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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Totem 1938 1938

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,v L S. KLINCK, President President's Message
Not long ago an alumnus of an eastern university, who is a close student of men
of affairs, and who has been more than ordinarily successful in business in this
Province, put this pointed question: "Can the quality of universities be judged
fairly by the culture and intellectual interests of their graduates?"
Continuing he said, in effect, "to men like myself it appears that, for many of
the graduates of our universities, Congregation Day marks the conclusion of their
formal education but not the commencement of continuing education. Having
ho compelling impulse to continue their studies following graduation, aside
from the interests imposed by the requirements of their business or profession, it
would seem that not a few of them are less keen intellectually and much less well-
informed than some of their associates who never attended university."
That there are instances such as this alumnus cited must be admitted, and the existence of such cases constitutes an indictment of our universities.
And yet may it not be that the blame should fall not entirely upon the alumnus,
but on the University also? Should not one of the duties of the University be
to provide intellectual stimulus for its alumni? At a time when the University
of British Columbia is doing its utmost to discharge its responsibilities to the
entire adult population around it, should it not make provision for the further
education of its own graduates?
That the value of the recently organized Extension Department is appreciated
by our alumni, is apparent from the loyal support which so many of them are
giving to this work in every part of the Province. And no service that they
might render could be greater than an explicit statement of the problems and the
interests of their respective communities. The graduate who is conscious of
what he owes, both to his Alma Mater and to the locality in which he lives, is the
ideal link between them: while the general public makes the existence of the
University possible, he makes that existence beneficial. The more closely this
intellectual contact can be made between the University and its alumni, the less
danger there is of the institution becoming mustily academic on the one hand, and
of graduates lapsing into mental stagnation on the other.
By continuing their education after graduating, the members of the Class of '38
will best serve their communities, their Alma Mater and themselves.
L. S. KLINCK,
President. FOREWORD
Keep The Totem near you when you are not at school. It will remind you of
people, scenes, and events. Let it serve as a background to your impassioned
words in favor of new buildings and more money for your University. Look
through it once or twice and then leave it for a while; look through it again
and you will find new memories brought to light by its pages. Look through it
with others and you will discover old high-school friends common to you all
who have been forgotten, campus scenes that will remind you of things seen
since leaving college, candid shots that will startle you as their implications and
connotations are suddenly brought homz by a chance word of another; more than
anything else you will be surprised at how many people you don't know.
The Totem records many of your impressions of the University—and some of
the University's impressions of you. These are so numerous and complex that
it takes years for them to fall into their proper place in the "scheme of things,"
that is why The Totem is always interesting — as memories and impressions
group and integrate the old pages gain new meanings. Keep your book as you
would a diary—only your Totem can be safely left open on the table. CAMPU
S Stadium: Built by
the Alma Mater
Society.
University Buildings
By John Garrett
Today sees a vision, caught more than twenty-five years ago by but four men,
partly realized. These men saw a complete university settlement nestling on
the tip of rugged Point Grey. They pictured a small town surrounding some
five hundred acres of university buildings. At the present moment only three
of the proposed buildings have been erected, and each of these forms a small part
of larger units to be built in the future. This trio of buildings forms the permanent class of the present university structures, while the other buildings
form the non-permanent class.
The oldest of the permanent buildings is, in a sense, the Science Building. The
romantic story behind the construction of this magnificent structure is well known
—how the vast framework was erected in pre-war days, how all building ceased
during the critical years of 1914-1918, and how the passionate Student Campaign forced the completion of the edifice. Now twelve years old the Science
Building is in need of supplementary expansion, for its neatly bricked rooms
house not the one Department of Chemistry as originally intended, but in addition the Departments of Physics, Bacteriology, and Nursing.
Just as the Science Building forms one side of the future Science Quadrangle, so
does the Library form the centre block of a double-winged construction. The
Library, completed in 1925, stands at the head of the proposed Arts Quadrangle,
east of the main axis, and is a two storied building of British Columbia granite.
Few forget the dignified erection after having once visited it to see the stately interior with its exposed trusses supporting the roof over the vast reading room,
its walls of Caen stone, its woodwork of plain oak, and its amber coloured windows with their own insets of the Coats-of-Arms of Canadian and British Universities.
Although the Faculties of Agriculture and Applied Science have their headquarters in the buildings under the same names, there are several laboratories and much
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I  * equipment in smaller outlying structures. Scattered over the farm lands at some
distance from the main part of the Campus are the many rustic homes for the
various departments in the Agricultural Faculty. There are three barns, a Piggery, a Dairy Building, and an Agronomy and Horticultural Building. Not as
far from the more central buildings are the engineering laboratories, for training
Mechanical, Electrical, Mining and Metallurgical, and Forestry Engineers.
The remainder of the university buildings are probably the most important in
the eyes of the students for the cost of construction was taken from the pockets
of these not too opulent persons. The first structure built by the undergraduates
was the Gymnasium, a modern and excellently furnished structure. Although
the cost of the building was in the neighbourhood of $40,000, the Alma Mater
Society floated a bond issue and successfully retired it before the day of maturity.
The second effort of the student body was the Stadium, which was in use for the
first time this session. It was built during the summer of 1937 at a total cost
of about $40,000, much of the labour being done by student employees.
The latest development in the realm of building is a plan to erect a $50,000 Memorial Building to Dean and Mrs. Brock who were killed in the summer of 1935.
The major portion of the necessary funds is in hand and it is hoped that actual
construction may commence during the approaching summer. The building
will be largely a hall suitable for dances and other social affairs, while at the
same time it will contain numerous rooms for the many campus clubs and societies that are at the present moment without accommodation.
As the problem of overcrowding becomes pressingly serious, the problem of buildings increases almost two-fold. The fact that the construction of buildings requires vast sums of money is sufficient to complicate the question of future expansion and to baffle most of the financial wizards at the helm of this university.
But the students have taken a lead in putting up their own athletic structures; they
have sacrificed; they have won.    May others take note and learn.
The Gymnasium
in centre: Built by
the Alma Mater
Society. Anglican
College
The third building in the permanent group is the Power House, which is placed
in the centre of the space ultimately to be the Engineering Quadrangle. The
Power House is, both a heating centre and an engineering experimental "guinea-
pig," for there are three different heating units each of which can be carefully regulated and observed. There is a Babcock Wilcox unit, with a Natural Draft
Stoker; a Sterling Boiler, with a forced draft Coxe Travelling Grate; and a Kid-
well Unit which also has a forced draft Coxe Grate, but which has optional air
pre-heating equipment. The heat generated by the boilers in the Power House
travels to all the university buildings, including the two Theological Colleges
which are at least a quarter of a mile from the central Mall.
The majority of the other fifteen or twenty university buildings are non-permanent, and are described as being "forty year structures." Forming a central
body are the Administration, Auditorium, Arts, Agriculture, and Applied Science Buildings, all designed in a modified Renaissance architectural fashion.
Their construction was commenced in May of 1924, and was virtually finished by
the May of the following year. All the buildings, excluding the first two, contain offices, lecture rooms, laboratories and common rooms.
The Administration and Auditorium Buildings have been designed specially for
their particular purposes. The Administration is a two story structure with offices, and large meeting rooms for the use of such bodies as the Board of Governors and the Senate, or the Faculties and their Committees. The Auditorium
has a well proportioned theatre which accommodates over 1100 people, and
which has a well equipped stage, suitable for any type of dramatic or musical
presentation. Beneath the theatre itself is the University Grill or Restaurant
which is more commonly referred to as the "Caf." Several hundred meals,
cooked in a large, modern kitchen under the auditorium stage, are served daily
to starving students.
PHOTO    BY    HANBURY
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{ &" PHOTO BY GEORGE GREGORY  FACULTY FACULTY
G. G. Moe, Ph.D.
Head   of   Department  of   Agronomy
P. A. Boving
Agronomy
H. M. King
Head   of   the   Department  of
Animal Husbandry
D. G. Laird
Agronomy
C. E. Dolman, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of Bacteriology
and Preventative Medicine
D. C. B. Duff, Ph.D.
Department   of   Bacteriology,   etc.
A. A. Hutchinson, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of  Botany FACULTY
John Davidson
Botany
R. H. Clark, Ph.D.
Head   of   the   Department  of  Chemistry
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H5»j|
m9u   sk' V
W. F. Seyer, Ph.D.
Department of Chemistry
William Ure, Ph.D.
Department of Chemistry
M. J. Marshall, Ph.D.
Department of Chemistry
Dean Finlayson
Head of the Department of
Civil  Engineering
F. A. Wilkin
Civil  Engineering A. H. Finlay
Civil   Engineering
A. Lighthall
Civil  Engineering
Lemuel Robertson
Head of the Department of Classics
0. J. Todd, Ph.D.
Classics
Blythe Eagles, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of Dairying
J. Friend Day
Economics and Commerce
C. W. Toping, Ph.D.
Economics and Sociology FACULTY
G. F. Drummond
Economics
Dean Buchanan, Ph.D.
Acting Head of the Department of
Education
W. G. Black, Ph.D.
Education
G. G. Sedgewick, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of English
W. L. MacDonald, Ph.D.
English
G. C. Wood
English
Thorleif Larsen
English FACULTY
Miss M. L. Bollert
English
F. M. Knapp
Head of the Department of Forestry
M. Y. Williams, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of Geology
and Geography
S. J. Schofield, Ph.D.
Geology
H. V. Warren, Ph.D.
Mineralogy  and   Petrography
W. N. Sage, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of History
F. H. Soward
History FACULTY
Dean F. M. Clement
Head of the Department of Horticulture
A. F. Barss
Horticulture
F. S. Nowlan, Ph.D.
Mathematics
W. H. Gage
Mathematics
F. J. Brand
Mathematics
H. J. MacLeod, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of Mechanical
and Electrical  Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
J. F. Bell;
Mechanical Engineering J. M. Turnbull
Head of the Department of
Mining   and   Metallurgy
Miss Isabel Maclnnes, Ph.D.
German
D. 0. Evans, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of
Modern Languages
H. T. J. Coleman, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of
Philosophy and   Psychology
A. E. Hennings, Ph.D.
Physics
T. C. Hebb, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of Physics
G. M. Shrum
Physics
E. A. Lloyd
Head of the Department of
Poultry Husbandry
C. McLean Fraser, Ph.D.
Head of the Department of Zoology 0
TUDENT
d McGuire
Brown
Publicity Committee
By Dorwin Baird
The announcement by President L. S. Klinck late in January that U.B.C. fees
would be raised $25, and registration limited to 2000, was followed immediately by action on the part of the student body. The day after the Ubyssey
announced the drastic changes in streaming headlines, a "protest" meeting was
called. For an hour and a half students discussed the situation, and sent a committee consisting of David Carey, Lyall Vine, Milton Owen and Edward Baynes
to Victoria to interview Premier T. D. Pattullo.
The interview took place on January 27, with Carey reporting back that the
"Premier gave us his sympathy and that was all." Plans were immediately
laid for a petition campaign, similar to that held by U.B.C. students a decade
ago. Reported a special campaign committee: "The action of the government
in refusing aid to the university will not be accepted by the students as a final
decision ... it will provide the necessary impetus to send the students on their
campaign for signatures ... a city-wide drive to secure the support of the
people .  .  . .finally covering the entire province."
The following Monday, January 31, another Alma Mater meeting convened
and Carey told the students: "A petition at this time would be crazy." A weekend of thought on the part of the special committee resulted in the above decision.
Instead, students decided to support the idea first advanced by Morris Belkin,
that a permanent publicity campaign be carried out, taking the form of a six-
months' drive to win public support "the hard way." Finances for the drive
were obtained by a $2 assessment from caution money, subscribed to by several hundred students. The night of January 31, Students' Council forwarded a letter to the Board
of Governors, then in session; asking them to defer the fee increase until results
of the student drive could be ascertained. Answer of the board was in the negative.
Meanwhile, extensive plans were laid for the campaign, with Belkin's committee being composed of Carson McGuire, Ed. Disher, Malcolm Brown and Charlie Campbell. A number of others worked along with the committee, laying
plans for province-wide publicity.
"Open House" day, under Charlie Campbell's direction, provided the proper
commencement to the campaign. Successful to an unexpected degree, "Open
House" did much to set the stage for the publicity drive.
Students' Council, still trying to convince the Board of Governors to stave off
the rise in fees, arranged to have a meeting with the board representatives to discuss the entire situation. Council wanted to see the university financial statement, in order to have proof that the increased fees were a necessity.
February 14, the publicity committee underwent a reorganization, leaving the
organization standing as it is today. After a three-hour session of nearly twenty
student leaders, John Bird was appointed head of the group. Personnel, as approved by the long meeting: Malcolm Brown, radio; Carson McGuire, statistics;
Paul Paine, service clubs and speakers; Morris Belkin, newspapers.
At a meeting of the Vancouver Institute February 12, Dr. G. M. Weir, Minister
of Education, proposed that an Institute of Preventive Medicine building on the
campus would do much to alleviate the overcrowding, and also serve the province in a direction where need has long been felt. Recent developments have
hinted that this proposal may be acted upon this summer.
The new campaign committee was in the meantime going ahead with its work.
Service clubs were cooperating, and news stories in papers throughout B. C.
were appearing, giving the University's message to the province.
The campaign became an issue in the presidential elections, and Carson McGuire was elected mainly on his record of hard work in connection with the work
of the committee.
A good deal of the work of the committee has been of such a nature that it
cannot be publicized. Statistics relative to the use of classrooms and the possibilities of curriculum changes relieving overcrowding were gathered by McGuire,
and prepared into a brief which went before the governors.
More important than the actual work of directing publicity was the new task
taken on by the committee: an attempt to stave off the fee increase and registration limitation. This was set as the main objective of the group, and no effort
was spared to reach this goal.
At the time of writing, several possibilities are in sight. Most important to
students of next year, is the fact that there may yet be a chance of keeping the
fees down. At any rate, the campaign committee is striving to this end. with
every hope of success.
They have had a thankless task. Once chosen, they were forgotten by the student body, left to work in comparative obscurity. No matter what may happen in the summer, the publicity drive will continue—it being felt that such an
effort can do the University no harm.
Students of tomorrow will have a debt to pay these campaigners of today.
For even if the results of their work should be nil, their unselfish efforts for
their Alma Mater should not go unrewarded. Most of them seniors or juniors,
they have been striving for something, the benefits of which they will not reap.
They have been working for the future of the university, and have set a precedent hard to follow, even in this young, energetic university, where time after
time, the burdens of development have been carried by the students themselves. By James Beveridge
On the morning of January 29th, at an early hour, the C.P.S.S. "Princess Norah"
drew out of Pier D into the dawn-flushed waters of the harbor, turned in the
appropriate direction, and proceeded steadfastly to Victoria. At the Capital City
eight hundred U.B.C. students streamed off the steamer and undertook a
systematic invasion of the city.
1938 thus revived the tradition of the rowdy 'twenties, when the Victoria Invasion was an annual feature of the University season. The revival was well and
thoroughly organized, efficiently conducted, blessed by excellent weather and
Varsity's McKechnie Cup win over Victoria's Crimson Tide.
Six teams competed in events against Victoria squads, all in the spirit of good
sportsmanship and brisk competition. Triumphal sequence of the journey was the
uprooting and rape of McDonald Park's goal posts, which were borne through
the city and subsequently to the U.B.C. campus, where they were installed in
the quad.    The bill arrived in due course.
A tea-dance, arranged by Victoria College in the tropical atmosphere of the Crystal Gardens, was convenient to the swimming gala in the Gardens pool. Students
scattered throughout the city for dinner, and went on to the basketball game at
Victoria High Gymnasium. They might have avoided this last; it was not
a U.B.C. victory.
The "Norah" left Victoria at 10 in the evening, and rapidly became the counterpart of William II's "White Ship." Fortunately she kept clear of reefs in Active Pass. Ozzy Durkins band, with dogged courage, provided dance music for
many hours of the return crossing. The entourage arrived home at 3 in the
morning, a grey hour.
Altogether, students expressed keen enjoyment and appreciation for the Invasion.
It is hoped subsequent expeditions will be as efficiently organized and as spontaneously effected. UDENTS' COUNCIL . . . MEN'S UNDERGRADUATE EXECUTIVE . . . WOMEN'S UNDERGRADUAT
TS MEN'S UNDERGRADUATE EXECUTIVE
tDUATE EXECUTIVE
iRICULTUREd
>UATE EXECUTIVE
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UNDERGRADUAT
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3RICULTURE ME
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3RICULTURE MEN'S
E EXECUTIVE .
E EXECUTIVE
DERGRADUAT
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RADUAT
TIVE .
ITIVE
ECUTIVE
NURSES' UNDERGRADUATE EXECUTIVE
'UDENTS'COUNCIL . . . MEN'S UNDERGRADUATE EXECUTIVE . . . WOMEN'S UNDERGRADUAT
ITS MEN'S  UNDERGRADUATE EXECUTIVE  . •.  .SCIENCE MEN'S UNDERGRADUATE EXECUTIVE University Government
By John Garrett
The university has, in recent years, come to occupy an increasingly prominent
position in the modern social structure—a structure which to a large extent is
dependent, in fact founded, upon efficient government. In striking similarity
the university, to function successfully, must possess a comparatively simple
adminstrative machine. The government of the university of this province, as
constituted by the British Columbia University Act, has proved, and is proving
itself to be of practical design.
This Act, drafted and passed in 1924 and amended from time to time since then,
separates the fields of administrative activity on the part of the university
authorities into three elastically defined sections to include financial business
of the institution, academical matters, and student affairs. An examination of
University Government with respect to the student population and its interests
commences with the position of the Chancellor.
Elected by Convocation, the Chancellor is chairman of this body and is the sole
person with the power to confer degrees Directly under him is the President,
chief executive officer of the university, who supervises and directs the academic
work and the teaching staff of the institution. His is the right to suspend any
student or to deal summarily with any matter of student discipline.
Under the chairmanship of the president is the Senate, empowered to make provisions to enable the students to elect a representative council which acts as an
intermediate body between the students and the university executives. These
"provisions" form the only basis for any "legal" status that the Students'
Council may appear to possess. But the Council has considerable powers and
activities by virtue of its own constitution which was laid down "locally," and
by virtue of the regulations made by th; faculty council.
The regulations of the latter board, although subject to the approval of the
senate, are virtually supreme in the establishment or abolition of such organizations as fraternities and sororities, and in all matters of student discipline. The
faculty council can suspend or fine students, and can permit the organization of
a students' court, to which it may delegate disciplinary powers, which, again,
it may increase, decrease or entirely remove.
The students' council, subject, then, to the faculty council in disciplinary matters and to the senate in all other decisions, is the executive body of the Alma
Mater Society, which is itself organized for the single purpose of carrying on
all student activities. The council controls all the. societies subsidiary to the
Alma Mater Society, and deals with questions of student conduct. But the faculty
have deemed it advisable to surround the students' council with advisory boards,
in order to assure wise administration.
There are two main bodies that act in a parental manner, the Joint Committee
on Student Affairs and the Faculty Committee on Student Affairs. The former
consists of an equal number of faculty members and council members, the latter of
faculty only. Power is given to the joint committee to amend or annul any
proposals of the Alma Mater Society, but a minority of two members can appeal
to the decisions of the committee before the senate. The faculty council exists
essentially as the primary medium of communication between the student body
and the university authorities.
Each of the major "chambers" of the university appoints numerous committees,
executives and advisory boards to supervise particular phases of adminstration.
In a final analysis it appears to be impossible to find anything that escapes the
jurisdiction of one committee or another. That is efficiency.
It is equally impossible to say that students are "kings in their own home," for
all decisions of the Alma Mater Society or the students' council require the stamp
of approval of the university authorities, such as the senate, before they become
law on the campus. But the university "supervisors" have, as yet, never opposed the desires of the student body; they have merely delayed certain student
legislation for further consideration—not, perhaps, unlike the English House of
Lords. The future success of our system of university government, particularly
where it concerns the student population, depends upon agreement and co-operation between the student executives and the faculty executives. Under the able, sensible leadership of David
Carey, 1937-1938 Students' Council carried
on its administration with vigour and consideration.    At first, its term promised to be David Carey
one of routine and small projects, but action
taken by the Board of Governors at the commencement of the spring term created a problem which this Council was well able to cope with. Under the conservative influence of its president, a campaign which boded at first to be one of rashness, developed into a well-organized movement to educate the province to the
value of the university.
Dave Carey's abilities were not confined to leadership of the student body. As
captain of the English rugby team he led the boys to victory in the World Cup,
Miller Cup and McKechnie Cup series. His prominence as an all-round student
was well revealed by his appointment as Rhodes Scholar last fall.
Dave fought successfully the wiles of the women members of Council. Mary
Black, kept active during the meeting with the minutes, also proved an able letter
writer, and member of various committees. Peggy Fox, president of W. U. S.,
fought bravely, but sometimes in vain, for the rights of women on the campus.
Jean Meredith, W. A. A. president, had her own ideas on all matters; she ably and
successfully directed Women's Athletics, and gave Peggy her spirited support in
women's affairs generally.
This year's council boasted capable men leaders, who carried on, as well, outside activities to the credit of the university. Among them was one of the most
outstanding fullbacks in the history of U.B.C. English rugby—John Bird. He
found time besides, to administer Men's Undergraduate affairs, and the Discipline Committee, and to successfully chair the Campaign Committee. Lyall Vine
also helped to uphold the dignity of the team, and do his bit in making it victorious. He also kept the ball rolling in Men's Athletics. The able and popular
treasurer, Bob Smith exerted his prowess on the field for the second team. Loyalty to English rugby did not detain him from being most magnanimous to any
other sport desiring an increased grant.
Mai Brown's exercise was confined to the tongue. He did more for L. S. E. in
one night than past administrators of this department did in a year. The fact
that the other eight council members fell asleep during his ravings perturbed him
not a bit. ,
John Brynelsen deserves a note of thanks for his capable management of rooms
and dates, and his consistent attention to the whims of his "accomplices" in the
form of cake, cookies and olives.
On the whole, Council enjoyed its year, and sincerely hopes that all its decisions
proved to the advantage cf the Alma Mater Society. Mary Black Bob Smith Malcolm Brown
Peggy Fox John Bird
Lyall Vine Jean Meredith John Brynelsen Men's Undergraduate Executive
This executive was not called upon to act all year.
John  Bird Alex Macdonald Paul Trussell Jack Davis Peggy Fox Jean Stordy Peggy Thomson      Morva   Longfellow
Women's Undergraduate
The Women's Undergraduate Society sponsored an information
booth for newcomers to the University; the Freshette supper in the
traditional children's party style; the Senior-Freshett tea; and teas
for out-of-town students. These functions welcomed the freshettes
to the campus and gave them a chance to meet their class-mates and
girls of the senior class.
In the spring the annual Hi-Jinx was duly held. This is an event
for women only and several intruding males were severely dealt with.
Other activities of the society were tea-dances after rugby and football 'games and one of the outstanding dances of the year—the
Co-Ed Ball. Arts Men's Undergraduate Executive
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Alex Macdonald    Struan Robertson     Robert Hayman       Graham Darling
Arts Men's Undergraduate Executive this year not only staged the magnificent
Arts-Aggie Ball but also aided in the formation of "Open House."
Popularity and formality were combined at the Ball. It was held in the Crystal
Ballroom of the Hotel Vancouver to tha music of Mart Kenney and his Western
Gentlemen. The party this year was a financial success and attendance was
doubled over previous years.
For the first time "Open House" was not just a technical display — this year
there were displays of work in the Arts Faculty and of work done in and by
the various campus clubs.
The executive was: president, Alex Macdonald; vice-president, Struan Robertson; secretary, Graham Darling; treasurer, Robert Hayman.
Science Men's Undergraduate Executive
Col. Wilkin
J. Davis
A. Allen
P. Love
Ray Jones
Jim Ussher
SMUS claims fame on its Pep Meets alone. Any other work is dull and torpid
after these. This year the meets had their usual ruddy glow, with perhaps a
few more predominant shady spots than usual. Wilf. Williams and his newly
organized Science Orchestra supplied the noise. One meet was held in the Auditorium with a down-town orchestra making music. The standard of entertainment was not lowered however.
This years executive consisted of Honorary President, Col. Wilkin; president,
Jack Davis; vice-president, Alf. Allen; secretary, Ray Jones; treasurer, Pat Love;
athletic representative, Jim Ussher; and class presidents, Gordie Snelling, Lawrence Garvie, Reg. Haskins, and Rex Parker. Agriculture Undergraduate Executive
P. Trussell M. Welsh
Joan McTaggart-Cowan
Nurses Undergraduate Executive
Miss Gray
Kathleen Taylor       Donna Leitch     Leslie Montgomery   Elizabeth Morris A. Beattie )NOMICS
PHYSICS
MATHEMATICS . . . CIVIL . . . GEOLOGY . . . GERMAN . . . MECH>
EMISTRY
ENGLISH . . . PHILOSOPHY . . . EDUCATION
PSYCHOLOGY ... NURSING .
CTRICAL . . . AGRONOMY . . . +IISTORY . . . FORESTRY
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SURVEYINC Dean
Arts
Have you ever consciously delved into probabilities? As an introduction compute
the probabilities of the following, using certainty—1:
(a) that college years are the happiest,
(b) that college friendships are the most enduring,
(c) that college training lays the foundations for a more successful career.
Sometimes a shrewd guess at the answers to life's problems will suffice when
computation cannot be effected. And always an effort to make the answers come
out right will be preferable to a listless submission to an undesirable result in a
supposed book of fate. You recall your joy when you found the answer in the
book to be wrong? Then attack life's problems with the confidence that satisfactory solutions are not necessarily unattainable, and with the assurance that
the answers are functions of what we believe in and strive to do.
D. BUCHANAN,
Dean. It is my pleasant duty to extend to
the members of the graduating class
my hearty congratulations on the
happy termination of their undergraduate studies. In obtaining your
degrees you have reached another
milestone in your quest of education. But I would have you realize
that there is a long trail ahead. You
have in your training the master
key to many practical problems, but
the key will avail you little if you
do not develop the power of adapting, modifying and correlating your
lore of principles to suit the exigencies of infinitely varying sets of conditions. It is only experience that
develops these powers, and in this
sense your term of training is life
long.
You are graduating at a time when the world has need, to an extent perhaps unparalleled
in history, of the services of educated men and women. A great university president has
compared the present world situation to a fog at sea, in which the nations like huge ships
drift, waiting for the fog to lift. We have faith in the courage and competence of the officers in the fulfilment of their routine and extraordinary duties. The courage of the passengers consists in keeping hold of themselves. In the communities where you serve, you
can do much to quieten the nervous apprehensions which have infected the race. In your
daily associations you will behave, I am sure, like educated men and women. You will
remain cool. You will maintain the open and inquiring mind. You will pursue patiently the ceaseless quest of truth, beauty and justice. Ye shall know the truth and the truth
shall make you free,
My wish to all is good health, opportunity and courage to serve your generation in devotion to a worthy purpose.
J. N. Finlayson.
Dean. D
f
ricult
You are the eighteenth class to receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture from The University of British Columbia. An enviable record has been
established by the graduates, and now you are ready to add your contribution to
the common tradition. If you face the n*w world with the same courage and foresight that inspired your predecessors you have little to fear. Farmers, scientists,
teachers, business men, leaders among our graduates in all walks of life should
be an inspiration to every one of you. All of these men are worthy of your
emulation.
You may at times feel discouraged, but there is really no valid reason why you
should do so. You have had the education and the training, and have been
offered all that a modern faculty in a modern university can offer you. Continue
your efforts and do not neglect your studies. If you work hard and use the
equipment that is now yours, your material, moral and intellectual success is
assured.
Carry on, as have your predecessors.
F.  M.   CLEMENT,
Dean. Founded in 1902, Victoria College was
affiliated, first with McGill University,
then with U.B.C. Originally occupied
as a private residence by the Dunsmuir
family, the building is still known as
"Dunsmuir Castle" or "Craigdarroch
Castle." Standing out in bold relief
against the skyline of Victoria, the red
slate roof and grey stone walls are visible
to ships in the Straits, and the lecture
rooms still retain much of their former
splendour with their stained glass windows, oak panels and mirrors.
It is in this romantic setting that 200-
odd students from Victoria and all parts
of British Columbia study for credits in
their first two years of Arts and Science.
It is an undisputed fact, attributed by
some to Victoria's wonderful climate,
that students coming from the College
to the University are a credit to their
Alma Mater. The late Dr. E. B. Paul,
and Dr. S. P. Willis are past principals;
the present principal is Professor P. H.
Elliott.
A representative Students' Council
handles student affairs and discipline, in
a very satisfactory manner, from its small
room on the third floor. Unusual elections in which each candidate, to the
accompaniment of loud hissing, assures
the students that he is unworthy of their
trust, are held each year.
Campus organizations include the International Relations Club, the S.C.M., the
Science Club, and the Literary-Arts Society. Entertainment, rather than education, is offered by the Men's Discussion
Club.
Informality is the keynote of all social
functions, except for the Varsity Ball,
the event of the season. The Players'
Club annually presents its masterpiece in
the High School Auditorium.
The Publications Board confines itself to
the publication of the "Craigdarroch," a
most creditable Annual.
Even in such a short description as this,
it is only fair to mention the feeling of
friendliness which pervades the whole
atmosphere of the College. It is this
which makes the strongest appeal to
former students and makes each of them
proud to say, "I went to Victoria
College." Victoria College
College enjoyed a successful year in the
field of athletics. The rugby team under
the excellent instruction of Dan Doswell
and Roddy Mclnnes, and captained by
Bill Noel, has to date made a fairly clean
sweep of the Intermediate League. Frank
Elliott's basketball squad has turned in
several fine victories over Victoria High
School and Normal School with Mc-
Keachie and Brodigan leading the scoring parade. Women's basketball has not
been quite so successful with a team entered in the Inter-School League. The
Badminton Club has had a good season
with Hugh Ford president and Rene
Watson, secretary. Joyce Thompson
and Dave Waddell made fine showings
in the B.C. Tournament while Ford won
the Junior title. Anglican College
Rev. P. P. Ellis        G. H. H. Watts       W. H. V. Smith
"The great multiplication of virtues upon human nature
resteth upon societies well ordained and disciplined."
Thoughts similar to those lying behind these words of Bacon
have occupied the writer's mind quite considerably this year.
We are living in an age which is characterized most markedly
by an utter lack of discipline. This lack is apparent in individual, national and international life; and it is of particular
import to us, college and university students, because, as
Bacon shows, one of the most powerful factors in the creation of "societies well ordained and disciplined" is tradition.
Inasmuch as ours is a young college and a young university,
it is ours to make tradition; and the time is at hand when
another company of graduates must ask themselves what
their contribution has been. The extent and value of it will
only be manifest in the disciplining force it exerts in the years
to come. May the four who leave us this year not be found
wanting! And—what is even more important—may those
whom we welcome to the family realize their responsibility
early.
We have this year shared with a number of non-theological
students our privilege of a corporate life here; and I think it
has been an experience of mutual benefit. On the one hand,
the lay mind has been opened to an appreciation of the difficulties which attend the life and calling of the padre; while,
on the other hand, their clergy-to-be have at least had opportunity for realizing more fully what the layman expects of
them!
The brightest star in a fairly brilliant athletic firmament was
our paene victoria in the Arts '20 Relay—A.T.C. is an opponent worthy of your best, Varsity. We shine, too—albeit
with reflected glory!—because of Ward DeBeck, one of our
number, who cut the Arts '30 record by 5.9 seconds, winning
the race for his class, Arts '38.
By reason of the larger family in residence this year, events
in the other half of our activities have received a proportionate
impetus. At our annual "At Home," the major social function of the year, an entertainment was staged such as merited
not a few of the superlatives with which we are familiar in
the world of the moving picture. "Red Riding Hood" was
produced, as a pantomime, by our incomparable director;
and the Glee Club recently formed made its debut. Since
then, the singers have been asked, and have expressed their
willingness, to be the nucleus of the Varsity Glee Club.
In a final word, we would welcome, as dean of residence, Rev.
C. W. Hedley, who comes to guide wayward youth with
fatherly hand. May his, as well as that of all the brothers,
be a happy sojourn.
Dr. H. R. Trumpour F. H. Golightly       George Pringle
T. Bailey
Union
Theological
Dr. J. G. Brown
The past session has been one of the busiest for many years for the students of
Union College. Early in the fall a reception was held by the faculty, students,
and Ladies' Auxiliary for the University students. Two parties were held by
the theologs and the closing social function will be that given by Dr. and Mrs.
Brown early in April. One of the highlights of the sport programme of the
year was the battle between the costumed football team of Union College and
the Anglican Seagulls. If anyone is interested in the score he can probably find
it in the Anglican College write-up. No doubt he will also find the result of
the second game there too. At the time of writing the track-meets have not
been held but judging by the enthusiasm of the boys the Anglicans are going to
be beaten.
One of the finest features of this year's session has been the noon-hour chapel
services. These have been held at a time that seems to be most convenient and
have drawn a gratifying number not only of theological but also of University
students. Almost every week at least one outstanding speaker has been present
and the addresses that they have given have been challenging and inspiring. We
were privileged to hear Dr. Zwemer, one of the outstanding authorities on the
Moslem world. Dr. Langford of the Board of Christian Education was another visiting speaker who inspired us with his message.
Union College feels that it has a right to be proud of the achievements of this
session. A new and finer spirit has been fostered and the influence of the institution on. the campus of the University has definitely been felt.
To the three students who are graduating this year we offer our sincere best wishes.
We hope that the ideals and the training that they have received here will enable
them to make their influence felt in the work that they are taking up. S 38 . . . SCIENCE 38 . . . AGRICULTURE 38 . . . ARTS 39 . . . SCIENCE 39 . . . AGRICULTU*
"S '40 . . . SCIENCE '40 . . . AGRICULTURE '40 . . . ARTS '41 . . . SCIENCE '41 . . . AGRICULTUF
fS 38 . . . SCIENCE 38 . . . AGRICULTURE 38 . . . ARTS
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. SCIENCF139 .
. AGRICULTUI The Average Student
By K. Grant
The winter of 1937-38 was a bitter one for the  "average student"  at U.B.C.
Questionnaires and statisticians pursued him as relentlessly as the bloodhounds
on the trail of Eliza, and having run him to earth his private life and foibles
were ruthlessly bared to the vulgar gaze of Mr. and Mrs. Public.
Much of the information was rung from him by promises that it would offer
"good publicity" for the university at a time when public support was needed.
In other cases he was merely ordered to tell all—or else.
A Students' Council questionnaire, for example, decided to find out just what
the unfortunately "average" student was doing with his money. Clothing
manufacturers, it discovered, were leading the raids on collegiate pocket books
with an annual booty of more than $400,000.
The avaricious Bursar was a close second with an annual haul well over the
$300,000 mark.
Land-ladies and boarding-house keepers were discovered to be removing $180,-
000 annually from the students' pockets (legally, of course), while a mysterious organization listed as Miscellaneous accounted for $150,000.
Service stations were fifth with a yearly loot of $75,000, B. C. Electric conductors and bus drivers reaped $65,000, and doctors and dentists $36,000.
Campus males doled out a nonchalant $15,000 a year to various barbers around
the village.
In an effort to discover where this million dollar supply of wealth originated,
it transpired that 80 per cent, of the men students and 22 per cent, of the women
were in the habit of working each summer. At the same time their average earnings were less than $200, which still left a lot of bills for the average father to
pay.
The Registrar's office provided the information that the largest group (31 per
cent.) of the fathers were tradesmen or labourers, contrary to a current belief
that university is a playground for millionaire children.
The second largest group of fathers were professional men (30 per cent.), which
included the largest single vocation group—134 engineers.
Only 23 per cent, of the students had fathers employed in "business", while 14
per cent, had fathers who were merchants, salesmen or retailers.
Farmers accounted for 5 per cent, of the student body, and government employees and sea captains for 1 per cent. each.
Having proceeded thus far, Mr. and Mrs. Public wanted to know just what this
remarkable child, the average student, looked like. The Health Service came to
the rescue with the information that, in his freshman year, the average male was
only 5 feet 7.2 inches tall, weighed 144 pounds and was barely 18 years old.
His freshette class mate was a bare 5 feet 4 inches tall, but weighed no less than
128.27 pounds and was 17. More than 26 per cent, of the men and 33 per
cent, of the girls entered U.B.C. behind a pair of spectacles. Tonsils were missing from. 50 per cent, of the students, 85 per cent, were "physically fit," and 12
per cent, were "perfect."
Yet another questionnaire, supervised by the Dean of Women, decided to discover what students thought about life on the campus. Fraternities, it was
learned, accounted for only 23 per cent, of the men, while 31 per cent, of the
women belonged to sororities.
Of these 70 per cent, favoured a revision of "rushing" rules (which were soon
after revised), but only 19 per cent, thought Greek Letter societies were too restricted.
Less than 4 per cent, of the entire student body were in the habit of attending
all campus dances, while only 12 per cent, attended "most" functions. More
informal dances and "mixers" were favoured by 85 per cent, of the men and 90
per cent, of the women, many of whom promised to support a "date bureau." Helen Crosby
Beverley Cunningham
William Hudson
Alexander Charters
Robert McLellan
Dorothy Yelland
There is probably no greater indication of success after graduation than the enthusiasm and cooperation which members of a class display in college activities. Arts
'38 has been particularly outstanding in academic, athletic and social pursuits.
Our Senior Class Party was characteristic of the fine class spirit and enthusiasm,
and is rated as being one of the most successful parties on record.
The outstanding members of the class are numerous, but space permits the mention of only a few. David Carey brings fame to his class as Rhodes Scholar, president of the Alma Mater Society and captain of the McKechnie Cup rugby
team. The hardworking Students' Council boasted also of such Seniors as Jean
Meredith, Peggy Fox, Mary Black and John Bird. Next year's Council will
have on it Rann Matthison and Marjorie Jessup. Publications Board is represented by Kemp Edmonds, Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey, and David Crawley,
editor of the Totem, who succeeds Jim Beveridge, another member of Arts '38.
Outstanding debaters included James Macdonald, Kay Armstrong, Mary Rendall,
Clymene Dickie, while Inter-fraternity Council was presided over by Ed.
Disher. The recently organized Phrateres was under the guidance of Norah Sibley, and the second year of the Film Society enjoyed success with Don Munro as
president. In the Players' Club were Art Sager, Hazel Wright, Don Cameron
and Ellen Boving, while the Musical Society was represented by Catherine Washington, Frank Patch, Gordon Heron and Priscilla Boyd.
Sports, too, are important for a well developed life, and Arts '38 showed prominence in this field as well. Dave Carey, John Bird played first team English
Rugby, Rann Matthison and Aser Rothstein took part in Canadian football;
while Rann also captained the Senior A Basketball Squad.
Despite the heavy rain, large numbers of seniors turned out to pay tribute to Dr.
Wesbrook at the annual Wesbrook Memorial ceremony.
To Mr. Larsen, we of Arts '38 owe our gratitude for his efforts on our behalf,
in his capacity as Honorary President. We extend to him our thanks for his
guidance and assistance which was given so readily and willingly.
The executive was headed by Paul Paine, active, also, on the Publicity Committee, with Helen Crosby as vice-president; Beverley Cunningham, secretary; Bill
Hudson, treasurer; Alex Charters, literary representative; and Dorothy Yelland
and Bob McLellan, athletic representatives.
Paul  Paine Harley D. Abbott
Vancouver
Musical Society
LV
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Roger J. Bishop
Vancouver
Letters Club
F. Rae Anderson
Vancouver
Biological Discussion Club
Players' Club
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Mary S. Black
Vancouver
Secretary A.M.S.
Alpha Gamma Delta
Mary K. Armstrong
Vancouver
Letters Club
President Literary Forum
S. C. M.
Alpha Omicron Pi
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Audrey C. Blackbourne
Vancouver
S. C. M.
Phrateres
Stanley J. Bailey
Vancouver
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MF-j
Kathleen M. Bladen
Victoria
La Canadienne
Outdoor Club
Wilfred B. Balderston
Vancouver
Golf
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Jean McL. Bonnell
Victoria
Gamma Phi Beta
James A. Beveridge
Vancouver
Editor 1937 Totem
Ubyssey
Film Society Executive
Players' Club
Elizabeth G. Bingay
Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma
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Granville F. Boothby
Mission
Track
Priscilla A. Boyd
Medicine Hat
Musical Society
Alpha Omicron Pi M. Ailsa Braidwood
Victoria
Alpha Gamma Delta
Clarence H. Bramwell
Vancouver
Charles P. Brewer
Vancouver
Barbara Brooks
Vancouver
Musical Society
Fred M. B run ton
Vancouver
William R. Butler
Vancouver
Musical Society
Letters Club
Hugh D. Cameron
Vancouver
Players' Club
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Donald Capon
Vancouver
David E. Carey
Vancouver
President Students' Council
1937-38
Rugby
Phi Delta Theta
Catherine L. Carter
Vancouver
Musical Society
Phrateres
Alexander N. Charters
Rosedale
Literary Representative Arts '38
International Relations Club
Beta Theta Pi
Ena C. Clarke
Vancouver
Basketball
Waldo J. G. Clarke
Vancouver
James Cobain
Vancouver James L. Colbert
Victoria
Track Club
International   Relations  Club
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Helen L. Crosby
Vancouver
Vice-President Arts '38
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Arthur G. Collier
Vancouver
Psi Upsilon
Beverley K. Cunningham
Vancouver
Secretary Arts '38
President of Panhellenic
Delta Gamma
Iris Corbould
Prince Rupert
**
L. Colin Curtis
Vancouver
Phyllis L. Cowan
Victoria
La Canadienne
Varsity Christian Union
D. Ursula Dale
Vancouver
Biological Discussion Club
E. Mary Craig
Vancouver
French Club
German Club
Phrateres
Alpha Delta Pi
Esther J. Davidson
Vancouver
La Canadienne
ft
David Crawley
Vancouver
Editor 1938 Totem
Zeta Psi
Doreen F. Davie
Vancouver
French Club
Outdoor Club
Alan S. Croll
Vancouver
Soccer
George E. Davis
Kimberley
Pre-Med. Club
Psi Upsilon Arthur P. Dawe
Vancouver
Ward F. DeBeck
Victoria
Track
Clymene L. Dickie
Vancouver
Literary Forum
S. C. M.
French Club
German Club
Senior B Basketball
Alpha Omicron Pi
Beverly B. Douglas
Vancouver
Kappa Alpha Theta
Gilbert H. Elliott
Vancouver
Bernard F. Ennals
Vancouver
S. C. M.
Jean A. Ferguson
Vancouver
Winifred C. Field
Vancouver
Badminton Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
Fred T. Fitch
Vancouver
John W. A. Fleury
Vancouver
A. M. Fotheringham
Vancouver
Players' Club
Ubyssey
Editor 1937 Handbook
Margaret MacL. Fox
Vancouver
President Women's Undergraduate
Delta Gamma
Richard R. Galpin
Vancouver
Pre-Med. Society
Rowing Club
Hilda L. Gibbon
Langley Prairie
La Canadienne
S. C. M.
Phrateres Mary G. Gibson
Victoria
S. C. M.
Biological Discussion Club
Douglas B. Harkness
Vancouver
Delta Upsilon
Louise-Mary Gilmour
Vancouver
Alpha Delta Pi
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E<*iH
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Margaret J. Harvey
Vancouver
Phrateres
Alpha Gamma Delta
Mildred B. Gow
Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma
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Jessie M. Heather
Vancouver
Hyslop B. Gray
New Westminster
Players' Club
Psychology Club
Alpha Phi
<9>
Yoshimitsu Higashi
Vancouver
Myrle A. Gray
New Westminster
Musical Society
S. C M.
F. Ruth Hind
Vancouver
S. C M.
Musical Society
Phrateres
George F. T. Gregory
Vancouver
Psi Upsilon
Ian G. Hind
Vancouver
Musical Society
Agnes M. Gwyn
Duncan
Outdoor Club
Biological Discussion Club
Mary W. Holdom
Crescent
Le Cercle Francais
Phrateres Barbara J. Hutton
Vancouver
Delta Gamma
Oliver I. Lacey
Vancouver
President Psychology Club
Badminton
Clarence P. Idyll
Vancouver
A.M.S. Treasurer,  1935
Biological Discussion Club
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Patsy Lafon
Vancouver
Big Block Club
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Betty Jones
New Westminster
Gamma Phi Beta
Albert C. Lake
Vancouver
Letters Club
Andrew T. Karsgaard
Vancouver
President 0. C. U.
Pre-Med. Society
Badminton
**
Alison M. Law
Gabriola Island
Badminton
Phrateres
H. Jean Kempton
Victoria
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Elizabeth C. Leslie
Greenwood
Historical Society
Badminton
Phrateres
Edna L. Kerr
Vancouver
Mathematics Club
Phrateres
S. C. M.
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So W. Leung
Vancouver
Cosmopolitan Club
Pre-Med. Club
S. C. M.
Alan G. Kirkby
Vancouver
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Ting K. Li
Vancouver
Basketball Elspeth M. Lintott
Penticton
Mathematics Club
S C. M.
Kathleen F. Matheson
Vancouver
Varsity Christian Union
La Canadienne
Alair Lips
Terrace
Chemistry Society
Newman Club
Carol E. Menchions
Vancouver
Chemistry Society
Samuel T. Madeley
Vancouver
Phi Kappa Pi
Wm. B. MacD. Millar
Penticton
Basketball
Delta Upsilon
Sadie Makinen
Vancouver
German Club
French Club
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Cathalin I. Miller
Vancouver
Musical Society
Alpha Phi
Margot J. Martin
Vancouver
Badminton Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
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Margaret Miller
Penticton
Psychology Club
Alpha  Phi
James R. Martyn
Vancouver
-37
William H. Mitchell
Vancouver
Musical Society
Volley Ball
Frances M. Matheson
Vancouver
Historical Society
S. C. M.
Frances M. Moran
Trail
Mathematics Club
S. C. M.
Phrateres Archibald 0. Morrison
Vancouver
Varsity Christian Union
James A. Macdonald
Vancouver
President Parliamentary Forum
Zeta Psi
John G. Morrison
Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta
Margaret J. Macdonald
Vancouver
Musical Society
Roy B. Morrison
Vancouver
Historical Society
Rugby
Phi Kappa Pi
fe-st
Mary; H. McDonald
Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma
W. Douglas Mottley
Vancouver
Biological Discussion Club
Phi   Gamma Delta
John M. MacKenzie
Vancouver
Pre-Med. Club
Rowing
Psi Upsilon
Mary A. McCulloch
Vancouver
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Margaret G. McKenzie
Vancouver
S. C. M.
Le Cercle Francais
Alpha Delta Pi
Margot C. McDermott
Vancouver
Historical Society
Newman Club
Literary Forum
Irene B. McLachlan
Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Ian H. McDiarmid
Vancouver
Jean C. MacLaurin
Victoria
Letters Club
Players' Club
Alpha Gamma Delta Cynthia McLean
Vancouver
Mathematics Club
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L. Margaret H. Rae
Vancouver
Musical Society
Alpha Phi
Robert B. McLellan
Vancouver
S. C. M.
Musical Society
James G. Retallack
Vancouver
Physics Club
Mathematics Club
Margaret C. McRae
Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma
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Margarette G. Rice
Maple Bay
Ronald Oldham
Vancouver
Musical Society
French Club
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Jack E. Richardson
Vancouver
Warrena N. Oliver
Vancouver
C. Eric Robertson
Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta
Paul B. Paine
Vancouver
President Arts '38
Jack E. Ross
Vancouver
June Porter
Vancouver
La Canadienne
Alpha Gamma Delta
Arthur H. Sager
Vancouver
President Letters Club
Players' Club
Soccer Agnes Schroeder
Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta
4^0
William A. Steuart
West Summerland
Psychology Club
Film Society
University Band
Jean M. Seaton
Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta
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Caroline J. Stewart
Vancouver
Pre-Med. Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
Phyllis Shaw
North Vancouver
Mathematics Club
Phrateres
Lois M. Still
Vancouver
Kunio Shimizu
Vancouver
ks»<?T,
William L. Stirling
Vancouver
Norah MacL. Sibley
Vancouver
President Letters Club
S. C. S.
Phrateres
AJm- mt%
John R. A. Stuart
Vancouver
Mary I. Smith
Vancouver
Mathematics Club
S. C. M.
Phrateres
A. Shinichi Takimoto
Vancouver
Japanese Students' Club
Mathematics Club
S. C. M.
Fronia E. Snyder
Vancouver
International Relations Club
S. C. M.
Historical Society
Phrateres
George T. Tamaki
Vancouver
President Japanese Students' Club Callum, Thompson
Penticton
Musical Society
Parliamentary Forum
V     "
George C. Walsh
Vancouver
Chemistry Society
Rowing Club
Grace E. Thomson
Vancouver
Golf
Gamma Phi Beta
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Catherine Washington
Vancouver
Musical Society
Phrateres
Marjorie D. Todd
Vancouver
Biology Discussion Club
Alpha Delta Pi
to^!
Kathleen Webster
Vancouver
Alpha Gamma Delta
Phyllis H. Trafford
Vancouver
V. c. u.
Le Cercle Francais
Evelyn W. Wellwood
Vancouver
Elizabeth U. T. Tuckey
Victoria
Outdoor Club
Phrateres
t—-—-"~
Elsie L Wilby
Vancouver
■Mfe
Olive St. C. Tufts
Vancouver
Delta Gamma
Jesse L. Williams
Vancouver
Lawrence J. Wallace
Vancouver
Psi Upsilon
Georgiana L. M. Wilson
Vancouver
Players' Club
Letters Club
Alpha Gamma Delta Mollie W. Wilson
Vancouver
Players' Club
Letters Club
Ellen Boving
Vancouver
President German Club
Players' Club
Hockey
Lois M. Win ram
Caulfield
Musical Society
Jf    •?
Arthur E. Covington
Vancouver
Robert G. Wismer
Vancouver
39*
Florence I. Cruise
Vancouver
Newman Club
Alpha Gamma Delta
John B. Wright
Vancouver
&
Kemp Edmonds
New Westminster
Editor-in-Chief Publications
Phi Kappa Sigma
Dorothy I. Yelland
Vancouver
Big Block Club
Basketball
Alpha Delta Pi
Willa J. Elliott
Vancouver
Musical Society
Alpha Omicron Pi
Gennady Zotov
Milner
Physics Club
«ft|
its
Eleanor M. G. Gibson
Vancouver
Players' Club
Letters Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
Lillian Boyd
Vancouver
Golf Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
I 3t
•*"-*•
Elizabeth M. Gillanders,
Vancouver
Players' Club Helen W. Gray
North Vancouver
Pre-Med. Club
Outdoor Club
Phrateres
Norman Lea
Vancouver
Regis A. Hicks
Vancouver
Newman Club
Alpha Delta Pi
George E. Lighthall
Vancouver
Musical Society
Dawson Club
M. Isobel Irwin
Regina
Kappa Alpha Theta
><&*
Jean Meredith
Vancouver
Women's Athletic Representative
Letters Club
Gamma Phi Beta
Peggy Jones
Revelstoke
Basketball
Alpha Omicron Pi
W. D. Mottley
Vancouver
Biological Discussion Club
Phi Gamma Delta
Maurice Latornell
Nelson
German Club
Musical Society
Stuart McDaniel
Portland, Oregon
Phi Delta Theta
Gladys A. Laycock
Vancouver
Chemistry Society
Outdoor Club
Hockey
Margie B. MacDonald
Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Fern M. Lew
Vancouver
Cosmopolitan Club
Chinese Students' Association
Phyllis I. McKean
Vancouver
Kappa Kappa Gamma
~-« W. H. McLaren
Vancouver
Soccer
Hazel Wright
Victoria
Players' Club
Delta Gamma
Jean M. McLeod
Vancouver
Musical Society
Volleyball
Phrateres
Alpha Delta Pi
E. W. Disher
Vancouver
Alpha Delta Phi
Mary D. RendeH
Vancouver
Historical Society
Literary Forum
Phrateres
Alpha Gamma Delta
T-*^
Marjorie Findlay
Vancouver
Alpha Delta Pi
A. Rothstein
Vancouver
^=7"
Chas. G. Robson
New Westminster
Phi Delta Theta
Agnes Shewan
Vancouver
Players' Club
Phrateres
Alpha Gamma Delta
'.':-
Chas. C. Locke
Vancouver
Players' Club
Zeta Psi
Nan L. Thomson
Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta
*►
Maurice J. Lambert
Quesnel
President Ice Hockey Club Prof. J. Friend Day
Commerce ?38
Probably the best possible write-up for this class is Jim Beveridge's classic of last
year:—
Commerce '38 " . . . found no need for organization throughout
its graduating year. Stat, labs., research, and pursuit of the
amenities during the term occupied most of the time available.
With splendid unconcern, the bureaucracy of an executive was
dismissed from thought.
"Professor J. Friend Day was Honorary President, by tacit understanding."
Outstanding members of the class are eulogized in the write-up for Arts '38. Ronald C. Andrews
Vancouver
Rugby Manager
Phi Gamma Delta
i    I
«t
Bruce M. Gordon
Vancouver
Rowing Club
Golf Club
Phi Gamma Delta
John I. Bird
Vancouver
President M. U. S.
Alpha Delta Phi
i^P
V*
J^fa
Joan F. Hall
Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta
Arthur E. Chapman
Vancouver
<e^i
Gordon L. Heron
Vancouver
Musical Society
Phi Kappa Sigma
Robert S. Clark
Kam loops
lV
V-
J. William Hudson
Victoria
Basketball
Zeta Psi
Charles R. Craster
Vernon
C.O.T.C.
Badminton
Hideo Iwasaki
Ocean Falls
Alastair S. Davie
Vancouver
Football
Badminton
Beta Theta Pi
Marjorie Jessup
Ocean  Falls
Letters Club
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Gerald S. Denby
Vancouver
Psi Upsilon
T. David Kato
Vancouver
Soccer Manager Marion I. Kersey
Vancouver
Badminton
Phrateres
Alpha Delta Pi
-*>/
Elizabeth A. McCallum
Victoria
Kappa Alpha Theta
Robert Kirkpatrick
Vancouver
G&
Gordon McCullough
Vancouver
Delta Upsilon
Charles J. Knox
Vancouver
Musical Society
Soccer
1^
John McMillan
Vancouver
Forestry Club
Golf
Phi Gamma Delta
David A. Lewis
Vancouver
Big Block Club
Canadian Football
Alpha Delta Phi
Margaret C. Porter
Vancouver
Lyon Lightstone
Vancouver
Golf
Psi  Upsilon
George M. Shiles
Vancouver
Players' Club
JackS. Michell
Victoria
Kunito T. Shoyama
Vancouver
Japanese Students' Club
Cosmopolitan Club
Edward H. C. Miller
Vancouver
"flF1
Franklin E. Walden
Summerland
La Canadienne
Soccer Jock W. Charlton
Vancouver
Football
Phi Gamma Delta
Clifford A. Robson
New Westminster
Phi Delta Theta
J. C. Whitelaw
Calgary
Delta Upsilon
Wm. F. Koren
Vancouver
C. 0. T C.
Ski Club
Benjamin R. Stevenson
Vancouver
Phi Gamma Delta
Quon H. Wong
Vancouver
should a mmm*i      mm
l      V 1%
[f  Hift   ■
* J
L. Beamish
P. Patterson
G. Crosson
F. Evans
L. Nixon
Dr. W. G. Black
Education ?38
Calling all school boards!
Once again the pupils and teachers of the Vancouver schools have suffered
martyrdom and another Education class is being loosed on an unsuspecting
Province.
No ordinary Education class this! Although harassed by innumerable lectures,
dozens of examinations and five weeks of practice teaching we were determined to
make this final year of Varsity the best in accomplishment and in enjoyment.
A class comradeship which has lasted through the year was created by our earliest
expedition—a picnic at Whitecliff, followed by singing and tall-tales around
a bonfire.
Two very successful parties, with surroundings decorated in true kindergarten
style, taught us something of old-time dinces, and basket suppers were very ably
auctioned by Dean Buchanan and Doctor Black.
A trip to Bellingham included a visit tD the Normal School where we observed
American methods of teacher training.
Santa Claus increased our numbers by bringing us several teachers with experience who have come from the East to see how it's done in B. C.
The executive, which spent many hungry noon hours pondering weighty matters of administration, was: Honorary President, Dr. W. G. Black; president,
Ludlow Beamish; vice-president, Pauline Patterson; social convener, Laura Nixon; women's athletics, Beth Evans; men's athletics, George Crosson; secretary-
treasurer, Gordon Fields.
This year has had many highlights, but to me the most vivid recollection is of
that moment in the first teaching week when the lesson, so laboriously prepared,
raced to an end and I faced fifteen eternity-long minutes with nothing to do but
gasp gently like a fish out of water.    Ah me! Gordon Snelling Laurence Machin
Jack Harris Patrick Love
It doesn't seem like five years since "the boys" of Science '38 started to equip
themselves mentally as engineers. Statistics show that considerably less than
fifty per cent, of the original class survived the first year onslaught of boarding-
house troubles, financial difficulties and examinations.
The scholastic standing of Science'38, while never brilliant, on the average was
consistently fair, with men like "Chemical" Charlie Davenport and "Civil" Jack
Kendrick doing the "honours."
For sport, we nominate Charlie Campbell, Ron Upward and Jim McCammon,
all repeater Big Block men. Also for sport, an orchid to Bud Machin and his
Chemicals for showing more spirit in the intra-murals than any other department. Science '38 took the University volleyball championship, the inter-class
rope climbing; placed second in the inter-class basketball; and was represented
in nearly all the inter-class races.
Now, looking back, we cannot help but feel some regret that its all over; and
looking ahead, we certainly hope, even if we do not feel, that we will all reach
the top in our chosen profession.
The executive consists of: Honorary President, Dr. T. C. Hebb; president, Gore/on Snelling; vice-president, Jack Harris; secretary-treasurer, Bob Pebbles; athletic representative, Bud Machin. Raymond C. Bell
Nelson
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry Society
<*3T
Thomas G. Moore
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
Beta Theta Pi
Charles Davenport
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
ai
-
Oliver H. Newmarch
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
Track
George F. Davies
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
Rex F. Pearce
Victoria
Chemical Engineering
Jack E. Harris
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
Charles Potter
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
C. John C. Henniker
Vancouver
Chemical  Engineering
Chemistry Club
ft
Maurice M. Wright
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry Society
Golf Club
John G. Light
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
President Chemical Society
Eiji Yatabe
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
Cosmopolitan Club
Laurence E. Machin
Vancouver
Chemical Engineering
Basketball
Delta Upsilon
*/\
John S. Kendrick
Vancouver '
Civil Engineering Royden M. Campbell
Vancouver
Electrical   Engineering
President Dawson Club
Football
Rugby
Ir^^
J. Donald Hogg
Vancouver
Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical Club
Phi Kappa Pi
Bernard F. Deshaw
Vancouver
Electrical   Engineering
Electrical Club
<*£-
Thomas G. Church
Vancouver
Metallurgical Engineering
Ski Club
John H. Radcliffe
Vancouver
Electrical   Engineering
President Outdoor Club
Thomas Buckham
Qualicum Beach
Mining Engineering
Outdoor Club
Ernest W. Hall
Vancouver
Forest Engineering
Daniel L. Lee
Vancouver
Mining Engineering
John W. Hoadley
Vancouver
Geological  Engineering
Heward W. Little
Vancouver
Mining Engineering
Allan F. Killin
Vancouver
Geological Engineering
Pep Club
1
Patrick W. MacMillan
Vancouver
Mining Engineering
George Ha rg reaves
Vancouver
Mechanical Engineering
Varsity Christian Union
William J. Smith
Vancouver
Mining Engineering Ronald A. Upward
Mining Engineering
Sigma Phi Delta
!**»
Patrick C. Love
Vancouver
Metallurgical   Engineering
University Engineering Society
Dawson Club
Senior B Basketball
Sigma Phi Delta
Alan B. Staniforth
Vancouver
Electrical  Engineering
Wm. J. Boyce
Mechanical Engineering
Sigma Phi Delta
James J. Wighton
Vancouver
Electrical  Engineering
Laurence F. Gray
Vancouver
Electrical  Engineering
A. I   E . E.
Outdoor Club
Roy H. Elfstrom
Vancouver
Metallurgical  Engineering
Beta Theta Pi
R. M. Peebles
Vancouver
Electrical  Engineering
Beta Theta Pi
A. Brookman Anderson
Vancouver
Forest Engineering
William A. Cloke
Victoria
Electrical  Engineering
A. I   E. E
Outdoor Club
John H. Benton
Vancouver
Forest Engineering
Ski Club
Fred T. Kolisnek
Cranbrook
Electrical  Engineering
Outdoor Club
Gordon A. Snelling
Vancouver
Mechanical Engineering
President Science 38
Football
Beta Theta Pi
'fl* ^B>|
Norman J. Dunlop
Victoria
Electrical Engineering
A. I. E. E. SCIENCE GRADS
J. M. English G. J. Boisjoli T. S. Bremmer J. W. Scott
L. Shelling C. M. Campbell
-^H
7™y#
r
I
K
a success- Neil Hockin
Edwin Fennell
Agriculture ?38
This class should be known as "perfect hosts." After this year's "Open House"
we became so efficient in answering questions from dear old souls that Dale Carnegie ought to give us all jobs after graduation.
But all joking aside, we have had a perfect four years at U. B. C. due to the
many friends we have made on the campus—and it is with this thought in mind
that we say "au revoir" as we break up to go our many ways in the field of
agriculture.
The executive of the year consisted only of Neil Hockin, president and Edwin
Fennell, secretary-treasurer, etc. Peter W. H. Crickmay
Vancouver
Rugby
Phi Kappa Pi
t*M
Joan McTaggart-Cowan
Vancouver
Secretary Agriculture
Undergraduate Society
Outdoor Club
Edwin J. Fennell
Vancouver
Secretary Agriculture '38
■'*!
W. Harvey Ozard
Victoria
President of Agriculture
Discussion Club
Badminton
Beta Theta Pi
Neil W. Hockin
Vancouver
President Agriculture '38
Wilfred C. Pendray
Victoria
Agriculture Athletic
Representative
Track
Donald G. Kerr
Vancouver
Tong Louie
Vancouver
A
\*m
4
Ross L. Robinson
Vancouver
Phi Delta Theta
Acia A. Rogozinsky
Vancouver
^m\     Khjb:   ■
Frances C. Mellor
Victoria
1      _^,
mmWjA'           Am\W
Sk   / i    mm^rnt
Cecil V. G. Morgan
rr"™*l
Wk^l
Vancouver
Vj       t*rB
Agriculture Discussion Club
filJ
BV**,
Paul Trussell
Trail
Agriculture Undergraduate
Representative
Fnglish Rugby
Ice Hockey
Phi Kappa Sigma
Maurice F. Welsh
Summerland
Agriculture Undergraduate
Executive
Agriculture Discussion Club
Badminton M. Miller
G.  Bowering Anglican College Graduates
T. Bailey Rev. P. R. Ellis       Rev. F. S. Henderson H. G. Neal J. H. H. Watts
R5]
Union College Graduates
F. H. Golightly        George Pringle       W. H. V. Smith Nurses' Graduates - Sixth Year
M. K. Black
A. E. Martin
A. J. Leitch
M. R. Mouat
D. A. Leitch
K. Taylor Public Health Nursini
Ruth Akagawa
New Westminster
J. Alice M. Beattie
Vancouver
Nurses Undergraduate Society
Alvera Bruhn
Vancouver
Elizabeth E. Copeland
Victoria
Margaret G. Fletcher
Victoria
Amy I. Forneri
Vancouver
Marion Harrington
Vancouver
Freda S. Hilton
Port Alberni
Nora H. Knipe
Vancouver
Anna V. Larson
New Westminster
Muriel J. Leslie
Okanagan Landing
Louise M. Lore
Victoria
Annie Mearns
Vancouver
Helen R. Medforth
Vancouver
Dorothy I. McClintock
Vancouver
S. McDiarmid
Vancouver
A. M. MacDonald
Medicine Hat
Violet M. Porter
Victoria Department of
Nursing and Health
Another successful year for the nurses has just finished. It leaves memories of
studying, social functions, travels to different rural fields and new friendships.
In October a kiddies' party was held at which the second year nurses and public
health nurses were welcomed to the faculty. In November the annual tea was
held for members of the faculty and nursing organizations in the city. Xmas
cheer was prepared by the nurses during that season, and the annual formal
dance held at the Georgian Club in January included the student nurses from
the hospital.
This year the department contributed to "Open House." The exhibit was
illustrated by posters and the nurses themselves were at hand to explain their
work.
In the senior class are twenty-six women, public health has twenty-four, and
teaching and supervision, two.
There are many positions open in the fbld of public health for nurses and it is
the sincere wish of this department that each nurse may carry on her work to the
best of her ability. Marian Vance Janet Seldon        Robert McDougall     Peggy Thomson        David Morrow Polly Brand
Arts '39
In sports the Juniors have excelled. The girls intra-mural basketball and badminton teams have both reached the finals and the boys
intra-mural teams are only a few points behind the leaders for the
intra-mural cup. Alec Lucas, By Straight, and Frank Turner ate
on the Senior A basketball team and Frank Clark, Arthur Clark,
Bob Smith, Jim Lowe and Howie McPhee ate all leaders in their
various sports; while Margaret Evans, Sheila Wilson, Myrne Nevi-
son and Audrey Chowne play grass hockey.
Individual members hold prominent campus positions. Bob Smith
is treasurer of the Student's Council, Jean Stordy is vice-president of
the Women's Undergraduate Society and Peggy Thomson is
secretary-elect of the Students' Council for 1938-39.
The class is well represented in the Musical Society by Frank Patch
and Douglas Ford; in the Players' Club by Anne Carter, Graham
Darling, Dacre Barrett-Lennard and David Morrow; and in the
Parliamentary Forum by Alex Macdonald and Bob Hayman.
Marion Reid reigned as Prom Queen at the major class function of
the year—the Junior Prom; which owes its success to the hard
work of the class members.
The executive consisted of Dr. Shrum, Honorary President; Philip
Griffin, president; Marian Vance, vice-president; Janet Seldon, secretary; Bob McDougall, treasurer; Polly Brand, women's athletic
representative; David Morrow, men's athletic representative; Peggy
Thomson, literary representative.
Philip Griffin Pauline L. Scott      Elizabeth   Fleck      Ernest Alexander    Rosemary Collins      Edward McPhee Nell Trapp
John Pearson
The sophomore class of 1937-38 has nearly completed
what has been a very successful year in every way. Well
represented in the field of literary activity; Mary
McLeod, Anne Carter, Pauline Scott and Dacre Barrett-
Lennard all took part in the Xmas and spring plays, Alice
Goddard figures prominently in the Musical Society; and
Beverly McCorkell, Rosemary Collins and Orme Dier ate
on the publications board.
But we also have our athletes. In the Arts '20 road race
we excelled ourselves and everybody else. Running a
four-man team consisting of Ted McPhee, Bob Kincade,
Jack Rattenbury and Vance McComber we were first
across the finishing line. Although Jack Rattenbury
placed second to De Beck in Arts '30 Mall race he was
able to break a record. Our stars in Canadian rugby
were John Pearson, Henry Stradiotti, Bert Horwood and
Dick Dowrey, while Ted McPhee is our lone representative on the first English rugby team.
Co-ed sophs compete with the best, Hortense Warne,
Betty Cole and Margaret Evans shine in grass hockey;
and Adrienne Collins, Pauline Scott and Edith Milting
made the first string in basketball.
Although intra-mural competition is not yet completed,
so far we have had only moderate success in this field—
the girl's volleyball team bringing in our only victory.
The biggest and best social event of the year—the "Soph
Stomp" — was held amid balloons, shrieks, summer
dresses, and "big apples" at the Alma Academy on
Thursday, March 10th; and now nothing remains but
exams. Laurence Garvie Alfred Allen
George Govier John Wilkinson
Having finally arrived at the point where each student proceeds in his chosen
branch of engineering the members of this class who have survived the sieges of
the past two years are looking forward to their coming work with renewed
interest.
The class has shown itself to be an alert aggregation; the members, bonded
closely in friendship, have proven their abilities in both academic and extracurricular activities. The latter included everything from Rowing Club and
Outdoor Club to C.O.T.C. and sport. We have Russ Keillor in football,
Strat Leggat in rugby, and Maurice Lambert in hockey. The Volley-ball team
under Don Wright reached the intra-mural finals. Ping-pong disrupted the
Forestry room much of the winter.
Our social life, as usual, centered on the Science Banquet, Class Party, and Ball.
All of these were highly successful but some of the boys found various other indoor sports which kept them amused during their leisure time.
The University Engineering Society has on its executive two of our prominent
class members, Cam King and Bill Bacon, while our Science Men's Undergraduate Society executive representatives include president Jack Davis, Ray Jones,
and Alfy Allen.
The class executive consists of Honorary President, Major Finlay; president,
Laurence Garvie; vice-president, Wheeler Govier; secretary-treasurer, Jack Wilkinson; athletic representative, Alfy Allen. Charles Lighthall       James Ussher        Stephen Burden
Although "overcrowding" has been the theme this year, the class of Science '40
has managed to squeeze through the year intact. In fact, for the first time in
many years no one received the little blue slip at Christmas.
Another remarkable feat, accomplished with no little effort on the part of the
Sciencemen, was the leaving of common room windows, tables, etc., in one piece
despite the usual temptations of an after-Christmas snow fall.
However, in spite of their apparent docility, the members of Science '40 are still
the torchbearers of University Spirit, as all and sundry who attended their gigantic, supercolossal pep-meet found out.
In the field of sports, the Science '40 basketball team has not lost a game in two
years, and this, together with their success in other intra-mural contests, makes
them again the leading contender for the Governors Cup, which they carried off
last year.
Science '40 is also well represented on the Varsity teams. Bud Burden, senior
track manager; Stan Roberts and Ian Smellie, swimming; Jim Ussher and Angie
Provenzano, ice hockey; and Mickey Pogue, ski-ing are upholding the University's name here and abroad.
In other campus activities, they are represented by John Brynelsen, Junior Member of the Students Council and Jack Mair, Associate Sports Editor of the
Ubyssey.
This year's executive, to whom goes credit not only for its success in sports, but
for keeping the class on its toes generally, consists of Honorary President, Dean
Finlayson; president, Reg. Haskins; vice-president, Chuck Lighthall; secretary,
Jim Ussher and men's athletic representative, Bud Burden. Rex Parker Donald  Parham        Robert Nelson Evan apRoberts
Science ?41
The fact that Science '41 is the largest second-year Applied Science class in history, yet lost only twelve of its number at Christmas, shows the calibre of the rising generation of Sciencemen.
They showed their spirit early in the year by upholding the honour of Science in the intra-facuity fights; but their enthusiasm was quelled by the damper
put on these activities by the Students' Council and they showed their good sense
by being among the first to stop.
Owing to a bad start at the beginning of the year, Science '41 had to fight its way
up from last place in the inter-murals to a place among the leaders under the
capable leadership of Ronnie Renshaw as sports captain.
Representatives from Science '41 in major sports were Oscar Orr, Jim Harmer,
and Evan apRoberts in Canadian football; Jimmy Robinson and Denis Leong
on the soccer team; Bill Lowe, Jack McArthur and Jim Harmer on the hockey
team.
The class was represented in the Musical Society by Charles Parker, Mildred
Twiss and Dave Thomas.   And in the Players' Club by Charles Parker.
Every Science function such as the Banquet, the Class Party and the Science
Ball showed a commendable number of second year men present but enthusiasm
for Pep Meets was unaccountably lacking.
Class executives were: Honorary President, A. M. Pebbles; president, Rex Parker;
vice-president, Don Parham; secretary-treasurer, Bob Nelson, and athletic representative, Evan apRoberts. Agriculture ?39
Another year has rolled around and with it another Totem. Classes still contain
many old faces, but new faces are much in evidence. In this respect Agriculture
'39 is predominant. A small class enrollment of last year has been nearly
doubled in number this year. If the increase continues proportionately Agriculture '39 will be the largest graduating class in the history of the faculty. Increased numbers has meant diversification in courses—Aggie '39 has students
in every department of the agriculture faculty.
Horticulture has attracted the largest group, having 4 students in that branch.
Next in popularity are agronomy and dairying with 3 students in each. Animal
husbandry and poultry husbandry each have 2 members of the class. Agricultural economics and bacteriology end the list with 1 student each.
In extra-curricular activities Aggie '39 again has a diversification of interest. One
class member is a dealer in mass transportation on the university bus line, another is a stalwart defender of his country as a member of the C.O.T.C. In the
sports arena members of Aggie '39 have well represented the class, especially in
track and basketball. Participation in "Open House" and the regular "Varsity
Time" comes also within the scope of the class.
Our Honorary President this year is Dr. Barss; the president, Jack Gray; vice-
president, Cam. Inkster and secretary, Odetta Hicks. Leonard Zink Lois Campbell
Agriculture ?40
The sophomore Aggie class has representatives in sport, in the S.C.M., in the
C.O.T.C, in the Musical Society, and in the Players' Club. Many of our members are attending the agriculture public speaking lectures and the Discussion
Club. Judging by the honours taken by members of the class at the fall field
day we ought to excel on the Agassiz trip, which we are glad to see is financed
by the pass system.
The executive is Honorary President, Dr.  Blythe Eagles; president,  Len Zink;
vice-president, Doug.  Dougans; secretary-treasurer, Lois Campbell. PHOTO    BY   CARTER   HANBURY
ARTS *41
The people in this pic
ture are not Freshme
—but the picture wa
taken at the Freshma
Class  Party.
It is put here on th
Freshman Class Pag>
because it illustrate
perfectly the spiri
that this year's clas
inspires — co-ordina
tion, youthful swing
and gaiety.
PHOTO    BY   CARTER   HANE Dorothy Hird Betty Bolduc Ernest Teagle Charles Nash       Madge Thompson        Lloyd Smith
Arts ?41
The fall term of the session of 1937-38 opened with the largest Freshman class
in the history of the University; 529 "wearers of the green" being registered.
Initiation ceremonies were entered into whole-heartedly, and in some cases,
bodily. Social activities began well with a "mixer" held in the gym one noon-
hour. This was followed by the Frosh Smoker, a girls party, and a huge reception at the Palomar, where the green was formally stripped from the backs of the
Freshmen.
In January, under John Brynelsen, Junior Member on Council, the class elections were held after one of the most heated campaigns ever seen on the campus.
The voters elected Professor Walter Gage, Honorary President; Joe Pearce, president; Dorothy Hird, vice-president; Betty Bolduc, secretary; Ernest Teagle,
treasurer; Charles (Robin) Nash, literary representative; Lloyd Smith, men's
athletic representative; and Madge Thomson,   women's   athletic   representative.
The class party, the main event of the year, was held on February 10th at the
Palomar. Patrons were Dr. and Mrs. William Ure and Mr. Gage. The unequalled success of the evening was largely due to the music of Sandy de Santis
and his band; and to the Pep Club which arranged the decorations.
Joseph Pearce John  Byers
Philip Parish
Agriculture ?41
Readers of the Totem read about us, Aggie '41's, and you will be surprised.
Early in the term we elected a vigorous executive in the persons of Jack Byers,
our aspiring president; Phil Parish, our practical vice-president; Phyllis Mitchell, our priceless secretary; and Pat Cumming the hoarder of our wealth.
Has anyone heard about the Public Speaking Club which operates under the
Agriculture Discussion Club? Well you ought to come in any Tuesday at 7:30
p.m. and hear our orators.
In the realm of athletics the Aggies are not to be outdone by any other faculty.
Both the Freshettes and the Freshmen excell in intra-murals, and as well many
of the class are actively engaged in track, basketball, and hockey.
Although Aggies are generally thought to be slow stolid creatures of the soil we
have several parties throughout the year to liven us up. Field Day at the University Farm is climaxed by a banquet and in the spring term rollicking fun is had
at the Aggie Barn Dance. The field trip to Agassiz is always one of the most
anticipated and exciting events of the year.
For the present let this be sufficient about the Aggie '41's of 1937-38, but remember that the "tree is but a sapling yet." You are going to hear more about us
in the next three years. L.   Louise  Anderson
Margaret J. Anderson
Violet I. Anderson
John B. Bakken
Edward J. Barrie
Harry R. Bell
L.  Robert Bergklint
Patricia G. Bibbs
Arthur J. Bingham
Arthur C. Bird
Betty D. Bolduc
Victoria J. Brown
Grace E. Bunnell
Thomas L. Butters
Joyce G. Carter
Dorothy  L.  Chamberlain
Elsie F. Chew
Henry B. Chu
Alice E. Clark
Robert M. Clark
Jean V. Cochrane
Theodora Combolos
Elliott A. Creelman
Guy R. L. Curwen
Dorothy M. Daniels
Gunhild H. Dellert
Clara M. Dollar
Aileen Dougan
M. Keith Douglass
M. H. Patricia Drexel
Aili S. Enegren
Esabelle T.  Eng Donald N. Fergusson
C. Samuel Fowler
Blanche R. Fry
Marjorie L. Galbraith
Valerie Gardiner
Hugh W. Gordon
Leone S. Gordon
Aubrey K. J. Gray
Helen D. Gray
Francis B. Gregory
D. Rodney Grierson
Vincent 0. Griffin
John A. Harrower
Bruce F. Harvey
Ben C. Herd
Dorothy M. Hird
Dorothy M. Hume
Bertram F. Hunter
Florence McG. Hurndall
Yoshio Hyodo
Roy V. Jackson
Joy B. Jameson
Doreen L. Jamieson
A. Elizabeth Jenkens
Alice G. Johnson
Doris C. Jonson
Hajime Kagetsu
W. Gordon Kersey
Jacqueline Kloepfer
W. Lloyd Marr
Nancy B. Martin
Ardis L. Mitchell H. Rodney Morris
Bernice L. Munro
Dorothy McCammon
D. Merle McCaslin
Frances A. McClean
Leslie M. McDonald
William P. T. McGhee
Jean L. MacLean
Ellis L. McLeod
Gladys McMichael
Angus MacPhee
Craig MacPhee
Andrew J. Nash
Barbara Nesbitt
M. Eileen Newby
Mary C. E. Nixon
Joseph M. Pearce
Doris B. Pepper
Dorene M. Perry
Eunice F. Pickering
Ursula Rhodes
Betty E. Rittenhouse
F. Mary Ross
Lloyd G. Ross
Raymond H. Rutter
F. Margaret Sage
Stephanie M. Sandwell
Wanda G. Shadforth
Louise McM. Skinner
Norman B. Smith
Helen M. Straith
Hiroshi Takeda M. Elizabeth Thomas
Jean I. Thomson
Douglas Todd
Takashi Tsuji
Ralph W. Tully
Marjorie V. Usher
Letti J. Vicelli
Vida M. Warden
Barbara M. White
Yukiko Watanabe
Josephine W. Weldon
Albert E. Wells
S. Mona Westby
Jocelyn M. Wickson
Ida B. Willis
Marian Willis
Pierre M. Wolfe
Elizabeth L. Worthington
Kathleen E. Wright
Tommy McL. Young
Douglas Archibald
Mary L. Beale
Mary Beaton
John M. Bezer
T. D. Cushing
Nancy L. Bruce
Margaret A. Burgess
Teresa J. Coady
Ruth C. Cochrane
Ruth M. Devlin
Alice T. Douglas
Rachel A. Douglas Kathleen E. Evans
A. John 0. Farina
E. Raymond Foster
Esther Galpin
John L. Glover
Muriel J. Glover
Elizabeth J. Jeffers
Bette M. Gosse
Dawne H. Grierson
Gordon B. Hewitt
Jean McC. Hill
Mary I. Hyslop
Shirley H. Johnson
Margaret E. King
Jean E. Logan
Ranjit S. Mattu
M. Albert Menzies
Donald B. Moody
Derek H. A. MacDermot
Margaret E. McKeen
Roddy McMillan
Helen L. Nowlan
Elizabeth J.  Peirson
Bob A. Potkins
Stuart P. Purvis
Patricia F. Reed
Mary-Lenore Schofield
Ruth P. Scott
Hugh J. Taylor
Ernest E. Teagle
David Vandt
Frances C. White Margaret A. Worthing
Lois C. McLeod
Roy G. Bell
James McG. Campbell
G. Anne Carr
George W. Claydon
Stanley S. Copp
Louise I. Dixon
Geraldine Docker
Constance M. Fairleigh
Paul L. Hammond
Joan Haslam,
G. Ruth Hutchinson
Donald P. Kerr
Doreen Martin
Victor G. Motherwell
Thelma A. Nelson
Alva E. Nichols
Robert L. Payne
Audrey M. Reifel
Darwin  H. Robertson
Hazel Scott
Lloyd L. Smith
Adrienne   R.  Southin
Anne K. Speirs
Semon G. Tater
Martha Toda
F. Todd Tremblay
Frances E. Webb
S. B. Weston
Barbara Shannon
Ida  Horn Keith Allan
Archibald Bain
J. H. Byers
Raymond C. Bailey
N. C. Bruce
Patricia C. Cumming
Mary Crane
Dorothy D. E. Chowne
Wm. Charlton
Grant Donegani
D. 0. Durkin
L. Stanley Durkin
Hugh Davie
Richard  Da vies
Janet Fleck
Victor Freeman
A. Joe Gregory
Geo. Hutchison
Geo. Howey
Ruth Heyer
Robert Ker
Geo. Kirby
Moray Kennedy
Martin Mathisen
V. L. Mosher
Ruth McElhanney
D. A. McLean
C. W. Nash
Wm. M. Ouimette
Carmen Planta
Virginia Poole
G. P. Parish Dave Ritchie
Ruth Seldon
Frances B. Thomson
Aoki Tetsuo •
Madge Thomson
Brita Vesterback
Newton Wolverton
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The UBYSSEY
Amid the turmoil of campus campaigns against overcrowding, delegations to
Victoria, Technocracy lectures, forbidden political clubs, basketball disasters and
theatrical productions, forty more isssues of the Ubyssey were successfully
ground out by the three veteran typewriters concealed in the debris of the "Pub"
office.
Used coffee cups, Coca-Cola bottles, overdue library books, even Senior Editors
themselves, were unable to halt the massive machinery which tells the world of
events on the U.B.C. campus.
Under Editor-in-Chief Kemp Edmonds, the 1937-38 staff of the paper introduced many changes in "make-up" and policy, even to announcing Turret Top
Type in keeping with the pace set by other Vancouver dailies.
News Manager Dorwin Baird, assisted by Senior Editors Dorothy Cummings and
Frank Perry supervised the actual news coverage and twice weekly printing of
the paper, while Sports Editor Frank Turner and his staff translated English into
Sportese for the benefit of campus ath1etes and their followers.
Associate Editors were Monty Fotheringham, Bill Sibley and Bob King, while
Victor Freeman, Rosemary Collins, Irene Eedy, Beverley McCorkell, Jack Mercer and John Garrett were active as Assistant Editors.
Associate Sports Editors were Jack Mair and Hugh Shirreff, with Van Perry,
Orme Dier and Myrne Nevison as assistants.
Reporters included Joyce Cooper, Joan Haslam, Ann Jeremy, Ozzy Durkin,
Barbara McDougal, Ed. McGougan, Virginia Galloway, Lester Pronger, Doug.
Bastin and Helen Hann, with Norm. Renwick, Basil Robinson, Frank Thornloe,
Archie Byers and Bob Melville covering the sports front. Dorwin
Baird
Dorothy   Cummings
The Ubyssey
James D. Macfarlane made himself
known on the campi from coast to
coast for his work as Exchange
Editor, and was also the only one of
a bevy of columnists not to use a
nom de plume. His more bashful
colleagues included "Darby", "The
Beggar Student" and "The Student
Prince".
Highlights of the year for the Ubyssey was the formation of the new
Canadian University Press service
in Winnipeg at Christmas, which
laid the foundations for a coast-to-
coast news service between Canadian
college papers.
R. King
and
M. Fotheringham
J. Macfarlane David Crawley
The TOTEM
The Totem, pawn on the publications chessboard and creature of fate, grew and
prospered in 1938 under the guidance of Editor-in-chief David Crawley. Modelled on the 200 page, nine-by-twelve year-book that is becoming standard among
West Coast universities, the Totem again leans to the photographic, with as
much topical reference as possible to fix the year and its events for posterity.
Mr. Crawley, undoubtedly the most nonchalant of Editors, often went for walks
on Marine Drive, or to the latest Carole Lombard picture, when publication activity was at its dizziest height. This did not seem to deter him from compiling
a richly representative and pictoral record of the session.
Innovations in the 1938 book include Freshmen pictures; their purpose being to
fix a contrast for the same students when their graduation pictures are made for
the Totem of 1941.
Carter Hanbury was official Totem photographer, the greater part of the picture
material in the book being his. Many campus camerartists generously contributed their work for publication.
Harry Campbell and Cicely Holmes gave unstinting time and labour to the mechanics of compilation, arranging lists, appointments, copy-writing and editing.
Lee Straight took over the organization of the large Sports section and assembled reports and write-ups. Jack Stark and Jean MacLeod compiled fraternity
and sorority material for the improved fraternity section which appears this year.
Others who aided in the cause to good purpose were: Kenneth Kahn and Joyce
Cooper. Dorwin Baird gave the book valuable publicity in the Ubyssey and
made up several striking ads for it.
Covers this year were made up in Vancouver, a fact of some interest considering this is the first year that this has been done. A distinct break in design and
size has now been effected with the Totems of earlier years, and the present
format will doubtless become a permanent feature of U.B.C.'s yearbook. Carter
Hanbury
Sport
Editor Monty Fotheringham
The Students9 Handbook
As one of the most concise, compact, informative and interesting publications in
this province, we would unhesitatingly nominate the Students' Handbook; that
little booklet of fact and figures distributed to the freshmen class each September.
Within the space of a comparatively few pages, the Handbook gives a graphic
and complete summary of all phases of Varsity life. Divided into four main sections—General Information, Student Organizations, Athletics, and Literary and
Scientific—it is a veritable fount of information, gushing forth facts and material about the University that are never run across elsewhere.
It is initially designed to help new students find their bearings as quickly as possible. Realizing that there is a very definite break between high school and Varsity, the editors have endeavored especially to gather information that would
assist the freshman classes to become active and interested members of the student
body quicker than might otherwise be the case.
Brief sketches of all the clubs on the campus, and information on all forms of
athletics, enables the student to make an intelligent choice of extra-curricular
activities. Then too, he is made familiar with the working of student government and organization on the campus, together with the more important sections
of the constitution and the code of the A.M.S.
Several pages of valuable odds and ends assist him in his actual day-by-day life
on the campus, helping him to find his way about the grounds. The Handbook
is published annually by the Publications Board and distributed along with the
freshmen insignia at the beginning of the session. This year's editor was A. M.
Fotheringham, Arts '38. A SOCIETY . . . PLAYERS' C
SITY TIME
RLIAMENTARY FORUM
AL SOCIETY . . . I. R. <
LITERARY FORUM .
CANADI
HEMATICS
10 CLUB ... . P
MESE STUDENTS1 A
A SOCIETY . . . PLAY
SITY TIME . . . PHRATER
CANADIENNE . . . JAPAN ES
CERCLE FRAt
. BIOLOC
IOLOG
NTARY FORUM . . ■.
. . HISTORICAL SOCIETY . . . I. R. C
CLUB . . . LETTERS CLUB . . . LITERARY FORUM
HEMATICS CLUB . . . PSYCHOLOGY CLUB . . . STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT . . . VAR:
10 CLUB . . . PHYSICS CLUB . . . MEMORA H SOCIETY . . . M. E. CLUB . . . LE CERCLE FRAh Prof. Gage
P. Larsen
A. Carter E. Boving
L. Sugarman
H. Wright        W. Nickerson James Fields
Players Club
TRYOUTS: Excerpt from School For Scandal
—admitted 30 new members.
HOMECOMING PLAY: One act, satiric
comedy Sham—Bob McDougall, Mary McLeod, Graham Darling, Arthur Sager (director) .
PLAYERS  CLUB  RECEPTION:
home of Miss Anne Carter.
At  the p
A
Y
R
o
r
U
8
RADIO PROGRAMME: Varsity Time —
MacBeth—Fred Hobson, Beth Gillanders, Ludlow Beamish, Arthur Sager, Mr. Dilworth
(director).
VISITING ACTOR: Bramwell Fletcher of
Noel Coward group—Players Club visited performance in a body back stage.
CHRISTMAS PLAYS: X^O or A Night in
the Trojan War by John Drinkwater—directed
by Prof. Ira Dilworth—a tragedy in verse. The
Blind by M. Maeterlinck — directed by Miss
Dorothy Somerset, psychological drama. Curse
You Jack Dalton by Wilbur Braun—directed
by Prof. Walter Gage, old-fashioned meler-
drama. The Fascinating Foundling by G. B.
Shaw—directed by Mrs. D. C. B. Duff and Dr.
Joyce Hallamore a disgrace to the outhor.
AFTER PERFORMANCE PARTY: On the
stage after Christmas plays.
PRESTIDIGITATION: W. C. Shelley, retired Minister of Finance in B.C.
ANNUAL ADDRESS: Prof. Thorlief Larsen, one of the two life members of the club.
MAKE-UP COURSE: Three lectures by Miss
Vivian Ramsay of the Vancouver Little
Theatre.
SPRING PLAY: Playboy of the Western
World by J. M. Synge—a satiric comedy directed by Miss Dorothy Somerset. Cast: Archie
Bain, Pauline Scott, Beth Gillanders, Pat Fowler, Norman Beattie, Dacre Barrett-Lennard,
George Kidd, Arthur Sager, Mary McLeod,
Anne Carter, Esme Caydzien, Jack Mercer,
Betty Blakely, Lester Sugarman, Bob McDougall, Dave Morrow.
TOUR:
province.
Contemplated to extend throughout Dr. Macdonald
s
The curtain closes on the last act, the sound of applause
fades away, and the audience files out of the auditorium. Another Musical Society production has joined
the group of past productions—and an imposing
group it is. Six Gilbert and Sullivan operas and two
operas outside the Savoyan repertoire have been produced in the last decade by the society.
Climaxing twenty-two years of musical activity on
the campus, the Musical Society this year presented the
most successful production of its career, "The Yeomen
of the Guard" by Gilbert and Sullivan.
Choice of the "Yeomen" was made early in November
and work was begun immediately to ensure a fine performance. Organization of the opera presentation
was capably carried out by president Frank Patch, ably
assisted by the other members of the executive. The
worth of his organization was reflected in the outstanding success of "The Yeomen" both artistically
and financially in the University Theatre from February 23, 24, 25, 26 inclusive, the opera played to a
capacity house each night.
The party to welcome new members, held in the Peter
Pan Ballroom in November, various banquets during
the year, and a party after the opera rounded out an
excellent social seacon.
Mr. C. Haydn Williams was the musical director, Mr.
E. V. Young, dramatic director; with Dr. W. L. Macdonald assistant musical director and Professor Walter
Gage, assistant dramatic director.
The executive consisted of Honorary President, Dr.
Macdonald; Honorary Vice-president, Walter Gage;
president, Frank Patch; vice-president, Catherine
Washington; secretary, Margaret Macdonald; production manager, Priscilla Boyd; business manager,
George Robertson, and treasurer Bob Boroughs.
Prof. W. Gage
E. Washington
P. Boyd
Frank Patch
M. McDonald
G. Robertson M  *mJ r%a  IS
ft?   Ifluftnli ■'
I \      II                     ^mmm
">
^
M U S I C A1
SOCIETY UUMWw^-Jwltt'n i q   h
The
Club
Hear Ye!
Hear Ye!
Hear Ye!
We give you the men behind the Pep meets, the oracles of the cafeteria, the lads
of the megaphone and white sweater—the Pep Club. Lead by pepster prexy
Grant Cameron, their maxim is "service to all." Thirteen men strong, the club
is perhaps the most active on the campus; one big daily job being the painting
and distributing of every sign from hasty notice to full-sized poster. It will
furnish all clubs with extra personnel for a hurry call. It has men on tap for
anything from ticket selling and grandstand "ushing" to yell-leading and decorating for varsity functions.
These are the fellows who have the sole responsibility for the ten big Pep meets
which are held each year. As well as stimulating ticket sales, these meets have
brought premier dance bands to the campus. A recent attraction was the "wide-
open" SMUS meet; twice this season the students have been privileged to hear
Canada's dean of swing, Mart Kenney.
The three stellar club successes this year have been:   the stadium opening,  at
which the Pepsters carried out a major  share   of   the   activities;   homecoming
week-end;   and  most  recently—definitely a feather in the club cap—the celebrated Victoria invasion.
The favorable press comments on its activities, the gratitude from all and sundry
campus groups, and the enthusiasm of the Pepsters themselves combined to assure
„p„
us that '3 7-'3 8 has been the biggest year yet for PEP!
'* p "
Back row:
A. Walsh
P. Kentley
J. McCarley
R. Renshaw
R. Bell
Front row:
S. McMorran
V. Perry
K. Shaw
G. Cameron
B. Bartholomew
R. Kincade
F. Willcox The University Engineering Society
MEMBERSHIP: Every student in Applied Science is automatically a member.
AIMS: To acquaint sciencemen with the engineering profession; and to give
them a chance to hear addresses by engineers on various phases of engineering
work.
SPEAKERS: Dean Finlayson on "The Life of Stevenson." Mr. Ridington on
"The Engineering Student and the Library." Mr. John C. Oliver on "The
City Underground." Major W. G. Swan on "The Construction of the Pattullo
Bridge," and Mr. A. Vilstrup, president, and Mr. E. A. Wheatley, registrar of
the Association of Professional Engineers in B.C. Professor Gillies and Mr. Fred
Bolton showed films.
ACTIVITIES: The society has long been known as the sponsor of the Engineers Open House both in 1933 and 1935, and it was through it that the demonstrations put on in the engineering laboratories were organized for the "Open
House" of 1938.
EXECUTIVE: Major Finlay was again Honorary President and Charlie Campbell was president for the year with W. R. Bacon as vice-president and J. Cameron King as secretary-treasurer.
1^1
American Institute of Electrical Engineers
AIMS: To give electrical engineering students a knowledge of the practical aspects of their course. Accomplished by having outside speakers and students
read papers, and by making field trips through local electrical plants.
ACTIVITIES: Motion pictures on "Induction Regulators" and "Transformers" were shown through the cooperation of Mr. F. Bolton of Canadian General Electric.
Mr. Thames of the Canadian Westinghouse Company gave a talk on "After I
Graduate—What?"
Four students will deliver papers before the Vancouver section of the A. I. E. E.
Field trips were made to B. C. Electric substations.
All members took an active part in "Open House."
EXECUTIVE: Faculty member, Professor W. B. Coulthard; president, Bob
Peebles; vice-president, Arthur Sutton; secretary, Laurence Gray; junior member, Jack Breeze. Alex Macdonald
James  Macdonald    George Gregory      Alex Macdonald
Parliamentary
Formm
AIMS: To provide entertaining and instructive debates to all interested; and to
give all a chance to take part in these debates.
DEBATES: Won the McGouan Cup, given to winning debating team of
western Canadian universities, for U.B.C, Struan Robertson and Morris Belkin
defeated the University of Alberta at Edmonton, as Alex Macdonald and Harold
Rome defeated the University of Saskatchewan, in Vancouver.
Jim Macdonald and Morris Belkin won everything but the decision from a
travelling team of Ottawa and McMaster universities.
Struan Robertson and Morris Belkin met Gonzaga University at a noon-hour
debate.     The audience gave the visitors  the decision.
Met the Women's Literary Forum in a no-decision contest. Bob Smith and Don
McGill debated for the Parliamentary Forum.
Norman DePoe and Bob Hayman tied the Vancouver Law School.
Don McTaggart and Don McGill represented U.B.C. against Stanford University in a no-decision debate.
EXECUTIVE: Honorary President, Professor J. Friend Day, upheld the tone
and dignity of the Forum, his special interest. The actual work was done by the
executive consisting of Jim Macdonald, Morris Belkin, Don McTaggart, Alex
Macdonald and George F. Gregory. Mathematics Club
AIMS: To bring together those students interested in Mathematics.
MEMBERSHIP: Limited to twenty-five undergraduates who are either honouring or majoring in Mathematics.
MEETINGS: Held bi-monthly at the homes of the student and faculty members. Papers are read and usually followed by discussions or sing-songs. Sometimes entirely social—like the roller-skating party in the spring term.
SPEAKERS: Dr. Nowlan on "An Introduction to Algebra." Mr. F. J. Brand
on "Dnalrednow ni ecila" which was a most amusing account of strange phenon-
ema found about us as seen through a mathematicians eye. W. English on Generalized Co-ordinates." W. Barss on the "History of Mathematics." G. Retal-
lack on "Magic Squares."
EXECUTIVE: Honorary President, Dean Buchanan; Honorary Vice-Presidents,
Dr. F. S. Nowlan, Mr. F. J. Brand, Mr.W. H. Gage, Mr. L. Richardson; president, Miss P. Shaw; vice-president, D. Manders; secretary-treasurer, Miss C.
McLean.
I^fol
The University Association of the
B»C* Teachers' Federation
The university branch of the B. C. Teachers' Federation affords experienced
teachers returning to the University, and students of the education class, a social
and professional organization which places them in immediate contact with
students of like experience. Any teacher joining this organization automatically becomes a member not only of the B.C.T.F. but also of the Canadian
Teachers' Federation.
This year the association has had two supper meetings in the cafe; has cooperated with Dr. Shrum in university extension work and in the submission of resolutions to the caster teachers'' convention; and has heard addresses by a
number of leading educationalists.
The executive is: Honorary President, Professor I. Dilworth; president, John E.
Wood; vice-president, George Crosson; secretary-treasurer, Edythe Burnham;
Clarke Wilkins, Jessie MacRae. Fronia   Snyder        Bernard Ennals    Margaret McKenzie    Robert McLellan
Student Christian Movement
The Student Christian Movement is an international and interdenominational
fellowship of students who regard their university experience not only as a preparation for life, but as life itself; and who seek in Christianity the principles that
will make this most meaningful.
To achieve this purpose the S.C.M. has carried on an extended program of
study groups, fireside and general meetings, devotional services, etc. Study
groups have been held weekly and bi-weekly with more than 125 students
participating. Visitors who have addressed members of the movement at various kinds of meetings have been: Martin Harvey, Watson Thompson, Ruth
Sparling, Luther Tucker, Dr. Anup Singh, Philip R. Beattie, Beverly L. Oaten,
Margaret Kinney and others.
Apart from its campus activities the S.C.M. has conducted two week-end retreats, the first a fall camp at Keats Island on the theme "Religious Living Today," and the second a week-end at Ocean Park on "The Student and Christianity." Other projects have been the organization of the local unit of the National Conference of Canadian University Students, the radio program, a freshman church service and social activities in each term.
Final event of the year will be the 13th annual spring camp, held at Gambier
Island. With its theme that of "Ideals In Action," students will give special consideration to Christianity and problems of peace and social change.
Officers of the movement are: Honorary President: Dr. L. S. Klinck, Honorary-
Vice-president, Dean M. L. Bollert; chairman of advisory board, A. E. Jukes,
Esq.; president, Bill Sibley; vice-presidents, Fronia Snyder, Bernard Ennals;
secretary, Margaret McKenzie; treasurer, Bob McLellan; executive: E. Bishop,
K. Armstrong, A. Charters, J. Ewen, M. Gray, R. Henderson, F. Matheson, P.
McEwen, F. Montgomery, F. Moran, T. Sanmiya, G. Tamaki, and R. Wilson. Agricultural Discussion Club
The Agricultural Discussion Club is an organization of the undergraduates of
the faculty of agriculture for the purpose of keeping them informed on new
developments in their field, and of becoming acquainted with the business and
scientific aspects of the industry.
Evening meetings have been called monthly by the president of the club, Harvey
Ozard, and discussions on current topics of interest have been conducted by well-
informed government officials and business men. This year the Discussion
Club, through the cooperation of its alumni, has been able to offer a public
speaking course to its members.
Other activities held under its auspices include a field trip to Agassiz, where
stock judging competitions were held, and a spring banquet at which the
trophies won at Agassiz were presented.
The executive of the club consists of Paul Trussell, president of the aggie
undergraduate; Harvey Ozard, vice-president the aggie undergraduate; Maurice
Welsh, treasurer, and Joan McTaggart-Cowan, secretary.
1^1
Historical Society
ACTIVITIES: An informal reception at the Gables Inn was held to introduce
new members directly to the faculty members, executive and old members.
The first term meetings included papers on "Arnold Toynbee," "Lytton
Strachey," "The Relations of Hollywood to History," and comparisons of
Canadian newspapers.
In the spring term study was centered on Spain. Its history and development
was traced up to the present. I
The debates in the B. C. Legislature in 1871 as to whether or not this province would enter confederation were dramatized for the radio program "Varsity
T' ft
1 lme.
Valuable documents, photostats of original correspondences, journals, maps were
on display to the public at "Open House."
EXECUTIVE: Honorary President, Dr. Sylvia Thrupp; president, Margot Mc-
Dermott; vice-president, Norman Beattie; secretary-treasurer, Frances Matheson. Political Discussion Club
The Political Discussion Club represents the outcome of an argument that
threatened to unseat the Students' Council, and later deadlocked the nine
councillors in a heated argument. Starting in the fall term, a group petitioned
Council for the right to form a branch of the Conservative Party on the
campus. Council refused to grant this request, but stated that two clubs embracing all factions would be acceptable.
The only immediate result was a petition which was circulated in an attempt
to call a meeting of the Alma Mater Society, and reverse the council ruling—
an act which would have amounted to a vote of lack of confidence in Council.
Eventually, however, it was decided that an all-faction club could be formed,
and organization meetings were held. But the club's original constitution
was thrown out by Council, and further proposals resulted in a deadlock;
some council members being  unalterably opposed to the club.
Finally the club's constitution was ratified, and meetings proceeded. The Oxford Union was chosen as the model on which the club should be based, and
it was decided that campus politics would not be discussed. Finesse is added to
the debates, which have included national defense, the Japanese question, and
the radio, by the invitation of speakers prominent in public life, who present
the cases of their political parties. Every shade of political opinion is represented in the club, from the reddest radicals to the stoutest die-hard reactionaries.
Executive for 1938 was: Honorary President, Prof. James A. Gibson; speaker,
Morris Belkin; secretary, Alec Sharp, and treasurer, Phyllis Wayles. La Canadienne
MEMBERS: Third and fourth year French students.
SPEAKERS:    Mile.    Sellon,    Lorraine Darling,  Kay  Armstrong  and  Mme.
Darlington.
ACTIVITIES:  Members are rehearsing a play to be presented in March.
EXECUTIVE:   President,   Kathleen Bladen;   vice-president,   Phyllis   Cowan;
secretary, Esther Davidson; treasurer, Kathleen Matheson.
[pQq
International Relations Club
ADDRESSES: Mr. James Gibson inaugurated the programme with a survey of
world events. Professor F. Forward spoke on Japan, Dr. Sylvia Thrupp on
Germany, and Count Keyserlinck on his experiences with the European press.
In the second term Dr. W. N. Sage outlined his impressions of a recent trip to
Europe.
Professor G. F. Drummond gave a talk on the effects of the depression.
Mr. Percy Bengough spoke on the C.I.O and the A.F. of L.
Dr. H. M. Cassidy and Professor F. H. Soward also spoke.
EXECUTIVE: Honorary President, F: H. Soward; president, Neil Swainson;
vice-president, Paul Volpe; secretary, Norah Feast; treasurer, Phyllis Wayles. Psychology Club
MEMBERSHIP: Third and fourth year students majoring or honouring in
Psychology who want to discuss their favorite subject.
DISCUSSIONS: Dr. Morsh gave a talk on "Race Prejudice." Mr. Boyes spoke
on his work at the Industrial School. Mr. Lightbody, advertising manager of
the B. C. Electric, spoke on the psychology of advertising.
Members of the club led discussions on social psychology and on music in its relation to emotion.
The background of anti-social behavior in children was discussed.
ACTIVITIES: A banquet and dance where members considered the pseudo-
science of astrology and debunked the Ouija board.
A popular exhibit at "Open House" was put on. The "lie detector" drew the
crowds, which found that they were also interested in mirror drawing and the
stereoscope. Five hundred people were tested for colour-blindness and some interesting results were obtained.
EXECUTIVE: President, Oliver Lacey, vice-president, Dorothy Brown; secretary, Millard Alexander; Hyslop Gray and Charles Richmond.
|pOq|
G M Dawson Club
MEMBERSHIP: Students in the fourth and fifth years of Mining and Metallurgy, in the department of Geology in Applied Science, in Geology in the Faculty of Arts.
MEETINGS: Held about every three weeks and addresses given by prominent
men in the profession, followed by informal discussion.
SPEAKERS: Dr. M. Y. Williams on the life of Dr. Dawson. Dr. Gordon
Davis on "Prospecting in Africa." Mr. D. Campbell McKenzie on "Deep Lead
Mining in Australia and British Columbia." Dr. John F. Walker, the Deputy
Minister of Mines, on the work of his department. Mr. J. R. Williams on problems in assaying.
ACTIVITIES: An annual banquet is held.
EXECUTIVE: Honorary President, Dr. M. Y. Williams; president, C. M.
Campbell; vice-president, P. Love; secretary-treasurer, J.  McCammon. Band and Glee Club
The session 1937-38 saw the inauguration of two new movements on the campus, both of them in the musical field. One was the Varsity Band, the other
a Glee Club, incorporated as such distinct from an instrumental or operatic group.
The product of intense mental ferment on the part of Osborne Durkin and L.S.E.
president Malcolm Brown, the band was organized early in the fall term. Brasses were scarce, so the group took its initial shape as a dance orchestra, rehearsing
briskly each Saturday afternoon in the otherwise torpid confines of the Applied
Science building.
Its first public appearance came on New Year's Day, 1938, with the tea-dance
and swing following upon U.B.C.'s victory over the visiting California rugby
squad. The band's most noteworthy accomplishment was the subsequent marathon engagement for the Victoria Invasion.
Next year, hopes are held for a plentitude of new men and new music, uniforms,
a quick getaway and consistent improvement. The band functions under the
sanction of L.S.E.
A male choir resolved itself out of the welter of Osborne Durkin's experiments
with mixed voices at the first of the session, and was distinctly fortunate in gaining the services of Professor Ira Dilworth. Amalgamation with a Union College
group under the leadership of Harry Watts was effected, and the new organization
rehearsed choral music during the spring term under Mr. Dilworth's direction.
Once again, next year is expected to witness the functioning of the choir in full
swing, under student direction and faculty supervision. It will remain a male
choir, Book Exchange
The Book Exchange is a cooperative organization run by students to facilitate
the inter-exchange of university text books. It carries out this function by accepting used text books from students and selling them at prices advantageous to the
owners. It was open this year for the first month of the fall term and the first
two weeks of the spring term.
The Book Exchange experienced a reasonably successful year with a cash turnover exceeding $1700. This session it was under the management of Clarence
Idyll with Philip Griffin and Douglas Ford as assistants.
MM
Biological Discussion Club
PURPOSE: The purpose of the Biological Discussion Club is to "promote interest in the biological sciences," and it has successfully carried out that purpose
this year. A more than ordinarily active year was experienced when a number
of interesting and instructive papers were presented by the members.
PAPERS: The opening meeting, at the home of Pro/7 G. J. Spencer, was a
social evening. Papers read during the fall term included "The Work of the
Summerland Experimental Station" by Maurice Welsh, and "Biological Photography" by Rae Anderson. The fourth meeting was given over to "Biological
Observations" by the members.
Papers during the spring term included "Notes on B. C. Willows" by Jack Davidson, "Poisonous and Edible Fungi" by Lois Still, "Spiders" by Bill Cameron,
and "A Fish-eye View of Life" by Dr. G. C. Carl, a former member of the club.
This latter, meeting was notable since it was the first open meeting in the history
of the club. The annual symposium, at which the discussion is led by six members, had as its subject "Evolution."
ACTIVITIES:    The year's activity ended with the annual picnic.
EXECUTIVE: Honorary President, Dr. C. McLean Fraser; president, Clarence
P. Idyll; vice-president, Ursula Dale; secretary-treasurer, Agnes M. Gwynn;
curator, Rae Anderson. Norah Sibley
Molly Fields Adrienne Collins        Fronia Snyder
Phrateres
One of the nine chapters in universities stretching from Mexico to Canada,
Theta Chapter of Phrateres at U.B.C, in its fourth year, is now one of the
most active on this coast.
Honorary President of this chapter is Dean M. L. Bollert, and advisor to the
club is Miss Clare M. Brown, its founder on this campus.
With its purpose of "Famous for Friendliness" All-Phrateres' programme for
the year included: a banquet, initiation, and dance, when over one hundred
new members were admitted into the club; an informal party; and a faculty tea.
Delegates were sent to the initiation ceremonies of Beta Chapter at the University of Washington, and to the conference at the University or Oregon.
Theta Chapter is divided into seven sub-chapters, and these too have their activities' schedule for the year. Philanthropic work at Christmas time, various
small parties, and discussion groups, were among the sub-chapter projects.
President of the club for the past year was Norah Sibley; vice-president, Biddy
McNeill; recording-secretary Mollie Field; treasurer, Adrienne Collins; corresponding secretary, Fronia Snyder; publicity manager, Rosemary Collins and
historian, Alice Gavin. Letters Club
Hoping that it has at least maintained the high standard of the past, The Letters
Club concludes its 1937-38 season during which papers have been given on a
variety of subjects—from the plays of Pirandello, the prose of de la Mare, to the
poetry of Hopkins,  Housman and Auden.
Exceeding previous years in quantity is the boast of our annual "original contributions" evening. Miss Georgiana Wilson was crowned Poet Laureate
and Miss Jean MacLaurin, Prose Laureate. Many of our poems were included
in the Literary Page of the Ubyssey.
Although our work does not lend itself to display our contribution to "Open
House" was thoroughly successful; the visitors being chiefly interested in the original work.
A comparison of recent prose and poetical drama was selected for discussion at
the joint meeting of the graduate and undergraduate clubs, which was the last
meeting of the year.
As ever, Professor Thorleif Larsen, as Honorary President and commentator,
has been our indispensable friend and advisor.
The executive was: president Arthur Sager; archivist, Bob apRoberts; secretary-
treasurer, Eleanor Gibson.
1^1
Cosmopolitan Club
This year the activities of the Cosmopolitan Club have met with great success.
Beginning the season with only a very small membership, the club has now
an active membership of forty students. These students endeavor to promote
an appreciation of the customs and the cultures of other nationalities than their
own.
The members are of many different nationalities: East Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Norwegian, Swedish, German, French, Jewish, Belgian, American and
British. The monthly meetings and the social gatherings have proved the
worth of the club by the bringing together of different nationalities on a friendly basis.
ACTIVITIES: Monthly meetings with special speakers. International party
at the Deutchland Cafe.     International tea at "Open House."
OFFICERS: Honorary President, Professor C. W. Topping; president, Alfred
J. Kitchen; vice-president, Mikkie Uyeda; treasurer, Fern Lew; secretary,
Ftankie Montgomery; social conveners, Hazel Dunbar and Ruth Leung. James Beveridge Peggy Jones
Film Society
U.B.C.'s Film Society completed its second boom year during session 1937-38,
with the importation of foreign films for showing on the campus. Using the
16 millimetre projector which is now a part of its equipment, the society
brought famous films from France, Germany, Russia, China and United States
to its 500 members at the university.
Among the most noteworthy of the society's showing were the Max Eastman
documentary on the Russian Revolution, "Tsar to Lenin"; and the Jacques
Feyder prize-winner, "La Kermesse Heroique," a sparkling comedy on sixteenth-
century town society in Flanders. Two pictures featuring child actors were the
French psychological drama, "Poil de Carrotte," and the German comedy "Emil
un die Detektiv." American revivals were the Lon Chaney portrayal of Victor
Hugo's "Hunchback of Notre Dame," made a decade ago by Universal; and
Rudolph Valentino's "Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse," directed by Rex
Ingram.
Two exchange programs were held in the evening for members of the downtown
branch of the National Film Society. One in the fall season featured Surrealist
and Impressionist film techniques. The films were "Entr'acte" (1924) featuring the combined talents of Picabia, Man Ray, and Erik Satie; and the Impressionist "Cabinet of Doctor Caligari" made by Werner Kraus in 1919. This
program was marred only by the action of the censor, who withheld Salvador
Dali's morbid Surrealistic "Chien d'Andalu."
The spring program featured "Four Horsemen" and two examples of British
documentary films.
Work on a Documentary Film, to be produced under the department of Extension, proved a bigger order than anticipated at the beginning. Difficulties of
organization and camera facilities withheld progress beyond laying a groundwork for future production. In the spring term, however, under Michael
Churchill as director of production, film material for a documentary film to be
used in the university's publicity campaign was compiled.
Executive for the 1937-38 season was as follows: President, Donald Munro;
vice-president, James Beveridge; secretary, Peggy Jones; treasurer, Philip Akrigg;
committee, Peggy Thompson, Lloyd Hobden, Dick Jarvis, Graham Darling,
Honor Vincent and Louise Skinner. Menorah Society
MEMBERSHIP: The Menorah Society of the University of British Columbia
is a branch of the international organization of Menorah societies of university students and as such automatically includes in its membership every Jewish
student on the campus.
MEETINGS: Bi-weekly meetings are held at the homes of the members and
at each meeting an address is given by a guest speaker and a discussion follows the
lecture.
SPEAKERS: Rabbi S. Cass spoke and presented a film on Palestinian Jewish
communities. John Stanton, leader of the Greater Vancouver Youth Council,
explained the operation of the Canadian Youth Congress.
ACTIVITIES: The annual "Menorah Party" at the opening of the spring
term was a well attended and successful function.
EXECUTIVE: President, H. Rome; secretary, Rose Weisse; treasurer, Bernard
Reed; and freshman representative, Bern ard Freeman.
|pQq|
Forest Club
AIMS: To promote interest in forestry and to establish closer contact with
outside interests in the industry. With this object in view monthly meetings
are addressed by members of both the industry and the forest service.
ACTIVITIES: The club organized the forest exhibit at"Open House," sponsored logging films at a meeting of the University Engineering Society, and
conducted a field trip in the spring term.
EXECUTIVE: Honorary President, Professor Malcolm Knapp; president A. B.
Anderson; vice-president, George Minns; secretary, J. H. Benton and treasurer,
P. Custance. Dorwin Baird
Struan Robertson
Time
As a feature of the "better publicity" campaign for the University, Varsity Time
was inaugurated as a weekly half-hour radio programme over CJOR. The policy
was one of giving the listeners some idea of the more serious side of university
life. Following this policy various organizations on the campus sponsored
separate programmes with their own script and cast. Such subjects as the dramatization of the history of the University, the Confederation debate in the British Columbia Legislature, the Winnipeg Conference, and several scenes from
"Macbeth" were used on the programmes.
Shortly after Christmas a demand arose for a lighter type of programme. To
meet this demand the staff was reorganized and the publication of the Ubyssey,
"Open House," and graduation were all dramatized in this less serious vein.
The directors of Varsity Time have realized the tremendous scope of their work
and also the difficulties entailed in the production of a weekly programme by unpaid amateurs in competition with skilled professionals. They do feel, however,
that they have made a move in right direction, and they trust that those who
follow them will profit by their experiences, and accomplishments.
Varsity Time was managed by Struan Robertson; Ozzie Durkin was in charge
of music; Dorwin Baird and Victor Freeman were announcers; Malcolm Brown,
president of L.S.E., was originator of the series. n
Outdoor Club
This past year has been one of the Outdoor Club's most successful. Larger
crowds than ever before up at the cabin
Saturday evenings have taxed its accommodation to the limit.
The fall trip on Thanksgiving week-end
up Howe Sound to Porteau was the largest in the club's history. Though the
objective of Mount Brunswick was not
reached and the outing was marred by an
accident, for most of the forty-two
V.O.C'ers, it was a week-end thoroughly enjoyed.
Wood-cutting and cleaning throughout
the fall gave us a clean cabin and a
winters wood supply.
The coming of winter brings snow and
snow brings ski-ing. Though some do
their ski-ing farther afield, most of us
stick to Grouse, to Paradise, the Big Hill
or perhaps Thunderbird.
Social activities have included two. dances,
skating parties (both ice and roller) and
turkey dinners up at the cabin.
In the field of science we have worked to
encourage the combustion of wet firewood, and in the realm of the arts we
have composed a new verse for a Varsity
song.    It runs like this:
My Girl's a V. O. C,
She will sit on my knee,
I taught her how to ski,
Now she's wrapped 'round a tree. ffrim
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With Mr. W. T. Kennett and Miss O/if e Selfe as Honorary President and Vice-President, our executive has
been: president, Jack Radcliffe; vice-president, Agnes
Gwyn; secretary-treasurer, David Smith, marshal,
Cam Stewart; archivist, Polly Brand.
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Officers
Training
The annual Christmas training camp was again held
this year at Work Point Barracks, Esquimalt. A new
programme of field maneouvres was carried out in hip
boots and rain capes in spite of heavy snow. Rifle
and Lewis gun practice was carried out at Blair Range,
North Vancouver and in the University indoor range.
Second Lieutenant F. B. Jones won the Leckie Shield
and Sergeant H. Mann was awarded the Mclnnes
Shield in the shooting competitions.
Commissions were awarded to Lieut. A. P. Morley and
Second Lieut. F. P. Griffin.
Commanding Officer was Lieut.-Col. G. M. Shrum,
and Medical Officer was Major G. A. Lamont. Other
officers were: Lieutenants, P. R. Lay ard, A. P. Morley;
Second Lieutenants, G. A. Dickie, D. C. Holland, C. G.
Wood, F. P. Griffin, J. R. Roberts, F. B. Jones, K. E.
Grant, C. E. Hand, and R. S. Clark. The Chemistry Society was founded in 1916 and so is one of the oldest clubs on
the campus.    Membership is limited to those taking Chemistry 3 or higher.
The society holds an open and a closed meeting each month. The open meetings are addressed by technicians in various laboratories throughout the city.
Speakers in the past year included Mr. Goard, who spoke on "Steel and Iron,"
Mr. Irving Smith who spoke on "Casein Glues," and Mr. H. Beard who spoke
on the "Chemical Problems of the Fishing Industry."
The closed meetings are held at the homes of the members and many of the addresses given were upon subjects being investigated by the speakers. Maurice
Wright, Rex Pearce, Iris Corbould, George Walsh, George Davis, Jack Harris,
John Hinniker, Laurence Machin, and Raymond Bell all read papers at these
closed meetings.
The executive for 1937-38 was Honorary President, Dr. E. H. Archibald; president, John Light; vice-president, Wheeler Govier; secretary, Carol Menchions.
|pQq1
The year's activities have included very interesting papers given by the Honorary
President, Honorary Vice-president, with folksinging and various plays done in
german by the members of the club.
The executive consisted of Honorary President, Dr. I. Mclnnes; Honorary Vice-
president, Dr. J. Hallamore; president, Ellen Boving; vice-president, Stuart Mc-
Daniel;   and  secretary-treasurer,   Joanne Brown.
[pQq
MEMBERSHIP: Open to all students who have done at least one year of
French at the University.
MEETINGS: The meetings were devoted to play-reading, the music of French
composers, study of French literature. The dramatic committee under the con-
venorship of Mary McCulloch and the musical committee under Eileen Burke
added greatly to the success of the meetings,
In some specially interesting meetings Le Cercle Francais combined with the La
Canadienne. A talk was given by Mme. Darlington of the University, a recital
by Mme Lorraine Darling, and Le Cercle presented several scenes from the comedy Tovarich by Jacques Deval. Janet Aitken, Margaret Findlay, Stella Bridg-
man, Norman Beatty, Douglas Wilson and Professor Wm. Kennett, taking part.
The two clubs also gave a tea for the French Club of King Edward High School
at which Mrs. G. Chambers gave a most interesting Marionnette show.
EXECUTIVE: Honorary President, Dr. Wessie Tipping; president, Clymene
Dickie; vice-president, Lucille Letham; secretary, Mary Eacrett; treasurer, Ruth
Barss. Literary Forum 1937*38
Inter-university debates and a five-week course in speech marked the highlights of
the year for the Literary Forum, the women's public speaking organization on
the campus.
Debates and short semi-impromptu speeches were held at the regular bi-weekly
meetings.
Mr. J. W. Morgan was brought to the campus to give a series of talks on the
fundamentals of speech.
During the year, literary forum representatives met debating teams from the
University of California and the University of Washington.
The return visit of two of the members of the forum to Washington was interesting as that occasion was the first experiment in symposium debating ever conducted by a British Columbia team. The forum hopes to use this form in a few
debates next year.
The executive was: Honorary President, Dean Bollert; debate advisor, Dr. Sylvia
Thrupp; president, Kathleen Armstrong; vice-president, Margot McDermott;
secretary, Margaret Findlay; treasurer, Mary Rendall; publicity, Clymene Dickie
and Irene Watson.
1^1
Newman Club
AIM: To bring together on a religious, intellectual and social basis all Catholic
students,  who automatically become members upon entering the University.
MEETINGS: The meetings are usually half social and the other half is devoted to business and to papers and discussion. Speakers this year have been Dr.
David Steele, Father A. F. Carlyle, Father Hugh Sharkey, and Paul Volpe who
represented the club at the National Conference of University Students.
The club passed a constitution drawn up by Paul Volpe, Florence Cruise, and
Brooks Costello. ■
EXECUTIVE: Honorary President, Mrs. J. M. Lefevre; Chaplain, Father William Enright; president, Marino Fraresso; vice-president, Kathleen Skae; secretary, Catherine Carr (on the resignation of Sheila Gillis); treasurer, Bob Boroughs; librarian, Margot McDermott. AIMS: To answer the educational, social, and cultural needs of Japanese students on the campus.
MEETINGS: Hon. Nemichi addressed the members on "The Sino-Japanese
Conflict." Miss Elizabeth Takahashi, and Rev. K. Shimizu spoke on the problems and future of second generation Japanese persons. K. Hidaka gave a report of the conference of university students in Winnipeg, which he and S. Hi-
gashi attended.
ACTIVITIES: Misses Kato. Muraki, and Uyede debated the Japanese Students' Club of the University of Washington.
The club sponsored a students section in the "Canada Daily News" in order to
publicize a picture of campus life.
A "Frosh Reception" at the Peter Pan Ballroom and a banquet and dance were
held during the year.
More activities are planned for this year—including a Graduation Banquet and a
Dolls' Festival.
EXECUTIVE: President, George Tamaki; vice-president, Hido Iwasaki; treasurer. K. Ayama; and E. Henmi, K. Kitamura M. Toda.
The Chinese Students5 Association
ACTIVITIES: During the summer two delegates were sent to attend the conference of "The Chinese Students' Association of North America" at Chicago.
They were instrumental in making this conference a success. Again, in the National Conference of University Students at Winnipeg this winter, our competent and energetic president was among the delegates who attended from this campus.
We may say that credit should be given to certain of our members who have
been largely responsible in taking the initial steps in the formation of "The
Chinese Youths' Association of Vancouver."
In the beginning of the spring term the association has cooperated in making the
second Annual International Dance on the campus a total success.
We have also held a few speaker meetings and social evenings besides our annual
functions which are the Spring Picnic, the Graduation Banquet, the Frosh Reception and the Christmas Party.
EXECUTIVE: President, Daniel Lee; vice-president, Quon Wong; English
secretary, Fern M. Lew; Chinese secretary, Chak F. Leu; treasurer, Frank Chin. Organized in 1933 in honour of Dr. A. S. Monro, by whose will the University received $80,000 for medical research.
The aim is to promote the educational interests of all students engaged in any
branch of pre-medical work at U.B.C.
The club was very privileged this year to have as its first speaker, Dr. Simpson,
Assistant Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University.
Other speakers were Mr. Joe Pierce, member of the club who spent sometime
working at the hospital at Rock Bay, and Mr. Charlie Watson, U.B.C. graduate who is member of the Provincial Psychopathic Department of the Mental
Hospital.
In December, through the courtesy of Mr. Jack Blanchflower of the Eceles X-Ray
Ltd., the club was able to see moving pictures of operations performed by outstanding surgeons.
Two surveys have been made during the year; one of the Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale, and one of the Vancouver General Hospital.
Although there is no faculty of medicine on our campus, it is hoped that those
who take pre-medical work here will be able to return for research in the near
future.
The officers of 1937-38 were: president, Jack McLaren; vice-president, Blanche
Banford; secretary-treasurer Marion Reid.
\j&\
Varsity Christian Union
Founded in 1925, the Union is composed of students who, knowing Jesus Christ
as Saviour,  desire to exalt him as Lord in daily living.
Meetings are held daily for Bible study and discussion with special open meetings
once a week. In the fall term we were privileged to hear, among others, Bishop
J. Taylor Smith, K.C.B., C.V.O., D.D., and Dr. Deck, F.R.G.S.
During January Mr. Jas. Forrester gave a series of talks on the reality of Evangelical Christian experience. Last year Mr. Forrester was president of the Debating Union and the V.C.U. at Queens University. Questions such as "Does
God Matter?" were the bases of four student talks in February.
A rally attended by 600 persons was held in King Edward School auditorium
and there were student speakers from Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle.
The executive consisted of president, Andrew Karsgaard; vice-president, Phyllis
Trafford; secretary, Kathleen Matheson; treasurer, Archie Morrison; and publicity, Gretta Rice. >HA DELTA PHI . . . ALPHA GAMMA DELTA . . . BETA THETA PI . . . ALPHA OMICRON PI .
.TA UPSILON . . . ALPHA PHI . . . KAPPA THETA RHO . . . DELTA GAMMA ... PHI DELTA 1
MMA PHI BETA ... PHI GAMMA DELTA . . . KAPPA ALPHA THETA ... PHI KAPPA PI ... F
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA . . . BETA THETA PI . . . ALPHA OMICRON PI . .
-TA UPSILON . . . ALPHA PHI . . . KAPPA THETA RHO . . . DELTA GAMMA ... PHI DELTA Tl
MMA PHI BETA . . , PHI GAMMA DELTA . . . KAPPA ALPHA THETA ... PHI KAPPA PI ... K,
KAPPA SIGMA ... PSI UPSILON . . . SIGMA PHI DELTA . . . ZETA PSI. . Edward Disher
Pat Denby
Inter ^Fraternity Council 1937*38
The Inter-Fraternity Council is the governing body for the ten fraternities on
the campus. The meetings are held at least once a month or when called by any
one fraternity. The executive for this session were Ed. Disher, president; Pat
Denby, vice-president; Bob Parkinson, secretary; and Prof. Finlay, faculty representative.
The various fraternities are governed by a constitution and rulings that may be
passed at the meetings. The purpose of the Council is to see that the rules are
enforced and if they are not suitable to remedy them. Also the fraternities,
through the Council assist Students' Council in any matter that may be deemed
advisable. Inter-Fraternity sports are organized such as English rugby, basketball, ping-pong and baseball. For these activities cups and souvenirs are presented to the winners.
One of the major jobs of the Council is the setting up of rushing rules for the
ensuing year and revamping the constitution as it becomes useless and outmoded.
This year the various fraternities felt that the rushing rules should be changed
somewhat and set about for a new plan. They were not in the same position
as the Pan-Hellenic in that drastic changes were desired, but nevertheless, the
rules were modified to a large extent.
The period of fall rushing has been changed from the first week in the fall term
to the first ten days of October, with a limited number of entertaining dates to be
drawn for at the first meeting of the Council in the fall term. The Freshman
rushing season is to commence, not on the last day of the Christmas exams, but
on the first day of the spring term. Thus the season will be cut some two
weeks.
In this way the fraternities on the campus may spend less time and money in
rushing and have more time for the University. They will be able to concentrate more on their own internal organization, with the result that rushing will
not be the major activity that it is now. Beverley Cunningham
Eleanor Gibson
Panhellenic Association
The Panhellenic Association's one meeting this year had profound repercussions.
The council was non-existent for the majority of the year until some tremendous
stimulus of unknown origin brought the girls together in a house party in West
Vancouver one week-end. In spite of the discomfort of the accommodation the
girls thought very hard about the evils of the rushing system. Clare Brown,
Gamma Phi, had an idea that all fraternity life would be rosy if only rushing
could be done away with.
Most of the fraternity representatives were doubtful but after an all-day Sunday
session they had decided on a system that would make rushing quite unnecessary.
Freshettes were to be educated in the values of fraternity life and were to be, if
they signified interest in the fraternity world, invited to Open House, to consist
of one simple tea given by a sorority. This would occur in the spring and
would be the only social event in connection with the bidding of new members.
Second year bidding was to be retained with the addition of the proven advantage of registration for bidding with the payment of one dollar registration fee
for the purpose of weeding out feeble interest. Finally instead of dates in which
the fraternity would find out if the girl wanted to join their group the "Biddee"
hands in preference sheets with the sororities ticked which she would consider
joining. Then the sorority would submit a list of girls they would consider
bidding. Adjustment would take place through the office of the Dean of
Women with plenty of chance for interview and adjustment if the lists didn't
coincide sufficiently.
The group came home Monday morning quite satisfied with their fine but a little
idealistic plan to find a new fear before them. They were afraid their group
wouldn't accept the plan. However working on the policy that any change was
better than none all the sororities with the exception of one, accepted the proposal. As majority were in favor and the new system is on trial for two
years.   That is, in the fall of 1938 and 1939.
And so with a brief but notable year's work behind them the Panhellenic executive of president, Beverley Cunningham; vice-president, Peggy McRae; secretary,
Eleanor Gibson, turns over duties to incoming president, Virginia Birmingham;
and vice-president, Doris Pratt. ALPHA DELTA PHI
D.   Barrett-Leonard     J. Bird J. Brake      K. Butchart      D. Carter      C. Chaffey    W. Colledge   G. Coldwell
J. Crawford E. Disher       J. Frazee,    W. Goulding    N. Hockin        R. Knox W. Knox        D. Lewis
G. Mackie      D. Morrow       R. Smith        D. Spencer      J. Stewart       F. Taylor       P. Larsen Beta Theta Pi was founded at Miami University, Oxford,
Ohio, on August 10, 1839. There are 89 chapters.
Gamma Omicron was installed in 1936.
H. Poole      B. Hodgson B. Peebles     G.  Snelling A. Charters L. Zink H. Ozard T. Moore B. Twiss
B. Davidson     B. Ducklow B.   Parkinson     H. Burke B. Dixon D. Wyness      R. Elfstrom       A. Davie B. Laidlaw
A. Deptford      H. Morris        R. Morel     J.   Stevenson      J. Fields J. Granger H. Livingstone R. Minshull H. McKim
D. Taylor B. McGhee     B. Mclntyre D. Fergusson H. Davie        R. Morris C. McGuire
BETA THETA PI DELTA UPSILON
R.  Smith      L.  Detwiller   C.  Whitelaw    W.   Daubner   W. Tremaine    W. Stokvis    G.   McCullough     G.  Finch        A. Staples
T. Crawford      B. Millar       S. Hayden      W. Robertson        L. Ross F.  Field        D. Harkness      N. McRae      R. McElhanney
St.  C.  Strong      W. Blair B.  Devlin G. Crosson        G. Mason        M. Moore       J. Tucker J. Ross L. Marr
T. Dashwood-Jones     A. Smith R. Wilson F.  Price G. Pringle      L. E. Machin     I. H. McDiarmid
Not in Photograph:      W.  Tolmie    B.   McLagan     H. Lumsden      M. Beach        B. Penney    L. McDonald
Delta Upsilon was founded at Williams College, New
Jersey, on November 4, 1834. There are 61 chapters.
The British Columbia Chapter was installed in 1935. C. Potter L. Sugarman H. Rome K. Kahn A.  Goldberg D. Vandt
H. Nemetz N.  Rothstein S. Wolfe M. Moss M. Narod
Not in Photograph:   S. Aqua
KAPPA THETA RHO PHI DELTA THETA
D. Carey G. Robson C. Robson S.   McDaniel E.   Robertson R. Matthison R. Robinson       R. King D. Darling
P. Griffin R.  McDougall     E. Jones W. Watson       G. Avery        B. Hoskins R. Lowe       W. Wallace J. Runkle
R. Smith B. Pearce J. Vance       D. McLeod R. Maitland   E. Alexander J. Garrett   D.   Palethorpe W. Lynott
D. Parham W. McLellan J. Pearce G.   Donegani    D. Ritchie     B.   Natheson W. Townley   J.   Matheson T. Robson
Phi Delta Theta was founded at Miami University,
Oxford, Ohio, in 1848. There are at present 105 active
chapters. British Columbia Alpha chapter was installed
in 1930. A
$.r.A.
J. McMillan
B. Gordon
B. Wilson
J.  Charlton
J.  Morrison
R. Andrews
J. Ussher
F. Pearce
S. Harris
R. Taylor
M. A. McDowell
F. Smith
R. Henderson
0. Orr
L. Straight
T. Williams
C. Cosulich
E. West
B. Horwood
B. Charlton
F.  Pendleton
B. Straight B. Stevenson T. Tremblay
F. Clark
D. Mottley
PHI GAMMA DELTA PHI KAPPA PI
J. Andrews
D. Hogg
L. Vine
T. Madeley R. Morrison P. Crickmay J. Merrett
H. Carruthers        I. Cameron W. Campbell N. Harrison F.   Billings B.   Robertson        C. Cunningham
T. Fitzpatrick       F. Jamieson        J. MacArthur A. Wallace D. Fairbairn
S. Lang
B. Robinson
C. Long
B. Calder T. Butters D. Robertson        B. Bergklint M. Crickmay
Phi Kappa Pi was founded at McGill University, Montreal,
Quebec, in 1913. There are six active chapters. Alpha
lota Chapter was installed in 1924. Phi Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of
Pennsylvania, Hershey, Pennsylvania, in 1850. There
are 39 chapters in existence. Alpha Omega was installed
in 1936.
B. Boe W. Braidwood       A. Byers D. Burnett       B. Campbell       F. Edmonds      K. Edmonds        G. Heron
R. Leckie A. Lucas G. Mason J. Farina A. Gray C. Clarke S. Clarke C. Wilson
D. McLean B. Sharpe F. Perry P. Trussell       M. McLeod A. Reid N. Gray
PHI KAPPA SIGMA PSI UPSILON
H. McPhee    P. Margetts S.  Jagger    L. Lightstone   D. Graham     L. Wallace     B. Anderson     A. Collier      G. Gregory
G. Denby      B. Cameron J. Davis E. Davis       J. Pearson       J. Stark      D. Dowrey   D. Montgomery C. Stamatis
J.   Robertson A.  Drummond     D. Ford M. Brown       C. Fulton    S.   Robertson    E. Teagle       R. Rutter        R. Payne
W. Moodie      R. Heddle D.   McDermot    A. Sweetnam     L. Beaumont     J.  McKenzie     J. Armstrong      D. Sage
The Psi Upsilon fraternity was founded at Union College,
Schenectady, N. Y., on November 24, 1833. The fraternity
has 27 active chapters. Zeta Zeta Chapter was installed
at the University of British Columbia on October 19,
1935.
m% R. Upward       J. Phelps     C. Archibald      H. Cliff    J. MacDermot   R. Nelson J. Brynelson W. Craighead   W. Bacon
John Scott   J. Woodward A. Drysdale D.  Macintosh J. Macintosh    R. Durkin C. Heim       M. Hanson    A. Andrews
C. Kennedy     R. Carver         D. Bell          J. Davis       C. Lighthall       P. Love A. Kerr        M. Pogue       J. Collins
J. Adair         J. Gunn       John Beatty  J.  Creighton    D. Patrick     W. Warren A. Allen        W. Boyce        B. Elliot
Not in photograph: G. Minns, G. Bessette
$
IGMA PHI DELTA ZETA PSI
K.   Campbell J. Campbell M.  Churchill       J.   Macdonald W.   Hudson D. Wilson
D. Crawley A. Macdonald H. Mann
D. Worth
C. Locke
J. McLeod P. Leckie-Ewing J.  Whittle P. Mathewson
K.   Eadie T. Branson R. Hayman E. apRoberts C. Hanbury J. Kennedy B. Emerson
G. Darling G. Killam R. apRoberts G. Douglas N. Stewart
Zeta Psi was founded at New York University in 1847.
There are 29 active chapters. Sigma Epsilon Chapter
was installed in 1925. Alpha Delta Pi was founded in 1851, and at present has
55 active chapters. Beta Kappa was installed on the
U. B. C. campus on February 7, 1931.
M. McKenzie E. Bossy J. Cameron M. Craig M. Dewar M. Eastham E. Eaton
N. Feast M. Findlay A. Gavin L. M. Gilmour R. Hicks F. Humfrey F. Jamieson
R. Jonson M. Kersey E.  McDonnell J. McLeod L. Nixon S. Parker M. Patton
M. Todd
D. Yelland C. Holmes I. Jenkins
G. Snow
M. Field
ALPHA DELTA PI ALPHA GAMMA
DELTA
B. Avis
M. Harvey
D. Smith
▲
F. Bain
D. Kemp
M. Black
A. Braidwood
F. Cruise
M. Eacrett
H. Hann
A. Leitch
D. Leitch
R. McDonald
P.  MacEwan
L. McEwan
B. McNeill
M.  Nevison
J. Porter
M. Rendall
A. Shewan
K. Webster
J. Wilson
1. Sullivan
E. Carter
D. McCully
Alpha Gamma
Delta was founded in
1904, and has 45
chapters.   Delta Zeta was installed at U. B. C. in 1930.
m Alpha Omicron Pi was founded in 1897, and has 48 active
chapters.   Beta Kappa was installed at U. B. C. in 1932
A. Clarke
P. Jones
V. Clark
W. Elliot
A. Gerow
C. Dickie
M. Shone
S. Bridgman
P. Boyd
V. Dean
M. Campbell M. J. Gerow J. Cooper B. Breeton J.  McArthur A. Jeremy
K.  Armstrong
M. Findlay
B. Ball
ALPHA OMICRON PI ALPHA PHI
M.  Biggs
M. Ecker
P. Patterson
D.  Peterson
H. Gray
C. Miller
M. Miller
M. Rae
0.  Hicks
D. Cummings
C. St. John
M. Millar
G. Pitman
D. Pratt
H.—J. Bescoby
J. Pearson
N. Pollack
B. McDougall
M. Twiss
J. Craig
J. Macaulay
M. Griffiths
A. Salter
<(/A>
Alpha Phi was founded in 1872, and has 36 chapters.
Beta Theta was installed at U. B. C. in 1929. Delta Gamma was founded in 1874, and there are 49
chapters. Alpha Phi Chapter was installed at U. B. C.
in 1928.
M. Fox
0. Tufts
H. Wright B. Cunningham B. Hutton
P. Macrae
M. Bradshaw M. Cosens F. Jones B. Crossley S. Wilson M. Heyer
A. Chowne E. Alexander B. Butters M. McDiarmid M.  Harkness
DELTA GAMMA GAMMA PHI BETA
J. Bonnell
E. Evans
J. Hall
B. Jones
J. Meredith
G. Thomson
N. Thomson
A. Schroeder
J. Seaton
E. Stangland
E. White
B. Bearce
A. Johnson
S. Lynn
J. Stordy
M. Evans
M.   Alexander
M. Sloan
S. Gillis
K. Hewitt
L.  Montgomery
B. Moxon
D. Sherratt
M. White
Gamma Phi Beta was founded ir
chapters.    Alpha Lambda was
1928.
1874, and has 49 active
installed at U. B. C. in Kappa Alpha Theta was founded in 1870, and has 63
active chapters. Beta Upsilon Chapter was installed at
U. B.C. in 1930.
L. Boyd
B. Douglas
F. Field
N.< Gibson
I. Irwin
M. Martin
B. McCallum
C. Stewart P. Brand J. Brown B. Hall M. Lightheart       M. Longfellow K. Sellens
M. Vance E. Whiteford M. Bremner M. Hunter B.   McCorkell E. Sellens K. Taylor
KAPPA ALPHA THETA KAPPA KAPPA
GAMMA
M.  McDonald
P. Lafon
P. McRae
B. McLachlan       M. Macdonald
M. Gow
H. Crosby
B. Bingay
M. Jessup
P. McKean
V.   Birmingham        N. Housser
D. Saville
P. Thomson
J. McRae
P. McLeod
J. Seldon
A. Carter          V.   Birmingham
M. Reid
J. McLeod
H.
Wrigh
t          M. Whitelaw           N. Trapp              E. Smith
Kappa Kappa Gamma was founded in 1870, and has
72 chapters. Gamma Upsilon was founded at U. B. C.
in 1929. TBALL . . . RUGBY .
. . BASKETBALL . . . TRACK . . . SOCCER ... ICE HOCKEY . . . ROWU
F . . . SWIMMING .
. . GRASS HOCKEY . . . BADMINTON . . . FOOTBALL . . . RUGBY . . . B>
CK . . . SOCCER . .
. ICE HOCKEY . . . ROWING . . . GOLF . . . SMMMIN(L^^jy*yi|p
CER     . . ICE HOCKEY . . . ROWING . . . GOLF . . . SWIMMING . . . GRASS HOCK
WNTON . . . FOOTBALL . . , RUGBY . . . BASKETBALL . . . TRACK . . . SOCCER ... ICE HOC
ING . . . GOLF . . . SWIMMING . . . GRASS HOCKEY . . . BADMINTON . . . FOOTBALL R Dr. A. H. Hutchinson
C. A. Lyall Vine      Rann Matthison
Archie Byers
Men's Athletic Executive
Under the efficient supervision of president Lyall Vine, the Men's Athletic Association has gone through a year of great activity. Inter-collegiate sport has been
the feature of the season, with Canadian football, swimming, rugby, basketball,
ice hockey, rowing and ski-ing all meeting other university teams.
Intra-Mural competition has been very active this year, the field of events being
considerably broadened with much more interest being shown.
Dr. A. H. Hutchinson was the Honorary President for the year. Members of the
executive were: president, Lyall Vine; vice-president, Rann Matthison; secretary,
Archie Byers. Jean  Meredith       Pamela  Runkle     Rosemary Collins
Women's Athletic
Mrs. T. A. Boving
Jean Meredith was the capable president of the Women's Athletic Executive this
year. Vice-president and in charge of Intra-murals was Pamela Runkle. Rosemary Collins was secretary-treasurer. Representing the various women's athletic
clubs were: Peggy McLeod, badminton club; Peggy Jones, basketball; Margaret Evans, grass hockey; Agnes Gwynn, outdoor club; Bunty Butters, swimming club.
Class representatives were: Madge Thompson, Arts '4l;Nell Trapp, Arts '40;
Polly Brand, Arts '39; Dot Yelland, Arts '38.
Honorary President was again Mrs. Boving. Dr. G. Shrum
H. McPhee
John   Bird
D. Lewis
MEMS BIG BLOCK CLUB
Back row:
Snelling
Poole
Leggatt
Upward
apRoberts
Madeley
Lewis
Middle row:
Twiss
Morris
Derwiller
McComber
Boe
Henderson
Hudson
Williams
Front row:
Davis
Campbell
Carey
McPhee
Matthison
Bird
Andrews The Women's Big Block Club has been active this year in helping to decide the
new awards system, but, excepting for this, it has become almost entirely social.
For the first time the club is looking after the annual women's athletic luncheon.
This year's executive is: Honorary President, Dr. J. B. W. Pilcher; president,
Peggy McLeod; secretary, Betty Fleck.
WOMEN'S BIG BLOCK CLUB
Back row:
McCullough
Porter
Clarke
Yelland
Carter
Wilson
Evans
Front row:
McEwen
Fleck
McLeod
Lafon
Nevison Jean Meredith
P. McLeod
With the change in the system of awards for women this year, there are a few
minor changes in the personnel of the committee, the addition of the vice-president of intra-murals, Pamela Runkle, and Margaret Haspell, the representative
from the women's athletic executive.
In addition to these the committee is composed of Miss Moore, physical director;
Peggy McLeod, president of the Big Block Club: Jean Meredith, president of
women's athletics; and representatives from all the girls' teams.
|pQq
R. Matthison
R. Henderson
A. Croll
H. McPhee
D. Carey
L Vine
Men's Awards Committee
The Awards Committee, a branch of the Men's Athletic Association, is entrusted with the task of making awards to those individuals whose performance in
athletics during the year is considered outstanding.
The committee for 1937-38 was composed of Dr. A. H. Hutchinson, faculty
representative; Lyall Vine, Men's Athletics Representative; Rann Matthison, Basketball; Alan Croll, Soccer; Dave Carey, Rugby; Ralph Henderson, Canadian
Football; Howie McPhee, Track. Instructor—Miss Moore
Women's Physical
Education Director
Miss Moore's enthusiasm has been the inspiration of another year of successful gymnasium classes. The women's
part in the splendid gymnasium demonstration at the
"Open House" is only one of the achievements for which
Miss Moore deserves credit. She has also been of inestimable assistance in the handling of the inter-class
activities.
Instructor—Maurice Van Vliet
"Maury" Van Vliet continues to dispatch his duties in
the gymnasium with increasingly gratifying results and
with his same unequalled popularity. His aim has always been to put the inter-class activities in front, and,
by the results this year, he has succeeded. Besides his
many hours of instruction in the gymnasium he coaches
the basketball, football and track teams. -
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SENIOR SOCCER
The Soccer Club, hitting one of its four
year cycles, has had a much more successful season this year than the past two
terms. With almost the same squad as
in the past two years, the team has developed into a fine soccer machine. They
were very fortunate to secure such outstanding city players as Douglas Todd
and Basil Robinson. An acquisition
from high school soccer ranks is Ben
Herd, a very promising player.
The interest in soccer has been fostered a
little more on the campus this year, and
the team will play in all eighteen games
in the Vancouver and District League,
first division. The squad has been unfortunate in a way to lose some very
close games by a single goal, but has held
some of the leading city teams to very
close matches. At the time of going to
press, arrangements have been made to
play an exhibition series with a Nanaimo
city team.
Laurels go this year to the hard fighting
fullbacks, Allan Croll and Shaw Mizu-
hara. The goal-keeper, Fiorillo, has been
the best we have had for a number of
years. Special mention should also go
to the following men: captain Dan
Quayle, our dashing centre forward;
Jack Rush, Foster, Kirkpatrick and
freshmen Todd, Herd, McMillan and
Jim Robinson.
The club is fortunate in still having
Charles Hitchins for coach.
Fiorillo
Croll
Rush
Todd
Herd "*    ^"M
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SOCCER
McMillan
Foster
Chapman
Kirkpatrick
Manager—Free SENIOR BASKETBALL
The Senior A basketball team of this year dropped out
of competition early in March, after playing a fine
series of games in the Inter-city League. Although
four players from the Canadian Championship team
of last year were lost to this squad, new blood has
quite made up for the loss. Promising new men are
Straight, Pallas, Flynn, Lucas and B. Matheson.
The club has been fortunate in once more having Dr.
C. McLean Fraser as Faculty Advisor and Mr. Maury
Van Vliet as coach. Senior manager is Art Clark, who
is ably assisted by associate managers Alex Charters
and Ernest West.
The squad has finished its schedule of fifteen league
games, having won nine and lost six. This standing
was equalled by Stacy's team from whom the playoff
bye was won by virtue of a 45-40 victory in a sudden
death game. The Thunderbirds lost out to Westerns
in the Inter-city finals, which began in Tuesday, March
8th, thereby obviating their chances of repeating last
year's championship drive.
During the year games were played in Nanaimo, Port
Alberni and Victoria. The team also travelled south
to play Pacific Lutheran College, Centralia Junior College, Multnomah Club of Portland and Seattle College.
Home games were played with Albany College, Seattle College, Centralia and the University of Washington Freshman Squad.
Team captain was Rann Matthison.
Straight
Lucas
Matheson
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BASKETBALl
Coach—M. Van Vliet
Pringle
Turner
Millar
Manager—Clarke
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♦^ / ENGLISH RUGBY
Taking up where they left off last year,
Varsity's "wonder team" successfully
defended the Miller and McKechnie cups,
as well as winning a great battle with
University of California on New Year's
day, to defend the World Cup, emblematic of Pacific Coast inter-collegiate
rugby supremacy.
In both Miller and McKechnie Cup competition, the students got off to a slow
start, dropping two of their first three
games in the former series but coming to
life to win the remainder of their
matches. In the McKechnie series, they
lost their first game to Vancouver Rep.,
took the next two from Victoria while
Vancouver lost one to Victoria and then
hit their top form to defeat Vancouver
11-5 in the final game.
The Tisdall cup has been left entirely up
to the "seconds" who at present are making a great job of its defense.
Capt. A. G. Dobbie again coached the
squad and showed his great ability in
that department in grooming several
freshmen to fill spots left from last year,
and in then winning the two trophies.
It was his fourth successive Miller Cup
and his second successive McKechnie Cup
winner.
Five of Varsity's stars played their last
games this year: Dave Carey, captain for
two years; Johnny Bird, Ron Upward,
Joe Andrews and Lyle Vine.
Ron Andrews managed the team while
Bill Calder made a great job of running
the seconds.
Bird
Leggatt
Tremblay
Teagle
T.  McPhee
nsr '
H.  McPhee
Carey
Robertson
Campbell i.       vi
ENGLISH RUGBY
Robson C.  McPhee Andrews Upward
Coach—Capt. Dobbie
Vine Mattu
Stewart Colledge Manager—Andrews -— -   i iXU >        .^1    - v-.» «--  -.5      # T ;.^T*-a
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The fall of '38 proved a bang-up season for the plunging lads. In fact, it was almost a repetition of those
good old days of '29 and '30, of which the old timers
so often reminisce.
The coaching bracket was filled by Maurice Van Vliet,
with "Doc" Burke adding his touches and Bill
Morrow and Fred Bolton adding their pepper, especially with the Junior gang.
Pre-season practices started September 14th. After
September 20th practices were held at 5 o'clock in the
afternoon. The field lights proved a marked success
in this respect. The turnouts were most encouraging
with 35 to 40 men out regularly, including many old
timers (as well as the promising youngsters) such as:
Tom Williams, Charlie Campbell, Russ Keillor, Art
Dept for, Barney Boe, Hunk Henderson, Aub Gray and
Johnnie Farina.
Straight Boe McGuire Lewis Charlton Horwood
Orr Martin Deptford Williams Henderson Smith Pearson FOOTBAL!
Coach—M. Van Vliet
Burnett Groy Farina Mason Hodgson Manager—H.  Burke
Dowrie apRoberts Campbell Stevenson Rothstein Ross ; 1
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TRACK
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This year's Track Club, built around a nucleus of
old-timers, also comprises a lot of new material. Last
fall Varsity entered a four man track team in the
Western Intercollegiate Meet at Saskatoon. Vance
McComber was the star for U.B.C, winning both the
880 and the mile, and combining with Howie McPhee,
Alex. Lucas and Wilf Pendray to win the relay. Varsity
was third in the meet.
On November third, Varsity entertained a number of
high school teams in a track meet. McCammon, McComber and De Beck were mainly responsible for the
University's win.
In intra-Murals McComber repeated his last year
victory by winning the Mall Race. Ware? DeBeck, a
comparative newcomer, won the cross-country, over a
rain soaked course.
In the Arts '20 Relay Race, Arts '40 produced an iron
man team of four men, instead of eight, to walk away
with the race.
Several meets are planned for the spring season. Towards the end of March, the track squad will compete
with C.P.S. at Tacoma, while an invitation to participate in the Hill Military Invitation Relay, the
biggest event in Western North America, has been
extended to us.
Coach Maury Van Vliet has charge of the track squad
this year. Senior manager is Bud Burden, assisted by
associate managers Jim Colbert, Sammy Wolfe, and
Bill Campbell.
McPhee
Lucas
Pendray
DeBeck
Hayman
mW T
ft
A
r
K
Campbell
Butters
Fairburn
Moody
Manager—Burden
Coach—M. Van Vliet L. Nixon
E. Clarke
L. McEwen
P. Scott
E. Milling
Senior "A" Women's Basketball
Hopelessly outclassed in the strongest top division in many years, the senior
girls failed to mark up a league win all season, though coming near it several
times. In spite of this record, two of the players were recognized for their ball-
handling, Ena Clarke, captain, and Lots McEwen.
Last fall, coach Dr. Montgomery took the team to Courtenay, where an easy win
and a good time was enjoyed by all.
Sharpshooter for the season was freshette Virginia Poole. President and manager of the team was Peggy Jones; Rosemary Collins was vice-president; and
secretary was Joanne Brown.
W. Shadforth
N. Martin
V. Poole
A. Collins Pamela Runkle
Paul Trussell
INTRA-MURALS
Intra-murals in the University hit a new high this year, due mostly to athletic
directors Maurice Van Vliet for the men, and Miss Moore for the women. All
events scheduled for the year have been run off without a hitch, except for
weather, which sometimes caused a postponement, but never a cancellation.
Men's intra-murals were handled by Paul Trussell, chairman of the committee
of representatives from each class.    The girls' chairman was Pamela Runkle.
Girls class standings are not complete at the time of going to press, but the Sophomores were declared undisputed champions, having won three of the five
meets. Women's events were: volleyball, badminton, basketball, archery and
swimming. The men had a larger programme the following year: volleyball, basketball, Arts '30 race, Mall race, Arts '20 race, tug-of-war, cross-country race,
foul-shooting, rugby ball throw for distance, rope climb, swimming and track.
Men's champions are the third year Sciencemen, who were battled all the way
by Arts '40 and Science '41.
Men's class representatives were: Agriculture, W. Pendray; Education, G. Crosson; Arts '38, R. McLellan; Science '38, B. Machin; Arts '39, D. Morrow;
Science '39, A. Allen; Arts '40, T. McPhee; Science '40, B. Burden; Arts '41,
L. Smith; Science '41, N. Renshaw.
Women's class representatives were: Seniors, D. Yelland; Juniors, P. Brand;
Sophomores, N. Trapp; Freshettes, M. Thompson; Agriculture and Nurses, P.
Runkle; Education, B. Evans.
Maurice Van Vliet
Miss Moore Wilson (coach), Bennett, Pearce, Leckie-Ewing, Hayman, Hetherington, Darling, Lynott, Flesher, Melville.
Sitting: Lyttleton, Churchill.
ROWING CLUB
Oars hitting a high beat swung varsity rowers through the course
of another successful season. Higher membership, greater enthusiasm, and excellent coaching all pointed towards rowing, rapidly
becoming one of the most popular sports on the campus.
Real advances have been made against the club's bug-bear of faulty
and insufficient equipment. Under the direction of coach Frank
Wilson a drive for new equipment was initiated and promises to be
completed for next year's crews.
Once again Varsity matched blades with oarsmen south of the
line when they travelled to Corvallis and beat Oregon State
College. A strong-pulling second crew competed against V. R. C.
on March 19. Plans for the Northwest Pacific Inter-Collegiate
Regatta have not yet materialized.
To the first-rate coaching and good-fellowship of coach Frank
Wilson would the rowing boys ascribe the reason for a most worthwhile and successful season. The club's executive numbered the
following: President, Bob Melville, vice-president, Bruce Gordon;
crew captain, Bob Pearce; secretary, Wordie Hetherington.
SENIOR CREW: Cox, Mike Churchill; stroke, Bob Pearce; 7,
W. Hetherington; 6, Bruce Gordon; 5, Peter Leckie-Ewing; 4, Bob
Hayman; 3, G. Darling; 2, Bill Lynott; bow, Eric Flesher.
SECONDS: Cox, Hugh Lytleton; stroke George Walsh; 7, Den
Bryson; 6, Doug. Patrick; 5,Lloyd Wilson; 4, Jack Mcintosh; 3.
Bob Mclntyre; 2, "Chuck" Bennett; bow, Frank "Ghost" Crofton. Back row:      Clive Cole Roberts
Front row:      Byers Miller
SWIMMING CLUB
The Swimming Club has enjoyed a season of moderate activity on the campus.
Although the fall term was taken up for training alone, after Christmas it
took part in two meets.
The first of these was one of the attractions of the Victoria "invasion," and resulted in a close defeat at the hands of a strong Victoria Y.M.C.A. team. The
other gala found the University of Oregon far too strong for the local swimmers.
Outstanding performers were Bruce Millar, Dick Cline, Stan Roberts and Archie
Byers among the men, and Valerie Gardiner, Betty Cole, Madge Thompson and
Bunty Butters among the girls.
Executive for the year was: president, Archie Byers; vice-president, Bunty
Butters; secretary-treasurer, Phil Margetts. Percy Norman was the very efficient
coach. Back row: J. Owen (coach), W. Lowe, J. Ussher, M. Lambert, C. McGuire, P. Trussell,
J. Stevenson, M. Van Vliet (coach).
Front row: M. Guiget, J. McArthur, H. Shirreff (capt.), J. Taylor, E. Fiorillo, 0. Dier.
ICE HOCKEY
The Hockey Club has completed the most successful year since its rebirth four
years ago. For the first time in the history of the University, inter-collegiate
hockey has come into its own. The season was opened with a memorable tour
of Southern California, where the Thunderbirds suffered two narrow defeats at
the hands of University of Southern California, 7-6 and 4-1. Subsequently,
the team defeated the University of Washington 6-0 and 2-1, but suffered two
decisive losses at the hands of Gonzaga University, 10-1 and 7-2.
Outstanding players were Orme Dier and Paul Trussell and Captain Shirreff's
performance in goal was most noteworthy.
Executive members were: President, Maury Lambert; vice-president, James
Ussher; and manager, Erman Fiorillo. Coaches were John Owen and Maurice
Van Vliet. -v   vv. '.
,' %JJ-.
'•\»h
"B"
>,'
Team
■
1
Back row:
«c   :"
Branson
fl)l
Hayden
■R   m
■4  If         MB
Macdonald
Front row:
£l
J. McLeod
Fleck
P. McLeod
*^ ~, _^
R. Seldon
BADMINTON
"C"
Teain
Back row:
Maw
Darling
Emerson
Mcintosh
Front row:
Galbraith
Thomson
Sellens
J. Seldon Grass
Hockey
Back row:
MacKay
P. Crickmay
M. Crickmay
Dorgans
Boisjole
Front row.
Mouat
Byers
Cameron
GRASS HOCKEY
SOIF
Golf
Charlton
Moss
Pierce
McDowell
Balderston
Durkin
Leckie
Stark
Vickers Intermediate
"A"
Teani
Back row:
Scott  (Capt.)
Curwen
Jones
McDonald
Rogers
Front row:
Campbell
Barton
Poulson
BASKETSAll
Senior
"B"
Team
Back row:
McLellan
Lewis
Taylor
McLean
Hatch
Front row:
Noseworthy
Miller (Capt.)
Minichiello U.B.C.
Team
Back row:
Norie
Boving
Wilson
Muir
Mair
Cole
Armstrong
Evans
Front row:
Scott
Nevison
Warne
Chowne
Lean
Mclnnes
GRASS HOCKEY
Varsity
Team
Back row:
Evans
Chowne
Scouler
Mitchell
Beaton
Front row:
Scott
Wright
Banford
Nelson
Thomas MINOR   SPORTS
Badminton
The two badminton teams have had
their usual year, the top team coming out in the middle of the City
"B" league and the second team
being unfortunate enough to lose all
their matches in the "C" division.
Executive of the club was: Peggy
McLeod, president; Kay Sellens,
vice-president; Norman Renwick,
secretary-treasurer; and Stan Hayden, team captain.
Second Rugby
Varsity had two teams entered in
the second division as well as its
senior team. The seconds did very
well in their league until they were
pushed up into first division Tisdall
Cup play in place of the retiring
first team, and at the time of writing
they are second in this league.
Thus the thirds are playing with a
few of the spare seconds and are
making a rather belated stand in the
division. There are several of these
players who will be playing first
division next year, and by their performances so far, the Thunderbird
'Wonder Team" will again be just
that.
Grass Hockey
The Women's Grass Hockey teams,
in spite of having no regular coach,
have had a very successful season.
Two teams, calling themselves
U.B.C. for the first squad and Varsity for the "seconds", entered the
Lower Mainland League.
The U.B.C. team won the "B" division in the league before Christmas and only lost two games after.
The first squad made a trip to Victoria on the "Invasion" and lost
4—1 to the Victoria Ladies' Club.
The second team, due to injuries and
lack of support, dropped out of the
league after Christmas.
Grass Hockey
The Men's Grass Hockey club suffered a serious set-back this season,
in that they won their league last
year and this season finished last in
the running, having only drawn one
game and lost all the rest.
President and captain of the club
was Michael Crickmay; secretary-
treasurer was Archie Macaulay and
manager was Douglas Dougans. MINOR  SPORTS
Golf
There have been no competitions in
the golf club this year to date, as all
tournaments are after the exams
are over, then the team picked in a
playoff among the members will
make a trip to Washington, and
perhaps Oregon, for inter-collegiate matches.
Intermediate uAn
Basketball
POINTS OF VIEW: The Team—
We had a great year, a great team,
a great captain and at the end everyone was behind us except Y.M.C.A.,
Gregory-Price and Megas. As is
usual with Intermediate Basketball
it was the traditional lost child of
sport, wandering in the wilderness
without a care or a coach. Among
other of our handicaps was a pessimistic manager; but then alibis are
of little use after the crime is committed.
The Manager—Managing the Intermediate A's has been pleasant
because one meets such interesting
persons. The team members were
and still are all swell fellows. The
team includes John Macdonald, Sid
Rigers, Bob Scott, Jack Campbell,
Hamish Robertson, Art Barton,
Guy Curwen, Bill McGee, and a sadder and wiser manager.
Senior "B"
Basketball
The Senior "B" basketballers took a
while to get going in their league
this year, as all their first games were
losses. However, they won the last
four of their eleven league games and
all of their outside games while on
tour in the Valley.
Maurice Van Vliet was coach this
year and was instrumental in the
team's improvement. Captain of the
squad was Ed Miller and manager
was John McLellan.
Women's
«*D»
enior
Basketball
The Senior "B" girls basketball
team enjoyed a very gratifying
season, placing third in the league,
thanks to the competent coaching
of Messrs. George Pringle and Bert
Cooper.
Challenge games were played
with Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Port
Moody, and New Westminster.
High scorers for the season were
Lois Harris, Valerie Gardiner, Lillian Johansen and Margaret Porter. MINOR SPORTS
Junior Football
Games won: Meralomas, 11-1;
Vancouver College, 11-5; Cougars,
22-10. Games lost: Trojans, 1-7.
The Junior's first game was against
the Meralomas, last year's finalist for
the championship, and our chances
were considered rather dubious, but
Varsity dug in and pushed over two
touches and a rouge to win the game
11-1.
Our second game was with Vancouver College at the College field.
Varsity again came from behind and
won their battle, 11-5.
The game with the Trojans was the
most important one as they were
tied with us for first place in the
league. In the first half, Varsity
pushed them all over the field, but
never managed to score any points
other than one for a rouge. The
second half, however, was all Trojans. They scored a converted touchdown and a deadline kick to beat
us 7-1.
Still rankling from defeat, the "Jay-
vees" went out and walked all over
the Cougars who at first gave us
quite a scare, with their 5-0 lead at
half time. In the second half we
settled down, and due mostly to the
stellar work of Aser Rothstein, who
scored 20 points, we walked away
with the game, 22-10.
The second half of the league is not
yet over as we. go to press, but so far
U.B.C. is tied for first place with
the Trojans.
Tumbling
This is the first year that tumbling
has received any recognition on the
campus. Ever since Mr. Van Vliet
has come to the University, there has
been an ever-increasing interest in
both tumbling and other gymnastics.
Because of the splendid work they
have been, doing, two teams of three
tumblers each, coached by Mr. Van
Vliet, were asked to put on a display at Open house and were very
well received. Back row.
Shepherd
Runkle
Knox
Harrison
Cunningham
Wallace
Robertson
Smith
Colder
Front row:
Griffin
E. Robinson
Madeley
Carrothers
B. Robinson
Long
Wilson
SECOND RUGBY
TUMBLING
■    f    1     1          III
tJ TJHLL
Mr   *    ^^B
WM 1
MHH       «P
&mm^mm^*^mmm± ^^*   "-•           ^^3
AWmfm
B vl
fen
H/ J
$m
fegp      fe ViM
i
Left:
Lowe
Mathieson
Lyons
Right:
Lowe
Lyons
Mathieson TO THE CLASS
\
■ Ey«y yeir-AJma Mater sends forth a new
^iftUoisbfis.tnM'iiiifhtxts-.. .-thus contributing, to the, richness of Canadian'culture, and
exerting an ever-Widening 'influence upon our
national life.
;Mueh'h»sjbeen achieved by the U.B.C. Classes
whe have; ■gonei ahead. Mucin is expected of
.today's Graduating Glass.  .,
British Columbians complete confidence that
the Class of '38, both^ as a group and as
individuals in many walks of life, will render
a good account of itself.
Good luck to you, then, end fair sailing in
the days that lie ahead!
l)ttMmyT&ag (fomimn^
&, *"
M— SSV'
INCORPORATED    2??   MAY   1670. Front row:
Hodgson
Renwick
Miller
Merritt
Parkinson
Livingstone
JUNIOR FOOTBALL
Back row:
Morrow
Brason
Byers
Mason
Fleishman
Cosulitch
Stamatis
Drummond
McDowell
Stevenson
FOOTBALL CLUB
Front row:
Stradiotti
Cosulich
Smith
Morrow
Lewis
Farina
Hodgson
Renwick
Parkinson
Brason
Drummond
Smith
Middle row:
Miller
Morrison
Stevenson
Livingstone
Charlton
Byers
Boe
apRoberts
Fleishman
Campbell
Henderson
Williams
Burke
Ferguson
Back row:
Mason
Burnett
Merritt
Martin
Gray
McDowell
Dowrie
Pearson
Stamatis
Orr
Horwood
Straight Whether for Home or Business Office
OUR STATIONERY and
PRINTING DEPARTMENTS
will serve you in many ways
GEHRKE'S  LTD.
566 Seymour Street Trinity 1311
UNIVERSITY
GOLF  COURSE
TENTH and BLANCA
Starting    times   may   be   booked   by   phone.
Times for Saturday and Sunday booked from
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H. WINDER, Professional
Phone Point Grey 144
Athletes would be
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Sporting Goods
from . . .
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— Two Stores —
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HOME GAS
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Back and forth from the halls
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For HOME GAS is a B.C. Product — made for B.C. use by
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CROSS & CO. LTD., MANUFACTURER
Fairmont 1173
DUFFUS
School of Business Ltd*
wishes the students of the
U.B.C. success
for   1938.
Summer School—
June, July, August
9
Day and Night School
Seymour and Pender Trinity 2574
The School that Gets Results
What are your Greatest Assets?
A UNIVERSITY EDUCATION
and a
CROWN  LIFE POLICY PENSION  BOND
Let me talk it over with you.
RALPH M. BROWN, '31
Crown  Life  Insurance  Co.
320-6 Rogers Building Douglas 5101
MODERN
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FURNITURE
We sell Furniture that you'll be happy and proud
to live with year after year.
DOMINION FURNITURE STORES
Marshall-Wells
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Manufacturers  -   Distributors  -   Importers
WHOLESALE HARDWARE
Congratulates  the  Student  Body  upon
the high standard of the 1938
Totem and wishes it
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Announcements and Invitations
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550 Seymour Street Vancouver, B.C.
NABOB
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IRRADIATED     TODAY     FOR
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•
KELLY, DOUGLAS & CO. LTD.
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Let a Kodak
Keep the Story
University life provides thrills galore.    Games,
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forgotten.
It's real fun to keep a Kodak story. Kodaks
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Uniuersitu Book Store
:
The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium
Building, was established for the convenience of the students,
and has effected a considerable saving to the students in
time and money. It is prepared to supply all the text books
required for the various courses offered in the University,
also such articles as note books, loose-leaf sheets, fountain
pens, drawing paper and instruments.
THE SOVERNMENT OF
THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
SUMMER SCHOOLof EDUCATION
ADMINISTRATION:
HON. G. M. WEIR, Minister of Education
S. J. WILLIS, B.A., LL.D., Superintendent of Education
H. L. CAMPBELL, B.A., Director
VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
July 5th to August 6th
1938 "
AT VICTORIA:
' COURSES in History and Philosophy of Education, Psychology and Measurement, Individual Development and Guidance, Organization and Administration, Educational Supervision, Secondary
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Social Studies, Music Education, Physical Education, Home Economics Education, Visual Education, Librarianship.
AT VANCOUVER:
COURSES in Commercial Education, Art Education,    Technical    Education,    Physical    Education,
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WRITE FOR BULLETIN TO
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL
VICTORIA rhatT1" '.rt\Xt^u .    _♦<-     . -a"      j^<ire • •   „   it ,1 IF YOU WISH TO SUPPLEMENT
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by
A   COURSE   OF   PRACTICAL   TRAINING
which will assist you in making the most of your Academic Preparation
THE
Sprott Shaw Schools
Are  at Your Service — Five  of Them
They have been successfully serving your predecessors for well nigh 40 years.
•
You need not worry about your location.    They have brought their services almost to your door.
For Appointments
Phone: Sey. 1810 - 9002; Fair. 41; Bay. 2740; North Van. 45; and  for Wireless and  Radio:  Sey.  7451.
HEAD OFFICE AND MAIN SCHOOL: 812  ROBSON  STREET,  VANCOUVER,   B.C.
President, R. J. SPROTT, B.A.
Congratulations
to the Graduates
of IQ38.
COMPLETE
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Consult us before
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To the 1938 Graduates
We extend our Congratulations and best wishes
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■
BANKERS TO THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
■
C.  R.  Myers, Manager
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LABORATORY SUPPLIES
CHEMICALS
CAVE & COMPANY
Limited
567 Hornby Street
Vancouver, B.C.
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Vice-President and Managing Director
Jenkins Bros., Limited
617 ST. REMI STREET, MONTREAL
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Always marked -with the Diamond
BRONZE- IRON- STEEL! AND   BOUND   IN   VANCOUVER
A.    H.    TIMMS    LTD.

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