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The Totem 1950 1950

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   PUBLISHED    ANNUALLY    BY    THE    STUDENTS    OF    THE    U VERSITY   OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA,    VANCOUVER,    B.   C -Painting by lillius Torrance Newton
I o JJr. O. Cz. Sedgewick, late head of £</./>. C 5 JJepartment
or English, the 1p50 J otem is respectfully dedicated.
Poge Pour     • <z=^DeJit
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1949 saw the passing of one of UBC's greats—a diminutive man with the
demeanor of an impressario, the mind of a truly great connoisseur, and the
tongue of an actor-orator.
Dr. G. G. Sedgewick was Head of the Department of English for a number
of years, and although his influence was felt in the many fields of literature on
this campus, on no subject did he lecture more brilliantly than that of his
beloved Shakespeare. Year after year students filled his lecture room to
capacity, sitting spellbound as this one small man brought Shakespeare's characters brilliantly alive; Hamlet, Puck, FalstafJ, Lady MacBeth, the smallest and
the greatest of the humans parading through the tragedies and comedies of
Shakespeare, came alive again on the floor of the lecture room.
It was this amazing insight into human nature that made the Doctor beloved
by many, even those whose egos exploded violently^ pricked by the silver tongue
that could be barbed upon occasion. Had he been more benevolent, more charitable, more patient and tolerant; had he, in other words, been the epitomy of
goodness in all things he would have been less admired. Dr. Sedgewick won
friends with his foibles as well as he did with his magnanimity.
He revelled in humanity. Human weaknesses received equal billing with
human achievement. Dr. Sedgewick was able in some wonderful manner to
dispel fear from the heart of the student by putting humanity on a pedestal and
pointing it out for what it is—a fascinating mixture of good and bad, weakness
and strength. He pierced for the student the gross exterior of FalstafJ and found
many things there including a potential greatness. He proved that Kings were
merely humans and that shepherds could be Kings He levelled humanity,
concentrated it, held its essences up for all to see. Though the student may not
always have realized it, Dr. Sedgewick gave a course in confidence disguised
as a Shakespeare course. His main commodity was understanding and he gave
of it unstintingly. He was a rare individual and his passing is a loss to all who
knew him as well as the students who will never know him.
•     Page Five  _*_!___
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,v*_ ARTS BUILDING
**•••••*•
Page Bight     • •     •••••*
PHYSICS BUILDING
•     Page Nine AGRICULTURE BUILDING
•     •****
Page Ten     • •    •    *    *
HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING
•    Page Cloven BROCK MEMORIAL HALL
*     •     *     •     •
Page  Twelve     • •    **••••••*
GYMNASIUM
•     Page  Thirteen   PRESIDENTS MESSAGE TO GRADUATES
Along with many of you who are graduating this
year, I have been somewhat concerned over the current
talk about "the saturation point among the professions in
Canada." There is a growing opinion that the Graduation
Class of 1950 will have more difficulty placing itself in
the economy of Canada than has been the case in the
post-war years to date. It is possible that there may be
some justification for this opinion, but I myself feel that
Canada will need and require the services of all the
well-trained people she is currently turning out if we are
to achieve that measure of national development in the
next few decades to which our national resources and
human talent would seem to entitle us.
There are, it seems to me, three things that we
require to ensure this development. The first is a considerable measure of confidence in ourselves and in our
capacity to solve those of our problems that lie within
our own control. The second is as great as possible a
measure of flexibility in meeting and dealing with those
problems. And the third is a sufficient measure of international stability without which no individual country
can be secure and prosperous. The importance of the
third can not be doubted and may even go far to outweigh the other two, but without confidence based on
knowledge of our own capacity and without that flexibility
which will enable us to make use of our training in a
variety of ways, we cannot take full advantage of whatever
international stability does exist.
A good many of you who are graduating this year
have already proved your ability and resourcefulness in
one or other of the Armed Services and have already made
a notable contribution to the development and maturity
of this University. For that we are extremely g-ateful
to you. We wish you the best of luck and we hope that
you will find your training here will have helped provide
you with the knowledge, confidence, and flexibility
required to make your contribution to our joint development, each in the field of his own choice.
tirmi** tif-tyyj-
Page Sixteen Geoffrey Andrew, Assistant to the President
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Major John F. McLean
ACTIVE FACULTY
Acted On Commissions, Wrote
Books, Articles And Taught
UBC's rapidly growing faculty—the "terrible four hundred" to students — found time between piloting 7,200
students through the shoals of higher education to write
books, produce plays, address countless meetings, and
probe matters ranging from marital happiness to eccentricities of the atom.
Busiest of all was President N. A. M. MacKenzie who
toured the nation with the Royal Commission on the
Arts and Sciences, guided the Universities mammoth
building program, preserved peace and harmony between
senators, members of the Board of Governors, faculty,
and students, and somehow found time to stump the
province on behalf of higher education and even to
address coast-to-coast radio audiences.
Running him a close second was his assistant, Professor
G. C. Andrew—"Geoff to thousands of students—who
kept the wheels of administration well-oiled, lectured in
the English department, conducted a CBC radio series
"You and Your University," helped student organizations
solve their countless problems and always had time to
talk to anyone about anything.
Topping the honours list were History Department
head, Walter N. Sage, who made history by becoming
the first Canadian ever to serve as president of the
American Historical Association, Pacific Division, and
Civil Engineering Professor Alexander Hrenikoff who
copped the American Society of Civil Engineers' coveted
Leon S. Mosieff Award for his contribution to engineering design.
Novelist and poet Earl Birney found himself among
best-selling writers after his riotous novel "Turvey" made
an instant hit with thousands of ex-service men who
found the tale of the troubles of a soldier kindled "fond"
memories of their own entanglements with military
bungling. Banning of the book in a small town of Ontario
caused author Birney to chuckle to himself as sales skyrocketed.
Happiest members of the faculty were Home Economics head Charlotte Black, who saw the opening of
a bright new Home Ec. building and Physics Department
chief, Dr. Gordon Shrum who gleefully contemplated the
completion of his shiny giant atom smasher, the Van de
Graaf Generator—largest of its land in North America.
Sociologist C. W. Topping, presented his course in the
family for the first time in three years, found it soon
dubbed "sexology" on the campus but found an unprecedented number of students eager to find the secret of
marital bliss.
Chemist Dr. J. Gilbert Hooley turned the atom on new
problems ranging from glass polishing to medicine.
•     Page Seventeen DEAN   WALTER  GAGE
DEAN MAWDSLEY
DEAN   J.   N.   FINLAYSON
DEAN G.  F. CURTIS
Page Eighteen     • DEAN   E.   L.  WOODS
DEAN BLYTHE EAGLES
DEAN MYRON WEAVER
DEAN S. N.  F.  CHANT
t     Page Nineteen STUDENT COUNCIL
Austerity-Conscious Council Made Sure Student Groups Met Their Budgets
Jim Sutherland and Walter Ewing had a big problem
on their hands when they took the reins of student
government in their hands at the beginning of the session
1949-50.
The problem, as treasurer Ewing told students was
"to produce a budget that will balance on a sum $10,000
TREASURER, WALTER EWING
less than was budgeted last year." A few weeks later, at a
record 17-minute meeting, students approved Ewing's
$68,231.30 austerity budget.
In cutting student spending, Ewing had slashed the
Ubyssey to three issues a week, and refused any money
to religious, political and within-faculty groups. The
remaining organizations who did get money found their
allotments had been slashed to almost nothing in some
cases.
Capable president Jim Sutherland, an ex-Parliamentary Forum debater, had a firm grasp of student problems
and wide experience in the field of administration.
Treasurer Ewing came to office after serving as
treasurer of the Men's Athletic Directorate the previous
year. His knowledge of monetary matters was largely
responsible for the Society's stable financial position
throughout the year. Firm in the knowledge that student
groups would meet their budgets, Ewing paid off the remaining War Memorial Gym debt immediately after the
fall general AMS meeting. The debt that had burdened
the Society for two years, restricted campus activity, and
ulcerated the stomach of more than one person, was
gone.   Students began to breathe a little easier.
After a Monday night cafeteria dinner, Sudent Council met in the Board Room in Brock Hall to ponder
student problems. They received innumerable delegations, ranging from a cut-rate merchandise promoter to
Page  Twenty     • PRESIDENT,  JIM SUTHERLAND
Engineers demanding the resignation of the editor-in-
chief of the Ubyssey.
Led by Peterson-pipe smoke Jim Sutherland, Council
succeeded in resolving most of the touchy problems that
confronted them during the year.
Five pretty girls took their places on Council this
year, the largest number in UBC history. Pretty secretary
Kay MacDonald did an efficient job operating the Pierce
wire recorder. Energetic Eileen Moyls managed the
Women's Undergraduate Society, whilst ever-smiling Elva
Plant represented sophomore students. Margaret Lowbeer,
president of the Literary and Scientific Executive, and
Carol McKinnon, president of the Women's Athletic
Directorate, completed the Council distaff bloc.
Storm centre on Council in first term was the Undergraduate Societies Committee headed by serious, scholastic Bill Haggart. Haggart's group aligned themselves
with the Ubyssey in fighting an MAD resolution which
would fine athletes five dollars, suspend them from the
Alma Mater Society, and send a recommendation to the
EILEEN  BOYLS,  WUS
BILL HAGGART, USC CHAIRMAN
KAY McDONALD, SECRETARY
•     Page Twenty-one USC RAMPAGED UNDER HAGGART
USC Hit MAD; LSE Experienced Famine Instead Of Feast
Bill Haggert's powerless Undergraduate Society's
Committee took on a brand new spit and polish luster
at UBC last year. Haggert's policies managed to stir up
more controversy among students than any other single
group as they played hob with book store and athletic
policies.
First campaign started by Haggert was one to determine what injustices UBC students were suffering at the
hands of the campus bookstore and Canadian publishers.
After tabulating results, Haggert published his controversial report in the post-Christmas term. Haggert
created the biggest campus storm before Christmas when
he went to bat for athletes who were allegedly forced
to play for UBC teams only. At a special AMS meeting,
Haggert had the AMS code changed so that athletes
would only have to inform MAD of their outside activity.
Hardest hit by austerity last year was Marg Low-
beer's Literary and Scientific Executive. A restricted
budget meant fewer symphony concerts, special events
for students. Vancouver Symphony staged several free
concerts before Christmas but they were slashed when
low attendance prevailed. It was a famine for a group
who had once enjoyed a feast.
Page Twenty-two     * ENERGETIC WUS STAGED FREE TEA DANCES DURING THE YEAR AND INCREASE WOMEN'S ACTIVITIES
WUS, AMS OFFICE STAFF
Office Staff Most Efficient In Years Both Organizations Ran Smoother Than Ever Before
Women's Undergraduate Society, ably guided by President Eileen Moyls, broadened their scope of activity on
the campus by promotion of additional extra curricular
activity. When it was discovered that WUS was going
to sponsor free tea dances and free basketball dances,
students loved them. Executive members of WUS included Vice-president Helen Robinson, Secretary, Joan
Taylor and Treasurer Pam McCorkell.
Council members thought they ran the AMS office. But
five girls and a business manager knew better. Pert bookkeeper, Bev Shepherd (who has her name spelled correctly in Totem 1950 for the first time) had a full year teaching  the   new  business   manager  the  ropes   and  then
announced she was going to get married in the summer.
Cashier Mavis Walton doled out cash with a knowing
look but always seemed happier when she was taking
money in. Doreen Scott was known to all athletes as the
efficient Secretary of Graduate Manager of Athletics, Ole
Baaken. Pretty Norma Wiles couldn't come to UBC as a
student, she said, but she did come to AMS office as a
typist. She ended up happily doing "joe jobs" for anyone
who asked. Virginia Barry was the receptionist who had
to answer all the stupid questions from innumerable
students.
This year's office staff was voted as the most efficient
and likable in years.
HARDWORKING  AMS   OFFICE   STAFF  WAS  PLAGUED   BY HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS, HAD PATIENCE OF JOB.
•     Page Twenty-three  *p
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__SS*S-?_ SUMMER-GROWN BEARDS BLOSSOMED DURING REGISTRATION WEEK
FRESHMAN
A slight reverse in regular tradition marked the
university campus during Frosh Week.
Freshmen wearing beards, a condition which is
usually expected of upperclassmen who are attempting
to impress the unsuspecting frosh, graced the campus,
and for a short time it was thought a new fad had struck.
Sciencemen also got their share of the surprises.
According to tradition, upperclassmen "go on a rampage"
ducking the "green" newcomers to the university.
This year, however, freshmen "turned the tables."
Reliable polls indicate that, on the average, Sciencemen
received a four to one beating. It was also reported that
Aggie students were instrumental in rallying the younger
class to the "cause of justice."
The indignant frosh even went so far as to ignore
non-fraternization rules.
Enforcement of university regulations were humbly
submitted to,  though.    Caf Commissionaires, probably
BEWILDERED FRESHMAN, FRESH FROM TUSSLE WITH REDSHIRTS, GROPES IN  LILY POND  IN  SEARCH  OF MISSING  GLASSES LOST DURING MELEE
Page Twenty-six    • WEEK
Redshirts Get The Gears
to hold down their jobs, skipped about advising the new
student of these rules, and warnings were begrudgingly
heeded.
George Cumming, co-ordinator of activities, kept
frosh activities during Frosh Week rolling at top speed.
Activity programs of the separate campus clubs were outlined to the incoming students, and Club Week was
willingly and seriously adhered to during registration.
Coordinator Cumming went before a small group of
lunch-munching redshirts early in Frosh Week and gave
them lists of freshman classes. Sciencemen were then
expected to harrass and intimidate Frosh as they left
their lectures. Somewhere along the line, things got
crossed up and the Freshmen, rallying around a few
hardy souls, staged several noon hour battles which saw
engineers come out on the short end in all but a few
instances.
At week's end Freshmen and their girl friends
flocked to the Armory where, with ceremony and hand
shaking they were officially welcomed into the fold as
students. Many stood in a queue for long, embarrassing
minutes until their turn came to shake the hand of
President MacKenzie and various deans. During intermission they threw their green regalia on the Armory's
miniature cairn and then stood in another queue to
receive free coke and doughnuts.
With the future appearing very bright, freshmen
settled down to a round of social activity, and then to
the grind of four years intensive study.
FEARLESS FROSH JACKIE HUME AND FRED STEARMAN FACE CAMPUS LIFE
COMMISSIONAIRES STARTED ANNUAL CAF CLAMPDOWN EARLY IN '49
EMBRYO  AIRWOMAN   SIGNS   UP DURING  FROSH  WEEK  CLUB  DAY
•     Page Twenty-seven LAMBDA CHI  ALPHA DONATED CUP FOR ELIZABETH TUPPER, FROSH QUEEN. LOSERS  JOAN  VICKERS,   LEFT,  AND  MARY STEWART,   SMILE  GAMELY
SOCIAL LIFE STARTED EARLY
INTERNATIONAL CLUBS SPONSORED ZANY MASQUERADE EARLY IN YEAR
Lambda Chi's Chose Queen,
International Clubs Talked
Once again this year while Freshettes were least
expecting it, members of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity
were scouting the campus in their annual campaign to
pick a Frosh queen. All during Frosh week, while the
first year co-eds were going about sans make-up and in
pin curls, the fraternity were spending their time looking
for a suitable candidate. Towards the end of the week
three finalists, Liz Tupper, Mary Stewart and Joan
Vickers were singled out as finalists. Then as a climax
to the Frosh dance blond Liz Tupper was named Lambda
Chi Alpha Freshette Queen, crowned with a tiara of
flowers and presented with the fraternity trophy to be
held until the next contest. The two other finalists were
presented with corsages and silver spoons engraved with
the fraternity crest as mementos of the occasion.
Internationalism was another feature of campus life
early in the year. UBC's International Clubs banded
together and staged the biggest display of international
goodwill the campus had ever seen.
Big week started when the United Nations Club
hoisted a flag depicting every nation that is a member
of the world organization on the flagpole at the north
end of UBC's Mall.
Poge Twenty-eight     • TOTEM PIXIE CAUGHT AGGIES EATING, GRIMACING AT ANNUAL FROLIC
■■M
EVEN FACULTY TURNED OUT AT BALLROOM FOR AGGIE FROLIC
STUDENTS' SOCIAL LIFE CONTINUES
Engineers Have Smashing Time;
As Aggies Throw Quiet Frolic
Spirit of faculty and student alike highlighted two of
the year's outstanding social events.
Aggie Barn Dance, with both student and faculty
advisors working as a unit, started the ball rolling. An
array of colorful costumes graced the halls of the White
Rose Ballroom as the Aggies displayed their talents in
old-time and modern dancing.
The ball came to an abrupt stop, even to the point
of   stopping   traffic,   when   Engineers   celebrated   their
annual banquet, however.
The much-publicized affair caused a great deal of
dispute between the aforementioned group and the
Student Publications Board.
Aside from poor publicity, however, Engineers
showed their unbeatable spirit, while the walls of the
Commodore Cabaret shook to the tune of the thundering
hoofs of this university's Sciencemen.
The Ball of Fire was yet to come, and Redshirts
settled down to complete plans for their next "smash."
ENGINEERS PARADED THROUGH CITY AFTER ANNUAL BANQUET AT COMMODORE,  LATER,  UBYSSEY,  GAGE  LEVELLED BLAST  FOR  BEHAVIOUR
•    Page Twenty-nine AUTHENTIC   DRESS   HELPED  LEND  AN  AIR  OF VERISIMILITUDE  TO   THE  RE-ENACTMENT OF 1922 TREK AT THIS YEAR'S HOMECOMING. HONOURED
THIS  YEAR  WAS   ABE   RICHARDS,   LEADER  OF  THE  TREK
Trek leader  Richards   got silver  tray  from  Sutherland.
Page Thirty    •
HOMECOMING
Dr. "Abe" Richards, Leader
of 1922 Trek Honored
Although the university Thunderbird football team
lost this particular game, Homecoming ceremonies otherwise proved extremely successful.
Symbolizing the famous trek of 1922, students,
clothed in the dress of former years, paraded through the
university stadium at half-time during UBC's grid battle
with Pacific University.
Sciencemen and Artsmen, as well as students from
other faculties, co-operated to make the occasion
successful.
Jim Sutherland, president of the Alma Mater Society
for the 1949-1950 term, and Peter deVooght, chairman
of the Homecoming committee, combined their efforts and
presented a silver tray to Dr. A. E. Richards, leader of
the original trek.
The gala entertainment and sport program worked
to combine tradition, pageantry and entertainment to
make he 1949 Homecoming the bast in history.
Annual day is set aside for graduates to return to
UBC to see progress their university has made during the
years of their absence. FALL CONGREGATION
Public Admitted to Capping
Ceremonies as 433 Graduate
UBC's Fall Congregation once again opened its doors
to the public for the first time since the overcrowded
conditions due to veteran enrollment forced restrictions.
Four hundred and thirty-three graduating students
received their diplomas on October 26, 1949, from Eric
W. Hamber, Chancellor of UBC.
The honorary degree of Doctor of Laws honoris
causa, was conferred upon the deans of prominent law
faculties in both the United States and Canada.
Congregation address by Dr. Erwin N. Griswold,
Dean of Harvard Law School, dealt with "Law and
Justice in Contemporary Society." Dr. A. E. Richards,
leader of the '22 Trek, was awarded the honorary degree
of Doctor of Science.
Held concurrently with the Congregation was a
Symposium of Legal Education believed to be the first
in Canada. All aspects of the problems in educating
lawyers were discussed.
The face of the university had changed with the Fall
Congregation of 1949. It signified the end of an era for
many students. In the graduating class were a large
percentage of veterans who for years had swelled UBC
enrollments and bought a new, mature viewpoint to the
campus. Most of them would be gone in another year.
But in their short stay on the campus, veterans had left
an indelible mark that would influence the greenest
freshman for years to come.
LES 'CHILDREN'S HOUR' BEWLEY GETS CAPPED BY CHANCELLOR HAMBER
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PARENTS, FRIENDS, GRADS JAMMED ARMORY FOR CONGREGATION, A.  B.   'AB'   RICHARDS, TREK  INSTIGATOR, GOT ONE   OF SIX  DEGREES
•     Page Thirty-one Typical Day In Life Of Freshette
Audrey Butler, 18, is a typical UBC freshette. When
September, 1949 rolled around she packed her bags at
her home in Grandview and boarded the bus for Point
Grey and her first year as a student at UBC. She
struggled through mammoth lineups in the Armory, her
hands full of forms wanting to know everything from her
birthdate to her father's occupation. She was no different from any other first year student. Officials regarded
her as just another person in search of higher learning.
Her first week on the campus paralleled that of
hundreds of others. She asked directions to obscure
corners of the campus where she sat through lectures
on typical freshman subjects.
Audrey's extra-curricular activities ran to the field
of sport. She had achieved fame of a sort in her high
school days by setting a record for the most number of
points scored by a girl in an inter-high basketball game
—22.
At UBC Audrey tried out for and won a berth on the
Thunderette basketball team who took a tough tumble
to just miss winning the championship.
The editors of the Totem have compiled a typical
day in the student life of Audrey Butler. A photographer
followed her around one morning from the first time she
shook her attractive head until she tumbled back into
bed that night. The day is not an unusual one. It is
typical of thousands of other students. The editors of the
Totem hope that they have captured some of the spirit
of student fife in these photographs. If they haven't then
the psychology of the idea must be wrong for we see
mirrored in the pictures some of the happiness and
nostalgia that characterizes student life.
Page Thirty-two Audrey Butler starts her day off with coffee in the Brock
Audrey  makes an appointment  to see Dean  Mawsley
Eating  her lunch   between   lectures  was a  daily  habit
Later on in morning Audrey turned up to play some bridge
Reading the Ubyssey over a cup of coffee
Audrey gets a book out of reserve banks
•     Page Thirty-three 1 ™m^   _ft       ^EB                        ■
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Audrey studies  between  lectures   in the library
Audrey  Works  Out  with   Thunderbirds  before   Going   Home
Looking over  Mamooks work while waiting for bus
No Manners, Chivalry extinct, only holds Aud's books
Audrey returns to Varsity with date for dance in Brock
Sleepy Time Gal  Audrey  Butler Winds  Her Clack and Yawns
Page  Thirty-four PHRATERES
Friend Of All UBC Coeds Celebrated
15 Years Of Active Campus Life
Swishing dresses, tuxedoes escorts and the touch of
a winter wand marked the occasion of the annual
Phrateres Fall Formal.
As lovely as the snowflakes of the Jack Frost theme,
the young coeds outdid themselves to appear gay and
glamorous at this special of special events.
With the Brock lounge like a scene from a picture
postcard, Al McMillan's orchestra playing sweet and low,
and a scintillating display of dancing by the Arthur
Murray studios, the evening was a great success.
Dance was preceded by parties for all members of
individual Phrateres sub-chapters.
During the rest of the year, Phratereans have been
equally as active. Their 1949-50 year started with an
All-Phrateres meeting early in September welcoming new
members. Firesides were held shortly afterward for new
and old members to become acquainted.
Pledging was held at the beginning of October and
was followed by the Old Members Banquet.
Happy  Couples  Lined  Up  for Grand  March
BIGGEST  FORMAL   OF  PRE-CHRISTMAS   SEASON  WAS   PHRATERES   FORMAL  STAGED   IN  THE  LOUNGE  OF  BROCK  HALL  DURING  NOVEMBER
•    Page Thirfy-Hvt Mardi dras Queen  Anita Henderson of Alpha Gamma  Delta  is  bussed
by senate member George Cunningham
Mardi  Gras   King   Jones  exhibited   voice   for   revelers.
MARDI GRAS
South Pacific Theme Draws
Hundreds To Local Nitery
Taking their theme from the current Broadway musical,
South Pacific, UBC's Greek Letter Societies set about
making their annual Mardi Gras for 1950 the best ever
produced. Assisted by dozens of committees, pretty Loni
Francis and Bob Annable took on the giant task of
organizing and managing the gala two-night affair.
Weeks before the date set, UBC's cafeteria looked like
a gaily colored, transplanted south sea island. Over a
dozen queens from campus sororities were put up and
giant campaigns to get students to vote for them were
staged. Balloons, imitation fish and synthetic palm trees
blossomed out in the midst of the worst cold spell since
the turn of the century.
A week before the affair, students swamped the
Armory to view a pep meet and see the queens. With
maestro Al McMillan supplying the music and Dick Ellis
acting as master of ceremonies, the pep meet turned into
one of the best ever staged. Feature attraction was the
all-male chorus. Students who cast ballots at the pep
meet overwhelmingly voted in George Jones as king of
the Mardi Gras. Freshmen had their innings at the pep
meet when they entered mysterious "Madame X" who
entered the Armory in a shuttered car. When her turn
Poge  Thirty-six     • Patient pianist  Al  McMillan  played  during   rehearsals.
came to be reviewed, out stepped an apple-cheeked
freshman in a 1910 bathing suit. Incensed by the laughter
of the students, Freshman executive thereupon withdrew
their candidate and she did not appear at the Commodore
the next week.
When votes were counted on the second night of the
Mardi Gras, Anita Henderson of Alpha Gamma Delta
was crowned queen of the Mardi Gras. After being
crowned and bussed, George Cunningham of the UBC
Senate waltzed the new queen around the floor.
When the queens were dispensed with, fraternity and
sorority members staged one of the best floor shows ever
seen by customers.
Hula  dancer  Diane   Cox  was  solo   hit  of floor show.
CHORUS LINE,  COACHED  BY CHOREOGRAPHERS  COX AND MITZI  SWITZER, KNOCKED OUT CROWD WITH THEIR  INTRICATE  ROUTINES.
•    Page Th/rty-ieven
\r Bundled Up Students walked between piled up  snow banks
WINTER
Lectures Lagged, Cars Stalled
During Record B.C. Cold Snap
Winter with all its bosom buddies hit UBC with a bang
this year. Students struggled through two-foot drifts
loaded with books, battled ice and grim road conditions
to reach campus, bundled up like snugglebugs against the
biting cold, and then spent hours in coffee shops breaking all coffee drinking records.
Guys and gals dressed alike in downhill, ski jackets,
and close fitting caps and there was many an embarrassing
moment when an amorous male realized that there was
a short, very feminine hair cut under that cozy wool toque.
Lectures were the main winter casualty but campus
social life continued its usual smooth pattern. Coeds who
preferred a warm bed in the early hours of the day shed
their lethargy toward evening and blossomed out in their
best for cocktail parties, dances, and sleighrides.
Mother's fur coat was prominent all over the campus
and male students wondered where mothers hibernated
during the cold months.
Despite the inconvenience of the cold and wet, students
couldn't help remarking that the campus was more beautiful in winter than it had ever been.
_>>ivi £-dB*rS   _*£
RINGED WITH SHARPLY  POINTED  ICICLES  UBS's FAMED  ARMY   HUTS   ALMOST   LOOKED   BEAUTIFUL   DECKED   FOR   WINTER
Page  Thirty-eight     • Familiar to all beach walkers are the Thousand Stairs
Spring Came to Campus
After the Fury of Winter Came the
Cramming for Exams
Birds and bees, budding trees and flowers, male
students exchanging warm coats for warm coeds—it all
adds up to one thing—Spring came to UBC, as usual.
Balmy weather exposed the lounge lizards and the
lecture lizards to the warm, friendly eye of old Sol. No
longer did the frustrated males linger in the caf only to
be disillusioned by concealing clothes and bulky boots.
Coeds donned their most fetching attire and settled
back to see what it would fetch. They hadn't long to wait!
As soon as they showed their trim little haircuts and new
spring suits on the campus, those once frustrated males
deserted their lounges and lectures for prompt pursuit of
the traditional "young man's fancy."
Arm in arm, the guys and gals deserted their classrooms, and set out on long, "twosomey" walks to all
corners of the campus. Pairs of feet wore new trails
through the fresh grass to the foot of the famous
"Thousand Steps."
Students wandered, starry-eyed from one end of
Wreck Beach to the other, and then came back to tell
the old tale about losing the trail, or being cut off by the
tide.
Lessons were studied to the sound of waves breaking
on the shore, but subjects weren't limited to conventional
school curricula. They ran the gauntlet from light flirting
courses to serious discussions on topics as old as Adam.
Young, uninitiated freshettes learned the whys and
wherefores of college life, or at least, those which they
had missed during the winter.
Their older friends and sisters gave them practical
lessons in the advantage of Spring as a season for cinching
a man. There's something about that time of year which
stuns a male, and weakens his winter resolve.
During all this time of pleasant but profitless dillydallying, the library resembled nothing so much as a
deserted manorial castle. Relics of its past importance
were the few tired librarians, the empty chairs, and the
shelves of dusty books.
But nary a wrinkle troubled the library's stern visage.
Let the young ones cavort as they would, laughing at its
beckoning door. It, at least, hadn't forgotten that on the
heels of Spring comes exams, as usual.
Students were often seen off by themselves talking.
•     Page Thirty-nine FARMER'S FROLIC WAS IN ARMORY
Even Patrons Joined In Square Dances In Fun-Filled Night
Hoedown music, scarecrow costumes, and great jugs
of corn likker set the scene for the annual "Farmers'
Frolic" of the Aggie students.
Ambitious Aggies transformed the normally staid
Armory into a hayseed's heaven complete with cows,
pretty milkin maids (more fun than machines), and bales
of discarded straw.
Patrons joined in the fun when they dressed as down-
and-out farmers to match the rest of the crwod, and did
their share in beating the armory floor with the husky
nai!s in their hip boots.
Sunbonnet Sues were the center of attraction in daring
"country" blouses which plunged, and plunged, and
plunged, but nobody neglected the Daisy Maes in their
appealing outfits.
A hepped-up hillbilly band played square dances,
schottisches, quadrilles, and reels meanwhile making the
most of the ample supply of liquid refreshment.
Time flew in the made-over barn and at the witching
hour (avoided like the plague by all good farmers) they
climbed into their one horse shays and clip-clopped off
over the fields to change themselves back into normal
students.
Ian Patron (3rd from left) and AUS Prexy Take Costume Prize
Farmers Went Wild as Balloons Were Dropped from the Ceiling
Page Forty     • ELIZABETH ABERCROMBIE, Sweetheart of Sigma  Chi
SHIRLEY  HOPKINS, Totem  '50 Queen
BELOVED OLD RED LEYLAND TRUCK WAS CAMPUSES CHIEF GARBAGE   HAULER, WAS A VERY FAMILIAR SIGHT TO UBC STUDENTS EVERY DAY
•    Page Forty-one Smiling Armour gets his beautiful locks cut by enraged engineers
Redshirts hold Banham and Cameron In Auto Court Cabin
Pubsters retaliate as they keep White from going to ball
Page Forty-two     •
PUB-REDSHIRTWAR
Engineers Used Every Tactic
From Kidnapping to Lying
The whole thing started when H. B. Maunsell,
business manager for the AMS phoned editor-in-chief
Jim Banham and asked him to come to his office.
Banham didn't make it. The editor of The Ubyssey
was waylaid by a horde of engineers and spirited off to
an auto court on Kingsway. A few minutes later another
band of redshirts grabbed senior editor Hugh Cameron
and took him to the same place.
Engineers then proceeded to take over the offices
of The Ubyssey and produced their annual issue to
publicize their forthcoming ball, this year entitled,
"Behind The Red Curtain."
Their first move was to shave the head of editorial
assistant Les Armour, who they felt had inflicted unwarranted criticism upon them during the year. Borrowing a pair of clippers from Brock Hall barber Peter Dyke
the vengeful engineers gave youthful Armour a crew cut.
Meanwhile, Banham and Cameron were spending a
dull day in the Kingsway auto court. Engineers, fearful of
a rescue party, kept the pubsters guarded by more than
a dozen redshirts. In the evening, after it was discovered
that a party of artsmen were about to affect a rescue,
Banham and Cameron were moved out and driven
around for several hours. Ransomed for two bottles of
beer, the two editors were allowed to leave at midnight.
But the matter was far from closed. Pubsters, their
pride injured, plotted revenge for days. The first night of
the engineers' ball, Banham buttered up Cy White, president of the EUS, with hand shakings and back slappings.
The next night the Pub struck.
While he ate dinner at his Little Mountain Home,
White was seized by a dozen pubsters and taken to a
private home in New Westminster. He was held there
until almost midnight and then a bevy of editors escorted
him to the Commodore where they turned him over to
fellow engineers.
The next week, both sides aligned themselves in
Brock Hall for a trial in which the Pub charged the
engineers with obstructing the production of the paper,
and causing bodily disfigurement. Charged were H. B.
Maunsell, as an accessory after the fact, Cy White and
Don Duguid, publicity representative of EUS. Defense
claimed the Pub was a den of evil and submitted cases
full of empty beer bottles, silk stocking and a brassiere
Editor Jim Banham on the stand stoutly protested
that he did not drink when the beer case evidence was
submitted. The specially chosen female jury found the
engineers guilty as charged.
Further shenanigans during the trial centered around
the engineers as they lowered hangman's ropes over the
balcony in an attempt to intimidate the judges.
Emminently fair judges sentenced the engineers to
scrub the pub with tooth brushes and drink a cup of caf
coffee. m&
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Ewing, McKinnon Got Together Election  Eve to Shake Hands
AMS ELECTIONS
Legion President John Haar Captured
Presidency Of Society
With the Ubyssey decrying the lack of pep in AMS
elections, candidates for the position of AMS presidency
got out this year and did some old fashioned stumping.
Before he had even filed nomination papers, Charlie
"Fireball" Walker started his campaign by plastering the
After Elections,  Out-going  Councillors  Congratulated Haar
campus and University Boulevard with signs. Elections
Committee threatened to disqualify him and Provincial
Police threatened to throw him in the pokey if he didn't
cut down on his advertising and remove his signs from
the Boulevard respectively.
The candidates for presidency restricted themselves to
hazy promises for the most part in their platforms and
one candidate, Peter de Vooght, even called for a "Holy
War" between Arts and Sciencemen. Observers claim
this lost him the election. On election night, USC Chairman Bill Haggert led the election race over John Haar,
but the Legion head won on the fourth count.
RETIRING AMS   PRESIDENT  JIM   SUTHERLAND   HANDS   OVER  GAVEL OF   OFFICE   TO   PRESIDENT-ELECT   JOHN   HAAR,   HEAD   OF   UBC   LEGION
•     Page Forty-three COLEMAN BROTHERS, RUDY VALLEE
Appeared At Pep Meet, Sang
Same Songs; Told Old Jokes
Despite a year heavy with austerity from debt imposed on students from previous years, the campus was
not completely devoid of professional, popular entertainment during 1949-50. Many artists, in Vancouver for
week-long engagements gave of their time and talents
to entertain students at noon-hour pepmeets. While students stood and munched lunches in the UBC Armory
or the Auditorium entertainers sang, danced and mugged
their way through an hour of modern and oft times old-
style lyrics.
One gentleman who fitted into the latter category
was the hardy and perennial favorite Rudy Vallee who
was appearing in Vancouver at the Commodore night
club. In response to a request to appear at UBC to
publicize a football game, Vallee, minus the microphone
he used in the jazz age, gave students some of the best
entertainment of the year. The nasal-voiced crooner
wrang nostalgia from the group with his rendition of the
old time tune "My Time Is Your Time" and even went
modern for the youngsters.
After the show a special committee entertained the
singer, who disguised himself with a pair of dark glasses,
in the Brock Dining room.
Students got a shock later in the year when they
turned out to hear the Coleman Brothers, a group of-
negro singers, who were unfamiliar to most. The quartet
harmonized their way through many favorites with an
ease and lucidity that had seldom been heard before.
Even though the year had ben relatively devoid of
highly-paid entertainment, students still enjoyed the
talents of many of the continent's top artists.
NEGRO   HARMONIZERS,   THE   COLEMAN   BROTHERS  GAVE   CONCERT   ON
CAMPUS
AGING CROONER RUDY VALLEE SANG FOR STUDENTS IN UBC ARMORY
Page Forty-four     • SPECIAL EVENTS
Nehru Of India, Jazz, Pop Music
Mixed For Special Events
Surrounded by beturbaned East Indians, red-coated
Mounties, and a hoarde of dignitaries, India's Prime
Minister, Pandit Nehru, was whisked on and off the
campus, pausing only to put a new twist on world
affairs by telling students the vast complexities of the
international situation only add to the zest of life.
He admonished students to remember that they are
indeed fortunate to live in an age in which there is so
much to do — and to remember that it is up to us to
find the solution to mankind's problems.
Students jammed the Field House to catch a glimpse
of the Cambridge grad who became spiritual successor
to Gandhi and leader of India's millions.
In sharp contrast was the resounding bop of the Jazz
Society which set students rocking to the music of Joe
Micellij Lance Harrison, Dave Pepper, and Chris Gage.
Literary and Scientific Executive's Special Events'
Committee unrolled its long hair for the show which
came off in the best Chicago tradition.
Students, not too familiar with the idiom, remained
slightly bewildered for a while by the hot solos and
orchestrations but soon caught the spirit of the thing
—and contributed handsomely to the Red Feather Drive
in a collection taken up at the show.
Following the November show, Thunral's blazing pep
committee kept students fighting for UBC's sportsmen
in a series of pep meets featuring noted artists.
PRIME MINISTER NEHRU OF INDIA CAME TO CAMPUS FOR SHORT TALK
Highlight of the series was the outstanding styling
of the internationally known Coleman Brothers.
The winners of the Peabody Award for outstanding
entertainment drew a record house with their harmonious collection of current "pop" songs and old favorites.
MICELLI, SNEDDON, HARRISON, McMARTIN, DAVIS, GAGE CAME TO CAMPUS FOR SMASHING JAM SESSION IN AID OF COMMUNITY CHEST DRIVE
•     Page Forty-five BEHIND THE RED CURTAIN
Before-The-Party Shenanigans Helped Cy White And Executive
Put Over Their Annual Ball, And Inflate Engineer Egos
It looked very innocent to start with.
The engineers wanted part of the Ubyssey to publicize their annual ball, this year dubbed "Behind the Red
Curtain." On the day the redshirts were to have page
three of the paper they stormed the Pub and carried off
Editor-in-Chief Jim Banham and Senior Editor Hugh
Cameron, who they held at a Kingsway auto court until
late that night.
Three nights later it was the engineers lot to be
caught with their pants down. Pubsters stormed the
Little Mountain Hut of Cy White, EUS president, and
carried him off to New Westminster where they held
him till the ball was almost over. At 12:30 a.m. they
marched him into the Commodore, pushed him onto the
bandstand, and had him say a few words to the crowd.
Both parties took it as a joke and when the evening
closed everyone was happy.
Aside from the extra-curricular shenanigans, the
engineers staged an affair to be remembered at the
Commodore. A dozen mechanical displays were set up
on tables and novices had a fine time gawking and asking questions. First year engineers walked off with the
display prize for their scale model of a B.C. Electric
trolley bus that drew juice off overhead wires, opened
and closed its doors, and ran on an oval track.
Mechanicals   Beer  Drinking   Redshirt  was  one  of  Better  Displays
WINNERS   IN   THE   DISPLAY   COMPETITION   WAS   THE   FIRST YEAR  REDSHIRTS  TROLLEY   COACH
Page Forty-six    • BIGGEST GRANT
Rockerfeller $90,000
Biggest In UBCs Life
Interest in Slavonic Studies at UBC got a shot in the
arm this year when the Rockerfeller Institute granted the
university the sum of 90,000. The grant was specifically
to be used in increasing student interest in the culture
and contributions of the Slavic peoples to world civilization.
With the grant came Professors E. Ronimous and
J. Ferrell to teach in the Department of Slavonic Studies.
Administrator of the fund was Dr. James O. St. Clah-
sobell, head of one of UBC's newest departments. Part
of the $90,000 grant was to be used to increase the library
supply of books on subjects allied to Slavonic Studies.
Professors Ferrell and Ronimous would both continue as lecturers at UBC with the addition of another
noted scholar. He is Dr. G. A. Rose, who will leave his
post as head of the Department of Slavonic Studies at
The London School of Economics to come to Vancouver
as a guest lecturer at UBC.
Dr. Rose, who will leave the London School to retire
from teaching, was once a Rhodes Scholar to England
from Canada.
Dr. James St. Clair-Sobell administered Fund at UBC
Professor J. Ferrell Taught In Slavonic Studies Department
Professor E.  Ronimous Will  Be Joined By third lecturer
•     Page Forty-seven  j
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- ANNA  WOOTON,  BOB  RUSSELL  AND  JOHN  MILLIGAN,   LEFT  TO  RIGHT,   TOOK   LEAD   PARTS   IN   PLAYERS   CLUB   SHOW,   "AN   INSPECTOR   CALLS"
IMPORTANT CHANGES FOR ACTORS
Club Gave Theatre Experience To Interested Undergrade
Changes in policy marked this
year as particularly significant in
the annals of the Players' Club.
All the changes have been designed in reconsideration of the
fundamental aim of the club: to
give experience and training in
theatre to interested undergrads.
The most important of these
changes involves membership.
Heretofore the club could only be
joined ait the first of the year, and
then only on the basis of an acting
tryout. It is now possible to join
the club at any time during the
year.  The tryouts  have  been re-
Anna Wooton and John Milligan  were outstanding performers
placed by interviews with the executive, and this method has been
found most satisfactory in discovering talent.
The next step, confirming the
talent, is loked after by the Fall
Plays. Here the director of the
Spring play finds his actors, stage
crew, set designers, etc.
Valuable training is provided by
these plays, and though the entertainment value is often high, this
is not of major importance.
This years directors of the fall
one-acters were non-professionals,
and in two cases, students.
The evening began with a sophisticated comedy debunking Greek
mythology ,Philip Moellar's
"Helena's Husband," and this was
followed by "The Doctor from
Dunmore," an Irish comedy of
atmosphere and characterization.
The closing piece was Moliere's
"Les Precieuses Ridicules."
Page Fifty     • HAROLD   HARVEY,   RITA   LOISELLE,   MILLA  ANDREWS  AND  GEORGE  JONES   PUT IN  COMPETENT  21st  ANNUAL  PERFORMANCES  FOR MUSSOC
TOM JONES PRESENTED BY MUS SOC
Play Celebrated Twenty-First Production Of Club
For their 21st annual production,
the Musical Society this year presented Sir Edward German's "Tom
Jones" an adaptation of the novel of
the same name by Henry Fielding.
Presented in the auditorium February 16, 17 and 18, the musical was
a dramatization of the life of hothead
Tom, who spurned by the woman he
loves,  runs  away and  is  eventually
Charming Milla Andrews takes Solo on Deserted Stage  in  Mussoc Operetta Tom Jones
reunited with her after a series  of
entanglements.
For the production, Mussoc employed the talents of many of UBC's
best singers. In the title role was
George Jones, who a few weeks before
had been crowned the king of the
Greek Letter Societies Mardi Gras at
the Commodore.
Feminine lead was played by Milla
Andrew, the lead in the previous
Mussoc production, "Iolanthe." These
major characters were assisted by
Hank Naylor, Rita Loiselle, Megan
Lloyd-Jones, Spencer Moore and Hal
Harvey.
Under the direction of Ken Bogus
this year, Mussoc had experienced
something common to every campus
group—austerity. The club managed
at the end of their production to iutrn
in a profit under able direction and
handling from their executive.
•     Page Fifty-one UN Club
Held Two Model
UN Assemblies
Under the able leadership of president
Don Lanskail, UBC's United Nations Club
gathered another first to their credit when
they raised the UN flag for the first time
on a university campus.
At the Spring Model Assembly the group
resolved that the city of Jerusalem be put
under international control and be a
separate city state.
Delegates attended model assembly
represented by 29 countries, including
Mexico; Jack Howard, campus LPP leader
for Russia; Miroslav Fie, European DP
student for the Philippines and Marchall
Bray for the United States.
UNITED NATIONS CLUB STAGED MODEL ASSEMBLY IN BROCK HALL DURING YEAR
FORESTERS
Held Paities and
Studied Problems
Vital to the future of B.C.'s forests were
members of the Forestry Club who concerned themselves with the problems of reforestation  and  logging.
Besides producing a smart handbook for
their members entitled "The UBC Forester"
executive of the Club invited interested
B.C. manufacturers to the university to
lecture members on the problems they would
face after graduation.
TWO FORESTRY CLUBBERS LOOK OVER CHARACTERISTICS OF B.  C. FOREST GIANT
CLU
Brought Speakers
To Campus Weekly
Speeches, petitions, and letters against
discrimination throughout Canada were
among the activities of the only Civil
Liberties Union on any Canadian campus.
High point of the fall term's events for
the group was presentation of the Sedgewick Memorial Award to Vancouver Sun
columnist Jack Scott, as "the person contributing most to B.C. civil liberties."
Spring term activities were dominated by
a campaign to secure a Bill of Rights for
B.C.
CLU PRESENTED PLAQUE TO VANCOUVER SUN COLUMNIST JACK "OUR TOWN" SCOTT
Page Fifty-two     • MAMOOKS
Service Club Did Posters For Dances,
Political Campaigns And Campus Clubs
Fun-loving, hell-raising and poster-painting Mam-
mooks started off the year at a disadvantage. They didn't
have anyone to love fun, raise hell or paint posters!
Since there was very little the service club could do
before they found a president, a few standbys elected tall,
practical-joking Pete Burnet. Somehow they found two
more prospective Mommooks to serve in the capacities
of vice president and secretary in Jim Cullen and Miriam
Zack.
After they started rolling early in the fall term the
club did paint some posters and even raised a little hell
but there was soon to be a break. Just before exams
there was a special meeting—an emergency meeting.
According to President Burnet there weren't enough
people to paint posters or raise hell.
A skeleton crew of old faithfuls returned after
Christmas and at least made an effort to stay in their
major service organization status on the campus.
The job of painting posters was at times not a happy
one, even for the fun-loving inmates of the Mamook
clubrooms in the south basement of Brock Hall. The Club
required a good two weeks notice for every piece of work
they did but the ever-present emergency always seemed
With Brush and Paint Mamooks Turned Out Posters by Dozens
to arise. In almost every case, Mamooks obliged harrassed
club officials by digging in and doing the work.
FUNNYMAN   BURNETT   HEADED   MAMOOKS
PAINT   POTS,   PRETTY   GIRLS   THRONGED   INTO   MAMOOK   OFFICES   EVERY   DAY
•    Page Fifty-three STUDENT   CROWD   JAMMED   BROCK   HALL  NOON   HOUR   TO   HEAR  MIXING   BOWL   AND   OTHER   RADIO   SOCIETY   PRESENTATIONS.
UNIVERSITY RADIO SOCIETY
Start From Scratch, At End Of Year Were A Major Success
Members of The University Radio Society returned
in the fall to find their studios, control room and offices
locked. They had been locked the year before by Student
Council when the Radsoccers made a general foul up of
a giant radio and talent show, went over their budget
and could not balance their books.
When the new Student Council decided that the club
Don   Cunlifte   guided   destiny    of   Radsoc   in   Brock   Hall    basement.
could do a job on the campus they reinstated them but
without a budget or any other help.
The club went on the air with a one hour daily campus
network programme, later aired University Round Table,
a production of Ricki Diespecker and Bob Leckie, over a
downtown station each week.
But with all their efforts the club was hampered. They
were not only hampered by lack of interested membership they were hampered in all their efforts to expand
over the campus not only by Student Council but by
Faculty and staff too. When it was suggested that they
start making money for the Alma Mater Society by selling
advertising on their air time, the idea was shelved and
never heard of again.
Nevertheless the group went ahead. With a very de-
pleated stock of elderly records they produced show
after show. When Christmas came along they decided
that they would be broadcasting for a longer time each
day. But what about records.
To solve the problem they borrowed a Pubster (usually
arch enemies of the Radio Society) to solve the problem.
Soon negotiations were underway whereby the record
library of the group was added to to the extent of over
100 records a month. Every record company except Decca
supplied the now active group with free disc-jockey
discs. In addition the University extension department
loaned classical recordings for the special twice weekly
programme "Music From The Masters."
Page Fifty-four    • EXECUTIVE TO PARLIMENTARY FORUM PICKED DEBATORS WHICH BROUGHT  DEBATING  FAME TO   UBC   PRESIDENT  HOWIE   DAY   IS  IN  CENTRE
UBC WON McGOUN CUP
President Howie Day Enlisted New Forensic Talent On Campus
Canada's most prized debating trophy was brought
home to UBC by a team of four debaters who were considered one of the best teams ever entered into the Trophy
race.
Don Lanskail, and Allister Fraser fought to a 2-1 loss
in the home contest, but ex-MP Rod Young and Stan
Medland won a unanimous three point win in Saskatchewan giving the UBC team a total of four points to take
the contest for the first time since 1942.
UBC took the affirmative in a resolution that "Communist Activity be Made a Criminal Offence in Canada."
Defending the resolution, Don Lanskail, former president of the campus branch of the Canadian Legion and
United Nations, contended that Communism "was a real
threat to our democracy. It is no longer a philosophical
movement—it  is  an  international conspiracy."
Debates at Vancouver were first delayed one day because snow slides held up the eastern team.
Appointment  of  new  medical  dean  Myron  Weaver was great  impetus  for pre-meds.
PRE-MEDS
Pre-Meds Exhumed By
Dean's Appointment
The over five hundred prospective medical
students on the campus raised the ceiling
of their little office behind the Brock in the
summer of 1949 when they learned that
they had a new leader—a dean of medicine
in the person of affable Dr. Myron M.
Weaver. The new dean put life in the
pre-med's organization. They filled their
spare time with medical service tours and
hospital field trips, lectures and successful
film showings.
The only patient that "came out of the
operation but died" was the pre-med smoker.
Under their able President, Ray Parkinson,
PMUS had an "as well as can be expected"
year.
•     Pag* Fifty-five _r^    _   B    ^-1
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Film Society brought comedy, heavy film drama to campus each Tuesday.
EIC Executive Members   beam for Totem  Photographer.
MINOR CLUBS PROVED EFFECTIVE
Film Society, Hams, Engineers, Pipers Were Active
Among the miscellany of minor and temporary major
clubs on the campus those most heard from during the
year included the Amateur Radio Operators Association,
Engineering Institute of Canada, UBC Film Society and
the popular Legion Pipe Band.
Over a hundred and a quarter miles of film were
shown on the campus by the energetic Film Society.
Their regularly scheduled comedy and top flight "A"
presentations were among the highlights of the campus
year.
Students came to know their Legion Pipe Band well
by the presence of the kilt clad pipers' presence at all
athletic events.
With hundreds of "contact cards" coming through
the mail every week the Amateur Radio Operators lived
up to their reputation of contacting everyone everywhere.
As for the Engineering Institute of Canada they
started out the year practically memberless. An effective
recruiting campaign, first aid courses, films, field trips
and lectures brought the membership up to par.
HAME KEPT PROMISE TO CONTACT ANYONE, ANYWHERE, ANYTIME
Page Fifty-six    •
SKIRLING UBC PIPE BAND WAS FEATURE OF SATURDAY FOOTBALL GAMES VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP MEMBERS TAKE TIME OUT TO MUNCH LUNCHES BETWEEN RELIGIOUS TALKS.
RELIGION
Clubs Continued To Bring Speakers Here
Extremes in religion were exhibited by UBC's two
main religious clubs during the year.
On one side of the fence was the swashbuckling,
bible-thumping members of the Varsity Christian Fellowship. In their meetings they presented some of the
leading lights in local revivalism.
Still blushing from their alleged Communistic leanings of the year before the Student Christian Movement
went into semi-retirement but continued to bring their
usual number of religious leaders to the campus to speak
on world affairs.
RETURNING  FROM  CHRISTMAS  CONFERENCE TRIP TO  SASKATOON  ARE  MEMBERS  OF  U.B.C.'s  ENERGETIC  STUDENT  CHRISTIAN  MOVEMENT.
•    Page Fifty-seven Hillel House Behind Brock Hall Was   Meeting  Place for Jewish Students Here.
HILLEL CLUB
Known For Cards,
Dances, and Parties
B'nai B'rith Hillel foundation made
good use of their campus headquarters—Hillel House behind the Brock.
In it they ate their lunches, lounged,
studied and held social functions, as
well as playing cards.
Not a lesser club on the campus
but usually there is very little heard
from the members of the international Jewish organization.
Still they made themselves known
by their dances, their tea dances
staged in their club rooms and their
all round participation in campus
activity.
Student-owned plane prepares to take off for spin.
Page Fifty-eight     •
AERO CLUB
Co-operatitive Even Tried To
Build Campus Airfield
Members of UBC's Cooperative Aero Club really had
high flying in their Link Trainer on the ground aircraft
which were housed on Sea Island for air flying and a
cooperative society which has government sanction.
Sore point for the group was the quelling of their
attempts to build an airfield on the University Endowment Lands. After having the area surveyed and the best
spot picked out they approached Dean of Agriculture
Blythe Eagles for permission to build the landing strip
on Agriculture lands. But Dr. Eagles didn't belive in
flying. He decided that the airfield would be too near the
campus (and possibly practising agriculture students).
Nevertheless, the Aero Club went forward in a big
way. With the help of a government order their membership jumped "sky high". Since most students wanted to
fly the $100 government minimum bonus was just an
added incentive.
Affiliated with the Aero Club of B.C. the members paid
$25 down and $6.75 a month for the privilege of flying
Their fees made them part owners in all society equipment. Rental of aircraft was much lower than any other
rental group.
Club offices were located in their Link Trainer Room
in the Armouries. Rooms were open not only to students
but to all faculty and staff members on the campus.
Members of the UBC Alumni Association were also
active in the group. U.B.C.'s  EMBRYO  SYMPHONY  ORCHESTRA  PLAYED  TWO  STUDENT  CONCERTS  IN  THE  AUDITORIUM.     ORCHESTRA   CELEBRATED   3RD   ANNIVERSARY.
JAZZ CLUB, SYMPHONY AND ADASKIN
LSE Sponsored Few Musical Concerts Due To Austerity
As austerity would have it, musical events on the
campus took one of the largest cuts in funds. Margaret
Lowbeer's Literary and Scientific Executive did the best
they could with the funds available but students were
on a pretty slim cultural diet.
Before Christmas students heard two concerts by
the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra and the UBC group
also played for students  after the holidays.   The Jazz
Society staged a jam session in Brock Hall in the pre-
Christmas term with jazz musicians from downtown
Vancouver. Profits from the concert were turned over to
the Community Chest drive.
The UBC Symphony Society, under the able direction of Colin Slim gave a free concert during March for
the student body. The concert featured the piano playing of Ubyssey music critic John Brockington.
Harry Adaskin and  wife  with  violin  and  piano  respectively  held  music
class spellbound.
Jazz Club hit an all time high as Mel Torme appears at meeting
•     Page Fifty-nine Cadets
Forces Had Record
Number Of Recruits
University Service Training Corps was
open to all students on the campus who
could meet the necessary physical requirements.
All branches of the services were represented, coming under the jurisdiction of a
Joint Services University Training Committee, consisting of the President of the
University and the Commanders of the
C.O.T.C, U.N.T.D. and R.C.A.F. (Aux.)
Deans of Faculties and representatives from
the Army, Navy and Air Force.
Canadian Officers Training Corps has
been operating on the campus since 1928.
Successful applicants were appointed as
Officer Cadets and were required to donate
a minimum of 3 hours per week and 3%
to 4 months during the summer.
This time was spent at various Active
Force Corps Schools across Canada under
Active Force officers and instructors.
Upon completion of the courses, cadets
may emerge with the rank of Captain in
the reserve or First Lieutenant in the
Active Force,
UBC's COTC was Livewire Organization who held classes for Officer Candidates Monday
University Naval Training Force was
commanded by A/Lieut-Commander F. J.
E. Turner, R.C.N.  (R.).
Training involves 23 hours of parading
during the calendar year and active duty
during the summer.
R.C.A.F. (Auxiliary) University Flight
was commanded by Dr. J. Allen Harris.
It offered students an opportunity to
qualify for positions in the R.C.A.F. Regular, Reserve or Auxiliary.
Blue-clad No. 442 Auxiliary Squadron held regular training hours, took to the air regularly
UNTD
Cadets Planned To
Cruise All Summer
University Naval Training Division was
one of the most active of the forces on the
campus. Early in the fall they picked the
new cadets, who start to learn how to become
naval men.
As exams started to roll around in April
the cadets were planing to spend the summer
months cruising around the Pacific Ocean
in Canadian Corvettes for three months.
All told while attending classes they had
spent 23 hours of parades down at HMCS
Discovery.
AIR FORCE
Ottawa Doubles
Flight Quota
Just before Christmas Ottawa officials of
the RCAF doubled the pilot quota of the
University Auxiliary Flight.
With this prospect in mind officers of the
local crew start an all out campaign for more
cadets.
The campaign really went over big with
over a hundred signing up. So when February rolled around the campus cadets could
be seen heading out for the airport for
instructions, which would prepare them for
their summer stay in a regular station and
air training.
Besides spending time studying air force
material, all cadets had to get better than
average marks.
Page Sixty    •  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF BANHAM EXPLAINS TOUCHY POINT OF UBYSSEY POLICY
MANAGING EDITOR MARSHALL WAS  BUSY GEARING WORK OF  "PUB"
PUB CARRIES ON
Students Got Fewer Ubysseys
During Austerity Year
The effects of austerity reached like a clammy hand
into the north basement of Brock Hall and sliced one
issue per week off The Ubyssey, student newspaper.
From, a daily for two years, the Ubyssey went to three
issues a week, accepted its cut with a shrug of the
shoulders and prepared for another year of keeping
students informed and thinking.
Editor-in-chief Jim Banham and his 12-man editorial
board in their weekly meetings, made the decisions
which would help students understand the problems
which their executives met.
Ferret-like Ubyssey reporters, under the whip-hand
of news editor Art Welsh, scurried all over the campus
nosing out the news. When they got into trouble it was
big. Early in the year, the Engineers' Undergraduate
Society demanded the resignation of Banham, Welsh and
Tuesday editor Hugh Cameron for what they termed,
"adverse publicity in connection with the annual Engineers banquet." When things cooled down, all three were
still in office.
Early in the term, Ubyssey editors, who felt they
had sat on the fence too long, came out in favor of
financial assistance for athletes on the campus. In frontpage editorials, they hammered at the question well into
1950.
Three times a week students fought for their copy
of the Ubyssey, which appeared Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday. On Mondays, ever-smiling Hugh Cameron, with
assistant Betty Hortin, turned out a smart paper. Wednesday, bespectacled Doug Murray-Allan draped his long
frame over the sway-backed editor's chair and commenced
to pound out copy. Striving for what he termed "perfect
makeup," editor Murray-Allan all too often brought the
wrath of the editor-in-chief Banham down on his head
for his independence.
On Thursday, quiet Ron Pinchin, whose brother had
edited a daily paper two years previously, took over "in
the slot." Amiable Pinchin each week tried to set a new
speed record for getting out of College Printers in the
evening. Slim, diminutive Shirley Finch edited page
three on Thursday, had a tremendous following for her
women's page.
Clown of the Pub was features editor Vic Hay.
Pubsters were kept in perpetual mirth with Hay's mimic-
ings and distorted expressions. Serious, scholastic, Les
Armour wrote editorials for each issue and pounded out
a series of controversial front-page articles during the
year.    The job of gathering news from other university
(Continued on Page 64)
Page Sixty-two     • JERRY MACDONALD, C.U.P. EDITOR
ART WELSH,  NEWS  EDITOR
RAY FROST, SPORTS EDITOR
•     Page Sixty-three TOTEM   EDITORS   FROST,   PINCHIN,   BANHAM,   MARSHALL,   HAY AND WELSH PITCHED IN TO PRODUCE MAMMOTH BOOK.
newspapers went to tall, curly-haired Jerry Macdonald.
Under the able direction of mustached, chain-smoking
Art Welsh, reporters scurried hither and thither on
assignments.
The  sports   desk,  always  rebelliously  independent,
was this year under the direction of red-haired Ray Frost.
Cameron worked nights to meet Totem deadlines
Page Sixty-four     •
Even with pretty Ann Langbein on his knee, Frost somehow managed to turn out three very competent sport
pages per week.
Responsible for the over-all smooth running of the
pub was COTC-boosting Chuck Marshall, former sports
editor. Under his able guidance, stories got a new twist
and cameramen were told where to go for pictures. Pipe-
sucking Marshall also screened irate subscribers, left
editor Banham more time to look after policy making.
Columnists kept students alternately laughing and
thinking. On Friday, blond, mustached Hal "Gobbledey-
gook" Tennant examined the foibles of human nature
gently and whimsically. Thursday, Vic "While The Sun
Shines" Hay excruciated the campus with his take-offs
on everything from movie reviews to Russian dictatorship.
The same day, intellectual Bob "What's Going On"
Russell examined the state of radio drama and reviewed
Vancouver's more arty happenings. On Monday, headman Jim Banham went head hunting for directors and
producers in his column "In This Corner," which looked
at the state of current cinema.
Reporters Berson, Sanderson, Pineo, Churchill, Jones,
et al, helped editors make The Ubyssey newsy and controversial throughout the year. SMILING BETTY HORTIN EDITED STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
GEORGE   ROBERTSON AND DARYLL DUKE  PRODUCED   THUNDERBIRD
TOTEM, DIRECTORY WERE BIG JOBS
Totem Edited By Ubyssey Staff Was Late Night Task
The biggest job of all confronting the Publications
Board this year was the production of the 1950 Totem.
When Novia Hebert, appointed editor last year, failed
to return to UBC for this session, editor Jim Banham
Langbein, Jones, Squire, Wadds Were Associate Editors
called an emergency Publications Board session and delegated section work to other staff members.
The work involved editing thousands of words of
copy and marking up hundreds of pictures, snapped by
a half dozen photographers. Energetic Hugh Cameron,
senior editor of The Ubyssey, labored far into the night
for weeks in an attempt to make engraving and printing
deadlines.
Said Editor Comeron, "It isn't the very best annual
on the continent, but it won't be late."
Biggest job was the sorting and arranging of pictures for the graduating class and then the laborious
work of typing out duplicate lists for printer and
engraver.
When this work was finished, editors Banham and
Cameron were sure they could identify any grad on the
campus.
Although late in arriving on the campus, the 1949-50
version of the Student Directory was one of the finest
ever put out. From the very beginning of the term
Editor Betty Hortin and her associates were beset with
difficulties,
•     Page Sixty-five BOB STEINER, AS PHOTOGRAPHY HEAD, WAS WORKHORSE OF PUB
OUR PIXIES
Worked Hard To Help
Put Totem Out On Time
Backbone of the Totem and much of the Ubyssey
work were the photographers of the Student Publications
Board. Under the direction of Bob Steiner, who managed
the darkroom behind Brock Hall, pixies ranged over the
campus every day piling up news and feature shots to
make the Totem and Ubyssey attractive to the students.
Tommy Hatcher, who alternated from the Pharmacy
Bui1 ding to the Pub did a lions share of the work. Famed
for his portraits, Hatcher's services were clamoured for
many times during the year.
Youngest photographer in the pub was Bruce
Jaffary, crew-cut pixie who vied with his brother Paul
for credit lines in both publications. Both boys used the
same speed graphic camera with large effects.
Jaffary did  lion's  share  of  work.
Tom Hatcher was Pub work horse.
Doug Barnett was always on hand.
Paul Jaffary was Engineer Pubster.
Page Sixty-six     •
Micky Jones  did downtown work;
Joe   Quan   was   constant   clicker. Grinning  like Cheshire Cats, Banham, left, welcomes Hay
HAY HEADS PUB
New Editor Prepared For
Year Of Ubyssey Headaches
The choice was virtually unanimous; funny-man Vic
Hay, who had kept students in stitches all year with his
Ubyssey column "While The Sun Shines," and efficiently
handled the features desk, was to be editor-in-chief of
the Student Publications Board for 1950-51.
Hay would have a big task on his hands. Besides
producing three Ubysseys per week, the smiling effervescent columnist would have to keep a sharp eye on The
Totem, student year-book, Student Directory, which listed
the telephone number of every registered student, The
Tillicum, handbook for freshmen, and The Thunderbird,
stamping ground for embryo literaty genii.
Wise-cracking Hay had an able background for
managing the Ubyssey. A veteran with 6 years in the
Canadian Army behind him, Hay became editor and
publisher of a mimeographed newspaper at a Canadian
Army camp during the war. After serving two years
overseas in France and Holland, Sergeant Hay returned
to Victoria, his home town, and became incumbent in
Victoria College, where he helped produce "The Martlet,"
Vic College's periodical paper.
LOST AND FOUND
Mrs. Davies Doubled As
Secretary For Publications
Students' wailing-wall was the office of blond, British
Vera Davies, who fulfilled with unflagging efficiency the
dual function of Manager of the Lost and Found department and Pub secretary. Bereft students came to Mrs.
Davies in droves, unfolding to her sympathetic ear tales
of lost car-keys, money, and vital text—books by the score.
Perplexing feature of the Lost and Found Department was found in the number of valuable articles which
were never claimed. Wallets, money, rings, watches,
compacts and many other costly knick-knacks lay unclaimed until they fell under the auctioneer's hammer at
the end of the second term.
At times things were quiet at Mrs. Davies' wicket;
nobody would lose, find, or claim anything for several
minutes. The cessation of sounds of weeping in the hall
immediately brought Editor Jim Banham to Mrs. Davies,
bearing armfuls of correspondence for the unfortunate
woman, to answer during her spare time. Her spare
time consisted of an aggregate of a few moments, or intervals between running back and forth to the wicket, making up the classified ad section, and folding, wrapping,
addressing, and mailing hundreds of copies of The
Ubyssey each week. Mrs. Davies was always delighted
by Mr. Banham's thoughtfulness.
Efficient Pub Secretary Vera Davies looked after Lost and Found
•     Page Sixty-seven EXECUTIVE  OF ALUMNI   CAMPAIGNED VIGOROUSLY  FOR  MULTITUDE  OF   PROJECTS   WHICH   WOULD   HELP   REALIZE   DREAM   OF   BETTER   U.B.C.
TURNER MANAGED ALUMNI
Now Have Over 3600 Members and Growing Rapidly Each Year
"The UBC Alumni Association—the permanent organization of former students—is at an 'in-between'
stage", declared President John M. Buchanan (B.A/17)
in a recent general report to the membership. "It is comparatively young; only in the last few years have our
graduate classes been Irage," he continued, "and the
greater service to the University possible from organized
effort of such a larger group is only now beginning to
become evident."
"This past year, the 'The Alumni-UBC Deveopment
Fund, got underway with creditable results. In the growing stage, there may be some criticism over expenses,
methods, objectives and details of execution but there
seems no valid argument against the fundamental
principle of a voluntary annual giving programme which
qualifies donors as Association members, 'Chronicle' recipients and at the same time makes possible a gift to the
university. This past year, UBC benefitted to the extent
of $7,000.00."
"On behalf of the Alumni executive," continued Mr.
Buchanan, "may I extend a hearty welcome to '50 grads,
and request the general active support of each in one or
all of the several avenues of interest; our 'Chronicle', our
'Development Fund', our public relations, our meetings,
Graduate Harry Berry handled Money for UBC's Alumni Association
Page Sixty-eight     • towards an overall objective, viz., the furtherance of education in our Province."
Mr. Buchanan, who in business life is presi-
2_?_£ *?£Columbia Packers> P^nted
out that a full-tame Association office was
opened in Brock Hall, UBC, in January, 1946,
with the appointment of Mr.  Frank J.  E
IT™ (pB-A"' B- C°mm- >39) ^ the iirsi and
present Permanent Secretary-Manager. Since
that date, active membership totals have risen
from 15 to 3,600, and alumni scope and in
fluence have expanded in similar fashion.
During   the   past   several   years,   branch
groups have been established in many BC
vLT*1 c;ntres_- includins °ne * *e
United Kingdom. At present, there are active
chapters in Victoria, Kamloops, Kelowna,
Summerland, Penticton, Kimberley, Trail
Toronto, Ottawa, Northern and Southern
California, while new groups are expected
shortly in Powell River^rince Ruperfcal
gary, Edmonton and Winnipeg
Assisting Frank Turner in the alumni office
and the person directly responsible for super-
Dnrof^T Um alumni r6COrds * Miss
Dorothy Dawson, another University graduate. Dot, with the help of periodic student
employment, looked after more than 100 000
individual pieces of out-going mail to alumni
last year and made over 5,000 individual
address changes.
Mr. Harry A. Berry (B.A., B. Comm. '37)
comptroller of Seaboard Shipping Co. and
Seaboard Lumber Sales, is the association's
toeasurer, while Mr. Ormonde J. Hall  (B-
?mTmr12'^IB- >48) iS the editor-in-chief of
die UBC Alumni Chronicle. Mr. James A.
Macdonald (B.A. '38) is 1st vice-president,
Miss Honoree Young (B.A. '43) is 2nd vice-
president and UBC's Dean of Agriculture
Dr. Blythe Eagles (B.A. '22) is 3rd vice
president.
Alumni past president Lieut.-Col. W Tom
Brown (B.A. '32) is chairman of the Development Fund trustees, while Mr. Joseph F
Brown, Jr. (B.A. 2'3), an executive member
If ?w "LTrek CamPaiSn C°™*tee in
the Jail of '22, is chairman of the Fund's
board of directors.
Closest to students and the work being
done by the Alumni Association is amiable
smiling Frank Turner, inhabiter of office 201
in Brock Hall.
Always ready to welcome graduates and
old alumni, Turner made innumerable contactsduring the year in search of money for
Se*. ?". DeveloPmei* Fund. At the end
of the student year, the Fund's coffers were
much richer than at the same time the year
Secretary Prank Turner Also Served a, CO of UNTD
Page Sixty-nlne --DHbEN-W  Headaches untold faced  Osborne  as  head  of Athletic  Department  but
many problems will  be  ironed out with new Gymnasium.
Load of handling femme sport enthusiasts on the campus fell on head
of  pleasant Marion Henderson
ADMINISTRATION
Competent Staff Guides Huge Athletic
Setup To successful Sport Season
Success of sport teams at UBC this season has
started a cry for the emphasis of athletics on the campus.
Heading the list of those who are trying to give a
proper place to sport at UBC is Robert F. "Tony"
Osborne, head of the Phys Ed Department.
Deeply interested in the promotion of clean sport,
Osborne accepted the position of president of the Amateur Athletic Union last December.
Handling athletics for the women at UBC is petite
Marion Henderson who doubles in teaching dancing to
the shy and unitiated.
Helping Osborne to make sports a feature of this
university are five members of the Phys Ed staff.
Tall Jack Pomfret handled the Thunderbird basketball team again for the second year, taking the reins from
Osborne the previous season after the latter became too
tied up with office duties to keep on with the team.
Pomfret took over the job of line coach of the 'Bird
football squad in the fall, taking some of the work away
from head mentor Orville Burke.
Assistant coach of the Thunderbirds basketball team
was Doug Whittle, mentor of the Senior A Chiefs the
previous season. The tough job of conditioning the 'Bird
hoopers was given to Whittle who whipped the team
into top shape.
Coaching the men's swimming team was the other
role taken over again this year by Whittle, and he put the
watermen through a fully-packed season of meets.
Newcomer to the staff this year is Dick Penn, well-
known figure in UBC sport circles for some time.
Penn started out the year with control of intramural
activities, lining up near-record number of 'mural games
for male students.
With formation of the Braves Inter A basketball
team, Penn was named coach, and he handled the team
like a veteran mentor.
Once again UBC Thunderbird ruggermen came
under the direction of Albert Laithwaite who guided
the squad to the McKechnie Cup series and through
World Cup play with California, as well as a series with
Stanford.
His English-accented voice kept the ruggermen out
in daily training even while foot-deep snow lay on the
campus.
Import from the United States is Hjelmar "Jelly"
Anderson, graduate of University of Washington, who
looked after the end coaching for the American football
squad.
Anderson, himself a football player for UW during
his days there, handled (he spring training of the grid-
men for head coach Burke.
Page Seventy-two    • MONEY LACK PLAGUES DIRECTORATES
Athletic Manager Bakken Tries Gags, Stunts To Make Sports Pay Dividends
Trying to regulate university sport with little money
to work with was the tough job of the Men's and
Women's Athletic Directorates.
Smaller enrolment and a cut budget limited the
funds of MAD especially, and many minor sport clubs
were given barely enough of a grant to keep the
organization alive.
MAD president Hilary Wotherspoon, with the board
behind him, attempted to regulate athletes playing on
non-university teams. Student body threw out his
resolutions with the consequences that any athlete could
play for outside teams if he wished.
WAD, under the guiding hand of Carol McKinnon,
had a smooth year. Only kick was over the little amount
of coverage and publicity given women's teams by the
Ubyssey. Sport Editor of the paper straightened out the
matter with satisfying results.
With a year's experience behind him as Graduate
Manager of Athletics, Ole Bakken became a first rate
huckster this season. Promotion schemes varying from
the cut-rate Privilege Pass to stadium-filling football
contest, kept MAD out of the red.
Bakken still kept his hand in campus sports, taking
over the job of coaching the Senior A Chiefs cagers.
Dreary-eyed Graduate Manager of Athletics did all  in his power to
keep sports on black side of ledger.
MAD  prexy  Hilary  Wotherspoon  tried  valiantly   to   introduce  athletics
assisting bills through council
Smooth   running  year was the  lot  of WAD  president  Carol   McKinnon
whose only complaint was lack of women's  publicity in Ubyssey
Page Seventy-three FORWARD WALL OF THUNDERBIRD GRID SQUAD LOOKED ROUGH AND  POWERFUL  BUT   WERE   STILL   OUTWEIGHED   BY  AMERICAN   TEAMS.
SPIRIT HIGH, WINNING RECORD LOW
Coaches Burke, Anderson And Pomfret Boost Team But Still Short Of Men
UBC  Thunderbird  American  football  team had  a Winning only one game, that against a non-conference
successful season in 1949, even if their won-lost record    Eastern Oregon team, Thunderbirds missed two tough
wouldn't seem to indicate this. ones by only one point, losing to Central Washington
14-13 and to Northern Idaho 13-12.
Faulty call by the referee lost the Idaho game for
the 'Birdmen, but because the visitors were not a conference club, UBC did not protest, even after the
officiating referee admitted his error.
"Guts" is the only word that could be used to
describe the hard-fighting Thunderbirds. Under-powered
and under-manned, 'Bird gridders never stopped trying.
Sixty-four points were garnered by the locals in their
eight-game schedule, having only one hundred forty-nine
scored against them.
Biggest score made in one game was in the last
season contest against Whitworth, most powerful team in
the conference. Whitworth's forty points were overshadowed in the eyes of Thunderbird fans by the twenty
points which the losers chalked up even though the
never-quitting 'Birdmen knew they could not beat
Whitworth.
Promises of an even better season next year, even
though a fuller conference schedule will be forced upon
UBC, were made by every grid fan when they heard
the news that coach Orville Burke would again be in
charge of the Thunderbirds.
And the spring training prograrr handled by end
coach Hjelmar "Jeny" Anderson will give Thunderbirds
a chance to get an early start next season, allowing the
players to hit their stride at the beginning of the grid
year, as well as giving the coaching staff a chance to
Never-say-die Spirit of George Puil Was Not Altered Much j       i • ,.    •  i
Even After Foe Gleefully Thumbed Eye develop  novice  material.
Page Seventy-four     • 4^.
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FORWARD  PROGRESS  OF  BALL  CARRIER  WAS HINDERED  SWIFTLY   AFTER  THUNDERBIRD   BACK  STAN   CLARKE  PLANTED   HIS   FRAME
FORM OKAY, BUT LACKING IN DEPTH
Scenes Depict Kind Of Play Featured
Clarke on Offensive Duty Changes Position via Ballet Jump to Avoid
Inclosing Tacklers
Consistent Ball Carrier Doug Reid Tries to Forge Way Through
Tough Yankee Line in Vain
Fullback Lord Shows Distate for Disagreeable Task of Bringing Down Always One to get in the way of Oncoming Foe, Reid ends up on Bottom
Opponent on Muddy Field After Stopping This  One
•     Page Seventy-five BIRD CAGERS DOWN IN DUMPS AGAIN
Four Goliaths of the 'Bird Quintet Bend Ears to get Full Value
From Coach Pomfret's Talk
Failed to Live Up to Press Notices
But Worked Well Together As Team
Thunderbird basketballers suffered another unsuccessful conference season, shattering the high hopes that
were built up in the pre-season exhibition matches where
the 'Birdmen looked as if they might be a threat in the
league.
Starting out with four straight wins in their pre-
Christmas games, Thunderbirds waited until the Pacific
Coast Conference University of Washington Huskies
invaded the campus to drop their first defeat.
In conference play, UBC fared poorly, winning
only two games out of fourteen to finish at the bottom
of the league.
Only wins to fall to the Thunderbirds came in
their initial contest of the new year, outlasting Pacific
Lutheran's Gladiators to win by six points, and in their
last home game with Western Washington.
UBC sport fans looked forward to a good hoop
season, at least a better season than the one previous. The
'Birdmen's first win bore out the fans' convictions that
UBC basketballers were on the victory march.
Sports writers, in an early concensus, polled UBC
as a possible dark horse in the Evergreen race.
Three-times Block winner Bill Bell adds two more points for 'Birds but
even that didn't help.
Page Seventy-six     •
Fireball of the team, Reid Mitchell, had one of his best seasons but
competition still too tough. Long Stretch to the Basket for 'Bird's Phillips While Southcott
Awaits Outcome Anxiously
NEMESIS OF LEAFS
'Birdmen In Highest Spirit When
Battling With Cloverleaf Five
Stars of the Thunderbird team this year were not
limited to the few of last year, but each member of the
team played good ball all through the season.
One of the bright stars of the year was sophomore
forward John Southcott, who, unlike in his freshman year
when he rode the bench, got on the floor most of the time
to show just what he could do.
Injuries to forward Bill Bell early in the season let
Southcott play in his spot, where he more than held
his own.
Newcomer guards Don Hudson and Willis Louie,
only Chinese ball player to make the Thunderbirds,
proved themselves to be important assets to the team.
Oldtimers Reid Mitchell, John Forsyth, Nev Munro,
Art Phillips, Bill Bell, Norm Watt, along with Pete
Walker, who saw action on the forward position, all
aided the cause in their usual deft ways, but their efforts
were not quite enough to hold back the cream of Yankee
teams.
Tolerant Grins Face Norm as  He Tries to
Look Big
Tricky Handoffs Featured Floor Work of Phillips
Big Feet, Little Hands Made Winning
Combination
•     Page Seventy-seven CHIEFS QUINTET ENDED  UP  FAR DOWN  IN SENIOR A LEAGUE BUT HOLD   DISTINCTION  OF  BEING   FIRST  TEAM  TO   BEAT  CHAMPION   CLOVERLEAFS.
CHIEFS FAR DOWN IN SENIOR LOOP
Students First Team To Beat Highly Touted Canadian Champion Cloverleafs
Only university entry in the Vancouver Senior A
basketball league this year was the Chiefs.
Playing in a tougher league than last season, Chiefs
started out slowly, gradually picked up speed and won
their share of games.
The student Senior A hoopers held the distinction of
being the first team this year to beat the highly-regarded
Dominion Champion Cloverleafs in league play.
Chiefs broke a twelve-game Cloverleaf win streak
early in January when they held out in the final minutes
of the game to win 63-62.
Immediately following this game, Chiefs rushed for
the boat to Prince Rupert where they played out a two-
game exhibition series with the hosting team, losing both
tilts.
Chiefs sported p'ayers from both university Senior
A teams of the previous year, and boast of two ex-members
who have made good on the Thunderbirds this season.
Having one of the best basketball players around
these parts as their coach has much to do with the success
of the Chieftains. Ole Bakken, Graduate Manager of
Athletics and ex-Cloverleaf star, took time out from his
office duties to guide the Senior A students through the
season.
Chieftains did everything in their power to keep up with opposition
but even in above picture foe scored.
Chiefs made their contribution to the local league,
helping them out of a financial hole by having Wednesday night doubleheaders out at the UBC gymnasium
instead of in the costly Exhibition Gardens.
Page Seventy-eight     • BRAVES   INTER   'A'   HOOP   SQUAD   RAN   THROUGH   SEASON   WITH   FEW LOSSES,  FINALLY TAKING  V  AND  D   PLAYOFFS   IN   FIVE  GAMES.
BRAVES TRIUMPH
End Up Second In League Play But
Penn Coaches To Victory In Finals
Supplying the local Intermediate A basketball league
with its stiffest competition of the '49-'50 season was the
newly-formed university team in this division, the UBC
Braves.
Pre-season prediction was that the Brave quintet
would be the power to beat in the league, and as the
year went on, they proved to be just that.
Composed mainly of Frosh, but retaining some of the
older upperclassmen as well, Braves' only potent threat
for supremacy in the loop was YMCA.
Idea behind the formation of the Braves originally
was to develop the newcomers to UBC into possible
future Thunderbirds by playing them against teams
comparable in age and experience, yet giving them an
idea of the type of competition they would encounter
later by pitting them against junior college teams from
the United States.
First series with a U.S. team came early in the
season when Mount Vernon Junior College played two
home-and-home games with Braves. The locals lost both
contests with the Yankees but gained valuable experience.
Coaching the embryo quintet was newcomer to the
Phys Ed staff Dick Penn. Working in practices for the
boys between his classes and intramural studies, Penn
found time enough to whip his charges into a first-class
fighting machine.
With a year's experience at university basketball
behind them, members of the Braves next year will be the
supply from which the Senior A Chiefs and possibly the
Thunderbirds will draw.
Coach   Penn gives serious  talk to  Bowman,   Ryan  and  Ritchie
In  Prep  for Playoff Series
•     Page Seventy-nine FEMME HOOPERS
Thunderettes, Majorettes In Finals
After Students End Up On Top Place
Winning laurels of inter 'A' girls' basketball league
were given to UBC Thunderettes at the completion of a
season long winning streak. Only major defeat of the year
was the loss of inter 'A' city finals where Varsity bowed
out to Majorettes in a close fought contest.
Second school term saw the amalgamation of former
'UBC hoopsters with Thunderettes. The resulting team
moved ahead to beat Senior 'B' teams at Cloverdale and
Courtenay.
Top scoring cagette for the year was second year
Physical Ed student Eleanor Nyho'm, who was matched
in playing abilities by Mimi Wright.
Probably the most outstanding event of their year
was the defeat of world famous negro basketeers
Chocolate Co-eds. Co-eds have been compared with
Harlem Globe Trotters, but were soundly trounced by
UBC femmes.
Majority of the players this year were first year
students. Big Blocks were awarded to Eleanor Nyholm
and Mimi Wright; while small blocks were received by
Audrey Butler, Maureen Walsh, Shiela Moore, Marcia
Hillman, Iris Sanderson, and Laurie Esplin. Round letter
winners were Mae Milling, Maureen Jergens, Van Nixon,
and Doreen Brinham.
Stiff practice sessions kept femmes on top of league all  year,
didn't help in finals
FRESH SUPPLY OF TALENT FROM  BRITISH  COLUMBIA HIGH SCHOOLS   GIVES  UBC HUSTLING TEAM WITH ASSURANCE OF SAME  NEXT YEAR
Page  Eighty     • MEN'S GRASS HOCKEY TEAM TOOK ACTIVE PART IN LEAGUE PLAY  AND DID WELL ON SELF-FINANCED TRIP TO VANCOUVER ISLAND
NO LACK OF GRASS HOCKEY TEAMS
Tougher League Slowed Down Men's
Team But Island Trip Successful
Men's grass hockey, like other sports on the campus,
suffered from the long freeze, but still managed to
produce good teams, when the weather cleared.
Early in the term the Thunderbirds travelled to
Vancouver Island to play with a Shawnigan Lake team,
winning both games.
UBC entered two teams in the Saturday City
League, Thunderbirds, and Varsity which ended in 3rd
and 4th respectively.
Northwest Hockey Conference Falls
To Student Femmes Of First Team
Girl grass hockeyists at UBC have once again
proven themselves a credit to the athletic reputation of
the Blue and Gold, winning the Northwest Hockey Conference for the second straight year.
Entering three teams, Varsity, UBC, and Totems
in the Vancouver Women's Grass Hockey League the
girls ran into a lot of trouble playing their scheduled
games due to what has been termed "unseasonable"
weather.
With departure of snow, hockeyists caught up on long
overdue practices on upper field.
First of three entries in the Women's league ran away with the Northwest
Conference title for second time.
Page Eighty-one SNOW-STALLED RUGGERS COME THRU
Demonstrating dummying form by which he constantly dodged
opponents is ace Russ Latham
Weather Holds Up McKechnie Cup Play
But Sunshine Greeted Visiting Yanks
UBC rugger fans were treated to another win-filled
year as the university's first team ran away with the pre-
Christmas Millar Cup league play, and continued to
show their skill as the Thunderbirds after Christmas in
the McKechnie Cup games and matches with both Stanford and University of California.
Only mar on UBC's first team before Christmas was
their withdrawal from the Millar Cup playoffs because
the games were scheduled at exam time for the students.
Two postponements in a row because of foul
weather put the playoffs well into the middle of examinations and some of the players had to write finals.
Appeal to the league brought no help and only one
solution, to withdraw from the playoffs, faced the students.
Cancellation still further, again from the ice and
snow conditions, enabled the students to take part in
the playoffs at last, but having already withdrawn, they
were not allowed back in.
Speculation as to whether the university team would
have won the series ran high, since the students lost only
one game in the season and that one was their first.
From that time on, their record remained unmarred.
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Page Eighty-two     • Mangle  of  scrum   men was  often   seen   in   Indian-'Bird   series   but
bard   work   of   the   forwards  gave   UBC   wins.
Captain of the squad Les Hempsal was one of the more aggressive
scrum members, continually coming out with ball.
The Varsity Thunderbird team, set to take part in
McKechnie Cup play immediately after Christmas, were
held up for many long weeks by the bad weather, causing
the players to lose a little of their spirit as well as their
conditioning.
Coach Albert Laithwaite kept the boys in as good
shape as possible with daily running workouts, but the
conditioning that comes only from continuous body contact was missing.
With important dates with Stanford getting closer,
as well as the McKechnie Cup games, snow finally cleared
from the campus and the Birdmen went back to their
stiff workouts.
Thunderbirds got in only one game, that with Victoria Crimson Tide in McKechnie Cup play, before trying
on the Stanford Indians for size.
On February 16 and 18, UBC hosted a team of 21
players from the university at Palo Alto, California. Outcome of the two games would seem to have depended on
skill rather than size as the locals took both games from
the visitors even though they were outweighed over ten
pounds per man.
Nine American football players, five of them over
200 pounds, formed the keystone of the Stanford team
but the rest of their mates were of almost comparable
size and calibre.
First test saw the fighter 'Bird scrum outpush the
visitors most of the game, bringing the ball out to the
local three fine who worked it up the field.
Second game was a kicking match as star 'Bird toe
artist Russ Latham made 14 points out of the 17 on
three penalty kicks, a field goal, and one convert while
Stanford's ace Bill McColl, sadly off form, missed just as
many chances, causing the visitors to lose out.
BLOCK WINNER   MANY  TIMES  FOR  HIS   RUGGER  WORK,   MARSH  SMITH   ADDED   WEIGHT AND   SPEED   TO   MAKE   SCRUM  TOUGH  TO   BEAT
•     Page Eighty-three VARSITY TEAM NOT THE  SMOOTH-WORKING OUTFIT OF FORMER YEAR   BUT   MANAGED   TO   SCARE   LEAGUE   LEADERS  WITH   THREE-ALL   TIE
SOCCERMEN OVERCOME PLAYER LACK
Cowan Missed Sorely But Varsity Team Showed Signs Of Threatening League
Varsity soccer team didn't fare as well as they had
the previous season, partly because of the lack of play-
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Forwards  Popowich  and  Moulds  Play With the  Ball  After Long  Layoff
Caused by Snowy Fields
ers and partly because of the tougher league facing them
this year.
Little enthusiasm for soccer on the campus at the
season's beginning plus the loss of many of the regulars
from last year's starry team cost Varsity a playoff berth.
For the first time, the students played some of their
games on Sundays at Callister Park, but the majority of
the matches were played on city parks.
■ Loss of Jack Cowan to Dundee in the Old Country
football league put a strain on the club but addition of
new men to the team sparked the team back up the
ladder.
Bobby Moulds, outstanding player of the season was
offered contracts from downtown soccer teams but he
refused them to play for the university.
Ken Campbell, outstanding rookie wingman last
year, helped the Varsity team again this year.
Games won by the Varsity team were against St.
Helens, Kerrisdale and Collingwood in the first half of
the season, before poor weather stopped their activity.
At the end of the season, Varsity eleven ended near
the top of the league after beating the league-leading
Collingwood team 3-1.
Despite the absence of several of last year's stars,
the Point Grey Soccermen, including Hugh Marshall,
Don Renton, Dave Thompson, Bill Walters, Jim Foster,
Hugh Ross, Mike Puhach, Bobby Moulds, Bill Popowich,
Howie Oburne and Ken Campbell played many commendable games.
Page Eighty-four     •
a_f Thrown-in   Form,   Styled   by  Varsity  Soccerman   Bobby   Mouds,
Is Almost Perfect Except for Grin
Forward   Lino  Prepare   lo   Launch   Drive  Toward   Opposite  Goal
In   Post-Christmas   Tilt
Hard-looking UBC Team Acted as Tough as They Appeared,
Giving Opposing Teams  Rough Times
Coach   Gordie  Baum  Outlines  Plan  of  Attack  as
Puhach, Popowich, Moulds Listen Tolerantly
UBC SOCCER TEAM
Second Team Ended Up On Bottom Of
League But Made Foes Earn Points
UBC, student entry in the Vancouver and District
Second Division Soccer League, had a bad season.
Lacking players of suitable calibre to make a good
team, Manager Eugene Smith had to be content with
those players who were not wanted by the Senior Varsity
Thunderbirds.
Throughout the season UBC only gained two points
from two games that they tied. But this record is a poor
indication of the way in which the team played. In
every game, the students put up an excellent fight to win
their way into the top rungs of the league ladder but
the stiff competition of the superior Vancouver clubs
proved too difficult to overcome.
UBC, however, has proved to be a very valuable
farm club for the Thunderbirds. Five of the outstanding
players will move up into the senior rostrum to replace
the vacant positions left by graduating 'Birds.
Handicapped by lack of players, UBC soccer men
had to play in different positions each week and while
they gained experience they did not get a chance to prove
their skill in any one settled position.
Players who were outstanding on the team included
Bruce Madley, Stuart Brown, Pete McLaughlin, Jim
Insley and John Miller.
Bruce Madley, who played in the outside-right berth
was the top goal-getter and the star of the team. If UBC
had had more players comparable to Madley they might
have finished the season on top of the league.
•     Page Eighty-five
' FULL CROP OF TALENT FROM EVERYWHERE BUT VANCOUVER WORKED WELL TOGETHER. LOSS OF OLD STARS MADE UP BY HUSTLE OF FRESH KIDS
INTERCOLLEGIATE HOCKEY MAKES GOOD
'Amateur' Mainliners Too Much For
Locals But College Teams Succumb
Student ice hockey fans were treated to some good
hockey this year even though they failed to see their
UBC Thunderbirds progress in the stiff Mainline League.
UBC remained independent of the league but played
games with two of the teams in the loop, Kerrisdale
Monarchs and Nanaimo Clippers.
Students could not be expected to compete on even
grounds with the supposedly amateur commercial teams
even though they did upset the top place Clipper outfit
early in the season.
In successive games with the newly formed Kerrisdale crew, in whose brand new arena Thunderbirds
played most of their games, the students came out on the
losing end of the scores.
Main interest to the student fans came from games
played with the visiting University of"Ga_i£oFnia Golden
Bears for the newly-donated Hamber trophy.
Interest was built up for the two games of the series
played at the Forum in Vancouver by the success of the
'Birdmen on their two week tour back to Alberta for the
first two games of the home-and-home series.
Never has a UBC team been so successful on the
road as the Thunderbird icemen in their prairies tour.
Page Eighty-six     •
The students played six games in ten days and managed
to win every game of the schedule.
Following the 'Birdmen's success in the newspapers,
local fans braved snow and cold to see the visiting Bears
tangle with the Thunderbirds at the Forum in the first
game of the series in Vancouver.
First night crowd saw Alberta come from behind to
force overtime, and then go on to win the game by a
tight 3-2 score.
Last chance desperation fling by the visitors in the
final game was squashed by the Thunderbirds as they
over-powered Alberta to win both the game and the Cup
via their 7-2 score.
Returning once more to the Mainline League UBC
got into the playoffs by agreement of the league, playing
against last place Monarchs in the quarter finals. Both
games of the two out of three series were taken by the
Kerrisdale crew, and the Thunderbirds career was ended
for the season.
Standouts in the lineup this year were many of the
same men who carried Thunderbirds to their second place
standing in the league of the previous year.
With the absence of former star Haas Young who
joined the Edmonton Waterloo Mercuries, Canadian
hockey representatives in the World Amateur Championships, scoring load was taken over by veteran Bob Koch. 'BIRD - ALBERTA GOLDEN BEAR TILTS PROVIDED LARGE CROWD OF STUDENT FANS WITH MANY THRILLS, AS WHEN BEAR'S FLEMING SHOT ON GOAL
The balding wonder continually amazed fans and opposing team members alike with his dancing, quick breaking
style. Koch lined up at the head of the scoring column
for the locals.
Kid line of Drake, Bailey and Lindsay did much
damage to opposing teams, working together even better
than in the previous year.
Steady playing of Wag Wagner, team captain; Fred
Andrews, and Hugh Berry, returned from Nanaimo, made
UBC a threat to any team.
Defensive star Terry Nelford never failed to give a
good performance and, along with rookies Jack MacFar-
land and Cookie Duchene, stopped Alberta cold in the
Hamber Cup series.
Real star of the team though was goalie Don Adams,
who was the backbone of spirit for the team. Adams was
invaluable to the squad, who always played their best
when he Was between the pipes. Defense Work of Team Captain Wag Wagner, Jack MacFarlane, and
Terry Nelford Was Outstanding
Hamber Cup Winners Rejoice In Dressing Room with Bottles of Coke
While Still Half Stripped
Kid Forward Line of Stu Bailey, Clare Drake, and Bobby Lindsay
Caused   Trouble   for  Opponents
•    Page Eighty-seven UBC TURNS OUT TOP SKI CLUB AGAIN
Femme Trio of Jane Corbitt,  Bev  Robertson,  Jo  Castillou Got  in
Lots of Practice at Rossland
Just Lose Out To Huskies At Rossland
But Nip Seattle U in Alberta Tourney
Once again, UBC skiers gamely but unsuccessfully
tried to dethrone the vaunted University of Washington
ski team at the annual Intercollegiate Ski Meet which
represents the cream of west coast campus skiers.
In the words of coach Peter Vajda, "Only incredibly
bad luck kept the Thunderbirds from upsetting the
highly favored Huskies."
Huskies took the meet for the third year in succession despite the great fight of 'Bird stars George Merry,
Gordie Cowan, Lome Calder and freshman Harold
Enquist pinch-hitting for John Frazee.
Loss of letterman Frazee the day before the meet
may have been the deciding factor in Thunderbird's
downfall. A four-way star, Frazee damaged his ankle in
a practice run on the downhill course.
Thunderbird team started poorly, coming fourth in
cross-country racing, but swept first and third places in
the downhill event to take the lead in combined standings.
Birds repeated their downhill victory in the slalom
when George Merry took first place, Gordie Cowan came
fourth and Harold Enquist followed up running fifth.
Luck deserted the team in jumping, though, when
they were forced to enter only three men instead of the
ROSSLAND   SKI   TEAM   OF  WILLIS,   MERRY,   CALDER,   GUNN,   FRAZEE,    COWAN,   ENQUIST,   AND   MANAGER YOUNG  ALMOST  TOOK  TROPHY
Page Eighty-eight     • A.*   A
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Snow Flies from the Fleet Skies of the Phantom Figure as
UBC Team Member Takes Night Spin
Bev  Robertson  manoeuvres   her way through difficult  slalom course
before intercollegiate meet.
four  allowed.  Lome  Calder was  withdrawn after  an
injury in the downhill.
Freshman Harold Enquist came second in the race
for individual honors, following Harold Fisher, of WSC.
In a meet at Mount Norquay, Alberta, UBC 'Birds
defeated Seattle University by 1.2 points. Universities
of Utah, Montana and Portland, and Colleges of Vanport
and Eastern Washington had been invited to the meet
but snow conditions prevented their attendance.
Cowan and Merry starred in downhill and slalom
racing. First place in individual scoring went to Don
Walker of Seattle University.
Femme ski team at UBC topped University of
Washington 'A' and 'B', Washington State, College of
Puget Sound and Lewis and Clark to win the Pacific
North West Intercollegiate Women's Individual Meet at
Vancouver.
Meet was hosted by UBC on local slopes. Jo
Castillou, star member of 'Bird team, took first place in
both her slalom races.
Manager Sid Young Takes Time Off from Figuring Out Finances
To Try His Hand on Course
John   Frazee,   Four Way  Man  on   Local   Squad   Ran  Afoul  of  Bad   Luck
By Turning  Ankle   Before   Meet
•    Page Eighty-nine ACTIVE  MEMBERS  OF VOC TRACKED  OVER  MOUNTAINSIDES  OF ANY   PEAKS   AT   HAND,   FOR   SKIING,   HIKING   AND   CAMPING   OUT
VOCERS FIND WAYS TO KEEP BUSY
Trips To Peaks Far And Near Were Highlights Of Season
Skiing, hiking and picnicing over the
slopes of any mountain within accessible
limits was the story of UBC's VOC club.
Trips were carried out in the fall, winter
and spring of the school term to Garabaldi,
Mount Baker, Mount Elphinstone and
other peaks of noted fame where the skiing enthusiasts of the club could get in a
little extra practice, and where those who
favored hiking alone could find enjoyment.
Between away trips, their cabin up Seymour Mountain kept a reasonable number
of club members comfortable over the
weekends.
When not up the mountains, socials of
all kinds, dances, parties, kept the large
club busy and made them well known on
the campus.
Summer saw the start of their new cabin
up on Seymour, a cabin which when finished will hold about 150 people comfortably. Enrollment should grow even more
when it is completed.
Temporary VOC  Cabin  on  Mount Seymour  kept  Members  Happy
Until   New   Establishment   on   Grouse  Was   Completed
Page Ninety    • Putting   the   Shot   Earned   John   Pavelich   More   Honor  Again
After Previously Breaking Record
CINDER POUNDERS
Tracksters Under Bob Osborne And Fred
Rowell Cleaned Up Conference Events
Under the capable coaching of Bob Osborne, head
of the Physical Education Department, UBC's track team
enjoyed a banner year. In the first part of the year in
the intermural cross country, tracksters Bob Piercy, Al
Bain and Ez Henniger, more renowned as sprinters took
the first, second and third spots respectively.
At Washington State College later in the year both
Piercy and Bain retained the same spots but Henniger
dropped to fourth in an invitational meet.
Other cinder events in the spring saw UBC runners
participate in a conference meet at Vancouver in May,
a dual meet in Bellingham and the St. Martin's relays.
In the Stadium at noon on Saturdays Bob Osborne
and assistant coach Fred Rowell put their charges
through their paces. Outstanding in the field events was
John Pavelich, who received a cup for being the outstanding athlete in his field.
Executive of the organization was President Pat
Minchin while Al Bain acted as Manager.
Junior runners who pounded the cinders and promised to be contenders in future events were Jack Lowther,
Godfrey Chowne and Gordon Oates.
TRACK  TEAM  OF  RUNNERS  AND  MUSCLED  ARTISTS  ALIKE   HANDLEO   THEIR  JOBS  WELL.  SPRING  COMPETITION   PROVED   NOT  TOO  TOUGH
•     Page Ninety-one CRICKETERS STRONGER ON CAMPUS
Cricketers practiced on campus fields to make ready for summer play with downtown teams
New Blood Fills Two
Teams In City League
Cricketers planned to have two teams
in the BC Mainland Cricket League this
summer, one team in the first and the
other in second division.
Almost a brand new club was formed
this year, after the graduation of most
of the old standbys that had kept active
in the club for the last three or four
years.
Jack Bradley, an ex-St. George's
player, took over the job of organizing
the team this summer after Alfie Martin,
last year's captain, was lost to graduation.
Along with Alfie Martin were Art
Griffin and Pete Hobson who ended
their university cricket careers.
FENCING CLUB LACKED EQUIPMENT
Playful Practices of Fencers Seldom Ended  in this Disastrous Situation,
Usually   Just Fun
Spirit Remains Among Few Old Standbys
UBC's fencing club dropped sadly from the high
position it had attained in previous years, but made a
game attempt to adequately represent the university in
meets during the year.
Running with a small membership and an even
lesser amount of equipment, club president George
Futcher and Master at Arms Sam Allman managed to
keep the club on its feet and send representatives,
themselves in this case, to the Pacific North West
Tournament. In the British Columbia Fencing Association sponsored meet, the UBC boys were sadly beaten
by teams from across the border.
Late in the term, a team composed of the two Club
officers together with Lyle Baigent and pert Jan
Stanowski entered the spring BCFA tournament in an
attempt to regain some of the honor and prestige gained
in previous years.
Club membership was about 28 of which only
around seven or eight were active. Much interest was
lost because of the equipment situation.
Allman, who had done a masterful job in instructing club members, felt sure that more equipment would
give the club a needed boost in the following years.
Page Ninety-two     • HOSTING GOLFERS
Try for Third Straight
Title on Home Course
UBC divoters planned to take the conference golf
championship for their third straight year with all the
advantages in their favor.
Sponsoring the meet this season, the local team had
the advantage of playing on their own home course.
All 36 holes were played on the same day to allow
two members of the team to play in an invitational
tourney.
Trips down south were taken by the five-man team
which had cleaned up in the conference the previous
two seasons and seemed destined to do the same again
this year.
Team was chosen through elimination rounds of all
campus divoters who wishes to take part in the game.
Veteran  divotman   Doug   Bajus   again   topped   university  golfers   to
head UBC's Conference team this season
DON  BODIE,  DOUG   BAJUS,  AND   PETER   BENTLEY  COPPED  CONFERENCE   TITLE   LAST  YEAR.    LATTER   TWO    WERE   ON   TEAM   AGAIN   THIS   SPRING
•     Page Ninety-three LARGE INTRAMURAL SETUP AT UBC
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'M.-ral  basketball   brought  out scores   of contenders  with   everyone
getting into the act
Sports From One End Of The Year To
The Other Was Aim Of Director Penn
One of the most extensive intramural organizations
of any university in North America was the boast of the
setup at UBC.
Under the direction of Dick Penn, newly appointed
member to the Phys Ed staff, a full schedule of 'mural
games was played from the beginning of the year up
until the very end.
Volleyball started the 'mural setup rolling in early
October with a near record amount of teams entering
the competition.
The high brand of intramural ball was emphatically
shown to students when an all-star volleyball team composed of members of the three finalists defeated a highly
rated University of Washington team which played in a
regular Intercollegiate league.
After Christmas, basketball took the spotlight, consuming most of the remainder of the year.
Soccer, cross-country, badminton, tennis, skiing, boxing, wrestling, baseball, track and many other activities
were carried on throughout the year, keeping those many
sports-minded students who would normally be too busy
to take the necessary time out for extramural sport still
in the swing of athletic life with all its many enjoyments.
Amateur leather swingers had a chance to get rid of boxing dreams
after few bouts in ring
All-star volleyball team from Intramural leaders beat Husky visitors
in exhibition
Page Ninety-four    • Coordination and Alertness are necessary to  perform such feats
on the club's high bar
Trampoline proved interesting if tricky but members mastered   it
before the season was over
HALF-TIME FEATURE WAS TRAMPOLINE
Gym Club Carommed Like Billiard Balls During Half-Time Trampoline Displays
When UBC's football and basketball teams left the field for half-time
tongue-lashings by their respective
coaches, members of the UBC gym
club were always on hand to keep
the customers entertained. At football games, a trampoline, on which
male students carommed around like
billiard balls, did the trick and high
bar tumbling work was featured
during time out in basketball games!
When spring came and there were
no football or basketball games, the
Club took to participating in competitive gymnastics. On March 4,
Washington State came to UBC to
show off and the club also did their
stuff at an intramural meet on March
25. They also participated in the
Provincial Gymnastics Competition..
The club boasted a regular enrolment of 40 students who were ably
managed by J. A. "Jack" Herwynen
and assisted by Bill Parker. Faculty
representative who looked on was
Professor W. Heslop but more active
participation came from Doug
Whittle of the Physical Education
Department.
Members combine their respective talents to present a pattern
of physical symmetry which is harder than it looks
t    Page Ninety-five Unbeatable diving form is displayed by oldtimer
Hawthorne
Men's swimming team held their own in meets even though hampered by lack of pool
facilities.
SWIMMERS HELD OWN IN CONFERENCE
Lack Of Pool Creates Little Interest
For Watermen But Still Win Meets
UBC swimmers carried out another season full of
success against American and local teams despite their
lack of pool facilities.
Overcoming the many disadvantages which hampered the student swimmers, UBC went through the
season with only one loss, that to the highly rated University of Washington frosh team which completely
swamped the game but out-classed Thunderbirds.
Washington frosh reversed the score by which UBC
had beaten them the previous season, ending the meet
with a 51-15 score.
UBC  mermaids  sometimes  entered   mixed  meets   with   men's   team,
held own  meets as well
Returning from the Washington encounter, UBC
later took on two Evergreen Conference teams near the
season's end at the Western Washington pool in Bellingham.
The locals pulled away from the Conference teams
to win the meet with a total of 55 points, Western coming second with 34 points, while Eastern Washington
trailed behind with 20.
Phys Ed instructor Doug Whittle again took over
the task of coaching the UBC team, traipsing downtown
with the students to the Crystal Pool to try to keep
interest in the practices.
Time spent by the watermen travelling back and
forth to the pool and the university invaded valuable
study time and sadly decreased the student's pocket-
book as well.
Old standbys of George Knight, Bob Thistle, Pete
Lusztig, Jim Hawthorne, Don Marshall, and others whom
graduation or offers from other universities didn't snatch
away, formed the backbone of the 1949-'50 club.
Newcomers to the roster, notably Don Thom who
did wonders for the team in his specialty of diving, helped
out in representing UBC throughout the season.
Coach Whittle is looking forward for the day when
. the new pool wi'l be built as an addition to the Memorial
Gymnasium, because he knows that UBC will have a
team comparable to almost any on the continent when
the pool is built.
Page Ninety-six Moment of laughter in months of work as front oarsman grabs
for falling  pants none too soon
UBC  Eight   practicing   in   near-darkness  for   Fall   Meet
With Oregon State and Penticton
ROWERS MATCHED WITH TOP CREWS
Trip As Far As California Pits Locals
Against UW, Oregon, U of California, Stanford
UBC Rowers came into their own
on the campus this year, competing
on equal footing with some of the
best college teams that the United
States universities had to offer.
In their first match of the term
early in November the students, many
of them still green but game, were
edged out by a top class University
of Oregon eight in the feature event
Cox Peretz takes sweater from losing
Oregon Cox
First UBC Four beat both Oregon and
Interior Crews
of a Coal Harbour meet, but took
first place over the Oregon four as
well as an Interior team from Penticton.
Recovering from the long winter
forced layoff with a few short weeks
of intensive practice, UBC rowers invited up the University of Washington team, National Lightweight
Champions of the 1949 season, in mid
March.
Washington brought up two of
their eight crews to take part in the
competition at Coal Harbour. UBC
had their two eights competing while
their three four-man shells kept the
spectators interested between events
with other races.
Both UBC crews of eight undertook fifteen days of practice, as much
as twelve hours per day, after exams
were over, to train for the big Spring
Acquade in Seattle on May 20.
Hosting UW Husky team allowed
the UBC eights to train down at
University of Washington four days
prior to the meet, bunking them at
the UW crew house.
•     Page Ninety-seven MEN'S  BIG BLOCK CLUB,  COMPOSED  OF TOP ATHLETES  ON THE   CAMPUS,   HELPED  OUT SPORT  EVENTS,  STAGED SOCIAL MIXERS
BIG BLOCK CLUBS WERE ACTIVE
Men's And Women's Big Block Clubs
Over a dozen outstanding women athletes received
Big Blocks and automatically became members of the
Women's Big Block Club on presentation day this year.
President of the Club, Anne Munro, guided the
organization, which boasted a total of 14 members. In
the fall the club gave a lunch for their graduate members
and awarded blazers to award winners.
Outstanding woman athlete in the club was Teacher
Training student Nora McDermott who has managed
to win her Big Block six times. Other members won their
blocks for participation in grass hockey, basketball,
swimming or badminton.
Staged Frosh Smoker, Grad Dance
Well over 25 male students became members of one
of UBC's inner circles this year—the Men's Big Block
Club. The award is given for outstanding contributions
to men's athletics on the campus.
The club, while designed as an honorary athletic
club wears off its excess energy by acting in a service
capacity. Energetic Stan Clarke, president of the Club,
put in a year of organizing off the field as well as being
a stalwart of the American football team.
As well as ushering spectators to stadium seats during sports events, the Club arranged the annual Frosh
Smoker.
MEMBERS OF WOMEN'S BIG BLOCK CLUB, WEARING  THEIR DISTINCTIVE  BLUE  BLAZERS,   REPRESENT TOP  FEMME  ATHLETICS AT  UBC.
Page Ninety-eight    • Grid coaching trio of Jack Pomfret, Orville Burke, and Hjelmar
"Jelly" Anderson guided Thunderbirds to a successful season even
though they won only one game officially. Increase in spirit and better
style of play of the 'Birdmen was mostly due to inspiring power of
head coach Burke who praised his charges continually even when
faced with their worst defeats.
Addition to Phys Ed staff this year
was Dick Penn, who has been active
in UBC sport circles for a long time.
Penn took charge of the Intramural
setup for the year and coached the
Inter A basketball Braves to a Provincial Championship.
UBC said goodbye to three of the old faithfuls of American Football this year. Graduation claimed Dick Ellis, Doug Reid and Bill
Choukalos, a trio who have been carrying the grid load for some
time. Ellis and Choukalos aided the cause as part of the seven fine
mules while Reid will be remembered by grid fans for his exceptional
backfield work. All three received athletic awards for their work.
Hailing from across the line, other new
addition to the Phys Ed staff is ex-Husky
Jelly Anderson. Playing both baseball and
football for UW, Anderson took over
coaching jobs in both these sports for
UBC, bringing in new training ideas with
him.
•     Page Ninety-nine   EVERY SORORITY ON CAMPUS  SENT REPRESENTATIVES TO REGULAR MEETING OF PAN HELLANIC.
PAN HELLENIC GUIDED SORORITIES
Had Busy Year Under Able Leadership Of Beth McEachen
Pan-Hell guided the nine Greek letter Sororities through
an action-packed year which was initiated by three hectic
weeks of competitive rushing. The rushing season was
Beth McEachern was Efficient Chairman of Pan-Hellenic
completed with the minimum of mishaps due to the tactful guidance of President Beth McEachern and faculty
adviser Dean Dorothy Mawdsley. After the rushes had
been pledged and were beginning to adjust themselves to
their respective groups many Pan-Hell meetings were
devoted to an analysis of competitive rushing. New ideas
were gathered to be discussed at workshop in the Spring.
Apart from these activities Pan-Hell found time to sponsor
a Pep-meet and a tea dance. Sorority members also took
an active part in intra-mural sports and at the end of the
term representatives from each sorority gathered at Pan-
Hellanic Bridge Tournament.
After Christmas the Sororities busied themselves with
publicity campaigns for their Queen candidates, decorations, chorus practices and raffle ticket sales for the
annual Mardi Gras. The Mardi Gras was followed by a
Pan-Hell sponsored Paris fashion show for the Women's
Residence Fund. The renowned Song-fest was held in
March. The Pan-Hellenic year was rounded off and completed by workshop at which active and alumnae
.representatives were present to discuss rushing and to
amend the constitution.
Page One Hundred and Two     • JOAN BENNETT
NANCY FRASER
ROSEMARY HODGINS
MARGARET LOW-BEER
KAY MacDONALD
CAROL MacKINNON
EILEEN MOYLS
SHEILA WHEELER
LOIS WHIMSTER
ISOBEL  CAMERON
FELICITY POPE
NORAH McDERMOTT
NENAGH   RICHARDSON
JOAN TAYLOR
DELTA SIGMA PI
•     Page One Hundred and Three JANE BANFIELD
BARBARA BARNES
DELORES  BRANCA
BEVERLEY BRYSON
DOREEN  CAMPBELL
JOAN  CAMPBELL
DIANE CARR
ELSPETH CLYNE
SHIRLEY-ANN CRIST
VICTORIA DAVID
SHIRLEY FISHER
LOIS GILL
ANN GILMOUR
JUNE   GREMELL
BUNNY KENT
GERRY KEOGH
JUNE  LITTLE
DAPHNE   LIVINGSTONE
MARILYN LOUGH
LORNA LOVERIDGE
JOYCE LOWRY
SHIRLEY MacINNES
SHIRLEY-MAE  MacKENZIE
BETH BcEACHEN
MARILYN McLEAN
SHIRLEY McLEOD
DOT  MOSHER
ANNE MUNRO
EILEEN MURPHY
BERNICE PINSKY
SHEILA RAYMER
HARRIET REID
LILA   SCRATCHLEY
VICTORIA STEVENS
ROSEMARY STOKES
HUE THOMSON
LEONA WATTS
ALPHA DELTA PI
Page One Hundred and Four     • elizabeth abercrombie
anne abernethy
francis archibald
lyla butterworth
shirley coltman
pauline diamond
elaine drage
rae gardner
rosalie haakonsen
anita henderson
elaine hopkins
kathie howard
chris johnston
barbara king
lorene lundell
jessie McCarthy
DONNA McDERMID
KAY MacDONALD
BETTY McKENDRY
JOAN McKERACHER
MIKKI McLENNAN
VERNA MARTINSON
LORRAINE MAYOH
LUCILLE MEHMEL
GERRY NESBIT
MARY POZARICH
COLEEN REDDIN
BARBARA SCHRODT
SHIRLEY SELMAN
MITZI  SWITZER
SHEILA WOLSTENCROFT
DOROTHY WRIGHT
SHIRLEY   HOPKINS
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA
•     Page  One  Hundred  and  Five GWEN BRADLEY
ROSALIND BRADLEY
SHIRLEY DOYLE
CONNIE  DOUGAN
NANETTE DURHAM
ELEANOR HORNE
ROBERTA   HUDSON
MAUREEN KELLY
JOYCE KIEVILL
JOANNE KING
ADA KIRK
DORIS LARKIN
AGORITA LIASKAS
PHYLLIS McCALLUM
LESLIE MacLEAN
MARY MacLEAN
MURIEL MORRISON
DOREEN PARKER
ALMA PHILION
DOROTHEA POWELL
BERYL SHANKLAND
RUTH SIMONSEN
MARY JOY STOESS
JANET WATSON
CHRISTINE WINDEBANK
ALPHA OMICRON PHI
Page One Hundred and Six    • LOIS BENNETT
MARION  BENNETT
AVERIL BLATCHFORD
ELAINE BOON
MARGARET BRAIM
MAUREEN BRAY
PATSY BYRNE
NANCY CARTER
MARY CLOHESY
LEONA FRANCIS
AUDREY   GILBERT
LOUISE HAMMERSTROM
BARBARA HICKEY
PAMELA HODSON
CONSTANCE  HOLMES
BETTY HORTIN
PAT JAMES
ANITA JAY
JO JEAN JOHNSTON
SHIRLEY LEWIS
SANDRA MacCARTHY
SHELAGH MacDOUGALL
NONIE MARSDEN
JEAN MOWATT
FAYE NELSON
JOAN NICHOLLS
MARJORIE PAULS
LLEWELLYNE  PACK
MARTHA PHILPOTT
MERLE  PORTEOUS
BETTY REID
BETTY  ROBERTSON
JOYCE ROLSTON
BEVERLEY SCOTT
JEANNE SINCLAIR
ALDEANE SNYDER
SHIRLEY THOMPSON
MARILYN THORNE
SARA LEE TIDBALL
JEAN UMPLEBY
RUTH VILSTRUP
ETHEL WADDS
JOAN WILCOX
KAY WOODHEAD
MARGARET WRIGHT
_T*      ; M
<f7v>
ALPHA PHI
•     Page One Hundred and Seven SHIRLEY ANDERSON
MILLA ANDREW
JACQUELINE ANDREWS
DIANA ARNISON
JUNE BAIRD
CONNIE BISSETT
JUNE BROWN
JANET CLOTHIER
DOREEN COURSIER
DIANA  COX
MARY DENISIUT
GWEN EADES
ANNE EWING
NANCY FRASER
PAM FRASER
BETTY GEIGERICH
BEV GLASGOW
MARILYN GRANT
THEO GYLES
NAN HARDIE
PAT HENDERSON
JEAN HOPKINS
MONA HOPKINS
SUSAN JAMES
PAM JOHNSON
MARY LEITERMAN
MARGARET LOW-BEER
GRETCHEN MATHERS
ELEANOR MATHESON
MARGERY MILLICAN
TONI MORGAN
ESME MacDONALD
ANN McDOUGALL
JOAN McLEAN
ROBIN ORR
JOAN PEACOCK
ELVA PLANT
JANET RODGERS
BARBARA SEYMOUR
SHIRLEY SHIELDS
JO-ANNE  STRUTT
JOAN TAYLOR
JANE  THOMPSON
JANET WHITMORE
DONNA WILSON
DELTA GAMMA
Page One Hundred and Eight     e SHARON FOX
DOLORES GOULD
MARILYN   HOLLENBERG
NOREEN INGRAM
DOROTHY MORRIS
FAY NAGLER
THELMA SATINOVSKY
RUTH SILVERBERG
RUTH SNIDER
RITA  SWEID
ARLISS TOBAN
PHYLLIS TOBAN
LILLIAN WEINSTEIN
REVA ZABENSKY
DELTA PHI EPSILON
•     Page One Hundred and Nine JANE ATKINSON
BETTY BALL
DIANE BANCROFT
JOAN BARTON
GENEVIEVE  BONE
PEGGE BOULTER
JEAN COCHRANE
BETTL COTTERELL
SHIRLEY DEAN
BERYL   DENMAN
DIANE ELWORTHY
SHIRLEY ENGELLAND
DOREEN FETHERSONHAUGH
LOIS GUNN
BARBARA  HALL
JANIS INGLEDEW
PAT JOHNSON
JOYCE   LEITH
JAN   McCOLL
PAM  McCORKELL
MARGARET   MacCORKINDALE
MARGARET McCOSHAM
NANCL McDIARMID
BARNEY McDONALD
peggy McGregor
WILLA MacKINNON
IRENE  MARCHESE
BEVERLEY MARTIN
SHIRLEY MALCOLMSON
SHIRLEY MATTHEWS
CAROL  MURRAY
DOROTHY O'BRIEN
ELIZABETH RIDLEY
JOAN  RITCHIE
NANCY  RUSSELL
NINI   SCOTT
CLAIRE  SHANAHAN
MARJORIE SHARP
MARGARET STEWART
CONSTANCE THOMPSON
JEAN TOMSETT
NANCY WELLS
BETTY WILSON
JOAN HAMILTON
MARG.   PARKINSON
GAMMA PHI BETA
Page  One Hundred and Ten     e MOLLY ARNESEN
BERYL BLANDY
BARBARA COX
DIANNE COX
ADELE GOULT
JACKIE  HARTT
PAULINE LEE
JEAN  LONG
KATHERINE MURPHY
AILSA McEACHRAN
JOAN McEACHRAN
PHYLLIS McINTOSH
MARIGOLD MACKENZIE
JANICE OLSEN
MARY RITTICH
SHEILA STEWART
SHEILA WEIR
LOIS WHIMSTER
GLYN YEOMANS
EILEEN YOXALL
BETTY CARR
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
•     Page One Hundred and Eleven SHIRLEY ABBOTT
BARBARA BLACK
SHEILA BLOIS
BARBARA-ANN BROWN
DOREEN CLARKE
VERITY COMLEY-COMBE
JACQUELINE DAVIES
BEVERLEY DIXON
MARY duVERNET
DELSA ELLIOT
SHIRLEY FINCH
GRACE FLAVELLE
JOAN FRASER
ATHALIE FRASIER
MARGARET  FRITH
ELIZABETH GRANT
MAUREEN GUILD
ELLANOR HALL
BETTE HEARD
SALLY HEARD
SHIRLEY HERN
JEAN HODGSON
SHELAGH JAMES
BERNICE LAIRD
MARION LISTER
ROSEMARY McGLASHAN
MARY MESSENGER
DIANA MILSOM
GERRY MITCHELL
DIANE NEWCOMBE
SHARY   PITTS
ALICE POP
KATIE POP
HELEN ROBINSON
JOAN SCOBY
MARNEY SICK
BEVERLEY SMITH
BEVERLEY URQUHART
CAROLYN WRIGHT
A OTaffifffiffHn_Sr__i
KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA
Page One Hundred and Twelve REPRESENTATIVES  FROM  FRATERNITIES  ON  CAMPUS  GATHERED  IN  BROCK   HAU.   EVERY   TUESDAY   TO   DISCUSS   GREEK   ACTIVITIES
IFC GOVERNED UBC FRATERNITIES
IF C Set Rules for Groups During Rush Weeks
Chairman of Inter-Fraternity Council was Dave Hinds
The Interfraternity Council is made up of representatives of all fraternities on the University of British
Columbia campus. Meetings are held frequently, and
problems common to fraternities in general are brought
up and discussed. Rules concerning rushing, pledging and
general fraternity conduct are set up and enforced by the
council.
Each year rushing and pledging activities during
registration and orientation are supervised by the council,
and an etffort is made to aid the new students in every
way possible.
For the most part, the fraternities at the University of
British Columbia govern themselves through the Interfraternity Council.
•     Page One  Hundred and Thirteen SIGMA TAU CHI
JERRY   MacDONALD
DON LANSKAIL
JIM ARGUE
JIM BANHAM
DOUGIE REID
HILARY WOTHERSPOON
GRANT LIVINGSTONE
GORDON BAUM
JIM SUTHERLAND
WALT  EWING
PHIL  BROCKING
BEN McCONNELL
BOB CURRIE
HERB ADAMS
BILL ANSTIS
JACK MAGUIRE
ERNIE PERRAULT
TERRY LYNCH
HUGH LEGG
lid!
TOM   CLARK
BARRY CLEMENTS
LEE CORBETT
JACK DAWSON
OWEN DOLAN
ART ERICKSON
HUGH  EVANS
WARREN FERGUSON
EUGENE FREDERICK
ALISTAIR  GALBRAITH
VAUGHN GRAMMS
DONALD GRAY
WILLIAM GREENWOOD
GEORGE GREGORY
BILL HALCROW
COLIN LEE
DAVID LUNN
JOHN MacDONALD
IAN MacKENZIE
ALLAN MILNER
TED MOIR
RODGER NELSON
DOUGLAS NICHOLS
WILLIAM SMITH
KENNETH TERRISS
GEORGE VAN  DOREN
GRAHAM WRIGHT
BEN WYATT
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON
Page One Hundred and Fourteen     • TOM  BARKER
NORMAN BARR
DARG BELL-IRVING
PETER BENTLEY
RON BOULTER
TONY BULL
HOWARD ECKMAN
DENNIS  EWING
MIKE FERRIE
KENNETH FIELD
DICK   GRANGER
BILL HILBORN
DICK JOHNSON
RON KELLY
BILL KING
PHILIP MARTIN
DAVE MELVIN
HERB MILLHAM
JOHN MURRAY
BRIAN  McLOUGHLIN
ROGER McLORG
TONY McLORG
LAWRENCE  ORTENGREN
JOHN  PANTON
WALTER  PUMFREY
BOB RIDLEY
ALAN ROBINSON
MIKE ROBSON
KEN ROSENBERG
BILL SELLENS
DAVE SMITH
BILL SOLLOWAY
BOB STOVALL
BARRY TAYLOR
PAT  THORSTEINSSON
BOB  THURSTON
JACK TURNER
PETER WILKINSON
ALPHA DELTA PHI
•     Page One Hundred and Fifteen RON ALTREE
HARRY A'ICHISON
TOM BAIRD
EDDIE BERGQUIST
ARNOLD BOOTH
HAL BOOTH
BILL BROWNLEE
BILL CRAWFORD
JIM DAVIES
BOB FALCONER
LEN FRANSEN
JOE  FOSTER
PHILIP FEE
BOB GILCHRIST
HAROLD GREGG
BOB HACKWOOD
ALUIN IMDRISON
DOUGLAS  McDONALD
VERN  McDONALD
CY McGUIRE
DAVID McNAIR
WILLIAM MIKKILA
ALFRED MUNNS
JAMES PATTISON
JACK  POTTER
IAN PYPER
FRANK PEARSON
JAMES REDDON
GORDON SCOTT
DICK SENDALL
HAL STANLEY
DONALD TRUESDELL
NEIL VIGAR
RAY WESTWAY
ALPHA TAU OMEGA
Page One Hundred and Sixteen BILL ATKINSON
RUSS LATHAM
DOUG BELL
JACK BURCH
JIM CLARK
CROSBY COLLINS
JOHN BANCROFT
GEORGE CUMMING
BOB DUNLOP
ROD ENGLISH
GERALD FARRY
IVAN FELTHAM
DAVE FLETCHER
DOUG FRANKLIN
DON  GARDNER
MARTIN  GRANGER
GILBERT GRAY
ED HARDY
JOHN HOLDSWORTH
TIM HOLLICK-KENYON
DICK HUBBARD
DON HUDSON
MAL HUGHES
PAUL JAFFARY
C. A.  D. JOHNSON
DON JOHNSTON
PETER KETCHEN
OLAF KRINGHAUG
MICHAEL  LePAGE
JACK MILLS
GENE MacDONALD
DEAN MacGILLIVRAY
FRANK McGINLEY
PETER McMARTIN
DOUG MILNE
DICK PENN
DAVE REDDIN
HUGH ROSS
JOCK ROSS
DEL SHARPE
DOUGLAS SHERLOCK
PETER SIEVENPIPER
JOHN SOUTHCOTT
CHUCK TIERS
PATRICK  TAYLOR
ALEX WEBSTER
HARRY WEBSTER
DENNIS WHITE
KEN WILLIAMS
NORMAN  WATT
BETA THETA PI
•     Page  One Hundred and Seventeen EVAN ABERCROMBIE
EARL BAMFORD
LES BROOKS
NORMAN BROWN
DICK CARSON
ART CHRISTENSEN
BOB  CHRISTOPHER
DONALD FLEETHAM
GORDON FLETCHER
JAMES GIBSON
BILL HAGGERT
RONALD HAWKES
DAVID HINDS
KENNETH  HODGERT
BYRON JOHNSON
HELMER JOSEPHSON
DAVID   KER
PETER  KITCHEN
DAVID LAIDMAN
BERT LEGGETT
BOB LINDSAY
JOHN LITTLE
BOB  LITTLE
PETER LUZSTIG
RONALD MILLIKIN
PETER   MILLWARD
REID   MITCHELL
DONALD MOIR
JOHN MacGOWAN
BRICE MacDOUGALL
BILL  MacFARLANE
DOUGLAS PARKIN
GEORGE PLANT
DENIS  PRATT
HAROLD  RUCK
JAMES RUSSELL
JOHN STANGROOM
JOHN WALLINGER
DELTA UPSILON
Page  One Hundred  and  Eighteen GRANT AINSCOUGH
BRUCE  ARNESEN
DICK ATKEY
BILL BAIRD
WALLY BERGMAN
DON CHRISTIE
DAPID COLLINS
HOWIE DAY
RUSS DIXON
FRED DURHAM
JACK  EDWARDS
GORDON HARRISON
BOB   HOWARD
BOB   JAMES
RON JENKINS
DON MUNRO
ANGUS  MacDONALD
ALEX   MacDONALD
JIM MacDONALD
BRUCE McPHEE
JOE TABBERNOR
GERRY TAYLOR
KEN TOMLINSON
DAVE TOMETTT
ANDREW  SZASZ
PHI KAPPA PI
•     Page One Hundred and Nineteen CLIFFORD ADKINS
DAVID ANFIELD
GILBERT BANCROFT
WILLIAM BELL
H.  A.  BLAKLEY
MIKE FRASER
LIONEL  GAUER
CLIFF GLOVER
DON GLOVER
IVAN HANSEN
LARRY HILLMAN
FRANK KELLY
M. W.  KIRKWOOD
LLOYD LEEMING
HUGH MacARTHUR
GORDON McCONKEY
DAVE   McFARLANE
SCOTTIE McKILLOP
BUD McLEOD
j. h. McMillan
KAPPA SIGMA
'/■«..■ V
T
Page  One Hundred and Twenty     • DOUG McPHERSON
WILLIAM MARKUM
DON MILLY
FRANK  MOORE
ROBERT NEELIN
FRED NESBITT
HOWARD NIXON
GEORGE OWEN
KEN PARSONS
WILFRED PLUMB
DAVE SHARP
KEN SINCLAIR
ROSS STANWAY
CECIL TAYLOR
R.  B. THOMSON
JACK VANCE
DENNIS WOTHERSPOON
HILARY WOTHERSPOON
ARTHUR WRIGHT
KAPPA SIGMA
•     Page  One Hundred and Twenty-one GLEN FELL
PETER FISHER
J. GILBERT
GEORGE JONES
LEO KELEKIS
MALCOLM MEEK
R. H. MOORE
P. P. OLLEY
H. B. PRETTY
J. J. TABBERNOR
G. G. WARD
PHI KAPPA SIGMA
Page One Hundred and Twenty-two     • BRIAN JACKSON
PHIL  SHIER
BOB SELKIRK
JACK AMM
BILL AMM
PETER deVOOGHT
IAN MACKENZIE
DON McCOLL
TONY McCROSSAN
JIM O'BRIEN
HUD SCOTT
GIL SMITH
RON BRAY
STU ST. CLAIR
AL  COX
KEN DEAN
PETE FORWARD
ALISTAIR GRAY
ARNIE HOUGHLAND
DOUG MILLER
JOHN MORGAN
DOUG BAJUS
LOU MANNING
PETER BURNET
DES EADIE
IAN DROST
DON HARRIS
BRUCE MacDONALD
WALT MacDONALD
DONN MORGAN
DICK NELSON
ANDY PULOS
LEE PULOS
GORDIE SHRUM
DICK STEVENS
U____fl
A
$.r.A.
PHI GAMMA DELTA
Page One  Hundred and Twenty-three BOB ANNABLE
JOHN  BANKS
RICHARD BURKE
TERRY CARSON
PHILIP COOK
ROWAN  COTTON
BILL COWAN
RALPH DIAMOND
BARRY DOWNS
HARRY DOWNS
DON ELWORTHY
ROD FILER
DON FEARNSIDE
ALF GEREIN
JIM  GILLEY
JOHN A. GRAY
DICKSON GRADY
RON GUNN
JIM  HENDRY
LEIGH HODGSON
DON HOPKINS
BOB JACKSON
BOB JACKES
COLIN JENSEN
EVAN  JONES
WILLIAM KENNEDY
GORDON YOUNG
PHI DELTA THETA
Page  One Hundred and Twenty-four     • AL KNUDSEN
DICK LAWRENCE
DAVID LECKIE
GORDON LYALL
BOB  McCREERY
HIME McLENNAN
BRUCE McKAY
FRED McKENZIE
AL MacMILLAN
TOMMY MORRISON
GEORGE O'BRIEN
DAVID  OSTROSSER
DICK OSTROSSER
DAVID OWEN
DON PAINE
KERRY PARK
ART PHILLIPS
JOHN PLOYART
MEL D. RICHARDS
JOHN ROBERTS
BOB RUSH
RUSS SUTHERLAND
ERIC VAN ALLEN
PETER WALKER
WILLIAM WALKER
JOHN   WHITBREAD
FRANK WILLIS
BILL MANSON
HARRY CARTER
DREW McTAGGART
PHI DELTA THETA
e     Page  One  Hundred and Twenty-five CAMERON AIRD
BILL ANSTIS
GEORGE BEATTIE
DEAN BEAUBIER
GEORGE BLYTHE
GORDON BOWMAN
JACK BRADLEY
WILLIAM BUHLER
MEL CRUICKSHANKS
JOHN DRINNAN
WALTER EWING
HENRY GALE
DICK GRIMETT
LES HEMPSALL
RENIE HOLLETT
DAVID HUMMELL
LYLE JOHNSON
.ANDY KLIMOVITCH
JIM  MacINNES
JOE   NAYLOR
MARSHALL SMITH
JOAN TENNANT
HAL THOMPSON
TED TRITES
KEITH TURNBULL
CHARLIE WALKER
BILL WOOD
PSI UPSILON
Poge  One Hundred and  Twenty-six     • RICHARD ARCHAMBAULT
BRUCE ARLIDGE
WALLY  BECK
PAUL BURNS
HUGH CAMERON
ED   DANNER
LOUIS DILWORTH
ROY  DONALDSON
FRED  ENGLISH
FRED FRENCH
RAY FROST
BERT GORDON
KEVIN GORGES
JIM  GRANT
TOMMY GRAY
REX HAYES
EDWARD HIRD
DON   HOFFMAN
PETER MANSON
C. F. MURPHY
CHARLES READY
GENE  SMITH
GERRY SULLIVAN
JIM TERRIS
FRANK  THOMPSON
GORDON  UMBACH
^     Cl
SIGMA CHI
Page One Hundred and Twenty-seven H. F. R.  ADAMS
J.   BEAN-
ERIC COWIE
LARRY HUGHES
M.  J.   JONES
NORMAN  KOLBEINS
JIM LYDER
HUGH MacKAY
ROBERT MILLS
K. C. SMITH
PETER SOUTHWELL
JIM STEWART
WM. TUFF
JIM  WARR
FRASER WIGGINS
NEIL WILLIAMS
ANDY ANDERSON
C. J.  AUSTROM
DAVID BELL
RICHARD BISHOP
EDWARD BOUDIER
RAY CHRISTOPHERSON
RAY HERRON
DON HOSKINS
MICKY JONES
GORDON MacKENZIE
NORMAN MAY
ALVIN NEMETZ
RAY NORDLUND
DOUG POLONIA
BILL VAN DER GRACHT
DANNY WALLACE
SIGMA PHI DELTA
Page  One  Hundred and Twenty-eight     • B. BAILE
W. J. BAILLEY
I.  F.  BARNET
G.  BECK
R. B. BIRD
R.   K.   BLACKSTAD
G.  CAMERON
G. E. DODMAN
F. R. DAWSON
U. A. H. EDELMALN-NELSON
R.  D.   FEARN
A. E. FONSECA
D.  GARSFORD
A.   GILLON
W.   F.   HARRISON
L. G. T. HENLEY
A. B. HOOD
N. HOOD
D. L. JENKINS
E. P. JOHNSON
K.  E. KERR
A.   A.  KNIGHT
D.  I.  KNIGHT
P. E. LOUKES
D.  R.   McKAY
N. W. R. MacLEOD
J. G. MOIR
J.  J.  MORRISON
C. V. S. MYROS
H. R. RENDELL
D. R. SHEPPARD
W. SHERWOOD
N. C. STEACY
P.  F.  STONIER
H.  URQUART
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
•     Poge One Hundred and Twenty-nine NORMAN ARCHEK
ALEC BECKER
MERWIN CHERCOVER
ISADORE DIAMOND
CHARLES FLADER
SYDNEY GLADSTONE
ALLAN GOLDSMITH
BALFOUR GUREVICH
MORLEY KOFFMAN
DAVID LAVEN
HAROLD LENNETT
GERALD LEVEY
ROBERT LIVERANT
WILLIAM MOSCOVITZ
ZETA BETA TAH
Page One Hundred and Thirty    • DICK S. BATTERSHILL
HARRY E. BELL
JOHN BIGGIN
HALL A. BRODIE
ROBERT G. BRODIE
ROBERT   CAVE-BROWN-CAVE
A. B. CARLSON
DON J. CORBETT
GEORGE B. DAVIES
DOUGLAS A. DEWAR
COLIN G. EVANS
RAY M. FABRI
C. "JOCK" FERRIE
C. S. FLEMING
JOHN M. GRAHAM
JOHN P. GRAHAM
JAMES S. HILL
JACK HARRIS
ROD HUTCHESON
BRUCE A. LEE
DOUGLAS J. McCALLUM
KENNETH A. McCALLUM
BARRY E. McDOUGALL
NEIL McFADYEN
RICHARD C. MARTIN
RALPH A. MARTINSON
ALEX T. MICHAS
JOHN M. MICHAS
NEIL MONROE
BLAIR  R. B.  PATERSON
HUGH G. PURVIS
J. W. PETE ROGERS
PETER C. G. RICHARDS
JOHN W. SEDDON
WILLIAM  F.   SPARLING
WILLIAM E. STORMONT
DAVID G. SWEET
DONALD J. URQUHART
DAVID J. WRIGHT
DOUGLAS A. WRIGHT
NORMAN  M.  YOUNG
ZETA PSI
•     Page One Hundred and Thirty-one   ARTS
ABBOTT, S. E.
ADAMS,  A.
ADAMS. H.
ALEXANDER, D. W.
ALEXANDER, H.
ALLAN, J. N.
ALLAN, J. R.
ANDERSON, D.  O.
ARCHBOLD, G.
ARLIDGE, B.
ARTHUR, G. H.
ATKINSON, D.
AUTERSON, M.
BADGER, S.
BAGUS, D.
BAILEY, D. F.
BAKER, DIANE
BAKER, J. L.
BAKKEN, A. M.
BALDWIN, G.
BANFORD, J. R.
BANKS, G. N.
BARRAUD, M.
BARRINGTON, N. M.
BARR, M.
BARTON, H.
BEARSiTO, H. D.
BECKTON, G.
BEEK, G.
BELL, DOUGLAS  N.
BELL, D. R. S.
BENHAM, B.
BERGKLINT, L.  R.
BERRY, H. A.
BERRY, M. E.
BINGHAM, M. M.
BIRD, E. A.
BLANDY, B. A.
BLAKE, W. G.
BLANEY, YORK
BLOOM, F.
BOGGIE, AL
BOLTON, J. B.
BONGIE, L. L.
BONNEY', I. D.
BOSHER, J. B.
ROTTING, W.
BOWEN, EARLE
BOYD, F. C.
BRACEWELL, R. G.
BROWN, B.
BROWN, C.
BROWN, G.
BREEN, J. K.
BROWN-JOHN, SYDNEY
BROWN, R. M.
BROOKS, L. C.
BRYANT, D.
BUCHANAN, JOYCE'
BURNETT, G. W.
Page One Hundred and Thirty-four    • ARTS
BURNS, P.
BYRNE, G. R. H.
CAMPBELL, D. A.
CASTILLOU, J.
CAMPBELL, JOAN
CAMPBELL, J. M.
CAMPBELL, R. L.
CARLSON, A. B.
CARR, J. W.
CHARTER, P.
CHEMAGO, L. J.
CHILTON, R. B.
CHRISTENSEN, R. M.
CLARK* D. M.
CLARKE, D.
CLERIHUE, MURIEL
CLYNE,  ELSPETH
COCK, ELEANOR
COGGIN, G. H.
COLLEY, M. E,
COLLINS, GEORGE
COLLINS,  J.  J.
COLLINS, M.
CORNISH, N. C.
COULTER, MRS. T.
COX, ALBERT
CRABB, MARG.
CRAIG,  J.
CREESE, A. S.
CRERAR, M. L.
CRIST, S.
CRUKSHANKS, J.
CUE, A. G.
CUMMING, G. S.
CURRY, JEAN
DELLAMORE, V.
DALTON, JAMES
DAY, H. W.
DELANE, JOYCE
DE MARCUS, EARL C.
DEMERSE, ETTA
DENHOLM, J. J.
DESBRISAY, G. R.
DESPREZ, R. L.
DEVESON, J. M.
DEVITO, W. P.
DIAMOND, P.
DILWORTH, L.
DISBROW, H. L.
DOBSON, M.
DONALDSON, R. G.
DOUGAN, CONSTANCE
DOWDING, R. W.
DOYLE, ALEX.
DRINNAN, R.
DUDLEY, J. H.
DUKE, D.
DUNCAN, C. R.
DUNCAN, W. G.
DUNN, C. E.
•     Page One Hundred and Thirty-five ARTS
•       *
DUPONT,  MARJORIE
ECKFORD, G. R.
EISENSTEIN, B.
ELLIS, J. A. N.
ELLISON, SHIRLEY
ERTLE, DORIS
EVANS, W.
EWING,  WALTER
FAULKNER,   J.   R.
FEDYK, J. J.
FERGUSON, C. W.
FERNEYHOUGH, B.
FETHERSTONHAUGH, DOREEN
FLADER, S.
FLEETHAM, DONALD
FRAMPTON, W. R.
FRASER, N.
FRASER, PAMELA
FRAZIER, A.  B.  M.
FREDENBURGH
FRIESON, J.  P.
FRIESON, J. R.
FREESE, D.
FRY, PAT
FOFONOFF, N. P.
FOGARTY, P. J.
FORSYTH, N.
FOSTER, J.
FOX, SHARON
FRANCIS,  LEONA
FRASER, M. A. M.
GALBREITH, S. S.
GALE,  H.  H.
GENONG, SHIRLEY
GARDNER, RAE
GEARY, G. W.
GELL, G. W.
GERAIN,  ALFRED
GIBSON, J. N.
GILBERT, W. H.
GILMOUR, ANN
GLOVER, J. B.
GONNASON, J.
GOULT, A. H. E.
GOW,   SHEILA
GRAHAM, JOHN
GRAHAM, R. W.
GRANT, D.
GRANT, E.
GRANT, W. R.
GRAY, GILBERT C.
GRAY, R.
GREMMELL, J.
GREMMETT, J.
GRIFFEN, A. J.-
GRIMMETT, R.  H.
GUEST, D. T.
HAAKONSON, ROSALIE
HAAR,  S.  L.
HACK, H. W.
Page One Hundred and Thirty-six     • ARTS
HALCROW, W. T.
HALDANE, J.
HAMILTON, G. C.
HAMILTON, J. D.
HANSEN, E.
HARPER, LOUISE
HARRISON, MARGARET
HARVEY, A. R.
HARVEY, M.
HASKINS, D. L.
HASTINGS,   MARGARET
HATFIELD, D. A.
HAUGOM, H.
HAWTHORN, J. W.
HAYWARD, R.  I.
HENDERSON, A.
HENNESSEY, R. G.
HENNIG, O. W.
HENRY, L.
HENSON,  W.   S.
HERBERT, E. V.
HERBERT, F. H.
HESTER, K. S.
HEWSON, R. T.
HAYDON, GORD.
HEYWOOD, W.
HIGGENS, JOHN,
HIGGENS, R. M.
HILL, IRIS
HOLMES, M. P.
HOPGOOD,  D.
HOPKINS, J.
HORNE, E.
HOWARD, D. R.
HUGHES,  R. J.
HUGHSON, A. A.
HYDE, A. W.
IBBOTT, J. W.
IMAYOSKI, K.
IRWIN, A. A.
IRWIN, H. G.
JACKLIN, L.
JACKSON, G. W.
JANTZ, O.
JOHNSON, D. P.
JOHNSTON, A.  F.
JOHNSTON, C.
JOHNSTON, D. R.
JOKANOVICK, ROBERT
JOKISCH, A. W.
JONES, D. E.
JONES, G. J.
JONES, M. J.
JORDAN,  B.
JORGENSON, EARL
JOYNER, G. N.
KELLER, D.
KELLY, FRANK D.
KELSBERG, ROY
KENNEDY, MRS. P. A.
4/' E 4_»_flffg7 _P§ «3
y_fcj____ ____*_&__
•     Page  One Hundred and Thirty-seven ARTS
_____.__.J__
_ea__t__k
KER, DAVID
KILBY, T. A.
KING,  H.  M.
KINGWELL, K. G.
KIRKER, R. J.
KIRKWOOD, M. W.
KLIMOVICH, A.
KNIGHT, GEORGE
KNOWLES,   R.
KNUDSON, A.  M.
KOPE, J. F.
KRINGHALIG,  O.
LAMBERT,  K.  G.
LAURITSON,  MILDRED
LAVEN, B. M.
LAW, C. E.
LEASK, D. C.
LEE, P. T.
LEITERMAN, M.
LEITH, JOYCE
LEVEY, G.  S.
LIASKAS, M. A.
LIESKE, E.
LIFTMAN, T. Y.
LIGGINS, P. M.
LINERANT,  ROBERT
LOISELLE, RITA
LOTZKAR, J.
LOVERIDGE, LORNA
LOW-BEER, M.
LOWIE, B.
MacCARTHY, SANDRA
MacDONALD, A. G.
MacDONALD, FRANCES
MACDONALD,  JERRY
MacDONALD,   J.   R.
MacDONALD,  KAY
MacDOUGAL, H. J. B.
MacKINNON, WILLA  C.
MacLEAN, J. A.
MacLEOD, BETTY
McALPINE, J.  D.
McCALLUM, K. K.
McCANN, T. B.
McCOLL, D. F.
McCREERY, P.
McCREERY, R. G.
McEACHEN, BETH
McFAYDEN, W. N.
McCUIRE, F.
McKAY, BARBARA
McKEE,   D.   S.
McKEOWN, G. G.
McLEAN, L. G.
McLEAN, W.
McLENNAN, M. E.
McLENNAN, N. H.
McMURRAY, R. F.
McNAMARA, J. M.
McNEIL, J. L.
Page One Hundred and Thirty-eight     • .   .   ARTS
McNICHOLAS, JOYCE
McPHERSON, E. M.
McPHERSON, V. A.
McQUAT, GORDON
MAHAFFY, E. F.
MALAMOS,   ELAINE
MANNING,  W.  L.
MANNING, SHIRLEY
MARCOTTE, R. O.
MARSHALL, C. J.
MARSHALL, E.
MARTIN, P. W.
MARTINSON, V.
MAYOH, L.
MAYRS,  J.  C.
MERRITT, C. N.
MICHAS, A. T.
MILLER, C. F.
MILLER, W. F.
MILSOM, DIANA
MINNIS, J.
MINTAK, J.
MITCHELL, J. J.
MITCHELL, T.
MORRISON, K. J.
MORRISON,  M.
MORRISON, M. M.
MORRISON, R.
MORTON,  S.
MOWATT, JEAN
MOYLS,  E.
MUNRO,  KAY
MURAY, R. I.
MURNANE, C. J.
MURPHY, T.
MOSCOUITZ, W.
MOSLIN, R. S.
NAGLER,   F.   E.
NAGY, J.
NASH, E. J.
NASTICH, M.
NEILL, T. O.
NELSON, F.
NICHOLS, J.
NIKLEVA, S.
NIXON, N.
OLDAKER, V. G.
OLSEN,   D.   H.
O'NEILL, W. E.
ORR, R. J.
PALIVSKY, R.
PARKER,  NOEL
PARKINSON, R.
PAULS, H.
PAUL, A. T.
PEARSON, VERA
PED, JOHN
PEEBLES, R.
PERRET, N.
PETERS, M.
•    Page One Hundred and Thirty-nine ARTS
4J_j_i_£itfU9
PETRIE,  E.  L.
PHARE,   R.
PHILPOTT, M.
PIERCE, M.
PIGGOT, I.
POCOCK, L. R.
FOLSON, F. V.
PONTIFEX,   ALEX.   H.
POOLEY, R. E.
POSTUK, P.
PRATT, L. A.
PRESTON, L. C.
PRIDE, A. H.
PRINCE, L.
PURDfE, J. J.
PURVIS, H.
PYKE, R. A.
QUESNEL, EARL A.
RAGG, H. I. G.
RASHLEIGH, E. I.
READY, C. B.
REID, H. E. V.
REID,   J.   J.
REID, R. H.
RICH, J. B.
RICHARDS,   ESME
RICHARDS, S. P.
RITCEY, A. G.
ROBERTSON, A.
ROBERTSON, B. L.
ROBERTSON, C.
ROBERTSON, D. S.
ROBINSON,  A.  W.
RODD, R. S.
ROEDDE, W. A.
ROSKELLEY, I.
ROSS, H. F.
ROTHSTEIN, ROSALIE
ROUTLEDGE, D.
ROY, R. H.
RUSSELL, L. W.
RUSSELL, N.
RYAN, S. M.
RYDER, DOROTHY
RYE, R. D. E.
SEMANN, E.
SAWATSKY,  P.
SCOTT, BEVERLY,
SCOTT, J. A.
SCOTT, N.
SCHROEDER, T. E.
SEATON, W. D.
SEDDON, J. W.
SEGEE, J.
SEMAIL, G. C. E.
SEYMOUR, B. A.
SHALLARD, B.
SHARP, D.
SHARP, D. E.
SHAVER, M.
Page  One Hundred and Forty     • .   .   .   ARTS
SHOBE, R. A.
SHORE, M.
SHULxMAN, L.
SHUMKA, E. V.
SHLISTER,  L.
SIMPSON, R.
SIMMONSON, M:
SINCLAIR, ENID
SKALING, T. R.
SKENE, O.
SUGDEN, L. G.
SLIPPER, W.  G.
SMITH, A.  R.
SMITH, B. A.
SMITH, D. M.
SMITH, K. F.
SMITH, M. E.
SNIDER, R.
SMITH,  R.  B.
SOPP, E. J.
SOWERBY, A.
SPEED, R.
STEWART, DOREEN
STEINER, R.
STEUART, V. J.
STEWART, K. A.
STOREY, L. A.
STOUT, J. D.
STOWELL, C. H.
STUART, MARY
SYMCHURCH, S. P.
SYSON, D.
TABATA, S.
TAYLOR, C. R.
TAYLOR, E. G.
TAYLOR, G.
TAYLOR, J. V.
TENCH, S. G.
THOMPSON, J. W.
THOMPSON,  HUE, H.
THOMSON, R. B.
THORNTON, R. C. G.
TOBAN, A.
TOBAN, P.
TORRANCE, W. R. L.
TOYNBEE, R. M.
TREWIN, H. E.
TRITES, A. E.
TUDDENHAM, S. F.
UMPLEBY, J.
VILSTRUP,  RUTH
VOLKOVICH, J.
WADDS, ETHEL
WALDMAN,   SHIRLEY
WALMSLEY, R. P.
WALSH,  RICHARD  J.
WARDILL,  S.  H.
WATT, F. W.
WATT, J. E.
WATTS, LEONA
•     Page  One Hundred and Forty-one ARTS   .   .   .
WEICKER, D. W.
WEST, G. A.
WHIMSTER, L. A.
WHITHAM, J. M.
WHITMORE, J. M.
WHYLTE, D.
WICK, L. B.
WILCOX,  J.
WILLIAMS,   M.   G.
WILLS, D.
WILSON,   H.   T.
WILSON, L. N.
WINDEBANK, C.
WINTER, M.
WOODHEAD, K.
WOODMAN,  R.
WOODS,  J.  T.
WOOLLAM, A.
WOSTCATT, C. A.
WOTHERSPOON, A. H.  B.
WRAY, E.
WRIGHT,  GORDON
Grad.  Studies
COPES, E.
Ray Parkinson, Jerry Macdonald, Margaret Low-Beer,   and  Marshall Bray on the  University Round Table.
Page One Hundred and Forty-two     • .   COMMERCE
ARMSTRONG, H.
ARMSTRONG, R.
BAILEY, D.
BARKER, E.
BATH, W.
BEATON, W.
BEATTIE, G.
BECKER, A.
BLAKLEY, H.
BORDEN, S.
BRITTON, J.
BROOKER,  G.
BROWER, S.
BROWN, D.
BROWN, W.
BUBRICK,  J.
CAMPBELL, D.
CAVIN, B.
CHADWICK, C.
CHISHOLM,   L.
CLARK, P
COCHRANE,  H.
COLLINS,   C.
COOMBER, H.
D'ANDREA, O.
DAWSON,   J.
DEAN, B.
DEGUEFFE,  T.
DIAMOND, R.
DORAN, J.
DRAPER, W.
DUCHARME, L.
DUNCAN,  I.
EVANS,  E.
EVANS, R.
FEARN, R.
GIBSON,   H.
GILBERT, J.
GLASS, J.
GORDON, W.
GROOM, D.
HAY,  G
HENNIGER, E.
HOLLAND, D.
HOLLETT, R.
HORWELL, R.
JEFFERSON, A.
JOHNSON, J.
KENEDY, J.
KING, S.
LAVERY,  W.
LEASK, H.
LINNINGTON, G.
LITTLE, R.
LOWE, E.
MacCALLUM, G.
MacDONALD,  L.
MacKINNON, J.
MacKILLOP, L.
MacLEOD, L.
•     Page One Hundred and Forty-three COMMERCE.
MacPHERSON, D.
McHUGH, B.
McINNES, G.
McQUEEN,   W.
McVEAN,  B.
MAGUIRE, J.
MARTIN, A.
MERIDETH, H.
MINTY, N.
MITCHELL, N.
MITCHELL, W.
MORLOOK, W.
MORRISON, M.
MYERS, D.
NICHOLSON,  H.
NOBLE, K.
PALMER, G.
PATE,  K.
PEMA,  C.
PHILLIPS, J.
PORTER, A.
PRITCHARD, G.
RAMSEY,  D.
RAWSTON, J.
ROOT, L.
SANFORD, T.
SANTO, P.
SEXSMITH, W.
SEYMOUR, G.
SHANNON, W.
SHERWOOD, G.
SKODE, B.
SPOND, J.
SPROULE,  W.
STEWART, D.
STEWART, J.
THRING, C.
THOMAS, E.
TINGLEY,   R.
TISDALE, A.
TODD, I.
VANE, R.
VARILA, M.
WALL, E.
WIDMEYER,  R.
WILSON, R.
WILSON,  W.
WOODLEY,  D.
WOZNEY, Z.
WRIGHT,' J.
WRIGHT, K.
WRIGHT, M.
Page  One Hundred and Forty-four     • .   .   .   ENGINEERING
ABRAHAMSON,   M.
ADAMS, H.
ADRIAN, W.
ALLAN, C.
ARMSTRONG, G.
AYRE, A.
BARRET, J.
BELL, T.
BELROSE, J.
BENNET, E.
BENNETT, F.
BERNON, M.
BLACKLOCK, G.
BREWER, P.
BLOTT; W.
BOXALL,  F.
BRADWELL, M.
BRIGHTWELL, S.
BROWN, W.
BROWN, M.
BURNELL, S.
BURNS, B.
.   CADEL, S.
CAMERON,  D.
CHATWIN, D.
CODRINGTON, W.
COLLINS,  K.
COOMES, G.
COWIE,   E.
CROUSER, E.
CUDDIFORD,  R.
CUTHBERT, R.
DALE, A.
DENNIS, L.
DOUGLAS, D.
DUECKMAN, J.
DUNCAN, E.
ELSON, J.
END, F.
FAIRBURN,   G.
FORSTER-COULL,   J.
FOSTER, W.
FRANK,  R.
FROUD,  J.
GREENWOOD, E.
HAGGERT, W.
HALL, W.
HARVEY, N.
HASTINGS, M.
HASTINGS, N.
HATTON, W.
HIRD,  E.
HOLTBY, L.
HORNER, A.
HUTCHESON, J.
JAMISON,  A.
JOHNSTON, W.
KAY, H.
KOLBEINS, E.
___*__.__
o     Page  One  Hundred and Forty-five ENGINEERING
KIRKPATRICK, L.
LAMBERT, D.
LINDEN, R.
LUCK,  A.
LYDER,   J.
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McINTYRE, D.
McKINLEY, D.
MANUEL, E.
MANZER, D.
MATHER, H.
METCALF, R.
MORLEY, W.
MULLEN, F.
NEWTON,  W.
OTTE, F,
PARSONS, K.
PYNE, M.
REDPATH, D.
ROSS, J.
RUDDELL, R.
RYWAK, J.
SINCLAIR,  K.
SLADE, A.
SMITH,   F.
SMITH, I.
SMITH, W.
STALKER, R.
STEELE, J.
STEWART, J.
STONEY, C.
TALLING, G.
THOMPSON,  G.
TIMS, W.
TONNER, J.
WARD, R.
WELK,  S.
WEST, D.
WOOD, W.
YEREX, H.
YOUNG, N.
Civil
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BOYES,   R.
PRESTON, J.
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CANT, J.
CHERCOVER, M.
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CHOW, E.
CORBETT, L.
CUNLIFFE, S.
DAVIES, J.
DE BECK, H.
DONATT, N.
DORAN, W.
Page One Hundred and Forty-six    • .   .   .   ENGINEERING
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FORD, J.
FLEMING, B.
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FERNE, R.
FAHLMAN, R.
FERRIE, R.
GOODMAN, E.
HALL, J.
HARRISON,  E.
HEENEY, R.
HEMPHILL,  P.
HEMPSALL, L.
HENDERSON, P.
HENDERSON, P.  S.
HEPBURN, N.
INGRAM, M.
L'HIRONDELLE, B.
HOYT, A.
JOHNSON, C.
JOHNSON, W.
JORGENSON,   W.
KLIMOVICH, J.
KL1T, P.
LASSIE, P.
LEE, E.
MacKAY, G.
McBRIDE, R.
McLENNAN, G.
McMINN, E.
McMORDIE, R.
McPHERSON, A.
MAARTMAN, R.
MAZUR, B.
MARGAN, G.
MOTHERWELL, J.
NELSON, A.
PATTERSON, F.
PAUL, V.
PIKE, C.
PRESTON,  J.
PRICE, H.
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SAMPSON, J.
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SPENCER, R.
STEE,  F.
STONE, J.
STOREY, G.
TAIT, B.
TAYLOR, H.
THORSON, A.
URQUHART, R.
WALKER, R,
•    Page One Hundred and Forty-seven ENGINEERING
•       •       •
5  .!♦ fS
_i-tt._na_____i
•» ■# >itkn Hj)__ f
«_AK-E_W_-i-____
WALLEY, B.
WALLISSER, A.
WEBBER, E.
WILLIAMS, N.
WORSLEY, G.
Forestry
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CLARK, M.
DANYLLIK,  W.
DEINES, E.
EASTON, D.
FLANAGAN, R.
FLIGG, D.
GAYLE, W.
GILGAN, W.
GILMOUR, J.
GILMOUR, J. R.
GLOVER, C.
HIGHSTED, C.
HUNTER,  R.
HUBBARD, T.
JEWESSON, R.
JONES, E.
JONES,  R.
KERR, M.
KIRBY,  C.
KLOTZ, P.
KNETEMAN, H.
KNIGHT, E.
LEHRLE, L.
L'ETOURNEAU, L.
McINTOSH, J.
McLAREN, J.
McLEOD, D.
McMINN, A.
McQUARRIE, J.
Mcquillan, d.
MERCER, L.
MILNER, L.
MITCHELL,   J.
MOYES,  E.
NEIGHBOR, B.
NICHOLS, N.
PAGE, B.
PAINTER, M.
PARKER, J.
PARRISH,  J.
PEARCE, G.
PEGUES, J.
POPE, R.
POSKUSKY, J.
POTTER, J.
RAINSFORD,  F.
Page  One  Hundred and Forty-eight     • .   .   .   ENGINEERING
REID, R.
RITCHIE, A.
SCHON, H.
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TOFDANL, K.
VAUGHAN, E.
WADLEIGH, J.
WESTERN, A.
WESTON, A.
WEYMER, T.
WILLIAMS,  R.
Mechanical
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ARCHIBALD, W.
ATKEY, R.
BEARDSEN, G.
BEALE, W.
BEAN, J.
BEZER,  J.
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BOOTH, N.
BRUBA, J.
BROWN,  M.
BROWN,  N.
BROWN,   R.
BUCKLEY, S.
BUHLER, W.
CAESAR, R.
CAMERON,  E.
CAMPBELL,   G.
CARRABETTA,  J.
CAREY, D.
CARTNELL, J.
CHALLIS, L.
COLE,  B.
COLLINS, P.
COOPER,   L.
COTTON,  G.
DAYTON, C.
DAYTON, F.
DEAN.   D.
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DON, H.
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DOXSEE, D.
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DYBHAUN, T.
EATON, G.
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FAUKES,  N.
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•    Page One Hjndrad and Forty-nine ENGINEERING
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HOLME, J.
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HOWARD, J.
HUGHES, L.
HUGHES, L.
HUGHES, P.
JEMSON, R.
JOHNSON, C.
JOHNSON, J.
KAYLL,  J.
LA CHANCE, F.
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LANCASTER, W.
LANG, M.
LEWCHUK, W.
LOCKIE, W.
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LONG, E.
LOVE, D.
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McCASKILL, K.
McDONALD, D.
McEWAN, W.
McMillan, j.
McNICOL,  W.
MAITLAND, P.
MILLER, J.
MITCHELL, J.
MULLEN,  A.
MUNSELL, M.
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NESBITT,  C.
NORTH, P.
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OLSEN, J.
PEARCE, D.
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PLANT, G.
POLLOCK, R.
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RUSSELL, C.
SCHRUM, A.
SHUGG, A.
SMALLWOOD, A.
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SMYLIE, R.
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DINSDALE, O.
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GRANTHAM, J.
GRAY, W.
HASTINGS, W.
HUNTER, J.
JAMIESON, R.
JOSEPHSON, H.
LATHAM,  A.
LILLIES, O.
McDOUGALL, N.
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McCAIG, F.
McGillivray, d.
McMAHON, R.
McMillan, j.
manning, r.
•     Page One Hundred and Fifty-one ENGINEERING   .   .   .
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MILL, J.
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ROBSON, R.
SHAND, J.
SHIRRA, R.
SHUMKA, J.
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SMYTH, H.
STEED, O.
TAYLOR, S.
UPHAM, D.
URQUHART, R.
WALLS, G.
WATT, J.
WEBB, J.
Mining
BOYKO, P.
BRAY, J.
CASTRO,  C.
COCHRANE, T.
CODVILLE, D.
. COOK,   W.
DUTHIE, R.
EASTMAN, J.
GIBNEY, W.
HODGSON, S.
JACK, P.
KNEEN,  T.
LITTLE, J.
LORIMER, M.
McDOUGALL, A.
McKAY, D.
MOORE, E.
NEWTON, C.
PHILLIP,  N.
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PRITCHETT, L.
SHANNON, J.
SHINDEL, W.
STICKNEY, J.
THOMPSON, J.
TROWSDALE, G.
Metallurgical
ANDERSON, J.
ANDREWS, S.
ANSLOW,  J.
BAIN, A.
BILLINGS, J.
BODIE, R.
BOYD,   A.
CLACK, A.
Poge One Hundred and Fifty-two    t .   .   .   ENGI N EERI NG
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DEITZ, G.
DENNIS, P.
HOBSON, A.
MacDONALD, A.
MILLS,   R.
NAYLOR, J.
SHNAY, R.
TUFF, W.
YOUNGER, F.
Geological
AITKEN,   JAMES
BARAGER,  W.
BEST, R.
COOPER, W.
FENSKE, L.
FRIESEN, O.
GOWER, J.
HARRIS, K.
HUGHES, H.
JAMES, R.
JORY,  L.
KANIK, S.
KUTNEY, E.
McCartney, w.
MILLAR, C.
NASMITH, H.
NOEL, G.
PEDLEY, S.
PLUMB,  W.
RENNIE, C.
RUTHERFORD, J.
SMITH, K.
STUART, R.
SUTHERLAND-BROWN, A.
TAFT, J.
TAYLOR, J.
TIBBITT, H.
ZEVEILLE, J.
Physics
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GOULD,  R.
HALL, J.
LYE, R.
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PARENT, L.
REESOR, T.
KERN, J. D. (mechanical)
Architecture
DE WOLF, P.
JACKSON,  D.
KELLICK,  G.
LEE, H.
McPHALEN, A.
TOBY, R.
WILLIAMS, D.
•     Page  One Hundred and Fifty-three NURSES   .   .   .
BELL, M.
BOLAND, C.
BOYLE, M.
BUTLER, A.
BYERS,   D.
CAPLETTE, M.
CHALMERS, B.
CORNELL,  J.
DEEBLE, D.
DUNN, R.
DUNNE, E.
EDDY, N.
FLATT, V.
GOLD,  L.
GORE, J.
HERMAN,   G.
HUMBLE, S.
LAURENCE, Y.
LIVINGSTONE,   C.
MacCARTHY, J.
McDIARMID, M.
McNAIR,  M.
NEILANS, A.
NIXON, R.
OLSON, A.
PARLIAMENT, A.
PIDDINGTON,  D.
POPE, D.
PUTNAM, E.
RADFORD,  J.
RANDALL, E.
ROBINSON, S.
ROBINSON, T.
STEWART,   S.
SUTCLIFFE,  J.
WHEELER, S.
WOOD, W.
WOODS, A.
Page One Hundred and Fifty-four     • *       •       •
AGRICULTURE
APPLEBY, B.
ATKINSON, H.
BARKER, A.
BARNET, J.
BARTLEY, C.
BAZETT, H.
BEAUSOLEIL, J.
BERRY, R.
BISSETT, H.
BONIN, N.
BRANDRITH, R.
BRENNAN, P.
BRYANT, H.
BURGESS, R.
CAMPBELL, I.
CAVERHILL,  J.
CHANCEY, H.
CHAPMAN, C.
CHARTER,  D.
CHESTNUTT, J.
CRAM, W.
CURREY,  H.
EADY, G.
EDGAR, R.
FARYNA, G.
GALLOWAY, N.
GILMOUR, R.
GOVE,   J.
GLINKIN, R.
GRAHAM, N.
GUIRY, P.
HAMILTON,   D.
HARRINGTON,  D.
HARRIS, R.
HATTON, A.
HAVARD,   D.
HETT, G.
HOLLOWAY, F.
HUGHES, R.
ISBISTER, R.
JAMES, F.
KEENLEYSIDE, A.
KEIS, N.
KNIGHT, H.
KYNASTON,   B.
LADDY, S.
LARKIN, D.
LAW, J.
LECKIE, D.
LINDSAY, J.
LLOYD, J.
LOGAN, J.
LORD, N.
McCONKEY, G.
MacDONALD, A.
MacDONALD,  J.
MacGREGOR,   D.
McCONKEY,   G.
MacKENZIE, R.
Mclaughlin, r.
•     Page One Hundred and Fifty-five AGRICULTURE
McMECHAN, A.
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McNeill, r.
McRAE, J.
MAIN, G.
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MINCHIN, M.
MORTON, J.
MULFORD, W.
MURRAY, W.
MURRAY, W. K.
NEUFELD, J.
NIBLOW, B.
NICHOLSON,   H.
NORDON,  H.
OSWELL, M.
PATON, I.
PATTERSON, E.
PARMITER,   R.
PEARSON, W.
PORTER, F.
PRINGLE, W.
RAINE, J.
RICHARDS, M.
RILEY,  J.
ROBINSON, H.
ROBERTSON,   L.
SANDBROOK,  A.
SERGENT, W.
SCOTT, G.
STEELE, P.
STEELE, W.
STEPHENSON, H.
STEWART,  J.
SWENSON, D.
THOMPSON,  M.
TOWNSLEY, D.
UNWIN, R.
VAN RYSWYK, A.
WAGNER, H.
WESLEY, M.
YOUNG, R.
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COX, D.
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McLEAN,  J.
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RIED, B.
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SHANKLAND, B.
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WHEELER, V.
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WOLSTENCROFT, S.
WONG, H.
Law
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BAKONY, C.
BARNESON, G.
BATE, A.
BECK, W.
BEESLEY,  A.
BELTZ, J.
BONNYCASTLE, R.
•     Page   One  Hundred  and Fifty-seven LAW   .   .   .
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BOONER, M.
BOYLE, F.
BOYLE, J.
BROATCH, G.
CHRISTIE, D.
COLLIER, F.
COOPER, R.
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HEAN,  A.
HEATH, H.
HELMCKEN, J.
HINDS,   D.
HINE, H.
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HOWARD, H.
HUMPHREYS, R.
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IREDALE, N.
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KICH,  W.
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LEDERMAN, J.
LEEMING, L.
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McLEOD, D.
McLOUGHLIN, B.
McMillan, h.
MACRA, H.
Page One Hundred  and Fifty-eight     • .   .   .   LAW
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.    POPHAM, E.
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Pharmacy
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BROWN, W.
!> C.)
•     Page One Hundred and Fifty-nine LAW
•   •   •
CHANDLER, P.
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CURRIE, D.
DANIEL, M.
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HUNTLEY, H.
JACOBS, M.
KILOH, A.
KNUTSON, C.
KOCH, R.
KOS, G.
KUCHER, P.
LE  HUGET, J.
MacIVER,  D.
MacLEOD, M.
McAllister, m.
McEACHRAN, J.
McQUARRIE,  D.
MAYO, H.
MEIER,  J.
MELVILLE, W.
MILLER, G.
MOIR,  J.
MORLEY, D.
O'GRADY, D.
O'NEILL, W.
PATTISON, R.
PAULSEN,  R.
PETERSON,   W.
PETTIT,   G.
PRIEST, R.
REID, K.
SHEPPARD, P.
SIMPSON,   R.
SMITH,   C.
STANBURY, W.
STOCKS, R.
TAYLOR, G.
TRESSIDER,  R.
TUCRK,  E.
TWEED, P.
WALL, J.
WATSON, R.
WEBB, M.
WOOD, H.
WOODS, E.
WORDEN, A.
YOUNG, J.
ZACHARIAS,   N.
Physical Education
BENNETT, M.
Page  One Hundred and Sixty MISCELLANEOUS
GLOVER,   R.
GOUTSCHI, E.
HUSBAND, J.
KENNEDY, F.
MacDIARMID, J.
MacKINNON, C.
MALTMAN, K.
MARSHALL, H.
MERRITT, S.
MUNRO, A.
NIXON, H.
OSTROM, B.
ROOTS, W.
SAWYER, J.
SHIELDS, D.
SMITH, M.
TAYLOR, B.
TAYLOR, C.
Teacher Training
CAMPBELL, T.
KISH, F.
MacKENZIE, S.
SEEMENS, A.
SIEMENS, P.
TUPPER, M.
Social
ANDERSON, N.
BELL, K.
BROCKING, P.
CAMPBELL,   D.
HAWKENS, R.
KEMPTHORNE,  M.
LAMB, J.
LLOYD-JONES,  M.
McINTOSH, P.
MATHESON, J.
POWELL, D.
ROBINSON, B.
SEIR, H.
THOMSON,  E.
TRASON,  G.  E.
WATT, F.
WILLEMS,  H.
Miscellaneous
LINBURGER, R. (Pharmacy
GOLDSMITH,  A.   (Arts)
ELWORTHY, D.  (Commerce)
•     Page  One Hundred and Sixty-one   EAT
SERVES
CM
From the %r corners of the globe,
from the trtkie markets of every nation^"
and from ourwwn Canadian producers,
EATON'S is cofl^antly bringing
fine merchandisers B.C.
Its great network ol^ranch stores
and mail order offices\|akes shopping
easy and convenient for 1^3. residents.
Remember ... for your special
or everyday needs, EATON'S i?
always ready to serve you.
CHILLIWACK        MISSION COURTENAY     NANAIMO        DUNCAN    NEW WESTMINSTER    VANCOUVER
VICTORIA
Page  One Hundred and Sixty-four     • Encyclopaedia Britannica
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912 W. Pender St.-opposite Abbotsford Hote/-Reservations: PA. 9000
•     Page One Hundred and Sixty-five With the Compliments of
CONTRACTORS TO
THE AMATEUR AND
PROFESSIONAL STAGE
LIMITED
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and
Costume Manufacturers
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Let Us  Help You  with  Your  HoHdoy  Plans
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We'll Make Your Reservations—No Obligation!
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228 Rogers Bldg.   -   -   -   -   Vancouver, B.C.
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Hotel Georgia
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Style-cutting — Cold Wave
Facials — Eyelash tinting
Open all day Wednesday — Closed Monday
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TRADE    |L__J    MARK
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FLAGG & COMPANY
Manufacturing Jewellers
FRATERNITY PINS — RINGS
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With the Compliments of
WOOLCRAFT LTD.
IMPORTED ENGLISH   KNITTING GOODS
IMPORTED  CASHMERE  &   BOTANY SWEATERS
IMPORTED CHILDREN'S WEAR
626 Howe St., Vancouver, B. C.
PA. 4935
// has been a pleasure to serve you this year
Perry's Typing Service
2507 - 9 West Broadway
CEdar 7610
Typing Mimeographing
U.B.C. Decal Crests
Page One Hundred and Sixty-six     • 1900
2000
1950
Fifty years ago, a relatively short time in the world's
history, the parents and grandparents of this
year's graduates celebrated the beginning of the
20th Century. Much was expected of the new
century in the way of scientific "marvels"—
but the realties of today (jet planes, television,
atomic energy, etc.) have surpassed all expectations.
Who would have predicted in 1900 that electricity,
for example, would one day heat water, bake
food, freeze food, wash and iron clothes, play
music, warm your bed, shave a man and do so
many other things around your home at so little
cost?
The next half-century will be full of just as many new
"marvels," and just as many difficulties, as the
first half. But the years ahead will be vastly
different for the Class of '50 because they will
be your years.
We wish you the very besf of success in your chosen field.
•     Page One Hundred and Sixty-seven SMART
DRESSERS
APPRECIATE
BETTER
Glotkel
Quality with Style
ALWAYS    A    SAFE
INVESTM EN T
•
NOW! a complete tine oi
Men's Haberdashery
You Will  Like Our  Personal  Service
EDDIE R. DEEM
534 Seymour Street   -  Opp. Yorkshire Bldg.
H.   B.   Maunsell   Was   Elected  Watchdog   of  Finances   for AMS
ABBIE'S
SPORTING GOODS
Boxing  EVERLAST
Equipment
Equipment  &   Uniforms   for   all
Sports
BASEBALL    —
SOFTBALL
LACROSSE   —
HOCKEY
SOCCER   —   BASKETBALL
Fishing  Tackle
&  Shells
Racquets Re-
strung
Abbie Bevilacqua
FAirmont 4272
12th AVENUE & MAIN STREET
H. B. MAUNSELL
AMS Business Manager Issued Dozens Of
Requisition Orders To Student Clubs
Bespectacled H. B. Maunsell is UBC's financial watchdog. Encamped in his undersized office in the AMS
offices in Brock Hall, Mr. Maunsell was responsible for
seeing that requisition orders for everything from paper
clips to tape recorders were issued as well as keeping a
sharp eye on the respective club budgets.
Mr. Maunsell was the result of a plebiscite staged last
year to determine whether UBC needed a man to watch
its expenditures. By a vote of almost 2-1, students indicated that such a man was needed. Despite the arguments
of some officials, who felt he would be a hinderance to
AMS autonomy, students felt the opposite.
Mr. Maunsell, at the beginning of the year, was of the
opinion that student financial affairs were being handled
well. He stated that he had received marvellous cooperation from AMS officers.
A retired bank manager, Mr. Maunsell declared that
the only recreation he intended to enjoy was a quiet
game of golf as well as participation in the Kiwanis and
Masonic lodges.
Page One Hundred and Sixty-eight     • £. W. JSOOA & CO. LIMITED
PRINTING & LITHOGRAPHING
1530 W. 4th Ave. •<__► CEdar 4157-8
Vancouver, B.C.
We extend our best wishes
and congratulations to the
students   of   U. _3. C.   as
they   endeavour   to   take
their   respective  places  in
the world of to-day-1950
An Employee Owned Company
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Bowling Rendezvous
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PA. 0956 MA. 9940
WOUM STATIONERS
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Printing •        Stationery
Offset Litho        •        Commercial Art
Phone: PAcific 9467-8
549 Homer St. Vancouver, B.C.
"Chesterfield"   Quality
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SPORTS SLACKS
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WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
LISLE FRASER
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Page  One Hundred and Seventy     • shop
wiselv!
Woodward's large variety and complets
selection of quality merchandise in e v e ty
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Consistent Everyday Low Prices
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•     Page  One Hundred and Sixty-nine t    Page One Hundred and Seventy-one "Est. 1841"
TRAVEL
EVERYWHERE
begins at
COOK'S
World's Largest and Oldest Travel Organization
THOS.   COOK  &  SON
(Continental and Overseas) Ltd.
831 W. PENDER ST.
.. TAtlow 1277
STYLES FOR YOUNG MEN
AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
FEATURING
w^ a cut it  u^taitJi Lutein.
0  C^s
_•_*
4444 WEST 10th AVENUE
DOWNTOWN AT 301 WEST HASTINGS ST.
Frosh Executive  Met Weekly to  Guide First Year Students
FRESHMEN
Frosh Executive, Under Cumming's Wing
Became Model Of Activity In 1949-1950
Led by Coordinator of Activities George Cumming,
UBC's Frosh executive became one of the liveliest groups
on the campus during the year.
Chairman of the Frosh Executive was John Milligan
from Prince of Wales High School. John, a kingpin in
the UBC Players Club, was ever willing to recruit members of the Frosh class for dirty work. Other members
of the Executive were: Beth Estey, Ted Lee, Laurie
Esplin, John Fraser and Dennis Yorke.
When UBC's Pep Club needed recruits to do the
myriad tasks of preparing for an event, many of the
helpers were from the Frosh executive. During the AMS
elections members won praise from Chief Returning
Officer Hugh Cameron when they manned polling booths
about the campus.
On the Undergraduate Societies Committee, members
of the Executive took an active part. On Valentine's Day
the Freshmen declared Dan Cupid king and staged a
ball in the lounge at Brock Hall.
PITMM BUSINESS COLLEGE Ltd.
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Violet A.  Ferguson, P.C.T., G.C.T.,  Principal
Page One Hundred and Seventy-two     • Grads of '50
Congratulations and Welcome to the Alumni Group
Your
U. B. C. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
A Member of the American Alumni Council
publishes the
U. B. C. Alumni Chronicle
A 36-Page Quarterly Containing News by and About Your  Fellow Alumni  and  U.B.C.
sponsors the
ALUMNI • U. B. C. DEVELOPMENT FUND
An Annual-giving Program Designed to Help U.B.C. and Her Students
Donors become Active Association Members and Receive Each Issue of the Chronicle
Please remember to send your
queries, suggestions and criticisms
to our genial and energetic full-time
Secretary - Manager, Frank J. E.
Turner in your Alumni Office, Brock
Hall, U.B.C., and send your Chronicle
news - items, personal and class
notes, and feature articles to our
brilliant Lawyer-Editor, Ormy Hall.
FRANK J. E. TURNER
Perm. Secretary-Manager
ORMONDE J. HALL
Chronicle Editor
Branches:
LONDON, ENGLAND — NORTHERN CALIFORNIA — SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
SUMMERLAND — SOUTH OKANAGAN — WEST KOOTENAY — VICTORIA
WELLS    —    KELOWNA    —    VERNON    —   KIMBERLEY   —   TORONTO   —   OTTAWA
MONTREAL   —   CRESTON VALLEY
•     Page One Hundred and Seventy-three Hilton & Webster
Sporting Goods
Complete Equipment for the Sportsman
• BASEBALL
• SOFTBALL
• TRACK
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• LACROSSE
Repairs for all Sports Equipment
Guns, Rods, Racquet Restringing, Camp Stores
FRaser 3133
6057 FRASER
VANCOUVER, B.C.
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■ 1300 CLOCK WIS7 rMAVIVA1/  ■   CI sis 4111
Familiar Sight During  Snowfall  Was Stuck Student Car
SNOW
Late Students, Bruised Posteriors
Resulted From Record Fall Of Snow
On a campus deserted for the Christmas holidays, the
snow piled up in drifts and mounds. It left the sometimes ugly contuors of the campus beautifully moulded
and soft. With little traffic on the roads, the snow fell
and stayed. The skeleton staff of workers left at UBC
could not cope with the billowing flakes that cascaded
down day after day.
The problem became even more acute with the termination of Christmas holidays. Students flooded back to
the campus bundled up for the coldest weather that the
University and B.C. had experienced since the turn of
the century.
On the steep hills leading to UBC, busses and student
cars skidded and slid with some of them even turning
at a ninety degree angle to stop traffic completely.
Once students reached Tenth and Sasamat, their problems had just begun. University busses, hampered by
terrible road conditions took as long as 20 minutes to
negotiate the route usually taking five.
Campus streets and walks were piled high with snowbanks and drifts. Some paths had to be negotiated single
file and many a student slipped to tumble down flights
of stairs.
Administration officials did a workmanlike job of clearing roads only to have the snow pile up even higher
from an overnight fall. In the process they paid out
hundreds of dollars to make things safe for students.
Your Ticket's as near
as your Telephone
at no extra Charge
International and Domestic Travel
686 HORNBY STREET TAtlow 5185
(Devonshire Hotel)   VANCOUVER, B.C.      PAcific 5481
Page One Hundred and Seventy-four    • IF A CAMERA could be constructed
with an eye to costs, this is the
picture you'd get of a synthetic
rubber plant. By showing all valves
as one valve it brings into proper
perspective the valve investment in
any plant, any large building where
operation involves 8uid control.
Collectively, valves represent a
major expenditure... yet too often,
they are selected with "petty cash"
consideration.
It will pay management to keep
this picture in mind. With wages
and material costs the highest ever,
valve maintenance costs must be
watched as carefully as operating
expense of larger plant units.
EXCESSIVE   MAINTENANCE   of  one
inferior valve is insignificant,
but multiplied by thousands, it
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budgets.
JENKINS BROS. LIMITED helps you
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ways. First by building
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For all new installations, for all
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for lowest valve costs in the
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JENKINS   BROS.  LIMITED • 617 St. Remi Street, Montreal • Sales Offices; Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver
•     Page  One Hundred and Seventy-five economy?
it's AUSTIN
Economy—at purchase; economy
— in operation; economy — for
upkeep     -     -     -     it's  AUSTIN!
Yes, economy-conscious college students are satisfied
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expertly built, that upkeep costs are down — away
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For more information that really spells e-c-o-n-o-m-y
call   in  and  see  Fred  Deeley to-day.
4Wine
^} I U R S  ofl„„w
Oldest Furriers in B.C. . . . Established in  1 892
MArine 6726
825 Howe Street
0.
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ALLAN
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Jewellers
Silversmiths
Diamor
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GRANVILLE at PENDER, VANCOUVER,
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W. & ]. WILSON
IMPORTERS OF FINE BRITISH WOOLLENS
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SWEATERS from Braemar of Scotland.    New
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Gehrke Stationery & Printing Co.
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Page One  Hundred and Seventy-six     • SUN STAFFERS WIN NATIONAL FAME
WRITERS SCORE LOCALLY, TOO
CRITICAL appraisers of Canadian journalism turn an appreciative eye to the
Vancouver Sun these days. From coast to
coast in newspaper circles there has risen
the conviction that the Sun has gathered
together and nurtured a group of the
smartest and most entertaining writers
boasted by any newspaper in the nation.
Here are pictured some who have brought
lustre to the Sun and pleasure to a half
million   readers.
ANDY LYTLE, nationally famous sports
editor and columnist, a Sun original, was
called home recently from Toronto to perform in his old stamping ground.
JACK SCOTT has made his daily column,
"Our Town," one of the sharpest in Canadian journalism and knowing critics say
he'll go far before he's through.
ELMORE PHILPOTT is a
veteran observer of national
and international affairs who
has a thoughtful audience who
follow closely his daily column
on worldwide social and economic conditions and trends.
MAMIE MOLONEY'S the writing housewife whose "In One
Ear . . ." expresses generous
feelings and sharp intelligence
when she comments on practically everything from home
chores to world affairs.
Penny Wise follows
the markets, shops
the shops . . . keeps
her readers informed
about best buys and
newest ideas.
Barry Mather's puckish sense of humor
makes his Page One
spot the center of
interest for laugh-
seeking readers.
Lloyd Turner covers
business and finance
with authority and
clarity, makes his
important subject
interesting to all.
Vera Kelley, Editor
of THE SUN'S
women's pages, is a
clever columnist who
has a wide reader
audience among
both sexes.
Edith  Adams  is the
girl who presides
over "Edith Adams'
Cottage" and writes
about toothsome
eatables for food
fans.
Tom Jarvis covers
police courts and
sheds a humane and
gentle light on the
seamier side of a
great city's  life.
•     Page  One  Hundred and Seventy-seven The House of Fine Fashion"
For 25 years
suppliers of
fine fashions
to Vancouver's
most discriminating
women.
2566 GRANVILLE NEAR BROADWAY
Symphonic Orchestra
Vancouver, B.C.
TAtlow    3 6 22
Business Manager
ALLAN STONE
Currie   Handled   Students   who   had  complaints  about   the   Pub
BOB CURRIE
Hard Working Public Relation
Officer Of Alma Mater Society
It was the greatest "Open House" in UBC's history.
That remembered March 5, 1949, when 50,000 people
thronged the campus must bring a glow of pride to Bob
Currie, who with a $3,000 budget and a lot of ideas,
co-ordinated the efforts of twenty-one committees to
bring that affair to its successful conclusion.
With Open House behind him, and a fine record as
chairman of the International Student Service Committee
and vice-chairman of Undergraduate Societies committee, Currie took office as AMS public relations officer
for the 1949-50 semester.
Calgarian Bob Currie performed with his customary
and characteristic efficiency in his new job. As liaison
man between Council and Publications, he sometimes
badgered both organizations and by so doing, brought
about a cessation of the "cold war."
Over a two year period, Currie ran and was defeated
in the campaigns for two council positions, junior member and AMS treasurer. A veteran, with the thriftiness
imposed by a DVA grant, Bob Currie's last campaign was
the most economically conducted in UBC history. It cost
him one dollar and eighty-seven cents.
Page  One Hundred and Seventy-eight     • ta
3>a*tce
\\M\
STUDIO
GRAKT VINCENT
F.N.A.T.D. (BB. LA. AT.)
M.I.S.T.D. (BB. LA.)
KAYE VISINI
F.N.A.T.D. (OB. LA. AT.
SB.)
M.I.S.T.D. (SB. LA.)
Examiners — Lecturers — Adjudicators — Demonstrators
WORLD'S   CHAMPIONSHIP   AND   MODERN   STYLE   BALLROOM
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•     Page One  Hundred and Seventy-nine Your South Granville
RECORD «—
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YOU'LL ALWAY
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Merchants whose ads appear on these pa<
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Exclusive Lingerie by Marjorie Hamilton
Correct Corset Shop
Expert Corsetiers
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2636 GRANVILLE ST.
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NEW AND  RECONDITIONED  RUGS
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1486 W.   12th Ave.
at   Granville
BARNES Jewellers
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"YOUR  SATISFACTION   IS OUR BEST
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Spec/a/ 70% Discount to
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CEdar 1314 2715 Granville St.
Page One Hundred and  Eighty     • 0   BETTER  ON
RANVILLE
3 interested in serving the students of UBC
e modern shops in South Granville.
ROYAL
SHOE  RENEW
Craftsmanship plus Neatness
2824 Granville, Between 12th & 14th
WIDE RANGE OF UNUSUAL AND EXCLUSIVE GIFTS
HAZEL RAYMER       2820 S.  Granville  St.
CEdar 4823 Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS
GODBER
THE PHOTOGRAPHER
REDUCTIONS    TO    STUDENTS
2238 Granville St.
CEdar 5710
EL-MAR
• Millinery
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• Parrernmaking
• Designing Hantaft   Nl llOOl
• Leather  Craft
• Day and Evening Classes—Enrol Any Time
• 3067 Granville St., Vancouver. CH. 9625
TOWN & COUNTRY
Custom Tailoring
Slacks Blazers
3084 Granville St., Vancouver, B.C. CH. 8345
O  (O
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JUNIOR SHOP
2608 Granville St.
vancouver, b.c.
LYON
Paint & Equipment Co.
Wallpapers   K^C-I-iT^h   Cellulose Tape
Paints
Spray Equipment
2549 Granville at Broadway — CHerry 5433
•     Page One Hundred and Eighty-one GRADUATES
^ririt   . J-mpreiiioviS    L^ounfJ
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Tennant and  Hay  Were  Ever-papular Ubyssey  Columnists
FUNNYMEN
Vic Hay And Hal Tennant Split Student
Sides In Thursday And Friday Ubyssey's
Thursday and Friday Ubyssey's were always snapped
up by students with great eagerness for their editorial
pages contained two of the funniest funnymen that had
ever written for the student paper.
On Friday, Hall Tennant alternately poked fun at
himself, AMS president-elect John Harr, and Victoria,
in his column entitled "Gobbledeygook." Tennant was an
old hand at writing features and columns for the Ubyssey.
Two years ago, flat broke and stranded in a metropolis
known as Namu, B.C., Tennant cabled the Ubyssey hoping that his absence would not be miscontrued with a
rise in the population of Tibet.
After finishing a stint in the fish cannery of Namu
Tennant wound up in the analysis lab of a paper mill
somewhere on B.C.'s fogbound coast and whiled away
the rest of the year carving paper dolls. When he returned
to the Ubyssey he found a new staff and editor and was
for awhile lost. But he adjusted his radar set atop his
prettily pointed head and continued to split the sides
of students with his humorous quips.
Vic Hay, complete with his column entitled, "Whilffi
the Sun Shines," had probably led the most checkered
existence of any Ubyssey editor. Once a professional
wrestler, Hay had spent a good many years in the fracas
known as World War II setting up good relations for
Canada in Holland, Belgium and France.
D.P.'s coming to Canada say the country still has not
recovered from him. In the offices of the Ubyssey, Hay
would twist his face into grimaces and make pubsters
laugh twice as hard as when he appeared normal. But
he still managed to bang out, with one finger, a column
that was always humorous and entertaining.
Page One Hundred and Eighty-two     • To you, the graduates of 1950, go our
heartiest congratulations and best wishes for
a successful future.
We hope that when in the future you recall
this year, you will do so with pleasure and in
leafing through the 1950 Totem it will bring
back fond memories.
Should you have any problem at any time
in connection with publicity or advertising, do
not hesitate to call on us for advice, we shall
always be pleased to see or hear from you.
It has been our great pleasure this year to
have contributed towards the success of your
Totem Yearbook.
Good luck, graduates of 1950!
J
N      U
S     M T W
12 3 4
8      9 10 11
15    16 17 18
Flowers are always appropriate!
Open 6 Days a week until 9 p.m.
Prompt City-wide Delivery
937 West Georgia Street •  Medical-Dental Bldg.   •   TAtlow 2020
•     Page One Hundred and Eighty-three BEST
WISHES...
U.B.C GRADS/
THE   KEYSTONE   PRESS   LTD.
Printers Lithographers
860 Kingsway    Vancouver    FAirmont 1238
YOU  MAY  DO BETTER
WITH
KEYSTONE
BRAND
Looseleaf   Sheets
and Binders
Choose   Keystone  Brand  for  all
your  class  and  study  work
Smith Davidson & Wright
Limited
VANCOUVER — VICTORIA — EDMONTON
CALGARY
With the Compliments of
THE  MAYOR
CHARLES E. THOMPSON
Vancouver, B.C.
With the Compliments of
GORDON FARRELL
Learn your
Practical Economics
at . . .
Bank of Montreal
Canada's   First  Bank
Your Bank on the Campus—In the Auditorium Building
MERLE   C.   KIRBY,   Manager
working    with    Canadians    in    every    walk    ot    lite    since    1817
With the Compliments of
THE
ROYAL TRUST
COMPANY
Executors & Trustees
OFFICES IN CANADA FROM COAST TO COAST
VANCOUVER   BRANCH 626  WEST  PENDER  ST.
George O. Vale, Manager
Page  One  Hundred  and  Eighty-four     • It's Here!
the new iDfiRCHftflT
• beautiful to see
• beautiful to touch
• beautiful to operate
FRANK L
309 Shelly Bldg.
America's First Calculator
again sets highest standards
for calculator design with
the new FIGUREMASTER..
Its features include "phantom touch" key action (no
lighter touch is known) . .
40% greater dial visibility
. . . functional, streamlined
design. With Marchant's
traditional supremacy in
accuracy control, simplicity
and silent-speed, these
achievements establish the
FIGUREMASTER as the
world's foremost calculator.
figure faster with a
FIGUREMASTER
BOTT & CO.. DISTRIBUTORS
Vancouver, B.C.
PAcific 2423
Stocks - Oils - Mines
Bonds — Grain — Commodities
James Richardson & Sons
Established   1857
955   W.   HASTINGS   ST.     -    VANCOUVER
PHONE MA. 8511
Fourteen  Offices from  Montreal  to Victoria  Connected
by Direct Private Wire
Opportunities - Success
Prosperity
To young men—I say—Never in history have
such opportunities existed in the world of
finance as exists today. Men joining our
organization will be given important jobs to
do, jobs that will lead them to the large financial centres of the world.
We invite interviews and correspondence with
men and women seeking employment or
investment opportunities.
I. W. C. SOLLOWAY,  President
I. W. C. SOLLOWAY & ASSOCIATES
•     Pcfee One Hundred and Eighty-five YOUR GUIDE TO QUALITY
The name
NABOB is your
assurance of
fop quality
food products.
NABOB       FOODS       LTD.
VANCOUVER    •    WINNIPEG    •    TORONTO
BUCK   WATER   FOUNTAIN   IN   WINTERTIME
Totem  Photo by Doug  Barnett
DAN MACLURO TAXIS LTD.
NEW CARS
Pikifi. 7171
Radio  Control
24-Hour Service
Airline and Limousine Services
Opposite Post Office    -    706 W. Hastings St.
FURS OF UNQUESTIONABLE
QUALITY
R. J. POP
LTD.
FURRIERS
Granville  at  Fifteenth
CEdar 9155
LARGEST   FIREPROOF   REFRIGERATED
FUR STORAGE VAULTS
Page One Hundred and Eighty-six     • JANTZEN KNITTING MILLS
OF CANADA LIMITED
Makers of the World-Famous
JANTZEN SWIM  SUITS
SWEATERS
AND SUN CLOTHES
Corner 10th Avenue and Kingsway Phone FAirmont 1261
Vancouver, B.C.
Make up a Party
for Saturday Night Dancing
at the
newly decorated
• _»!•
COMM
CABARET
$1.25 per person
(inc. tax)
Reservations: PA. 7838
872 Granville St.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Hilker Attractions Ltd.
Vancouver       Victoria       Calgary
BOOKING AND PRESENTING THE WORLD'S
FINEST CONCERT ATTRACTIONS,   ROADSHOWS AND POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT
FEATURES   FOR  WESTERN   CANADA.
•     Page  One Hundred and Eighty-seven Gestetner
(Canada) Limited
Manufacturers of the
World's Premier Duplicator
Fine Papers, Stencils
and Ink
660 Seymour St.   -   -   -   Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 9644
HEAD   OFFICE    FOR   CANADA   -   TORONTO,   ONT.
FACTORY   -   LONDON,   ENGLAND
Be
SURE
it's
TOASTMASTER &«_
Soft
•      Fresh      *      Delicious
AT YOUR FAVOURITE FOOD
STORE
Cat
ladian Bakeries Ltd.
Officials Handled Gobs Of Cash At Giant Surplus Sale
GIANT SALE
Giant New Year Sale Cleared Out Over
$600 Worth Of Surplus AMS Inventory
Sitting in the AMS office this year was thousands of
dollars worth of pins, crests, pennants, records, and sheet
music, all a grim reminder of the post-war bubble that
had burst two years before and plunged the AMS into
debt.
Treasurer Walt Ewing had a decision to make. Should
the stock be allowed to move slowly over the AMS
counter ,or should a giant sale which would see the stock
go at bargain prices be staged?
Ewing decided on the latter course and early in the
new year hundreds of students jammed the lounge in
Brock Hall and snapped up goods at bargain prices.
There were Victor pressings of "Hail UBC" and sheet
music for the same song, pennants, faculty crests, pins
and dozens of other items.
Gleefully banging the cash register were AMS office
staff members and newly-hired business manager H. B.
Maunsell.
When students had gone back to lectures and the
money was counted, the AMS had ridden itself of a lot
of surplus stock and raised over $600 as well.
Page  One Hundred and Eighty-eight     • Totem '50 Features
SHOPS IN KERRISDALE
This page has been sponsored by the merchants
of Kerrisdale, in the hope that you will shop
more and more in Kerrisdale
Two Shops to Serve You Well
ELIA SHOE RENEWING
Call at either shop for First Class Work
and  Quick Service
2154 WEST 41st AVENUE — PHONE KE. 7261
5725 GRANVILLE STREET — PHONE  KE.   1010
"YOU'LL NEVER SEE  FINER QUALITY"
Hilda Flinn
Blouses    *    Sweaters    •    Lingerie
Sportswear    •    Housecoats
2007 W. 41st AVE.
KErr. 6421
Kerrisdale Dry Goods
Ladies' and Misses' Ready-to-Wear
Staple Dry Goods and Silks
Men's and Boys' Clothing
Children's Wear
2106 West 41st Avenue        Phone KE. 0054
KErrisdale   0293R
2>oUyb MiUinety
and    CO-ED    BAR
We Design Hals
D. Lightfoot, Prop., 2249 W. 41st Ave.
Assisted   by   Mrs.   Irene   Watson,   formerly   of   Irene   Watson
Millinery
<J\Laiia\Q.c\'   _J"tov_ct  G)ii.op
Fresh  Flowers,  Plants,  Corsages
Prompt Delivery to all Parts
"Designs that Personify"
5957  West  Boulevard
KErr. 5944
FROST'S
KERRISDALE
Specializing in
IMPORTED TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, NUTS
2257 W. 41st Ave. KErrisdale 0542
•     Page  One Hundred and Eighty-nine Challenger Watches
are known throughout
Canada for
dependability and
long service
SELECT YOUR CHALLENGER
at
Jewelers
BIRKS
Vancouver, B.C.
Silversmiths
Compliments
On Georgia At Hows
VANCOUVER,    B. C.
During the Past Year
FAMOUS PLAYERS CANADIAN
CORP. LTD.
Gave You the Ultimate in Fine Motion Picture Enjoyment
IN 1950
FAMOUS PLAYERS AGAIN WILL PRESENT
ALL THE
OUTSTANDING   CONTENDERS   FOR   TOP
SCREEN ENTERTAINMENT
Watch   for   Them   at
CAPITOL-ORPHEUM-STRAND
CINEMA- DOMINION
BROADWAY - STANLEY - KERRISDALE - ALMA
GRANDVIEW - HOLLYWOOD - KITSILANO
REGENT - VICTORIA - WINDSOR
Compliments of
The Auditorium
Georgia and Denman Streets
Vancouver, B.C.
Available for
CONCERTS — DANCES
MEETINGS-SPORTING EVENTS
ETC.
FOR RESERVATIONS
PHONE PAcific 2821
ocoraia  <Jla\$e.K Q)nap.
1006 WEST GEORGIA STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CORSAGES AND FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS
PAcific 7945
"Service with a Smile"
COMPLIMENTS
DICKSON
IMPORTING
CO. LTD.
PAcific 7451
m
157 West Cordova
Page  One Hundred and Ninety     • Adult Educational Classes
for 1950
Junior Bookkeeping — Shorthand and Typewriting
Senior Accounting and Secretarial Classes
Finney Accounting Course in Charge of C.A. covering Examination
work for C.A. and C.G.A.
Dale Carnegie Effective Speaking Course
Dale Carnegie Personality Course
— WRITE FOR CATALOG GIVING  FULL  INFORMATION —
DUFFUS
SCHOOL OF
BUSINESS LTD.
522 W. Pender
PA. 7567 —
Day and Night
WHOLESALE
RADIO SUPPLIES
Radio.
mEunited
The Favourite  Spot for Radio
Amateurs    and   Experimenters.
Vancouver's Largest Stock and
Assortment of Radio Parts
and Equipment.
TAtlow 1421
780 BEATTY STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ASK FOR A DEMONSTRATION
of the
ROYAL PORTABLE
TYPEWRITER
with
• FINGER FLOW KEYS—to follow the con
tour of your fingers.
• SPEED SPACER—cuts down spacing errors.
• RAPID    RIBBON    CHANGE—new    ribbon
with no fuss or muss.
• MAGIC   MARGIN—position   the   carriage
then   flick  your  fingers.
BYRNES TYPEWRITERS
LTD.
592 Seymour Street   -    PA. 7942 - PA. 2752
•     Page  One Hundred and Ninety-one U.B.C, Students
are always
welcome at
HALLETT'S
Three Shops to Serve You
HALLETT'S
Chocolates & Ice Cream Shop
1736 COMMERCIAL DRIVE HA. 0346
HALLETT'S
Chocolates & Ice Cream Shop
4381  WEST 10TH AVENUE AL. 3482
HALLETT'S
Chocolates & Ice Cream Shop
BROADWAY AT BALACLAVA        CH.0012
NELSONS GUARANTEE
YOU
The Finest Quality Laundry
and Dry Cleaning Service
in Canada
mm
FAiimonl 6611
Mimi  Professionally Entertained at Smashup Fresh Smoker
MIMI
Entertainers Made Frosh Howl And Hoot;
Students Got Plenty Of Cider And Smoke
Mimi is a singer.
Mimi isn't a very good singer but that didn't seem to
bother 200 freshmen who gathered in Brock Hall lounge
for their annual smoker during Frosh Week at UBC.
Stan Clarke, who engineered the entertainment for the
affair gathered together several professional entertainers
from downtown that set Freshmen howling and shouting
through the best hour-long show of the year.
At the strictly stag affair, sponsored by the Men's Big
Block Club, many a freshman went green around the
gills from his first cigar. Others stuck to cigarettes or
filled their pipes with pungent tobacco.
As well as viewing singers and dancers, the frosh got
pep talks from Ole Baaken, graduate manager of Athletics
and Orville Burke, coach of the Thunderbird Football
team.
At evening's end, pumped full of cider and tobacco
smoke, Freshmen wended their way home wishing they
had such a show to see each week.
Page  One  Hundred and Ninety-two     e "THE SYMBOL OF BUSINESS EFFICIENCY
#/
Cash Registers
Accounting Machines
Adding Machines
The National Cash Register Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
501 West Georgia St. Vancouver, B.C.
alcohol
ITS        PLACE
I N
INDUSTRY       TODAY
Paints, lacquers, varnishes, dyes . . . radio equipment . . . bakelite . . . films—these are
but some of the products of Modern Industry which call for the use of high-grade Alcohol
in their manufacture. Medical applications, pharmaceutics, antiseptics and drugs—
these, too, need peak-quality Alcohol as an essential ingredient.
r	
A vital section of the giant U.D.L. plant
here in B.C. is its Industrial Alcohol
Division. Here, U.D.L. produces high-
grade alcohols to meet the widely varying demands of science and industry, its
chemists and craftsmen catering to the
needs of Canada's foremost research
workers.
^
.   .   .  and   in your  car
In one branch of Industrial Alcohol, U.D.L. leads
all Western Canada in the manufacture of a
quality product—a non-corrosive, non-rust-
forming Anti-Freeze which is your assurance
your car can laugh at Jack Frost this winter.
Yes, and it's more economical, too! For best
results this winter, fill the radiator of your
car today with
FROST-TOX
J
UNITED     DISTILLERS     UNITE
 VANCOUVER,       B. C.       and       GRIMSBY,        O N T. 	
•     Page One  Hundred and Ninety-three Directors of
Funeral
Service
T
Nunn & Thomson
FAirmont 0221
2559 Cambie  Street                        Vancouver
UNION STEAMSHIPS LIMITED
Continuous   Friendly   Service   Since   1889
CRUISES   -   RESORTS   -   EXCURSIONS
Union Pier
Ft.   Carrall   St.
PA.  3411
City   Ticket  Office:
793   Granville St.
MA. 5438
EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY
LOOSE LEAF BOOKS    -    SLIDE RULES
FOUNTAIN  PENS    -    SCALES
DRAWING  INSTRUMENTS
CLARKE 8 STUART
CO. LTD.
Stationers,    Printers, Bookbinders
550 Seymour St. Vancouver, B.C.
AT
YOUR
SERVICE
AND DRY CLEANERS
FAirmont 1228
WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
LIMITED
1025 HOWE STREET MArine 8111
VANCOUVER,  B.C,
College Printers
Ltd.
Printers of the Ubyssey
4436 W. lOrh Ave
ALma 3253
Page One Hundred and Ninety-four    • ^cfivateof
Shell Premium—the most
powerful
gasoline
your car
can use!
1.Activated   for
knockless power!
2. Activated for fast
"get away."
3. Activated   for
quicker warm-up!
4. Activated for full
mileage.
Get it today from
Your Neighbourhood
SHELL DEALER
WE SERVE U.B.C.
Special    ^Jermi    to   S^tudentd
ACME
TYPEWRITER & OFFICE EQUIPMENT
^Jupevurit
JP
en
trading,    fr/ack
ines
Se
ervi.ce
603 WEST HASTINGS STREET
l/ancouver,    _D.  C.
MArine 7411
•     Page One Hundred and Ninety-five ICE
FUEL   OIL
WOOD
SAWDUST
COAL
Fuel, like so many other commodities, is subject to the law
of supply and demand. To be
sure that your supply will be
delivered, order your fuel
requirements at an early date
this year.
Yards in Vancouver,  North  Vancouver and  West Vancouver
GARVIN ICE & FUEL CO., LTD.
Phone W. 788 - FA. 6707
To the Student Body .  .  .
OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND
BEST WISHES
BELL & MITCHELL LTD.
641 Richards St. Vancouver, B.C.
Geo.
Nicol Oil Supply Co.
LUBRICANTS      —      INDUSTRIAL SOAPS
WAXES,   ETC.
PAcific 6627
123 East Cordova St.      VANCOUVER, B.C.
Page One Hundred and Ninety-six     • R
C
A
F
RESERVE UNIVERSITY
FLIGHT
FLYING TRAINING TO WINGS STANDARD
Otyicek bi4UH44Uf witlt pay
tf-ull Bummen. CmfMuftHesU
FOR FULL INFORMATION INQUIRE AT
R.CA.F., Order// Room, Armouries
THE    UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
R
C
A
F
THE UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
The Book Store was established for the convenience of the students and has effected a
considerable saving to the students in time
and money. It is prepared to supply all text
books required for the various courses offered
in the University, also such articles as note
books, loose-leaf sheets, fountain pens, drawing paper and instruments.
•     Page One  Hundred and Ninety-seven BEGG BROTHERS
LTD.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   DIRECT   DEALERS
Dodge &
DeSoto Cars
Dodge
Trucks
1190 W. Georgia       845  Terminal Ave.
PA. 5181 TA.  1321
Medalta Sales B.C. Limited
29 WEST PENDER ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.
Distributors of
MEDALTA
VITRIFIED HOTELWARE
A Made in Canada Product
VITRIFIED
HOTELWARE
GLASSWARE
CUTLERY
STONEWARE
Telephone TA. 5181
TA. 5182
Mel Torme and Jack Cullen Gape at Camera before Interview
TORME and CULLEN
Torme Greatest Singer
Tells Jazz Society Meeting
Slightly pudgy, baby-faced Mel Torme is the greatest
of modern jazz singers today, Bill Hill, former president
of the UBC Jazz Society told a group of society members
in an interview with Torme here. Although he didn't
sing at UBC, Torme displayed the showmanship that has
made him the idol of bobby-socksers throughout the U.S.
and Canada. He also earned the name "Velvet Fog" for
his silky renditions of such tunes as "I Cover The Waterfront" and "A Foggy Day in London."
Speaking to the Jazz Society, Torme demonstrated that
his tastes run from Dixieland to be-bop.
On the same day he visited the campus, Torme was
interviewed by gregarious Jack "Owl Prowl" Cullen, disc
jockey for a Vancouver station. Cullen, also cut an interview with several UBC coeds which was characterized
by giggling and inane dialogue.
YOUR CAMPUS
BARBER SHOP
Union Shop  (A.F.L)
Save yourself valuable time by dropping
in at your convenience. Minimum waiting time with FOUR chairs to serve you.
PETER DYKE
Proprietor
Formerly with   Hotel  Vancouver  Barber Shop
South   Basement Brock  Hall
Page One Hundred and Ninety-eight    • UNIVERSITY NAVAL TRAINING DIVISION
U      • A CAREER, OR INVALUABLE TRAINING AND U
EXPERIENCE
The University Naval Training Division offers undergraduates an excellent
opportunity to qualify as Commissioned Officers in the Royal Canadian Navy
. . . Permanent and Reserve Forces.
Winter drills and recreation combine with technical and professional training
in the summer (ashore and afloat) to give the Naval Cadets a well rounded and
interesting programme.
• Rank of Cadet, Pay $153.00 per Month Clear
• Full Summer Employment
APPLICANTS—Applicants must have four years at University ahead of them
(three if Ex-Service or Petty Officer or above in the Sea Cadets). Applications
accepted at the start of the fall term. Further information may be obtained from
Lieut. J. W. Greene in the Staff Office in the UBC Armoury. The Unit is presently
commanded by Lt. Cdr. Frank J. E. Turner RCN OR).
D
THE m...
Still Boasts the same Informality . . . although the Brock
Memorial Building Lunch Room is getting some of its business.
Eat in either place, depending on the mood you're in . . . but
don't forget to patronize Compus Merchants. Your undergrad
idiosyncrasies will be understood and overlooked.
•     Page One Hundred and Ninety-nine 7ftp^&eU>ece
MONARCH
>•        PASTRY       «.•
• •■    riouR I »••
^g__B U_
Compliments of the
millers of
MOMRM Pastry Flour
and
MONARCH
Cake Mixes
FREDERICK
Ltd.
CERTIFIED INSTRUMENT
MAKERS
Specialists in the Repair of
Instruments for Engineers/
Aviators, Surveyors/ Navigators
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
569 Howe Street   -   Vancouver
MA. 3822
JELLY
POWDERS
•
SPICES
FLAVORING
EXTRACTS
The Vancouver Supply Company Ltd.
Demand
Cross & Co/s
Dry Ginger Ale & Kist Drinks
also Whistle
CROSS & CO.
FAirmont 1 173
HARDWOOD CHAIR
Company Limited
Makers of High Grade Chairs
For Homes, Offices, Schools
•
1634  Franklin St.    -     -    Vancouver,   B.C.
Page Two Hundred     • THE GOVERNMENT OF
THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CONGRATULATIONS
to the Faculty and Student Body of the University of British Columbia on
their ever-increasing progress in the field of education, and best wishes for
1950.
The uneasy peace in which we are living might be discouraging were it not for
the firm belief that our pattern of living has so much more to offer than the
alternatives.
Today, British Columbia offers innumerable opportunities to the youth of
the province. Its wide-spread electrification program, the development of its
natural resources, its expanding transportation facilities, and its numerous
construction programs, all play an important part in inviting industry to move
to British Columbia.
With industry's tremendous expansion, somewhere in this vast organism there
is a place for every student graduating from our Halls of Learning. More
and more as techniques improve and new processes are developed, industry
demands the trained mind.
For the student, trained, alert and adaptable, there is always a place in the
industrial world of British Columbia.
DEPARTMENT   OF  TRADE  AND   INDUSTRY
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
E. G. ROWEBOTTOM, HON. LESLIE H. EYRES,
Deputy Minister. Minister.
•     Page Two Hundred and One The Makers
of
FELIX DRY
GINGER ALE
offer
Heartiest Congratulations
to the Graduates of
1950
MAY  YOU   HAVE   CONTINUED   SUCCESS
FELIX  BOTTLERS  LIMITED
Pacific Agricultural H yd rated
Lime
HIGH CALCIUM        QUICK ACTING
Hydrated Lime is the Most Effective
For every use on the Farm and Garden
MANUFACTURED BY
Pacific Lime Company Ltd.
602   Pacific   Building
Vancouver, B.C. MArine 0321
n
Manufacturer  of
Wire Ropes of
All Descriptions
BLUE
STRAND
British
Ropes
Canadian Factory
Ltd.
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Pharmacy  Undergraduate Society Had Offices in Orchard Hutt
PHARMACISTS
President Gerry Brown Was
A Capable Administrator
One bright spot on the campus this year was a group
of ex army huts on the edge of the orchard. Here the
Pharmacy Undergraduate Society under the leadership
of a vigorous executive proved themselves one of the
most active groups on the campus. From the very first
it was evident that a program designed by the executive
to foster Faculty and University spirit would be well
supported.
Pharmacy booster extraordinary was Gerry Brown,
president of the Ph.U.S. Gerry distinguished himself as
an able administrator and a capable organizer. Having
already served a year on the executive as vice-president
he had intimate knowledge of the affairs of the undergraduate society when he took over the President's chair.
In assuming a position relative to its importance on the
campus, the Pharmacy group has met with many problems in its four years on the campus. Chief among these
have been the problems of finances and undergraduate
cooperation. Austerity budgeting has reduced a normally
small AMS grant to an even smaller portion.
Norman Zacharias and Leona Milne are active on the
USC as well as the Ph.US executive. Leona, who is on
the USC executive will be remembered as the Pharmacy
entrant in the Fall Ball contest. Zacharias is admired
for his high scholastic record.
Secretary-treasurer, Peggy McAllister has put in an
extremely active year. Personable and friendly Peggy's
humour is known throughout Pharmacy.
News of the Faculty and the University is carried
across Canada in three trade journals. Responsibility for
these and other publicity write-ups rested on the capable
shoulders of Carl Knutson.
Walter Janicki is almost as well known in the Gym \»s
in his. own Faculty because of his position as sports
representative.
Frank Wills, friendly, young second year class representative is a good example of the freshman class.
Page Two Hundred and Two     e FOR   LABORATORY   CHEMICALS--
7/^/,/ NICHOLS .M,/
C.P. Acetic Acid
C.P. Ammonium Hydroxide
C.P. Hydrochloric Acid
C.P. Nitric Acid
C.P. Sulphuric Acid
-1
Complete line of Baker &
Adamson Laboratory Reagents and Fine Chemicals
for educational, research and
industrial uses.
Ihe NICHOLS CHEMICAL COMPANY. Limited
MONTREAL • TORONTO • VANCOUVER... Executive Offices, Sun Life Bldg., Montreal 2
With the Compliments of
Northern Alberta Dairy Pool Ltd,
Makers of "NU-MAID" Brand Butter
DIRECT FROM WESTERN CANADA'S LARGEST CREAMERY
Largest Distributors of Butter to
the Retail Trade in Western Canada
655 TERMINAL AVENUE
VANCOUVER, B.C.
HEAD OFFICE:
EDMONTON, ALBERTA
o     Page Two Hundred and Three ZwrntitteeM, . . .
When you graduate to problems
involving   high   grade  sand  and
gravel,   True-Mix   concrete   and
other building materials
consult
DIETHERS LTD.
Granville Island - MA. 6231 - Vancouver, B.C.
COAL
NANAIMO - COMOX
McLEOD RIVER
MACAULAY, NICOLLS,
MAITLAND 8 CO. LTD.
INSURANCE   BROKERS
REAL ESTATE AND MORTGAGES
435 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:
PAcific 4111
ANGLO - CANADIAN
SHIPPING COMPANY
Steamship and Chartering
Agents
955 W. Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
P€T€R'S
ICE
CREAM
CO.
"The Quality Ice Cream
of the Pacific Coast"
CEdar 9181
3204 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER, B.C.
With the Compliments of
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch
LIMITED
518 WEST HASTINGS ST.        MArine 8141
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
MARSHALL WELLS
B. C. LTD.
WISHES THE GRADUATING
CLASSES OF THE UNIVERSITY
SUCCESSFUL CAREERS
IN THEIR
CHOSEN SPHERES
OF ENDEAVOR
Page Two Hundred and Four    e PRIffllG IS OUR BUSINESS
We have served, your Alma Mater during  your  collegiate  years.      May  we
have the pleasure of serving you in your Business or Professional years ahead.
Call us at CEdar 3111
^^rnderdon f^rintina   (^ompanu oLlmtted
12th  AVENUE  AT ARBUTUS   STREET
Compliments    of
NELSON BROS.
FISHERIES LTD.
325 HOWE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Packers of
Famous   IJarattUMnt  Brand
Canned Ocean Foods
FILING SYSTEMS
and OFFICE EQUIPMENT
Desks, Chairs, Files, Safes,
Lockers, Shelving Partitions,
Book Cases, Card Cabinets,
Card Indexes, Filing Systems,
Visible Card Equipment.
^FFICES_ITOIALTYMmG>.
HEAD OFFICE AND FACTORIES: NEWMARKET, ONT.
VANCOUVER BRANCH
AT
536    HOWE    STREET
Branch Offices in Canadian Cities From Coast to Coast
e     Poge  Two Hundred and Five CANADA
CHAIN &  FORGE
COMPANY   LIMITED
MANUFACTURERS OF ALL  KINDS OF FIRE WELD
CHAIN   — ALL  STANDARD  AND SPECIAL  SIZES
Granville  I sand
Vancouver,   B.C.
Compliments
CANADIAN WOOD PIPE
& TANKS LTD.
MArine 7245 550 Pacific  Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Favorite
Venetian Blind Co.
FLEXALUM—STEEL
Choice of Colors      —      Repairs
All Metal We Specialize in
Heads Cornices
For Free Estimates Call Us First
Phone HAstings 5360
2679 E. Hastings Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS
BAIIS MAUI LTD.
Contractors & Engineers
G. E. BAYNES - Class '32    101° Seymour St.
D. |. MANNING - Class'47 MArine 7840
COED ANN LANGBEIN SHOWS DP MIROSLAV FIC CAMPUS  WONDERS
MIROSLAV FIC
Czech DP Here Under Unique
Democratic Education Plan
Miroslav Fie was the first ma le student brought to
UBC under the unique "education for democracy" plan
initiated at the University two years ago. Students had
their fees raised $1 to provide funds for transportation,
fees, and room and board for Fie and Guna Walters, a
Latvian DP.
Under the original plan, officials had hoped to bring
two German students to UBC, but a Canadian Government ruling stated German nationals were excluded from
Canada, Fie, a Czeck leftist, but not a member of the
Communist party, was the first male student brought here
under the plan.
Your Campus Service Station
Students' Car Repairs
Our Specialty
U.B.C. Service Station
(Just Off University Boulevard)
ROY   HAND,  Prop.
2180 Allison Road
ALma 0524
Page  Two Hundred and Six     e Totem '50 Looks At Campus Expansion
University Buildings Rank Near High With Other Campuses
Totem '50 brings the history of the buildings on th e campus and the firms that contributed a great deal in
this project.
Without the advice and the help of the firms show n in the next fifteen pages the campus would not be as
beautiful as it is today.
Excluding the as yet unfinished medical building,
UBC officials had allocated almost $5 million towards
the building of structures in which to house burgeoning
or over-crowded faculties, since 1946.
First project which began in 1946 and ended in
1948 is the pride and joy of Dr. G. M. Shrum. The
Physics building, opened with great fanfare in 1948,
houses one of Canada's links in atomic fission—the Van
der Graff generator, a two-storey high atom smasher.
The building contains three large lecture theatres,
two of which seat 140 students each and the largest has
a capacity of 272. There are also 12 research rooms, an
x-ray and optics lab and three electrical labs housed in
the building.
Students who had stood around in the over-crowded
library to plunge at vacant seats on a moment's notice
got relief not long ago with the opening of the new
library wing. The new wing, built at a cost of $716,580
was packed full of modern innovations that made the
old wing look almost medieval.
The library was made completely functional with the
addition of a seminar room, a classroom, a projection
room and additional offices and storage rooms. The new
wing was acoustically treated to allow a maximum of
comfort and a push button control elevator was installed
to serve eight landings. A dumb waiter also facilitated
the movement of books from lower stack levels.
One of the newest buildings to spring up during the
summer months was the Applied Science building
behind the bus stop. At a cost of almost $1 million the
structure relieved the badly over-crowded condition of
the old building.
The structure was designed as the most modern of
science units. Dozens of laboratories provided working
space for students of hydraulics, soil and concrete,
materials. There are roomy drafting facilities with
special attention being given to lighting.
The building was begun in 1948 and was completed
in 1950.
(Continued on Page 211)
WESTERN PLYWOOD COMPANY LIMITED
VANCOUVER, CANADA
Manufacturers ot
WESTPLY BRAND
POPLAR, BIRCH, MAHOGANY, OAK    .
STRUCTURPLY AND STANDARD DOUGLAS
FIR PLYWOOD
Distributors of Oak, Mahogany and Walnut Lumber
•     Page Two Hundred and seven en SC\^Ct
M    &   ^
.***
iSS&S
,OHO^C5
^f/VlQ
^ G<^«SSJW
WOMEN'S RESIDENCE GROUP
-STEFFENS COLMER STUDIOS
THE UNIVERSITY ARCHITECTS
HAVE  HAD THE  PLEASURE  OF  DEVELOPING
THE   ABOVE   PROJECTS   SINCE   1944
Page  Two Hundred and Eight     • another great U.B.C. project
-Photo by Graham Warrington
the Memorial Gymnasium
in process of construction by Dawson & Hall Ltd.
Dawson & Hall Ltd.
ENGINEERS
and
CONTRACTORS
775 Clarke Drive HAstings 2800
VANCOUVER, B.C.
•     Page  Two Hundred and Nine DOMINION BRIDGE COMPANY
LIMITED
Pacific Division
ENGINEERS • FABRICATORS • ERECTORS
structural   Steel     -      -Janm      -      1 ipe    cJ-ines
tv/ine    Cars      -      ^Jjiaeiteri      -     il5oiier5
2150 BOUNDARY ROAD                                  PHONE: GLen. 1000
P.O. Box 160
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Page  Two Hundred and Ten     • Hundreds of Home Economics students found themselves destitute of books and equipment one morning
early last year when they arrived on the campus to find
that a fire had chewed its way through four huts and
thousands of dollars worth of valuable equipment in the
early hours of a rain-soaked morning.
An appeal helped many of the students replace,
books and personal belongings, but no appeal could
possibly replace the loss of equipment. But through
generous outside donations a new Home Ec. building
arose on the same site as the huts and was ready for
occupancy when students returned in September.
The building, which cost over $186,000, was designed on a four level plan to suit the grade on site
causing a minimum of excavation. The architecture of
the building was unique among campus structures. Many
of the materials which were utilized in the construction
were prefabricated.
T_ie unit contained labs for food, clothing and textile analysis as well as space for nutrition research and
experimental cookery. In addition to these facilities, there
was space for arts and crafts and home management.
Ready for occupancy in the summer of 1950 will be
the newest addition to campus building—the biological
sciences and pharmacy building.
Designed to give complete separation of departments
and yet have a common focal area to house the lecture
theatre, lecture rooms, locker rooms, and heating plant,
the principle of a V-shaped building was used.
(Continued on Page 215)
With the Compliments of
HOLMES & WILSON
TRUCKING CO. LTD.
CEdar9161
1906 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
FOSTER WHEELER LIMITED
STEAM GENERATORS
PETROLEUM REFINERIES — CHEMICAL PROCESS PLANTS
HEAD OFFICE: ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO
Representative  in  British  Columbia
NORTHWEST  FILTER   COMPANY   LIMITED  —  FOOT OF  McLEAN DRIVE,  VANCOUVER, B.C.
•     Page Two Hundred and Eleven SPECIALISTS  IN
HARDWOOD
FLOORS
CHerry
2525
Nigh. Calls:
CEDAR 6063
FRED M.
BEA TTY
LIMITED
New Floors Installed
Old Floors Sanded and Retinished
Advice and Estimates FREE.
2046 WEST BROADWAY
Industrial Spray Painting      •      Caulking      •      Waterproofing      •      Mastic Applicators
PAINTING &
DECORATING
MArine 9S32
• RESIDENTIAL - INDUSTRIAL
• STRUCTURAL STEEL
AND TANKS
• INDUSTRIAL PLANTS
• MILLS AND FACTORIES
• SCHOOLS AND CHURCHES
• INTERIORS AND EXTERIORS
J. T. DEVLIN & CO.
615 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Page  Two Hundred and Twelve     • B. BOE
LIMITED
PLUMBING
HEATING
OIL-BURNER
SERVICE
652 Seymour Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
•     Page Two Hundred and Thirteen CHAS. E. LONGLEY
CO. LTD.
Industrial and Commercial Electrical Contractors
TAHow 2241-2-3
1319 SEYMOUR STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C.
'A Complete Electrical Service"
Builders'                  CEdar
Supplies                    6232
Darlington Haskins
Co. (194.) Limited
CONTRACTORS FOR
Tile
Mosaic
Marble
Terrazzo
2144 Granville St.           Vancouver, B.C.
The same skilled and competent service that
fits R. D. Bristowe Limited to handle the
Roofing and Sheet Metal Contract for the
fine new
U.B.C. GYMNASIUM
is available to YOU if you require
• A new Asphalt Shingle Roof
* Home Insulation
• Brick or Asbestos Siding
* Commercial, Industrial or Residential
Painting
• Steam Cleaning or Sandblasting
* Concrete or Paving  Breaking
It costs no more to have work
of this class
DONE RIGHT.
For Free Estimate or Technical Advice
Call
R. D BRISTOWE LIMITED
MArine 0714 - New West. 1662
With,    Compliments   of
George Montgomery
f-^lasterina    Contractors
KERRISDALE 1403
8650 ADERA ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Page Two Hundred and Fourteen     • By doing so, the designers were able to give natural
light and ventilation to the myriad small rooms.
The unit is designed on four levels and three main
lecture rooms will seat over 200 students each. Laboratory space has been allowed for students in the fields of
osteology, physiology and zoology.
Greatest student project ever undertaken began to
take shape beside the stadium before 1949 was over. The
War Memorial Gymnasium, designed as a memorial to
all B.C. servicemen who died in World War II was begun,
even though much of the projected interior work would
not be   completed.
Most dominant feature of the project is the huge
floating pan roof and ceiling supported on slender reinforced concrete structural columns. Created for purely
functional reasons to follow the sloping line of the bleachers, this particular innovation will direct spectator attention to the floor.
Although it will not be included in the first unit a
swimming pool will be included in the building with a
seating capacity of 750 people. Other facilities as yet not
designed include squash courts and dancing studios.
Four new units, designed as women's residences will
take shape during 1950. Location of the residences, which
will house freshettes, is located away from the main
university campus on the north side of the Marine Drive
cutoff.
The residence will be built on this site in the form
of units.
For the home
of
Distinction
British    PLATE MIRRORS
Thermopane        PLATE
WINDOWS
PILKINGTON  GLASS   LTD.
102 POWELL STREET PAcific 0145
Compliments
LOCKERBIE &
HOLE Limited
SANITARY
HEATING
ENGINEERS
1650 West 4th Avenue
CEdar1108
With the
Compliments
of a
Friendly Firm
•     Page  Two Hundred and Fifteen C R ITT A L L
WINDOWS
CRITTALL METAL WINDOWS
are being used in the
• INSTITUTE OF PREVENTIVE
MEDICINE
• THE BIOLOGY BUILDING
Supplied through
North Western Supply Company Ltd.
Vancouver
British Columbia
Crittall  — the World's  largest manufacturer  of  metal   windows  and   doors
Witk tL
2    Com
tollments    of   .    .    .
w.
G.
JENNER LTD.
f-^lasterina    Contractors
4654 LIN WOOD STREET     -     BURNABY     -     DEXTER 3718 T
Page  Two Hundred and Sixteen     • Commonwealth Constructs . . .
P_H
■ r        -n
W/Jm~4mm\m
WW                   ■_f__rri    ii.rrrrrmT
"S^rirSMi   "■■■■■Ti    t,,imi,m
ilill *iwi           annum
1    j B^tW ^^^^M*gga_____i i-Bi    [}|                           _.__■-■_
■■■■«» WIIS1B     ailillliM
i
Iflflf^il       HmX^kl
~p^~-^»    j_  ii iiiniiw ■
fflj1 »  , "'
——	
<=!Lj_____!^ *^**^m9M&m^
* _■$_*■ ■■
„_—iJS*    *""                           flP_HB_B_HH&_
1      ™
	
—Photo b>y Tony Archer
. . • The Preventive Medicine Building
CONSTRUCTION  OF ALL  KINDS
•  BUILDINGS, TERMINAL  ELEVATORS
• INDUSTRIAL   DEVELOPMENTS
•  HIGHWAY PAVING
COMMONWEALTH CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY  LIMITED
WINNIPEG, MAN.
670 TAYLOR STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
VICTORIA, B.C.
•     Page  Two Hundred and Seventeen Deluxe Custom Made
Venetian Blinds
MADE TO ORDER IN OUR OWN FACTORY
CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
If you are planning to dress up your home,
apartment or office, with Venetian Blinds,
don't delay.
Steel or Flexalum
Choice ot Colors
Venetian Blinds accentuate the beauty of
your window treatment . . . eliminate undesirable views . . . insure privacy . . . diffuse
light .  .  . and  regulate ventilation.
SUNSET SHADE
AND VENETIAN BLIND CO.
1141-3 Robson Street
MArine 2051 - PAcific 4732 - PAcific 7835
LAB APPARATUS
We can supply immediately
BAUSCH & LOMB MICROSCOPES
MICROSCOPE LAMPS   & BALOPTICONS
VOLAND & SONS ANALYTICAL BALANCES
AND   OTHER   SCIENTIFIC   EQUIPMENT
J. S. HUDSON
Offices and Showrooms
633 Hornby St., Vancouver, B.C., MA. 1357
INLAID FLOOR & SUPPLY
COfflPAHY LimiTED
Specializing in Rubber
Linoleum & Asphalt Tile Floors
2676 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. CHerry 5101
Assay,   Industrial   and  Educational
Laboratory Supplies Chemicals
Cave & Company Ltd.
567   Hornby  St.
Vancouver,  B.C.
FOR BETTER CONSTRUCTION
ON THE PACIFIC COAST
USE    .    .    .
PACIFIC   PRODUCTS
Lump Quicklime      —      Builders' Hydrate
Lime  Putty        —        Pulverized Quicklime
Brick Mortar
MANUFACTURED BY
Pacific Lime Company Ltd.
602   Pacific   Building
Vancouver,  B.C. MArine  0321
CUT YOUR OPERATING COSTS WITH
THE RIGHT MATERIALS  HANDLING  EQUIPMENT
Cleveland Tramrail Division
Get This Book!
BOOKLET No. 2008. Packed
with valuable information.
Profusely illustrated. Write
for free copy.
THE CLEVELAND CRANE a ENGINEERING  CO.
2267   EAST  286th  STREET       e       WICKLIFFE,  OHIO
TfAMRML
OVERHEAD MATERIALS HANDLING EQUIPMENT
N. C. SHERMAN LTD. industrial engineers
1156 West Pender St.
Vancouver, B.C.
PA. 1588
Page  Two Hundred and Eighteen     • mARUJ.LL
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LIMITED
410 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 2311
are proud to have assisted
in the building ot U. R. C.
Marwell's Activities Include:
BUILDINGS • ROADS • AIRPORTS • BRIDGES   EARTH MOVING
jiterlmg ^ilbtxtb
VANCOUVER, B.C.
(&mtm\tnb (Ijhtalttg
Henceforth  Known As
BOGARDUS WILSON
Limited
1000 Homer Street MA. 3248-9
Vancouver,   B.C.
AEROCRETE CONSTRICT!.
CO. (B.C.) LTD.
1025 W. 77TH AVE.        VANCOUVER, B.C.
Specializing  in the Manufacture
of
Lightweight Concrete Rooting
and Floor Slabs
and
Pre-Cast Reinforced Concrete
Floor Joists
AS USED  IN
UBC Home Economics Building
•     Page  Two Hundred and Nineteen WESTERN   CANADA'S   LARGEST
MODERN WOODWORK FACTORY
_>t4?°n
: ^gS5_S.:
>   DOORS
, VANCOUVER.
Compliments oi
Fred Welsh
&S0N
PLUMBING & HEATING
INSTALLATIONS
SANITARY  ENGINEERS
HEATING CONTRACTORS
733 BEATTY ST.   -   TA.   7267
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
With the Compliments of
BLAIR IRON WORKS
119 W.  Pender St.
VANCOUVER
826 Royal Avenue
NEW WESTMINSTER
Phone  TA.   5713
CHAS.   W.   VAN
EWART  A.  VAN
The Window Shade Emporium
WINDOW SHADES AND VENETIAN BLINDS
337 Gore Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS   OF
Hingley Company Ltd.
EXPERT  TILE   SPECIALISTS
Tile Kitchens   —    Bath Rooms
Fireplaces      —      Floor Tile
Built and  Designed  For You
"IF YOU ARE  BUILDING A  HOME,
WE   HAVE  TILE   FOR  EVERY   PURPOSE"
Visit Our Showroom at
1660 West 4rh Ave.       Phone CHerry 2030
GOOD LUCK, GRADS
Page  Two Hundred and Twenty     o Best for All Your
Interior Painting
the modern finish for all woodwork and walls and ceiling in
kitchen and bathroom. Highly
resistant — scrubbable — extremely durable.
Washable finish for walls and
ceilings. Covers practically all
wall surfaces in one coat.
Pastel shades and new deep
colors.
Products of
GENERAL PAINT
CORPORATION   OF  CANADA   LTD.
950 RAYMUR AVE. VANCOUVER, B.C.
H. D. LAYFIELD & CO.
Roofing — Flooring — Insulation
B.  C.   DISTRIBUTORS
Johns-Manville  Insulation and
Power  Products
Johns-Manville Industrial Friction
Materials
Approved Johns-Manville Contractors
TAtlow  1471-2
1225  HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER,  B.C.
F. DREXEL CO. LTD.
REFRACTORY & INSULATING MATERIALS
APPROVED   rlKrHnl   f|\  DISTRIBUTORS
833 Powell Street   -    -    -   Vancouver, B.C.
FL00RCRAFT LIMITED
Resilient Flooring Contractors
ARMSTRONG'S ASPHALT TILE
LINOLEUM    —    RUBBER TILE
1955 West Broadway      VANCOUVER, B.C.
CEdar 6210
COMPLIMENTS
GENERAL EQUIPMENT
LIMITED
POWER PLANT HEATING &
VENTILATING EQUIPMENT
CEILING     AIR     DIFFUSERS
PAcific  5932
1230 Granville St.
GLASS
PLATE & WINDOW GLASS
MIRROR  MANUFACTURERS
METAL   STORE   FRONTS  — GLASS   BLOCKS
STRUCTURAL VITROLITE  GLASS
DU PLATE SAFETY GLASS
THERMOPANE   INSULATING GLASS
AUTO GLASS INSTALLED
W. HOLT & SON
436 W.  2nd  Ave.      —       FAirmont 6696
•     Page  Two Hundred and Twenty-one Page  Two Hundred and Twenty-two     • folate Pantnait
Stadia
Photography at its Best
MEMBER
*<_$2£__x>
• WEDDINGS
WISHING ALL
GROUPS
GRADUATES EVERY
CHILDREN
SUCCESS
PASSPORTS
YOUR   NEGATIVES   WILL
FTT
BE KEPT ON FILE FOR
YOU   FOR   RE-ORDER
• FLASH
AT CONTRACT PRICE
PHOTOS   AT
TELEPHONE
HOMES
PAcific 9840
CHURCH
569   GRANVILLE   STREET
RECEPTIONS
VANCOUVER, B.C.
COLUMBIA
PAPER CO. LIMITED
Wholesale
Paper  Merchants
Manufacturers of 'Columbia" Quality
Scribblers and Exercise  Books
Vancouver,  B.C.    -    -    -    -    Victoria,  B.C.
COMPL 1 MENTS
OF
£!f4^^4^£ r%//^»s
' &£*+*//&ef
PRINTERS     AND      LITHOGRAPHERS
382 West Broadway    •    Telephone FAirmont 7605    •    Vancouver, B.C.
•     Page Two Hundred and Twenty-three ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS . . .
Totem Editor 1950 wishes to thank the following persons and firms who
contributed so much in helping produce this year book.
CHARLES E. PHILLIPS, of Ward and Phillips Limited
HAROLD KENT, of Cleland-Kent
JIM SUTHERLAND
BOB CURRIE
ADVERTISING ENTERPRISES
ERNEST PERRAULT
SHIRLEY FINCH
JAMES BANHAM
OUR ADVERTISERS
TOTEM PHOTOGRAPHERS
KRASS STUDIOS
and the thousand of students who cooperated in no little way.
Printed by WARD &  PHILLIPS LIMITED at 352 West  Broadway in Vancouver,  Canada

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