
103
You Will Find It A Pleasure
To Do Business With Us . . .
PRINTING
of every description
ft     ^
Anderson Printing Co.
Limited
Located at
Victory Square
455 Hamilton St.
Telephone:.
PAcific 5838
1
We
like   to   sell   clothes   to
men   who   knew that
clothes  mean  a  lot in
every day life.
Business and Social
For
Smarter   Styling   and   Perfect  Fit   see   our
New
Lounge  Models,   both   in  busi
ness and  sports
wear.
Personal service
always.
Eddie It.
Deem
498 Seymour St.
Cor. Pender
Scoones, Ann    123
Scott, Anthony    123
Scott, Elizabeth Ann   112
Scott,  H. James   134. 1&
Scott, Hazel _  153
Scott, J. C. Melvin  105
Scott, John T _  123
Scott, Margaret  123
Scott, Norma   112
Scott,   William  136
Scrivener, Jack    112
Selkirk,   Lords  97
Scougall, Jessie   -  148, 149
Selkirk, Lorris  48
Sexsmith,   Roderic     140
Sexsmith,  William     123
Page Two Hundred and Forty-seven GOULD and HIRD
IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS
TEA, COFFEE, SEEDS, Etc.
300 Arts and Crafts Building,  576 Seymour Street,
Vancouver,  B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Hosiery and Lingerie Shop
648 Granville St.
Vancouver, B. C.
CREATORS OF  FINE JEWELLERY
AND WATCHES
PAcific 4364-5
Seymour at Dunsmuir
Vancouver, Canada
Sewell, Vincent  	
Seyer, Anthony ....
Seyer,  John  	
Seymour, Aileen  ...
  103
  123
  103
  112
Shadwell,  Howard    137, 140
Shannon,   Barbara   	
Shannon, Joyce 	
Shaw,   Alexander   	
Shaw,   Dorothy   	
Shaw,  Ronald   	
Sheeley,  Ralph  	
Sheldon, Stanley 	
Shepherd,  Fraser  	
Shigei,   Hideo   	
Shillabeer,  John    .._	
Shimo-Takahara, Katherine
Shimo-Takahara,   Lloyd   	
153
123
136
93
123
93
128
128
105
112
93
112
Shelling, Anne 	
Sherborne, Patricia
Sherratt, Mona 	
Shewan,   Robert   ....
Shields, Meryle 	
Shinobu,   Roy   	
Shiozaki, Fumiharu .
Shkwarok,  William
Shoji, Henry	
Sholund,  Alvin  	
Shore,  Alan  	
Short,  John   	
Shortreed, Grace ...
Shortreed,  James   ...
Shoul,   Albert   	
Shrum, G. M	
Shumas,  Fred   	
Sibley, John	
Simpson,  Carl  	
Sillers, Jean 	
Simpson, John 	
Simpson,   Keith   ... .
Sinclair, Eleanor 	
Simmons,  Patricia  .
Sinclair,  Donald  	
  123
  123
  123
  103
  112
  93
  97
  112
  140
  103
  145
  115
  93
  149
  123
 _  15
  136
  112
  149
  93
  136
  112
  103
  123
  123
Sinclair,   Lister    46,   93
  103
  112
  93
 -  93
  112
  103
  136
  93
  136
  136
  123
  105
  145
 -  112
  93
  126
  133
  136
  140
  103
  103
  140
  153
  123
  123
  123
  133
  112
 -  140
  112
    51, 103
 -  129
  115
  97
  123
  94
      IIS
 -  133
  103
  112
 v  103
  140
Sinclair, Robert Meade
Sinclair,   Robert   ...
Skelhorne,  Gordon
Skinner, Louise 	
Slark,  Gordon  	
Slater,  Mary   	
Slater, John 	
Sleath, Edward 	
Sleigh,   Barry   	
Small, Frederick ...
Smalley,   Robert   ...
Smedley, Jack 	
Smith,  Alex „	
Smith,  Douglas  	
Smith,  Barbara  ..
Smith,  Eric   w	
Smith, Frank ,	
Smith,  Leslie 	
Smith,  Herbert  	
Smith,  Herbert  S.
Smith, Paul  	
Smith,  Jack   	
Smith,   Nancy   	
Smith,   Anne   	
Smith, Robert E. .
Smith, Robert  C. .
Smith, William 	
Smith, Wilma  	
Smuin, Eugene 	
Smythies, Charles .
Snaddon,  Andrew   .
Snow, James  	
Snyder,   Edward   ...
Snyder,   Russell   ...
Solum, Berna 	
Sorochan, John  .. .
South, Donald 	
Spaetgens, Ted  	
Southin,   Eleanor   .
Sparks,  Cliff  	
Sparks, John  	
Speakman,  George
Page Two Hundred and Forty-eight Spears,  Dorothy    -  ""
Speers, Edward   103
Speirs, Harold  -  W3
Spencer,   Barbara                     94
Spreull. Elizabeth      123
Sprott, Edgar  ~.  127
Stamatis,   Dorothy     ™
Stamatis,   George    -  "S
Stamatis,   Patricia    -  **■
Stamford,   Gordon    -  ™
Steele, Ian    136
Steele,   John     123
Steele, Robert  123
Steel, William  131
Stefanelli,  John     141
Steuart,  Kenneth  123
Stevens,  John     123
Stevens, William  112
Stevenson,  Helen  153
Stevenson,  Margaret     123
Stevenson,  Ted    -  103
Stewart, Ann   123
Stewart, Allan J  132
Stewart,   Harold    _  136
Stewart,  James   — 127
Still, Constance   123
Stormont, Audrey  -  123
Story,  Jack    141
Stonhouse,   Alice  123
Straight, Byron  103
Straith,  Joan  113
Stratton, Donald  141
Street,  William     123
Stroyan, William B  143
Stusiak,   Michael     131
Sugarman,  Lester    46,   94
Sully, Lynn  145
Sullivan, Constance   94
Sullivan, Lucy   103
Sutcliffe,  Ernest     133
Sutherland, Ernest    94
Sutherland,   Herbert     123
Sutherland, John   123
Sutherland,  Gordon   ... _  123
Sutton,  Donald    116, 123
Sutton,   Douglas     113
Suzuki, Goji   113
Swackhamer,  David   _  145
Swainson, John    103
Sweatman,  Henry       113
Sweeny, Moira   123
Sweeney,   Maxwell    131
Swinton, Hans  iy
Swinton,  William   _  147
Syme,  Thomas ..._    136
Tabata,   Minoru     131
Taillefer, Warren   124
Tait, Jean   103
Takimoto,  Kimiko  94
Tamboline,  Florence     145
Tarbox, John   31, 128
Tarrant,  Edmund  141
Tatroff, Daniel   103
Taylor, Arthur  113
Taylor,   David     113
Taylor,  Doreen   _  124
Taylor, Hugh   131
Taylor,  June     113
Whether for Home or Business Office Our
Stationery and  Printing  Departments  will
serve you in many ways.
GEHRKE'S LTD.
566 Seymour Street
TRinity 1311
Taylor, Leonard
Taylor, Norman
Taylor,  Douglas
Taylor,  Ted  	
Tawse,   Kenneth
141
136
136
113
113
Telfer,  Gwen      48, 103
Telford, Robert  	
Temple,  Vivian  	
Terrace, James  	
Thicke,  Douglas   ..
Thicke, Joan  	
Thicke, Ronald  	
Thomas,  George  	
Thomas, John A	
Thomas,  Wallace  	
Thomson,  Alexander
Thompson, Dorene ...
Thompson, David  	
Thompson,   Doris   	
Thomson,  Dorothy  ...
Thompson, Elmer 	
Thompson, James 	
Thomson,  Lorraine   -.
Thompson, Ross  	
Thomson,  Helen  	
Thomson,   Melville   ..
Thorson,  Emil  	
Thorson,  Victor   	
Thumm,  Walter   	
Thurgood, Mervyn  ...
Thurston, Audrey  ....
Tiedje,  John   	
Tierney,  Letitia   	
Timmons, Anthony ..
113
103
124
113
113
124
94
103
124
113
124
124
113
94
127
131
143
121
103
149
136
127
113
113
94
136
124
141
Page Two Hundred and Forty-nine Columbia  Paper  Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE PAPER MERCHANTS
Manufacturers of "Columbia" Quality
Scribblers and  Exercise  Books
VANCOUVER, B. C.
VICTORIA, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Famous Cloak & Suit Co.
Muirhead
Florist
"Your  personal  attention  florist"
Flower* far all
occasions
MA
6923
810
Howe St.
COMPLIMENTS OF
WILLARD'S APPAREL
681  Granville Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Tindle,   Muriel   	
Todd,  Stuart  	
Todhunter,   Stanley
Tompkins,   Dorothea
Toombs,   Harold  	
Toope, Mary 	
Toguri,  Samuel  	
Touhey, Thomas  	
Townsend,  George  ...
Townsend, James  	
Townsend,  John	
Tweed, Lorna	
Treen,  Gerald	
Trumbull,   Mary   	
Tuck, M. Denis 	
Tucker, Jack 	
Tucker,  Norma  	
Tufts, Aileen	
Tupper, Norman 	
Turko, Michael 	
Turley, Francis 	
Turner, David  	
Turner,   Stuart   	
Turyk,  Michael   	
Twiss, Mary 	
Twizell, Margaret ....
Uglow,   Elizabeth   	
Underhill,   Anne   	
Underhill,   Charles   ..
103
149
115
94
136
124
113
113
143
141
94
94
115
124
97
129
104
113
149
124
141
143
144, 145
113
104
104
104
94
124
Underhill,  Isabelle
Uyeda,  Lily  	
Uyeda, Mariko ..
Uyeno, Teiso  ..
Van deBogart, Helen 	
Van De Putte, Madeline
Vandt, David 	
Van  Home,  Bircham  	
Van Vliet, Maurice L	
Vaughan,  Annie   	
Vaughan,  David   	
Vaughan, Roderick 	
Venini,  Mary	
Veregin,   Thomas   	
Vernon, Ernest  -—.
Vesterback,   Greta   	
Vey,  Albert   	
Villiers-Fisher,  Joan   	
Vincent,   Vivian   	
Wadman,   Hamilton   ...
Wainwright, Roderick
Wakelynn,   Morris   .. .
Waldie, Adam   	
Waldron,   Benjamin   ..
Walker,  Ursula 	
Walker, Douglas 	
Walker,  Goldie 	
Walker, John  	
Walker,   Phyllis   	
Walker, Robert 	
Walker, Thomas 	
Walker,   William
Walker, William M.
Wall,   Muriel   	
Wallace,   Betty   	
Wallace,   Gordon   	
Wallace, John  	
Walsh,   Helen   	
Wallace,  William  	
Walter,  Bruce   	
Walton,  Norman  	
Walton,   Howard  	
Wannop, Leonard   	
Warden, John  	
Wark,   Bruce	
Warne,   Maxwell   	
Warner,  Harry 	
Warner,   Mary   	
Warner,   William   	
Warrack,  Beryl  	
Warwick,  William  	
Watanabe,  Saburo  	
Wate,   George   	
Wate, William 	
Watson,   Mary   	
Watson, Stapleton 	
Watson, Wilfred  	
Watt,  Evelyn  	
Watts,  Mildred 	
Weaver,   June   	
Webb,   Charles   	
Webb, Joan	
Webb, Eva 	
Webb,   Frances   	
Webber, Donald  	
Webber,   Stuart   	
Webster, Robert  	
113
113
104
149
113
124
104
145
33
124
104
145
94
113
94
124
104
113
124
124
143
115
115
124
124
94
104
115
104
104
124
124
141
104
104
97
13C
113
94
124
127
141
141
113
124
104
97
107
115
94
113
141
141
113
113
136
104
115
94
113
124
113
94
153
124
104
124
Page Two Hundred and Fifty Weed,   Joseph   	
Weicker,   Charles   .
Weiner,   Harry   	
Weins, Elvira 	
Weir, John  	
Welch,   Helen   	
Weldon,   Dorothy   .
Weldon,   Margaret
Wells,  James  	
Welsford,   William
West,  Enid 	
West, James	
Westwood, Mary  ...
Whelan, Patricia ...
  38, 133
  141
  131
  113
  149
  113
  124
  94
  113
105
  113
  124
  94
  124
Whimster,   Muriel     38, 113
White, Charles 	
White,  Jean  	
White,  Frances   	
White,   Louise   	
White,   Ronald   	
White,   Ruth   	
White,  Sadie   ...
White, William  	
Whitelaw,   Glenn   .
Wickstrom,  Tage   ..
Widdess, E. H	
Wigen,   Sydney   	
Wilding,   Malcolm
Wilkie,  Gavin   	
Wilkie, Jack 	
Wilkinson, Barclay
Willcocks, Shirley
Williams, Bernice
Williams, David 	
  126
  124
  113
  124
  48, 131
  124
  104
  113
  115
  113
  113
  141
 ;  136
  113
 -  94
..._ _  124
  61, 124
  113
  124
Williams,  Campbell          83, 131
Williams,   Frances
Williams,   June   	
Williams, Margery
Williams, Thomas
Williams,  James  _..
Willis,   Charles   	
Willox,   George   	
Wilson,   Atholl   	
Wilson, Charles L.
Wilson,   Ewing   	
Wilson,   Florence   .,
Wilson, Frank  	
Wilson,   James   	
Wilson, Kathleen ..
Wilson, Raymond ..
Wilson, William  L.
124
113
124
141
124
141
136
124
113
124
124
124
105
104
114
115
Winram, Edna      54, 105
Wintermute, John ..
Wismer,   Jack   	
Wismer,   Shirley   ....
Withler, Frederick
Witter,  Beverley  ..
Wong,  William   	
Woo,  John   	
Woo,  Anne  	
Woo, Mary 	
Wood, Betty       ..
Wood,  David   ...
Wood,  Hunter  	
Wood,  George  	
Wood, Gordon 	
Wood, Juanita 	
Wood, Mary  Alice
Wood,  Norman  ...
136
124
94
124
104
124
141
104
114
104
129
115
104
114
104
114
124
SWEET SIXTEEN LTD.
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR
Five Stores for Your Convenience:
137 W. Hastings; 927 Granville;  2438  E.  Hastings;
2315 Main St; 437 Columbia, New Westminster
UNION GARMENT HOUSE
SOUTH GRANVILLE FLORIST
SMART CORSAGES
KErrisdale 0094
EDITH A. CARROTHERS
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear
2776 Granville Street Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
SCOTT'S   CAFE
ANNE MALONEY, LTD.
Importers of Women's Wear
HOTEL GEORGIA
VANCOUVER, B. C. CANADA
Vancouver's Newest Store
BEST'S  LTD.
Fine Ladies' Apparel
Coats      -      Suits     -      Dresses and  Sportswear
888 Granville St.
{Next to Orpheum Theatre) VANCOUVER, B. C.
De Luxe Bowling Centre
MA 9940     Hastings at Homer     PA 0956
HOME OF  THE
U.B.C. Sororities Bowling League
We Cater to Rushing Parties
Wood, Stanley   124
Woodcroft, John    141
Woodman, Thomas    141
Woods, John    114
Woods,   Wilfred     147
Woodside, Lloyd   94
Woodsworth,   Richard . 124
Woodward, Charles   124
Workman, Allan    136
Worthington, Elizabeth. 94
Wright, Gloria   124
Wright, Kenneth   124
Wright, Kenneth T  124
Wright,  Norman   147
Wright, S. Courtney .... 114
Wuest,   Elmer     97
Wybourn, Ed   104
Wyness,   Eleanor  114
Yyrzykowski,  John    124
Yamada,   Peter     94
Yamashita,  George    97
Yamashita,   Thomas   . 114
Yano,  Fred     124
Yeasting,  Alice  .. .-.   .. 115
Yip,   Cecil     114
Yip,   Chuck     141
Yorston,  Shirley   .. 124
Yoshioka,   Edward     114
Young,   David     147
Young,  Honoree     54
Young,  Lawrence     .... 145
Young,   Michael        46, 114
Young, Thomas    104
Young,  Victor    124
Young,   William   ..      .. 124
Younger, Andrew     141
Zabinski,   John     131
Zitko, Ludoric  ... 127
Page Two Hundred and Fifty-one PRINTED   BY
WARD   &   PHILLIPS   LIMITED
VANCOUVER,   B.C.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubcyearb.1-0119021/manifest

Comment

Related Items