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1941 Totem 1941

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   The Empire at War . . .
TOTIE Salutes You! PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE
UNIVERSITY   OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
ELIZABETH  E. O U I C K, Editor.
THOMAS W. MEREDITH, Bus. Mgr. FOREWORD
Warfare, in its modern idiom, has reached out and enveloped our University for a second year, just as it has enveloped institutions and individuals
throughout the entire world.
It has been a strangely new experience for us, the students of U. B. C, to
wave goodbye to fellow undergraduates as they left for training in army,
navy, and air-force units, and to don the khaki of non-permanent militia, along
with every other university in Canada. Twenty-five years ago one of the first
acts of our university was to watch a troop train pull out, for we were a
"war baby" of 1915.
This past year, as in the days of 1914-1918, the students of U. B. C. have
thrown their support behind the giant wheel of an allied war machine, which
has called upon every able-bodied man the Empire can muster.
On ourselves, as undergraduates still engaged in academic work, this
war has had a decided effect, and life on the campus has been greatly altered,
fls it is the duty of the Totem to present a true record of a year's experiences,
this book must necessarily be built around a war theme. Preparedness, the
watchword of democracy, is the keynote of the 1940-1941 Totem.
We presents our Campus in Khaki . . . PREPAREDNESS      ACTIVITIES
ADMINISTRATION      UNDERGRADUATES
ATHLET      ICS
WmmWm
ORGAN   IZATIONS
CONTENTS The doorway
swings open to
. . • a college career micD
The home of
farming science
■■■MMMjM LIBRARY
A challenge to . . .
... inquiring minds Centre of war
research Athletics are
featured.. .
... even in war BROOK
Where student
life goes on
l  With the Empire at war. we
do our bit towards . . .
a ■
Lt. Col. Gordon Merritt Shrum.
In the summer of 1940 something happened to
Canada.
It started slowly at first, in the late spring when
France began to crumble, gathering momentum as a
dictator's boot ground into the once free soil of Europe,
until it burst into a full-throated roar from the lips of
the Canadian people—a cry for preparedness.
In the summer of 1940 the people of Canada began
to awake, and as the Canadian war machine commenced to whirr, the Universities of the Dominion
girded themselves for conflict. The youth of a nation
was ready.
Strange, that the action of a European paranoaic
should change the theme of life at an institution of
learning more than 7000 miles away—that the pulse
of a great University should be quickened by the
work of a small group of men on another continent.
Yet, where one short year ago the campus of the University of British Columbia was a sunlit green, today
it is dotted with the khaki uniforms of hundreds of
students soldiers—uniforms which cast a patchwork
of war on a campus which has heretofore known only
The boys dress up in khaki .
Lieutenant Holland;  Major McLeod, Chief Instructor;  Lieutenant-Col.   Shrum,   Officer   Commanding;   Major   Topping;   Lieutenant   Harris.
14 1.   Machine Gun Drill—2. Basic Takes Instruction—3. Ready to March—4. Making Ready—5. Fighting Against Gas—6. In Firing Position,
the conflict of science against arts, of freshman against
sophomore.
Today, the University of British Columbia is proud
in the knowledge that it has answered its government's call to Preparedness.
It was on the last Saturday afternoon of September,
1940, that the residents of the University Area first
heard the thud of 1750 pairs of student boots on the
pavement of the University boulevard—1750 undergraduates and graduates, learning to be soldiers.
It was a motley group of students on this first
parade—a ragged line of march. But what it lacked
in efficiency, it made up in spirit. To the undergraduate as he swung along on this, his first route
march, and to the graduate, as he returned to the
familiar campus for training, it was a great adventure.
As they marched they sang songs and shouted yells,
and the residents of the Area heard the Alma Mater
song "Hail U.B.C." chanted as a military theme.
That was September . . .
Soon the tramp of student feet became a familiar
rhythm in the University district on Saturday afternoons, and as student taught student, the ragged line
became a single throbbing unit, moving as one man,
marching to the martial strains of the Varsity Band,
which once sent football heroes down the gridiron
to victory ... In 1940 the gridiron became a parade
ground for drilling scholars.
To the casual visitor, stepping from the bus onto
the U.B.C. campus any weekday during the winter
session, there seemed to be little change in the normal
tenor of undergraduate activities. For, in between the
pressure of parades and military lectures, U.B.C.
students managed to carry on, managed to cram a
curtailed schedule of social functions and extra cur-
ricular activities into the limited time available.
and become men of the C. O. T. C.
15 Leaves Fall as the Boys Swing Out on a Route March.
while the others do their part .
But there was, and is, a difference. You can hear
a message in the click of knitting needles in Brock
Hall, in the tinkle of silver in the self-denial boxes, in
the sharp bark of uniformed students in the Officers
Training Group. It's a message that says: "We're
doing something. We, the students of the University
of British Columbia, are working with the people of
Canada to help preserve the conditions of life which
help to govern our country and our campus. We're
alert and we're prepared."
"We are prepared." This is the sentiment, which,
above all others has wrought a change in campus
life during the 1940-41 session. The government made
a request, and to a man, the University answered the
plea. Today, the University is ready to send her
quota of well-trained men into any branch of the
service for which they may be required. And the
men are ready to go.
Willingness has been the keyword of the Khaki
Session. It is a point of pride among the officers of
the C.O.T.C. that no single disciplinary action has been
taken by the committee on military affairs. Every
student has been more than ready to do his share.
Eagerness has predominated.    So willing have the
;<arfESS_EEKCT_ffl_KI
Coatless Students Relax on the  Playing Field as CoL Shrum Lectures.
16 1. Calling   the   Roll—2. Future   Officers   Relax—3. Commissioned   to   Lead—Centre-On   Guard—4. Basic
6. Resting "En Route"—7. Registering Attendance.
"At   Ease"—5. Dismissal-
students been to do what is required of them, that
their progress has far surpassed the expectations of
their officers. _ Despite the fact that the majority of
them were without uniform, rigid discipline has been
maintained successfully in the ranks. Each student
is every inch a soldier.
When the University embarked upon her job of
training 1750 men to be soldiers and officers she was
faced with a herculean task. More than that she was
faced with the handicap of an absence of trained
instructors. During the 1939-40 session, several hundred graduates and undergraduates had trained voluntarily to be officers. Many of them had qualified for
commissions; all were well adapted to handle men.
But with the swift-moving events of the summer oi
1940, the University was drained of almost all her
trained men, as her sons answered the call to arms.
With the opening of the new session there were 1750
raw recruits, waiting to be trained, with only a handful of officers to accomplish the task.
Yet despite the lack of trained men, the impossible
was accomplished. The call went out for instructors
and the call was answered.
The Corps needed more than 60 instructors weekly,
to handle squads and instill discipline in the ranks.
Students who had never before been leaders, suddenly found themselves in command of a squad of 20
men. Undergraduates found that they were being
trained for something more than war: they were being
trained for leadership. The Khaki Session instilled
the students with a new type of self-confidence found
only in time of great emergency.
in mastering basic training
17 1.    Major McLeod at Work.    2.    Dressing Hanbury.    3.    Military Lecture.     4.     Inspecting   the   Rifle.
6.   Dictation.   7.   Major McLeod and Officer.   8.   'Shun.   9.   Orderly Room.   10.   D.U.'s and Rifles.
5.     Keatley   in   Battle  Dress.
11.   Orders for the Day.
As a rough stone is polished into a perfect jewel,
so were the raw recruits in the Officers Training section of the corps transformed into efficient, quickwitted leaders by the handful of skillful officers
attached to the U.B.C. Contingent.   This section was
composed of several hundred upperclassmen and
graduates. Some had a modicum of previous training but the vast majority were forced to start from
scratch. Yet within a few months, these men were
themselves taking the lead, barking orders at their
18 squads in the manner of seasoned army men, and
before the end of the fall session each cadet in the
Officers Training section had been outfitted with battle
dress.
For these potential officers, army training presented the greatest demand on time. Cadets put in
six to eight hours weekly while instructors were
required to spend as much as ten hours on training.
With the spring term, the group was divided into
several divisions and cadets had the choice of entering the engineers, army service corps, artillery,
infantry rifle or infantry machine gun.
The second and largest unit of the C.O.T.C. was
the Basic military group. Except for a minority of
lance-corporals, they were without uniforms. Yet
with a few weeks training they too attained the bearing of soldiers. Members of the basic section took
six hours training weekly. Three hours was spent in
practical work Saturday afternoon, one hour on military theory, one hour on physical training and one
specialized hour on some technical subject.
Students of both sections who attend the two week
camp at the end of the session will have covered the
same ground as soldiers in the Non-Permanent Active
Militia who have taken their required month's training at camp.   Members of the Officers Training Corps
Dr. Joyce Hallamore.
The women too. are serving .
By Machine   .    .
and Hand.
19 Dr. Hallamore and Co-eds Discuss Plans.
No Idle Hours.
Busy Hands.
who are successful in their examinations will have all
the qualifications of a lieutenant.
At present, the permanent army has no great need
for men. But should events change in the late spring,
as well they may, then the University of British
Columbia will be prepared to send every available
soldier to the country's service. During the winter
session, the Alma Mater has lost many students to
the army.   She is prepared to lose many more.
Not only is the University training soldiers; she is
training scientists. During the winter session countless graduates interrupted research work on M. A.
theses to take up war research under the National
Research Council. At the close of the session, the
Chemistry department expects to place every one of
its graduates at the service of the nation.
And, in this great Preparedness program, the
women of the University have not been idle. They
have trained, not with rifles, but with knitting needles;
they have not commanded squads, but they have
organized war charities. Early in the fall session, a
room was set aside in Brock Hall where co-eds could
spend their spare time knitting garments for soldiers.
Instructors were present eight hours daily to super-
on Red Cross Relief
Bridge Games Abandoned as Co-eds Knit For All Branches of the Service.
20 First All-Varsity Chorus Swing It at the Red Cross Pep-meet.
Co-ed beauty draws money for charity
vise the women as their nimble needles wrought
khaki vests, socks and body bands for the troops.
It was the women too, who conceived and organized weekly self-denial days for the Canadian Red
Cross Society. While men attended military lectures,
co-eds kept an eight hour vigil, each Wednesday,
over the colored tins that held the nickels that students
would ordinarily expend on luxuries. Home nursing
and first aid classes have claimed large numbers of
eager co-eds.
Early in the year, a gigantic Red Cross ball raised
$2,000.00 for the Canadian Red Cross Society.
Working at the heads of committees, organizing the
affair, were sorority girls, who made the function the
success it was. No cadet trained harder than
the thirteen co-eds who performed the intricate dance
routines which was one of the highlights of the show.
The war is not yet over. Before the great sore in
Europe's side has ceased to fester, more and greater
sacrifices will be called for from the Canadian people.
Every resource which the Universities of Canada can
mobilize must go to aid the war machine. During the
past year, the University of British Columbia has
shown what she can do in the Canadian Preparedness
program. During future years the program will be
even more comprehensive. The youth of British
Columbia are ready to do their part. —P. B.
Dorothy Beebe and Margaret Morrow Enlist.
21 Greeks do their share by . . .
1. Co-ed. chorus. 2. Drawing the lucky numbers. 3. To the war-chant. 4. Ex-business manager of Totem and party.
5. Inspection of telegram-donation. 6. M. C. Baird, guest Pinky Tomlin. and Oie. 7. Genial Dean and students. 8.
Presentation of money from sorority headquarters. 9. Co-eds.Way." 12. Intermission relaxation. 13. Zetes. 14. Floor
pose. 10. Dorothy Hebb and partner. 11. "Down Argentina show finale. 15. "The better to see." 16. Examining the
prizes.    17.   Fraternity sings.
22 . • . staging successful Red Cross Ball
23 //
■ Not withstanding curtailment
we carry on our Campus . . • Worry and Calm as They Register and Find Big Sisters
The Frosh are always with us
THE University of British Columbia
gave a gruff but kindly welcome
to a bumper crop of over 600
earnest, apple-cheeked, nattily-
togged freshmen during the week
of September 23-27.
Newcomers who attended the
traditional freshman reception ceremony the previous Friday, September 20th, received their official
blessing in the form of mingled words of welcome
and admonition; smiled with smiling Walter Gage,
genial Maths, professor; chuckled at the witticisms
of Dean Daniel Buchanan . . . ("Please, God, take
care of yourself, or we're sunkl . . . That's what we
say to you freshmen") and sat quietly as they listened
to the earnest plea of President L. S. Klinck for a
more dignified war-conscious student year.
What promised to be a dull Freshman Week took
a sudden, shocking turn—the soph-frosh pushball
game turned into "... the worst brawl of a decade ..."
as hundreds of freshmen attacked and routed one
fifth their number of sophomores with a score of 1-0.
Upperclassmen, student executives, and University officials had no sooner recovered their breath
when news came through that the traditional frosh
smoker, held the next evening at the Alma Academy,
had been characterized by an unusual spectacle. The
bill of entertainment, originally drawn up to include
2 tap dancers, 1 soprano, and 1 acrobat, had unaccountably been enlarged to include 1 strip-tease artist
(female). Entertainment convenor and freshman committees denied responsibility; smokerees grinned
approval above sloppy green bow ties.
All "emerald vile"—male and female—already
bewildered in their new element, hemmed in with
rules, customs, precedents and taboos, glumly faced
a year rumoured to be shorn of most traditional college Frippery and Finery. Cause:—War Effort. Tra-
dtiional ban on lipstick, make-up, fancy footgear, and
feminine knicknacks gave a doleful, turnipy aspect
to most high-school glamour graduates; mixed Frosh
perambulation ban (ignored by many) added to gen-
26 Off to the fight.    Little sisters go home after traditional supper.    Pr of. Gage advises.    Photos for student passes and Totem.    Vertical:
Losing a shirt.   Rough leap-frog.   Dancing at Frosh reception.   Inset:  Traffic-king Orcnard admonishes.   Deadlock. Big-Little Sister Supper.
eral distress. Gloomy Musical Society prognostica-
tors, overawed by male military training plans, predicted all-women, trouserless shows. Campus
angels—"Big Sister" group—mothered disconsolate
female Frosh; males, uncared for, jawed over already-
habitual pop, coffee-sinkers refuge, milled in common-rooms, brazenly smoked in corridors.
All Frosh, still green-beribonned, lecture-broken,
less fearful of Sophs, came to ceremonial wind-up of
Frosh Reception, September 27th; few held aloof.
Agog, they whooped with Mamooks ("Kitsilano,
Capilano, Siwash, Squaw!") shagged and trotted to
Trevor Paige's music; overflowed from Brock Hall
into nearby gym; yammered and cavorted. Limbered, flushed, Frosh ran the gauntlet of lined sophomores in pairs. Paddled, booted, cursed, midnight
saw them stripped of tell-tale regalia, waiting their
turn for next year's crop. —L. B.
Interest in Brawl Wanes With Fatigue.
27 U. B. C. Cargo Looks Eager as Boat Docks.
We follow the birds to Victoria .
Shorn of all its pre-war glamour, de-socialized to
the extreme, informal to the extent of spontaneity, the
annual invasion of Victoria by U.B.C. was carried out
with but a mere handful of invaders.
There was no special boat this year, no tea dances
at the Empress, no blood-spilling basketball game
against the Dominoes. One hundred students made
the trip to the Island, saw a football game between
the Thunderbirds and Victoria Revellers, cheering
even as we lost 23-12, and trooped back to the boat.
In previous years, the Invasion had been the event
of the social calender. With plans laid far in advance, parties arranged, staterooms booked, the boat
transferred into a marine-going Flirtation Walk, U.
B. C. had invaded the Capitol City.
On October 14, 1940, Thanksgiving Day one
hundred students walked down the gang-plank of the
Princess Marguerite, piled into waiting cars, and
silently moved on to Macdonald Park, scene of the
Canadian Football game. There was no riotous
parade down Government Street; no taking over the
"Poodle Dog", no steady stream along Esquimalt
Road; rather students were determined to see and
enjoy the game.
Overhanging clouds, threatening rain momentarily,
had failed to dampen their enthusiasm on the boat,
the same enthusiasm they took to Macdonald Park,
where be-sweatered yell leaders had actually coerced spirited cheers. That boat ride proved one
conclusive point: University students are by far the
most rabid bridge fans of society.
Stewards were kept busy, setting up tables and
getting cards as even football coach Maury Van Vliet
forgot the worries of regimenting the diet of temperamental gridiron stars to double a spade bid made in
a rash moment by superior officer Col. Shrum, major
domo of the C.O.T.C.
A year before, campus cynics would have scoffed
at such an outing, but this Thanksgiving Day university students found pleasure in such antics, augmented by masculine and feminine versions of the
"bull session." Heavy talk of the males, of course,
centred about the war, the coming game, and distinctly manly topics.
Co-eds, veneer and all, sat quietly for the most
part, during the daylight ride over, calmly knitting
red cross articles, and chatting.
The game itself, naturally the "raison d'etre" for
this "pocket-sized intrusion," while disappointing to
the Varsity crowd in that the Thunderbirds sustained
their first gridiron defeat in two years, was yet well
worth the trip.
28 Players Tangle—On the Line.
It seemed at first that Varsity was to continue on a
two year win streak when Jim Harmer, burly captain
of the 'Birds, opened the scoring early in the game.
It became evident, however, that a lack of practice,
plus the loss of most of last year's front line, was too
great a handicap to overcome.
Going into the last minutes of the game, with the
score 13-12 in favour of the Island Revellers, the
Thunderbird machine collapsed and Victoria ran
across two fast touchdowns to take the score to the
unprecedented heights of 23-12, a most woeful end
to an exuberant beginning.
Below deck, bridge games were renewed, keyboard artists entertained, the more social couples
danced to small orchestra. Invasion over, one
hundred students filed down the C.P.R. gang plank
at 10:30 p.m., three hours earlier than usual.
Yes, the 'Birds followed the birds to Victoria, and
took a drubbing 23-12, yet even defeat was well
taken.
Ex-President Pearson, Coach Maurie and Players Look Glum as Outcome Becomes Certain.
. . . and take a beating 23-12
29 Thunderbirds Score a Touchdown.
Homecoming • . . when alumni and
Cutting Up a Scienceman.
The past lived anew for several hundred graduates of U. B. C. on Saturday, October 26, when an
enthusiastic undergraduate body welcomed them
back to their Alma Mater in the annual Homecoming
festivities.
All the old glamour of former college days was re-
aired as the oldtimers strolled across the grassy
campus, meeting former friends who had dropped out
of sight in the mad rush that greets every graduate
as he enters the world of business.
They had much to talk about, too, as they had
witnessed, as special guests, the traditional Homecoming Canadian Football game and had seen the
Thunderbirds go down to defeat in the last ten seconds
of a thrilling game when the Bulldogs ran 108 yards
to score a winning touchdown.
Previous to the game, former members of the Big
Block Club had attended a luncheon in Brock Hall,
where gridiron greats of the past had boasted of their
prowess, and some had even paid debts owing to
Frank Underhill, Caf magnate, for years.
The graduates took somewhat of a back seat
following the game at the Homecoming Tea dance
in Brock Lounge where Sid Poulton's Poulcats entertained cm energetic, jitter-bugging student crowd.
30 Vancouver Bulldog Brought Down by Thunderbird Tazkler.
Capacity Crowd Watches.    Bench-warmers Follow Play.
Homecomers looked on in amazement at the exuberance displayed by the youthful hep-cats, or strolled
reminiscing, through the various buildings wherein
they had studied for long years.
Chief item of interest, of course, was Brock Hall, a
product of student initiative. Old-timers remembered
the fight for a student union building started 'way
back in '23, smiled respectfully as they acknowledged
the spirit of students who had made that dream a
realization.
Feature attraction of the Potlatch came when
Freddie Bolton called upon all the graduates in the
audience to stand and take a bow. Many were those
who stood in the spotlight, the oldest of all Mrs. A. M.
Menzies, of the Class of '16.
The rest of the program was composed of skits
presented by all the faculties, a racy bedroom farce
by the Players' Club and a March of Slime staged by
the Publications Board.
Previous to the Saturday festivities, the more
socially-minded grads had mingled with students at
the Homecoming Formal, held Friday night in Brock
Hall, dancing to the music of Trevor Paige.
All arrangements were under the guidance of
Charlie Nash.
under grads gather for reunion
31 Students Chat With Good Natured Dean.
Scientific farmers and artsmen
Musty Oriental incense clouded the Commodore
one evening last November, draped figures glided beneath a canopy of Chinese lanterns and gaily coloured
balloons. Chopsticks clicked. On the stage, Ole
Olson, resplendant in a Manchu robe, led his Oriental-
garbed orchestra in modern dance arrangements.
The Arts-Aggie Ball was in full swing.
Always ingenious, this year's Arts-Aggie executive
chose a Chinese atmosphere for their annual formal.
But although the ballroom was graced with an
Oriental veneer, it was an un-Cantonese assembly
which swayed to the strictly American rhythms of
the Commodore band.
Preceding the event, a noon hour Pep-meet was
staged in the Auditorium, featuring original skits by
members of the student body, and a preview of
orchestrations by Ole Olson's Commodore Band. The
long-reigning authority of Science enthusiasm at
Pep-meets was finally overthrown by the concerted
efforts and combined intellect of the cultured Artsmen
and lusty-lunged Aggies.
Lending their patronage to the affair were President
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1.    Deans Buchanan and Bollert.    2.    Grace Cuthbert and Doug Hume.    3.    Dancing  Couples.    4.    Glnny  and  Pierre.
32 1—Hungry Dancers. 2—Rosalind and Admirers. 3—Janet Greets
the President. 4—Intermission. 5—Students and Faculty Mingle.
6—Sandy Nash and Party.   7—Charlie Entertains.   8—Oriental Ole.
L. S. Klinck, Dean Mary L. Bollert, Dean F. M. Clement,
Dean and Mrs. D. Buchanan, and Professor and Mrs.
E. H. Morrow.
The traditional success of the Ball was this year due
to the work done by A. M. U. S. president, Sandy Nash,
Aggie president Jock Byers, and a committee including Ken Eldridge, Don Buckland, Doug Hume, Phyllis
Ellis, Tom Anstey and Phyllis Mitchell.
Sandy. Artsmen's President Holds Floor.
•      •
. get together for annual Arts-Aggie
33 Informality proves success . . .
President Lumsden accepts radio.
Prof. Gage presents War-Savings Stamps.
A radio plays for the enjoyment of loungers in
Brock Hall, $125.25 worth of war savings stamps
are reposing in Ottawa the gift of U.B.C. students,
and the Arts Faculty is well on its way towards
getting a "faculty spirit" all through the sweat of
four brows, the Arts Men's Undergraduate executive, whose brain-children, the Brock Hall Mixers,
proved to be popular beyond all possible hopes.
Starting merely as a means towards establishing "spirit" and drawing out members of the faculty
that otherwise didn't go to run-of-the-mill University
dances, the Mixers showed themselves to have
infinite possibilities. Proof of this stands in the
lounge of Brock Hall where a console type, combination radio now stands, the gift of A.M.U.S. to
Council and paid for from proceeds of the Mixers.
Music for the Mixers was supplied by Sid Poul-
ton's orchestra.
Members of the A.M.U.S. executive who deserve
credit for the Mixers are President Sandy Nash,
Vice-President Ken Seldridge, Secretary Doug Hume,
and Treasurer Don Buckland.
34 1—Assembled multitude at first mixer. 2—Bill McGhie and partner des Brisay win prize.
3—Dancers take over during intermission. 4—Archie Paton poses. 5—The Home Waltz.
6—Singer White holds mike for pianist.
. . . at Brock Hall "Mixers
55
35 Chancellor R. E. and Mrs. McKechnie, and Dean I. N. and Mrs. Finlayson
pose with S.M.U.S. prexy.
Engineers desert laboratories
Parker.  Beaty  and  Co.  with  Superman.
Sciencemen celebrated their first year of freedom on
February 13, when they gathered together at the
Commodore Cabaret for the annual Science Ball.
Flushed by the success of their 21st birthday ball the
year before the Engineers staged an even greater
party this year, using Superman as their theme.
It was definitely an informal affair, sciencemen being urged to throw off the yoke of tradition, and their
boiled shirts, and come in business suits.
S.M.U.S. executives also cracked down on the wearing of corsages, warning coeds that the appearance
of flowers at the dance would result in their being confiscated. Instead, sciencemen urged the buying of
half-dollar carnations, the proceeds to go to the Red
Cross.
Inside the Commodore, all was festivity. The different branches of science all vied for the most effective and novel table decorations with Forestry supplying Christmas trees, snow, and log cabins. The
Mechanicals, after working on it all afternoon, finally
got their steam engine working.
The gigantic figure of Superman, being symbolic
of feats of great strength and agility, was a fitting
theme  for  the  biggest  Science  party  of the year.
In charge of arrangements for the affair were Rex
Parker, Stan Harris, John Beaty, John Brynelson, Mack
Buck, Bob Potkins, Charles Parker, and Bob Davidson.
36 1—Klinck and McKechnie chat.    2—Buchanan. McEwen and Nash.   3—Head Table.   4—Forestry Table.   5—Examining Superman motif.
6—Something new in evening wear.    7—Corsages for the Red Cross.    8—Balloons.     9—Charlie  Parker  entertains  guests.     10—Junior
Member Nash and party.   11—Science intrigue.    12—Sigma Phi prexy and partner.
. . . for "Superman" Science Ball
37 Juniors dance at coronation
Ted McBride. Jean Clugston. Dr. Currie. Beverley Matthews.
The best thing about being a junior is the passing
through the stage between the happy carefreeness of
Archie Paton. Professor Wood, President Klinck, Mrs. Wood.
the  sophomore  and the  cold  sophistication  of the
senior.
Besides, there is the Junior Prom.
The soft lights of the Commodore ballroom winked
on the stately figures of six of U.B.C.'s fairest Juniors
that night in February, to rest finally on pretty dark-
eyed Jean Clugston, brunette Delta Gamma—queen
for a night.
Candidates for the sought-for position of Queen of
the Junior Prom were Bunny Finch, Louise Skinner,
Jean Clugston, Shirley Wismer, Elizabeth Hebb and
Beverly Matthews.
Patrons for the dance were Dr. and Mrs. A. W.
Currie, President L. S. Klinck, Dean Mary Bollert, and
Dean and Mrs. Daniel Buchanan.
An energetic committee headed by Ted McBride
made the 1941 Prom the greatest financial success the
dance has ever been, thus justifying the earlier request of the Junior Class that their dance not be combined with the Senior Class Party. Other members
of the executive included Archie Paton, Pat Carey, and
Phyllis Ellis.
38 1.—Invitation by Ole Olson.    2.—Prom Queen and class president with friends.   3.—Bob Curry and party.   4.—M.C,
Terry Parsons.    5.—Flash bulbs surprise them.    6.—Bruce McEwen and partner.    7.—A close-up.    8.—Pep Master
Al Dean.
. . . of Junior Prom Queen
39 Totem cameramen catch glimpses of
1—Seniors at supper. 2—Jo Weldon and Art Fouks. 3—Ruth Wilson dances. 4—Rex Parker,
talks to Dean and Mrs. Finlayson. 5—Close-up. 6—Amy Hackney and Charlie Nash. 7—Phi
Kappa Sig Table.    8—Peter McTavish and Mary Lister.    9—Science Ball guests.    10—Nash at
40 students as they abandon books for
Outdoor Club party.
Budd. 14—Trucking,
dance.
11—Ranji smiles for cameraman.    12—"Tickets please."    13—Eileen  and
15—Examining Science Ball program.    16—President Lumsden exchanges
41 1—Frankie in  Turnabout  as  Ruth  Watches.   2—The  madding  crowd.    3—Alison foots the bill.   4—Not-to-crowded Co-ed.    5—Patrons
and patronesses.    6—Thirst quencher.    7—Marg McClory pins lily on Jack McMillan.    8—Corn at the Aggie Bam Dance.    9—Sitting
one out.    10—Lucy. Jack and the lily.    11—Dorothy and Doug.   12—V.O.C. party.   13—Four hicks after cider.
brief respites at various parties
•    •    a
42 The things we see and hear
^—
43 Ruth Heyer
John Glen
Lister Sinclair.  Margaret Morris, Lester Sugarman.
Thespians score double triumph
The Players' Club this year revived its practice begun during the first Great War of contributing to the
War effort. To this end, a special benefit performance
of the previous year's spring play, "Pride and Prejudice" was given on January 10. The play was an
artistic and financial success, and $450 was handed
over to the Alma Mater Society's Red Cross Campaign.
The cast was practically the same as at the original
production, many alumni returning to take part.
Arthur Hill, a freshman member, replaced Jim Hal-
crow as Mr. Collins, and Archie Bain replaced Bob
Haywood as Mr. Bingley.
Four one-act plays were presented as usual this
winter in November.   Innovations this year included
the production of a short Nativity play, the Coventry
Nativity Play of the Shearmen and Tailors, and the
granting of opportunities to students to direct plays.
Archie Bain of Arts '41 directed the Nativity Play, and
John Glen, also of Arts '41, directed a melodrama,
"In Cold Blood." The other plays included a comedy,
"Far, Far Away," directed by Dr. Dorothy Mawdsley,
and a farce, "Edward About to Marry," directed by
Professor Walter Gage, who was welcomed back as
Honorary President after a year's stay in California. The general production was supervised by
the former Spring play director, Sydney Risk. Mr.
Risk, the value of whose services to the club cannot
be over-estimated, left early in 1941 to take up a
dramatic post in Alberta.
"Far.  Far  Away.'
Scripting backstage.
Tom Collins
Kennedy and Johnson
44 This left the club with the necessity of finding a
new Spring play director. They were very fortunate
in securing the services of Mrs. Ernest Woodward,
for many years a prominent Little Theatre director.
1.    Prideand   Prejudice;   2.   Backstage  With   Candida;   3.
Make Up; 4.   Relaxing in the Green Room.
Players
"Candida", by George Bernard Shaw, was the
Spring play chosen for this year to be presented on
March 19, 20, 21 and 22. The cast selected, after the
usual competitive try-outs, was as follows:—the Rev.
James Morell, Arthur Hill; Eugene Marshbanks, John
Glen; Candida, Mary McLorg; Mr. Burgess, Lister
Sinclair; Prossy, Nancy Bruce; and Lexy Mill, John
Powell.
Play readings were held at the homes of members
every fortnight during the year, and proved very
popular. The plays read included such notable
works as "The Importance of Being Ernest," "The
Wild Duck," "Hay Fever" and "Hamlet", the last
under Dr. Sedgewick's direction.
The club executive, headed by President Ruth
Heyer, included vice-president John Glen, secretary
Margaret Morris, Business manager Lester Sugar-
man, treasurer Lister Sinclair, and a committee of
Mary McLorg, Archie Bain, Shirley MacDonald and
Michael Young.
Arrangements were made to wind up another
successful year with the annual tour of the Province
of the Spring Play.
with 'Candida\ 'Pride and Prejudice
45 Rollicking sea chanties featured
Margaret Haggart and Tom Robinson.
Joan Bruce
Dune McFayden
Fred Middleton
Coeds and Director Williams
Gone but not forgotten.
Such was the epitaph bestowed on "H.M.S. Pinafore" as the final curtain rolled down one Saturday
evening in February, on the 25th anniversary performance.
This year, the words might have come from the lips
of any member of the enthusiastic audience who applauded the truly unforgettable performance of Gilbert
and Sullivan's light opera. But coming as they did
from a prominent member of the society, they neatly
expressed in one terse phrase the careful choice of
opera, the painstaking rehearshal of parts, the tedious working out of detail, the eager waiting for the
performance, the dreaded curtain calls, the applause,
and the sudden realization that once more the show
was history.
Once again, the capable baton of Maestro C.
Haydn Williams guided the society through one of
its most difficult years to a successful climax. Up
to standard in every way, the show left the execu-
Webber and Ford
Usher and Middleton dance at formal.
Haydn Williams chats with friend.
46 Top Row: Marjorie Usher; Doreen Grant, Tom Robinson, Marjorie Usher; Marjorie Usher and Doug Ford; Bottom Row: Doug Ford; Sidney
Horswill; Marjorie Usher; Doreen Grant and Tom Robinson.
tive resting with the certain knowledge of a duty
well   done.
Thomas J. Robinson, president, guided the affairs of the society with a steady hand, while vice-
president Margaret Haggart was responsible in
large part for the successful social arrangements of
the society which included a fall formal and after-
show party. Secretary Joan Bruce and Production'
Manager, Duncan McFayden were conscientious and
capable in their respective offices.
The business staff again maintained their customary effciency. It was largely through their efforts that
the production enjoyed the largest financial profit in
the history of the club. Capable business manager
was Fred Middleton. George Robinson handled advertising and Ronald White was ticket manager.
Dr. W. L. MacDonald, Honorary President, assisted
the Musical Director, while Mr. E. V. Young and Professor Walter Gage handled the dramatic direction
efficiently.
Professor Walter Gage in Characteristic Pose.
at production of "H.M.S. Pinafore
55
47 Left to right—Jim McCulloch. Bob Murray, AL Johnstone, Frances White.   Left to right—Dennis Leong, SidPoulton, Leonard Korsch,
Budy Estey. Centre, Vocalist Frances White.
The orchestra takes the down-beat. .
Started last year under the able guidance of Gil
Clark, the orchestra made rapid headway in convincing students of their playing ability. This year,
under the baton of likeable Sid Poulton, the boys have
soared to undreamed heights in popularity, and are
fast becoming one of the best musical aggregations
in the city.
Now, with their own public address system, new
uniforms, and a large library of music, the "band" is
set to conquer the city.
Tabbed the "Poulcats" by the Ubyssey, the orchestra
is composed of ten pieces. The saxophone section
is made up of Sid Poulton, Dennis Leong, Leonard
Korsch, and Bud Estey, with Sid taking the "hot"
tenor breaks.
Back in the brass section Al Johnstone and Bob
Murray handle the trumpets, with Jim McCulloch
featured on trombone.
The rhythm section has Johnny Fletcher on piano,
George Reifel, drums, and Leo Foster, bass fiddle.
Arrangements are handled by Fletcher, Leong and
McCulloch, with vocal choruses going to Sid and
Frances White, the band's "songbird."
48 Upper.   Cheer leaders at half-time.     Lower.    Entire  roster  with  University  mascot.
Going Up.
Mamooks - they cheer us on
Behind every megaphone, behind every concerted
cheer at games, behind every dance in Brock Hall,
behind every club sign, stand the Mamooks, a group
of university minded students intent on raising "college spirit."
When some club wants to advertise a meeting, the
Mamooks paint them a sign, then broadcast over the
public address system which carries to Brock Hall
lounge and the Caf.
When one of the classes wants to put on a dance
in Brock Hall, or the Artsmen stage a Mixer, the
Mamooks advertise it, decorate the Hall, and provide
checkroom service.
Yell leaders are provided at basketball and football
games. This year, they instigated a novel idea by
having co-eds as cheer leaders, with Buddy Graham
and June Hewitson taking the honours. Al Dean was
accorded praise for his spirited leading, while Terry
Parsons drew accolades for his M.C.'ing.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Dr. J. Allen Harris; President, Harry Warner;
Secretary-Treasurer, Charles Carncross; Master of
Ceremonies, Terry Parsons; Yell King, Jack Caldwell.
Glamour-gal cheer leaders.
49 Verna MacKenzie
"Varsity Time"
is on the air
A definite rise in the calibre of "Varsity Time"
programs this year followed a change in policy of
the Radio Society—that of concentrating on the study
of the technique of radio and voice cultivation, and
producing fewer programs of a higher standard.
Weekly campus news broadcasts were replaced
after Christmas by the "Personality Parade" series
which depicted academic and extra-curricular activities of outstanding undergrads, and followed the
careers of well-known graduates. "Cavalcade of
U.B.C." presented the history of the University since
its inception, its humble beginnings in Fairview, and
its various campaigns, in dramatic form. A 'spot'
broadcast from the campus publicized the premier
of the Players' Club's presentation of the G.B.S. epic,
"Candida" in March. The club co-operated with the
Homecoming committee in its Potlatch for the grads,
and with the Film Society night show, supplying
script and competent announcers.
The co-operaton of the staff and management of
radio station CJOR, over which all of this year's programs were presented, was invaluable.
Policy and production work this year was in the
hands of dark-eyed Verna MacKenzie, Program
Director. Pierre Berton as chief announcer, Louis
Monasch as chief technician, and Janet Walker as
secretary, worked tirelessly throughout the year.
Albert Miller gained an enviable reputation by his
individual style in the sports announcing department-
handling the P.A. during several games throughout
the year with Jim McCarry. Bill Wilbur and Don
McMillan collaborated on research work on the
"Personality Parade."
Announcers were Jack McEwan, Harry Darley, Bob
Wallace, Stu Madden, Bill Wilbur, and Don McMillan. Script was handled by Pierre Berton, Verna
MacKenzie, and Leslie Bewley.
Stu Maddln, Jack McEwan, BUI Wilbur, and Don McMillan
Harry Darley, Pierre Berton and Albert Miller.
50 Bob Bonner.
Art Fojiks.
Austin Delaney.
Elspeth Munro.
. Masters of oratory on the campus
Baron Tradition is Mr. Chairman, and the Parliamentary Forum is his castle. Mr. Chairman plunks
the slanting, mahogany-coloured speaker's rostrum
in the centre of the long table.
Mr. Chairman looks critically at his audience. A
banana, its four peels drooping down, protrudes from
the mouth of one student. Another chews upon an
egg sandwich.   All regard Mr. Chairman warily.
McGoun Debaters.
Mr. Chairman taps sharply on the rostrum with his
pencil .... and the pencil becomes gavel, the
chairman becomes Mr. Speaker, and the gluttonous
undergraduates become Members of the House.
Fortnightly, the. Parliamentary Forum of the
University of British Columbia holds its traditional
campus debates. The tradition was maintained this
year; members took turns as Leader of the House
and Leader of the Opposition.
U.B.C. held an exchange symposium debate with
U. of W. early in the year on the general subject
"American Foreign Policy". To Seattle: Fouks and
Bonner.   At home:   Munro and Delany.
Of three City League Debates, the Forum won two.
Forumites' Valhalla is the McGoun Cup Debate,
held this year on January 17. Won at home against
Saskatchewan: Munro and Delany. Lost at Winnipeg against Manitoba: Fouks and Bonner. Said
President Fouks ruefully: "Those Manitoba boys
are certainly smooth."
The Forum is "daddy" to two offspring—Men's and
Women's Public Speaking Clubs; chaired by Forum
regulars.
Executive of the year: President, Arthur Fouks;
Vice-presidents, Archie Bain, Andrew Roddan; Secretary, Elspeth Munro; Publicity, Arvid Backman.
51 The silent screen lives again .
Holmes Gardiner, Ian Cameron
Rejuvenated after a lapse of inactivity, the Film
Society presented a varied program to student audiences. Under the guidance of Ray Foster the society
was able to bring such attractions as "Jane Eyre",
"Raffles", "Les Miserables", and numerous other
entertaining and educational films to the campus, as
well as continuing with the work entailed in preparing the University Documentary films. They were
fortunate in having the National Film Society library
at their disposal.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Dr. D. O. Evans; President, Ray Foster;
Vice-President, Verna MacKenzie; Secretary, Maureen
Evans; Publicity, Les Bewley; Music, Lister Sinclair
and Jack Deithers.
. Forerunners of Faculty of Law
Few members of the Law Society believe in the
doctrine of re-incarnation. But the Society itself does.
It has died more than once, but it has always been
born again. It was bom again this year.
Previous members have wrestled with two bogeys:
a small membership, and no hope of the establishment of a Faculty of Law at the university. This
year's Law Society has a listed membership of
eighteen; its principal aim is a Faculty of Law for
the University of British Columbia, the only large
Canadian university now without facilities for legal
training.
Minor alterations were made to the Society's constitution by a committee empowered to make recommendations to the membership earlier in the year.
As a result, freshmen are now eligible for membership in the Society.
Several prominent local barristers accepted the
invitation of the executive to address the members
of the Society. These series of talks were part of the
Society's plans to acquaint its members with all
phases of law and legal training. Noted cases and
judgments of history were re-enacted by members
of the Society as part of a pre-legal study plan.
*
"
%
i II
i
<$
***** ■•
Hugh Ritchie, Charles CottereL Doug Hume. Art Fouks.
Executive members: President, Hugh Ritchie;
Vice-president, Charles Cotterell; Secretary-treasurer,
Douglas Hume; Educational Director, Don Ross.
52 Student journalists at work . .
53 John M. Margeson, Editor-in-Chief Publications Board
students of the news they had or should have made.
The passing of yet another journalistic milestone
was marked in January, 1940, when the Ubyssey
appeared, decked entirely in a new streamlined
format. The result of hours of labour spent by senior
editor Pierre Berton, who scanned American papers
such as the New York Post, the new make-up transformed the campus chronicle into the most readable
college paper in Canada. Briefly, the style consisted
of the taking out of column rules, and the use of
'whirligig' make-up, and plenty of front page pictures.
Reigning supreme over his brood was Jack Marge-
son, who, as editor-in-chief of Publications, maintained
a calm dignity while keeping straining scriveners
from youthful foibles. Jack established somewhat of
a record around Pub precincts by being editor in his
junior year, and yet managing to remain an honour
student.
Perhaps the two most important events in Pub history this year, excluding the radical change in make-
This year . . . 2650 students made news
Firmly ensconsed in the lavish surroundings of
their Brock Hall offices, tapping typewriters to the
latest boogie beat, the 1940-41 stock of campus journalists recorded the news made by undergraduates,
and even, as is their wont, made news themselves.
From the sumptuous setting "in the depths of old Brock
Hall", to quote the new Pub song, forty issues of the
Ubyssey,  campus  semi-weekly,  emerged to inform
Edna Winram, Friday Editor.
Pierre Berton. Tuesday Editor.
up, were the Forum Debate and the writing of the
Pub Song,
Challenged by the Parliamentary Forum to defend
the resolution "Resolved that the Ubyssey justifies its
expense to the students of U.B.C", the pubsters marshalled all the oratory in their power, chose Pierre
Berton as their spokesman, and marched defiantly
54 into Arts 100 to win victory over McGoun Cup debater
Austin Delany.
Personalities in the Pub this year were more diverse
than at any other time. Presiding at the "Doomsday
Book" was industrious, society-consious Janet Walker, news manager. Subsidiary to this task, but far
more important in the eyes of campus swains, was
her writing of "Mary Ann", columnistic mudpack.
Extremes in personality were represented in the
two senior editors Pierre Berton and Edna Winram.
Bustling Berton and his newsy nose found his way
into every nook and cranny on the campus, did
radical things with page make-up, and Darwin's
missing link. Winram, calm, immobile, put out hei
paper, bore "Chang Suey", climbed mountains.
Archie Paton, methodical sports editor, injected
much-needed vitality into the back page, earned the
distinction of sponsoring a successful "Chink" contest, a not-so-successful quiz, and a basketball game
for the McPhee memorial fund.   Able assistance was
Manager, assisted by Allison McBain, capably
flooded the campus with Ubysseys.
Working in conjunction with the senior editors were
associate editors Bob Morris and Doris Filmer-Bennett,
assistant editors Marg Reid, Marion MacDonald, Jack
Ferry, Jack McMillan, and Lucy Berton, and reporters
Les Bewley, Andy Snaddon, Adam Waldie. Helga
Jarvi handled the role of secretary with great dispatch, doing notable work on the cut files.
The greatest drawing card of the Ubyssey was the
column, the Mummery, written by honour student
Eric Nicol, under the pseudonym of Jabez. By far the
most humourous collection of writing ever to appear
in the paper, the Mummery weekly panicked its
undergraduate audience.
Pat Keatley's Fruit Salad was just that—a little bit
of everything (mostly screwball and innuendo), while
Lister Sinclair's "Pearl Castings" and Jack Grant's
"New Needles in Old Grooves" attempted to sustain
a certain intellectual standard in discussing topics of
and read it in the Ubyssey
■*3\
Archie Paton. sports editor.
given by newcomer Jack McKinlay, and by Chuck
Claridge, Jack Mathieson, Jack Ferry, Helen Matheson, and Jean Eckhardt.
Notable work was done by C.U.P. editor Arvid
Backman, who, with the assistance of Lloyd Williams
and Ken Wardroper, covered the news of other Canadian  universities.     Bob   Menchions  as   Circulation
Janet Walker. News Manager.
55 Bill Backman
Eric (Jabex) NicoL
. . . a product of student journalism
current interest.
Surprise of the year, from the standpoint of both
students and the English Department, was the Literary Supplement brought out in March under the
editorship of Jack McMillan.
Including poetry and prose, the entries were
judged by Thorlief Larsen of the Department with
book prizes being awarded to winning entrants. Bill
Dawe's sonnets placed first in the poetry section,
while Lister Sinclair won the prose prize.
Cameramen Bill Grand and Dave Waddell were
on the spot with their flash bulbs throughout the
year.
Marg Reid, Jack McMillan and Bob Morris edit copy.
Marlon MacDonald, Helen Matheson—Co-ed Sports.
56 mgjr^jprr
Betty Quick, editor
Campus memories holdfast
Lionel Salt Associate Editor.
Like its Indian namesake of old, the Totem is the
tribal record of U.B.C.'s 2650 students. Modern flash
cameras and typewriters have taken the place of
flinten hatchets and yellow ochre, and up-to-date engraving, printing and binding, have placed The
Totem of today on a far higher plane than its primitive forbear. But the purpose of the Totem that of producing a permanent record of the activities and
achievements of the tribe, has changed little.
Settled in the Publications tepee, the 1941 Totem
scribes have laboured with modern tools to carve out
a picture of student life at the University of British
Columbia. That they should have achieved their task
to a greater degree of completeness than their pre
decessors is a tribute not only to the present group,
but also to those of former years who laid the foundations of progress.
The undergraduate reader, as he carelessly flips
the pages of his leather bound Totem, is too apt to
take the volume for granted. Each page of the book
represents the careful planning and painstaking toil
on the part of the students whose self appointed job
it is to publish The Totem for the benefit of their
fellows.
To Betty Quick, diminutive, hard working co-ed
editor, must go part of the credit for the success of the  1941  Totem.    It was only after Betty's
Budd Devlin, Photography Editor.
57 BUI Grand
Gordon McDonald
Dave Waddell
as student sons of "Sho-you-hwa
55
arrival at University in the fall term that she found
herself in the position of Editor left vacant by
the entrance of Hampton Gray into the Navy. But,
though the task was great, Betty shouldered the responsibility with courage and resourcefulness. Working with a staff greatly depleted by campus military
training, Betty sacrifced other activities to make the
Totem a credit to U.B.C.
First lieutenant on the Totem staff was associate
editor Lionel Salt. A former Ubyssey mainstay,
Lionel left the paper to devote full time to the yearbook, spending most of his waking hours poring
over dummy forms at the engravers.
The Khaki theme of war is threaded through the
pages of this year's Totem— war reflected in the steel
helmet of the Totem mascot, Sho-You Hwa. It has
been the purpose of the editors to show the influence
of war on campus life.
This year, more than ever before, pictures have told
the story, and the men behind the lenses have had a
full-time job on their hands. Photography editor Budd
Devlin, and associates Bill Grand, Dave Waddell and
Bob McAllister have become familiar campus figures.
No major event has occurred during the session that
was not covered with professional thoroughness by
Totem photographers. When not actively engaged in
flashing pictures, they spent their time in a newly constructed darkroom, turning out stacks of glossy prints
for the engravers. Dorothy Gillies as photography
secretary worked faithfully and well making appointments.
Brunt of the literary work was borne by a small
group of writers whose task it was to chronicle the
activities of the 1941 students. Working under Features Editor Pierre Berton was a competent staff which
included Les Bewley, Jack McMillan and Jack Mar-
geson. Class write-ups were handled by Honoree
Young who was assisted by a willing staff. Maureen
Evans was in charge of the club section while Phyllis
Ne Metz handled re-writes.
Honoree Young and Staff.
Les Bewley
Maureen Evans
58 Tommy Meredith
Excellence of the sports section was maintained by
Gordon McDonald who gave complete coverage to
Varsity's curtailed program of sports events.
Advertisements, the life blood of any yearbook,
were in the hands of business manager Tommy Meredith and advertising manager Keith Porter. Assistants included Gordon Wallace and Mary Frank Atkin.
The sale of Totem advertising was more than satisfactory in keeping the book "out of the red."
Mention should be made of the men whose skilled
workmanship is unceasingly at work to make the
book worthy of student attention. Harold Kent, layout expert, and Ron Jackson, of the art department
at Cleland-Kent Engraving, and printer Charlie
Phillips, of Ward and Phillips, spared no effort to
fashion a technically perfect Totem.
Keith Porter
Jim McCarry
. produce their 26th year book
Betty   Muir,   Audrey   Jones,   Jean   Clugston.
Mary Frank Atkin, Doug Moloney. Keith Porter.
Bill Gilmour.
59 Cornelia Burke, Lucy Berton. Kay Augustine. Mary Drury.
Edna Winram, Maureen Evans, Marion McDonald.
The great difficulty with contacting a University
friend is, of course, that the phone number is registered
under the parent's name.
But with the efficient staff of directory-ites busily
pouring over files, filled in by students in September,
the Directory takes shape, is published, and sold at a
very nominal fee.
Regarded by pubsters as just one mass of routine
typing, checking, and re-checking, the book is used
assidiously by those wise enough to procure copies.
Perhaps the greatest use made of the book is by
club executives who can easily find the numbers oi
their members to inform them of coming meetings.
Under the direction of Editor Edna Winram, who
instituted a fool-proof checking system this year,
the large staff was composed of: Kay Augustine and
Pocket date bureau
The perpetual worry of getting the right phone
number has been taken from the hands of U.B.C.
students by members of the Publications Board who
each year edit the Student Directory, a compilation of
phone numbers of every undergraduate registered
at the University.
Cornelia Burke, assistant editors, and assistants Mary
Drury, Maureen Evans, Adam Waldie, Helen van der
Bogart, David Monro, Jean Cushing, Bunny Boale,
Bob Morris, Bunny Finch, Doug. Christie, and Marion
MacDonald. The cover was designed by Joan Thompson.
Students' "Who's Who
55
Despite an active orientation scheme advanced by
Council, there are innumerable items of interest concerning life of the University about which the ordinary freshman would know nothing—if it were not for
the Tillicum.
The Tillicum, or as it used to be called, the Handbook, is that little brochure all freshmen get when they
buy their green regalia in September.
Within its pages lies a wealth of information concerning every activity that takes place on the campus.
Summaries of university rules, eligibility requirements,
reviews of clubs, fraternities, and sororities, items of
note on athletics, and names of student executives are
all contained in the book.
This year, the editor, Archie Paton, departed from
the usual staid make-up, injected a little life, made it
easier to read, inserted pictures of campus personalities, and changed the name from "Handbook" to
"Tillicum" to fit in with the Thunderbird motif of the
University.
Since the Tillicum must be ready for publication by
the time students arrive on the campus in September,
most of the work on the book must be done during
the summer months. Assisting on the editorial staff
were Edna Winram, Barbara Newman, and Cornelia
Burke.
Barbara Newman, Archie Paton, Cornelia Burke
Centre: Edna Winram.
60 1—Salt Kent, Quick and Grand stage year-book orgy. 2—Gillies, Devlin and Salt put heads together. 3—Reporters congregate. 4—
Ormle Hall and McKinlay argue. 5—Honoree Young in usual happy mood. 6—Phyllis Ne Metz goes peasant 7—"Quickie" emerges
from Totem den. 8—Margeson and Fouks caught in interview. 9—Informality always in Pub. 10—Berton, Salt and Kent survey pictures.
11—Hugh Aiken and Lionel relax on desk. 12—Bill Grand, veteran photographer, goes quietly mad. 13—Lanky Dave Waddell and
ever-present camera.    14—Business manager  Meredith hoists  photog. Devlin.    15—Berton edits Ubyssey under scrutiny.    16—Betty, Bill
Verna.    17—Inseparables—Paton and McKinlay.
61 I
II United, students and Faculty
solve problems of. . .
I President L. S. KLINCK
Who's Who has him listed as Klinck, Leonard S.—educator. But to
every student who has passed through the portals of U.B.C. since 1919,
he is listed in their minds and hearts as President Klinck, friend, advisor,
and educator.
No one knows him better as a friend and advisor than the undergraduates of today. With the problem of military training engaging the
attention of all male students, the President is giving unstintingly of his
time and thought to a harmonious adjustment of the students to the demands which military training rightly impose.
President Klinck entered the field of education in 1903 when he
graduated from the University of Toronto (Guelph) with a B.S.A. degree,
becoming a lecturer at Iowa State College in 1904. The following year
he obtained his M.S.A. from that institution and was appointed head of
the Cereal Husbandry department of Macdonald College.
In 1914 he came west to U.B.C. as Dean of Agriculture and professor
of Agronomy, a post he held until 1919, when, on the death of Dr. F. F.
Wesbrook, he was appointed president, a position he has held ever since.
President Klinck is a Fellow of the Canadian Society of Technical
Agriculturists, received his D.Sc. of Iowa State College, LLP, of Western
Ontario, and has received the Order of Agricultural Merit and Officier
de l'lnstruction Publique.
64 Chancellor R. E. McKECHNIE
In this streamlined age of specialization a man who can do one job
well is considered a success. To accomplish success in two undertakings
is to be a genius. We offer you, then, U.B.C.'s lovable genius, Robert E.
McKechnie, one of B.C.'s foremost medical men, and Chancellor of the
University.
This dual personality lies lightly on the still straight shoulders of the
Chancellor, for he has been practicing medicine for fifty years, and has
just completed his 23rd term as the University's chancellor.
Robert E. McKechnie was born in Brockville, Ontario, attending Prince
of Wales College, and taking medicine at McGill. He graduated from
McGill, a gold medalist, with the degrees M.D., CM., in 1890, and soon
after came west to B.C. He was made municipal and provincial health
officer at Nanaimo, and in 1898-99 sat in the House as a member for
Nanaimo City.
His interest in U.B.C. sprang from an ambition of his own student
days, when his greatest dream was to become a member of a university
faculty. In 1912, he was elected to the Senate formed by the Provincial
Government to set the wheels of organization moving. When Chancellor
F. L. Carter-Cotton died in 1918, Dr. McKechnie was chosen as his successor, a post he has held ever since.
65 G. T. C. Cunningham. A E. Lord, Dr. Evelyn F. Farris, Pres. L. S. Klinck. Chancellor R. E. McKechnie. J. R. Clearihue, P. R. Bengough,
The Honorable Mr. Justice Denis Murphy, W. G. Murrin, Miss A. B. Jamieson
Board of Governors
Several of the most important matters pertaining
to university administration fall under the supervision of this group of ten citizens which meets on
the last Monday of every month in the Administration
Building.
Their function is chiefly financial, including the
establishment of bursaries, and the acceptance of
scholarships and gifts. They maintain campus
buildings, boulevards and grounds and sanction the
erection of new buildings on the campus. Their most
important duty, however, is the appointment of the
whole staff of the university and the right to limit
attendance.
The board contains a varied personnel, including
graduates, lawyers, and business men—in fact, most
of the professions have at some time been represented on the board.
Two of the members are ex-officio, three are chosen
from the University Senate, and the remaining six
are appointed for six year terms by the Lieutenant-
Governor-in- Council.
The chairman of the board since 1918 has been
Chancellor R. E. McKechnie, while President L. S.
Klinck is the other ex-officio member of the board.
Elected by the Senate are: A. E. Lord, city solicitor;
Miss A. B. Jamieson, retired teacher; and Mrs.
Evelyn Farris.
The six members of the board appointed by the
Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council are: Percy R. Bengough, secretary of the Vancouver Trades and Labor
Council; George T. Cunningham, of the Cunningham
Drug Company; W. G. Murrin, president of the B.
C. E. R. Co.; Honorable Mr. Justice Denis Murphy,
and Joseph Badenoch Clearihue, Victoria lawyer.
These citizens guide the university through the
tangles of business. Their's is a great task, that of
keeping the university spirit alive through the years.
It is a great responsibility—in capable hands.
66 In charge of education . . .
<^^X**m?
67 Heading the Faculty of Arts and Science is
Dean D. BUCHANAN
Much maligned in this age of specialization, the
Arts and Science Faculty still composes the bulk of
the undergraduate body at U.B.C. It is a tradition
that Applied Science and Agriculture students mock
Artsmen because of the diversity of their courses,
and their lack of "spirit", while they themselves bask
in the sun of a specialized, pigeon-holed profession.
Because of its universal appeal, the faculty Arts
and Science has the reputation for harbouring the
educational riff-raff who come to college merely to
put in time, patronized by plutocratic parents. That
is the reputation.
In actuality, this froth of the dilettante form but a
small minority in Arts. Go below the surface, and
there you will find the Citizens of Tomorrow.
The high school teacher, the medical student, the
social service worker, the lawyer, the economist, the
journalist of tomorrow—the student of Arts of today.
who is assisted by
HENRY F. ANGUS
MAXWELL A. CAMERON
W. A. CLEMENS
•C. E. DOLMAN
Economics
Education
Zoology
Bacteriology and Preventive
B.fl. (McGill), B.C.L., M.A. (Oxon),
M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Toronto),
M.A.   (Toronto),  Ph.Dv   (Cornell),
Medicine
F.R.S.C.
(Acting Head)
F.R.S.C.
M.R.C.S.   (England),   M.B.,  B.S.,
M.R.C.P., D.P.H., Ph.D. (London)
68 and . . .
DAVID  OWEN  EVANS
Modern Languages'
M.A.,   D.Phil.   (Oxon.),  D.  Lett.
(Univ. oi Paris)
ANDREW H. HUTCHINSON
Botany
M.A. (McMaster), PhDd. (Chicago,
F.R.S.C.
J. A. IRVING
Philosophy and Psychology
M.A.  (Toronto),  M.A.  (Cambridge)
ELLIS  H.  MORROW
Commerce
B.A. (Queen's), M.B.A. (Harvard)
The war, that omnipresent cloud on every horizon,
will have as great effect on the future of these as on
that of any scientist; the need for trained services will
be as fevered in the education of tomorrow's youth
as in the building of tomorrow's bridge.
Today, the coffers of the nation are being depleted.
Tomorrow, they must be replenished. Reconstruction,
the hope of Science, is impossible without finance.
The way to that influx of funds lies only through the
income of these men and women who will go out to
reconstruct the business world which operates, or has
operated, so successfully in symbiosis with Science.
That is why Artsmen can laugh off the derisive
jeers of Science and Agriculture, why they can continue on their diverse ways. Tomorrow they sign the
cheques that set the wheels of science moving.
And so they delve into the past histories of forgotten nations, peruse intently lines written by a
feverish author, graph statistical charts of the drop
in the sale of peanuts during the winter months,
study conditions in slum areas, record the extracurricular activities of the university in the college
paper, and smile condescendingly at Science.
Sure we need bridges and wheat crops. But who
foots the bill? . . .
with . . .
W. N. SAGE
History
B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Oxon),
Ph.D. (Toronto), F.R. Hist. S., F.R.S.C.
G. G .SEDGEWICK
English
B.A.  (Dal.), Ph.D. (Harvard)
LEMUEL ROBERTSON
Classics
A.A.  (McGill)
>>\
69 Students of Applied Science study under
Dean J. FINLAYSON
Increased importance of the Applied Science
faculty at this and other Canadian universities has
been forecast in view of the present war-time demand
for trained engineers, and it is now becoming obvious
to the general public just how much our modern
world leans upon these skilled scientists in a time
of crisis.
According to affable Dean J. N. Finlayson of the
Applied Science Faculty graduates in Science this
year will be able to pick and choose their positions
in the electrical, mining, mechanical, civil and
forestry engineering services.
During the present conflict, there is a special wealth
of opportunity for advancement in the R.C.A.F., for
with a thorough knowledge of radio and electronics,
science graduates could qualify to take over special
radio stations.
Civil and Metallurgical Engineers also can qualify
for posts in the Airforce as Special Airforce Examiners, while the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer
and his colleagues
ROBERT H. CLARK
Chemistry
M.A.   (Toronto),  Ph.D.   (Leipzig),
F.R.S.C.
F. MALCOLM KNAPP
Forestry
B.S.F.   (Syracuse),   M.S.F.  (Wash.)
HECTOR JOHN MACLEOD
Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering
B.Sc.   (McGill),   M.Sc.   (Alberta),
A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard),Ac. M.A.I.E.E.,
M.E.I.C.,   F.A.A.A.S.
GORDON MERRITT SHRUM
Physics
M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), F.R.S.C.
70 and
J. M. TURNBULL
Mining and Metallurgy
B.A.Sc. (McGill)
M. Y. WILLIAMS
Geology and Geography.
B.ASc.   (Queen's).   Ph.D.   (Vale),
F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C.
Reserve is also taking mechanical, electrical and
mining engineers.
A perhaps greater need for trained scientists will
arise in the post-war re-construction period, however,
and it is actually towards the goal of training enough
men to take over this gigantic task of building again
world that has come to depend so greatly on
science, that the faculty is moving.
However, too much emphasis must not be placed
a
upon science in wartime, for its true merits lie in its
peace time accomplishments so commonplace today
as to become part of that vast field of Things Taken
For Granted.
A friendly spirit of cameraderie is maintained between the professors and undergrads in the Applied
Science faculty, for it is the feeling of Dean Finlayson
that a proper understanding between the two is
essential in student training.
In charge of the Faculty of Agriculture is
Dean F. CLEMENT
71 who receives support from
A. F. BARSS
Horticulture
B.B. (Rochester), B.S. in Agriculture
(Cornell), M.S. (Oregon Agricultural
College), Ph.D. (Chicago)
BLYTHE EAGLES
Dairying
B.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Toronto)
Along with Applied Science, the Agriculture Faculty is looking forward to an increased demand for
trained men in the science of agriculture, and is
taking 'every step possible toward having those
trained men available.
The enrollment this year is the biggest on record
in Agriculture, and it is becoming apparent that
students are recognizing the possible fields in store
for a trained agriculturist.
The increased work in Agriculture lies not so much
with the war period but rather the post-war period of
reconstruction, when trained services will be needed
to replenish the world's supply of essential food
supplies, so exhausted by the present conflict.
H. M. KNG
Animal Husbandry
B.S.A.   (Toronto),   M.S.   (Oregon
Agricultural College)
Along with the task of pushing Canada's production even higher than at present, will come that of
lending assistance to European countries where, if
modern economists can be trusted, famine is sure to
follow in the wake of war.
Every man in agriculture is preparing for this peace
time rehabilitation, and it is to the credit of the
entire professional staff, headed so capably by Dean
F. M. Clement, that they are meeting the added
imposition so cheerfully.
Agriculture, the "growing" faculty, is moving into
its deserved position alongside that of Arts and
Applied Science.
and . . .
E. A. LLOYD
Poultry Husbandry
B.S.A. (Sask.) M.S.A. (Washington
State College)
G. G MOE
Agronomy
B.S.A.   (McGill),   Ph.D.   (Cornell)
72 Co-eds come for counsel to
Dean M. BOLLERT
Diplomat, father-confessor, gracious hostess, and
advisor: that is the daily task of a university's dean of
women, and in Mary L. Bollert U.B.C. is fortunate in
having the personification of all these graces.
Dean Bollert came to U.B.C. in 1921 with a fine
record of achievement in educational and women's
work. Graduating from University of Toronto with
honours in modern languages, Miss Bollert went to
Columbia University in New York where she received
her master's degree in Education and English. At
Columbia she was instructor in English.
During her residence in New York, Miss Bollert became interested in the problems besetting co-eds who
were enrolling at universities in greater numbers every
year, and she made an exhaustive survey of the
woman's place in the business world.
Dean Bollert was called to her present post in 1921
from Regina College, where she had spent four highly successful years organizing the college's women's
department. Many are the honours which have been
bestowed upon this gracious lady, whose main purpose in life for the past twenty years has been to
counsel the young women who attend the University.
New monarch of the Library is
Dr. KAYE LAMB
Dr. Lamb took over the position of Librarian last
September when it was announced that John Rid-
dington, with the university since its inception, was
planning to retire.
Stepping into the shoes of our beloved "King John"
was a difficult task for any man, but if one year is
enough to form an opinion, U.B.C. has no cause to
worry about the capabilities of Dr. Lamb.
He spent seven years in all in undergraduate and
graduate studies at U.B.C, and was employed by
Mr. Riddington as a student assistant in the Library
back in 1925.
Before coming back to his Alma Mater, Dr. Lamb
spent seven years as Provincial Archivist and
Librarian in Victoria. Along with his busy schedule
in the Library, Dr. Lamb is editor of the B.C. Historical
Quarterly.
73 Faculty strives for perfection
Department oi Agricultural Economics
F. M. CLEMENT, B.S.A., M.A.
Department oi Agronomy
G. G. MOE, B.S.A., M.Sc, Ph.D.
D. G. LAIRD, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D.
VERNON C. BRINK, M.S.A.
Department  oi  Animal Husbandry
H. M. KING, B.S.A., M.S.
STANLEY N. WOOD, B.S.A., D.V.M.
J. C. BERRY, M.S.A., Ph.D.
Department oi Bacteriology and
Preventative Medicine
C. E.   DOLMAN,   M.R.C.S.,   M.B.,   B.S.,
M.R.C.P., D.P.H., Ph.D.
D. C. B. DUFF, M.A., Ph.D.
LAWRENCE E. RANTA, M.D., D.P.H.
D. G. B. MATHIAS, B.A.
Department oi Botany
ANDREW H. HUTCHINSON, M.A., Ph.D.,
F R S C
FRANK DICKSON, B.A., Ph.D.
JOHN DAVIDSON, F.L.S., F.B.S.E.
JOHN ALLARDYCE, M.A., Ph.D.
E. MIRIAM R. ASHTON, B.Sc, M.A.
Department oi Chemistry
ROBERT H. CLARK, M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C.
F.R.S.C.
E.  H.   ARCHIBALD,  B.Sc,  A.M.,  Ph.D.,
F.R.S.E. & C.
W. F. SEYER, B.A., M.Sc, Ph.D.
M.A.I.Ch.E.
M. J. MARSHALL, M.Sc, Ph.D.
WILLIAM URE, M.A.Sc, Ph.D.
J. ALLEN HARRIS, M.A., Ph.D.
Department oi Civil Engineering
JOHN  N. FINLAYSON, M.Sc,  M.E.I.C,
M.Am.Soc.C.E., LLD.
ALLAN H. FINLAY, B.A.Sc, M.S. in CE.
A. LIGHTHALL, B.Sc
J. FRED MUIR, B.Sc.
EDWARD S. PRETIOUS, B.A.Sc, M.Sc.
ARCHIE PEEBLES, B.A.Sc, B.A., M.Sc.
ALEXANDER HRENNIKOFF, M.A.Sc
J. B. ALEXANDER, M.Sc.
Department oi Classics
LEMUEL ROBERTSON, M.A.
O. J. TODD, Ph.D.
PATRICK C F. GUTHRIE, B.A., M.A.
MISS JEAN M. AULD, B.A., M.A.
GEOFFREY B. RIDDEHOUGH, M.A.
Department oi Commerce
ELLIS H. MORROW, B.A., M.B.A.
ARCHIBALD W. CURRIE, B.A., B.Com.,
M.B.A.,  Dr. Com. Sc.
FREDERICK HELD, C.A.
Department oi Dairying
BLYTHE EAGLES, B.A., Ph.D.
MRS. OLGA VOLKOFF, M.A.
Department oi Economics. Political
Science and Sociology
HENRY F.  ANGUS, B.A., B.C.L.,  M.A.,
F.R.S.C
G. F. DRUMMOND, MA., M.Sc.
C   W.   TOPPING,   B.A.,   S.T.D.,   A.M.,
Ph.D.
JOSEPH A. CRUMB, B.B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
Department oi Education
GEORGE M. WEIR, B.A., M.A., D.Paed.
MAXWELL A. CAMERON, M.A., Ph.D.
D. H. RUSSELL, B.Sc, M.Ed., Ph.D.
Department oi English
G. G. SEDGEWICK, B.A., Ph.D.
W. L. McDONALD, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
FREDERICK G. C WOOD, B.A., A.M.
THORLIEF LARSEN, M.A., B.A., F.R.S.C.
MISS M. L. BOLLERT, M.A., A.M.
HUNTER CAMPBELL LEWIS, M.A.
MISS  DOROTHY  BLAKEY,  M.A.,  B.A.,
Ph.D.
EDMUND MORRISON, B.A., A.M.
MISS DOROTHY MAWDSLEY, B.A., M.A.
Ph.D.
F. E. L. PRIESTLEY, M.A., Ph.D.
JOHN H. CREIGHTON, M.A.
Department oi Forestry
F. MALCOLM KNAPP, B.S.F., M.S.F.
BRAHAM G. GRIFFITH, M.A., M.F., Ph.D.
THOMAS G. WRIGHT, B.F., M.F.
R. M. BROWN, B.Sc.F.
J. H. JENKINS, B.A.Sc
L. B. DIXON
WILLIAM BYERS
Department oi Geology and Geography
M. Y. WILLIAMS, B.Sc, Ph.D., F.G.S.A.,
PD C p
CLARENCE OTTO  SWANSON, MA.Sc,
Ph.D., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C
HENRY CECIL GUNNING, B.A.Sc, M.S.,
Ph.D., F.S.S.A., F.R.S.C
H.  V.  WARREN,  B.A.,  B.A.Sc,  D.Phil.,
F.G.S.A.
GORDON DAVIS, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Department oi History
W.  N.   SAGE,  B.A.,  M.A.,  Ph.D.,   F.R.
Hist. S., F.R.S.C
F. H. SOWARD, B.A., B.Litt.
A. C COOKE, B.A., M.A.
MISS   SYLVIA   THRUPP,   M.A.   Ph.D.,
F.R. Hist. S.
Department oi Horticulture
A. F. BARSS,  A.B.,  B.S.  in Agr., M.S.,
Ph.D.
G. H. HARRIS, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D.
FRANK E. BUCK, B.S.A.
Department oi Mathematics
DANIEL BUCHANAN, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.,
F R S C
F. S. NOWLAN, B.A., A.M., Ph.D.
RALPH HULL, M.A., Ph(D.
L. RICHARDSON, B.Sc
WALTER H. GAGE, M.A.
MISS MAY L. BARCLAY, M.A.
S. A. JENNINGS, M.A., Ph.D.
Department oi Mechanical and
Electrical Engineering
HECTOR JOHN MACLEOD, B.Sc, M.Sc,
A.M., Ph.D., M.A.I.E.E., M.E.I.C.
F.   W.   VERNON,   B.Sc. Eng.,   Wh. Sch.,
A.M.I. Mech. E.,   A.F.R.A.S.
S.   C   MORGAN,   B.Sc,   M Sc,   M.S.,
A.S.M.A.T.E.E.
W.   B.   COULTHARD,   B.Sc,   M.A.I.E.T.,
A.M.I.E.E.
W. O. RICHMOND, B.A.Sc, M.S.
H. M. McILROY, M.Sc
DANIAL W. THOMSON, B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc.
H. P. ARCHIBALD, B.A.Sc.
Department oi Mining and Metallurgy
J. M. TURNBULL, B.A.Sc
GEORGE A. GILLIES, M.Sc
FRANK A. FORWORD, B.A.Sc
Department oi Modern Languages
DAVID   OWEN  EVANS,   M.A.,   D.Phil.,
D.Lett.
A. F. B. CLARK, B.A., Ph.D.
MISS ISABEL MacINNES, M.A., Ph.D.
MISS JANET T. GREIG, B.A., M.A.
MISS DOROTHY DALLAS, M.A, D.Lett.
MISS JOYCE HALLAMORE, M.A., Ph.D.
RONALD HILTON, M.A.
CHARLES ERNEST BORDEN, M.A., Ph.D.
MADAME Y. DARLINGTON
Department oi Nursing and Health
C   E.   DOLMAN,   M.R.C.S.,   M.B.,   B.S.,
M.R.C.P., D.P.H., Ph.D.
MISS   MABEL   F.   GRAY,   R.N.,   Cert.
P.H.N.
MISS MARGARET E. KERR, R.N., B.A.Sc,
M.A.
MISS    GERALDINE    HOMFRAY,    R.N.,
B.A.Sc, M.A.
Department oi Philosophy and
Psychology
J. A. IRVING, M.A.
JOSEPH E. MORSH, B.A., Ph.D.
FREDERICK    THOMAS    TYLER,    B.Sc,
M.A., B.Ed., Ph.D.
Department oi Physics
GORDEN MERRITT SHRUM, M.A., Ph.D.,
F.R.S.C
A. E. HENNINGS, M.A., Ph.D.
A. M. CROOKER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
KENNETH C MANN, B.A., Ph.D.
GEORGE   MICHAEL   VOLKOFF,   M.A.,
Ph.D.
JOSEPH M. KELLER, B.Sc
Department oi Poultry  Husbandry
E. A. LLOYD, B.S.A., M.S.A.
JACOB BIELY, M.S.A., M.S.
Department oi Zoology
W. B. CLEMENS, M.A., Ph.D., R.S.C.
G. J. SPENCER, B.S.A., M.S.
IAN McTAGGART COWAN, B.A., Ph.D.
Department oi University Extension
GORDEN MERRITT SHRUM, M.A., Ph.D.,
F.R.S.C
MISS DOROTHY SOMERSET, A.B.
LEONARD CHATWIN
ROBERT T. MACKENZIE, B.A.
Department oi Health Service
STEWART MURRAY, M.D., D.P.H.
J. S. KITCHING, B.A., M.D., D.P.H.
GEORGE T. CUNNINGHAM, Esq.
MISS MURRIEL UPSHALL, R.N., B.A.Sc.
Physical Education
MISS GERTRUDE MOORE
MAURICE VAN VLIET, M.S.
74 Leaders of student body . . .
75 President Harold Lumsden
tribution the Society should make. The meeting
enthusiastically decided to sign waivers for the
returnable caution money, and to appoint a committee in charge of the Red Cross Campaign.
Dorothy Hird and her Women's Undergraduate
Society made a large contribution to the campaign
by instituting Self-Denial Day.
While the men received military training, the women worked at Red Cross work in a special sewing
room in Brock Hall. The Players' Club revival of
Pride and Prejudice, and the Greek Letter Red Cross
Ball, suggested by Ruth Wilson, made large contributions to the fund, which grew steadily during the
year by numerous other smaller campaigns.
The use of Brock Hall has been another feature of
Council policy this year. By lowering the rent and
by securing the opening of the building in the evenings and on Saturday afternoons, Council has
succeeded in making the building a centre for dances
and parties of all kinds, for record recitals, for music
Members of Student Council .
The Red Cross Campaign has been the outstanding
work of the Student Council this year. Because of
the increased seriousness of the War, the Council
believed that a greater effort than that of the previous
year was necessary, and therefore called cm Alma
Mater meeting early in the year to discuss the con-
appreciation lectures, and for bridge games and social meetings.
Harry Lumsden as President guided the Society
quietly, conservatively, and surely during the year.
Always conscientious and hard-working, he learned
the intricacies of student government and faced the
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Peter McTavish
Betty Bolduc
76 Bob Bonner
Tod Tremblay
Jim Harmer
Charlie Nash
problems that arose with the interests of the students
and of the University in mind.
The treasurer, Peter McTavish, faced cooly a difficult and exacting position as he endeavoured to wipe
out a bank overdraft and yet allow campus activities
full scope. Peter is an excellent pianist as well. Bob
Bonner as President of the L.S.E. watched all his
numerous clubs carefully, and temporarily suspended four that had not handed in reports of their activities. As a debater, he upheld the name of U.B.C. in
Winnipeg.
Dorothy Hird and Todd Tremblay, presidents of
W.U.S. and M.U.S. respectively, managed a great
deal of the Red Cross Campaign as well as numerous
other details in connection with discipline committees,
election committees, and so on. Their good humour
always made life happier at Council meetings.
Ruth Wilson, as level-headed and sensible as anyone on Council, looked after women's sports, and
Jim Harmer, an all-around athlete, did the same for
the men for a second year.
Secretary Betty Bolduc, an honor student in English,
was noted for the speed with which she could read
minutes.
Junior   Member,   of   course,   was   Charlie   Nash.
Charlie had a number of important jobs to do during
the year, such as arranging Homecoming and the
questionnaire on student finances, all of which he
did to everyone's satisfaction.
1940-41 was a year full of difficulties and problems
with regard to student administration and finances.
With a sane conservative policy, the Council walked
warily during the year, balancing opposing elements,
and doing whatever was possible to keep the name
of the University free from blame of any kind.
Although troubles arose that seemed insurmountable at the time, Council came through it all successfully.
J. M.
Dorothy Hird.
Ruth Wilson
77 Sandy Nash
Rex Parker
Ernest Harvey
lock Byers
Men's Undergraduate Society
Great White Fathers,
That's the Men's Undergraduate Society—more
often referred to us 'MUS'. Fathers indeed, for their
task of curbing the bubbling spirits of 500 unruly freshmen was no easy one.
Clad in a green dunce cap to disguise his true
identity, Todd Tremblay, head of the M.U.S. executive, weathered onslaughts from Sophomores and
Freshmen alike to referee the now famous Frosh-Soph
pushball game, first of its kind on the campus.
Once again the executive engineered the annual
Frosh reception at the Alma Academy—a strictly stag
affair save for the entertainers. All and sundry congratulated the body for their choice of program.
Task of the M.U.S. executive, that of filling out
U.B.C.'s complicated Social Calendar, was performed efficiently despite the Red Cross Ball which necessitated considerable juggling of dance dates.
The executive again acted as elections committee
on the campus. Sets of rules governing candidates
campaigns, size of posters, and length of election
speeches were prepared. Todd Tremblay chair-
manned the meetings which heard the various
candidates set forth their promises for the coming
session. On election days, ballot boxes were closely
guarded by the M.U.S. executive, coercion at the polls
suppressed.
This years executive included President, Todd
Tremblay; Rex Parker representing Science, Jock
Byers representing Agriculture, Sandy Nash representing Arts, and Ernest Harvey representing Commerce.
President Todd Tremblay
78 Jean Clugston, Lois Nicholson, Pat Carey.
Women's Undergraduate Society
War work, not the marching, the rifle drill, or the
first aid, but the knitting of socks, helmets, and bandages, became a major issue with U.B.C. co-eds this
year under the stirring direction of the Women's
Undergraduate Society.
Carrying on with much of its traditional work, the
President Dorothy Hird
Society yet found time to organize university women
into helping the local Red Cross bureau in caring
for the men overseas.
Two rooms were taken over in Brock Hall where
sheets were hemmed, felt slippers made from old
hats, singlets made, and knitting done.
First formal activity of the year came as early as
Freshman Week when Big Sisters piloted their Little
Sisters, or freshettes, through the maze of orientation.
Festivities wound up with the Freshette Supper in the
Caf, where the freshettes appeared in "baby dress,"
paid penalties for broken rules.
One of the most successful Hi-Jinx Parties in Society
history, the annual "stag" dance, was this year's
Air Raid party, with the co-eds appearing just as they
would be clad if an air raid warning were to sound
at two in the morning.
Biggest social achievement of W.U.S. was, however, the Co-ed Ball, held February 27 in Brock Hall.
It was a case of turnabout, with the women taking
the men, buying the corsages, and arranging for
transportation.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Dean Mary Bollert; President, Dorothy
Hird; Vice-President, Pat Carey; Secretary, Lois Nicholson; Treasurer, Jean Clugston; President of Phrateres, Nancy Carr.
79 Ken Eldridge. Sandy Nash. Doug Hume, Donald Buckland
Artsmen s Undergraduate Society
Revitalization . . .
Such was the motto of the energetic Artsmen's
Undergraduate Society during the 1940-41 session.
Goaded by the taunts of red-sweatered Sciencemen,
spurred to action by the student will, the executive of
the society, under the leadership of cheerful Sandy
Nash, determined to cast off the cloak of apathy, and
plan a definite program for the year.
The result was an ambitious program of mixer
dances held every two weeks in Brock Hall. Launched
with a gigantic pep meeting, the dances proved to be
a sensation with undergraduates who were seeking
inexpensive Saturday night entertainment. With
Sid Poulton's Varsity Dance Orchestra supplying the
music, record crowds turned out to every one of the
eight popular functions.
The mixers were not only responsible for the purchase of a cabinet model radio complete with record
attachment for Brock Hall, but also sent $125 in War
Savings Stamps to the Government as part of a contribution to the war effort.
Early in the year, the executive whipped up Arts
spirit by re-inaugurating Arts sweaters on the campus.
The smart blue and gold sweaters were worn by men
and women alike and formed a brilliant contrast to
Science red.
Working with the Aggie Undergraduate Executive,
the Artsmen sponsored the lavish Arts-Aggie Ball,
which, for the first time in years, cleared a profit.
Another highlight in the Arts schedule was the Arts
skit 'Cutting up a Scienceman' presented at the Homecoming Pot-Latch.
At the annual Arts elections held in March, the Arts-
men, by means of free coke and Sid Poulton's music,
obtained a quorum for the first time in years.
The executive was made up of: President, Sandy
Nash; Vice-president, Ken Eldridge; Secretary, Doug
Hume and Treasurer, Donald Buckland.
80 Rex Parker
Stan Harris
John Brynelson
Jim Robinson
John Beaty
Science Men's Undergraduate Society
For the first time in U.B.C.'s history, it has been impossible to gather all the Sciencemen together at one
time for noon hour pep meetings.
This has not however, affected the activities of
S.M.U.S., or the energy and enthusiasm of the Engineers, to any perceptible degree.
Noon hour C.O.T.C. lectures have cramped the
Sciencemen's style as far as noon hour pep meets
are concerned, but the red-sweatered Engineers
still have an imposing record of achievements to their
credit.
Always an active force on the campus, despite their
heavy timetable of lectures and labs, the Sciencemen
have provided the extra vitality so necessary for the
preservation of that nebulous "college spirit" to which
undergraduates continually refer, and are referred to.
During the Fall term, more than 350 Sciencemen
gathered in the Commodore cabaret for the annual
Fall banquet and listened to an informative talk on
"The Power of the Press" by George Wright, News-
Herald columnist.
Just before the annual Science class party in November, the Sciencemen revived the old S.M.U.S. pep
meet to whip up spirit for the affair. The dance was
held in Brock Hall.
Well on in February, Sciencemen marched en masse
to the offices of the Publications Board and completely
took over one issue of the Ubyssey. Clad in new
dress of bright red ink, the paper presented all phases
of Science activity from study to El Stuffo. Editor-in-
Chief for the issue was Arvid Backman, Ubyssey
veteran and prominent Engineer.
Mack Buck, long-limbed president of Science '43,
stalked the Auditorium platform as master of ceremonies for the much-blushed-at pep meet. Here lusty
Science humor and rousing Engineers' songs and
yells goaded students into attending the Science Ball.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary President, Dr. H. C. Gunning; President, Rex Parker; Vice-
President, Stan Harris; Secretary, John Beaty; Treasurer, John Brynelson, Athletic Representative, James
Robinson.
\
6'0(f
81 Jock Byers
Tom Anstey
Alastair Young
Phyliss MitcheU
Agriculture Undergraduate Society
War, and the campus military training, curtailed the
activities of two of the main organizations of the
Agrculture Undergraduate Society in 1941.
The Agricultural Discussions Club and Public
Speaking Club, sponsored by the honorary agricultural fraternity Sigma Tau Upsilon, were forced to
disband to make way for the more pressing call of
the C.O.T.C.
However, the formation of the Junior Society of
Technical Agriculturists made up in some measure
for the loss of these two valuable organizations.   The
Junior C.S.T.A. is the first organization of its kind in
Canada.
In the fall term, Aggies celebrated their coming
of age by holding the 21st annual Fall Banquet at
the Commodore Cabaret. The affair recorded the
largest attendance in the history of the Undergraduate Society. A military theme marked the banquet,
which was dubbed "The 21st annual re-union of the
Farmer's Regiment under Commanding Officer Dean
F. M. Clement."
Later on in the fall term, the Aggies played an
important part in organizing and staging the Arts-
Aggie Ball.
In spite of Saturday's military parades, Aggie
students once more journeyed to Agassiz for their
annual judging competition. The following week,
the undergraduates convened in the main lounge
of Brock Hall for dinner and the presentation of
awards won at Aggasiz.
The executive responsible for carrying on these
activities consisted of: President, Jock Byers; Vice-
president, Tom Anstey; Secretary, Phyllis Mitchell-
Treasurer, Neil Gray; and Athletic Representative,
Al Young.
82 Mamie Millar
Elizabeth Stewart
Margaret Ball
Nurses Undergraduate Society
An increased need for trained nurses   .   .   .
Such is the forecast, and the Department of Nursing
at the University bears it in mind as training of co-ed
nurses continues in lecture rooms on the campus,
and in the wards of the Vancouver General Hospital.
The course is a long one. Two years are spent
at 'Varsity, three in the hospital under the jurisdiction
of hospital authorities in conjunction with the faculty
on the campus, and one additional year of lectures,
labs, and field trips. It is a full schedule, and the
girls have little time for extra-curricular activities.
In spite of limited hours, the nurses met in the Fail
for their annual informal Fireside, at which student
nurses and those from the hospital mingled to become better acquainted. Later in the Fall, a tea was
held, the guests being the heads of Public Health
agencies in the city.
A considerable sum of money was raised at
Christmas, and turned over to the Victorian Order of
Nurses for hampers.
Highlight in the social year for the nurses was the
annual Formal, held in January in Brock Hall.   Spon
sors were Miss Mabel Gray, Miss Grace Fairley,
Doctor and Mrs. C. E. Dolman, and Dean and Mrs.
Finlayson.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Miss Mabel Gray; President, Marnie Millar;
Vice-president, Marion McDonell; Secretary, Dorothy
Morris; Treasurer, Betty Kirkpatrick; 5th year representative, Alice Uyeda; 4th year representative, Doris
Pepper; Athletic representative, Irene Butler; Hospital
representative, Margaret Avis; representative of one-
year Public Health Certificate Course, Kathleen
Muirhead.
83 // Life blood of any university
lo    il&    •    •    • Josephine Weldon and Derek McDermot
Valerie Gardiner
Ranji Mattu
Arts '41
Graduation! A magical word, pregnant with connotation for the 275 members of this year's senior
class, Arts '41. For four years, or more, these eagei
students have wallowed in undergraduate anonimity,
gradually erasing the stigma of each succeeding
year, through to the present, when last September they
took possession of the campus, full fledged seniors.
From the day they appeared at U.B.C, clad in
green pill box caps, so degrading to sensitive freshmen souls, to that fateful moment when the words "I
admit you" echoed above them as gown-clad seniors,
our class of '41 had been caught up in the dizzy swirl
of undergraduate activity.
Triumphant seniors of that year evinced justifiable
pride as they pointed to the Stadium as the fruits of
their labour, and posed the question to jealous frosh
"What can you do to add to the legacy of U.B.C"?
Those same seniors got their answer sooner than
they thought possible when the class of '41 threw
their whole support behind two of the greatest campaigns the undergraduate body has ever sponsored.
The Campaign Committee to lower fees and stop the
move to restrict registration occupied the minds of all
students that year as did the increased agitation for
a student union building.
When they emerged from the shelter of the lower
bracket, and became full-fledged upper classmen, they
united with fellow members of those exalted heights
to bring about the erection of Brock Hall, greatest
triumph of student initiative.
Last September then, with all this wealth of experience behind them, Arts '41 took their place at the
head of the University in its first, full, war-time session,
seniors with the great responsibilty of piloting a mass
of 2600 students through the shoals of a stricken world.
Much of the added responsibility fell upon the
shoulders of Student Council, who, although encountering inevitable criticism, discharged their duties with
great aplomb. Led by President Harry Lumsden, this
year's Council was composed of Betty Bolduc, secretary; Peter McTavish, treasurer; Bob Bonner, president
of L.S.E.; Todd Tremblay, president of M.U.S.; Dorothy
Hird, president of W.U.S.; Jim Harmer, president of
M.A.A.; Ruth Wilson, president of W.A.A., and Jack
Margeson, editor-in-chief of the Ubyssey.
Also prominent in campus political circles was the
senior class executive composed of: Honorary president, Dr. J. A. Crumb; president, Derek McDermot;
secretary-treasurer, Josephine Weldon, and athletic
representatives, Valerie Gardiner and Ranji Mattu.
86 SICKEN, PXEX—Vancouver
Major, Philosophy
Minor, English
ALLAN, JOHN—Victoria
Major, Zoology
Minor, Physics
ALLAN, WILLIAM—Victoria
S.C.M., Badminton
ARCHIBALD,  DOUGLAS—North Vancouver
Major, Sociology, Psychology
ASHBY, IOAN—Harrop
Major, Bacteriology;  Minor, Zoology;  Musical Society
BADGER, ELIZABETH—Vancouver
Honours,   Biology;   S.P.C.,   Cosmopolitan   Club,
Biology Club, Musical Society, Archery
BAIN, ARCHCIBALD—Vancouver
Majors, English, History
Players Club, Parliamentary Forum
C.S.A.D.C., S.P.C., S.C.M.
BALL, ENID D.—Penticton
Majors,   History,   English;   Phrateres
BARCLAY, WILLIAM—Vancouver
Honours, Chemistry
Chemistry Club, Pre-Med Club
BARTON, NORMAN—Vancouver
Honours, Mathematics,  Physics;   Math. Club
BEALE, MARY L.—Vancouver
Major, English; Minor, History
Kappa Alpha Theta
BEATON, MARY—Vancouver
Honours, Philosophy, Psychology; V.C.U.
BENNETT, GORDON—
BERTON, PIERRE F.—Vancouver
Major, History, English; Minor, Philosophy
Government, Ubyssey, Radio Society
BIBBS, PATRICIA—Vancouver
Major, History, English;  Minor, Sociology
Alpha Phi, Historical  Society, Outdoor Club
BOLDUC, BETTY—Vancouver
Major, English;  French, Honours
Kappa Kappa Gamma, French Club
BOYD, ANETTA—Vancouver
Maj., Bacteriology; Min., Zool.
BROWN, KEITH—Langford
Maj., Physics; Min., Maths.
BROWN, VICTORIA—Vancouver
Honours in Maths.
Maths. Club, Physics Club
BROWNE, EDITH—Vancouver
Honours in Franch
French Club, German Club
BRUCE, JOAN—Vancouver
Maj., Eng., German; Min., French
Musical Society, French Club, German Club
BRUCE, NANCY—Vancouver
Maj., Eng., History; Min., Psych.
Players Club, Phrateres
BUCKLAND, DONALD—Vancouver
Honours, Biology;  Biol. Discussion
BUNNELL, GRACE—Vancouver
Maj., Eng., Math.;  Min., Music
S.C.M.,  Phrateres,  Grass  Hockey
BURGESS, MARGARET—Vancouver
Maj., Econ., Math.;  Gamma Phi Beta
CALDWELL, FRANCES—North Vancouver
Honours, French; Le Cercle Francais, S.C.M.
CAMPBELL, WILLIAM E.—West Vancouver
Major, Economics, German
Phi Kappa Sigma, Newman Club, Skiing
CARR, GERTRUDE A.—Vancouver
Major, English, Latin;  Minor, French
Pnrateres, Newman Club
Lister Listens to Lester.
87 CARTER, JOYCE—Vancouver
Maj.   History;   Minor,   Economics,  English
S.C.M., Public Speaking Club
CARTER, NESTA A.—Vancouver
Major, History, Geography; Minor, English
CAVERS, JAMES—West Vancouver
CAWLEY, AMY—Victoria
Major, Economics
Minor,  Sociology, Psychology
Phrateres
CHARTER, HAROLD R.—Vancouver
Major, English
Minor, Education; V.C.U.
CHILD, COLIN G.—Vancouver
Major, Physics, Chemistry
CHRISTIE, REGINALD G.—Royston
Majors, Zoology, Psychology
CLARK, ALEXANDER-
CLARK, EDNA J.—Trail
Major, History, English;  Skiing
CLIFF, HAROLD—Vancouver
Honours, Biology
Sigma Phi Delta, Forestry Club
CLINE, RICHARD—Vancouver
Major,  French,  Maths.
COADY, TERESA—Vancouver
COCHRANE, JOSEPH—Victoria
Honours, Chemistry
COLWELL, BRYAN C—Port Simpson
COMBOLOS, THEODORA—Vancouver
Honours, French
La Canadienne, C.S.A.
COOLS, EVELYN—Okanagan Centre
Major, Physics, Maths.
Minor, Psychology
Delta Gamma
COWAN, MAISIE—Vancouver
Major, Economics, English; Phrateres
COWAN, THOMAS A.—Vancouver
Honours, Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Outdoor Club, Pre-Med. Club
COX, LIONEL—Victoria
Honours, Chemistry
CRONE, THOMAS H.—Vancouver
Major, English, History
Phi Kappa Sigma
CRUTE, MARGARET—North Vancouver
Major, French; Minor, German
CUNNINGHAM, DAVID—Victoria
Honours, Chemistry
CUSHING, JEAN—Vancouver
Major,  Economics;   Minor,  Sociology
Kappa Alpha Theta, Phrateres
DANIELS, DOROTHY M.—New Westminster
Majors, French,  English
Alpha Delta Pi, Phrateres,
Le Cercle Francais
DASHWOOD-JONES, EDMUND—New Westminster
Major, Psychology; Minor, Zoology
Delta Upsilon,  Monro Pre-Med Club
DAUNT, ACTON—New Westminster
Majors, History, Maths.; Skiing
DAVIDSON, ROBERT J. H.—Vancouver
Majors, Economics
Minor, English, Psychology;  Beta Theta Pi
DEARING, INA S.—Vancouver
Majors, History, English
Minors, Geography, Phychology;  S.C.M.
Jean and Val share partner.
88 DELLERT, GUNHILD H.—Kimberley
Major, Psychology
Minor, Sociology, French
DEVLIN, BUDD J.—Vancouver
Major,  Math.;   Minor,   Physics
Photography;  Golf
DIER, ORMOND W.—Vancouver
Major, History; Minor, English
Phi Kaopa Pi
DIXON, HAROLD F.—Victoria
Major,  Zoology;   Minor,   Chemistry
Zeta Psi
DOBSON, NORMA G.—Vancouver
Major,   English,   Zoology
Minor, Psychology
S.C.M., Cosmopolitan
DOCKER, GERALDINE P.—Invermere
Majors, French, Geography
DRYSDALE, ALISTAIR J.—Vancouver
Major,  Geology;   Minor,  Geography
Sigma Phi Delta, G. M. Dawson
DUNCAN, MARJORIE E.—Vancouver
Honours,  Latin;  Phrateres
DUNLOP, ELIZABETH—Vancouver
Major, English;  Minor, History
Delta Gamma
EMERSON, BRUCE—Vancouver
Major, English; Minor, History
Players Club, Badminton
ENGLISH, MOIR A—Vancouver
Major, French
EVANS, MAUREEN—Colquitz
Honours,  Latin,  French
Film  Society, Camera Club;   Badminton
EWEN, JOHN S.—New Westminster
Majors, History, English
Minor, Psychology
FAIRLEIGH, CONSTANCE M.—Vancouver
Maj., Phil.; Min., Eng.
Alpha Phi, Phraieres, Psych. Club
FERRIES, BEULAH E.—Vancouver
Maj., Eng., History
Min., Sociology, Geog.
FILMER-BENNETT,  GORDON—Vancouver
Maj.,   Eng.;   Min.,  Phil.
FINLAYSON, JEAN K.—Okanagan Landing
Maj., Hist, and English; Phrateres
FLEISHMAN, NEIL M.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Eng.;   Min.,  German
FOSTER, RAYMOND E.—Kamloops
Maj., Zoology; Min., Botany
Film   Society,   Biol.   Discussions
FOUKS,  ARTHUR
Maj., Economics and Gov't.
Min., Political Sci. and Hist.
Law Society, Forum, Debating
FREEMAN, VICTOR J.—Vancouver
Honours in Bacteriology
Min., Zoology; Radio Club
FRETWELL, HAROLD C—Vancouver
Maj., Economics and Hist.
Min., Eng. and Phil.
FRITH, NORMA C—Vancouver
Maj., Eng.  and Hist.;   Basketball
FROST, ISOBEL—Vancouver
Maj., Psych.;   Min., Eng.
Delta Gamma;  Badminton
FULTON, RUPERT—Prince Rupert
Maj., Eng.; Min., Economics
Ski  Club,  V.O.C.
GARDINER, VALERIE—Vancouver
Alpha Pi, -Phrateres;  Basketball, Swimming
GATHERCOLE, PATRICIA M.—Vancouver
Honours in French;   Min.,   German
La Canadienne, German Club
GILLESPIE, WALLACE—North Vancouver
Maj., Ec. and Hist.; Min., Eng. and Phil.
Basketball,   Badminton
Jordan-Enox. Fcdrleigh, Dashwood-Jones.
89 GLEN, JOHN E.—Vancouver
Maj., Eng.;  Players Club
GLEN,  MARY E.—Vancouver
Maj., Eng. and Psych.
Newman Club
GRACE, ALICE M.—Vancouver
Maj., Phil, and Psych.
Min., Eng.;  Mus. Soc.
GRAND, WILLIAM H.—Chilliwack
Maj., Eng.;  Players' Club
GRAVES, MARIE F.—Trail
HAUGER, ALICE C—Dawson Creek
Maj., Biology;  Min., Chem., Physics, Math.
S.C.M.
HAWKES,   ARTHUR   S.—Victoria
Maj., Chem.;   Min., Physics
HAWKINS, DOROTHY I.—Vancouver
Maj.,  Hist.;  Min.,  Psych.
Outdoor  Club,   Phrateres
HENDERSON, MARY E.—Cloverdale
Honours in English
La Canadienne, Letters Club; Hockey
HENRY, JOHN M.—Vancouver
Maj., Physics and Chem.
HERD, BEN C.—New Westminster
Maj., Eng.; Min., French
Delta Upsilon;   Soccer
HEWITT, GORDON B.—Vancouver
Honours in Chemistry
Semper Club, Pre-Med.  Club
Golf, Badminton
HEYER, RUTH—Vancouver
Honours in English
Delta Gamma, Letters Club, Players' Club
HIGGINS, MARY P.—Victoria
Kappa Alpha Theta; Golf Club, Phrateres
HIRD, DOROTHY M.—Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta, Pres. of W.U.S.
HOOLEY,   ELSIE   E.—Vancouver
Maj., Bac,  Min., Chem.
Outdoor Club
HOPWOOD, VICTOR G.—Vancouver
Maj., Eng.; Min., Phil.; Letters Club
HOWARD, GERALD V.—Vancouver
Maj., Biol,  and  Eng.
Phi Kappa Sigma
IZEN, BENJAMEN—Vancouver
Maj., Math.; Min., French; Basketball
JACK,   MARJORIE   H.—Hatzic
Maj.,   Eng.;   Min.,   Hist,   and   Biol.
Players'  Club,  V.O.C.,  I.R.C.
KATO,  KIYOSHI—Vancouver
Maj.,  Ec;   Min.,  Eng.
Japanese Students Club, S.P.C.
KAWAGUCHI,   HIROSHI—Cumberland
Maj., Chem.;  Min., Math.
Japanese   Students'   Club
KEMPER,   FRANCIS   D.—Britannia   Beach
Honours  in  Bac.
Monro   Pre-Med.
KERR,   DONALD   C—Vancouver
Maj.,   Hist.;   Min.,  Geog.,   Psych.
Beta Theta Pi; Rowing
KILBANK, SIDNEY C—Vancouver
Maj., Chem.; Semper Club
Chemistry   Club
KLOEPFER,   JACQUELINE—Vancouver
Maj., Eng.;  Min., Hist.
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Newman, Players'  Club;   Golf
JORDAN-KNOX,   RUTH—Vancouver
Maj.,   Eng.   and   Phil.
Alpha Phi
LAMONT-HAVERS,  RONALD  W.—Vancouver
Honours in Bac.
Dorothy Hird and sisters.
90 LANE, GEORGE—North Vancouver
Maj., Chem.; Min., Botany and Physics
English   Rugby
LARONDE, HARRY D.—Crescent
Honours in Hist.
Historical Club, J.R.C.,  S.P.C.
LATIMER, EDGAR C—New Westminster
Maj., German, Education
LEBLANC,   RENEE—Vancouver
Maj., Hist.;  Min., French
Alpha  Delta  Pi
LEPSOE, GUNNAR
LOWE, MARGARET—Victoria
Honours  in Hist.
Mus.  Soc;   Badminton
MACKIE,  WILLIAM
MAINGUY, JAMES WISHART—Duncan
Honours in Economics
English   Rugby
MANDERS,  ERNEST C—Vancouver
Maj., Biology
Monro   Pre-Med.   C.O.T.C,   Cosmopolitan   Club
MARCHANTON, EILEEN OLIVE—Vancouver
Honours in History
MARGETTE,   EDWARD   LAMBERT—Trail
Maj.,   Chem.;   Min.,   Bac;   Psi  Upsilon,  Monro  Pre-Med.
Chem.   Society;   Weightlifting,  Boxing
MARPLES,   EDWARD   GEOFFREY—Invermere
Honours  in  Botany
Musical Society
MARTIN, NANCY BLACK—Vancouver
Maj., Psych.;   Min., Phil.
Kappa Alpha Theta; Basketball
MATTU, RANJI—Vancouver
Maj.,   Economics;   Min.,   Government,   Pari.   Forum
Eng. Rugby; Can. Football
MEIGHEN, MOLLY—Kamloops
Maj., English;  Min., French
Kappa Alpha Theta
MEREDITH,  IOHN ROGER—Victoria
Honours  in  History
English;   Psi  Upsilon,   Hist.   Soc,   I.R.C.
METFORD, LIONEL JACQUES SEYMOUR—Salmon Arm
Honours in French; Players' Club; Tennis, §occer
MIDDLETON, FRED TURNER—Vancouver
Honours in History
Musical Society, S.C.M., Pari. Forum
MINICHIELLO, ARMANDO PETER—Vancouver
Maj., Economics and English
Basketball,  Soccer
MITCHELL, ARDIS—Vancouver
Maj.,  Psychology;   Min., English
Alpha Gamma Delta
MAMOSI, KIYOAKI CHARLES—Vancouver
Maj., Hon. in Econ.; Min., Govt.
Japanese Students' Club
MORRIS, JOYCE—Penticton
Maj., Mathematics; Min., Physics;  Maths. Club
MORRIS, MARGERET CLAIRE—New Westminster
Maj., Latin, Mathematics, English
Delta Gamma, Players' Club
MOTTLEY, DOUGLAS W.—San Francisco
Maj.,  Biology;   Min., Bac.
Biology  Discussions   Club
McCAMMON, DOROTHY—Burnaby
Maj.,  Eng.,   Hist.;   Min.,   Psych.
S.C.M., Phrateres
McCLEAN, FRANCIS
McCULLY, DOROTHY A.—Moose law, Sask.
Maj., Psychology;  Min-., Sociology
.Alpha Gamma Delta
MacDERMOT,   DEREK—Vancouver
Maj.,   Eng.   and  French;   Min.,   German
Psi  Upsilon,  Musical  Society
Don Ferguson instructs.
91 MACDONALD, HELEN M.—Nanaimo
Maj., English and History
Alpha Phi, Phrateres
MACDONALD, JOHN CAMPBELL—Victoria
Hon. Math., Physics;  Phi Delta Theta
Math. & Physics Clubs; Skiing
MACDONALD, MARGARET HELEN—Nanaimo
Maj., French and Eng.;  Min., History
Cosmopolitan and French Clubs;  Badminton
McDONNELL,  EILEEN  JEAN—Vancouver
Maj., Eng. and Phil.; Min., Psych.
Alpha Delta Pi; Psych. Club
MACINNES, ELIZABETH—North Vancouver
Maj., Psych.;   Min., Eng.
Hockey
MACKAY, HECTOR RONALDSON—Vancouver
Honours  in French
McKAY, KATHERINE M.—Vancouver
Alpha Delta Pi;  V.O.C.
MACKENZIE, ALMA AGES JEAN—Vancouver
Maj.,   English  and  French
Min., History;  French Club
McKENZIE, COLIN—Victoria
Maj., Geography
Min., History, Education, Psychology
MACKENZIE, VERNA C—Vancouver
Radio Society, Film Society
McKINNON, ELAINE KELLY—Vancouver
'   Maj., French;  Min.,. English
McLEOD, ELLIS LAURENCE—Vancouver
Maj., History; Min., Economics
Kappa Kappa Gamma;  Int. Relat. Club
McMORRAN, A. STEWART—Vancouver
Maj., Econ.;  Min., Pol., Sciences
Semper Club
McQUEEN, DONALD ROBERT—Vancouver
Maj., Physics; Min., Biology
NASH, ANDREW JOSEPH—Vancouver
Honours in Biology
Newman Club, Biol. Discussions Club;   Skiing
NEWBY,  MARY EILEEN—Vancouver
Maj.,  Bac;  Min., Zool.
Kappa Alpha Theta
NICHOLS, ALVA EILEEN—Vancouver
Maj., Eng. Hist.; Min., Psych.
Women's Public Speaking,  S.P.C., C.S.A., S.C.M.,  I.R.C.
NIKAIDO, HARRY—Vancouver
Maj.,   Chemistry;   Min.,   Zoology
Basketball, Soccer
NICOL,  ERIC PATRICK—Vancouver
Honours French; Le Cercle Francais
NOWLAN, HELEN LOUISE—Vancouver
Maj., French;  Min., History
Alpha Gamma Delta
OLDFIELD, HENRY—Saanich
Letters Club
Track
OSBORNE, WILLIAM—Medicine Hat
Maj., Chemistry;  Min., Physics
Musical  Society;   Tennis
OZEROFF, WILLIAM—Shoreacres
PARIZEAU, PAUL—Victoria
Maj., Biology
PARKS, JOHN—Burnaby
Maj.,  Zool.;   Min., Psych.
PHYSICK, ART—Vancouver
Maj., Hist.;  Min., Sociology, Pschyolgoy
Phi Kappa Sigma
PICKERING, EUNICE—Vancouver
Maj., Zoology,  Chemistry
Monro Pre-Med. Club, Outdoor Club
PROVEN, ANNA—Vancouver
Maj., French., Eng.;  Min., Hist., Geog.
La  Canadienne,   Soc.  Prob.;   Badminton
Connie Fairleigh and Audrey ReiieL
92 PULLEN, ELIZABETH—Vancouver
Maj., French; Min., German
Le Cercle Francais
PURDY, JAMES—Victoria "
Maj., Zool.;  Min., Chem.
Zeta Psi, Monro Pre-Med
REIFEL, AUDREY—Vancouver
Maj., Econ.; Min., Psych.
Kappa Kappa Gamma
RIDELL,  MARJORIE—Keewatin, Ont.
Maj., English, French
Letters  Club,   S.C.M.,   S.P.C.
La  Canadienne,  Phrateres;   Badminton
RIDLAND, MARGARET—New Westminster
Maj., Eng., Hist.;Min., Psych.
Badminton
ROBINSON, THOMAS—New Westminster
Maj., Hist., Eng.; Min., Psych.
Musical Society
RODDAN, ANDREW—Vancouver
Maj.,  Government,  Economics
Min., History;  Basketball
SAGE, MARGARET—Vancouver
Maj., History, English;  Alpha Phi
Players' Club, Hist. Soc.
SCHOFIELD, MARY LENORE—Vancouver
Letters Club, Phrateres
Musical Society, Ubyssey '
SCOTT, HAZEL—Vancouver
Maj., History; Min., Econ., Sociol.
Kappa Kappa Gamma
SCOTT, ROBERT—Alberni
Maj., Hist.;  Min., English
Semper Club;  Basketball
SELDON, RUTH—Vancouver
Maj., Psych.; Min., English
Kappa   Kappa   Gamma;   Badminton
SHANNON, BARBARA—Vancouver
Maj., Psych.; Min., Sociol.
Kappa Kappa Gamma
SHEFFIELD, J. OWEN—
Delta Upsilon; Musical Society
SHIMO-TAKAHARA, GEORGE—Vancouver
Maj., Zoology
Min., Chemistry
Japanese Students' Club
SLOAN,   WILLIAM—Vancouver
Maj., Biology;   Min., Chem.,  Physics
SMITH, NANCY—Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Eng.; Alpha Phi
SOUTHIN, ADRIENNE—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology, English
Alpha Gamma Delta
THOMAS, M. ELIZABETH-
THOMSON,  FRANCES—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology; Min., Philosophy
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Badminton
Psych.  Club
THOMSON, JEAN IRENE—Kimberley
Maj., Mathematics, History
Min., Economics; Math. Club
Badminton, Basketball
. THOMSON, VIVIAN—Vancouver
Maj., Latin, French;  Min., German
Phrateres
TODD, DOUGLAS—Vancouver
Maj., Latin, French; Soccer, Tennis
TONKS, DAVID—Vancouver
Honours in Chemistry
Band, Chem. Society
TRUSCOTT, LEONARD GEORGE—Nelson
Maj., Math.; Min., Physics
TWISS, MILDRED ANN—Vancouver
Maj., English, Geography
Min., Mathematics; Alpha Phi, Musical Society
USHER, MARJORIE VICTORIA—Vancouver
Maj.,   English,   French;   Min.,   Psych.
Musical Society, French Club
VANCE, JOHN—
Lounging in the Sun,
93 VESTERBACK, BRITA HELENA—Aldergrove
Hon., French, English; Letters Club
WALLACE, FRANCES—Victoria
Maj., Eng., Hist.;  Min., Psych., Phil.
Musical Society, S.C.M., Phrateres
WALKER, JANET—Haney
Maj., Eng.; Phil.; Min., History
Alpha Delta Pi;   Ubyssey, Mus.  Soc, Letters
Phrateres   Radio   Soc;   Badminton,   Tennis
WARDEN, VIDA—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology;   Min.,  Sociology
Psychology Club
WATANABE, SATORU—Vancouver
Maj., Chem., Zoology; Min., Physics, Biol,
lapanese  Student  Club
.WATT, DOUGLAS—West Vancouver
Maj., Psych., Phil.; Min., Eng., History
Phi Kappa Sigma; Golf Club
WEBB, FRANCES—Vancouver
Maj., Psychology;  Min., Sociology
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Golf Club
WEBBER, PATRICIA—Victoria
Maj., English;  Min., Latin
Musical  Society,  Letters  Club
Badminton
WELDON, JOSEPHINE—Vancouver
Maj., English, History
Alpha Gamma Delta, Public Speaking Club
WELLINGTON, WILLIAM—Vancouver
Honours in Biology (Zoology option)
WEST, JOHN—Vancouver
Maj., Economics; Min., Philosophy
Phi Kappa Pi
WESTLAKE, DOROTHY—Taber, Alta.
Maj., Bacteriology, Zoology;
Bio.  Discussions Club, Pre-Med
Phrateres;   Badminton
WHITE, BARBARA MARY—Vancouver
Maj., Economics; Min., English
Gamma Phi Beta
WILLIAMS, TOM CAMPBELL—Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta, Football
WILSON, ROBERTA—Vancouver
Maj., History, English
WILSON, RICHARD—Vancouver
Honours in French
Delta Upsilon
WILSON, RUTH—Vancouver
Maj., English, History
Alpha Gamma Delta, Big Block Club, Hist. Soc; Basketball, Golf
WOOD, JOHN EDWARD—Penticton
WOODSIDE, LLOYD—Vancouver
Maj., Zoology;  Min., Chemistry
Musical Society; Boxing
WORTHINGTON,   ELIZABETH—Vancouver
Maj., Bacteriology;  Min., Chemistry
Gamma Phi Beta
Mary Beale loses books.
94 Top:    Bill Van Houten and Grace Cuthbert.
Bottom:    Gerry Armstrong and Dale RumbalL
Commerce '41 . .
Ernest Harvey
No doubt you've seen Commercemen sweatered
But do you know they can't be bettered?
To prove this now beyond dissent,
We give you Lumsden, president.
And further of the dirty nine
MacTavish makes our nickels shine.
Many's the time our efforts were thwarted,
While in cheesy places we punched and sorted,
But struggling with depreciation,
We couldn't forget our recreation,
In sport Harmer, Teagle and Byers,
Went into a huddle to reduce spare tires.
At least one fact we stored away,
While o'er reports we pored away,
'Twas this: Two minds are better than one,
Borrow your neighbor's, or you'll never be done.
And at graduation we desperately make amends,
For the candle we rashly burnt at both ends.
Class executive:
E. H. Morrow, honorary president.
President, Ernest Harvey.
Vice-president, Bill van Houten.
Secretary, Grace Cuthbert.
Treasurer, Dale Rumball.
Athletic Rep., Gerry Armstrong.
95 AOKI, TETSUO—Vancouver
Japanese Students' Club
ARMSTRONG, GERALDINE E.—Vancouver
Alpha Delta Pi
Big Block, Grass Hockey
Basketball
BYERS, ARCHIE—Vancouver
Com. and Forestry; Phi Kappa Sigma
CAMERON, JAMES—Victoria
Com. and Forestry;  Forestry Club
CHAN-KENT, ROBERT—Vancouver
Tennis
CLARK, ROBERT M.—Vancouver
Parliamentary Forum
Social Problems
CLARK, SYDNEY H.—Prince George
Commerce
CRAWFORD,  JOHN A.—Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi
CUTHBERT, GRACE I.—Webter's Corner
Phrateres; Basketball, Archery
DALE,   HAROLD  E— Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma
d:s BRISAY, HELENE—Vancouver
Alpha Gamma Delta
FILTEAU,   JOHN—Calgary
Minor, English
Phi Kappa Pi
GITTERMAN, SIDNEY L.—Vancouver
HARMER, JAMES O—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi
HARVEY, ERNEST C—Vancouver
C.O.T.C.
HAYWARD, CHESTER G.
Kamloops
KENNEDY, ERNEST F.—Vancouver
Minor, Economics, Government
KIRBY, GEORGE H.—Nelson
Minor, Economics
Beta Theta Pi, Law Club
LUI, CHAK F.—Vancouver
Chinese Students' Club
Future   businessmen.
96 LUMSDEN, HAROLD D.—Vancouver
Delta Upsilon
Alma Mater President
McARTHUR, JAMES—Victoria
McEWEN, JACK—Vancouver
Double Degree Arts and Com.
MacFAYDEN, ROBERT DUNCAN—Vancouver
Double Degree Commerce and Forestry
Musical  Society
MacRAE, ALEX J.—Caulfeild
Double Degree in Commerce & Forestry
Badminton
McTAVISH, PETER J.—Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi
Rowing, Track
PENDLETON, FRANK—Red Gap
Phi Gamma Delta;  Forestry
POWELL, GEORGE—Summerland
ROBERTSON, DAVE—Victoria
Psi Upsilon
ROSS, LLOYD—Aldergrove
Delta Upsilon
SANMIYA, TATSUO—
Musical Society
TANABE, LUKE Y.—Vancouver
Japanese Students' Club
TOWNSEND, ERIC ALBERT—Victoria
TURLEY, FRANK—Victoria
TURNILL, ERIC STANLEY—Vancouver
Zeta Psi
VAN HOUTEN, WILLIAM—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma
WELDON, CHARLES—Grenfell, Sask.
WINSLOW, BARBARA—Victoria
Kappa Kappa Gamma
YAMADA, FWIYOSHI—Vancouver
Corns. Do Extra-curricular Work.
97 Archie Paton. Phyllis Ellis. Pat Carey, Ted McBride.
Arts '42
Younger brothers have long been used to the
practice of being shunted into the background, while
earlier arrivals occupy the stage and fret "their fretful hour."
For the past session Arts '42 have been but young
brothers, but with the coming of Spring, and graduation, they assume the gowns of seniority so recently
vacated by their over-lords.
The present Junior Class appeared first at U.B.C,
dunce-hatted, placarded freshman, to find that the
Student Campaign Committee, formed to ask the
government to lower fees, had failed to attain this
end, but had succeeded in getting registration restrictions lifted.
They along with other members of the Alma Mater
Society gathered in the Auditorium that same year to
vote an added burden of three dollars to their fees
that Brock Hall might be built. Then, as sophomores,
they moved to the newly-completed union building
that had been completed.
In September, 1940, they became upperclassmen,
this year's Junior Class.
Juniors of the campus . . . Arts '42 . . . were well
represented in all phases of student activity throughout the term. Council member, representing the
Literary and Scientific Executive, was Bob Bonner,
who also starred as McGoun Cup debater, along with
Elspeth Munro. Both were active in the Parliamentary
Forum, the latter being one of the few women ever to
make the debating team.
Also prominent, as campus literary leader, was
Jack Margeson, stolid editor-in-chief of the Ubyssey,
while we saw and heard Mary McLorg as "Candida"
in the Players Club Spring production, and Margaret
McTaggart did her share towards making Musical
Society history. Perhaps most often seen and heard
Junior of the year was Sid Poulton, leader of the
Varsity dance orchestra.
Athletics claimed the attention of many Juniors this
year. Notable among co-eds were Jean Eckhardt,
tennis, badminton, and basketball; Joan Morris, badminton; Beverley Matthew, Muriel McLagen, volleyball; Margaret George and Joan Morris, grass hockey
and archery.
In men's athletics, Arts '42 was led by such stalwarts as: Jack Ryan, basketball; Spence Wallace,
soccer; Bob Curry, Alan Gardner and Gus Carmichael,
Canadian football; Evann Davies, English rugby.
The race to choose a Prom Queen to reign over the
annual Junior Prom, was a fast and furious one this
year, with Jean Clugston being declared winner.
Runners-up were Bunny Finch, Elizabeth Hebb, Beverley Matthew, Louise Skinner and Shirley Wismer.
98 ADAMS. JOHN R.
ALEXANDER,  ATHENA
ARAI, KIMIMICHI
ARMSTRONG, JEAN E.
ARMSTRONG, JOHN J.
ASKEW,  WILLIAM  E.
AUGUSTINE,  KATHLEEN
BARNETT, MARGERY L.
BARTLETT, PHYLLIS L. M.
BELL, G. DOUGLAS
BERTRAM,  FRANCIS  E.
BISHOP,  GEORGE  D.
BISHOP, HARRY E.
BONNER,  ROBERT W.
BROWN, ELLEN L.
BROWN,  F.  MARGARET
BROWN,  IRENE   R.
BROWNING,   GEORGE   V.
BULGIN, M. MINTA
BURNEY, JEAN E.
BUTLER,  IRENE E.
CAMPBELL,  MARY I.
CAREY, N. PATRICIA
CARTER,  EILEEN V.
CAWLEY,  SHEILA F.
CHARTERS,  JOHN A.
CHETKOW,  GERALDINE
CICCONE, LEO D.
CLARKE,  CHUMMER B.
CLERY,   PATRICK   M.
CLEVELAND, EDWARD M. D.
COLEMAN, WILLIAM A.
COLLINS,  THOMAS  LeG.
CORBOULD,  BETTY  H.
COUTTS, JAMES W.
CULL, R. JOYCE
CUNNINGHAM,  MARGARET
CURRY, ROBERT M.
DARLING,  DENISE
DEBECK,  NEDRA  M.
DELANY,  AUSTIN
DEWDNEY,  EDGAR
DONALDSON, WILLIAM
DONNELLY, CHARLES W.
DUNCAN, DONALD G.
ECKARDT, JEAN
EDMONDS,   DAVID   F.   D.
EDWARD, JOAN C.
Prom. Queen Candidates Parade.
99 ELLIS, DAVID W.
ELLIS, DOROTHY I.
ELLIS, PHYLLIS B.
EVANS, HARRY MacD.
EWING, J. KENNETH
EWING,   MARGARET  L.
FERGUSON, WILLIAM C.
FIERHELLER,  GORDON  M.
FINCH, MARGUERITE L.
FINLAYSON,  ANNA RUTH
FISHER, HAROLD E. B.
FLEMING,   KELVIN  O.
FOTHERGILL, AMY H.
FOWLE, CHARLES D.
FOWLER,  FRANCES
FRITH, AUSTIN F.
GALLOWAY, JOHN G.
GARDINER,  WILLIAM   M.
GEORGE, MARGARET S.
GOLDMAN, FLORENCE R
GRAHAM, AILEEN F.
GROSS,  EDWARD
GUNN,  J.  STRUTHERS
HACKNEY,   AMY  L.
HAGGART, MARGARET M.
HAMMOND, GWENDOLIN M.
HAMMOND,  PAUL L.
HANSON, DON McK.
HARRY,   KENNETH  F.
HEBB,   ELIZABETH
HENDERSON, DOREEN
HEWETT, MARGARET H.
HOGGAN,  ISABEL
HOLMES,  GWENDOLYN  A.
HOOD, JAMES A.
HOOPER,   W.   CAMERON
HORNE, HARRY J.
HOWIESON, MARGARET
JEFFRIES, JAMES G.
JOHNSON, VICTOR R. L.
JOHNSTON,  DONALD  W.
JOHNSTON,   SHIRLEY  K.
JOINER, WILLIAM M
JONES, AUDREY L.
KIDD, JAMES Mel.
KIRKPATRICK, MARGARET E.
LAPP, GUSTAVUS S.
LARSEN, ANTHON A.
Quad. Box-office Attracts.
100 leacy, francis h.
lennie, doris c
lennie, margaret l.
long, elizabeth g.
lynn, margaret s.
mannix, luella
margeson, john m. r.
martinoff, ivan
matheson, claudia
matthew, beverley r.
mayne, thomas w.
menzies, m. albert
meredith olive m.
meredith, thomas w.
morris, dorothy r. a.
morris, joan i.
morris, robert j. d.
morton, betty h.
munro, elspeth
murdoch, a. jane m.
murphy, marion e.
murray, robert n.
muttart, mary
McCarthy, m. Frances
McCLORY, MARGARET I.
McDiarmid, betty m.
McDONELL,  DOROTHY M.
McEACHERN,   FLORENCE  I.
MacEWAN,  WILLIAM  R.
McGHEE,  WILLIAM P.  T.
MacKAY, SHEILA T.
McKENZIE, GEORGE J.
McKENZIE, LLOYD G.
MACKENZIE,   RODERICK   D.
McKINLAY,  JOHN
McLAGAN,   MURIEL  G.
MACLEAN, CHARLES A.
McLEAN-BELL, JANET M. G.
McLEOD,  R.  RAYMOND
McLORG,  MARY A.
McMICHAEL, GLADYS E.
McMillan, jack l.
McNEAL, RODERICK O.
McNEELY, CHARLES J.
McPHERSON,  DOUGLAS C.
NEIL, KINGSLEY C.
NICHOLS,  DAVID  R.
NICHOLS,   EDWARD   M.
Tommy and Betty.
101 Emu
§]«? #
NICHOLSON, LOIS A.
NISSEN, HANSI
NOGUCHI,  KIICHI
OASTLER, JOHN W.
OGILVIE,  ALFRED  L.
O'NEILL,   ALBERT  N.
PATON,  ARCHIBALD T.
PAUL, RACHEL M.
PHILLIPS, MARY E.
PON, LEMUEL
POULTON,   SIDNEY   A.
PRIMROSE,   NEIL
PROUD, GERALDINE
RALSTON,  H. KEITH
REID, WILLIAM D.
RITCHIE,  DAVID  M.
RIVERS, DAVID E.
ROBERTSON,   JEAN   A.
ROBINSON, DORAMAY
ROBINSON, MARIAN
ROSS, R. GORDON
ROWELL, FLORENCE V.
RUARDI-WICHERS,   MARIA
RUSHWORTH,   EILEEN
RYAN, DOREEN E.
RYAN,  JOHN G.
SENDALL,  GEORGE E.
SHAW, DOROTHY A.
SHEELEY,  RALPH  G.
SHERWOOD,   CLARE   T.
SHIMO-TAKAHARA, K. S.
SHINOBU,  ROY
SHORTREED,   GRACE
SILLERS, JEAN E. M.
SINCLAIR,  LISTER  S.
SKINNER,  LOUISE  McM.
SLEATH, G. EDWARD
SMITH, BARBARA E.
SNYDER,  RUSSELL  P.
SPENCER,   BARBARA   E.
STAMATIS,   DOROTHY   M.
STURDY,   DONALD   D.
SUGARMAN, LESTER C.
SULLIVAN,  CONSTANCE M.
SWOBODA,  JOSEPH S.
TAKIMOTO,  KIMIKO
THOMAS,   GEORGE  P.
THOMAS,  J.   P.  WALLACE
Candid Classroom Shot
102 THOMSON, DOROTHY
THURSTON, AUDREY E.
TOMPKINS,  DOROTHEA M.
TOWNSEND,  JOHN A.
TRENHOLME, AMY V.
TWEED,  LORNA  G.
UNDERHILL, ANNE B.
URQUHART, ALEX N.
VENINI,  MARY J.
VERNON,  E.  KENNETH
WALKER,   DOUGLAS  L.
WALLACE, W. SPENCER C.
WARNER, HARRY L.
WARRACK, BERYL E.
WATTS,   MILDRED  F.
WEBB, EVA
WESTWOOD,  MARY  J.
WISMER,  SHIRLEY
WONG, JOHN G. S.
WOODCROFT, HELEN
Bob Menchions With Two.
103 % 5.  tS %
COMMERCE-
ADAM, JOSEPH
ALMAS, D. JAMES
ASHWORTH, FRANCES E.
ATKIN, MARY F.
BARRIE,  EDWARD   J.
BEAUMONT,   LEYS   M.
BROWNELL, J. ROSS
BRYSON, GERALD S.
BUSHELL,  NORMAN F.
CLUGSTON,  JEAN  E.
COX,  JANE E.
CURWEN,   GUY   R.   L.
DAVIES, EVANN
DAYKIN, VICTOR A.
EATON, ARTHUR R.
ELLIS,   ROBERT  L.
HALL,   ORMONDE  J.
HARPER,  DAVID  A.
HUGHES, P. ELIZABETH C.
KORSCH,  LEONARD  S.
LYLE, DONALD F. H.
MAHOOD, BRIAN H.
MATHIESON, JACK R.
MELVIN,  JAMES T.
MENCHIONS, ROBERT G.
MOXON, JOHN O.
McBRIDE,  W.  EDWARD
McCALL,  GRAHAM  E.
MACFARLANE,   GORDON  B.
McMAHON,   M.   PATRICIA
MacQUARRIE. ALEX B.
NAMBA. AKIRA
NAYLOR, JOSEPH
NOSE, ROY H.
OKUNO,  SHIGEKAZU
PARFITT,  ARTHUR E.
PERRY, LORNE G.
PORTER, ROBERT K.
ROSE, ROBERT H. M.
RUMBALL,  DALE L.
SASAKI,   FREDERICK  Y.
SHIOZAKI,  DAVID  F.
TEAGLE, ERNEST E.
TUCK,  MONTAGUE D.
WALLACE,  GORDON  G.
WILSON,   GEORGE   C.
WUEST,  W.  ELMER
YAMASHITA,   GEORGE  S.
Fountain Centre oi Attention.
104 Kennedy MacDonald
Dorothy Beebe
Pat Flynn
Helen Brandt
Arts '43 . . .
Campus strangers one year, overlords of the
freshmen the next year—that is the legacy of each
succeeding Sophomore class, and Arts '43 was no
exception. Proud of their newly acquired maturity,
yet shadowed by the majesty of Upperclassmen, Arts
'43 moved to justify their claim to admittance in those
hallowed ranks—a rich abundance in athletic, cultural and executive abilities.
On the sports front, the Sophomores outdid themselves with Joe Ryan, Pat Flynn, and Doug. Pedlow
all starring on the champion Senior A basketball
team. Kenny McBride won his second successive
University Golf championship, with fellow sophomore Bob Plommer as his closest rival for the title.
Badminton, which took a sudden spurt in popularity, also featured prominent members of the class,
outstanding of whom were Hugh Hall, Frank Pidgeon,
Ward DeBeck, and Kennedy MacDonald. Churning
up cinders on the Track team were Bill Swinton, Stu
Madden, and Don Ralston, while Ray Gorman was
touted as the "find of the season" in the local Canadian Football league.
The co-eds, too, were prominent in athletics, with
an emphasis on basketball. Brenda Phillips, Joyce
Orchard, Ruby Palmer, and Helen Brandt all whooping 'er up, while Buddy Graham exhorted cheers
from basketball crowds as Pep Leader.
Our own Totem claimed the services of four
Sophomores, chief of whom was Betty Quick who
handled the task of editing the year book with great
dispatch. Lionel Salt, Associate Editor, Honoree
Young, Classes Editor, and Phyliss NeMetz, Rewrite,
lent capable assistance.
Phyliss NeMetz was also secretary of the Radio
Society, and along with Jackie Ellis, handled social
news for downtown papers.
Sidney Horswill, Arts '43, newcomer from the
Interior, stole the show in the Musical Society production of "H.M.S. Pinafore," singing the role of Capt.
Corcoran in a pleasing baritone.
Arts '43 class executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Professor Walter Gage; President, Kennedy
MacDonald; Secretary-Treasurer, Dorothy Beebe; and
Athletic Representatives, Pat Flynn and Helen Brandt.
105 #    ^   'f/sf-     5      ^
ADES, AUDREY I.
ALEXANDER,  VELETTA   M.
ALLAN, JAMES G.
ALLAN. JOHN N. M.
ALLEN,   NORMAN  P.
ANDERSON,   ELIZABETH   D.
ANDERSON, JOHN J.
ANDERSON,   V.   YVONNE
ARM,  JEAN M.
ARMITAGE,   MARIAN  H.
ARMOUR,   JUNE  C.
ARMSTRONG,   NORMAN  H.
ASHE, GEOFFREY T. L.
ASZKANAZY,  C.  LEONORE
ATHERTON,  RUTH  E.
ATTREE,  PATRICIA  W.
ATTRIDGE,   MARY  LOUISE
BADGER,  ISABEL McN.
BAIN, DONALD T.
BAKER,  CHESTER H.
BAKONY, EDWARD G. J.
BALL, PATRICIA E.
BARLOW,  C.  VERNON
BARNETT, JOAN R.
BARSS, ELIZABETH M.
BARTHOLOMEW, GILBERT A.
BARTON, DOROTHY F.
BARTON, WILLIAM S.
BEAUMONT,   ELIZABETH  N.
BEEBE,   DOROTHY
BELL, MAUREEN F.
BELTON,  CAROLINE
BENDER, WILLIAM G.
BENNETT,  JOHN  N.
BERTON,  LUCY F.  B.
BETTERIDGE, JOHN H.
BEVERIDGE,  E.  ISABEL
BEW, NORMA
BEWLEY, A.  LESLIE
BINGHAM, ALFRED E.
BJARNASON,  VAL
BOULTBEE,   MARIAN   E.
BOURNE, EVELYN I.
BOWIE, JACK W.
BOWIE,, JAMES  L.
BOYCE,  KENNETH  C.
BOYD, MARY E.
BRADLEY,  MARY E.
Bottled "El Stuifo".
106 BRANDON, JAMES R.
BRANDT, HELEN K.
BROADHEAD,  RONALD L.
BROWN,  EANSWYTHE
BROWN.  HARRY
BUCKERFIELD,   MARY  I.
BULLER, MARGARET H.
BUNTING, ROSAMUND G.
BURKE,  CORNELIA C.
BURRIS, DONALD S.
BUTLER, L.  MAY
CAMPBELL,   CHARLES  G.
CAMPBELL, WILLIAM M.
CARDINALL, ERIC R.
CARSLEY, JULIE W.
CARSON, JOHN J.
CARTER,  ARTHUR  W.
CASSELMAN, W. G.  BRUCE
CHAMBERS,  STEWART L.
CHENOWETH,  JOCELYN D.
CHRISTOPHERSON,  KATHLEEN
CHUBB, J. ARTHUR
CHURCH,  EDWARD  J.  M.
CLARIDGE,   CHARLES   A.
CLARK, KATHLEEN D.
CLEMENS, ANN M.
CLYNE,  NORVAL  S.
COLLINS,  FRANK  A.
COREY,  D.   RUTH
CORMACK,  WILLIAM T.
COSTELLO, MARY J.
COY, FILMER R.
CRANE,  GORDON W.
CROSBY,  MARJORIE E.  L.
CULLINANE,  RAYMOND T.
CURRIE, JOHN F.
DALIN, WINIFRED H.
DANIELL, JOCELYN M. D. B.
DARLING, M. KATHLEEN
DAVID, RUTH  A.
DAVIE,  ROBERT G.
DAVIES,   LLEWELLYN  B.
DEAR, WALLACE
DeBECK, HOWARD D.
DesBRISAY,  MARY  E. ",
DesBRISAY,  RUTH M.
DICKIE,  BETTE F.
DILGER, V. VIVIAN
Lab.-hoppy.
107 #»
M$ if '5 :8:#
DIXON, CHARLES R.
DONOVAN, BASIL G.
DRURY, MARY A.
DRYSDALE,   NORMA  K.
DUNCAN,   MARGARET  W.
DWYER,  MELVA J.
EDWARDS, DAIMA
ELLIS, HUGH MacK.
ERICKSON, NORMA A.
FAIRALL,   WALLACE   H.
FARINA,  ALFRED  J.  O.
FARRELL,   F.   MARY
FERGUSON,  NORMAN  C.
FILMER-BENNETT, DORIS
FISHER, E. BRIAN
FLYNN, JOHN P.
FRANCIS,  MARGARET V.
FREEMAN,   VIVA  F.
FRISKEN, JAMES R.
GALBRAITH, D. EWEN
GARDINER, GLORIA E. L.
GARDINER, MARGARET H.
GARDNER,  ALAN
GARRETT,   DOROTHY   E.
GELLATLY, ALLAN E.
GIBSON, DOREEN
GILLARD, S. MEGAN
GOYER,   MARGARET  E.
GRAHAM,  EVELYN  F.  M.
HALL,  J.  GORDON
HALL, RANJIT S.
HALSTEAD, JOHN G. H.
HAMILTON, ISOBEL B.
HAMILTON,  ROY J. A.
HAMMOND,  ARTHUR  B.
HANBURY,   A.   WELDON
HARVEY, ELIZABETH E.
HASTINGS, WILLIAM G.
HOSE, JACK K.
HERBERTS, EDWARD D.
HERBERTS,  LEWIS  T.
HIBBERSON,  ROBERT  J.
HILL, CHARLES J.
HIRANO, TOSHIO
HOAG, AUDREY
HOBDEN,  F.  ELIZABETH
HOLLAND,  ARTHUR  G.
HOLLAND,  KATHLEEN  A.
Library Crammers.
108 HOOSON, WILLIAM
HORSWILL,  SYDNEY R.
HUNTER, ROY A.
HUNTER,  SYLVIA J.
IRONS,   MARGARET  L.
JACKSON,   DOUGLAS   L.
JACKSON, FRANCES C.
JENKINSON, DOREEN E.
JOHNSON, EVA C.
JOHNSON, GORDON H.
JOHNSON,  PHYLLIS M.
JONES,  NEVILLE C.
JUKES, JOAN
KEITH, KENNETH L
KELLS, OWEN C.
KITSON, C. EDITH
LANSDOWNE,   ROSEMARY  L.
LARGE,  RUTH
LAWLER, LAVERNE
LEACH, GWENDOLYN D.
LEBEDOVICH,  STEPHEN
LEE, JEAN-CAROL
LEE, RUTH
LEEDHAM,  DAVID  A.
LIGHTSTONE, ROBERT
LIND, LORNE O.
LIPSETT, C. MARY
LISTER,  MARY H.
LOCK,  VIVIAN  E.  R.
LONG,   CHARLES  F.
LYNN, JAMES F.
MABEE, JEAN M,
MADDIN, W. STUART
MANES, JOHN D.
MARR, K. MAVIS
MARSHALL,   RUSSELL   H.
MARTIN, CAROL M. S.
MATHESON, BERYL A.
MATHESON, HELEN R.
MATHESON, IAN D.
MATTHEWS,   CHARLES   A.
MEEK,  A.  J.  DENHAM
MELLISH,  GLADYS  M.
MEREDITH, PATRICIA M.
MESSENGER,  GEORGINA A.
MILLIGAN,  PHYLLIS  H.
MILLS,  FLORENCE S.
MOE, BARBARA M.
Exams. Are Far Away.
109 99    *if
4 y
aH&£
MOYLS, MARGARET L.
MULHERN,  MERRIE
MUNDELL,   PERCY
McBURNEY, LORNE
McCUAIG,  ELIZABETH
McDIARMID,   LORNA
McDONAGH, JACK E.
MACDONALD, JOHN L.
MACDONALD, MARION,  A. M.
MACDONALD, MARY J.
MACDONALD,   SHIRLEY
McKAY, DONALD M.
McKELVY, MARY E.
McLACHLAN, ROSS S.
McLACHLAN, RUBY J.
McLEARY,  NAN
MacLENNAN,   CATHERINE
McLEOD,  J.  D.  PENN
MacLEOD, ROBERT A.
McLINTOCK, SUSAN M.
MacMILLAN, DONALD J.
MACNAB,  PHOEBE
McPHAIL,  ALIX
McPHEE,  MAURICE  D.
McQueen, Barbara m.
McTAVISH,  MARY
McWilliams, helen c.
McWilliams, robert w.
nash, marygold v.
nelles, thelma m.
nelson, catherine m.
NeMETZ,  PHYLISS R.
NEVISON, JAMES H.
NEWMAN,  BARBARA
NEWTON, JUNE
NOBLE,  DAVE  A.
NORTH, GEORGE A.
OAKES, LILA M.
ONLEE, LILAC L.
ORCHARD,   ETHEL   J.
OTSUKI, JUKO
OUGHTRED,   WILLIAM  T.
OWENS, E. MARY
OXLEY,  GWENDOLINE
PALMER, RUBY A.
PARSONS, TERRENCE G.
PEATFIELD, JOAN
.PEDLOW,  DOUGLAS  S.
Frances Relaxes.
110 PENDLETON, WAYNE S.
PENNY, HARRY L.
PETERSON, ANNIE B.
PETTIE, GEORGE W.
PHILLIPS, BRENDA C.
PICKERING,  MARY  G.
PILKINGTON,  LAURENCE
PLOMMER, ROBERT D.
PRONGER, RALPH  C.
PRONGER, SHIRLEY C.
PROVEN,  NETTIE I.
QUICK,  ELIZABETH  E.
RAVVE, ABRAHAM
RAYNER, PATRICIA M. A.
REDFERN, NANCY I.
RICKETTS, DONALD B.
RIDLEY, EILEEN J.
RITCHIE, HUGH J.
RITCHIE, L. NONI
RITTENHOUSE,  BETTY  E.
ROBERTSON,  DONALD  A.
ROBERTSON,  JAMES M.
ROBIN, DORIS  J.
ROBINSON, CLIFFORD
ROBINSON, GRANT T.
ROCHE,  R.  GORDON
ROGERSON, JOHN
ROSE,  JOHN O.
ROSS, DONALD H. MacR.
RUSSELL,  ROSAMUND A.
SAINT, JUNE A. B.
SALT, LIONEL H.
SAVITSKY, SONIA
SCOTT,  BEATRICE  M.
SCOTT,  NORMA MacD.
SEIVEWRIGHT,  PAMELA  M.
SEYER, JOHN F.
SHAW,  SELMA L.
SHELTON,  SIDNEY
SHEWAN, ROBERT G.
SHILLABEER,  JOHN  A.
SHKWAROK,   WILLIAM   F.
SHOLUND, ALVIN L.
SINCLAIR,  ELEANOR  W.
SINCLAIR, R. MEAD
SKELHORNE,   GORDON  P.
SLATER, MARY A.
SMITH,   HERBERT S.
Bridge Addicts Play While Proctor Kibitxes.
Ill 9- £$
SMITH, JEAN M.
SNADDON,  ANDREW W.
SOUTHIN,  ELEANOR W.
SPARKS,  JOHN E.
SPEARS, DOROTHY H.
SPROULE,  WALTER J.
SPRY, FRANKLIN R.
STEPHEN, THOMAS M.
STEVENSON,  THEODORE  K.
STEWART,  WILLIAM E.
STOESS, CHARLES T.
SUTTON, DOUGLAS M.
SUTTON, EDWARD A. B.
SWINTON, A. HANS
SWINTON,  WILLIAM  A.
TAIT,  JEAN W.
TARRANT,  E.  HENRY
TATROFF,  DANIEL P.
TEMOIN,  BERNARD C.
THOMSON, HELEN
TINDLE, MURIEL A.
TOUHEY, THOMAS B.
TROUP,   IRENE  J.
TUCKER,  NORMA McC.
TWISS, MARY H.
TWIZELL,  MARGARET S.
UGLOW,  ELIZABETH R.
UNDERHILL,  ISABELLA  G.
UYEDA, MARIKO
VAUGHAN,   DAVID  L.
WALKER, GOLDIE E. C.
WALKER,  K. JOAN
WALKER, PHYLLIS M. S.
WALL,  MURIEL N.
WALLACE,  BETTY
WALLACE,   JESSIE  M.
WALLACE, ROBERT B.
WARD,  EVERETT G.
WARDROPER,  WILFRED K.
WARNE,  ROBERT M.
WARNER, MARY E.
WATKINS,   CAROLYN   K.
WATSON, WILFRED
WEBBER,  STUART C.
WEST,  WILLIAM  D.
'   WHITE,  SADIE M.
WIDDESS,  EDWARD  H.
WILLIAMS,  CLARA L.
Freshman "Basketed".
112 WILSON, GEORGE A. C.
WILSON, NEIL L.
WITTER, BEVERLY M.
WOO, ANNE M.
WOOD, BETTY R.
WOOD,  DUDLEY  H.
WOOD, GEORGE
WOOD, GERALD R.
WOOD, JUANITA E.
WOODS, JOHN R.
WOOLLARD,  ELEANOR G.
WRIGHT, "M.   MARJORIE
WYBOURN, EDBROOKE S.
WYLES, THELMA J.
YQUNG, HONOREE G.
YOUNG,  THOMAS  McL.
COMMERCE—
ANNAND, J. DUFF
ASSELSTINE.   JAMES  W.
BARTON, ARTHUR S.
BEALE, STANLEY
BEDDOME, ANNE C.
BLUNT,  JOYCE E.
BOLLANS, FRANK L.
BRETT,  CECIL C.
BROWN, G. GORDON
CANTELL, E. THOMAS
CLARK, KENNETH P.
CLUGSTON, BEATRICE A.
COTTERALL, CHARLES L.
CROMIE, PETER E.
FRANCIS, IDA C.
GILMOUR, WILLIAM A.
GOURLAY, JOHN L.
GOYER,  GERTRUDE E.
GRIGG,  VERNON  H.
HALL, HUGH U.
HANBURY, PAUL K.
HILL,  CLIFFORD J.
HUDSON,  WILLIAM H.
HUME,  DOUGLAS D.
LAWRIE, FRANK D.
LLOYD,  MOIRA  C.
LOGAN, KENNETH T.
LYONS,  RONALD  S.
MERCER,  WILLIAM M.
MORRISON,  J. LEE
MORRITT, JACK B.
MORROW,   MARGARET  E.
■ -j -\Wa4j      ^sr        WW
Sadie White and Friends,
113 3i£ *& I©
McBRIDE,   KENNETH  G.
MacDONALD, DONALD J.
McDONALD, GORDON S.
McDONALD,  IAN  W.
MacDONALD, W. H. K.
MacGOWAN,  KENNETH O.
McKERCHER, R. JOHN
ORR, THOMAS F.
PAISLEY, JOHN K.
PAO, GERSON S.
PERRY,  KEITH  O.
PHYSICK,   MORRIS   C.
PICKFORD, JOHN W.
PIDGEON, EDWARD
PIDGEON, FRANK H. B.
PUNTER, WILLIAM F. G.
ROBINSON,  ERIC W.
ROUSSEL,   DAVID  M.
SCOTT, J. C. MELVIN
SHIGEI, HIDEO
SMEDLEY, JACK V.
STEVENSON,  KYLE B.
STINSON,  JAMES  C.
STRONG, GEORGE F.
THOMPSON, W. HAROLD
WALKEM, CHARLES A.
WALKER, JOHN A.
WHYTE, ROBERT S.
WINRAM, EDNA E.
FINDLAY,  J. G.
LLOYD, N. D.
TELFER, GWEN
Co-eds on way to work
114 Bud Fairgrieve
With difficulties finally straightened out, Arts '44
found themselves with an executive that consisted
of Bud Fairgrieve, president; Gwendolyn DeBou, secretary; and Sandy Hay and Penny Runkle as Athletic Representatives. Dr. Ralph Hull was chosen as
the honorary president.
Biggest departure from the time-worn routine this
year was the combining of the Freshman Class Party
with that of the Sophomores. Since President Klinck
in his address to Arts '44 had stressed the need for
economy in social affairs this year, it was thought
that a combined Frosh-Soph party would be the best
contribution to this end.
Freshman names that made news in athletic circles this year were; Bud Fairgrieve and Ray Gorman
in Canadian Football and English Rugby, Sandy
Hay, who made the Senior A basketball squad, and
the entire rosters of the Frosh rugby and basketball
teams.
The Freshman Class . . . Arts '44
. FROSH!
Derisive, exultant, hurled from the throat 'midst
scenes of battle, that word has been with us ever
since we became a University. It has been an infamous word, too, for who of our dearly beloved
General Public will forget those snake parades
through town, those glorious fights, those egg-splattered, clothes-torn students who celebrated the arrival of a fresh batch of neophyte world-beaters every
September?
But the war stepped in in September, 1940, clamping itself like a gigantic pinchcock on the exuberance
of Arts '44—the 1940 Freshmen—and "Frosh" became
a word of conversation—but a vital one.
And so we of the University looked on as the
Frosh ambled through their annual antics (curtailed
version) which make up Freshman Week — Pushball
games, Big-Little Sister parties, notorious smoker, and
the culminating dance in Brock Hall.
They were just Freshmen during that week . . .
But at the dance something happened to them,
and they became Arts '44, members of the University
of British Columbia. We were proud to accept them,
and we expect great things from them.
Freshman class elections are usually of a sporadic
nature. This year was no exception, and the committee was forced to hold a second election.
Sandy Hay. Penny Ronkle, Gwen De Bou
115 § P M # *
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IS ¥ #
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ABERNETHY, MARGARET J.
ABRAMS,  BETTY M.
ADCOCK, ZELLE
ALLEN, PETER
ANDERSON, J. DOUGLAS
ANDERSON, SYLVIA L.
ARCHDEKIN,   ROY   H.
ARNELL, A. LEON
ATKINS, ELEANOR
AUGUSTINE, BETTY-VALERIE
AVIS, STANLEY F.
BAKONY, LIONEL I.
BALLANTYNE, W.  GEORGE
BALLARD, ISABEL W.
BANFORD, NORMAN M.
BARER, RALPH D.
BARRY,  FRANK W.
BARRY, FRED
BARTHOLOMEW, HAROLD D.
BATTEN,   WILLIAM   R.
BEAVO, WILLIAM A.
BERSEA, KEITH A.
BERTRAM,  GORDON W.
BIBBS, RICHARD M.
BINNIE, ROBERT F.
BISHOP, PHYLLIS D.
BLIGH,  HILDRED N.
BLOCH, INEZ E.
BOALE, BERNICE R.
BODNAR, MICHAEL W.
BOWSTEAD, MARY E.
BOYD, NORA E.
BOYD, RUTH M.
BOYES, MARGARET M.
BRANDON, GEORGE F.
BRATT, HERBERT A.
BREMNER, J. ALAN
BROMLEY,  GORDON F.
BRUCE, MONA L. C.
BRYANT, JAMES L.
BUDD,  JOAN
BUERGE, REUBEN O.
BUNNELL, FRANK R.
BUNTING,  I.  JOAN G.
BURGESS, BERYL M.
BURKE, HAROLD H.
BUTCHART, M. DOREEN
CAMPBELL,  JEAN A.  K.
CAMPBELL, MARY E.
CAMPBELL, N. EVA-JEAN
CAREY, AMY C.
CARMICHAEL, ANDREW J.
CARROTHERS, R. BRIAN B.
CARTER,  S. MacMORDIE
CHALLIS,  LESLIE A.
CHAN KENT, JOSEPH
CHECOV, LOUIE
CHONG, PETER
CHRISTEN, ROSINA P.
CHRISTIE, SYDNEY J.
CHRISTIE, T. DOUGLAS
CHUTTER,  GEORGE P.
CLARK,   BETTE   G.
Freshettes' First Day.
116 CLARK, G. NOREEN
CLARK, JOHN A.
CLARK, JOHNSON B.
CLARKE, WILLIAM G.
COFFEY, P. MARION
COLES,   JOHN  M.
COLLINS,   PETER   J.
CONKEY, ELIZABETH E.
CONN, BARBARA
CONWAY, LORRAINE C.
COOKE, HUGH A.
COOKE, NORMAN E.
COOPER, JOHN B. G.
CROCKER, CHARLES B.
CROFT, MARGARET C.
CRONKHITE, J. MORRISON
CROSBY, ROBERT T.
CROWDER, DORIS I.
CROWELL, CHARLOTTE L.
CRUISE,  GEORGE T.
CRUIT,   RICHARD   N.
CULVER, DENNIS F.
CUNNINGHAM, JACK R.
CURTIN,  FRANCIS  J.
DEAN, ALAN W-
DeBOU,  GWENDOLYN M.
DELLERT, ALBERT
de MACEDO, JOHN B.
DENNIS, LESLIE L.
DENNIS, P. JAMES A.
DENNISON, A. SPENCER
de PENCIER, E. AUDREY
DEVITT, ELEANOR E.
DIRASSAR, LEON G.
DOCKRILL,  JOSEPH  F.
DORGAN, M. MARCIA
DRAKE, EDWARD A.
DRENNAN, G. ALEXANDER
DUDGEON, E. WINNONA
DuMOULIN, PHYLLIS A.
DUNELL,   BASIL  A.
ECKMAN, JAMES S.
EDWARDS, A. DOUGLAS
ELLINGHAM, JOAN C.
ELLIS,  HARRY McF.
ELVIN, DICK W.
ERRICO,  ERNEST
ESTEY, BYRON T.
EVERTON, MARGARET E.
EVERTON, VERNON A.
EYRE, ALAN M. L.
FAIRBANK, DAVID P.
FAIRGRIEVE, WILLIAM C.
FAIRNIE, LOUISE LaR.
FARINA, CHARLIE O.
FARR, DAVID M.
FELL, J. MICHAEL G.
FERGUSSON, OTWAY C.
FERRY, JACK A.
FIELD, RALPH I.
FINLAY, MARY B.
FISHER, HAROLD D.
FITZSIMMONS, HUGH T.
117
Newcomers With Their Big Sisters. tlffWJff *•# §
FLADER, SAMUEL
FLEMING, BRYCE H.
FLEMING,  NORMA W.
FOLEY, FRED R.
FOOT, EDWARD J.
FORSTER, IOHN H.
FOSTER, I. ELIZABETH
FOSTER, MARY L.
FRANCIS, DONALD W.
FRANCIS, FRANK M.
FRANCIS,   JOSEPH
FREEMAN, RUTH I.
FRIZELL, R.  NOEL
FROST, MARION L. G.
GALBRAITH, IOHN B.
GALLAGHER, JACK L.
GALT, WILLIAM T.
GANSNER, NINA M.
GARDINER,  JACK  L.
GARDNER, MELVIN T.
GARNER,   IOSEPH   J.
GARRETT, F.  MARIORIE
GIBSON,  DONALD A.
GILLIES, BARBARA B.
GILLIES,  DOROTHY   I.
GILLIS,  GLENNA H.
GITTERMAN,   CHARLES  O.
GIURIATO,   LINO
GODDARD, PHYLLIS B.
GOGAIN, MARION F.
GOLDING, IOHN W.
GOODMAN, CHARLES R.
GOODWIN, NORMAN L.
GORMAN, RAY T.
GOSNELL, BERTRAM C.
GOULD, R.  ALLAN
GOW, FRANK J.
GRANT, DOREEN M.
GRANT,  WILLIAM   D.
GREGORY,  EDWARD S.
GRIFFIN, F.  PAUL
GRINNELL, IAMES B.
GUICHON, LLOYD J.
GUSTAVSON, ARNOLD E.
HALPIN, ROGER
HAMMITT, VIRGINIA A.
HANDLING, MARY J.
HARADA, TERUO
HARVEY,  HARRY  J.
HASEGAWA,  IAMES H.
HATTE, ROSS
HAZLEWOOD, MARY-GORDON
HEBB, DOROTHY M.
HEWITSON, IUNE M.
HIGGINS, JAMES A.
HIKIDA,  HIDEAKI R.
HILL, ARTHUR E.
HILL, ROBERT W.
HODGE, MURIEL
HODGES, WILLIAM G.
HOLBROOK, ELSIE G
HOLDOM, FRANCES E.  L.
HOPKINS, JOHN A.
"Big Sister" Entertains.
118 HORMAN, ELLY A.   J. E.
HORNE,  PAULINE F.
HOUSE,  MARGERY  S.
HOUSSER,  DAVID
HOWARD,  EDWARD   I.
HUGHES,   EDWARD   N.
HUNTER,   DORRIE   M.
HUTCHINSON, WILLIAM T.
IVEY, DONALD G.
IAMES, RALPH B.
IARDINE, JOHN E.
JARVI, HELGA
JENKINS, ALBERT E.
JENKINS, MARGARET R.
JESSOP, HARVEY C.
JINKS, GORDON MacM.
JOHNSON, ARTHUR C.
JOHNSON, NORMAN T.
JOHNSTON, DOREEN E.
JOHNSTONE,   ALAN   D.
JONES,   HUGH   C.
JOYCE, RONALD N.
KAARIO, EDSEL A.
KADOTA,  CHARLES H.
KAGETSU,  AKIKO
KAWAGUCHI,   JACK   S.
KENDALL,   RICHARD   A.
KENNEDY,   JOHN  W.
KENYON,  KENNETH A.
KERMODE, HARRY  D.
KERR, ROBERT G.
KIDD,  MARY H.
KILET, CYNTHIA  M.
KNOWLES, ROBERT A.
KOBAYASHI,   YUTAKA
KOENIGSBERG, IRVING N.
KOSTMAN,  PHILIP
LAKE,   JUNE  M.
LAM, MATHIAS
LAMBE,  AUSTIN  C.
LANE, RUTH A.
LARGE,    D.    LORRAINE
LATREMOUILLE, BRUCE E.
LAWSON, DAVID A.
LAZZARIN,  FIORETTA
LEAN, ALF H.
LEE, DOUGLAS H.  T.
LEES, DORIS M.
LEIGH-SPENCER,  G. L.
LIGHTHEART, OLIVER L.
LIGHTSTONE, JACK
LIM, MAN Y.
LIND, FRED  O.
LINDSAY, J. ELEANOR
LINDSAY, MARY E.
LINDSAY,    RODERICK
LITTLE, ALICE E.
LITTLER, ADA E.
LLOYD,  GEORGE A.
LOCKE, ELIZABETH M.
LOCKE,   ORVILLE  G
LONG,   JOSHUA
LONG,  KATHERINE  R.
ire
Little Sister Supper.
119 LOUIE, JOHN
LOUIE, QUAN
LOWTHER, ROY A.
LYONS, ORMOND E.
LYTLE,   DENNIS  D.
MAITLAND,  WILLIAM J.
MARHULL,   ELLEN
MARLING,  KATHLEEN
MARSDEN,   ADELE
MARSHALL,  DORIS  P.
MARSHALL,  M.   E.  KAY
MARTIN,  MARGARET  B.
MARTIN, SALLY V.
MASUDA,  GEORGE
MATHEWS, FRANK S.
MENZIES, DORA K.
MERCER,  E.   FLORENCE
MESSINGER,  DOROTHY M.
MIKKELSON,   MELVYN  A.
MILL,   JOHN B..
MILLAR,   DOUG.   A.   J.
MILLER, ALBERT J.
MILLER, ROBERT F.
MILNE,  IACK  E.
MINIATO,   OSWALD  K.
MITTEN,   DOUGLAS  S.
MIURA,   HIDEO
MOHR, FRANK K.
MONTADOR, ROBERT E.
MONTGOMERY,  WILLIAM R.
MOORE,  SHEILA B.
MORAN, JOHN W.
MORRIS,   DESMOND
MORRIS,   FRED   S.
MORTON,  EVALINE  A.
MORTON, JAMES W.
MORTON, ROY E.
MUNRO, DAVID A.
MURRAY, R.  ELAINE
MYERS, FRED C.
McARTHUR,  RAOUL  L.
McBAIN,   MIRIAM   A.
MacBEAN, DAVID P.
McBRIDE, RONALD T.
McCARRY,  JAMES   J.
McCARVILL, CYRIL J.
McDERMID, D.  JEANNE
McDERMID, EDNA M.
McDIARMID, LORNA K.
McDIARMID, MURIEL A. I.
McDONALD, COLIN F.
MacDONALD, J.  MALCOLM
MACDONALD, MARY J.
McDONALD,  RUSSELL  G.
McFADDEN, M. EILEEN
McFARLANE,   M.   E.   R.
McGHEE, DONALD W.
MacGILLIVRAY,  JACK O.
McGregor, f. Christopher
McGUINESS, DAVID
MacINTOSH,  L.   IEAN
McINTOSH, MARY B.
McKECHNIE,   HAZEL   L.
Freshmen Do Battle.
120 MacKENZIE, ALEX
MacKENZIE, D. MUNRO
McKENZIE, EILEEN E.
McKENZIE, RUTH C.
McKEOWN, ROBERT J. E.
McKIE, AUDREY E.
McKILLOP,   MOIRA   W.
McKINLAY, WILLIAM D.
MacKINNON,   GEORGE L.  C.
MacLACHLAN,  MARGARET R.
McLEAN, ALASTAIR
MacLEAN,  EIAN  D.
MacLEAN,   JEAN   C.
MacLEAN,    J.    HARRIS
McLEAN, ROBERT E.
McLEOD, SYDNEY D.
McMillan, mary a.
McMURCHY, LORNE S.
MacPHERSON, ALLAN D.
MACPHERSON,   P.   McA.
MacRAE,   JEFFERY   W.
NAGATA, SHINKO M.
NAIRNE, MILDRED M.
NAIRNE, RONALD S.
NEIL, EILEEN M.
NELSON,  JOHN  A.
NESBITT,  SHEILA  J.
NICKERSON,   D.   G.
NIKAIDO, TAKAKO
NIMMONS, PHILLIP R.
NOBBS, WILLIAM H.  L.
NORDALE, ARNOLD
•NORTON, WILLIAM A.
NYGARD, HOLGER O. V.
OGILVIE,   SHEILA  McD.
OGREN, ARTHUR
OLIVER, HUBERT G.
OLLIVER,   GWENNETH   M.
OLSEN,  JOHN  N.
OLSON, EUGENE A.
ONIZUKA,  SHIGEO
OTTEWELL,  M.  BONNIE
OUGHTRED, AULAY M.
OZEROFF, W. WILLIAM
PANTON, WILLIAM D.
PARNUM, EWART
PASTINSKY,   BELLE
PATERSON, KATHLEEN M.
PATON,  ALEXANDER K.
PATRICK, BARBARA A.
PAYNE, HAROLD R.
PEARSON, YVONNE R.
PEDLOW, ALAN LeR.
PERCIVAL,   JOSEPH  K.
PHELPS,  JAMES W.
PHILLIPSON,   MURRAY
PHILPOT, MARY C.
PHILPS, FRED M.
PICKIN, H.  BARBARA
PIDERMAN, J. PIERRE
POOLE,  DISNEY B.
POOLEY, ROBERT E.
POWELL,   JOHN   R.   P.
Freshettes Watch Brawl.
121 POWELL, REES K.
PRIDE, AGNES G.
PURDON, RICHARD  M.   H.
RAE,  ELIZABETH  B.
RALSTON,   DONALD
RAND,   ROBERT  W.
RAWLINGS,   PHYLLIS T.
REDLICH, BERTA B.
REDMOND, JOHN E.
REED, KENNETH W.
REID, MARGARET McD.
REID,  W.  WALLACE-
REMNANT,   PETER
RENWICK,   H.   MIRAM
REYNOLDS,  AINGELDA ST. L.
RHODES,  HUGH
RHODES, JOHN A.
RIDDELL, WILLIAM G.
RIETCHEL, PATRICIA
ROBERTSON, AUDREY M.
ROBERTSON,   HEATHER
ROBINSON,  DONALD  B.
ROBINSON, J. W. DAVID
ROBINSON, VALERIE J.
ROBSON, DONALD M.
ROBSON, MABEL  G.
ROOTS,  E.  FREDRICK
ROSE,  M.  EVELYN
RUARDI-WICHERS, W. C.
RUNKLE, PENELOPE A.
RUSH,  GEORGE E.
RUSSELL, MARIORIE M.
RYAN,   DAPHNE  M.
SABA,  ALBERT H.
SANDERSON,   PHYL.   A.
SANDISON, ANNABEL
SANDYS, MARJORIE A.
SCATCHARD, SHIRLEY K.
SCHIEDEL, NANCY C.
SCHOFIELD, WILLIAM J.
SCOTT, ELIZABETH A.
SCOTT,   NORMA   E.
SCOUGALL, JESSIE E.
SCRIVENER, JACK V.
SCUDAMORE, JOHN T.
SEMPLE, MARY
SERVICE, P.   KELVIN
SEXSMITH,  RODERIC F.
SEYMOUR,   E.   AILEEN
SHERMAN, PHYLLIS R.
SHIELDS, MERYLE E.
SHIMO-TAKAHARA, L. Y.
SHOJI, HENRY N.
SHORTREED, JAMES F.
SIBLEY, JOHN C. A.
SIMMONS,  PATRICIA A.
SIMPSON, KEITH B.
SIMS, MERVIN H.
SINCLAIR, MARJORIE H.
SINCLAIR, R. ELMER
SLARK, GORDON A.
SMITH, WILMA  G.
SPARKES, CLIFFORD S.
Hail the Conquering Heroes.
122 STEWART,  GERTRUDE  V.
STILES,  EDWIN  H.
ST. JOHN, PATRICIA J.
STRAITH, JOAN M.
STREET,  WILLIAM  A.
STRUTHERS,  JEAN
SWANSON,   CHRIS.   T.
SWEATMAN, HENRY C.
SWEENEY, FAY LOIS
SWORDER, JACK V.
TAMBELLINI,   GEORGE   J.
TAYLOR, BRUCE E.
TAYLOR, EDWARD R.
TAYLOR,  JEAN  E.
TAYLOR, LEONARD H.
TEES, PETER J. A.
TELFORD, ROBERT B.
TEMOIN, PEARL
THICKE,  JOAN  C.
THOMPSON, DORIS L.
THOMSON, M. GERALD
THOMSON, M. PATRICIA
TIMMONS, ANTHONY
TOGURI, SAMUEL G. T.
TOMPKINS,  JUNE E.
TUFTS, AILEEN M.
UNDERWOOD, ELDIN S.
URQUHART,   H.  M.  A.
UYEDA, LILY Y.
UYENO, TEISO
VAN DE BOGART,  HELEN
VAN ROGGEN, GEORGE
VICKERS,   PAULINE
WALDIE, ADAM C.
WALDIE,   ROBERT   J.
WALKER, NOELLE E. E.
WALLACE, JOHN A.
WALLACE, RICHARD
WALMSLEY,  H.  NEIL
WALSH,  HELEN  M.
WALTER,  BRUCE H.
WALTON,  WILLIAM  A.
WARNER, WILLIAM L.
WARREN, MARGARET E.
WARWICK, WILLIAM E.
WATANABE,  SABURO
WATSON, ELIZABETH A. M.
WATSON,   MARY  V.
WATT,   EVELYN   J.
WATTS, WILLIAM B.
WEAVER, JUNE M.
WEBB,  GENEVIEVE
WELCH,  HELEN  P.
WELSFORD,  WILLIAM D.
WESTMAN,  THOMAS  A.
WHIMSTER, MURIEL F.
WHITE,  G.   GEORGE
WHITE,  WILLIAM A. T.
WHITELAW,  GLENN  R.
WICKSTROM,  N. A.  TAGE
WILBUR, WILLIAM
WILLAN,  MARGARET F.
WILLIAMS,   B.   M.   S.
After the Fight Is Over.
123 WILLIAMS, CHESTER J.
WILLIAMS, L. IUNE
WILSON, RAYMOND H. _
WILSON, WILLIAM L.
WISHART,  MARION  M.
WISMER,   JACK
WOO,   IOHN   S.
WOO, MARY M.
WOOD, MARY A.
WOODCROFT, DEREK A.
WOOLLEY, DOROTHY L.
WRIGHT,  STANLEY  G
WRIGHT, S. COURTENAY
WYNESS,   ELEANOR   I.
YATABE, MINORU
YEASTING, ALICE M.
YIP, STANLEY D.
YOUNG, MICHAEL G
YOUNGER,  ANDREW  H.
YUILL, RONALD B.
Subversive Plans ior Brawl.
Faculty and Assistants Relax at 4:30.
124 Artsmen . . . at work and play
I.—"40 Beers." 2.—Sunshine lures them from Library. 3.—Zoology 5. 4.—"Do as I say."
decorate. 6.—"On the Fence." 7.—Perusing the Ubyssey. 8.—Drilling. 9.—Lecture-bound,
the Caf.    12.—Dorothy Stamatis, Candidly.    13.—Fijis in front.
5.—Mary Beale and Janet Walker
10.—Fresh Air Enthusiasts.    11.—To
125 Charlie Parker
Howard McKim
Alan Wallace
Science '41 . . .
Out to the mines, the survey camps, the construction firms, the forests of Canada this summer will go
the current crop of Applied Science graduates, the
class of Science '41. To those various places they
will carry with them all the intensive training that
can be packed into five years of solid study, combined with a practical knowledge picked up in
summer labour.
But more than this, they will carry with them the
good reputation of the Applied Science Faculty at
U.B.C.—a potent factor in their search for employment.
Because the faculty has that reputation to maintain, the Class of '41 has been more than cut in
half through its four years in Applied Science until
now, with Convocation to come, that class represents
the cream of the B. C. science crop.
The fact that there is little diversity in their courses
tends to give" science students that indefinable spirit
of friendship that makes them outstanding as an
organized body. Focus for all Science activity is,
of course, the Science Men's Undergraduate Society, with Science '41 prominent as the committee
lists.
The Science class party, banquet, and the mam
moth Science Ball, as well as the pep meets entailed, were capably handled by S.M.U.S. executives.
Stan Harris, Garth Wade, Art McLaren and John
Gillies were men of Science '41 who helped on the
Science issue of the Ubyssey.
Science '41 had a strong representation on the
Engineers rugby team, as well as being represented
on the McKechnie Cup team by Alan Wallace, the
soccer team by Jim Robinson, basketball by Jack Ross,
and rowing by Bill Lynott. Bill Braidwood was a
member of the Training Club.
In executive ability, Science '41 acted as leaders for the entire faculty. Charles Parker, president, and Herb Kelland, vice-president of A.S.M.E.,
Garth Griffiths, president, and George Crane, executive member of A.I.E.E., Bill Lynott, president
and Alan Wallace, secretary-treasurer of G. M.
Dawson Club, John Beaty of S.M.U.S., and Walter
Moodie, president of Inter-Fraternity Council, are just
a few members of the class active in extra-curricular
activities on the campus.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Archie Peebles; President, Charles Parker;
Secretary-treasurer, Howard McKim; and Athletic
Representative, J. Alan Wallace.
126 ANDREWS, A.  J.—Chapman Camp
Sigma Phi Delta
BEATY, JOHN—Vancouver
Sikma Phi Delta; Rugby
DAVIS, RUSSELL—Vancouver
Chem.  Society
GREENO, DANIEL—Upper Sumas
HARRIS, STANLEY—Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta
HIPKIN, HOWARD—Vancouver
LINDSAY, WILLIAM—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Pi
MIKKELSON, ELMER—Golden
MOODIE, WALTER—Vancouver
Psi Upsilon Inter-Irat. Council
McKIM, HOWARD—Calgary
Bet Theta Pi
Rowing
PURDEY — JAMES—Vancouver
•  Chem. Society
RICHARDSON, ALLYN—North Vancouver
ROBINSON, JAMES—Victoria
ROSENBERG, ELOF—North Vancouver
SANFORD, LIONEL—Vancouver
SMITH, HARRY—New Westminster
THOMAS, DAVID—Victoria
.   Musical Society
GOODE, NORMAN—Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta
HARFORD, GEORGE—New Westminster
JANES, JOHN—Vancouver
MARKHAM, DOUGLAS—Vancouver
Phi   Gamma Delta
WALLACE, WILLIAM—Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta, S.M.S.U., U.E.S.
ZIRUL, MELVIN—North Vancouver
Track, Boxing
ANDERSON, CAMERON—Vancouver
A.I.E.E.
CRANE, GEORGE—New Westminster
Relaxation.
127 DAVIDSON, GORDON—Qualicum Beach
Sigma Phi Delta
Badminton, Swimming
DUKE, LAURENCE—Vancouver
FOSTER, JAMES—Glen Ewen, Sask.
GREGARY,   ALFRED—Vancouver
A.I.E.E.;  Boxing
GRIFFITHS, GARTH—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta
HAILEY, ARTHUR—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta, A.I.E.E.
LYONS, EDGAR—Vancouver
MORIN, DESIRE—Vancouver
NASMYTH, PATRICK—North Vancouver
RYDER, CHARLES—Chilliwack
JOHNSTON, J. RALPH—Invermere
Forestry Club, Boxing Club
KER, JOHN—Vancouver
Forestry Club; Badminton
MAHOOD, IAN—Chilliwack
Forestry Club; Soccer
SPROTT, EDGAR—Vancouver
LYNOTT, WILLIAM- Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta, G. M. Dawson Club Rowing, Boxing
McEACHERN, RONALD—Vancouver
Outdoor Qub
NEWMARCH, CHARLES—Victoria
G. M. Dawson; Track, English Rugby
SMITH, ALAN—Vancouver
Delta  Upsilon,  G.   M.   Dawson
Club;  Canadian Football
THOMPSON, ROBERT—Vancouver
Track
WALLACE, ALAN—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Pie, G. M. Dawson Qub
English Rugby
WILLIAMS, EDWIN—Vancouver
G. M. Dawson Qub; Badminton
BARCHARD, FRANQS—Trail
BRAIDWOOD, WILLIAM—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Sigma
Training Qub, C.O.T.C.
CHINN, FRANK—Vancouver.
Chinese Students Club
GILLIES, JOHN—Vancouver
Desk Job.
128 GRANGER, THOMAS—Vancouver
HASKINS, REGINALD—Kelowna
Sigma Phi Delta
KAILLOR, GORDON—Vancouver
KELLAND,  HERBERT—Vancouver
Sigma Phi Delta,  A.S.M.E.
Skiking
MILLS, WILLIAM—Vancouver
A.S.M.E.
McLAREN, THOMAS—Vancouver
A.S.M.E.
NAZZER,  DONALD—Vancouver
NICHOLS, WALTER—Edmonton
Phi Kappa Pi
PARKER, CHARLES—Revelstoke
Sigma Phi Delta, Pres. A.S.M.E.
Musical Society; Skiing, Hiking
RATTENBURY, DAVID—Kelowna
SHINOBU, EIICHI—Vancouver
STOREY, JOHN—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi
WADE, GARTH—Kamloops
Sigma Phi Delta, A.S.M.E.
WYNESS, DONALD—Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi, A.S.M.E.
MAXWELL, JOHN—Swift Current, Alta.
OLSON, GEORGE—Nelson
RAE, ARTHUR—Vancouver
Phi Kappa Pi, Mamooks
BURNET, FREDERICK—Kimberley
Sigma Phi Delta
IVERSON, BAYARD—Oliver
MERRETT, JOHN—Victoria
Phi Kappa Pi, G. M. Dawson Club
MORTON, NORMAN—Portage la Prairie
McMILLAN, GORDON—Vancouver
MACRAE, RODERICK—Winnipeg, Manitoba
Sigma Phi Delta
PATIENCE, PATRICK—Kimberley
ROSS, JOHN—Britannia Beach
Basketball, Rugby
TOWNSEND, STANLEY—Oyama, B.C.
G. M. Dawson Club
English Rugby
Metalethargy.
129 Back row: R. Potkins. Harold Fargey.
Ian T. Richards, Alan Hopper.
Front row:
Dr. H. D. Smith
Science '42 . . .
The class of Science '42 this year entered as
fourth year engineers and split up into its more
specialized divisions of engineering. The largest
group was the Chemicals, who numbered 23. In
diminishing order came Mechanicals with 19, Electricals 14, Miners 12. Once again the Foresters outnumbered the Civils. Smallest groups in the faculty
were Geology and Metallurgy, who had six and
three members respectively.
Taking the place of the usual spirited athletics,
military training occupied the boys' very limited
spare time. The vast majority of the fourth year class
were members of the Canadian Officers' Training
Corps, and attended noon hour lectures in Army Engineering.
Although bowed down by curricular activities,
the men of Science '42 were not loath to take steps
in seeing that student government was upheld on the
campus.    One of the most active of the class was
Charlie Nash, junior member for the past year on
Student Council, and a candidate for the office of
President for the year 1941-42.
Others were Rex Parker and John Brynelson,
president and treasurer of S.M.U.S., Sid Rooney,
president of the Outdoors Club, Jack Creighton, vice-
president, and Chester Matheson, treasurer of the
Forestry Qub, Gordon Bell, president of the Mining
and Geology Club, and John Collins, junior member
of the A.I.E.E.
Names that made news in the curtailed sports
calendar were Doc Miller, Jack Turner, Bink Fairbum,
Binks Drummond, Ian Richards, Fraser Shepherd,
Rod Renshaw, and Bob Potkins. Dr. Harry Warren
rendered valuable service in English Rugby and
Cricket.
The cartooning of Bill Angley was featured in the
Ubyssey and the down-town papers.
130 ANDERSON, THOMAS T.
ANGLEY, WILLIAM F. P.
BENNETT, REGINALD B.
BUSHELL, CHARLES H. G.
FARGEY, HAROLD T.
GORDON, ARTHUR D.
HARVEY, BRUCE F.
HOPPER, D. ALAN
McGOWAN, JOHN
ORR, OSCAR F.
PARHAM, DONALD S.
POTKINS, ROBERT A.
POULSON, JOHN H.
RUSH, IAN C. MACD.
SMITH, ERIC L.
WHITE, CHARLES E. T.
BELL, HARRY R.
DOUGLASS, M. KEITH
HARDING,  JOHN   H.
McKENZIE, WILLIAM C.
STEWART, JAMES N.
THORSON,  VICTOR
BASTIN, DOUGLAS H.
BRADFIELD, ALBERT W.
BUNDY, LEONARD P.
CHU, GAN D.
DAVIE ,HUGH S.
HILLS, J. FRANKLYN
JAMIESON, FRASER
MILLER, RICHARD C.
NOSWOTHY, FRANK M.
RICH, ROYCE
WALTON, E. NORMAN
ZITKO, LUDOVIC
BOSS, NORMAN H.
CREIGHTON, JOHN D.
FLYNN, JAMES E.
FRASER, ALAN R.
KAGETSU, HAJIME
MATHESON, CHESTER R.
RICHARDS, IAN T.
THOMPSON, ELMER A.
YOUNG,  W.  EDWARD  L.
-^■B ^ea. <%*%.     *   —   ^ ' —. -
Concentration.
131 ABRAMS, JACK H.
CARLISLE, DONALD
DARLEY, HARRY P.
GROSSS, WILLIAM H.
HILCHEY, GORDON R.
KERMODE, EDWARD J.
RENSHAW, RODNEY E.   '
BARTON,  EDWARD  S.
BRUCE, NORMAN C.
BRYNELSEN, JOHN A.
CASSON, H. VINCENT
CURRAN, HENRY M.
GRANGER, JOHN M.
JOHNSON, WILLIAM J.
LOGAN, JACK D.
NASH, CHARLES W.
PARKER, REX C.
ROXBURGH, J. MALCOLM
SHELDON, STANLEY W.
TAKAHASHI, SABUO
TURNBULL, ARTHUR W.
MORRISON, BERNARD H.
AP ROBERTS, G. EVAN
BENNETT, JOSEPH H.
BLAIR, WILLIAM B.
DAVIES, KENNETH R. G.
DRUMMOND,  ALAN  S.
EDWARDS, DONALD M.
FAIRBAIRN, DENNIS W. L.
FITZPATRICK, SAMUEL T.
GATENBY, LISLE B.
HAYWOOD-FARMER, ROBERT
McARTHUR, JOHN P.
SINQAIR, G. WILLIAM
SNOW, JAMES C.
TUCKER, JACK N.
Sciencemen and Work.
132 Dr.  McHroy,  Honorary President.
Mack Buck. Sandy Buckland.
Campbell Williams.
Science '43 . . .
"We're the guys that build pour bridges,
And construct your power line;
Though we never have much money,
We always love a darn good ti/me."
So runs a popular science song that might almost
be the theme of Science '43. For no one could accuse
the boys from the mines, factories, and icewagons of
ever leading an uneventful life on our campus. They
worked hard and played hard all year in keeping
with the Science tradition, and entered into almost
all fields of campus activity.
In sports, as always, the class was well represented.
Mack Buck, Bob Field, and John Zabinski starred in
Canadian football. Norm Gill and Ed Benson were
prominent in ice hockey, Hughie Livingstone managing the team. Lending their skill to the soccer team
were George Campbell, Don Evans and Walt Green.
Throughout the entire year the class maintained
a high scholastic standing, and at Christmas the
comparatively small class boasted five first class
students with averages well over eighty per cent.
In the ranks of the Canadian Officers Training
Corps, Science '43 had more than its share of leaders.
Two of the officers, Walt Goodwin and Jack Colvin,
were supported by six Non-commissioned Officers.
Claiming the services of the small class, the Musical
Society featured six class members among its stars.
Jim McCulloch and Dennis Leong wrote arrangements and played in the Varsity Orchestra.
A large proportion of the active membership of the
Varsity Outdoor Qub was composed of students from
Science '43. The surprising energy of the Outdoor
Club was due to the fact that the club's roster was
replete with El Stuffo-men, anxious of getting away
from it all in the hills of the North Shore.
133 f'Wf i<f m m
BACKMAN, ARVID H. V.
BAKER, DUDLY L.
BALDWIN,  JOHN  H.
BANNERMAN,   DONALD  K.
BEI.EY,  J.  PATRICK
BENSON,  EDWARD
BOURNE, EDWARD A.
BROWN, IVAN T.
BUCK,   FRANK A.  M.
BUCKLAND,  JOHN A. C.
BURNS,   DAVID
CAMPBELL,   GEORGE   C.
CARLYLE, D. GORDON
CARTER, RONALD B.
CHARLESWORTH, F. H. B.
COPP, STANLEY S.
COX, LEONARD
DAY, ALVIN A.
DELEEN, JOHN L.
DUNELL, G. ERIC
ELLIOTT, ALBERT H.
FIELD, ROBERT C.
FINCH,   GORDON   L.
FORRESTER,  ANDREW G.
FRASER, GEORGE B. R.
GARDINER, ALEXANDER H.
GELFAN, DAVID
GILL, NORMAN A.
GOODWIN, WALTER H.
GORDON,   FRANCIS  J.
GRAHAM, HAROLD M.
GRAY, JOHN S.
GREEN, WALTER C.
HADDAD, MICHAEL A.
HAMMOND,  JOHN  S.  N.
HANDFORTH, R. VICTOR L.
HARRISON, JOHN S. M.
HATCH,  NOLL  J.
HOLE, JOHN S.
HOOKINGS,   PAUL  H.  H.
HOOPER,   PERRY   McF.
HORNE, LESLIE R.
HUGHES,  R.  B.  CHALMERS
HUTCHINSON, BRUCE
JESSUP,  DOUGLAS G.
KING, A. DAVID
KULLANDER,  MARVIN  O.
LEAR, HAROLD K.
Shirt Sleeves in Applied Science Lab.
134 LEONG, DENNIS T. S.
LEPSOE, CHRISTIAN H.
LIVINGSTONE, HUGHIE
LOW,  WILLIAM R.
MANN, CLARENCE W. J.
MASON,   ERNEST
MILLER, JAMES W.
MORRIS, H. RODNEY
McCAY, JAMES
McLEOD, A.  ALLAN
MacRAE, HECTOR R.
McTAGGART, KENNETH C.
ONTKEAN, ORVILLE M.
PATTERSON, LAWRENCE A.
PATTERSON,  STANLEY G.
PICKARD, MURRAY K.
PITMAN,  DUNCAN L.
PRIEST,   JACK
PYLE, R. GORDON
ROACH, STEWART W.
ROGERS,   JOHN   S.
SCHIEDEL, IAN H.
SMITH, FRANK F.
SMITH,  WILLIAM  R.
STEEL, WILLIAM E. J.
STEWART, A. JOHN
STEWART, HAROLD C. E.
STUSIAK, MICHAEL
SUTCLIFFE, ERNEST D.
SWEENEY, MAXWELL P.
TABATA MINORU
TAIT, ROBERT J.  C.
TAYLOR,  HUGH J.
THOMPSON,  J.  VERNON
TSUJIMURA, KOICHI
WEED, JOSEPH D.
WEINER, HARRY S.
WHITE, PATRICK J.
WHITE, RONALD J.
WILLIAMS, F. CAMPBELL
WILLIAMS,  LLOYD
ZABINSKI, JOHN
& % ?S 4*
HUi    Im
Prof. Shows How.
135 Jim Scott, John Slater, Bob Davidson
Science '44 . . .
After a year on the campus as Artsmen, one
hundred and seventy-six students donned the red
sweater of the Science faculty, and became staunch
defenders of the rights of Science and El Stuffo.
Probably the most outstanding student in this class
was the one girl, the only girl in the entire Science
faculty, Edna Clarke. In spite of the levity with which
her appearance was greeted at the first few lectures,
Major A. H. Finlay
she gradually impressed the rest of the class with
the seriousness of her intent, and was finally accepted
as a true student of Science.
Meeting the challenge of extra work imposed upon
them by the burden of military training, the neophyte
Sciencemen were yet able to uphold all the traditions
of their faculty by maintaining a high scholastic
record.
Although the class felt the absence of intra-mural
sport, athletics played a major part in the extracurricular activity of Science '44.
Starring for the second successive year on the
Senior A basketball team was lanky Jim Scott, who
was well up in the race for individual scoring honors.
In other realms of sport, Science '44 was ably represented by Al Narod and John Hicks, English Rugby;
Paul Cote, Canadian Football; Bob Davidson, Track;
Alf Bonutto and Jim Goodman, Hockey; John Simpson,
John Slater and Barry Sleigh, Rowing; and Jack Garble and Howard Shadwell who performed as team
managers.
Science '44 class executive consisted of: Major
Allman H. Finlay, Honourary President; Bob Davidson, President; John Slater, Secretary-Treasurer; Jim
Scott, Athletic Representative.
136 ABBOTT, HUGH M.
AFFLECK, ANTONY C.
ANDERSON, BLAIR W.
AUCHINLECK, GILBERT F.
BAAL, G. GILBERT G.
BACON, FRANK C.
BAILLIE, ALEXANDER
BAKER, F. BRUCE
BALL, HAROLD  W.
BARLOW,  FREDERICK  J.
BAYLY, LEMUEL J.
BEATON, STANLEY J.
BELL, S. WILLIAM
BENNETT, ORVAL W.
BENTALL, ROBERT G.
BLAKLEY,  HERBERT  A.
BLEZARD, ROY J.
BLUMENAUER, GEORGE H.
BONUTTO, ALFRED L.
BOURNS, JOHN D.
BRAMALL, BRIAN L.
BURROWS, MICHAEL
BURTON,  JOHN A.
CAINE, GEOFFREY R.
CALDERHEAD, GORDON A.
CALDWELL, JOHN R.
CARLILE, IACK C.
CARLYLE, ALLAN M.
CARNCROSS,  CHARLES  A.
CARROTHERS,  P.  JOHN G.
CHESTNUT, R. GLENN
CHOW, JACK K.
CHRISTIE,  HUGH A. S.
CLARKE, EDNA A.
CLAY,  CHARLES H.
COCHRANE, JAMES W.
CONFORTIN, JOHN C.
COOKE,  DEWAR B.
COOPER, ALEXANDER C.
COTE, PAUL T.
CROSS, GERALD H.
CURRIE,  ALLAN
»»•;«■. pjjL &
Lab.—Two Heads Are Better Than One.
137 Sy 7 S> **
DAVIDSON, ROBERT A.
DENNYS, KENNETH W.
DICKSON, GEOFFREY A.
DIXON,  HUGH  C.
EDDLESTON,  JAMES  A.
EKMAN,  FRANK O.
FILMAN, NORMAN J.
FITCH, HANDLY F.
FOSTER, LEO W.
FROST, PAUL J.
FULLER, F.  MICHAEL
GALL, LOUIS
GIFFORD, ROSS J.
GITTERMAN, LOUIS H.
GODFREY, GERALD F.
GOODMAN,  JAMES  E.
GORDON, GEORGE A.
GORSE,   FREDERICK   W.
GRAVES, HAROLD B. R.
GRIMBLE, WILF G.
GUSH,  JOHN B.
HAILE, ISAAC
HANDA,  ROY
HANEY, D.  FRANCIS
HAUSCH, ROBERT C.
HICKS, JOHN B.
HITCHCOCK, JOHN H.
HOLY, HAROLD W.
HOOD, JOHN A.
HURT,  H.   ALTON
JAGGER, PAUL S.
JONES, MICHAEL J.
JULSON, O. MELVIN
KATO, YOICHI
KERMODE,   DONALD  J.
LABELLE, EUGENE P.
LANGENEK,  FREDERICK
LEGEER, RONALD J.
' LESLIE, J.  PATRICK
LIGHTBODY,   ALEXANDER
LIVINGSTON,  DONALD A.
LONG, JOSEPH D.
Alan Carlyle and trio
138 MARTIN, LIONEL
MATSUI RICHARD
MATTSON, NELS H.
MILLIGAN, GEORGE B.
MOSHER, ALLISON F.
MOTHERWELL, VICTOR  G.
MURRAY, GEORGE
MURRAY, JOHN M.
McADAM, J. CLIFTON
McCARTER, DONAL C.
McCARTER,  WILLIAM L.
McEWAN,   ROBERT  R.
MacKAY,  RONALD N.
MacKAY, WALLACE I.
MacKINNON, DONALD  F.
McLEAN, DONALD
McLEOD,  DONALD  F.
McLORG, TERENCE W.
MacMILLAN, DONALD G.
McNaughton, james h.
McTAGGART, HUGH D. H.
NAROD, ALVIN J.
NASH,  FREDERICK H.
OATES,   ROWLAND   C.   J.
O'DYNSKY, PETER G.
OLES, JACK E.
PEARSON, CARL E.
PORTER,  JAMES  A.
RICHARDSON,  JOHN M.
ROBINSON,   DENNIS   E.
ROME, ALEXANDER H.
ROSE, DAVID J.
RYMER, KENNETH W.
SANSUM, JOHN D.
SAUNDERS,  HAROLD L.
SCARISBRICK,   RICHARD  G.
SCEATS, HUGH B.
SCHJELDERUP, VILHELM R.
SCOTT, JAMES A.
SERAPHIM, ANDREW F.
SHADWELL, HOWARD  J.
SHAW,  ALEXANDER  J.
Prof. Instructs first year boys
139 SHORE, ALBERT G.
SHUMAS, FRED
SIMPSON, JOHN D.
SLATER, JOHN S.
SLEIGH, E. BARRY
SMALL, FREDERICK
SMITH, H. LESLIE
SMITH, HERBERT S.
SMUIN, EUGENE G.
SOULSBY, ALAN ST. G.
SPEAKMAN, GEORGE
STAMATIS,   GEORGE
STEWART, LEONARD J.
STORY, JACK W.
STREET, A. VERNE
STUART,  WILLIAM B.
SWERDFEGER,  JOHN H.
SYME, THOMAS D.
TAYLOR, JOHN D.
TAYLOR, NORMAN E.
TAYLOR,  R.  DOUGLAS
THOMPSON,  C.  H.  A.
THOMSON,  STANLEY G.
THORNTON-TRUMP,   W.   E.
THORSON, EMIL
TIEDJE, JOHN L.
TILSON,  RITCHIE
TIMLECK, GERALD B.  D.
TOOMBS,  E.   HAROLD
TORGERSON,   HAROLD   P.
WALLACE, JOHN M.
WALLING, OLIVER J.
WHEATLEY, GORDON H.
WILDING,  MALCOLM F.
WILLOX,   GEORGE J.
WILSON,   CHARLES   L.
WINTEMUTE, JOHN R.
WOODMAN,  THOMAS
WORKMAN, ALLAN B.
YIP, CECIL E.
YIP, ROY W.
Embryo Engineers and Girls.
140 We are the Engineers . . .
1—Ed. Bourne surveys. 2—Prof. W. B. Coulthard. 3—Doc. Miller experiments. 4—Electricals. 5—Learning to cook. 6—Prof.
Hrenikoff. 7—Bob McAllister. 8—Pres. geology club in lab. 9—Prof. Pretious. 10—Prof. Harry Warren watches. 11—
Concentration—Nash, Richmond. 12—Clarence Fulton masked. 13—Charlie Newmarch blocking.   14—Nash Boys break speed limit.
141 r>
Patricia Cumming
Cam Gilmour
Agriculture '41 . . .
Through the maze of uncertainty that hangs so
ominously over the outcome of the present conflict,
one thing is becoming increasingly apparent; the
greater emphasis to be placed on agriculture, following the war's culmination.
Economists throughout the world are pointing to
the tragic wastage, enormous expenditure, and forecasting a world-wide famine, unless a definite program of conservation of resources, plus added work
on perfecting the means of production through scientific application is put into effect.
Towards this end, the Faculty of Agriculture has
dedicated its every effort, striving to supply Canada
with a ready supply of trained agriculturists, capable
of caring for all the needs of the farmer.
In full realization of this great need, the senior
class of Agriculture has quietly rallied to the side
of their faculty, without the publicity accorded to
war research in applied science, but with all the
burning zeal of the true scientist.
One of their greatest achievements towards this
end has been the organization on the campus of a
branch of the Junior Canadian Society of Technical
Agriculturists, whose purpose it is to promote a
better understanding between technical and practical
agriculturists through a discussion group which includes third and fourth year students.
In an effort toward fostering a better friendship
between co-ed agriculture undergraduates and their
professors' wives, the women students, led by the
seniors, used Brock Hall as a setting for a series
of teas.
In lighter vein, the senior men inserted a skit on
the Fall Banquet program much to the amazement
of the faculty, and did much to make this year's
Arts-Aggie Dance a great success.
As a proof of the growing faculty-spirit in Agriculture, a spirit which threatens to overshadow that of
Science, was the Aggie rugby team, formed to take
the place of intra-mural activity. Lacking practice,
the "farming fools" put up a very creditable display
against their bitter rivals, Science.
Although the smallest faculty class on the campus,
Agriculture '41 was still able to put one man on this
year's Student Council in the person of Todd Tremblay, president of M.U.S., who also starred as
McKechnie Cup ruggerman.
The class executive of Aggie '41 was as follows:
President: Cam Gilmour;
Secretary: Patricia Cumming.
142 ANSTEY, THOMAS—Victoria
Maj., Hort.; Min., Botany Biol. Discussions, V.O.C.; Skiing.
BYERS, JOHN—Vancouver
Maj., Animal Husb.; Min., Poultry
COX, EDMUND T.—Rossland
Maj., Animal Husb.;  Min., Agronomy
Phi Kappa  Sigma,  Big  Block   Hub,
CUMMING, PATRICIA—Steveston
Maj., Dairying,  Bacteriology, Chemistry
Min., Poultry Husbandry
DONEGANI, GRANT R.—Eburne
Maj., Econ.; Min., Animal Husb. Phi Delta Theta
EEK, CATHERINE—Fanny Bay, B.C.
Maj., Agronomy; Min., Botany
GILMOUR, CAMPBELL G. —New Westminster
Maj., Agronomy; Min., Chem., Biology; Phi Gamma Delta
GRAY, NEIL T.—North Vancouver
Maj., Dairying, Bacteriology Phi Kappa Sigma;  Rugby
GRIEVE, THOMAS—Vancouver
Maj., Agronomy; Phi Kappa Pi
MILLARD, ROBERT POOLE—Vancouver
MITCHELL, PHYLLIS DOROTHY—Vancouver
Maj.,  Dairying, Bacteriology
Min., Agron., Chem.; Archery
MONCKTON,  JOHN—Victoria
Maj., Animal Husbandry
Min., Agronomy Outdoor Club, Soccer
MORGAN, JOSEPH FRANCIS—Vancouver
Maj., Dairying, Chem.; Min., Agron.
McEWEN, IOHN MURRAY—Vancouver
Maj., Economics   Min., Agronomy, Animal Husbandry
McKIM, ANSON—Vancouver
Maj., An. Path.; Min., Bacteriol.
Agric. Discussions Club, Jr. C.S.T.A.
OLDFIELD,  JAMES—Saanich
Maj., Animal  Husb.;   Min., Agronomy
PARISH, GEORGE—Vancouver
SAKAMOTO, ARTHUR—Whonnock, B.C.
SALISBURY, LAWRENCE—Vancouver
Maj., Chemistry, Dairy Sc.
Min., Bacteriology,  Animal   Husbandry
TAMURA, YUKIO—Haney
Maj., Agronomy
TREMBLAY, FREDERICK TODD—Vancouver
Maj., Agronomy
Min., Dairying
Phi Gamma Delta
English Rugby
CUMMING, ALISON—
GARRISH, ARTHUR—
REAGH, DENNIS—
STROYAN,  WILLIAM-
Aggie students confer
143 u-\^
Lorraine Thomson
Ian McSwain
Agriculture '42 . . .
Keeping pace with senior agriculture students in
their efforts to aid in the rehabilitation of Canadian
economy after the war, junior farmers, Aggie '42,
swung in behind the Aggie bandwagon, lending
enthusiastic support to the Junior Canadian Society
of Technical Agriculturists.
Aggie '42 took an energetic part throughout the
year in all campus activities, and was represented in
many organizations, chief of which was the Agriculture Discussion Qub.
Athletics came in for its share of the attendance of
junior agriculturists, although, as in every class,
murals had gone by the board.
Chief claim for prowess on the field was the superlative rugby team the Agriculture faculty formed to
do battle with similar teams from Arts and Science.
Many, indeed, were the juniors on that gallant team.
Also a standard bearer in sport was pink-cheeked
Wally Johnston, one-handed shot artist of the Senioi
A basketball team.
It is of significance, too, that the sport representatives for all Agriculture are both in the junior class,
being Nora Neilson and Allistair Young.
As in former years, the social highlight of the Fall
term was the annual pre-Chistmas party given by the
honorary president of the class, Professor E. A. Lloyd.
Careful not to succumb to war hysteria, juniors
worked off excess steam at pep meets, danced sedately at the Arts-Aggie and revelled in the "corn",
pure, cob, and liquor of the traditional if not official,
Aggie Barn Dance.
This year's junior class executive consisted of:
Honorary President: Professor E. A. Lloyd.
President:   Ian McSwain.
Secretary-Treasurer:    Lorraine Thomson.
144 BENTLEY, ROBERT O.
BRIDGE, TOM-
BROWN, KEN R.
CHANG, JUNE
CLEMENT, JOHN W.
CUTHBERT, W. JAMES
DAVIES, JOHN C.
FERGUSSON,  DONALD  N.
FULTON, RONALD F.
JOHNSTON, WALLACE M.
LIDSTER, ECHO L. R.
LORD, TERENCE M.
MAXWELL, JOHN C.
MYLROIE, ROBERT L.
McCUAIG, IAN B.
McMULLAN, M. JEAN
NEILSON, NORA E.
NOVIKOFF, MORRIS
PEARCE, JOSEPH M.
THOMSON, J. LORRAINE
TOWNSEND, GEORGE C.
WAINWRIGHT,   PHILIP  R.
WATT, ALEXANDER W.
145
Ashcan for footstool. Mary Mulvin and John Roe
Agriculture '43 . . .
True agriculturists for the first time in their University career—this was the boast of Aggie '43 as they
shook off the effects of a year spent in the Arts Faulty
as newcomers, and moved into their chosen work.
It was this year one of the biggest Sophomore
classes ever enrolled in Agriculture, and with the
promise of Agriculture becoming increasingly important on the campus, these men of the earth got
down to serious study. Warned by their faculty of
the need in the future for trained scientists of the
soil, Aggie '43 set about to get that training.
But despite their curricular work, and the omnipresent bugaboo of military training, Aggie '43 did
take time off to join in extra-curricular activity, with
special emphasis on athletics.
The Track Qub claimed the services of three
sophomore   agriculturists  with   Don  MacLean,   Bob
Lloyd, and Ian McDonald all vieing for honours.
Walter Friker played wing three-quarters for the McKechnie Cup English rugby team. Laurie Young
played on Charlie Hitchen's soccer squad, while Phil
Fitz-Hames turned out for rowing. Al Young shone
in both basketball and the shot-put.
A well-attended banquet was held in the Fall, and
a vast majority of the class joined the rest of their
Faculty in the Spring Barn Dance.
Three Aggie '43 men joined His Majesty's Service,
with Andy Johnston going overseas in the First Survey
Regiment of the Canadian Artillery, and Jack Heal
and John Ryall joining the Airforce.
The class executive was comprised of: Honorary
President, Dr. Berry; President, John Roe; Secretary-
Treasurer, Mary Mulvin.
146 BRADNER, FRANK E.
BUERK, ROBERT C.
CLAYDON, GEORGE W.
DALE, J. PETER B.
DILWORTH,   J.  GERALD
FARLEY, KENNETH F.
FERGUSSON, CONRAD N.
FITZ-JAMES, PHILIP
FOLEY, RICHARD B.
FRIKER, WALTER F.
GOODWIN, MARTIN B.
GRAHAME, RICHARD W.
GREEN, CHARLES A.
GUICHON, URBAN J.
HEAL, STEPHEN J.
HUNTER, DOUGLAS R.
KILLICK, STANLEY R.
LETHAM,  W.   HERBERT
MARSHALL,   ROBERT  A.
MERRYFIELD, JACK W.
MOYLS, ADRIAN W.
MULVIN,  MARY L.
MacCARTHY,  JAMES A.
McDONALD,   IAN  J.
MacSWAIN, IAN C.
PLANTA, CARMEN
RIPLEY, THOMAS  A.
RIPPON,   ARTHUR   W.
ROE,  JOHN  A.
RYALL, JOHN P.
SANDALL,  FRANCES  W.
SHORE, ALAN W.
SMITH,   ALEXANDER  F.
SWACKHAMER,   DAVID
TAMBOLINE,   FLORENCE   R.
TURNER, STUART W.
VAUGHAN, RODERICK
YOUNG, ALASTAIR, J.
YOUNG, DAVID B.
YOUNG, SIMEON L.
Sophomore Aggies on guard.
147 Paul Buck.
Kathleen Lacey.
Agriculture '44 . . .
Despite word to the contrary from the Registrar's
Office there is such a thing as a Freshman class in
Agriculture, this year Aggie'44, and they elect an
executive, hold banquets and other celebrations, and
work towards establishing a unity between themselves, that far outdoes the efforts of any other of the
many classes on the campus.
Bigger and better than ever is the boast of this
Qass of '44, for they have an enrollment of sixty,
more members than any other class in Agriculture
history. The confusion in distinguishing between a
Freshman Aggie and a plain Freshman lies in the
complexity of their respective courses.
Frosh Aggies have the alternative of taking a two-
year Industrial Course, one of the most practical
courses offered at the University, or they can work
towards the usual four-year Bachelor's degree.
Of consuming interest to every member of the class
is the attempt to foster a class spirit, a feeling of
cameraderie between all of its sixty members.
Towards this end the class holds a banquet near the
beginning of the term, given by the Faculty, to help
acquaint everybody in the class.
A sort of get-together, the students find this form
of entertainment of much more use than the traditional 'orientation' of the ordinary frosh.
Biggest event of the year, however, comes early in
the Spring, when they band together for their annual
jaunt to Agassiz.
Here, they stage judging contests on the Government Experimental Farm, with rivalry keen, the cups
awarded to the students coming first in the many
events. After the judging, a banquet is held, at which
the prizes are given out, and conviviality flows between student and professor alike.
Two members of Aggie '44 found the time to spare
from their studies (for it is a thorough going course)
to make names for themselve in the sporting world.
Both Sandy Hay and Lynn Sully played on the
championship Senior A basketball team.
The executive for Aggie '44 this year, consisted of:
President, Paul Buck; Secretary, Kathleen Lacey.
148 ASH, A. BRUCE
BLAIR, ROBERT C.
BUCK, PAUL A.
CARSON, DOUGLAS J.
CLARK, JOHN D.
CLARKSON,  L.  TREVOR-
COHEN, THEODORE
COOK, DOUGLAS T.
DAVIS, GORDON L.
EAKINS, JAMES J.
EXCELL, STEPHEN E.
FARLEY, KATHRYN A.
GOODMAN, MARTIN H.
GOODWIN, C. REX
HAGGART, DOUGLAS A.
HAY,  DONALD  A.
HO, THOMAS K.  K.
HOOPER, FRED. H.  S.
HUNTINGTON, ARTHUR R.
KING, J. DAVID
LACEY, KATHLEEN M.
LANE, ROBERT B.
McCAMMON, JOHN T.
MACDONALD,  JAMES  A.  S.
MACFARLANE, J. ALAN
McINTOSH, GLORIA C.
McLEOD, MELVILLE C.
McMANUS, GERALD F.
McMillan, robert h.
nolson, james a. s.
noble, stanley r.
pearson, harold h.
pinchin, victor l.
racey, r. stewart
reid, james a.
reifel, george h.
robinson, john
rolfe, william a.
sully, lynn k.
swan, robert e.
thomson, ronald m.
turner, jack h.
wright, norman s.
The new crop.
149 1—Stocking feet in lounge.   2—Mamooks.   3—Spring dance.   4—Group   Shot.     5—Contrast.     6—Chief   MitchelL     7—Full
ahead.   8—The worse for wear.   9—Buddy watches.    10—Pierre, Lister and Pat.    11—Over.    12—Archery fans.    13—Part oi the
Band.    14—Library scene. JEAN V. ANDERSON
ELIZABETH M. BALFOUR
MOIRA C. BREMNER
HUGH. G. CHRISTIE
MARION K. FLEMING
MARION E. FOSTER
EMILY A. FRASER
MARIANNE R. LOURIE
EVELYN E. SADLER
JANET L. SELDON
KATHLEEN SKAE
HELEN M. STEVENSON
ISABEL G. STOTT
NELL K. TRAPP
HONOR E. VINCENT
MARGARET E. WHITELAW
DOUGLAS H. WORTH
HELEN L. WRIGHT
Twenty-five B.A. graduates of the University are
continuing on with their education this year, working
toward a diploma in Social Service, one of the growing professions of the province.
The enormous task of caring for the underprivileged, and helping to clear out the slum areas is but
part of the great task which confronts students in
Social Service.
As would be expected, field trips play a large part
in the work toward the diploma with calls being
made on many of the local institutions.
As a part of the social activity of the class, two
teas were held, one in February for the supervisors,
and another late in March for the public health
nurses.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Douglas Worth; Vice-president, Emily Fraser; Secretary-treasurer, Kay Skae; Social Convenor, Nell
Trapp.
151 ADAM, J. KIRSTEEN
BAKER, M. ANNE
DRIVER, JOYCE L.
GULLOCH, ENNIS
HICKS, MARY N.
MUNGEN, ISABEL L.
YAMAMOTO, NANA
AVIS, MARGARET L,
BALL, MARGARET
BOLTON, NANCY
COFFEY, DORIS M.
CROSS, JOSEPHINE
FLECK, JANET S.
HYSLOP, MARY I.
MANN, ALISON M.
MUNRO, MAE E.
McCORKELL, BEVERLY G.
ROWE, PHYLLIS S.
STEWART, ELIZABETH J.
THOMPSON, JOAN M.
BANFORD, PAULINE E.
CHIPPERFIELD, NORA J.
COCHRANE, RUTH C.
GOBLE, MARGARET A.
JAMIESON, DOREEN L.
JENKENS, A. ELIZABETH
JOHNSON, SHIRLEY H.
Cramming.
152 LADNER, DOROTHY M.
McKAY, JEAN C.
PEPPER, DORIS B.
ROBERTSON, MARGARET
TROUT, M. FERNE
WALKER. JEAN M.
WRIGHT, LEORA R.
TAYLOR, M. GAYLE
CAMPBELL, ISABELLE—Vancouver.
Alpha Gamma Delta
CURTIS, KATHLEEN—Vancouver.
DARBY, KATHLEEN—Vancouver,
Alpha Gamma Delta.
HOWARD, EDNA G.
MILLAR,   MARGARET—Vancouver,
Alpha Phi.
MACDONELL, MARION—Sardis.
STANIFORTH, MARJORIE—Vancouver.
WEIR, JENNY McM.
BUCKLEY, ALICE E.
CARTER, DORIS E.
DODS, MYRTLE J.
HIND, DOROTHY M.
HOLLAND, EVELYN S.
JOHNSON, NELLIE
MARTIN, JEAN E.
MEGAW, MARGARET M.
MUIRHEAD, KATHLEEN M.
McCLURE, ALMA M.
Mcdowell, marjorie e.
pinchbeck, marjorie
More than a quorum.
153 ADAMSON, P. RAY
AVIS, BARBARA L.
BARTON, EDGAR C.
BIRNIE, ELIZABETH H.
BORELLI, JAMES V.
BOYD, ELEANOR G.
BUSBY, CONSTANCE I.
CAYDZIEN, ESME C.
COLLINS, ROSEMARY R.
DOHERTY, NORAH
DRAPER, H. LEIGHTON
DUCKLOW, ALBERT J.
DUNCAN, MORRIS R.
FULTON, MARY L.
GARSTIN, LAWRENCE F. H.
GLASS, GEORGE E.
HANN, HELEN M. E.
HEWITT, KATHERINE B.
HOLDOM, MARY W.
HORN, PATRICIA H.
HUMFREY, FRANCES E.
JOHANSON, LILLIAN V.
JOHNSTON, JEAN E.
JONES, DOROTHY MAY
KEATLEY, PATRICK C.
LAYCOCK, GLADYS A.
MILLING, EDITH M.
MOE,  JOHN G.
McARTHUR, JOAN R.
MACAULAY,   ARCHIE   M.
MiHHnuHl
A. Macaulay, Rosemary Collins, Jack Rush.
Pauline Scott
154 macaulay, johnina m.
McCaffrey, Audrey e.
mcdiarmid, maureen n.
macdonald, june g.
McDONALD,  RUTH  E.
MACEWAN, PHYLLIS J.
McNEILL, MARGARET T.
McPHEE, EDWARD I.
PAUL, ARTHUR B.
PELLANT, E. ROY
PHILPOT, DOROTHY J.
PULLINGER, PERCY B.
PYM, FLORENCE C.
RALPH, JOYCE E.
RATTENBURY, JOHN A.
RITCHIE, SHIELA R. J.
ROSS, R. HELEN
RUSH, JACK T.
RYAN, NORA
SCOTT, PAULINE I. L.
SHERRATT, DOROTHY M.
SINCLAIR, EVELYN B.
SWAN, FLORA McK.
THOMPSON MARGARET K.
WARNE, JOHN W.
WEISS, ROSE
WILBUR, G. LOUISE
WRIGHT, IRENE M.
JOHNSTON, J. R. VANCE
Faculty parade.
155 1—On the college steps.    2—Games and Work.    3—Informal group.   4—Lectures and notes.
Anglican College
The Rev. H. R. Trumpour.
Those patrons of rubber-neck busses who scrutinize
the severe architecture of Anglican College and regard the building as a monastery would receive a
jolt if they know how little in common the College
has with such an institution.
True enough Theology, the queen of the sciences,
is therein studied, but studied not in the cold, austere
manner of monasticism, but rather in the cheerful
light of freedom of thought and toleration.
Nor is the College anti-social, for in its "Lit. and
Ath."it has an active student society formed to promote camaraderie among the students. During their
annual "At Home" and the Oratorical Contest, the
theologians played host to more than three hundred
The College lost the services this year of their
beloved Dean Gemmill who retired, but the students
were fortunate in obtaining Rev. William Gower to
carry on the work as Dean of Residence.
The past year has been one of significance for the
College. The spirit of fellowship that has existed
among all the men, and the seriousness of purpose
with which they undertake the preparation for the
ministry is full proof of  the reality of their motto
"Vita erat lux hominum."
156 1—Around the discussion table.   2—References.   3—At work.   4—In the library.
7—Bookworms.
-"Two heads
6—Study time.
Massive concrete tower reaching upwards to the
heavens symbolizes the faith with which students
at Union College prepare for the minstry.
Union College represents the merging of three
theological colleges, and has enjoyed at least 44
years of existence in the province.
First start was made in 1893 when Columbia College was opened by the Methodist Church. Then in
1908 the Presbyterian Church founded Westminster
Hall to be followed in 1914 by the incorporation of
the Congregational College of British Columbia.
In 1923 Ryerson College was established in Vancouver, and in 1927 amalgamated with Westminster
Hall and Congregational College to form what is
now known as Union College.
Although those beneath its roofs are students
seriously pursuing Theology, relaxation is urged, and
a friendly spirit of rivalry in athletics exists between
them and the neighboring Anglican College.
Lyall C. Johnston and Charles O. Richmond are
seniors graduating from the College. The full appointment of Gerald B. Switzer, Ph.D., as professor of
Church History and Religious Education was
announced.
Union College
The Rev. Dr. J. G. Brown.
157  Spirit of sportsmanship
upheld in . . . Maurice Van Vliet . . . P. E. Director
Once more we pay tribute to the popular Director
of Physical Education. Maury is now in his sixth
year at the University, and each year only deepens
the mystery of how we ever got along without him.
Every year finds Mr. Van Vliet undertaking more
and more responsibility. First he took over the position of Head Coach of the Canadian Football team,
then the Track team, next came the Senior "A" Basketball team. All this was in addition to his regular
job of supervising the inter-class activities and general physical education classes in the gymnasium.
Ever since coming to U.B.C. Maury has wanted to
install a compulsory course of physical education for
all first year students. Before he could put it into
effect a state of war was declared, and the idea was
postponed. However, this year, in conjunction with
compulsory military training on the campus, the
military authorities instituted a system of physical
training classes. The logical man for the job was
Mr. Van Vliet. In order to be fully versed in Army
requirements Maury took a one month course in an
Army camp in Alberta last summer, and while there
qualified as an officer.
The present plan is in effect similar to but more
extensive than that proposed by Mr. Van Vliet
himself.
The results of Maury's organizing ability is evident
in the timetable now in effect at the gymnasium.
Every afternoon has been carefully budgeted in
order to accommodate both the army groups and
all the interested students who have enrolled in the
many gym classes.
160 H. Lumsden, G.  Donegani,  J. Harmer,
Dr. Dickson, Dr. Cameron.
Men's Athletic Directorate . . .
The Men's Athletic Directorate is the controlling
body in men's sport on the campus. All teams are
under its direct supervision, and the directorate is in
turn responsible to the Student Council.
On the board this year were two faculty members,
Dr. Cameron and Dr. Dickson; Jim Harmer, president
of Men's Athletics; Maury Van Vliet, Director of
Physical Education; Grant Donegani, president of the
Big Block Club;  and Ernest Teagle,  student representative.
The Awards Committee has one of the most difficult
tasks at the University. Trying to decide which
athletes have been outstanding during the year and
who have contributed most on any one team requires
very detailed work.
The committee this year was composed of two
faculty members, Dr. Hutchinson and Dr. Warren;
Director of Physical Education, Maury Van Vliet;
President of Men's Athletics, Jim Harmer; two members of the Big Block Club, Tod Tremblay and Doug
Todd; and president of the Big Block Qub, Grant
Donegani, who was the chairman of the committee.
.  . . and Awards
T. Tremblay, J. Harmer, G. Donegani
D. Todd
161 Back Row: Bob Field, Spencer Wallace, Mack Buck, Todd Tremblay.    Middle Row: Evann Davies, Ed. Cox, Ranli Mattu, Jim Harmer.
Front Row:   Charles Long, Campbell Williams, James Mainguy, Grant Donegani.
Men's Big Block .
This year the Men's Big Block Qub has continued
its policy of policing any University function whether
in the auditorium, the stadium or the gymnasium. The
club is not only willing but anxious to help in any
way it can. Most of the members are campus leaders and they have developed a very efficient organization.
Membership in the club is automatic. All that is
necessary is for a man to win the major athletic
award either as an active player or as a senior manager. During the past year the club held its third annual home-coming luncheon. It was held in the Brock
Hall and was, as usual a success. This affair affords
a fine opportunity for the stars of former years to contact the men who are following in their footsteps.
Another innovation this year was the complete club
mailing list. This was no easy assignment, as it
meant locating the present address of every man who
has ever won his big block at the university. With
the files complete it will now be possible to contact
these men and keep them informed of activities on
the campus.
The executive for the past year was: President,
Grant Donegani; Secretary, Evan Davies; Treasurer,
Graham Finlay.
162 May 11, 1916
Nov. 29, 1940
Howard McPhee - - - In Memoriam
163 Miss Moore . . . P. E. Director
Miss Moore was appointed Women's Physical
Education Director in 1936. Since that time she has
been in charge of all women's Intermural activities
on the campus.
She is very popular with the girls. One of the reasons for this is the manner in which she has tried to
introduce classes which would be both useful and
enjoyable. She believes that the girls should gain
some lasting benefit from their physical training.
During the past five years she has considerably
broadened the variety of her courses.
In this respect she began classes in folk and tap
dancing. This has proved invaluable to girls who are
taking Educational courses at the University. The
girls have shown their appreciation by forming large
classes.
Miss Moore has found the greatest response in her
play and playground courses. Women taking teach
ers training and social service have given this class
the biggest attendance on record. The director has
found that a greater number of girls are becoming
more interested in activities which will benefit them
in later work, and this is in accord with her own ideas.
The old sport of archery is a favorite of Miss Moore.
She has shown such enthusiasm and proven such a
capable coach that in the last few years interest attained new heights on the campus. She has developed
several fine shots.
There has been a record attendance during the
past year. More than one thousand girls registered
for at least one, and a great many took part in several classes. Miss Moore was very well satisfied with
the results and they serve as a fine compliment to
her ability.
However, it is her desire to see every girl in the
University taking part in some class, either for educational purposes or for recreation.
164 Miss Moore. Dr. Hallamore, Ruth Wilson, Jean Eckhardt.
Beverley Matthews, Nancy Martin
Women's Athletic Directorate
The women's Athletic Directorate has direct control and administration of all women's athletics on
the campus. It acts in an advisory capacity and is in
turn responsible to Student Council.
This year the women adopted a system which is
very similar to that used to control men's athletics.
The executive has been abolished and the directorate is the sole governing body.
The directorate has to pass on all budgets pertaining to athletics .They must judge the worth of clubs
and teams from a standpoint of participation and
achievement. This is necessary in order to lighten
the work of the Council Treasurer.
Also this body has the responsibility of appointing
managers for all teams. They endeavor to choose
girls who are interested in the sport but who for some
reason cannot or do not wish to actually play the
game.
All trips and arrangements with leagues come under the jurisdiction of this body. They make arrangements to have either a faculty representative or a
member of council accompany a team as chaperon.
Whenever a visiting team is invited the directorate
arranges for their entertainment.
One popular innovaion this year was the idea of
inviting schools from the United States to come to
the U.B.C. for 'playdays'. The only day held this
year was with Western Washington College of Education. The girls played volleyball, badminton, ping
pong and had an archery shoot. It was very informal
and teams were mixed in order that the girls from
both schools could become acquainted.
The directorate is made up of two faculty members,
the Director of Women's Physical Education, the
President of Women's Athletics, two student representatives elected by the above and one sudent who
is elected secretary by the women of the student body.
The directorate this year was composed of: Ruth
Wilson, chairman; Dean Bollert and Dr. J. Hallamore,
faculty representatives; Beverly Matthews, secretary;
Nancy Martin and Jean Eckhardt, student representatives.
165 Back Row:   Betty Muir, Pat Carey, Nancy Martin, Ruth Seldon, Jean Eckhardt, Jean Thomson, Lillian Johanson, Helen Matheson.    Front
Row:   Gerry Armstrong, Pauline Scott Elizabeth Maclnnis, Valerie, Gardiner, Ruth Wilson, Rose Mary Collins.
Women's Big Block .
. . and
Awards
Dr. Hallamore. Miss Moore, Gerry Armstrong, Ruth Wilson.
Inset:   Nancy Martin.
This year the Big Block Club has existed as a
purely honorary institution. There has been no request for its services for ushering or any other duty.
As a result many of the girls have lost interest.
There have been no meetings nor is it likely that
one will be held this year for the discussion of activities.
The club did not have the luncheon which has
been the highlight of former years. Later in the year
it is planned to give a tea for the girls who are to receive minor awards. At that time the presentations
will be made.
The girls are looking forward to the picnic which
will be held immediately after completion of the
Spring examinations. This will give both the new and
the old members of the club an opportunity to become
better acquainted.
The girls are not even sure of their executive but
the following have been submitted: Dr. J. Hallamore,
faculty representative: Gerry Armstrong, President;
and Betty Muir, Secretary.
166 Wearers of the Blue and Gold . . .
167 1 ' m
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Sandy Hay
Pat  Flynn
Lynn Sully
Jack  Ross
Varsity's invincible basketball squad
This has been the most successful year since the days of
the "Gold Dust Twins". At
the time of writing Varsity is
waiting for the prairies to decide the other finalist in the
Western Canada playoffs.
Entered in the Inter-city League the Thunderbirds ran up a
string of seven straight wins. They won their first
game after the holidays and then lost four of the next
seven games. As a result they finished the season
tied for first place with Angelus. In a 'sudden death'
game, Varsity won the bye into the finals by a single
point.
The team made only one short trip to the United
States. They lost the first game to Centralia 39-46,
but defeated St. Martin's 53-50. The star of the trip
was Norm Armstrong who was subsequently declared
ineligible. Everybody had a good time and stopped
off in Seattle as guests of Hec. Edmondson, coach of
the University of Washington.
In a return game, played as a Red Cross benefit,
Varsity defeated Centralia 54-45.
Barton beats Harlem
168 Van Vliet
Brud Matheson
Wally Johnston
Doug Pedlow
Photo courtesy Lloyd Turner, Province Staff Photographer
John Ryan Art Barton
wins provincial championship
Once again the Senior team acted as hosts and
stooges for the colored Harlem Globe Trotters. The
pro team put on its usual crowd-pleasing exhibition
and left no doubts as to why they are champions of
the world.
The squad received a bad scare when it was rum
oured that Norm Armstrong, Doug. Pedlow and John
Ryan had not obtained their marks in the Christmas
examinations. However, to the great relief of all concerned, the eligibility committee ruled, that Armstrong
was the only man who had to be dropped.
Varsity recovered from their slump when they won
the bye into the city finals. They went on to defeat
Angelus three straight and left no doubts as to which
was the better team.
In the provincial playoffs the Thunderbirds met
the Victoria Dominoes. The Dominoes were Dominion champions three years ago and vowed that nothing would prevent them from winning again this
year. As usual the series was bitterly fought and
seats for all games were at a premium.
The first two games were played in the U.B.C. gymnasium. In the first game Varsity was off its game
and trailed the Islanders until late in the fouth quarter.
169
He sho can Jump. Jim Scott
Bob Scott
Tom Cantell
Wally Johnston
However, grim determination and superior condition
were not to be denied and Varsity won 37-32.
The next night Varsity had command throughout,
in a slow defensive game. At no time did the Dominoes hit their stride. Result. .. Varsity 40, Victoria 29.
With the Dominoes still threatening to win three
games on their home floor the teams left for Victoria.
Nearly one hundred students accompanied the squad
for moral and vocal support. The game was close
but the Thunderbirds led all the way.
It is now an accepted fact that Maury Van Vliet is
the best coach in the province. He has continually
taken raw kids and developed them until they become the best in Canada. His credo is condition, the
best and plenty of it. Also he does not believe in
throwing away sure things. A fine example of this
is the startling percentage of free shots that his boys
have piled up this season. Every man on the first
team has been introduced into senior company by
him. The only exception on the whole team is Sandy
Hay who saw a little action with Tookes last year.
Under the managerial system this year Bob Scott
was in charge of all basketball on the campus. Tom
Cantell and Stu McMorris were his first lieutenants.
Tom managed the boys on the floor while Stu has
handled the 'gates' for the playoffs.
THE TEAM
Jim Scott—The big rangy forward who was runner-up for league scoring honors. Jim has really come
through when points were needed. During playoffs
John Ryan
Art Barton
170 Doug Pedlow
Jack Ross
Norm Armstrong
Lynn Sully
That torrid Angelus series.       Lloyd Turner Photograph
has averaged fifteen points a game or better. Rated
tops by Van Vliet.
Pat Flynn—The "workhorse' of the team. Paddy
won the scoring championship this year. Plays centre but has been a tower of strength on the defense.
Brud Matheson—Brud has supplied the steadying
influence which has been so necessary this year. He
is a fine playmaker and one of the best guards in
the city.
Art Barton—'Lefty' has an almost unstoppable shot
which has puzzled opponents all year. Has proved
the sensation of the season in his first senior year.
The coolest man on the team, it costs points to foul
him as he rarely misses a free shot.
John Ryon—'Jo-Jo' is the little guard who never
smiles on the court. Has a very deceptive dribble
and can shoot with the best of them. Never seems to
have an off night and has more fight than anyone on
the floor.
Doug. Pedlow—fill arms and legs, Doug, proved
hard to get by. With the five mentioned above he
formed the six man team which saw most action during the year.
Wally Johnston—A junior, Wally started slow this
year but improved each time out. His one-handed
shots are good for lots of points if he is 'on'.
Sandy Hay—Last year with Tookes but didn't see
much action, has developed fast, is tall and a good
shot.
Jack Ross—Jack returned after several years absence. Used sparingly but rounded out a strong second string.
Norm. Armstrong—Ruled ineligible at Christmas
just when he was beginning to prove himself a prolific scorer.
Lynn Sully—Lynn was signed when Armstrong
left.
171 Hold 'em Varsity!
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D. Nichols
Canadian Football season one of
J. Farina
Because of military restrictions it was necessary
to curtail the football schedule to four games. The
team entered the Inter-city League against Victoria
and Vancouver and played a home and home series
with each. Varsity managed to win one game from
Vancouver but lost both encounters with Victoria.
Their second meeting with Vancouver, in the
Homecoming game, produced the wierdest finish
ever witnessed in the Stadium. Varsity had the ball
inside Vancouver's twenty yard line . . . score
tied. The Thunderbirds tried for a deadline kick.
Desperately Vancouver returned the kick but it was
partially blocked. The ball bounced from player
to player until a Vancouver man finally broke into
the clear and passed to a team-mate who completed
the one hundred and five yard run to a touchdown
and the winning points. There was not even time to
kick off again before the final gun ended the game.
W. Gardiner
J. Tucker
D. Orr D. Ralston
172
M Buck G. Finlay
R. Gorman
outstanding successes and failures
E. Teagle
Ernie Teagle, Jim Harmer, Graham Finlay, Gus
Carmichael and Johnny Farina returned to star in
the backfield. The nucleus of the new line were
Oscar Orr, Bob Currie, Ranji Mattu and Jack Tucker,
whose experience was of great help to the freshmen.
Ray Gorman, the star of last year's High
School champions, was the best prospect, and great
things are expected of him next year. He did the
kicking and plunging from the fullback position.
Another first year star was Hunt Wood, the elongated
end who won a starting spot and proved to be one
of the strongest men in the line. Dave Nichol and
Bill McGhee also proved their worth this season.
The credit goes to head-coach Maury Van Vliet
and line-coach Niel Watson, the best coaching team
in the league, and to the great spirit shown by the
freshmen and upperclassmen who turned out for the
first time. G. Macfarlane was senior manager.
B. Fairgrieves
G. Carmichael
A. Byers
H. Swinton
B. Currie
173 I ■
T. Stewart
B. Fcdrgrleves
W. Fricker
T. Meredith
Military training costs senior Rugby
J. Rose
It is the end of a dynasty. It is hard to believe
but for the first time in history the Thunderbirds went
through a season without winning a single game. It
has been years since the team failed to bring back
at least one cup to grace the trophy case in the
Library.
However, in all fairness, an explanation is in
order. Because of the military situation on the
campus it was decided to enter a team in only the
McKechnie Cup series against Victoria and Vancouver Reps. This meant that Varsity had to give up
the Miller Cup without even contending for it. Then,
too, the Canadian Football squad claimed Mack
Buck, Jim Harmer, Ernie Teagle, Jack Turner and
Ranji Mattu before Christmas. Harmer, Teagle and
Tucker managed to get into two games, but Mattu
passed up the sport this year. There was plenty of
material on the campus but it was difficult to get the
men out for the long grind, especially when the four
games were spread over a six month period.
Despite the lack of competition a great deal of
M. Buck
R.  Held
J. Mainguy
174 A. Wallace
E. Shepherd
D. Ralston
team the McKechnie Cup
I. Richards
credit is due to Tom Stewart who this year was in the
unique position of coaching both Varsity and the
Vancouver Reps. He was never able to put the same
team on the field for two games in succession, which
explains why the famous Varsity teamwork was only
spasmodic, but he did marvels with the turnouts he
got at practices. The game against Victoria in the
Stadium was very well fought, and the student team
came close to upsetting the champions.
Tod Tremblay, a great three-quarter, returned to
the game after a year's absence to become the team's
major scoring threat. The forwards had Jim Main-
guy, Al Wallace, Evan Davies, Mack Buck, Jack
Bingham and Jim Harmer from last year. Ian Richards was back to bolster the wing line.
The pick of this year's freshman class were Al
Narod and Walt Ficker from Victoria College, and
George Rush, Jack Rose and 'Bud' Fairgrieve.
Much credit for keeping interest high belongs to
Tom Meredith, the busiest man on the team.
A. Narod
G. Rush
T. Tremblay
175 L. Fournier
- L. Fournier
Along with all other athletics on the campus this
year the Track Qub has had to restrict its activities.
Also the fact that American colleges do not begin
their season before the middle of April made it
difficult to arrange meets with them before school
closes.
Despite all handicaps, the University of Washington team has been invited here for a meet in April,
and if international restrictions allow, the Thunderbirds expect a great fight. The annual High-School
vs. Varsity meet will be held sometime in March.
The future looks bright for next year with five
lettermen returning: Campbell Williams, who has
developed into the fastest sprinter at U.B.C. since
the late Howie McPhee; Lionel Fournier, the 'iron
man', who does everything from hurdles to heaving
Stars of the Cinder Track
R. Lloyd
S. Maddon
B. Lloyd
C. Matthews
S. Maddon
C. Williams
176 Campbell Williams, Lionel Fournier, Stu Maddin, Doug Edwards, Norm Armstrong, Bob Lloyd, Doug Lee, Albert Dellert
Ed Bakony, C. Matthews. Ed Cox. Ian McDonald. Bob Davidson. Len Truscott
. . . prepare for their season
Front Row:
the shot, and is coholder of the university high-jump
record; Ted Scott, the middle distance runner; Jim
McCammon, who stars in the field events; Don McLean, a half-miler who is also next year's senior
manager.
Other men who are returning with a year's experience are: Jim Brown, sprints; Norm Armstrong,
holder of B. C. junior high-jump record; Bill Swinton,
junior Canadian mile champ; Stu Madden, 440 yards;
Ian McDonald, half-mile; Mead Sinclair, pole vault;
and Don Ralston in the dashes and 440.
Three promising freshmen were uncovered this
year in Doug Lee, C. Wickstrom, and Mike Young.
Once more the team has benefitted from the
coaching of Maury Van Vliet, the former Oregon star.
Ed Cox has been the hard working senior manager
this year, and will be back in September to lend his
experience to next year's squad.
Jim Brown, C. Williams. Bob Lloyd, L. Fournier. Doug Lee. Ted Scott, C. Mathews, Ed Bakony.
177 Badminton Club shows great promise
&
The "B" team consisted of Jean Eckhardt, Joan
Morris, Jean Thomson, Ida Francis, Mary Alice Wood,
Stew Burris, Ken McBride, Dave Waddell, Alan
Stevenson and Denny Thompson.
Members of the "D" team were: Mary Semple, Tish
Thomson, Anne Clemens, Muriel Whimster, Jocelyn
178 1—Muriel Whimster and Hugh HaU. 2—Mary Alice Wood and Denny Thompson. 3—Mary Semple and Kennedy MacDonald.
4—Frank Pldgeon. Group picture: Back Row: Hugh HaU, Ken MacDonald, Peter Allen, Frank Pidgeon, Howard DeBeck. Front
Row: Ann Clemens, Mary Semple, Tish Thomson, Jocelyn DanielL Absent: Muriel Whimster.
Daniell, Kennedy MacDonald, Frank Pidgeon, Howard DeBeck, Hugh Hall, Pat Leslie and Peter Allen.
The university was well represented in the various
open tournaments held in Vancouver and on the
Island. Jean Eckhardt was the 'shining light' in
carrying of the Vancouver Island singles title, and
was runner up in the women's doubles and in the
mixed doubles. Jean also reached two finals in the
combined Pacific Coast and B. C. Championship
meet, losing to Eleanor Young in the singles. The
surprise of the above tournament was the 'upset' win
by Ken McBride and Stew Burns over the seeded
team of Johnny Samis, former Canadian single
champion, and Stu Barnard, in the open doubles
event. The Varsity pair then advanced to the semifinals before bowing out to the eventual champions
Mustart and Strachan. Dave Waddell was ousted in
the first round of singles.
The only B. C. champ, on the campus is Kennedy
MacDonald who played in great form to win the
B. C. handicap singles championship.
At the time of writing the Qub championships are
getting under way. Dave Waddell is defending his
singles crown and Waddell and Jean Eckhardt are
trying for a repeat win in the mixed. Burris and
McBride are the present men's doubes champions.
Jean Eckhardt is aso co-holder of the women's
doubles with Joan Morris, as well as being last
year's singles queen.
A handicap tournament is also under way which
will give the junior members an opportunity to develop under competitive  conditions.
179 1—Left to right: Bob Morris, Dennis Culver, Alex. McKenzie, Bob Miller, Barry Sleigh, Hugh Skeets, Alf. Ogilvie, PhlL Fitz-iames.
Fred Hooper.    2—John Slater.    3—Putting the oars away.   4—Out   of   storage.    5—Fred   Hooper.    6—Don   Kerr.    7—Lowering
away.    8—Practice run.
Rowers maintain tradition . . .
This year the Rowing Club began working out on
the first of October and has maintained a bi-weekly
schedule all year.
Despite the lack of competition, there has been a
fine response to the call for new men who have won
more than half the seats in both heavyweight and
lightweight boats.
Two meets are planned in the spring. Washington
has invited Varsity to a meet in Seattle on May 2,
while Oregon is bringing its Jayvee and lightweight
crews to Coal Harbour, probably on April 5.
The club was fortunate in obtaining Ned Pratt as
coach during the spring session. The lack of an
experienced coach has been a great drawback to
the club in former years.
The Heavy boat included: John Slater, Terry Parsons, Pat Leslie and Guy Curwin of last year's crew,
with Charles McNeely, John Simpson, Austin Lambe,
Mel Julson and Norm Goodwin being the new men to
make good.
The Light boat included: Phil Fitz-James and Barry
Sleigh, the only holdovers from last year, Hugh
Sceates, Alf Ogilvie, Bob Morris, Miller, Fred Gorse
and Dennis Culver.
Slater, Parsons, Fitz-James and Sleigh are the foremost men of the veterans; McNeely and Simpson are
new men deserving special mention.
President was Don Kerr; Secretary, Phil Fitzjames;
Treasurer, Terry Parsons; Crew Captain, John Slater;
180 1—J. Chatwin and V. Street.   2—Dr. H. V. Warren.   3—R. Morris.    4—J. Chatwln and J. Rush.    5—J. Chatwin and J. Brandon.
Cricket. . . with ties of Old Land
When they rang down the curtain last September
on the third year of Varsity's cricket endeavours, still
another triumph had been added to the remarkable
list of exploits which have marked Thunderbird par-
participation in Mainland Cricket circles.
Winners of the Fyfe Smith Shield in 1939 by virtue
of seven straight late-season victories, the university
XI this summer took the only other trophy open to
them—the Con Jones Cup, emblematic of the championship of the First Division.
The Varsity XI had the services of Dave Carey for
only six games, but was fortunate in having, for
most of the season, Geof Robinson, who took second
place in the batting averages and shared wicket-
keeping duties with Malcolm McGregor.
Basil Robinson (37.84), Geoff Robinson (29.00) and
Dr.  Harry Warren (23.45) led the  season's batting
averages for the club. For the third successive summer, stock bowlers Bob Morris and Basil Robinson
with 45 and 69 victims respectively, secured more
than 100 wickets between them.
Fielding was again a strong point of the Qub,
with the brilliant efforts of such well-known athletes
as Doug Wilson, Frank Turner, Malcolm McGregor
(the latter a capable wicket-keeper-batsman who
played half the season with a broken thumb), and
Dave Carey. Three individual centuries were
recorded, one by Carey and one each by the Robinson brothers, and in this department, too, the university entry led the league.
Executive of the Club included: President, Ted
Strongitharm; Secretary-treasurer, Ed Barton; Captain
and League Delegate, Basil Robinson; Vice-captain,
R. Morris.
181 f f
mtfe ■     *    '■   »
Back Row: C. Hitchens (coach). S. Roach. Fred Sasaki. Spenee Wallace, Walter Green, Dennis Leong, Jim Robertson, Lourie Young.
Roy  Hamilton,  George North.  Ken  Eldridge  (manager).
Front Row:   Doug Todd. G. Stamatis. G. CampbelL J. Rush. B. Herd. J. Morton.
Soccer. . . one highlight of Varsity sports
This season has brought more injuries than any in
the past. No less than five of the star players were
laid up. Influenza and crocked knees took the biggest toll. The loss of these men naturally had a great
effect on the team's play, and as a result, Varsity
slipped badly in the league standings.
Despite these obstacles there was no lack of spirit
on the squad. At time of going to press the team has
advanced to third place and have hopes of doing
better before the season ends. The injured men are
gradually rounding into shape again and their presence is already helping a great deal.
Soccer has one of the longest seasons on the
campus since league play begins in October and does
not end until the middle of April.
Charlie Hitchins, the coach again this year, has
been the spirit behind Varsity soccer for many years,
and has developed many fine players. Ken Eldridge
was the hard-working manager for the season, and
much of the credit is his for ensuring another fine
year.
Deserving of special mention are: Jack Rush, Doug.
Todd, Fred Saski and Spenee Wallace, all veterans of
three or more Varsity seasons. Don McLean and
Dennis Leong shared the goalkeeping duties and
made a good job of it. Jimmy Robertson and Jim Morton were the best of the freshmen.
Robertson has been a great help to the team. He
has starred in every game this season and has
proved himself to be one of the best halfs in the league.
182 Ruby Palmer. Brenda Phillips. Norma Frith, Ruth Wilson. Helen McWilliams,
Jean Thompson, Bob Osborne (coach).
Women's Senior "B" Basketball. . .
This has been one of the most successful years
that the girls have enjoyed in several years.
The team again advanced to the playoffs. Out
of fifteen league games the squad lost only four.
They defeated the strong Western Mutual entry to
win the city championship. Then they made the trip
to Sardis where they defeated the home team to
annex the Lower Mainland title in a 'sudden death'
game.
At the time of writing the team is preparing to leave
for Powell River to compete in the Mainland playoffs.
If they come out on top again the girls travel to
Victoria for the coast championship. If they win
there, and the girls are optimistic, they have the right
to challenge the B. C. Senior "A" champs.
The girls are very anxious to win because at the
end of this long trail is an invitation tournament at
Edmonton between the famous Grads, two teams
from the United States and the B. C. champions.
In three trips the girls lost one to Sardis, but defeated both Powell River and Kamloops.
The backbone of the team again this year were
the high scoring Ruth Wilson and Jean Thompson,
who acted as the brains of the team. Two new stars
were developed in Ruby Palmer and Mary Bradley.
Also Jean Eckhardt was valuable, although badminton claimed her attention most of the season.
Much credit must be given to Bob Osborne, the
coach, who has really developed a smart team, and
to Helen Brandt, the hard working manager.
Inset:- Ruth Wilson.
-Jean   Eckhardt.    2—Helen   McWilliams.    3—Brenda   Phillips.
4—Norma Frith.    S—Ruby Palmer.    6—Jean Thompson.
183 "■ ,♦>-
Back Row: Grace Bunnell. June Lake.
Georgina Messinger. Elizabeth Mclnnes.
Jean Handling. Dorothy Garrett, Mildred
Nairne, Helen Matheson.
Front   Row:   Margaret   George,   Betty
Muir,   Mariorle   Garrett,   Gerry   Armstrong, Joan Morris.
Members   not   shown,   Pauline   Scott,
Gladys Laycock.
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Women's Grass Hockey .
The past season was not the best that the U.B.C.
team has enjoyed in the past few years. One reason
for this is the fact that "lab" work and Teacher's
Training courses handicapped regular turnouts to
practices. As a result, it was found impossible to
develop the proper teamwork so essential to a consistent winner.
Undismayed, the girls showed no lack of spirit,
and continued their reputation as the hardest-trying
team in the league.
The team competed in the Lower Mainland League.
The Co-eds lost the first three games of the season
before they had been sufficiently organized, but
despite this poor start, managed to finish the schedule
in fourth place in the seven team league.
From a very fine collection of individual players,
Jean Handling, the centre forward, stands out as the
star of the year. Jean is the scholarship winner from
North Vancouver.
This year the team was captained by able Elizabeth Maclnnes, with Grace Bunnell as manager.
The final standings of the season were: Pro-Recs
24, ex-Kits 15, Generals 14, Varsity 13.
Army Boxing . . .
For the first time in the history of the U.B.C. contingent of the Officer's Training Corp a team will be
entered in a meet against the best talent in all the
other units in Military District eleven.
The meet is being sponsored by the Canadian
Corp Association Boxing Tournament. It will give
the Cadets the opportunity to prove themselves real
fighting men, and they are anxious to show their
ability.
Director of Physical Education Maury Van Vliet
has charge of the team, and has brought them into
fine shape.
Until this meet was announced, boxing had been
officially inactive this year. However, such experienced men as Austin Frith and Binks Drummond
have been working out for their own amusement.
The most likely entries from the University are:
Tommy Syme, Austin Frith, Bins Drummond and Bill
Street.
The preliminaries will probably be fought at the
Seaforth Armories, and the finals at the Auditorium.
184 E.   Fraser.   K.   Marshall   R.   Boyd.   P.
Runkle. J. Pratt, N. Uellson, B. Goddard.
P. MitchelL H. Brandt P. Thomson.
Followers of Robin Hood .
The past season has proved to be one of the most
successful since archery was first introduced to the
campus. It was a compliment to the efficient coaching of Miss Moore that the enrollment this year was
the greatest on record, since more than two hundred
girls have been turning out regularly.
The only shoot so far this year was against a team
from Western Washington. The Varsity girls defeated the Americans without much difficulty.    One
more meet has been arranged for this spring against
a team of Margaret Eaton grads, to take place some
time in June.
It was doubly disappointing to the girls to miss the
chance to win the Canadian championship this year
because they have improved greatly in the last few
years. Their progress was emphasized when Emily
Fraser posted a score this year which was a full fifty
points higher than that made by any entrant in the
Canadian championship meet.
Golf. . .
Kenny McBride added his name to the Varsity
championship trophy for the second year in a row
by defeating Ormy Hall in the 36-hole final.
No trip to the United States is contemplated this
season to emulate the club's successful jaunt to
San Francisco last year. On that trip they defeated
Bellingham Normal, College of Puget Sound, and
came within two points of beating the University of
Washington, and the University of California at
Berkely.
However, the club executive has decided to send
the Varsity team on two trips to Victoria for challenge
matches against the Uplands Golf Qub and the
Colwood Golf and Country Qub late in March. Also
the usual spring matches will be played against local
golf clubs later in the spring, and teams from the
Universities of Oregon, Washington, and Bellingham
Normal are expected here in April.
The Varsity team this season includes Gordie
Livingston, Ormy Hall, Kenny McBride and Bob
Plommer of last year's team and freshmen Jim Allan
and Bob Waldie.
H. Swinton. J. Allen, O. Hall, R. Waldie. R. Plommer. K. McBride.
185 Back Row: J. Mathieson (manager), S.
Gunn, C Clarldge, N. Burnett. N. Armstrong, P. Flynn (coach). Dave Young.
Front Row: E. Robinson. K. Harry. V.
Pinchin. R. Scott. A. Menzies.
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Senior "B" Basketball . . .
Once again the Senior 'B' team made the league
playoffs. The squad was entered in the Community
League, and finished the season in third place in the
eight team league..
The team was greatly bolstered after Christmas by
the addition of Norm Armstrong from the 'A' team
via the ineligibility route. Al Menzies was slated to
move up in his place, but could not obtain his release
from the Senor 'B' roster.
Others on the team were: Bob Scott (also the
senior 'A' manager), Struthers Gunn, Chuck Qaridge,
Ken Harry, Dave Young, Bob Shewan, Norm Burnett,
Harry Hunter, Harry Nikaido and Vic Pinchin.
The team had the good fortune to obtain the likeable and able Pat Flynn of the Senior 'A' squad as
coach. Pat was able to develop a smart and fast
team by the end of the season.
Jock Mathieson was manager.
Frosh Basketball. . .
This year the Intermediate "A" team was again
made up from the "Frosh" class.
The team was entered in the Community League
and finished the season in fifth place with five wins
and seven losses.
The most promising of these young stars were Art
Johnson, Al Dean and Harry Kermode.
Back Row: 1. to r.: H. Shadwell (manager). C. Crocker. H. Kermode. J.
Hetherington, J. Cunningham, A, Johnson, A. Stevenson (coach).- Front Row.
L to r.: O. Louie, H. Nygard, A. Dean
(capt). H. Smith, B. Fleming, absent—
J. Dennis.
During the past season the squad played only one
exhibition game. In the Christmas holidays the
team made a trip to Kamloops where they defeated
the home team.
Coaching the team was Al Stephenson, and the
manager was Howard Shadwell.
186 Back Row: H. Livington (manager). N.
Gill. J. Goodman, Ed Benson, J. Harmer.
E. Stevenson. A. Carlile (asst manager).
Front Row: E. Taylor, A. Frith, J. McArthur. J. Moxon. A. Bonutto.
Missing: H. Home.
On blades of steel. ,
At the start of the season the outlook was anything
but bright for Ice Hockey on the campus because of
the disbanding of the old Inter-city League. But the
untiring efforts of those interested in the promotion of
hockey at the university finally obtained a berth in
the King Crest League.
Much credit must be given to Mr. Fred Taylor, Sr.,
and Johnny Taylor, who backed Varsity and coached
the team all season.
The team won three pre-season games but suffered
a slump in league play. The team was eliminated in
the semi-finals.
To close another fine season the team plans a trip
to Seattle sometime in March.
The mainstay of the team was its defence of Jim
Harmer and Jack Moxon, both sixty minute men, and.
Ed Benson in goal. The leading forwards are Harry
Home, Norm Gill, Jim Goodman, Ted Taylor and Ted
Stevenson.
This year the team will lose only one man through
graduation—Jim Harmer.
Keeping the team going was manager Hugh Livingstone.
Intermediate "A"
Basketball . . .
True to tradition, this year's Intermediate "A" team
held firmly to the cellar position in the league.
The most remarkable thing about this team was
the enthusiasm that prevailed throughout the season.
Win, lose or draw, the girls were out to practice
regularly, and worked hard at their game. They all
enjoyed themselves thoroughly, and learned a great
deal from their enthusiatic and capable coach, Eileen
Rushworth, and ex-Alberta star. The turn out for the
squad was good, and some fine players were
developed for future Senior teams.
The team made one trip to Chilliwack, losing to
the home team. Exhibition games were also played
with West Vancouver High School and University
Hill.
Outstanding for the team this year were: Helen
Brandt, Miram Renwick and Helen Matheson.
The very willing manager was Marguerite Neil.
Back Row: Eileen Rushworth, Marguerite NeiL Helen Brandt
Margaret George. Front: Helen Matheson, Elizabeth Long,
Florence RowelL  Absent Miriam Renwick, Edna McDermid.
187 nf
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• • . . . Inter-Fraternity Council
Pan-Hellenic Association . .
190 J. -W. ASSELSTINE
E. J. BARRIE
J. H. BALDWIN
K. C. BOYCE
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H. E. BISHOP
D. S. BURRIS
J. A. M. CRAWFORD
P. M. CLERY
A. CUMMING
H. M. ELLIS
W. L. FRIKER
W. M. GARDINER
J. P. LESLIE
P. J. McTAVISH
D. C. McPHERSON
J. L. MACDONALD
G. A. MACLEAN
G. B. MILLIGAN
M. K. PICKARD
C. T. STOESS
E. D. SUTCLIFFE
F. H. C. TAYLOR
J. P. W. THOMAS
R. J. C. TAIT
F. M. TURLEY
A. N. UROUHART
G. F. WILLOX
G. R. WOOD
Alpha Delta Phi
191 VERNON BARLOW
ROBERT BENTLEY
JACK CARLILE
CHARLES CARNCROSS
PAUL COTE
CHARLES COTTERALL
GUY CURWEN
BERT DUCKLOW
DON FERGUSSON
KELVIN FLEMING
AUSTIN FRITH
FRED GORSE
ARNOLD GUSTAVSON
GORDON HALL
JAMES HARMER
NEIL KELLER
DONALD KERR
KEN KIETH
GEORGE KIRBY
HUGH LIVINGSTONE
ROBERT MORRIS
BOB MURRAY
ROY MOREL
JACK McDONAGH
BILL McGHIE
HOWARD McKIM
BOB PARKINSON
KEITH PORTER
BOB SHEWAN
MEAD SINCLAIR
TED STEVENSON
JOHN STOREY
DOUG WALKER
JACK  WALLACE
DON WYNESS
Beta Theta Pi
192 N. A. BLAIR
R. W. BONNER
E. DASHWOOD-JONES
B. J. DEVLIN
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G. L. FINCH
H. M. GRAHAM
B. C. HERD
H. D. LUMSDEN
D. F. H. LYLE
H. A. LYTTLETON
J. R.  MATHIESON
I. H. McDIARMID
L. G. PERRY
S. W. ROACH
L. G. ROSS
D. L. RUMBALL
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J. O. SHEFFIELD
E. B. SLEIGH
A. R. SMITH
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R. J. WALDIE
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JOHN CLEMENT
WILLIAM GROSS
THOMAS MEREDITH
EDWARD McBRIDE
LORNE McBURNEY
DONALD McCARTER
DONALD McLEAN
JOHN McKINLAY
JOHN McDONALD
DONALD PARHAM
JOSEPH PEARCE
HOWARD PAULSON
ALAN SHORE
JAMES STINSON
JOHN RYAN
NORMAN GOODE
WM. WALLACE
HARRY GRAY
PAUL GRIFFIN
JOHN  CARSON
NOEL HATCH
CHESTER BAKER
WM. LYNOTT
BRUD MATHESON
JOHN MATHESON
ROBERT LOWE
DOUGLAS PEDLOW
KENNETH McBRIDE
HUGH RITCHIE
JAMES LYNN
EDWARD CRUISE
JAMES McARTHUR
JACK TURNER
WM. HASTINGS
STUART MADDIN
DAVID RICHIE
W. H. K. MACDONALD
Phi Delta Theta
194 J. NflYLOR
GRAHAM FINLAY
GORDON McDONALD
IAN MACDONALD
G. BROWN
W. JOHNSTON
T. WILLIAMS
J. SCOTT
D. LIVINGSTON
A. MENZIES
O. HALL
STAN HARRIS
DOUG MARKHAM
CLARENCE MANN
DOUG MALONEY
CAM GILMOUR
TODD TREMBLAY
GEOFF CAINE
DREW RIPLEY
GUS CARMICHAEL
KING NEIL
JACK GRAY
CAMPBELL WILLIAMS
DAVE SWACKHAMMER
BOB PLOMMER
TOM CANTELL
C. HILL
O. ORR
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R. TAYLOR
W. S. PENDLETON
F. PENDLETON
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195 JOHN FILTEAU
EVANN DAVIES
JOHN WEST
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IAN RICHARDS
WALTER NICHOLS
ALAN WALLACE
FRASER JAMIESON
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ARTHUR RAE
TERRENCE FITZPATRICK
DENNIS FAIRBAIRN
JOHN McARTHUR
IVAN BROWN
THOMAS GRIEVE
CHARLES LONG
WILLIAM LINDSAY
DARWIN ROBERTSON
LYNN SULLY
JIM  JEFFRIES
GEORGE CLAYDON
EDWARD BENSON
GEORGE LANE
NORMAN GILL
DONALD  KERMODE
GEORGE BROWNING
STANLEY PATTERSON
EDGAR DEWDNEY
TOM BRIDGE
FRED BILLINGS
ALEX. McCARTER
H. C. E. STEWART
Phi Kappa Pi
196 NORMAN ARMSTRONG
ROBERT BENTALL
DONALD BLAKE
ALFRED BONUTTO
EDWARD  BOURNE
WILLIAM BRAIDWOOD
MICHAEL BURROWS
ARCHIE BYERS
WILLIAM CAMPBELL
CHUMMER  CLARKE
STANLEY COPP
THOMAS CRONE
EDMUND COX
HAROLD DALE
ALFRED FARINA
NEIL GRAY
KENNETH HORTON
GERALD HOWARD
DOUGLAS HUME
FRANK   LAWRIE
ROBERT LLOYD
WILLIAM MANN
ARTHUR MONAHAN
JAMES McCARRY
J. McLEOD
ARTHUR PHYSICK
MORRIS PHYSICK
SIDNEY POULTON
RALPH PRONGER
DONALD ROBERTSON
WILLIAM VAN HOUTEN
JOHN WINTEMUTE
DOUGLAS WATT
MORRIS DUNCAN
GIL MORRISON
Phi Kappa Sigma
197 Psi Upsilon
WALTER MOODIE
DEREK MacDERMOT
JOHN MEREDITH
ERNEST TEAGLE
RUSSELL SNYDER
D. J. ROBERTSON
ALAN DRUMMOND
LEYS BEAUMONT
JACK MOXON
GORDON MacFARLANE
WILLIAM McMASTER
DOUGLAS JESSUP
DAVID NICHOLS
C. O. FULTON
EDWARD PIDGEON
GEORGE STAMATIS
DONALD STURDY
ROBERT M. CURRY
ALFRED FARROW
ROBERT LIGHTSTONE
KENNETH LOGAN
W. REID
JAMES MAINGUY
JOHN  SPROULE
IAN McDONALD
ART RIPON
GRAHAM McCALL
BILL ORR
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ALASTAIR DRYSDALE
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JOHN BEATY
BLAIR ANDERSON
ARTHUR ANDREWS
FRANK BACON
BRUCE BAKER
JOHN BRYNELSON
FRED BURNET
D. BANNERMAN
HOWARD BENNETT
VINCENT CASSON
JOHN COLLINS
GORDON DAVIDSON
ALBERT ELLIOT
DON EDWARDS
REGINALD HASKINS
GEORGE HARFORD
ROBERT HAILEY
HERBERT KELLAND
JOHN MACKENZIE
RODERICK McRAE
FRANK NOSWORTHY
CHARLES PARKER
REX PARKER
MALCOLM ROZBURGH
WILLIAM STEEL
WILLIAM SMITH
VICTOR THORSEN
GARTH WADE
BARRY CHARLESWORTH
GEORGE CAMPBELL
ROBERT DAVIDSON
ROY McEWAN
CLIFF McADAM
BERT SHORE
JOHN ZABINSKI
Sigma Phi Delta
199 HUGH ABBOTT
EVAN apROBERTS
ROBERT BUERK
CHARGO CAMPBELL
JOHN CARROTHERS
DEWAR COOKE
PETER CROMIE
HAROLD DIXON
BRUCE EMERSON
WILLIAM  GILMOUR
HUGH HALL
PAUL HANBURY
FRANK LEACY
JOHN MARGESON
JACK MANES
RICHARD MILLAR
JAMES MOTHERWELL
WILLIAM OUGHTRED
JACK PAISLEY
JAMES PURDY
ROBERT ROSE
JACK SHILLABEER
NORMAN STEWART
HANS SWINTON
ERIC TURNHILL
GEORGE VAN ROGGEN
JOHN WALLACE
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DAVID VANDT
Kappa Theta Rho
202 " ~ *
DAVID B. YOUNG
ALASTAIR YOUNG
KENNETH BROWN
GRAHAM HOLLAND
PAUL HAMMOND
BRIAN  MAHOOD
HARRY WARNER
ARTHUR  BARTON
ROBERT A. MARSHALL
DONALD DUNCAN
PERRY HOOPER
ROBERT POTKINS
JOHN BENNETT
PAT FLYNN
ALFRED OGILVIE
STEWART McMORRAN
GORDON HEWITT
ROBERT W. SCOTT
SIDNEY KILBANK
VENON GRASSIE
KENNETH SHAW
JOHN W. WARNE
Semper
201 MARGERY BARNETT
CAROL BELTON
MARGOT BURGESS
JOCELYN CHENOWETH
RUTH DES BRISAY
ANNA RUTH FINLAYSON
BETTY HARVEY
KATHERINE HEWITT
DOROTHY HIRD
AUDRAY JONES
GWEN LEACH
MARY LISTER
ALIX McPHAIL
FLORENCE MILLS
BETTY MUIR
MARION MURPHY
JOYCE ORCHARD
DOROTHY SHERRATT
DOROTHY STAMATIS
LORRAINE THOMSON
BARBARA WHITE
SHIRLEY WISMER
BETTY WORTHINGTON
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LUELLA MANNIX
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HELENE DesBRISAY
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helen hann
doris lennie
margaret lennie
beverley matthew
ardis mitchell
Frances McCarthy
FRANCES McLEAN
MARGARET McCLORY
DOROTHY McCULLY
RUTH MACDONALD
PHYLLIS McEWEN
BIDDY McNEILL
HELEN NOWLAN
ADRIENNE SOUTHIN
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JOSEPHINE WELDON
RUTH WILSON
MARGARET GARDINER
MARGARET McCOLL-SMITH
JEAN ECKHARDT
JEAN BURNEY
PHYLLIS JOHNSON
JEAN-CAROL LEE
JOAN MORRIS
CLAUDIA MATHESON
ISABEL UNDERHILL
LORNA McDIARMID
ELAANOR SOUTHIN
SHIRLEY PRONGER
JANE MURDOCK
PEGGY TWIZELL
CONNIE SULLIVAN
DAIMA EDWARDS
MARY WARNER
AUDREY THURSTON
Alpha Gamma Delta
204 MARY FRANK ATKIN
KATHLEEN AUGUSTINE
DOROTHY BEEBE
PEGGY CLARKE
BETTY CLUGSTON
JEAN CLUGSTON
EVELYN COOLS
JOAN COSTELLO
MARGARET CUNNINGHAM
DENISE DARLING
KATHLEEN DARLING
NORMA DRYSDALE
ELIZABETH DUNLOP
FRANCES FOWLER
ISABEL FROST
RUTH HEYER
JEAN JUKES
LA VERNE LAWLER
MARGARET MORRIS
BETTY McDIARMID
MAUREEN McDIARMID
RACHEL PAUL
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DORIS ROBIN
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MARJORIE WRIGHT
VIVIAN DILGER
MARION MACDONALD
Delta Gamma
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205 MILDRED TWISS
PATRICIA BIBBS
VALERIE GARDINER
RUTH JORDAN-KNOX
HELEN MACDONALD
MARNIE  MILLAR
MARGARET SAGE
NANCY SMITH
FLORENCE McEACHERN
PATRICIA McMAHON
DOROTHEA TOMPKINS
JUNE ARMOUR
HELEN BRANDT
DOROTHY GARRETT
BARBARA MOE
MARGARET MORROW
BARBARA NEWMAN
ELIZABETH UGLOW
BETTY RAY WOOD
Alpha Phi
206 AUDREY REIFEL
JACQUELINE KLOEPFER
ELLIS McLEOD
BETTY  BOLDUC
BUNTY SCOTT
RUTH SELDON
BARBARA SHANNON
FRANCES WEBB
FRANCIS THOMSON
BARBARA WINSLOW
BARBARA SMITH
DOREEN RYAN
MARGARET EWING
JESSLYN  ELLIS
PATRICIA  CAREY
EILEEN CARTER
ELIZABETH HEBB
RUTH LARGE
MAUREEN  BELL
ELIZABETH   BOULTBEE
PEGGY BROWN
MARY BETH DesBRISAY
MARY FARRELL
MARY JOAN MacDONALD
HELEN WOODCROFT
BARBARA SPENCER
BARBARA McQUEEN
KAY HOLLAND
SHIRLEY MACDONALD
KATHERINE McLENNAN
\
Kappa Kappa
Gamma
207 GERALDINE ARMSTRONG
JOYCE BLUNT
CORNELIA BURKE
MARY CAMPBELL
ANN CLEMENS
DOROTHY DANIELS
MARGUERITE FINCH
MARION  FOSTER
AMY HACKNEY
FRANCES HUMFREY
FRANCES JACKSON
KATHERNE  McKAY
eileen McDonnell
MURIEL McLAGAN
BRENDA PHILLIPS
MARY PHILLIPS
ELEANOR SINCLAIR
JEAN SMITH
JANET WALKER
MURIEL TINDLE
DOROTHY BARTON
Alpha Delta Pi
208 NANCY MARTIN
MARY BEALE
LOUISE SKINNER
MOLLY MEIGHEN
JEAN CUSHING
RUTH PICKIN
MARY VENINI
EILEEN NEWBY
LOIS NICHOLSON
BETTE ANDERSON
BEATRICE SCOTT
NORMA SCOTT
MARY BOYD
DOREEN GIBSON
MARY HIGGINS
ELIZABETH   McCUAIG
IDA FRANCIS
EANSWYTHE BROWN
Kappa Alpha Theta
209 Alpha Omicron Pi
JOAN MacARTHUR
ELIZABETH BIRNIE
LILIAN JOHANSON
MARGARET FINDLAY
GLADYS McMICHAEL
MINTA BULGIN
PATRICIA ATTREE
PEGGY MOYLS
EILEEN RIDLEY
MARJORIE CROSBY
GERTRUDE GOYER
CLARA WILLIAMS
PATRICIA MEREDITH
MARGARET FRANCIS
MARY  McKELVY
GEELDINE  PROUD
HONOREE YOUNG
210 Phrateres
"Famous For Friendliness" — the international
smile. That, in brief, in Phrateres, the largest woman's organization on the campus.
Object of the club is to promote social intercourse
among woman students, and acquaint freshettes with
Dean Mary L. Bollert
campus life in a manner not possible under the
orientation system.
Taking the shape of a vast, unlimited sorority,
Phrateres has on its membership many members of
recognized campus Greek women's organizations,
who find, within the Club, a scope impossible to
accomplish within their own tightly-knit society.
A very impressive initiation ceremony in candlelight was held in the Fall in Brock Hall, and was
followed by a banquet. Killarney was the scene of
a gay, informal, and strictly co-ed gypsy party. Two
teas were also held in the Fall term, one limited to
old members, the others expressly for the neophytes.
Hampers were distributed at Christmas to the needy.
In January a formal Phrateres co-ed was held in
Brock Hall.
Executive members of All-Phrateres this year consisted of: President, Nancy Carr; Vice-president, Lois
Nicholdon; Secretary, Mary Mulvin; Treasurer Daima
Edwards; Awards Chairman, Dorothy Hawkins;
Publicity, Mimi Schofield; Initiation Chairman, Marjorie Duncan; Sub-chapter Chairman, Dolly Ellis;
Senior Advisor, Betty Thomas
Sub-chapter presidents included Muriel Tindle, Doreen Henderson, Norma Bew, Peggy Moyles, Betty
Hughes and Jean Thomson.
211 Walter Gage
Despite the decreased amount of time available
for club work, the activities of the Literary and Scientific Executive were not curtailed to any appreciable
extent during the year.
The activity of the Player's Qub, the Musical Society and of the Parliamentary Forum and Social
Problems Qub manifests the sustained high standard
of club work on the campus.
Activities of the Parliamentary Forum were extended this year by the increasing success of Public
Speaking classes.
The Varsity Band played this year for military
parades while the Varsity Dance Orchestra made a
name for itself in the field of student entertainment.
Before the end of the year it is expected that the
Chemical Engineering Society will be completely
organized with the ultimate purpose of becoming
international in a manner similar to the American
Institute of Electrical Engineers and the American
Society of Mechanical Engineers which flourish in the
Scientific branch of L.S.E.
The musical appreciation lectures of Dr. Ida Hal-
pern, given weekly in Brock Hall as part of the Pass
system features was an outstanding contribution of
the L.S.E. this year.
A triumph for the executive was manifested in the
Conference with Reed College at the University of
British Columbia on the general field of War and its
effects on Canadian and American life.
bob bonner
donald buckland
art fouks
john glen
archie bain
jack McMillan
elspeth munro
charlie nash
charlie parker
thomas robinson
harry warner
L  S.  L
Honorary
1940
1941
212 JUNIOR CANADIAN SOCIETY OF TECHNICAL AGRICULTURISTS
Senior Agriculture Students took an original and
unprecedented step when they founded the Junior
Canadian Society of Technical Agriculturists of U.
B. C, the first of its kind in the whole of Canada.
The aims of the club are to promote active discussion of technical agricultural subjects by junior
and senior undergraduates. As well as facilitating
closer co-operation between students, teaching staff,
and technically trained men in agricultural fields,
the organization promotes interest among under-
grads in the work of the Senior C.S.T.A., composed
of graduates and senior students.
Constituting the executive were: President, Anson
McKim; Vice-President, Jim Campbell; Secretary-
Treasurer, Patricia Cumming; Curator, Joe Morgan.
Joe Morgan. Anson McKim. Pat Cumming. Jim Campbell
iii
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. . .AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
Electrical engineers at the university gathered
together at bi-weekly meetings to hear papers presented by guest speakers and students, and to view
films showing the importance of electricity in industry. The club also conducted several field trips to
inspect electrical installations at local concerns. A
joint meeting of the student branch and professional
electrical engineers was held late in the year.
This year's executive consisted of: Chairman,
Garth Griffiths; Secretary-Treasurer, George Crane;
Junior Member, John Collins; Assistant Secretary,
Hugh Davies; Counsellor, Professor W. B. Coulthard.
Executive officers
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
Technical papers on subjects dealing with all
branches of the mechanical science were presented
at each meeting by two student members. At regular
intervals, prominent local mechanical engineers
visited the campus to give addresses. Several inspection trips were made to local shops, factories,
and power plants.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
Chairman, Professor H. M. Mcllroy; Chairman,
Charles W. Parker; Vice-Chairman, Herbert Kel-
land; Secretary-Treasurer, Garth Wade.
Charles Parker. Herbert Kelland. Garth Wade,
Honorary President, Professor H. M. Mcllroy.
213 Hi
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Band on parade.
BIOLOGY DISCUSSIONS CLUB
Students and members of the faculty united to
discuss topics of interest in biology, with various
students presenting papers on the newer aspects oi
the science. Other attractions included an evening
of motion pictures, a panel discussion, and a social
evening.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Dr. C. Maclean Fraser; President, Don
Buckland; Vice-President, Dorothy Westlake; Secretary-Treasurer, Phyllis Mitchell; Curator, Phil Fitz-
Hames.
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. . . VARSITY BAND
From a minor organization whose only task was
to play at football games, the Band emerged into
its full glory this year by taking on a military aspect.
Every Saturday they performed for the army by
providing military music for basic route marches,
as well as the usual performance at athletic functions. The Band has a membership of twenty-five
conscientious musicians.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President and Conductor, Mr. A. W. Delamont;
President, Bircham Van Home; Vice-President, Stan
Patterson; Secretary, Anne Underhill; Treasurer,
Alan Johnston; Business Manager, David Herberts;
Librarian, Elaine McKinnon.
I'M    :
9»
Executive and Members
CAMERA CLUB
The Camera Club claimed as its greatest achievement this year the building of a dark room in Brock
Hall, culmination of several years' effort and planning. Regular meetings were held periodically and
during the second term speakers were invited from
the city to give talks on photography.
The executive during the first term consisted of
President, Ronald Yuill; Vice-president, Ken Logan;
Secretary-treasurer, Budd Devlin. After Christmas,
President, Herb Blakeley; Vice-president, Greg MacMillan; Secretary-Treasurer, Ken Logan.
G. MacMillan. Ken Logan. Herb Blakley
214 CHINESE STUDENTS  CLUB . . .
Chinese students, especially those who appear
on the campus for the first time, find the Chinese
Students Club a great help in aiding them to get
acquainted with the problems of university life.
Regular monthly meetings were held, consisting of
speeches given by club guests, and discussions. A
Frosh reception, Christmas party, and matric social
for the matriculation students were all part of the
year's activities, climaxed by the Graduation banquet and dance.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Ruth Lee; Vice-President, Robert Chan Kent; Secretary, Anne Woo; Treasurer, Cecil Yip; Social convenors, Lilac Onlee and Jack Chow.
Hajime Kagetsu,  Jack  McMillan,  Ranjit  Singh,  Alvin  Sholund,
Molly Owens, Gunhlld Dellert, Norma Dobson, Ray McLeod.
G. M. DAWSON CLUB . .
This, the official geological society of the University, proved to be a great help to students anxious
in pursuing a career in geology, by offering the
opportunity of contact with local experts who visited
the monthly meetings to deliver papers of a technical
nature. The students themselves presented papers
at weekly noon-hour meetings. The term's activities
closed with the annual banquet in March.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Dr. H. C. Gunning; President, William J.
Lynott; Vice-President, S. D. Townsend; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. A. Wallace.
Cecil Yip, Jack Chow, Bob Chan-Kent, Anne Woo, Ruth Lee,
Lilac Onlee
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB
Fifteen nationalities were represented in this
year's personnel of the Cosmopolitan Qub, united
to discuss race problems and their possible solution.
Coming under discussion were England, Poland,
Hawaii, the Orient, and South America. Firesides
were held every Sunday. Highlights of the year
were the International Tea and the Masquerade
Party.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Jack
McMillan; Vice-President, Majime Kagetsu; Secretary, Gunhild Dellert; Treasurer, Alvin Sholund;
Ranjit Singh, Mollie Owens and Ray McLeod.
Stan Thompson. Bill Lynott. Allan Wallace.
215 Rex Parker.  Jock Byers, Todd  Tremblay, Dorothy Hird,
Sandy Nash.
HISTORICAL SOCIETY . . .
The present war had its effect on the Historical
Society just as it did on all other campus activities.
The semi-monthly meetings this year were devoted
entirely to papers having a direct bearing on the war,
and the countries involved in it. At the end of the
Fall term, a banquet was held in conjunction with
the International Relations Club, at which Mr. Robert
McKenzie spoke on "The Causes of the Present
War."
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, A. C. Cooke; President, John Meredith;
Vice-President, Lois Nicholson; Secretary-Treasurer,
Patricia Bibbs.
. . . DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE
One of the outstanding examples of student government on the campus is the Discipline Committee,
comprised of student leaders who act as voluntary
policemen, enforcing the Alma Mater code on the
culprits who accept their verdict in the same, democratic, voluntary fashion.
It is a tribute to U.B.C. students this year, that,
respecting the caution of their President, L. S. Klinck,
to safeguard the dignity of the University's reputation
in the face of military training, the work of the Committee was practically nil.
Executive members of the Discipline Committee this
year were: Todd Tremblay, president of M.U.S.,
Dorothy Hird, president of W.U.S., Sandy Nash, Jock
Byers, and Rex Parker.
John Meredith, Pat Bibbs, and Lois Nicholson
.INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB
- Founded as an organization with the purpose of
discussing problems of international peace and
good-will, and sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the club, this year, was
fortunate in hearing a speech delivered by Mrs.
Harold Hemming on "Nazi Germany and England
in War Time," as well as other topical addresses
given by Dr. J. A. Crumb, C. Dupuis, the Belgian
Consul; Robert MacKenzie, and O. Philips.
A joint banquet was held with the Historical Society at the end of the Fall term.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Harry Laronde; Vice-President, Aileen Marchanton;
Secretary-Treasurer, John Meredith.
John Meredith, Eileen Marcharton, Harry Laronde.
216 JAPANESE STUDENTS' CLUB . .
Problems besetting Japanese men and women, as
students of the University, and as New Canadians,
are discussed and ironed out at regular meetings of
the Japanese Students' Club.
Activities included a reception for the freshmen, a
parents-students informal social gathering, annual
debate with the University of Washington Japanese
Students' Club, sponsoring of an annual oratorical
contest for Japanese High School students, participation in the annual Pacific Northwest Advance held
at the University of Washington, and other social-
educational meetings.
Leading this year's executive was President
Kiyoaki C. Momose.
Edith Browne, Moira English, Elizabeth Henderson, Theodora Combolos
LE CERCLE FRANCAIS
French students, eager to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of French culture gathered
at regular intervals to hear papers on such subjects
as: "French Canada and the Rowell Commission",
"Modern French Music", "France and Security",
"Significance of Descartes in Philosophy and Psychology", "La fin de la Democratie Francais". The
final function of the year was the annual banquet
held in conjunction with La Canadienne.
This year's executive consisted of: Honourary
President, Ronald Hilton; President, Frances Caldwell; Vice-President, Eric Nicol; Secretary, Margaret
Crute; Treasurer, Neil Wilson.
Club executive.
... LA CANADIENNE
La Canadienne, a campus club composed of
students interested in French, was very active this
year. The main highlights in the calendar were the
many meetings at which prominent guest speakers
were featured. Some of these speakers were Mrs.
Kaye Lamb, Dr. Qarke, Miss Grieg, Mr. Parker, Dr.
Dallas, Dr. Evans, Dr. MacDonald, Professor Hilton,
Mme. Darlington, and Miss Boyles. The final event
of the year was a closing banquet held in conjunction with Le Cercle Francais, at which members of
the club entertained with a play, "Dead Heat".
The executive was composed of: Honorary president, Mrs. Kaye Lamb; President, Theodora Cocbo-
los; Vice-president, Moira English; Secretary, Edith
Browne; and Treasurer, Elizabeth Henderson.
Neil Wilson. Margaret Crute, Eric Nicol, Frances Caldwell
Professor Ronald Hilton
217 Victor Hopwood, Brita Vesterback
MONRO PRE-MED. CLUB .
An organization devoted exclusively to premedical students on the campus, the Munro Club
carried on its usual program this year, with addresses being given by prominent men in local
medical circles. Educational films were shown, and
a book prize was awarded to the member presenting
the best paper. Members also conducted surveys
on conditions in city hospitals, and the provincial
asylum.
This year's executive consisted of: President, F.
Dean Kemper; Vice-President, Bill Barclay; Secretary, Ken Keith.
. . . LETTERS CLUB
Of limited membership, and demanding a keen
interest in all things literary is the Letters Club, long
considered the dilletante of all campus clubs. Its
activities are based solely on the contributions of its
members, which take the form of papers on subjects
of literary merit. The first meeting in January was,
as usual, "Original Contributions Night" with every
member having to bring something of his own
authorship. The last meeting of the year was held
in conjunction with the Graduate Letters Club.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Thorlief Larsen; President, Victor Hop-
wood; Secretary-Treasurer, Brita Vesterback.
Dean Kemper, Bill Barclay, Ken Keith
. . . NEWMAN CLUB
Students of Roman Catholic denomination, anxious
to fraternize on the campus, made this year's Newman Qub a notable success with regular semimonthly meetings held throughout the year. Also
included in the Club's activities were Holy Communion breakfasts, roller and ice-skating parties, debates, firesides  with the S.C.M.
Headed by the Chaplain, Rev. Father Hill,
C.S.S.R., this year's executive was composed of:
President, Betty Hughes; Vice-President, Marion
Murphy; Recording Secretary, Henry Curran; Corresponding Secretary, Joan Costello; Treasurer, Jim
McCarry; and Junior executive members, George
Speakman, Josephy Adam, Peggy Clarke, Jim
Eakin.
Marion Murphy. Jim McCarry. Betty Hughes. Henry Curran.
Joan Costello.
218 PHYSICS CLUB . . .
Yet another of the campus clubs was formed to
give students more opportunity to specialize in their
favorite branch of science. Speakers throughout
the year delivered many papers of varied interest
while undergraduates competed for a prize awarded
by the Society in the second term for the best
student paper presented. Various places of interest
were visited by club members including the Dominion Meteorological Station at the airport.
This year's executive consisted of: Honorary
President, Dr. G. M. Shrum; Honorary Vice-President, Dr. A. M. Crocker; President, J. B. Brown; Vice-
President, Hin Lew; Secretary-Treasurer, R. R.
McLeod.
Four physicists.
Gunhild Dellert,  Edward  Gross, Eileen  McDonnelL  Ken Ewing
. . . PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
To take care of the ever-increasing flood of new
and complex ideas on psychology, students and
faculty members gather together at regular meetings
of the Phychology Qub. Because of the advanced
nature of the discussions, membership is limited.
Of this latter group, interesting papers given were
those by Dr. Lindenfield, formerly of Vienna, on
"Child Guidance Clinics", Dr. J. E. Morsh on "Hypnotism", Miss Stewart from Alexander Cottage, on "Problem Children", Dr. Davidson on "Emotions and
Health", and Mr. Cowley and Mr. Hobden.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Kenneth Ewing; Vice-President, Connie Fairleigh; Secretary-Treasurer, Eleen McDonnell; Corresponding Secretary, Gunhild Dellert; Publicity Manager, Edward
Gross.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT . .
Correlation of university life to religion formed the
basis of the club's activities this year as in former
years, with study groups, firesides, church services,
and student-faculty dinners on the busy program.
Camps were held in both terms, with many informal
social evenings scheduled throughout the year. A
Christmas conference, New Year's Ball and Spring
dance completed the itinerary.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Ted
Nichols; Vice-President, Joyce Carter; Second Vice-
President, Ina Dearing; Treasurer, James Melvin;
Secretary, Joseph Francis; Frank Bertram, Bryan
Colwell, Bob Morris, Norman Tuddenham.
Back Line: Frank Bertram. Ted Nichols. Joe Francis, Norm Tuddenham.    Front Line:    Jim Melvin, Joyce Carter, Ida Dearing, Dorothy
McCammon, Bob Morris, Ted Scott.    (Missing: Bryan Colwell).
219 Everett Ward, Athena Alexander, David Ellis, Mary Beaton.
Maurice McPhee, Hope Hewitt.
OUTDOORS CLUB . . .
Undoubtedly one of the most enthusiastic and
energetic clubs on the campus, the Outdoors Qub
had a very full schedule. In April, 1940, an unsuccessful attempt was made to scale the Golden Eyres.
In September one group climbed Mount Brunswick,
and another Deek's Peak. Later in the fall the men
climbed Crown, and the women Little Goat.
Ian McCuaig and Ernie Mason placed well up in
the Intercollegiate Ski Meet with the College of
Puget Sound.
The executive was: President, Sid Rooney; Vice-
president, Eileen Hooley; Secretary-treasurer, John
Stewart; Marshall, Sandy Buckland; and Archivist,
Edna Winram.
. . VARSITY CHRISTIAN UNION
Students anxious not to let their university education interfere with devotional studies met daily with
regular prayer meetings, discussions, and speakers.
Many church services were attended by members of
the club, who also held social evenings and firesides. In January, students from the University of
Washington came up for a week-end conference. A
Chinese dinner brought the year's activities to a
close.
This year's executive consisted of: President,
Everett Ward; Vice-President, David Ellis; Treasurer,
Maurice McPhee; Advertising, Mary Beaton; Librarian, Hope Hewett; Secretary, Athenia Alexander.
Scaling the Heights
DISCUSSIONS CLUB
Problems faced by university students in their
quest for education formed the basis for many pertinent discussions held by the club throughout the
year, with much valuable work being done along
those lines. The organization of co-operative boarding houses, pleas for scholarships, quiz programs,
and plans for opening a co-operative book store
were accomplished.
This year's executive consisted of: President, Val
Bjarnson (Fall term); Jack McMillan (Spring term);
Vice-President, Jack McMillan; Secretary, Theodora
Combolos; Archie Bain, Jim Melvin, Vernon Barlow.
Jim Barlow. Archie Baon, Jim Melvin, Theodora Combolos,
Jack McMillan
220 Co-operative boarding houses . .
Thirteen boys, who desired a convenient home
near the university with good fellowship and reasonable board and rent, started from modest beginnings,
a co-operative boarding house movement which has
spread to four establishments embracing some forty-
one students. The experiment was a success and
the charge of twenty dollars yielded a surplus at
the end of the year.
Encouraged by their success, they expanded this
year to include three houses and added a fourth one,
consisting of co-eds, to the group.
During the summer vacation, the Canadian
Student Assembly Discussion Club supervised the
formation of the girls' co-op., which was done largely
by Miss Dorothy Brown and Miss Joyce Carter. At
present, eight girls live together and work to earn
part of their board.
The co-op. houses place large orders for groceries
every two weeks with resultant saving. Each resident does about half an hour of work daily and the
high marks attained by the students indicate that
they do not suffer from overwork.
House leaders who were elected each term consisted of Joan Edwards, Terry Parsons, Bernard Mor-
risson and Bill Ozaroff. The executive of the entire
organization consists of Griff Cameron, president, and
the house leaders. They are registered under the
Societies Act as a corporation and maintain a legal
advisor.
The girls have a house mother who acts as a
chaperon  and performs  the heavier  duties   of  the
Girls' co-op. group.
establishment. The girls may entertain gentlemen
friends in the house and a reasonable curfew is set.
The same honour system applies when they are out
for the evening.
The girls' house contains varied personalities from
many stations in life. Talent is prominent, with Joan
Edwards exchange student from McGill studying for
her A.T.C.M., Francis Wallace, an ardent boogie
pounder on the keys, and Evelyn Watt an accomplished classical pianist.
Ruby Palmer is the athlete of the house, being a
star basketball player. Other residents are Jean Armstrong, Nenegh Hutchinson, Sheila Moore and Jean
McLean.
Dean Bollert had dinner with the girls at their house
in the Xmas holidays, and expressed favourable
opinions of the establishment. The houses have a
well-organized social season with each house entertaining the others at periodic dinners. The first
affair of the season was a combined dinner party,
during which each house presented a skit in competi-
Men's co-op. Number 1.
221 Music-minded students.
Residents pose.
tion  for a  prize,  with  the  girls'  winning  the  first
"Oscar."
Sleeping accommodation is well planned, with
private rooms for those who desire them. Dormitories
are available to men of more limited income.
A unique feature of timekeeping is used in one of
the houses. One battered alarm clock is entrusted
to the official waker-upper, who is awakened at 6:30
by the alarm (if all goes well) and then wanders
through the rooms rousing all the occupants in time
for early lectures.
The society possesses only one car, which does
transportation duty for the whole group. The society
represents nearly every campus club, and maintains
its own discussion clubs on the co-operative movement, to ensure a continuance of the ideas next year.
Three members of the houses joined the air force
during the term and their places were quickly filled
by new occupants.
Members of the house under the leadership of
Terry Parsons, are: Harry Warner, Griff Cameron,
Charlie Ryder, Dan Greeno, Charles Carncross,
Urban Guichion, Don Nazzer and Stan Thompson.
Those in the house on 8th Avenue are: George
and Ernest Bishop, Gordon Davidson, John Ozaroff,
Malcolm Wilding, Lem Bailey, Joe Dockerill, Bernard
Morrisson, Tom McLaughlan and Don Bunyan.
Under the leadership of Tom Pepper are: Jim Pepper, Charles Weldon, Harry Brown, John Dickenson,
Adam Wadie, John Uhtoff, Archie Karrio, Allan Currie,
Hugh Stewart, Keith Ralston, William Ozaroff and
Dennis Robinson.
. first step toward student dormitories
in Advertising . . .
223 Eyestrai
20% of school children have defective vision.
40% of college students have defective vision.
95% have defective vision at 60 years of age.
.. . Protect your eyes with adequate lighting.
BETTE
BETTER SIGHT,
PHONE SEYMOUR 5151 FOR FREE HOME LIGHTING TEST .  .  . NO OBLIGATION'.
tetter Index . . .
Abbott, Hugh Martin _.
Abernethy, Margaret J.
Plbrams,  Betty Meryl  _.
flbrams,  J.  H.  	
Adam,  J.  K.  	
Adam, Joe 	
Pldams,   John  R.
Pldamson, P. Rae
fides, A. I. 	
Adcock, Z. 	
Affleck,   A.   C.   —
Aicken,   A.   C.   __
Alexander,   A.   	
Allan, J.  G.  	
Allan, John A	
Allan, J. M. N. —
Allan, W. M. 	
Allen,  N.  P. 	
Allen,   Peter   	
Alexander, V. M.
Almas,  D.  J ._
Anderson, B. W. _.
Anderson, C. B. _
Anderson,  E.  D.  _
Anderson, J. D. 	
Anderson,  Jean V.
Anderson,  John  J.
Anderson, S. L.	
Anderson, T. T.	
Anderson, V. Y. ...
Andrews, A. J. 	
Angley, W. F.	
Annand,  J.  D.  	
Antsey,   T.   H.   	
Aoki,  T. 	
Aral,  K.  	
Ap Roberts, E. _.
Archdekin, R. H.
Archibald, D. ...
Arm, J. M.	
Armitage, M. H.	
Armour, J. C. 	
Armstrong,    Gerry
Armstrong, J.	
Armstrong,   Jean   _
Armstrong, N. H. _
Arnell, A. L.	
Ash, A. B. 	
Ashby, M. J. 	
Ashe,  G.  T.  	
Hsworth, F. E. _~
Askew,  W.  E.  _.
Asselstine,  J.  W.
Aszkanazy, C. L.
Atherton,   R.  	
Atkin, M. F 	
Atkins,   E.   	
Attree, P. W.	
Attridge, M. L. __
Auchinleck, G. ._
Augustine, B. V.
Augustine,   K.	
Avis, Barbara L.
Avis, M.	
20,
137
116
116
132
152
104
99
154
106
116
137
87
99
106
37
106
87
106
116
106
104
137
127
106
116
151
106
116
131
103
127
131
113
82,    143
96
99
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Avis,  S.  	
Baal,   G.	
Bacon,   F.   	
Backman,  A.  .
Badger, E.	
Badger,  I.  	
Baillie,  A.	
Bain, A.	
Bain, D. 	
Baker, D.	
Baker,   F.   	
Baker,   A.	
Baker,   C.   	
Bakony, E. _
Bakony, L. _
Baldwin, J. H.
Balfour, E.	
Ball, E. D. 	
Ball,  H.	
Ball, M. I.	
Ball,   P.   	
Ballantyne,   W.   G.
Ballard, I. 	
Banford,   N.   	
Banford,   P.   	
Bannerman, D. 	
Barchard,  F.  M.   _
Barclay, W. A.	
Barer, R. D. 	
Barlow,  C.  V.  	
Barlow, F. J. 	
Barnett,   Joan   	
Barnett,    M 	
Barrie,   E.   	
Barry,   F 	
Barry,   Fred   	
Barss, E. M. 	
Bartholomew,  B.
Bartholomew,  G.
Bartlett, P.	
Barton, A. S	
Barton,  D.  	
Barton,  E 	
Barton,  N.  	
Barton
Bastin,
Batten, W. .
Bayly,   L.
Beale, M. _
Beale,   S.
Beaton,   M.
Beaty,   J.   .
S.   W.
D.  _....
60,
Beaumont,   E.   	
Beaumont,   Leys   ..
Beavo,  W.   A.	
Beddome, A. 	
Beebe, D. 	
Beley,  J.   P.  	
Bell, G. D. 	
Bell, H. R. 	
Bell,  M.  	
Belton,  C.   	
Bender,   W.   	
Bennett,   J.   N.	
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225 Benneth, Joseph H.
Bennett,   R.   	
Benson, E. 	
Bentley,   R.   	
Berton,  L. 	
Berton,  P.  	
Bersea, K. 	
Bertram,  F.  E. 	
Bertram,   G.	
Betteridge,   J.   	
Beveridge,  E.   I.  ._
Bew, N. 	
Bewley,  A.  L.  	
Bibbs,   P.   	
Bibbs, R.	
Bingham,  A.	
Binnie,  R.  	
     42,
-32,    50,    54,
60,
61,
Birnie,   Elizaheth   H.
Bishop, G. 	
Bishop, H. 	
Bishop,  P. 	
Bjarnason,   V.	
Blair,  N.  A.  	
Blair, R. J_.
Blair,   W.	
Blakley,   H.	
Blezard,   R.   	
Bligh,   H.	
Bloch,    I.   	
Blumenauer,   G.
BluntJ.	
Bodnar,   M.	
Boale,   B.   	
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Bolduc, B. 	
Bollans, F.	
Bolton,  N.  	
Bonner,  R.	
Bonutto,   A.   	
Borelli, James, V.
Boss,   N 	
75,
51,     75,
77,
Boultbee, N. E. _
Bourne, E.	
Bourne, Edward .
Bourne,   John  D.
Bowie, Jack	
Bowie,   James   _.
Bowstead,   M.   _.
Boyce,   K.   	
Boyd,   A.   	
Boyd,  Eleanor G.
Boyd,   M.   	
Boyd,   N.   	
Boyd, R.	
Boyes,  M.	
Bradfield, A. 	
Bradley, M. E. 	
Bradner,   F.   	
Braidwood,   W.   _
Bramall,   B.   	
Brandon,  G.  	
Brandon,   J.	
Brandt,   H.   _..	
Bratt,    H	
Bremner, J. A.
Bremner,  M.  _
Brett,   Cecil   _
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226 "EFFICIENT   BUSINESS   TRAINING   PAYS   DIVIDENDS   ALL   THROUGH   LIFE'
College of Business
The new type, High Standard College for those who
appreciate superior efficiency and modern methods.
Students of this progressive College find that they master the courses
more thoroughly and in much less time because we have
—The latest methods
'.   —The latest Office Machines
—And more Teachers in proportion to Students than is customary
SHORTHAND SIMPLIFIED
The New Willis System of Shorthand is so much simpler and speedier
than the old systems that Students save both time and expense and have
a much more satisfactory system for practical use because they can read
their own notes with greater ease and accuracy.
(We still teach Pitman to those who desire it, or who began it elsewhere and wish to
profit by our advanced methods and modern   facilities.)
We teach Bookkeeping as actually practiced in business—the practical
way.    No time wasted.
We give the Complete Dictaphone Course as prepared by the Dictaphone
Company.
Special Comptometer Course as arranged by the Comptometer Company.
University graduates and students are specially invited to visit this High Grade College
to inspect our Up-to-the-minute Facilities for Successful Business Training.
STEPHEN T. WILLIS
President
INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION
OPEN ALL YEAR
ENTER ANY TIME
NIGHT SCHOOL ON
MONDAY AND THURSDAY EVENINGS
'It is better to have attended Willis College than to wish you had."
Ask for the Catalogue.
i$^-
Credit Foncier Building
College of Business
Telephone: PA cific 0327
850 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, B. C.
227 BUY AT HOME IN 41
HOME      ;    i
HOME
EASTERN
v   ^w
PARTNERS      IN     PROTECTION
1.111
1111111.
•%     W     "tot*:.  *«..•* ■*,
llllltll
.1  1
■ a ■
For surging POWER—use HOME GAS! For a MOTOR OIL that brings
SURE PROTECTION—specify HOME EASTERN! HOME GAS, HOME
EASTERN and your HOME GAS Dealer together assure you economical
and efficient car performance.
HOME   OIL   DISTRIBUTORS   LIMITED
The Independent 100% B. C. Company
Bridge,  T 	
Broadhead,  R.
Bromley,   G.   	
Brown,  E —
Brown, Gordon
Brown, Ellen —
Brown, F. M. 	
Brown,  H	
Brown, Irene _
Brown,   I.   	
Brown,  K.  	
Brown,  R.  Keith
Brown,  V —
Browne,  E.  _	
Brownell, J. Ross
Browning,   G.    —
Bruce,   J.   	
Bruce,   M 	
Bruce,   N	
Bryant,   J.   	
Brynelsen, J.  	
Bryson, G. 	
Buck, F. A. McK.
Buck, P 	
Buckerfield, M. 	
Buckland,   D.    _
Buckland,   J.   	
Buckley,   A	
Budd, J. 	
Buerge, R. O	
Buerk,   R.   	
Bulgin,   Minta   	
Buller,  M.  	
Bundy,  L	
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Bunnell,   F.	
Bunnell, G.	
Bunting, I. J	
Bunting, R.   	
Burgess, B 	
Burgess,   M.    ...
Burke, C. 	
Burke, H. 	
Burnet, F. E. 	
Burney,  J.  	
Burns, D. 	
Burris, D. S	
Burrows,  M.  	
Burton, J. A	
Bushell,   Norman
Butchart,   M.   	
Butler, I. 	
Butler, L. M. 	
Busby,  Constance  -
Bushell, C	
Byers, A. McA _
Byers,  J.  	
Caine,   G 	
Calderhead,  G.  	
Caldwell, I. F. __.
Caldwell,   J	
Cameron, D. I	
Cameron, J. G. 	
Campbell,  Charles
Campbell,    G.   	
Campbell,   I	
Campbell,   Jean   _.
Campbell,  Mary  	
Campbell,  Mary  I.
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228 229 1/1/e ettdenvat at All tinted to maki
PRINTED BY WARD & PHILLIPS LIMITED
318 HOMER STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
.   ,   ,   a liallmatk oj. anal itu vtuituta
PRINTERS OF THE 1941 TOTEM
Campbell, N. E. J.
Campbell,   W.   	
Campbell,   William   M.
Cantell, E. T.	
Cardinall, E. 	
Cary, Amy C. .—
Carey,   P.   	
Carlile, J.	
Carlisle, D. 	
Carlyle,   A.   	
Carlyle, D. Gordon 	
Carmichael,  H.  A.  	
Carncross,   C.   	
Carr,  Gertrude 	
Carrothers, A. B. 	
Carrothers,  P.  J.  	
Carsley, J. _.	
Carson, D 	
Carson,  J. 	
Carter,  A.  	
Carter,   E.   	
Carter,   Doris  E.  	
Carter, J. 	
Carter,   N.   	
Carter, S. M.	
Casselman,  W.  B.
Casson,   V.   	
Cavers,   J.   	
Cawley, A.	
Cawley,  S.  	
Caydzien, Esme C.
Challis,   L.   	
"Chambers,  S.	
Chang,   J.   	
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Chan Kent, R.	
Chant Kent,  Joseph
Charlesworth, F. B.
Charter,   H.   R.	
Charters, J. .	
Checov,   L.   	
Chenoweth, J. 	
Chestnut, R.	
Chetkow, G. .	
Child,   C.	
Chinn, F.	
Chipperfield,   N.   ...
Christen, R. P. .	
Christie,   W.   D.   ...
Christie, H. A.  S. .
Christie,   Hugh  G.
Christie,  R.	
Christie,   S.   J.	
Christopherson,   K.
Chong,   P.	
Chow, J.	
Chu, G. 	
Chubb, J. A.	
Church, E. J.	
Chutter,  G.  P.	
Ciccone,  L.	
Claridge,  C.	
Clark, A.	
Clark,  B.	
Clark, G. N.	
Clark, John A.	
Clark, J. B..	
Clark, John D. 	
Clark, K.  	
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230 ost valuable
of the services a newspaper renders
to the community of which it is a
part are those which are never
entered on any ledger...
231 We are proud...
to have so large a part in the production of this
Totem and hope to serve you in the future when
you need
PHOTOGRAPHS
in your business, professional or social lite.
833   GRANVILLE   STREET
REG.
TUDIO
PHONE:   MArine   3932
Clark, Kenneth
Clark, R. 	
Clark,   S.   	
Clarke,  Chummer
Clarke,  E. A.  	
Clark, E. J. 	
Clarke,   W.   	
Clarkson,  L.  	
Clay, C. 	
Claydon,  G.  _
Clemens,  A.  _
Clement,  J.  	
Clery,  P.	
Cleveland,   E.
Cliff,  H. N.  _
Cline,  R.  	
Clugston,  B.  _.
Clugston,  J.	
Clyne, N.	
Coady,  T.  	
Cochrane,   J.  _.
Cochrane, Joseph S.
Cochrane,   R.   	
Coffey,  D.  	
Coffey,  P.  	
Cohen,  T.	
Colemen, W. 	
Coles,   J.   	
Collins, F.	
Collins,   P.	
Collins, Rosemary R.
Collins,   T.   	
Colwell,   B.   :	
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Combolost,   T.
Confortin,  J.   _
Conkey, E. —
Conn,    B.    	
Conway,   L.   _
Cooke,  D.	
Cook,  D.  T.  _
Cooke,  H.  	
Cooke,  N.  	
Cools,   E.   	
Cooper, A.	
Cooper,  J.	
Copp, Stanley
Corbould, B. _
Corey,  Ruth  _
Cormack,    W.
Costello,   M.   _
Cotterall,   C.
Cote, P.  	
Courts,   J	
Cowan,   M.   _
Cowan, T. A. ..
Cox,   E.   	
Cox, J	
Cox,   L.   	
44,
Coy,   F.   	
Crane,  G.	
Crawford, J. A.
Creighton,  J. 	
Crocker,   C.   	
Croft,   M.   	
Cromie, P.	
Crone,   T.   	
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232 The University Book Store
The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium Building, was established for the convenience
of the Students, and has effected a considerable saving
to the Students in time and money. It is prepared to
supply all the Text Books required for the various
courses offered in the University, also such articles as
Note Books, Loose-Leaf Sheets, Fountain Pens, Drawing Paper and Instruments.
Jbtitofcef itfuwqt^OAHtfj&tif/n
Jenkins Y&lves
\# T since   lOG.*.
\nls    Always   marked With  the "Diamond"
BRONZE   -   IRON
MADE IN CANADA BY JENKINS BROS. LIMITED. MONTREAL
233 IF YOU WISH TO SUPPLEMENT
Vour University Education
By
A COURSE OF PRACTICAL TRAINING
which will assist you in making the most of your Academic preparation,
THE
SPROTT-SHAW   SCHOOLS
Are at Your Service — Five of Them
They have been successfully serving your   predecessors for well  nigh  forty years.
You need not worry about your location.    They have brought their services almost to your door.
At the time of "going to press," there is not a Sprott-Shaw student, boy or girl, out of a position.
HEAD OFFICE AND MAIN SCHOOL:
812 ROBSON STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C
President: R. J. SPROTT, B.A.
Cronkhiet,  J.   M.
Crosby,   M.   	
Crosby,   R.   	
Cross,   G.   	
Cross, J. 	
Crowder,  D.  	
Crowell,   C.   	
Cruise, G. T.	
Cruit, R.	
Crute,   M.	
Cull, R. J. 	
Cullinane, R.	
Culver, D. 	
Cumming,   A	
Cumming, P. 	
Cunningham, D.
Cunningham, J.
Cunningham,  M.
Curran,    H.    	
Currie,  A.	
Currie,   J.   	
Curry,   R.   	
Curtin, F. J.	
Curtis,   K.   	
Curwen,   G   	
Cushing,   J.    	
Cuthbert,   G	
Cuthbert,  W.   J.._
Dale,  J.   Peter  _
Dale,    H.    	
Dalin,  W.  	
Daniell, Jocelyn
Daniels,   D.	
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Darby,  K.  	
Darley, H. 	
Darling,   D.   	
Darling, M. K. 	
Dashwood Jones,   E.
Daunt,   A.   	
David,   R.	
Davidson,   G   	
Davidson,    R.	
Davidson, Robert J. .
Davie,   H.  	
Davie,   R.   	
Davies,  E.  	
Davies,  J.   	
Davies, K. 	
Davies, L.	
Davis,  Russell	
Davis,   G.   	
Day, A.  ,
Daykin, V.	
Dean, A. E.	
Dear, W. 	
Dearing, I. —	
De Beck, H. 	
De Beck, N. -	
De Bou, G.	
Delany,  A.  	
De Leen, J.	
Dellert, A. 	
Dellert, G.	
De Macedo, J. 	
Dennis, L. 	
17,    88,
136,
Dennis, P. J. __
Dennison, A. J.
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234 British Columbia thrives by its industries
With its immense resources of Timber, Minerals,   and   Foodstuffs,   naturally   British
Columbia has played a major part in Canada's war effort.
For the Basic Industries, 1940 was a highly successful year.
But besides these, we have our Secondary Industries—Manufacturing in all its branches
—and these too record substantial gains.
In fact, British Columbia finds its industrial returns restored to the level of the banner
years of 1928-29.
There is every reason to believe that the cessation   of  hostilities  will  bring  a   lively
movement of capital and population to British Columbia, and that the acceleration due
•to the war will be maintained in peace, and on a solid and lasting basis.
"BUY  B. C. PRODUCTS" and help now to make British Columbia an attractive field
for new enterprises by supporting and building up those already in existence.
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Parliament' Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
E. G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister
HON. W. J. ASSELSTINE,
Minister.
Dennys, K.	
De Pencier, E.	
Des Brisay, H	
Des Brisay, M. E.
Des Brisay, R. 	
Devitt, E. 	
Devlin,   B 	
Dewdney, E. __„	
Dickie,   B.   	
Dickson,   G.   	
Dier, O. 	
Dilger,  V.   	
Dilworth. J. G. .
Dirassar. L. G. .
Dixon, C. R. 	
Dixon, H.	
Dixon, Hugh	
Dobson, G. N. _
Docker, G.	
Dockrill, J.	
Doherty, Nora _
Donaldson, W. .
Donegani, R. G.
Donnelly, C. 	
Donovan,  B.	
Dorgan, M.  	
Douglas, M. K. .
Drake, E. 	
Drennan, G. A. .
Driver, J. 	
Drummond,  A.  .
Drury,   M.   	
Drysdale, A. —
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Drysdale, N _
Dudgeon, E. W.
Dumoulin, P. A.
Duncan, D.  	
Duncan, M. 	
Duncan, Margaret
Dunell,  B.  	
Dunell, G E. 	
Dunlop, E 	
Duke, R. L —
Dwyer,   M.'	
Eakins, J. 	
Eaton, A. 	
Eckman, J..	
Eckardt, J. 	
Eddleston, J.	
Edmonds, D.	
Edwards, DaSma
Edward, J.	
Edwards, A. Douglas
Edwards, D. 	
Eek,   C.  	
Ekman, F. 	
Eldridge, K.	
Ellingham,   Joan	
Elliott, A. 	
Ellis,  D. 	
60,
Ellis, Dorothy -
Ellis, Harry 	
Ellis,  Hugh	
Hlis,  P.   	
Ellis,  R.	
Elvin, D.	
Emerson.   B.   	
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235 This new Studio of Furs features smart fur
coats and jaunty jackets priced to college
budgets. You are invited to drop in any time
and inspect this fine collection of quality pelts
and latest styles.
R. J. POP Ltd.
Furrier
GRANVILLE at FIFTEENTH
BA yview 8311
<=JD&ct&'c,  J—awuet,
y VLccckant, K^-kier
Whatever you plan to do after leaving University you will appreciate the smart appearance and dependability of a
CHALLENGER WATCH
Challenger Watches for men and women are priced
from $25.00 and are obtainable in B. C. only at
Birks', Vancouver.
BIRRS
JEWELLERS SILVERSMITHS
DIAMOND MERCHANTS
VANCOUVER
English, M. .
Erickson,  N.
Errico, E.	
Estey,  B.  	
Everton, M. .
Everton, V. .
Evans,   H.   ...
Evans, M.	
Ewen, J. 	
Ewing, J. 	
Ewing, M. 	
Eyre,   A	
Excell,   S.   	
Fairall, W.	
Fairbairn, D. ._
Fairbank, D. ....
Fairgrieve, W.
Fairleigh, C	
Fairnie,  L.  	
Fargey, H. 	
Farina, A. J	
Farina, C. O _
Farley,  K.  	
Farley, Kenneth
Fair,  D.  	
Farrell, M. 	
Fell, J. M. 	
Ferguson, C. _
Furguson, N. _
Ferguson, W.
Fergusson, D.
Fergusson, O.
Ferries, B. 	
Ferry, J. 	
Field,   R.   	
Field, Robert, C.
Fierheller,  G.  	
Filman, N.	
Filmer Bennett, G.
Filteau,   J.   	
Finch,   M.   	
Finch, G. 	
Findlay, J. G. 	
Finlay, M. 	
Finlayson,  A	
Finlayson, J. 	
Fisher, E. Brian
Fisher, H	
Fisher, H. E. B. _
Fitch, F. H. 	
Fitz James,  P.  	
Fitzpatrick,   T.   _
Fitzsimmons,  H.
Flader,  S.   	
Fleck, J. 	
Fleishman,   N.   _
Fleming, B.	
Fleming, K.	
Fleming, M. 	
Fleming^ N. 	
Flynn,  J	
Flynn,  James  	
Foley,  F. 	
Foley,  R. 	
Foot,  E.  	
Ford, Doug 	
Forrester, A.	
Forster,   J.   	
21
Foster,  J.  E.
89
  108
117
      48,    117
117
  117
100
58,      60,      39
89
  100
100
117
149
108
132
117
     115,    117
89, 92
117
130
108
117
149
147
117
21, 108
117
147
108
100
91, 145
117
89
117
117
134
100
138
89, 108
96
100
134, 193
114
117
100
39
108
117
100
138
147
132
117
118
152
89
118
100
151
118
108
105, 131
118
147
118
47
134
118
118
236 FRANK   UNDERHILL
Manager.
THE CflF . . .
Still boasts the same informality
Although   Frank's   new   Brock   Lunch   Room  is getting some of  its business.
Eat at either place, depending on the mood you're in    .    .    .    but don't forget
to patronize Campus Merchants.
Your Undergrad idiosyncrasies will bs understood and overlooked.
Foster, J. M. _..
Foster,   L.   	
Foster,  M.  	
Foster, Mary L.
Foster,   R.	
Fothergill,   A.   _
Fouks,  A.  	
Fowls,   C.	
Fowler, F.	
Francis,   D.   	
Francis,   F.	
Francis,  I.	
Francis,  J.  	
Francis,   M.   	
Fraser,  A.	
Fraser,  E.	
Fraser, G. 	
Freeman,  R.  	
Freeman,  V. 	
Fretwell,   H.   _..
Friker, W.	
Frisken, J. 	
Frith, A. 	
Frith,   N.   	
Frizell, R. 	
Frost,  Isobel 	
Frost,  Marion _
Frost, P.	
Fuller, M. F. _
Fulton, R.	
Fulton, Ronald -
Galbraith, D. E.
Galbraith,   J.   _..
Gall,  L.	
40,    51,   52,
61,
B9,
128
138
151
118
89
100
89
100
100
118
118
113
118
108
131
151
134
118
108
89
147
109
100
89
118
89
118
138
138
89
145
108
118
138
Gallagher,   J.   _
Galloway, J. —
Gait, W.	
Gansner,  N.  —
Gardiner, A.	
Gardiner, G	
Gardiner, J. 	
Gardiner,   M.   ._
Gardiner, V. 	
Gardiner,  W.  ._
Gardner,  Alan .
Gardner,  M.  	
Garner, Joseph _
Garrett, D. 	
Garrett, F. M. _.
Garrish,  A.	
Gatenby, Lisle -
Gathercole, P. —
Gelfan, D. 	
Gillatly, A.  	
George, M.	
Gibson, D. 	
Gibson,  Doreen
Gifford, R.	
Gill,   N.   	
Gillard, S. M. —
Gillespie, W. __
Gillies, D. 	
Gillies,  B.  	
Gillies, J.	
Gillis, G	
Gilmour, C. G.
Gilmour, W.  	
Gitterman, C.	
. 28,      86,
..42,
88,
118
100
118
118
134
108
118
108
89
100
108
118
118
108
118
143
132
89
134
108
100
118
108
133
134
108
89
61, 118
118
128
118
142, 143
59, 113
118
237 DUFfUS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
High Standards Make Competent
Graduates
Special Summer Courses
Individual Attention
SEYMOUR AND PENDER
Day and Night
Department of Education
SUMMER SCHOOL
of
EDUCATION
VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
JUNE 30th to AUGUST 1st
NEW COURSES FOR 1941
Integrative Teaching, Integrative Education Workshop, Construction of Tests and Measuring Instruments, Character Education, Guidance in the Personality Adjustment of Children, Modern Art for the
Upper Grades, Remedial Instruction in Reading,
Techniques of the Modern Dance.
Write for bulletin to
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Provincial Normal School
Victoria, B. C.
Gitterman, L. .
Gitterman,  S.  .
Giuriato, L.	
Glen,  J.  	
Glen,  M.	
Goble, M 	
Goddard, P. B.
Godfrey,   G.   _
Gogain, M.	
Golding, J.	
Goldman, F. _
Goode, N. 	
Goodman, C. .
Goodman, J. _.
Goodman, M. .
Goodwin, C. —
Goodwin, M. .
Goodwin, N. ...
Goodwin,  W. .
Gordon,  A.	
Gordon, F	
Gordon, G.	
Gorman, R.	
Gorse, F. 	
Gosnell, B. C. .
Gotenby, L	
Gould, R. A. _.
Gourlay,  J. 	
Gow, F	
Goyer,   G.   	
Goyer,  M. 	
Grace, A.	
Graham, A. 	
Graham, E. 	
Graham, H. ..
Grahame,   R.   _
Grand, W. 	
Granger, J.	
Granger, T. 	
Grant,   D.   	
Grant, W _..
Graves, H.	
Graves, M. 	
Gray, N. T.	
Gray,   J.   	
Green,  C.	
Green, W. 	
Greeno, Daniel
Gregory,  A. J.
Gregory,   E.   	
Grieve, T. 	
Griffin, F. P. _
Griffiths, G.	
Grigg, V.	
Grimble, W. .._
Grinnell,  J.	
Gross,  E 	
Gross, William H.
Guichon, L.	
Guichon, M. J.	
Gulloch,  E.	
Gunn, J. S.	
Gush, J.	
Gustavson, A.
Hackney, A. _
Haddad, M. .
Haggart, D. _
Haggart,  M.  _
44,
138
96
118
90
90
152
118
138
118
118
100
127
118
138
149
14S
147
118
134
131
134
138
118
138
118
118
118
113
118
113
108
90
100
108
193
147
..58, 61, 90
132
129
   47, 118
118
138
90
143
134
147
134
127
128
118
143
      118
      128
113
138
118
100
      132
118
147
152
      100
      139
118
41, 100
134
149
46, 100
134,
34,
238 Compliments of
MR. GORDON FARRELL
in the new FLAV-O-TAINER
"JAe&ag-that does, t
THE SAME FAMOUS FLAVOR
IN BOTH CONTAINERS
KELLY, DOUGLAS & CO. LIMITED
VANCOUVER, B.C.
STATIONERY
LOOSE LEAF SUPPLIES
DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
SLIDE RULES   —    SCALE RULES
FOUNTAIN PENS
Let Us Do Your Printing For Your
Fraternity and Sorority Organizations
The Clarke & Stuart
Co. Limited
STATIONERS AND PRINTERS
550 Seymour St. Vancouver, B. C.
BUY BRITISH
Gestetner Duplicators
are   made  only  by
D. GESTETNER LTD.
al
TOTTENHAM, LONDON, N. 17
Used .by hundreds of educational  institutes for
the speedy reproduction of
MAPS — EXAMINATION PAPERS — BULLETINS
REPORTS — MUSIC CHARTS — FORMS, ETC.
A complete range of models to meet every
duplicating requirement.
D. Gestetner (Canada) Limited
660 Seymour Street Vancouver, B.C.
Halifax, St. John, Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto,
Hamilton, London, Regina, Windsor, Winnipeg,
Calgary,  Edmonton.
239 CAMPUS
FAVORITES
MADELEINE CARROLL
and CARY 6RANT weTe
chosen by the Student Body
Popular Vote: THE MOST
OUTSTANDING STARS
of the SCREEN forl940-4l
See All the Stars at
CAPITOL: ORPHEUM: STRAND: DOMINION
Famous Players' Downtown Theatres
SPECIAL    RATE    TO    STUDENTS   WITH   UNIVERSITY   IDENTIFICATION   CARDS
Haile, I _.
Hailey,  A.  ..
Hall,  H.  	
Hall, J. G. ...
Hall, O. 	
Hall,   Ranjit
Halpin,  R.  _.
Halstead,   J.   	
Hamilton, I. 	
Hamilton, R. 	
Hammitt,  V	
Hammond, A. B.
Hammond, G.	
Hammond,   J.   	
Hammond, P.	
Hanbury,  A.  W.
Hanbury,   P.  	
Handa, R.	
Handforth, V	
Handling, M. J. _
Haney, D. 	
Hanson, D.	
Harada, Teruo „_
Harding,  J.   	
Harford, G. 	
Harmer,  J 	
Harper, D.	
Harris,   S.	
Harrison, J. Stanley
Harry, K.	
Harvey, B. 	
Harvey, E. 	
Harvey, H.	
75,      77,
95,      78,
81,
96,
138
128
113
108
104
108
118
108
108
108
118
108
100
134
100
108
113
138
134
118
133
100
118
131
127
36
104
127
134
100
131
108,
118
Hasegawa, J.	
Haskins, R.	
Hastings,   W.   	
Hatch,   N 	
Hatte,  R.  	
Hauger,  A 	
Hausch, R. C. 	
Hawkes,   A.   	
Hawkins,  D.	
Hay, D 	
Hayward,  C.  	
Haywood Farmer,  Robert
Hazlewood, M. 	
Heal, S. J. 	
Hebb, D	
Hebb, E. 	
Hedse, J.	
Henderson,  D.  	
Henderson,  M.  E. 	
Henry,  J.  	
Herberts,   E.	
Herberts,   L.	
Herd,  B 	
Hewett, M. H.
Hewitt, G. B. ..
Hewitson,  J.  -
Heyer, R.	
Hibberson,  R.  J.
Hicks, J. B.	
Hicks,   M.	
Higgins, J.	
Higgins, M. 	
Hikida, H. 	
Hill, A. 	
115,
90,
44,
118
129
108
134
118
90
138
90
90
149
96
132
118
147
118
100
108
100
90
90
108
108
193
100
90
118
90
108
138
152
118
90
118
118
240 eotae
BRITISH   IMPORTERS OF
CAMPUS CLOTHES
905  GEORGIA  STREET WEST
FOR MEN-
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Smart Imports in Tweeds
Sport Clothes and Haberdashery
FOR  LADIES—
Scotch Cashmere Sweaters
Brooks Sweaters
Scotch Tweeds
Shetland Homespuns
Always the Finest in Quality
Hill, C 	
Hill, Clifford J.
Hill, R. 	
Hilchey, G.	
Hills, J. F	
Hipkin, H. 	
Hirano, T __
Hird, D. 	
Hitchcock, J. 	
Ho, T.	
Hoag, A. 	
Hobden, F. E.
Hodge, M. —
Hodges, William
Hoggan, I 	
Holbrook, E.	
Holdom,  F.	
Hole, J.	
Holy, Harold W.
Holland, A. G. _
Holland, K. 	
Holmes,   G.   	
Hood, J. 	
Hood, John A.
Hookings, P. _
Hooley, E. 	
Hooper,  Cameron
Hooper, F.	
Hooper, P.	
Hooper, Victor	
Hooson, W.	
Hopkins, J.	
Hopper, Alan	
77,      79,
ina
Hopper, D        . .. .
                      131
113
Hormann, E.    . .. __ .. __  	
...                            119
118
Home,   H.     _     _	
100
132
Home, L        	
134
131
Home, P.    .     . .	
                             119
127
Horswill, S.      _  _
47,      109
1C8
House, S. M _  . _  .  _	
119
90
                    119
138
Howard, E. _  __      _ _ _
153
149
Hnwnrd,  Fr]wrrH
.                          119
108
Hnwirri,  d.
90
108
Howieson,   M _     . .
..                  100
118
Hudson, W.         - - -       — .  - . 	
                    113
118
104     119
100
Hughes, R. C.
134
118
118
Hume,  D _      	
Hunter, D. .            	
113,     21,     52,        80
.               119
134
138
Hunter, Douglas. R.	
Hunter, R.    .
                 147
109
108
Hnntor, S.
..                         109
108
Huntington,   R.   R,
. .  . .                  149
100
Hurt,  H.  A.   ..	
138
100
Hutr-hlnsinri,   R
                         134
138
Hutchinson,  W            	
                           119
134
Hyslop, Mary I.           _
152
90
Irons,  M      _.	
109
100
Iverson, B.    .	
- -                           129
149
Ivey,  D.
119
134
Izen,   B.  .            ....               	
. .                              90
90
Jack, M. 	
90
inq
JnHrsnn,   f)
- -                           109
118
Jackson,  F.    .   	
109
130
Jagger,   P.                  _                  	
              138
241 Bre«»
the*
there
ta**
*»
th *°
ul*°
aed
d''
*****
THE UNION OIL COMPANY OF CANADA LTD.
James,  R.   _
Jamieson, D.
Jamieson, F.
Janes, J.	
Jardine,  J.	
Jarvi, H.	
Jeffries, J.	
Jenkins, A.	
Jenkens, E.  	
Jenkins,  M.	
Jenkinson,  D.  E.
Jessup, G. D.	
Jessop, H. 	
Jinks, G. 	
Johnson,  A.	
Johnson, Eva 	
Johnson,   N	
Johnson,  P.  	
Johnson, V.	
Johnson, William
Johnson, G. H. __
Johnson,  S. 	
Johnston,
D.
Johnston, D. E.	
Johnston, J. R.	
Johnston, S.	
Johnston, W. 	
Johnstone, Alan D.
Joiner,  W.	
Jones,  A.	
Jones, H. 	
Jones,   M.   	
Jones, N.	
48,
Jordan Knox,   R.
59,
90,
119
152
131
127
119
119
100
1.19
152
119
109
134
113
119
119
109
119
109
100
132
109
152
100
119
128
100
145
119
100
100
119
138
109
89
Joyce, R.	
Jukes, J.	
Julson, M. O. _
Kaario,  E.  	
Kadota, C.	
Kagetsu, A. 	
Kagetsu,   H.   	
Kaillor, Gordon
Kato, K.	
Kato, Y. 	
Kawaguchi, H.
Kawaguchi,  J.
Keith,  K.	
Kolland. H.	
Kells,  O.	
Kemper, F. D. .
Kendall, R	
Kennedy, E. _.
Kennedy, J. _
Kenyon, K. A.
Ker, J	
Kermode, D. _
Kermode, E. _-
Kermode, H. _
Kerr, D.	
Kerr, R.	
Kidd,  J.  	
Kidd, M.	
Kilbank,  S.  _.
Kilet, C.	
Killick,   S.   	
King, A. D.	
King, J. D.	
Kirby, G	
119
109
138
119
119
119
131
129
90
138
90
119
109
129
109
90
119
96
119
119
128
138
132
119
90
119
100
119
90
119
147
134
149
96
242 Social Headquarters
for B.B.C.
Kirkpatrick,   M.
Kitson, C. E. _.
Kloepfer, J _
Knowles,  R.  —
Kobayashi,  Y.
Koenigsberg,   I.
Korsch, L.	
Kostman, P.	
Kullander, M. _
Le Belle, E. .	
Lacey,   K.   	
Ladner, D.	
Lake,  J.	
Lam, M. —:—
Lambe, A. :	
Lamont Havers,   R.
Lane,  G.  	
Lane, Robert B.
Lane,  Ruth	
Langenek, F.	
Lansdowne, R.
Lapp, G.	
Large, D. L.	
Large, R.	
Larone, H.	
Larsen, A.	
Latimer,  E _
Latremouille,  B.
Lawler, L.	
Lawrie, F. 	
Lawson, D. 	
Lazzarin,   F.  —
Leach,  G.  	
Leacy, F. 	
Lean,  A 	
48,
100
109
90
119
119
119
104
119
134
138
149
153
119
119
119
90
91
149
119
138
109
100
119
109
91
100
91
119
109
113
119
119
109
101
119
Lear, H.	
Lebedovich, S.
Leblanc,   R.   ._
Lee, D. C.	
Lee, J. C. 	
Lee, R.	
Leedham, D. _
Lees, D.	
Legeer, R.	
Leigh-Spencer,  G.  .
Lennie, D.	
Lennie, M.	
Leong,  D.  	
Lepsoe, G.	
Lepsoe, C.	
Leslie, J. P.	
Letham, W. B.	
Lidster, E.	
Llghtbody, A	
Lightheart,   O.	
Lightstone,   Robert
Lightstone, Jack	
Lim,  M.	
Lind, F.  	
Lind,  L.  	
Lindsay, W. 	
Lindsay, J. E.	
Lindsay,  M.	
Lindsay, R.	
Lipsett, C. M.	
Lister, M.	
Little, A.	
Littler, A. 	
Livingston,   D.	
Livingstone, H	
48,
134
109
91
119
109
109
109
119
138
119
101
101
135
91
135
138
147
145
138
119
109
119
119
119
109
127
119
119
119
109
40, 109
119
119
138
135
WHITE
SPOT
CHICKEN AND STEAK DINNERS
•
Granville at Sixty-seventh Avenue
243 COMPLIMENTS OF
W.&J.
I
Importers of Fine British Woollens.
HOTEL   VANCOUVER
Sweaters from Braemar of Scotland
Coats and Suits from Jaeger and
Chester Barrie of London.
Shirts, Socks, Ties, etc., from well-known
Old Country Makers.
HORSE RACING
RACING  DATES, SEASON   1941
Lansdowne Park, Sat., June 28th to Sat., July 5th
Brighouse Park, Wed„ July 9th to Wed., July 16th
Hastings Park, Sat., July 19th to Sat., July 26th
Lansdowne Park, Sat., Aug. 2nd to Sat., Aug. 9th
Brighouse Park, Sat., Aug. 16th to Sat., Aug. 23 rd
Hastings Park, Mon., Aug. 25th to Men., Sept. 1st
Victoria,   B.   C,   Sept.   6th   to   Mon.,   Sept.   22nd
VANCOUVER   THOROUGHBRED   ASS'N.
LTD.
Ste.  102—535 W. Georgia Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone:  MA rine 4640
Lloyd, G	
Lloyd,   M.   	
Lloyd, N.	
Locke, E. Vivian	
Locke, Elizabeth M.
Locke,   O.	
Logan,  J.  .	
Logan,  K.  _	
Long, E. 	
Long, J.	
Long, Joseph D. ..
Long, K. R.	
Lord, Terence M.
Louie, J.	
Louie, Q.	
Lourie, Marianne B.
Low,  W.	
Lowe, M.	
Lowther, R.	
Lui,  C.  	
Lumsden,  H.
Lyle, D.	
Lynn, J.	
Lynott, W. _
Lyons, E.	
Lyons, O.	
Lyons, R.	
Lyttle, D. 	
Lyttleton, H. A. _
Mabee,  J.  	
Maddin,  S.  _.,	
Mahood, B.	
Mahood, I.	
Mataguy,   J.	
Maitland,   W.   	
Moloney,  D. 	
Manders, E.	
Manes,   J.   	
Mann, A. 	
Mann,   C 	
Mannix,   L.   	
Marchanton, E. _j_
Margeson, J.	
Margetts,  E.	
Marhull, A.	
Markham, D.	
Marling, K.  	
Marples, E. G. ._
Marr, K. Mavis	
Marsden,  A.	
Marshall, D.	
Marshall, M	
Marshall, R. 	
Marshall, Russell
Martin, C.	
Martin,   Lionel  	
Martin, M. .	
Martin, N.	
Martin,  S.   .	
Martinoff, Ivan 	
Mason,  E. _
Masuda,   G.	
Matheson, B.	
Matheson, C. _.
Matheson, Claudia
Matheson, J.	
Matheson, H.	
Matheson, I.	
Mathews, F.	
Mathieson,   J.	
75,
76,
97,
104
30
54,    101,
119
113
114
109
119
119
132
113
101
119
138
119
145
120
120
151
135
91
120
96
193
193
109
128
128
120
113
120
193
109
109
104
128
91
120
59
91
109
152
135
101
91
61
91
120
127
120
91
109
120
120
120
147
109
109
139
120
91
120
101
135
120
109
131
101
104
56, 109
109
120
193
244 Matsui, R. 	
Matthew,  Beverley
Matthews, C.	
Mattu,  R.  	
Mattson, N.	
Maxwell, John	
Maxwell, J. ,	
Mayne, T.	
Meek, A. D.	
Meighen, M.	
Mellish,  G.	
Melvin, J.	
38,
Menchions.  R.	
Menzies, D.	
Menzies, M. A.	
Mercer, E. Florence
Mercer, W.	
Meredith, J.	
Meredith, O. 	
Meredith,  P.	
Meredith, T.	
Merrett, J.	
Merryfield, J.	
Messenger, G.	
Messinger, D.	
Metford, L.	
Middleton,  F.  	
Mikkelson, E.	
Mikkelson, M.	
Mill,  J.	
Millar, D.	
Millar, M. _
Millard, R. P.
Miller,   A.   _
Miller,  J.	
Miller, R.	
Miller, Richard
Milligan,  G.  —
Milligan, P.	
Mills, Florence -
Mills,  William
Milne, J. ,_-
Miniato, O.	
Minichiello, A. _
Mitchell, A.	
Mitchell, P. D. _
Mitten, D. 	
Miura, H.	
Moe,  B.  	
Mohr, F.	
Monckton, J. 	
Montador, R.	
Montgomery, W.
Moodie, W.	
Moore, S.	
Moran, J.	
Morin, D. *.—
Morgan, J. F.	
Morris,  D.	
Morris, Dorothy _
Morris,  F.  	
Morris, H. R.	
Morris, J. 	
Morris, Joyce 	
Morris, M.	
Morris, R _
Morrison,  B.  _.
Morrison, J. L.
Morritt, J.	
Morrow, M. —
46,
B3,
139
101
109
40, 91, 86
139
129
      145
      101
      109
       91
109
      104
  103, 104
120
101
      120
113
       91
101
109
59, 101,  61
      129
147
      109
      120
91
91.
127
120
120
120
153
143
50, 120
135
120
131
139
109
109
129
120
120
91
91
82
120
120
109
120
143
120
120
127
120
120
128
143
120
101
120
135
101
91
91
101
132
113
113
21, 113
143
44.
56,
You Will Find It A Pleasure
to do Business With Us . . .
PRUTING
of every description
£
Anderson Printing Co.
LIMITED
Located at
Victory Square
455 Hamilton St.
Telephone:
PA cific 5838
FENTON
Commercial School
6109-6111 West Boulevard (at 45th Ave.)
KERRISDALE
Principal   W.   H.   Fenton,   Outstanding   Commercial
Specialist under the Department of Education
for twenty years.
POST  GRADUATE   TRAINING   FOR
BUSINESS AND SECRETARIAL
APPOINTMENTS
Limited  Enrolment Individual  Attention
Public Stenography  Department
MMS. typed and bound
PHONE KErr. 3717
245 TO REACH YOUR GOAL
Every graduate when he
leaves University has an objective he would like to
reach. No matter what he
decides his life work will be,
regular Savings deposits of
even small amounts, accumulating at compound interest, lead step by step to
security and to the attainment of his goal.
THE
ROYAL   BANK
OF   CANADA
WOODWARD'S
GREATER VANCOUVER'S
SHOPPING CENTRE
You  can   save   money  on   all   the   new   Fashions   for
Campus   and   Social   Activities   from   the   complete
selection at Woodward's.
Misses' Fashions—Floor 2
Men's Fashions—Main Floor
Morton, B. 	
Morton, E 	
Morton,  J	
Morton, R 	
Morton, N	
Mosher, ft. 	
Motherwell,  V.
Mottley, W. D.
Moyls, ft	
Moyls,  M.  	
Moxon, J 	
Muir, E. 	
Mulhern,  M.  .;..
Mulvin,   M	
Mundell, P. 	
Mungen, I. 	
Munro,  D.  	
Munro,  M 	
Munro,  E	
Murdoch, J	
Murphy, M. 	
Murray,  G	
Murray,  J.  	
Murray, R. Elaine ..
Murray, Robert N.
Muttart,  M 	
Myers, F. 	
Mylroie, R.  	
Mcfldam, J. C.
McAllister, Bob
Mcflrthuf, R	
McArthur,  J.  ....
McBain, M. A.
MacBean,   D.   ..
59,
50,
48,
97,
101
120
120
120
129
139
139
91
147
110
104
101
110
147
110
152
120
152
101
101
101
139
139
120
101
101
120
145
139
141
120
132
120
120
McBride, K. 	
McBride, R	
McBride, W. E. .
McBurnery, S. L.
McCall, G	
McCammon,   D.
McCammon,  J.   ..
McCarry, James
McCarter, D. 	
McCarter, W. ....
MacCarthy, J. ....
McCarthy, M. F.
McCarvill,  C	
McCay,   J.   	
McClean, Francis
McClory,  M	
McCorkell, D	
McCucdg, E _.
McCuaig,   I 	
McCulloch,  J.   	
McCully,   D _..
McDermid, D. J. _
McDermid, E.  	
MacDermot, D. 	
McDiarmid,  B.   	
McDiarmid, I. H.
McDiarmid,   L.   	
McDiarmid, Lorna M.
McDiarmid, M	
McDonagh, J	
Macdonald, D	
McDonald,  Gordon ...
MacDonald, H. 	
McDonald,  C.  F.  	
114
120
38, 98, 104
110
104
91
149
58
139
139
147
101
120
135
91
  101,  42
152
110
145
48
91
120
120
   91,  86
101
193
110
120
120
110
101
  114,  58
92
120
246 SIP»».
ts
not what you
wear but how
you wear it !
. . . It's being spotless, crisp, and un-
erumpled, keep-
ing smart and up-to-
date that counts. It's
Sanitone, the modem
drycleaning process
that turns the trick.
For Sanitone restores
brilliance to colours,
firmness of texture to
materials of all kinds
and makes clothes
look like new.
LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANERS
LIMITED
MArine 1321
McDonald, I. J.	
McDonald, Ian W.	
MacDonald, James A. 	
MacDonald, J. Campbell
McDonald, Donald J.	
Macdonald, J. L.  ,
Macdonald, J. Malcolm
MacDonald, Kennedy 	
Macdonald,   M.   	
MacDonald, Marion	
Macdonald, Mary Jane
Macdonald, Mary Jean
McDonald, R. 	
Macdonald,  S.  	
MacDonald, W. H.	
McDonnell, E. 	
McEachern,  F.   —
McEachern,  R.	
McEwen, J. 	
McEwan,  R.  	
MacEwan, W.	
MacEwen, E. Bruce
McEwen, John M.	
McFadden, M. E.	
MacFarlane,   G.   	
MacFarlane, J. A. _
MacFarlane, M. E. ..
MacFayden, R. D. ..
McGhee, D. 	
McGhee, Wm.	
MacGillivray, J.	
McGowan, J 	
Macgowan, K.  	
McGregor,  F. C. —
McGuinness, D. 	
Maclnnes, E.	
Mcintosh, G. .	
Macintosh, L. Jean
Mcintosh, M. 	
McKay, D. 	
MacKay,  H.	
McKay, Katherine
McKay,  Jean C.  _
MacKay/R. N.	
MacKay S.	
MacKay, W.	
McKechnie,  H.	
McKelvy, M. 	
MacKenzie,  A.  	
MacKenzie, Alma _
McKenzie,  C.  	
MacKenzie, D. M.
McKenzie, E. 	
MacKenzie,   George
McKenzie, L.  H	
MacKenzie, R. D. —
McKenzie,  Ruth 	
MacKenzie, V. 	
McKenzie, W. C. 	
McKeown, R. 	
McKercher, R 	
McKie, A. 	
Maclde,   W. ,	
McKillop, M.	
McKim, A. 	
McKim, H. 	
McKinlay,  J.   .	
McKinlay, W.	
McKinnon,  E.  	
110,
56,
60,
50,
46,
35,
50,     92,
147
114
149
92
114
110
120
105
92
153
110
120
120
110
114
92
101
128
97
139
101
39
143
120
104
149
120
97
120
101
120
131
114
120
120
92
149
120
120
110
92
92
153
139
101
139
120
110
121
92
92
121
121
101
101
101
121
61
131
121
114
121
91
121
143
126, 127
101
PI
92
247
is achieved by being
correctly dressed in a
manner to suit your
particular personality.
SUITorT'COAT
HAND-CUT AND TAILORED
TO YOUR INDIVIDUAL MEASURE
from
24
.95
LADIES' Garments Tailored in the
Mannish  Manner — at Same Low
Price)
TAILORED CLOTHES
340 West Hastings St. Sole Agents for the new "WILD" Transit
by Kern £> Co., Switzerland
FREDERICK GOERTZ, LTD.
Certified Scientific Instrument Makers
PHONE SEymour 1877
Specialists   in   Repair  Work   on   Instruments   of  Any  Make   for
Engineers,  Surveyors,  Navigators and Aviators.
All Work Guaranteed.
INSTRUMENTS   FOR   RENT
Instruments Bought and Sold or on Commission Sale
569 HOWE STREET VANCOUVER, B. C.
MacKinnon, D. 	
MacKinnon, G.	
McLachlan,  R.  	
McLachlan,   Ruby  	
MacLachlan, Ruth M.
McLagan,  M.  	
McLaren, T. 	
McLean, A 	
MacLean, G. C. 	
McLean, D. Sidney	
MacLean, Donald W.
MacLean, E. D. 	
McLean-Bell,   J.   	
MacLean, J. H. 	
McLean, R 	
McLeary,  N.	
McLeod,  A.  	
McLeod, D 	
'Perfection in Style,
Comfort and Fit."
101,
A sure fire combination of all three to be found in
our clothes. The new English Lounge Drape Models,
and Sport Clothes have all these distinctive qualities.
EDDIE R. DEEM
498 Seymour Street,
Cor. Pender
139
121
110
110
121
101
129
121
121
121
139
121
101
121
121
110
135
139
McLeod,  E.  	
McLeod, Joseph P.
McLeod,   M.   	
MacLeod, R.	
McLeod, R. Raymond
MacLennan, C. 	
McLintock, S.	
McLorg, M. 	
McLorg, T. 	
McMahon, M. P.	
McManus, G. 	
McMichael,  G.  	
MacMillan,   D.   	
McMillan, J. 	
McMillan, G. 	
42,
McMillan, Mary A.
McMillan, R. 	
MacMillon, D. G. _
92
110
149
110
101
110
110
101
139
104
149
101
50, 110
56, 101
129
121
149
139
Your Nearest Bank is
THE CANADIAN BANK OF
COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branch
A general banking business is transacted
and accounts of the Faculty and Students
of the University are invited.
Bankers to the Alma Mater Society
C. R. MYERS, Manager.
TURPIN BROS. LTD.
655  GRANVILLE  STREET
Home of the Famous
SHIFFER HILLMAN COY.
HAND TAILORED CLOTHING FOR MEN
Canada's No. 1 Line of Mens' Clothes
Canadian Industries Ltd.
"Cellophane" Division
"Fabrikoid" Division
Paint and Varnish  Division
Plastics   Division
Alkali  Division
General  Chemicals Division
Organic Chemicals Division
Salt Division
"Dominion" Ammunition Division
Explosives Division
Fertilizer Division
Nylon Division
248 McMorran, S.	
McMullan, M. J. 	
McMurchy, L. 	
McNab,   P  	
McNaughton, J. H. 	
McNeal,  R.   ..	
McNeely,  C.  	
McPhail,   A — 	
McPhee, M. 	
MacPherson,  A.    	
McPherson,   D.   	
MacPherson,   P.   	
MacQuarrie, A. 	
McQueen, B 	
McQueen,  D.   	
MacRae,   H.   	
MacRae, J    	
MacRae,   Roderick     	
MacSwan, I. _   	
MacRae, A. 	
McTaggart,  H 	
McTaggart,  K.  	
McTavish, P        ....    75, 76,
McTavish, M. 	
McWilliams,   H.     	
McWilliams, R    	
Nairne, M 	
Nairne, R. 	
Nagata,   S.  	
Namba,  A. .: 	
Narod,  A.     	
Nash, A     33,      78,     80,
Nash,  Charles _    77,      41,
Nash F 	
Nash,  M    	
Nasmyth,  P.  	
Naylor,   J 	
Nazzer, D. 	
Neil,   K 	
Neil,  E.  M 	
Neilson, James S —
Neilson,   N 	
Nelles, T 	
Nelson, C. 	
Nelson, J.   — 	
NeMetz,   P.   	
Nesbitt,  S.  	
Nevison, James H 	
Newby, M. E 	
Newman,  B 	
Newmarch,   C.  	
Newton, J   	
Nichols,   A 	
Nichols,   D !	
Nichols, E. 	
Nichols,   W _. 	
Nicholson,   L.  	
Nickerson,  D.  G 	
Nicol, E.   	
Nikaido, H 	
Nikaido, T 	
Nimmons, P.     _
Nissen, H 	
Nobbs, W 	
Noble, D 	
Noble, S. R.   	
Noguchi, K.   	
Nordhle, A.    	
North, G. 	
144,
40,
32
145
121
110
139
101
101
110
110
121
101
121
104
110
92
135
121
129
147
97
139
135
97
110
110
110
121
121
121
104
139
92, 141
132, 141
139
110
128
104
129
101
121
149
145
110
110
121
110
121
110
92
60
141
110
92
101
101
129
79, 102
121
92
92
121
121
102
121
110
149
102
121
110
61
110,
128,
56,
Norton, W. ...
Nose, R. 	
Nosworthy, F.
Novikoff, M. .
Nowlan, H. ...
Nygard, H. ...
Oakes,   L	
Oastler,  J.  	
Oates, R. ......
O'Dynsky,  P.
Ogilvie,  A.  ...
Ogilvie,   S.   ...
Ogren,   A.   	
Okuno, S	
Oldfield, J. _..
Oldfield, H. ...
Oles, J. 	
Oliver,  H	
Olliver, G	
Olsen, J. N	
Olson, E 	
Olson, G	
O'Neill, A. 	
Onizuka,  Shijeo
Onlee, L. —
Ontkean,  O	
Orchard, E. J. -
Orr, T	
Orr, O. 	
Osborne, W	
Ottewell, M. B.
Otsuki, J. 	
Oughtred, A. _
Oughtred, W. _
Owens, E. M.
Oxley, G —
Ozeroff, W	
Paisley,  J. 	
Palmer, R _
Panton, W.  	
Pao,   G.  	
Parfitt, A	
Parham, D	
Parish, G. P. ....
Parizeau,   P	
Parker, C	
Parker,  R _
Parks, J 	
Parnum,   E	
Parsons, T.	
Pastinsky, B.   	
Paterson, K. 	
Patience,   P.   	
Paton, A        35,    38,
Paton, Archibald 	
Patterson, L 	
Patterson, S   	
Patrick, B 	
Paul, R 	
Payne,  H 	
Pearce, J. 	
Pearson,  C. 	
Pearson, H	
Pearson, Y —
Peatfield,   J.   .	
Pedlow, A 	
Pedlow,  D	
Pendleton, F -.
Pendleton, W. 	
   121
  104
  131
   145
  92
  121
   110
  102
  139
   139
   102
  121
   121
104
  143
   92
  133
121
  121
  121
  121
  129
  102
   121
  110
  135
   110
     . 114
   131
92
  121
  110
  121
  110
  110
  110
       92,    121
  114
 .  110
  121
  114
 .  104
  131
  143
  92
36,      37,    126,    129
78,      40,    132,      81
  92
  121
      39,    110
  121
121
129
121
102
135
135
121
102
121
145
139
149
121
11C
121
110
97
111
55,    60,      98,
This year.. it's
FOR   BUSINESS  AND
SPORTS   WEAR
SUITS
Tweeds are still popular in
two and three button style.
Full and modified drapes,
are the choice of the smart
dresser. Don't overlook the
chalk stripe worsteds, they're
smart.
JACKETS
Sport Jackets continue, long
and rather plain in line and
design, but are made of
colorful patterned fabrics,
Backs will be perfectly plain,
devoid of pleats or belts, with
or without a centre vent,
rather straight and easy
fitting.
LTD.
THE STORE FOR MEN
866 Granville Street
Commodore  Bldg.
Phone    -    -    MA rine 1526
249 "6ntke
&
earn
rr
Kirk's Styles are definitely "On the Beam"
for 1941 — Smart
Lounge Suits for men
and long, flattering
Sport Jackets for women are features!
ugs
TWO STORES TO
SERVE YOU:
301   West   Hastings   Street
2561 South Granville Street
SNAPSHOTS..
come the easy way
with KODAK
VERiCHROfllE ffLfll
" ST
1 IP      h * Jb
—and they're finished right
when we do the work.
See for yourself by leaving your next exposed rolls of film
with us for quality photo finishing!
EASTMAN THHT LTD.
610 GRANVILLE STREET
CAMPUS
CLOTHES
. . that rate "A Plus"
in any College!
The store of "Youthful Fashions" present
smart college clothes
endorsed by co-eds!
Coats, Suits, Dresses,
Furs, Sportswear and
Millinery at exceptionally low prices.
Charge and Budget
Accounts   if   desired.
564 GRANVILLE STREET
Penny,  H.	
Pepper, D. 	
Percival,  J.  _.
Perry,  K.  	
Perry,   L.   	
Peterson,  A.  .
Pettie,   G.	
Phelps, J. 	
Phillips, B. 	
Phillipson, M.
Philpot, M. ...
Phillips, M. _.
Philps, F.	
Physick, fl	
Physick, M. ...
Pickard, M. ...
Pickering, E. .
Ill
153
121
114
104
111
111
121
111
121
121
102
121
92
114
135
92
Pickering,   M.  _
Pickford, J. 	
Pickin, B. 	
Piderman,  J.  P.
Pidgeon,  E _.
Pidgeon, F. 	
Pilkington, L. .	
Pinchin,   V.  	
Pitman, D	
Planta,  C.  	
Plommer,  R.   	
Pon, L	
Poole, D. 	
Pooley, R. 	
Porter, J. fl. 	
Porter, R	
Potkins, R. 	
Poulspn, J. H. ...
130,
111
114
121
121
114
114
111
149
135
147
111
102
121
121
139
104
131
131
250 ** Eyes .
■     ■
to see require ever\
' care.    This care, painstaking and
exacting, is written into your Eye-Physician's Prescrip
tion  for glasses.
This same   individualized,  precise
treatment is offered
you, when our services are utilized
to interpret these
findings to the finished eyewear.
Just remember—
oo
PRESCRIPTION
EnspERsml
[[OrTICMIIs]
OPTICAL
CO. LTD.
(Est.   1924)
424
VANCOUVER. BLOCK.
Best Wishes
To the Student Body of U.B.C.
for Success in
1 94 1
McLennan, McFeely &
Prior Ltd.
VANCOUVER —VICTORIA — NEW WESTMINSTER
British   Columbia's   Pioneer   Hardware   Supply   House
Established 1859
Poulton,   S	
Powell, G. 	
Powell, J. 	
Powell,  R _
Pride,  A 	
Priest, J 	
Primrose,  N.  ....
Pronger, R. 	
Pronger,   S.  	
Proud, M.-G. ...
Proven, N. 	
Pullen, M. E. ...
Punter, W	
Purdon, R. 	
Purdy,  I. 	
Purdey,  James
Pyle, R. G. 	
Quick,  E.  	
Racey, S _.
Rae,   R	
Rae, E. 	
Ralston,  D.  .....
Ralston,  H.  	
Rand, R. 	
Rattenbury,  D. .
Ravve,  R.  	
Rowlings, P	
Rayner, P. 	
Reagh,  D.  	
Redfern, N. 	
Redlick,   Bertha
Redmond,  J.  	
Reed,  K.   	
Reid,  I.   	
Reid,   M.   	
      48,    102
97
  121
122
  122
135
     100,    102
114
111
102
      92,    111
93
114
122
93
127
135
57, 111, 61
149
129
122
122
102
122
129
  111
  122
111
143
111
  122
  122
  122
  149
      56,    122
Reid,  W.  	
Reid, William W.
Reifel, A. 	
Reifel, G 	
Remnant,  P.  	
Renwick, H. M.
Renshaw, R. 	
Reynolds, A. —
Rhodes, J. 	
Rhodes,  H.  	
Rich, R _
Richards, I	
Richardson, R.
Richardson, J. _
Ricketts,  D	
Riddell, M. 	
Riddell, W. 	
Ridley,  E.  	
Ridland,   M	
Rietchel, P. 	
Ripley, T. A. __
Rippon, A. 	
Ritchie, D. 	
Ritchie, H ._
Ritchie, L. N	
Rittenhouse, B.
Rivers,  D	
Roach,   S	
Robertson,  A. ..
Robertson, Donald A.
Robertson, David .■.	
Robertson, H.  -	
Robertson, J  •.	
Robertson, M. 	
Robin, D. 	
130,
52,
102,
122
102
93
149
122
122
132
122
122
122
131
131
127
139
111
93
122
111
93
122
147
147
102
111
111
111
102
135
122
111
97
122
110
153
111
STUDENTS ENJOY BANKING
at the
Bank of Montreal
Established 1817
A Bank Where Small Accounts are Welcome
WEST  POINT GREY  BRANCH
10th and Sasamat
E. J. SCHIEDEL, Manager.
Union Steamships Ltd.
Offer an Unrivalled Series of
SUMMER VACATION TRIPS
From a day to a week.
From $1.00 to $55.00.
Between May 1st and September 30th
Illustrated   Folders   and   information   at   City   Office,
739 Granville Street, Phone MA rine 5438; or Union
Pier, foot Carrall Street;  Phone PAcific 3411.
1889—Over Fifty-one Years of Friendly Service--! 941
251 Chief Contributor to Vancouver's
Beautiful Gardens
is
//
Uplands Special
Fertilizer
Acknowledged by Greenskeepers and
Professional Gardeners to be
THE  BEST
AT YOUR FLORIST, HARDWARE STORE
or for Prompt Free Delivery
PHONE   High. 5400
BUCKERFIELD'S LTD.
//
Robinson, C. 	
Robinson, D. 	
Robinson,  Donald _
Robinson, Doramay
Robinson,  E. 	
Robinson, G 	
Robinson,   J	
Robinson, Joan 	
Robinson, J. David
Robinson,  James	
Robinson, M. 	
Robinson, T. 	
Robinson, V.	
Robson, D 	
Robson, M 	
..46,      47,
Roche, R. Gordon
Roddan,  A.  	
Roe, J 	
GOULD AND HIRD
IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS
Tea, Coffee, Seeds, Etc.
300 Arts and Crafts Building,  576 Seymour Street
Vancouver B. C.
Ill
139
122
1C2
114
111
31
149
122
127
102
93
122
122
122
111
93
147
INSIST ON HAVING THE BEST
//
Keystone Brand
LOOSE LEAF SHEETS AND BINDERS
//
All general lines of School Supplies
Manufactured  in  British  Columbia
by
Smith Dauiddon
&Uhiqht£td.
VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
CALGARY AND EDMONTON, ALBERTA
Rogers, J 	
Rogerson, J. 	
Rolfe, W. 	
Rome,  A.  	
Roots, E. F _
Rose, D	
Rose, J 	
Rose, M. E	
Rose, R _
Rosenberg, E. _
Ross, D _..
Ross, R. G. 	
Ross, J. 	
Ross, L _.
Roussel, D. 	
Rowe,  P.  	
Rowell, F _..
Roxburgh, J. M.
MACAULAY, NICOLLS,
MAITLAND & CO. LTD.
Insurance, Financial and Estate Agents
435 Howe Street
Vancouver,  B.C.
Telephone:
SEymour 3540
135
111
149
139
122
139
111
122
104
127
111
102
129
97
114
152
102
132
252 Knowledge comes with experience
Behind the services rendered by Pemberton's in
Real Estate and all its branches, lies fifty-four years
of constant, consistent work in our clients' interest.
Consult with  our experts on
any   problem   in    this   field.
PEMBERTON'S
Established in  1887
Real  Estate
Investments
418 HOWE STREET
Insurance
TRinity  1271
COMPLIMENTS OF
Commodore Cabaret
Ruardi-Wichers, M.
Ruardi-Wlchers, W.
Rumball, D.	
Runkle, P.	
Rush, G.	
Rush, I.	
Rushworth, E..	
Russell, M.	
Russell, R.	
Ryall, J.	
Ryan, J. 	
Ryan, Daphne
Ryan, Doreen _
Ryder,   C.  	
Rymer, K.	
Saba, A.	
Sadler, E	
Sage, F. M. 	
Saint, J.	
Sakamoto, A. __
Salisbury, R. L.
Salt, L.	
Sandall, F.	
Sanderson, P. _
Sandeson, A.	
Sandys, M.	
Sanford, L.	
Sanmiya, T.	
Sansom, J.	
Sasaki, F.	
Saunders, H.	
Savitsky, S.	
Scarisbrick,  R.
Scatchard, S. __
Sceates, H. 	
Schjelderup, V.
Schiedel, I	
Schiedel, N.	
Schofield, M. L.
Schofield, W. _
Scott, B.	
Scott, E. 	
Scott, H. B.	
Scott, J. A.	
Scott, John C. _
Scott, Norma E. _
Scott, Norma M.
Scolt, R.	
Scougall, J. 	
Scrivener, J.	
Scudamore, J. _
Seivewright, P.
102
  122
      95,    104
     115,    122
122
  131
  102
122
111
  147
  102
  122
  102
  128
  139
  15l"
  93
  Ill
143
  143
57,    111,     61
  147
  122
122
  122
127
  97
  139
  104
  139
  Ill
  139
  122
139
  139
135
122
93
122
  Ill
122
  93
     136,    139
114
122
  Ill
93
  122
122
122
111
Seldon,   J.  	
Seldon, R.	
Semple, M.	
Sendall, G. ._.
Seraphim, A.
Service, P. K.
Sexsm'ith,  R.
Seyer, J.	
42,
Seymour, E. A. _
Shadwell, H	
Shannon, B.	
Shaw, A, J	
Shaw, D.	
Shaw, S.	
Sheeley, R.	
Sheffield, J. O. -
Sheldon,  S.	
Shelton,  Sidney
Shepherd, A. F.
Sherman, P.	
Sherwood, C. R..
Shewan, R. 	
Shields,  M.	
Shigei, H.	
Shillabeer, J.	
Shimo-Takahara, G.
Shimo-Takahara, K.
Shimo.Takahara, L.
Shinoby, E.	
Shinobu, R.	
Shiozaki,  D.	
Shkwarok, W.	
Shoji,  H.	
Sholund, A.	
Shore, A. 	
Shore, A. W	
Shortreed,  G.	
Shortreed, James 	
Shumas, F.	
Simmons, P.	
Sibley, J.	
Sillers, J.	
Simpson, K.	
Sims, M.	
Sinclair, G. W.
Sinclair, L.	
Sinclair, M. _.
Sinclair, Mead .
Sinclair, E	
44, 102,
Sinclair, R. Elmer
Skae, K.	
Skelhorne, G	
151
93
122
102
139
122
122
111
122
139
93
139
102
111
102
93
132
111
122
102
111
122
114
111
93
102
122
129
1C2
104
111
122
111
140
147
102
122
140
122
122
102
122
122
132
87
122
111
111
122
151
111
253 ESTABLISHED   1908
Do not look upon our service as an expense
but as an investment.
Swan  Bros.   Limited
EXPERT CLEANERS AND  DYERS
Head Office and Plant:
12th Ave. and Kingsway FA irmont 6200
Branch Office:
537  Richards St. SEymour 6200
Whether for Home or Business Office
Our Stationery and Printing Departments will serve you in many ways.
GEHRKE'S LTD.
566 Seymour Street
TRinity 1311
Skinner, L 	
Slark, G ,	
Slater, J. S 	
Slater, M. 	
Sleath, G. E 	
Sleigh, E. B	
Sloan, W. R _
Small, F	
Smedley, J. 	
Smith, Alan 	
Smith, Alexnader
Smith,  B. 	
Smith, E 	
Smith, F.	
Smith, Harry _.'	
Smith, H. Leslie	
Smith, Herbert	
Smith, Herbert S.
Smith, J. 	
Smith, N. 	
Smith, W. 	
Smith, Wilma 	
Smuin, E _
Snaddon, A	
Snow, J	
Snyder, R 	
Soulsby, A 	
Southin, A	
Southin, E. 	
Sparkes, C. 	
Sparkes, J. 	
Speakman, G 	
Spears, D 	
Spencer, B.	
Sprott, E —
136,
Sproule, W. J.
Spry, F. R. 	
102
122
140
111
102
140
93
140
114
128
147
102
131
135
127
140
111
140
112
93
135
122
140
112
132
102
140
93
112
122
112
140
112
102
128
Stamatis, George .
Stamatis, Dorothy
Staniforth, M. 	
Steel, W. 	
Stephen,  T	
Stevenson, H _
Stevenson, K.	
Stevenson,  T	
Stewart,  A	
Stewart, E 	
Stewart, G	
Stewart, J. N.	
Stewart, L. J 	
Stewart, W	
Stiles, E. 	
Stinson,  J 	
St. John, P	
Stpess, C. 	
Storey, J.	
Story, J. W. 	
Stott, I 	
Straith, J. 	
Street, A. V	
Street, W. A. ..
Strong, G	
Stroyan, W	
Struthers, J, 	
Stuart, W. B. ....
Sturdy, D	
Stusiak, M	
Sugarman, L. .
Sullivan, C	
Sully, L	
Sutcliffe, E. D.
Sutton, D _..
Sutton, E. 	
Swackhamer ,D. ..
Swan, R.	
Swanson,  C	
Sweeney, F. 	
Sweeney, M.	
Sweatman, H	
Swerdfeger, J. 	
Swinton, A. Hans
Swinton,  W	
Swoboda, J 	
Sworder,  J.  	
Syme, T 	
Tabata, M. 	
Tait, J 	
Tait, R. 	
Takahashi, S. ...
Takimoto, K.	
Tambellini, G. J.
Tamboline, F	
Tamura, Y	
Tanabe, L	
Tarrant, Henry .
Tan-off,  D 	
Taylor, B _
Taylor, Edward R.
Taylor, H 	
Taylor, Jean	
Taylor, John D. 	
Taylor, Leonard ._
Taylor, M. G. 	
93,
44, 102,
112
112
140
102, 125
153
135
112
151
114
112
135
83, 152
123
131
140
112
123
114
123
112
129
140
151
123
140
123
114
143
123
140
102
135
87
102
149
135
112
112
147
149
123
123
135
123
140
112
112
102
123
140
135
112
135
132
102
123
147
143
97
112
112
123
123
135
123
140
123
153
254 Taylor, N. E ..
Taylor, R. D.
Teagle,  E  _.
Tees, P. 	
Telford, R	
Telfer, G. 	
Temoin, B	
Temoin, P. 	
Thicke, J	
Thomas, David 	
Thomas, G P —
Thomas, J. W 	
Thomas, Mary E. 	
Thompson, Doris 	
Thompson, C. H. A.
Thompson, E.	
Thompson, J. V. 	
Thompson, Joan 	
Thompson, W. H. 	
Thomson, F.  *.	
Thomson, D	
Thomson, H. 	
Thomson, Jean  _,
Thomson, J. Lorraine .
Thomson, M. Gerald
Thomson, M. Patricia .
Thomson, R. 	
Thomson, Ronald M.
Thomson, S	
Thomson, V.	
Thorton-Trump, W. E.
Thorson, E ,
Thorson, V. 	
Thurston, A	
Tiedje, J 	
Tilson, R. ....	
Timleck, G. B 	
Timmons, A 	
Tindle, M.	
Todd, D. 	
Toguri, S. 	
Tompkins, D	
Tompkins, J 	
Tonks, D 	
Toombs, E. H	
Torgerson,  H. 	
Touhey, T. 	
Townsend, E.	
Townsend, G C.
Townsend, J	
Townsend, S. 	
Trapp, N	
Tremblay, F. T.
Trenholme, A. ...
Troup, I. 	
Trout, M. F. 	
Truscott,  L.  	
Tsujimura, K. ...
Tuck, M	
Tucker, J	
Tucker, N	
Tufts, A. 	
Turley, F	
Turnbull, A	
Turner, J. 	
Turner, S. 	
Turnill, E	
Tweed, L. 	
Twiss, M	
144,
78,
93,
140
140
104
123
123
114
112
123
123
127
102
102
93
123
140
131
135
152
114
93
103
112
93
145
123
123
128
149
140
93
140
140
131
103
140
140
140
123
112
93
123
103
123
93
140
140
112
97
145
103
129
151
143
103
112
153
93
135
104
132
112
123
97
132
149
147
97
103
112
Quality is remembered long after
Price is forgotten,
but
When the Quality is High and the Price is
Low, not even the Price is forgotten!
Jxem  J/<ym ^t
wowifiawu, demited
Creators of fine furs for over
a Quarter Century
ON GEORGIA, AT HOWE
Ray's Superior Stores Ltd.
QUALITY MEATS, GROCERIES, FRUITS
& VEGETABLES AT LOW PRICES, COMBINED  WITH   SERVICE   UNSURPASSED.
Meat Dept.
ALma  1760
PHONE
CREDIT
DELIVERV
Groc. Dept.
AL ma 0930
Authorized
BY FAST
TRUCK
Accounts
FREE
Twizell, M	
Uglow, E	
Underhill, A. ....
Underhill, I. 	
Underwood, E.
Urquhart,  A.  ...
Urquhart, H. ...
Usher, M	
Uyeda, L	
Uyeda, M. 	
Uyeno, T.  a	
Vance, John	
Van De Bogart, Helen
Van Houten, C. W. _..
Van Roggen, G. 	
Vaughan, D 	
Vaughan, R. 	
Venini, M. 	
Vernon, E. K 	
Vesterback, B 	
Vickers, P 	
Vincent, H 	
Wade, G 	
Wadell, D 	
Wainwright, P. R.
Waldie, A 	
Waldie, R. 	
Walkem, C. A	
Walker, Douglas L.
Walker, G	
Walker, J. 	
Walker, Jean 	
Walker, John	
Walker,  K.  Joan ....
Walker,  N. 	
112
112
103
112
123
103
123
46, 49, 93
123
112
123
93
123
       95,      97
123
112
147
103
103
94
123
151
129
     61
145
123
123
114'
103
112
94, 125
153
114
112
123
55,
255 COMPLIMENTS OF
Empire motors Limited
BURRARD   AND   DUNSMUIR
Ford, Mercury and Lincoln
SALES  AND   SERVICE
Columbia Paper Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE PAPER MERCHANTS
Manufacturers of "Columbia" Quality
Scribblers and Exercise Books
VANCOUVER, B. C.
VICTORIA B. C.
Walker, P.	
Wallace, Allan ._.
Wallace, F.  :	
Wallace, B.	
Wallace, G. —_
Wallace, J. A	
Wallace, Jessie —
Wallace, John M.
Wallace, R.	
126,
Wallace, Robert B.
Wallace, S. 	
Wallace, W.	
Walling, O.	
Walmsley, R. N. —
Walsh, Helen	
Walter, B.	
Walton, E N	
Walton, W.	
Ward, E	
Warden, V.	
Wardroper, W. K.
Warne, R. M _.
Warner, H.	
Warner, M. 	
Warner, W _
Warrack,  B.  	
Warren, M.	
Warwick, W.	
Watanabe, S.	
Watanabe, Satoru
Watkins, C. 	
Watkins, Wilfred _
Watson, A. E.	
Watson, M.	
Wattt A. W	
112,
112
128
94
112
104
123
112
140
123
112
103
127
140
123
123
123
131
123
112
94
61
112
103
112
123
103
123
123
123
94
112
112
123
123
145
Watt, D.	
Watt, E. 	
Watts, M.	
Watts, W.	
Weaver, J.	
Webb, E	
Webb, F.	
Webb, G. 	
Webber, P	
Webber, S	
Weed, J.	
Weiner, H.	
Weir, J	
Welch, H.	
Weldon, C	
Weldon, J	
Wellington, W.
Welsford, W. ._.
West, J	
West ,W.	
Westlake, D. ._
Westman, T. ._
Westwood, M. -
Wheatley, G. __
Whimster, M. ..
White, B.	
White, C.	
White, F. 	
White, G.	
White, P.	
White, R. J. 	
White, S. 	
White, W.	
Whitelaw, G. _
Whitelaw, M. _
42,
94
123
103
123
123
103
94
123
94
112
      135
     135
153
      123
97
40,  94,  86
94
      123
       94
  104, 112
94
123
103
140
123
94
131
   48, 110
123
      135
135
  112, 113
123
123
151
Charlton & morgan Ltd.
MEN'S APPAREL
Our new home,
657-659 GRANVILLE ST.
Yamato Silks Limited
Silks, Woollens and Accessories
460 GRANVILLE ST.
256 CONGRATULATIONS to the graduates of 1941
FROM YOUR WEST POINT GREY MERCHANTS
Snow White Fountain
Lunch
4514 W. 10th
Varsity Produce
4495 W. 10th Ave.
ALma 1141 ALma 1142
Hewers Hardware
4459 W. 10th. ALma 1552
Varsity Book Shop
10th Ave. and Sasamat St.
"Text Books and Classics"
Kay's Meat Market
"The Best Meat You Can Buy"
4460 W.  10th Ave.
ALma 1794 ALma 0812
White   Dove  Cleaners
ALma 1688 4562 W. 10th
Standard Shoe Repair
4437 W. 10th ALma 0608
Point Grey Flower Shop
4429 W.  10th Ave.
Edith A. Carrothers
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR
2776 Granville Street Vancouver, B.C.
LISLE FRASER
SPORTING    GOODS
545  Granville street
(One Store Only)
COMPLIMENTS OF
CENTRAL CAFE
608 West Pender Street Vancouver, B.C.
South Granville Florist
SMART    CORSAGES
KE rr. 0094
COMPLIMENTS   OF
KER & KER LTD.
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
475 Howe Street TRinity 2594
FOR  REFRESHMENT DRINK
ORflllGE CRUSH
ENJOY THE FRESH TASTE AND FEEL FRESH
PAPPAS FURS
WHOLESALE AND  RETAIL MANUFACTURING
FURRIERS
850 Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
C. P. FOSTER & CO. LIMITED
631  Seymour Street
Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
BEGG MOTOR CO. LTD.
1062 West Georgia Street
SE ymour 3161
SWEET SIXTEEN LTD.
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear
Four Stores for Your Convenience:
137 W. Hastings; 927 Granville; 2438 E. Hastings;
2315  Main
UNION GARMENT HOUSE
257 COMPLIMENTS
O. B. ALLAN LTD.
JEWELLERS
Diamonds
Granville and Pender
Watches
Vancouver
Phone:   BAyview 2908
DOROTHY FLETCHER
Imported Sportswear and Hats
2572 Granville Street Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Famous Cloak & Suit Co.
H. SICKELMORE
FLORIST
'Flowers in  the Modern Manner"
2633 Granville Street
BA yview 2172
738 West Hastings Street
SE ymour 0677
COMPLIMENTS OF
SCOTT'S CAFE
INSURANCE
of all kinds
Parsons, Brown Limited
VANCOUVER AND NEW WESTMINSTER
Whyte, R.  	
Wickstrom, T. 	
Widdess, E.	
Wilbur, William _
Wilding, M. 	
Willan, Margaret .
Williams,  B.  	
Williams, Clara	
Williams, Chester
Williams, E 	
Williams, F. C  ..
Williams, June 	
Williams, Lloyd	
Williams, T. 	
Willox, G. 	
Wilson, C. L. 	
TR inity 1841
Hotel Georgia
ANNE MOLONEY,
LTD.
Importers of Women's
Wear
VANCOUVER, B. C.
CANADA
Wilson, George C. —
Wilson, Raymond H.
Wilson, N. 	
Wilson, Roberta _
Wilson, Richard .
Wilson, Ruth	
Wilson,  W.  	
Winram, E.	
Winslow,  B _.
Wintemute, J. R.
Wishart, M —
Wismer,   J.   	
Wismer, S. ..
Witter,   B.   	
Wong;, John 	
Woo, R. 	
Woo, J. 	
Woo, M. ,	
Wood, B	
Wood, D. H	
Wood, G. 	
Wood, Gerry	
Wood, John 	
Wood, Juanita —
Wood,  M.	
Woodcraft, D	
Woodcroft, H. __.
Woodman, T.	
Woods, J.	
Woodside, L. 	
Woollard, E	
Woolley,  D.   	
Workman, R.	
Worth,  D	
Worthington,   E.
Wright, H. L. ...
Wright, L. 	
Wright, M.	
Wright, N.	
Wright, S	
Wright, S. C	
Wybourn, E. —
Wyles, T.	
Wyness, D.	
Wyness E. 	
Yamada, F.	
Yamamoto, Nana
Yamashita,  G.  _.
Yatabe, M.	
Yeasting, A.	
Yip, C.	
Yip, S 	
Yip, R. W.	
123,
133,
77,      94,
._    54,    114,
114
123
112
50
140
123
123
112
124
128
135
124
135
94
140
140
104,    113
124
113
94
94
40
124
60
97
140
124
124
103
113
103
113
124
124
113
113
113
113
94
113
124
124
103
140
113
94
113
124
140
151
94
151
153
113
149
124
124
113
113
129
124
97
152
104
124
124
140
124
140
258 Young,  R.
Young, D	
Young, H. ^__
Young, M.  \.
Young, Simeon L.
Young, T 	
Young, W. E _
Younger, R _
Yuill, R. 	
Zabinski, J. 	
Zirul, M.	
Zitko, L. 	
82,    147
147
113,
61
124
147
113
131
124
124
135
127
131
From the time Dairy land products
leave the verdant Fraser Valley till they
reach your home—rich, safe and clean
—the highest degree of care and protection is afforded by "Canada's Most
Modern Dairy."
ASSOCIATED DAIRIES LTD.
Telephone FA irmont  1000
COMPLIMENTS OF
BLOEDEL,
STEWART
LTD.
*
fir WELCH
COMPLIMENTS   FROM   THE
e,
aae
House of Good Entertainment
626 HORNBY STREET
TRinity 5922
8000 PAIRS   .   .   .
Young men's Sport Trousers. The largest showing
in all Canada. Drapes and slacks. Gabardines,
Worsteds, Tweeds, Sharkskins, Flannels, etc.
$3.95 to $ I©.™
Young men's Sport Jackets, in every style and color.
Full Drapes, etc.    Your choice from—
$10.»5 to $21.o©
ARNOLD   &   QUIGLEY   LIMITED
540 Granville Street
259 Apologia . . .
Having reached this, the last page of the Annual, the
reader has undoubtedly discovered the several omissions
and errors which somehow slipped past the notice of the
critical proofreaders.
For these, the editor and staff of the 1941 Totem offer
their sincere apologies.
PRINTED    BY
WARD   &    PHILLIPS    LIMITED
VANCDUVEH.    B.C.

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