UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The 1937 Totem 1937

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubcyearb-1.0119012.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubcyearb-1.0119012.json
JSON-LD: ubcyearb-1.0119012-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubcyearb-1.0119012-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubcyearb-1.0119012-rdf.json
Turtle: ubcyearb-1.0119012-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubcyearb-1.0119012-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubcyearb-1.0119012-source.json
Full Text
ubcyearb-1.0119012-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubcyearb-1.0119012.ris

Full Text

 ■
TH1 1
^.-*_ ^ -.      wnm ,.-...■ 'v.t-,A-'<j ~)L 1931
Compiled and Edited by
THE PUBLICATIONS BOARD
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER  dedication
TO
ERIC   WERGE   HAMBER
VISITOR TO THE
UNIVERSITY
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR
OF THE PROVINCE
THIS BOOK IS RESPECTFULLY
DEDICATED
S L'ari- f o
r e w o r
d
Consciousness and appreciation of the University seems to be displaced, during our
four years there, by the press of present
activities and the excitement of stimulated
thought. It is likely that real appreciation
can only arrive with retrospect, from the
viewpoint of avoirdupois and later middle
age. Not until then, probably, will life
have calmed sufficiently for us to recall a
clear-etched memory of days at University,
and to roll "Alma Mater" off the tongue
with contemplative relish.
While we are here, however, we are conscious of moods and sensations, later to
shape our recollection. A vibrant visual
impression evolves from familiar scenes—
the sweep of mountains behind Union College; slanting bars of dusty sunlight across
library tables; acrid fumes in labs; clatter
on the caf. stairs; the infinite mood-and-
colour range of late afternoon, when the
most gorgeous of western sunsets leave the
campus rich in afterglow.
Benefits of University Education are stoutly
and untiringly maintained against the commercial point of view We concede them
all, but cherish a richer, intangible affection for the University, derived from beauty
of setting and—let us call it—rareness of
atmosphere.
We hope this volume will serve to recall, in
later years, something of life and sensation
on the campus in 1936-37.
Page   Four president's
message
Few readers, surely, can glance through a college Annual and not be struck by the
spirit of youthful zest that pervades the whole work. Here is no story of imposed
tasks, but a record of things done spontaneously and joyfully—a record that still
pulses with vivid life when the reader takes up the volume many years after
Graduation.
And yet there are cynical folk who have no deeper comment to make than the observation that Life—that Life with a capital "L" which presumably begins only after
Graduation—is "very different from all that." Of course it is! And no one realizes
it better than those who have with such gusto engaged in or recorded such undergraduate activities.
What really matters is to preserve the zest itself, the joy in doing, the enthusiasm
which is akin to faith. The years will teach how best to control and employ such a
gift; look to it that the years do not rob you out of it. For though many a great
work has been wrought in sadness, greater always is the noble task joyfully accepted
and joyfully performed.
L. S. KLINCK,  President.
Page   Five 1937—A CORONATION
REVOLT IN SPAIN
ABYSSINIA VANISHES
Page  Six MISSISSIPPI FLOODS
STRIKERS SIT
PACIFIC SEAMEN WALK OUT
Page  Seven CANADIAN REARMAMENT
SOCIAL CREDIT TOTTERS
DOLLAR-TWENTY WHEAT
Page   Eight HEALTH INSURANCE
POTATOES PICKETED
FEBRUARY SNOW
Page   Nine McKECHNIE CUP
FILM SOCIETY ON CAMPUS
LEACOCK—VISSER T'HOOFT—KEYSERLING
Page   Ten f
a c u
t y
Page   Eleven Daniel Buchanan
Mathematics
J.  N. Finlayson
Civil  Engineering
F. M. Clement
Horticulture
rJm              ^E ~>^§|^|
hem) •^*v       ^
i
^
Miss Mary Bollert
Dean of Women
H. T. J. Coleman
Philosophy
C. McLean Fraser
Zoology
Lemuel Robertson
Classics
department    heads
M. Y. Williams
Geology
Page   Twelve D. 0. Evans
Modern Languages
T. C. Hebb
Physics
R. H. Clark
Chemistry
G. G. Sedgewick
English
G. G. Moe
Agronomy
Andrew  Hutchinson
Botany
Henry Angus
Economics
John Ridington
Librarian
department    heads
Page  Thirteen Blythe Eagles
Dairying
H. M. King
Animal Husbandry
E. A. Lloyd
Poultry Husbandry
J. M. Turnbull
Mining and Metallurgy
H. J.  MacLeod
Mechanical and Electrical
Malcolm Knapp
Forestry
W. N. Sage
History
C. E. Dolman
Bacteriology
department    heads
Page   Fourteen  s t u d e n t s'
c o u n c i
John Groves Gould
President
The 1936-37 Students' Council can receive credit from the
student body for having carried on its routine duties with
competence and placed before the Alma Mater Society two
projects of major importance. The first of these, the Pass
System, secured overwhelming student endorsement in the
fall, and has finally been approved by the Board of Governors. The new system will go into effect next term, and
is looked upon by many as an important advance in student
finance. The second project, plans for a long-discussed
permanent Stadium, will be placed before the society at its
annual meeting.
Council has been fortunate this year in having the able and forceful leadership of Jay Gould. Jay
brought the experience of a previous council term to his duties, and combined this with his legal
knowledge and executive skill to fine advantage. He made a most efficient chairman of council
meetings at all times, while his ready repartee brightened many a dreary hour of routine business.
The never ending flow of correspondence which it is the secretary's duty to attend to did not prevent
Kay Scott from retaining her natural cheerfulness and demureness. Audrey Horwood, as president of
W. U. S., protected the rights of femininity with vigour, and provided competent leadership for women's
activities. Beth Evans, the energetic leader of women's athletics, was the butt of many a verbal
onslaught by her male counterpart, and the custodian of finances; but defended her bows and arrows,
intra-murals and other interests with enthusiasm.
Lyall Vine, invincible forestry student, proved the most successful and efficient treasurer in years.
He protected the treasury against the raids of innumerable clubs with fairness and impartiality while
council discussions always found him well informed. John Logan, as president of the L. S. E.,
defended the interests of non-athletic organizations in many a warm debate, and espoused the conservative point of view against the arguments of more radical members.
Scienceman John Witbeck gave firm leadership to the discipline committee, watched over the freshmen in their initial student days, settled disputes over social function dates and brought a quick
tongue and elegant verbiage to council meetings. Dave Carey guided the affairs of Men's Athletics
with skill and energy. His constant interest in all forms of sport, his enthusiasm in advancing out-of-
doors activities, and his sound views on council questions made him an invaluable member of council
and an outstanding president of the M. A. A.
The duties of junior member were ably carried out by Howie McPhee. He kept council well supplied
with olives and other delicacies, supervised the assignments of rooms and dates and backed Carey in
many matters of athletics with his own wide experience in sport. In general, council has completely
avoided internal friction, and has received much outside co-operation essential to the successful
administration of student affairs.
Page   Fifteen students'
cou nci
Lyall Vine
David Carey
John Logan
Audrey Horwood
John Witbeck Beth Evans
Katherine Scott
Howie McPhee
Page   Sixteen John Witbeck
President
X»*
■v   ^^i      jjjjjn^Ujjjjj
i^^^K        4
Pa
ge  Seventeen
Alan  Morley
Paddy Colthurst
Phil Emery
Ralph Cudmore
men's   undergraduate
executive Dean Mary Bollert
Honorary President
Audrey Horwood
President
Peggy Fox
Vice-President
Marjorie Jessup
Secretary
Jo Dickie
Treasurer
women's   undergraduate   society
This year the Women's Undergraduate Society sponsored an information booth for newcomers to the University; the Freshette supper in
the form of the traditional children's party style; the Senior Freshette
tea; two teas for out-of-town students. These events presented a welcome to the new recruits of the Freshette class and gave them an
opportunity to become acquainted with their seniors and Big Sisters.
In the spring the annual Hi-Jinx was duly held. This is the event of
the year for women students solely. In connection with this function,
Phrateres was a co-sponsor.
After the home-coming Alberta-U. B. C. games, a very successful
tea dance was held. Another feather in the W. U. S. cap is the Co-Ed
ball, the highlight of Varsity functions. The proceeds from thece two
functions were put aside for the furnishings for the women's rooms in
the Brock Memorial Building.
The final function of the year was the tea in honour of the members
of the Faculty Women's Club.
Betty Street
Beverley Cunningham
Miriam   Cosens
Evelyn Maguire
Elza  Lovitt
Madge Neill
Page  Eighteen Paddy Colthurst Wilson McDuffee Malcolm  Brown
Bob Smith
Jim Bardsley
arts   men's   undergraduate
executive
Alan Morley, President
science men's undergraduate
executive
Philip Emery, President
Pat Love
Cordon Morris
Bill Dayton
Cordon Snelling
jack Davis
John Brynelsen
Page  Nineteen agriculture   undergraduate   executive
Ralph Cudmore
President
Walter Charles Paul Trussed
Bill Johnston
Len Zink
nurses'   undergraduate   society
Miss Mabel Gray
Evelyn  Maguire
President
Miss Grace Fairley
Maisie Clugston
Vice-President
Betty  McLennan
Secretary
Mary McGinnis
Treasurer
Page  Twenty senior   classes arts    '37
Page   Twenty-one dean    of    arts
message
Graduation is not the journey's end along life's intellectual way. It is one, and only
one, of the summits. Along the path you have climbed you have been led to discover
vistas of which some have stood out in clear relief while others may have been less
distinct. But the nearer view is not always the more comprehensive. Retrace, some
day, the old paths where perhaps obscurity lurked because of distance or perchance
of fog. Seek new paths. You have challenged the traditions of your forerunners, but
beware of too sudden finalities. Let progress continue upon the rest of the journey.
May it always find you in the realm of the whatsoevers—truth, purity, loveliness and
good report.
D. BUCHANAN,'
Dean.
Page  Twenty-two Betty Street Pauline Patterson
Les Allen
Lloyd Hobden
Ceorge Crosson
Laura  Nixon
Professor F. G. C. Wood
Wilson McDuffee
Page   Twenty-three
a r
ts  '37
With a record of which they may be justly proud, Arts '37 faces a
world which promises a warmer welcome than that given to graduating
classes of former years. Throughout its campus life, Arts '37 has
shown a spirit of exceptional co-operation and enthusiasm which bodes
well for the future success of its members.
Elected to Student's Council as a reward of their keen interest in
student affairs, Beth Evans, Kay Scott, Molly Lock, John Logan, John
Gould and Clarence Idyll have merited the honor bestowed upon them.
Arts '37 has not lacked for literary talent. Distinguished members
of Players' Club are Nora Gibson, Leslie Allen, Audrey Phillips, Constance Baird and Ludlow Beamish. Active in the .Musical Society were
Bill Cameron, Margaret Atkinson, Pauline Patterson, William English
and Walter Barss. Publications have been well managed under Zoe
Browne-Clayton, Dick Elson and Ken Grant. For the Parliamentary
Forum Jay Gould and Ludlow Beamish have done very creditable service.
Many class members have participated actively in Athletics. In
women's sports were basketball, Beth Evans, Margaret Porter, Margaret Haspel, Laura Nixon and Helen Parker, grass hockey, Elizabeth
Houston; and badminton with Molly Lock.
Outstanding in men's sports are Art Willoughby in basketball;
Paddy Colthurst on the track; Wilson McDuffee in rowing; and Joe
Andrews in English rugby. Minor sports did not lack their enthusiasts.
Throughout campus life, Prof F G C. Wood has been an active
honorary president. His inspiring address at the Wesbrook Memorial
Service will long be remembered by the class.
This year's executive was' President, Wilson McDuffee, vice-president, Betty Street; secretary, Pauline Patterson; treasurer, Leslie Allen;
literary representative, Lloyd Hobden; women's athletic representative,
Laura Nixon; men's athletic representative, George Crosson. William  N. Agnew
Vancouver
French
Latin
Classics Club
Swimming Club
Margaret Allison
Vancouver
Margaret M. Atkinson
Vancouver
Economics
English
Vice-Pres., Musical Society
Kappa Kappa Gamma
G. Philip V. Akrigg
Vancouver
History  Honours
Kathleen E. Armstrong
Vancouver
Janet M. Baillie
Victoria
Biology  Honours
Sec'y,   Biological  Discussion Club
Margaret C.  Bailey
Vancouver
Walter M. Barss
Vancouver
Physics and Mathematics
Musical Society
Mathematics  Club
Physics Club
Alpha Delta Phi
Doris E. Betchley
Vancouver
Vera L. Baker
Vancouver
Latin
English
Musical  Society
Ludlow W. Beamish
New   Westminster
History English
Pres., Parliamentary Forum
Executive,  Players' Club
Historical Society
S. C. M.
Margaret L. Biggs
New Westminster
History  Honours
Alpha Phi
Psychology Club
Page   Twenty-four Olive J. Biller
Vancouver
Art Club
Letters Club
Nora F. Blair
Vancouver
English
Psychology
Alpha Phi
Ruth M. Brandon
Vancouver
Alpha  Gamma  Delta
Phyllis W. Black
Creelman
Sec'y,
Psychology
English
Psychology
Phrateres
Badminton
Club
G. Bowen-Colthurst
Sooke
English
English Rugby
Track
Ubyssey
Phi Kappa Sigma
Rose L. Brookes
Vancouver
English
French
Phrateres
Z. W. Browne-Clayton, B.S.A.
Kelowna
Economics
English
Editor-in-Chief, Publications
Agriculture   (Three years)
Alpha Phi
John A. V. Cade
Vancouver
Delta Upsilon
Ian B. Cameron
Vancouver
Sheila C.  Buchanan
New   Westminster
Latin
English
Biological  Discussion Club
Elizabeth  Cain
Vancouver
English
Psychology
Badminton
Alpha   Delta   Pi
Joan J.  Carter
Vancouver
French   Honours
Vice-Pres.,   La   Canadienne
Phrateres
Dage  Twenty-five Marjorie E. Carter
Port  Moody
Latin and French Honours
Nina Cheng
Lillooet
English
Psychology
Violet D. Clark
Vancouver
Latin English
Psychology
International   Relations Club
S. C. M.
Alpha  Omicron   Pi
Muriel W. Chave
Victoria
English
History
Psychology
Psychology Club
Roderick D. Clapperton
Vancouver
Beta Theta Pi
Anna P. Clarke
Victoria
English
French
Art Club
Alpha Omicron Pi
George Cormack
Vancouver
Mathematics
Economics
U- B. C. Teachers' Association
George N. Crosson
Vancouver
Mathematics
History
Basketball
Delta Upsilon
Margaret Daugherty
Vancouver
English
French
Badminton
Alpha Delta Pi
Arthur H. Coulter
Vancouver
Rowing
Economics and Government
Phi Kappa Pi
W. Patrick G. Cumming
Vancouver
French
Economics
Parliamentary Forum
Robert F. Davey
Victoria
History
Outdoors Club
Page   Twenty-six John F. Davidson
Vancouver
Biology
Players'  Club
Stuart DeVitt
Vancouver
Pep Club
Thomas A. Dohm
Vancouver
Edwin  P.  Davis
Vancouver
Geology
Chemistry
A. Gordon Dickie
Vancouver
Arthur M. Eastham
Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
Senior Manager, Senior "A" Basketball
Psi Upsilon
William N. English
Vancouver
Physics Mathematics
Musical Society
S. C. M. Physics Club
Mathematics Club
Boxing
C   0. T   C.
Frederick J.  Field
Vancouver
Mathematics Honours
Louise F. FitzGerald
Vancouver
Juanita Falconer
Vancouver
W. Gordon Fields
Victoria
3iology Chemistry
Track
Boxing
Badminton
Chemistry Society
Beta Theta Pi
Norman S. Free
Vancouver
Mathematics  Honours
Mathematics Club
Assoc.  Manager Soccer Club
Page   Twenty-seven Archie P. Gardner
Vancouver
Economics  Honours
S. C. M,
Kenneth E. Grant
Vancouver
English History
Psychology
Ubyssey
C. O. T. C.
Pep Club
M. Alice Hagan
Vancouver
Bacteriology
Chemistry
Biological Discussion Club
Alice E. Gerow
Crescent   Beach
French English
Bioiogy
Biological   Discussion Club
Musical  Society
Alpha Om cron Pi
Mary M. Gurney
Vancouver
History
English
Historical  Society
Alpha Omicron Pi
Audrey Y. Hamilton
Victoria
Mathematics
Philosophy
Mathematics Club
Constance C. Harvey
Vancouver
Margaret M. Haspel
Vancouver
Margaret C. Higgs
Victoria
English
Psychology
Phrateres
Delta Gamma
Physics
Mathematics
Art Club
Psychology Club
Pres.,   Basketball   Club
Delta Gamma
Ubyssey
Swimming
Delta Gamma
Jack H. Harvey
John Henderson
Benjamin J. Ho
Winnipeg
Vancouver
Vancouver
English
Economics
Track
Big Block Club
Beta Theta Pi
Physics
Malhematics
V C  U.
Page   Twenty-eight J. Frederic Hobson
Elfriede H. Hoffman
Constance M. Hollis
Vancouver
Pitt Meadows
Vancouver
English
Mathematics
Rugby
Players' Club
Phi Kappa Pi
History
French
Economics
English
Literary Forum
Phrateres
Marjorie M. Hobson
Elizabeth L. Hoffmeister
Elizabeth J. Houston
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
History
English
Delta Gamma
English
French
Letters Club
Literary   Forum
Alpha Omicron Pi
French Honours
Pres., La Canadienne
Vice-Pres., Women's Grass Hockey
Big  Block  Club
Musical Society
K
C. Margaret C. Hughes
Penticton
History
English
Historical Society
Phrateres
Tsuneo Kondo
Vancouver
Economics
Philosophy
Thomas E. Ladner
Vancouver
Economics
Parliamentary Forum
Zeta Psi
Thomas E. Jackson
Winnipeg
Economics
Government
Sec-Treas , Outdoor Club
Shuichi Kusaka
Vancouver
Physics
Mathematics
Physics Club
Mathematics Club
Margaret Langley
Vancouver
English
Philosophy
Musical Society
International Relations Club
Phrateres
Alpha Gamma Delta
Page  Twenty-nine John  M. Lecky
Vancouver
Delta Upsilon
Jean M. Lowrie
Vancouver
Bacteriology
Biology
Kappa  Kappa Gamma
Ralph V. Manning
Vancouver
Economics Honours
Historical Society
Psi   Upsilon
John E. M. Logan
Vancouver
History  Honours Classics
Pres. L. S. E. Senior Editor "Ubyssey"
C. O. T. C. Historical Society
Musical   Society
Basketball Psi Upsilon
Aileen E. Mann
Vancouver
Philosophy
English
Psychology Club
Alpha Gamma Delta
Joan Martin
North  Vancouver
Chemistry
Mathematics
Phrateres
Gym
Volleyball
Rosetta Martindale
Rossland
English Economics
Vice-Pres., Literary Forum
Phrateres
Bacteriology Psychology
S. C. M.
Archery
Club
Robert N. S.  Melville
Kuling, China
History
Historical Society
Vice-Pres., I. R. C.
Rowing Club
V. C. U.
Raymond G.  Minshull
Vancouver
Chemistry
Mathematics
Beta Thera Pi
Arne Mathisen
Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
W. A. D. M. Meredith
North  Vancouver
French
English
Latin
Outdoor Club
Literary Forum
William J. Mouat
Vancouver
History
Education
International   Relations Club
Badminton
Page  Thirty Patricia J. Murphy
Jean E. McCleery
Hugh J. MacKay
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
English
History
Sec'y.,   Newman   Club
Alpha Gamma   Delta
History
English
Badminton
Alpha Delta Pi
Zoology Honours
Pres.,  Biological  Discussion Club
Basketball
Soccer
Premedical  Club
Frederick C. McCague
Robert McClelland
Catharine M. Mackintosh
Victoria
Kelowna
Vancouver
Physics
Mathematics
Mathematics Club
University Teachers' Assn.
Economics
Government
Basketball
Golf Club
Beta Theta  Pi
English
German
Psychology
Kappa Alpha Theta
Jessie M. MacRae
C. M. Madge Neill
George A. Nicolson
West  Vancouver
Vancouver
Revelstoke
Chemistry
Mathematics
Phrateres
Social Service
Pres. Phrateres
Gamma Phi  Bata
Premedical
Pres., S. C. M.
Munro Premedical Club
Varsity Ski Club
Track
Beta Theta Pi
Bernard F. Neary
Dorothy A. Newcomb
Laura A. Nixon
Victoria
Vancouver
Vancouver
History
Mathematics
Soccer
Badmintor
C  0   T   C
English
Psychology
Kappa Kappa Gamma
English
French
Basketball
Athletic  Rep., Arts '37
Alpha Delta Pi
Page   Thirty-one Pauline Patterson
Penticton
Mathematics  Honours
Musical Society
Phrateres
Exec, W   U. S.
Ubyssey
Alpha Phi
David K. Peta piece
New Westminster
Economics
Political  Science
Ubyssey
Letters Club
Psi   Upsilon
Audrey C. Phillips
Cumberland
English
German
Players' Club
Delta Gamma
Harold R. Pennington
Dorothy E. Peterson
Joan Pinhorn
Vancouver
Vancouver
Victoria
Psychology
English
Vice-Pres.,  Psychology  Club
Alphi Phi
History
English
Historical Society
Outdoor Club
Alpha Gamma Delta
John B. Poole
Elsie M. Porteous
Daniel B. Quayle
Vancouver
Vancouver
Ladysmith
Zoology Honours
biological   Discussion   Club
Outdoor Club
Varsity Ski Club
French
English
Psychology
Phrateres
Zoology  Honours
Soccer
Big Block Club
Biological  Discussion  Club
Alfred George Pooley
Evelyn D.  Prisk
Margaret B. Ramsay
Vancouver
Victoria
North   Vancouver
French   Honours
Sec'y, La Canadienne
English
French
German
Swimming  Club
Treas., Literary Forum
Page   Th
r t y - t w o Doris  M.  Read
Sam Roddan
Florence A. Roussel
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
English
French
Alpha Gamma  Delta
English
Letters Club
Players' Club
S. C. M.
Jean S. Reid
Vancouver
E.  DeLancey Rogers
Vancouver
Amy K. Seed
Vancouver
History
English
Badminton
Ubyssey
Phrateres
Alpha Delta Pi
Mathematics
Physics
Musical  Society
Mathematics Club
English
Psychology
Players' Club
Delta Gamma
Richard B. H. Sewell
Molly Shone
Robert H. Smith
Vancouver
Vancouver
Latin
English
Musical  Society
Alpha Omicron Pi
Vancouver
C. Bernard Shipton
Geoffrey G. Smith
Robin H. Smith
Vancouver
Vancouver
History
English
Pres., Historical Society
Vancouver
Page   Thirty-three T. David Somervillc
Margaret K. Stewart
Margaret F. Strachan
Vancouver
Vancouver
Dewdney
English
History
English
French
Alpha Phi
Phrateres
English
History
International   Relations Club
Alpha Omicron Pi
Norman Soul
Marjorie W. Stiell
Elisabeth R. Street
Vancouver
Kelowna
Portland
Geology
Chemistry
Chemistry Society
Captain, Men's Grass Hockey
Men's Athletic Council
English
U.   of  Alb?rta
Alpha Phi
English
Psychology
Letters Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
Merle A. Turnbull
Vancouver
Alpha Gamma Delta
H. Madeleine Vance
Vancouver
German
French
La Canadienne
Der deutsche Verein
Allan F. Walsh
Vancouver
French German
Players'  Club
Art Club
Pep Club
Pres., German Club
Ralph V. Tyner
Vancouver
Joseph Vingo
Nelson
Chemistry
Biology
John H. H. Watts
Middlesbrough,  England
Latin
Greek
Page   Thirty-four Kenneth A. West
Arthur W. Willoughby
Vancouver
Vancouver
Mathematics
Physics
Basketball
English Rugby
Phi Gamma Delta
W. Clarke Wilkin
James L. Wilson
Vancouver
Vancouver
Zoology  Honours
Musical Society
ological   Discussion  Club
Economics
Government
English Rugby
Track
Dick C. Woo
Vancouver
Doreen L. Woodford
Vancouver
English
Philosophy
German Club
Psychology Club
Evelyn E. Woodhead
Vancouver
French
German
German   Club
Phrateres
Alpha Phi
Kiyoko Yoshida
Steveston
Psychology
German
Joan E. M. Adams
Leslie A. Allen
Kelowna
English
Psychology
U. of Alberta
Vancouver
Economics
Pres., Film Society
Vice-Pres,   Parliamentary   Forum
Business  Manager,   Players'  Club
Treas,  Arts '37
Psychology  Club
William G. Ainley
Constance M. Baird
Vancouver
Vancouver
English
Economics,
Rugby
Zeta Psi
History  Honours
Ubyssey
Players' Club
Letters Club
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Page  Thirty-five Leslie E. Barber
Chilliwack
History English
Basketball
Senior City Football
Track Club
Historical Club
Phi   Delta Theta
Margery C.  Boulton
Vancouver
William M. Cameron
Vancouver
Biology Honours
Pres., Musical Society
Biological Discussion Club
Effie Campbell
Vancouver
Francis Cook
North Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
Chemistry Society
Grass Hockey
David  R.  Dowler
Vancouver
vJ V
\l
Willa J. Elliott
Victoria
Bacteriology
Musical Society
S. Roy English
Vancouver
Kathleen E. Farquhar
New Westminster
English History
Pres.,  Literary  Forum
Historical Society
Cosmopolitan Club
S. C. M.
Richard L. Elson
Spokane
Economics
Ubyssey Sports Editor
Totem Sports Editor
Badminton
Track
Phi Gamma Delta
Beth I. Evans
Vancouver
English Biology
Philosophy
Pres., W. A. A.
Big  Block Club
Basketball
Gamma Phi  Beta
Eleanor M. G. Gibson
Vancouver
English Honours
Pres., Players' Club
Letters Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
Page  Thirty-six Edgar A. Gourlay
Vancouver
Pat Hemberow
Victoria
Bacteriology
Chemistry
Chemistry Society
Grass Hockey
Alpha Gamma  Delta
Lloyd  H. Hobden
West Vancouver
French   Honours
Feature  Editor  Ubyssey
Pep Club
Vice-Pres.   Film  Society
Players'   Club Rowing  Club
Arts '37 Exec.
Louis W. Greenwood
Vancouver
P. Shinobu Higashi
Vancouver
English   Honours
Letters Club
Ubyssey
Japanese  Students'  Club
Audrey F. Horwood
Vancouver
English Philosophy
Pres., Gym Club
Pres., Phrateres
Pres., Women's Undergrad
Alpha Gamma Delta
Harry C. K. Housser
Vancouver
English Rugby
Phi Delta Theta
Yvonne Ladner
Vancouver
English
Economics
Letters Club
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Ethel J. Lowery
Vancouver
History
Economics
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Karl K. Knapp
Vancouver
Barbara V. Lee
Vancouver
Percival H. Mallett
Vancouver
Mathematics Honours
Page  Thirty-seven K. Marguerite Manson
Vancouver
English
Psychology
Kappa Alpha Theta
Max S. Maynard
Vancouver
English   Honours
Pres., Art Club
David W. McDuffee
Vancouver
Economics
History
Pres., Rowing Club
Musical Society
Pres., Arts '37
Parliamentary  Forum
D. Gordon B. Mathias
Vancouver
Bacteriology
Biology
Ice  Hockey Coach
Phi Kappa Pi
Alan P. Morley
Penticton
C  0. T. C.
Ubyssey
Pres., A. M. U. S.
Robert T. McKenzie
Vancouver
History Honours
Historical Society
S. C. M.
Donald McN. McKinnon
Vancouver
Geology
Chemistry
G. M. Dawson Club
Frampton Price
Calgary
Economics
Ice Hockey
Football
Delta Upsilon
Stewart G. Rogers
Vancouver
Mabel V. Pearce
Vancouver
Gordon E. Rogers
Vancouver
Katherine E. Scott
Vancouver
Sociology
English
Treas.  W.  U. S.
Sec'y A.   M.  S
Phrateres
Alpha Gamma Delta
Page  Thirty-eight Eleanor  K.  Smith
Victoria
Bacteriology
Delta Gamma
George A. Turner
Vancouver
Helen M. Westby
Vancouver
English
Philosophy
Vice-Pres.,   Badminton  Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
Margaret G. Smith
Vancouver
Olga M. Webber
Vancouver
English
Philosophy
Rec. Sec'y,  Phrateres
Basketball
Alpha  Gamma   Delta
Lorene Betty White
Vancouver
Phrateres
Gamma  Phi  Beta
John G. Gould
Vancouver
Economics
Pres, A. M. S.
Parliamentary Forum
Zeta Psi
John W. Whitelaw
Vancouver
English
Rugby
Pres., Inter-Fraternity Council
Zeta Psi
Thomas A. Elliott
Vancouver
Chemistry
Mathematics
Chemistry Society
Eric I. Wood
Vancouver
Commerce
Page  Thirty-nine Professor J. Friend Day
commerce
'37
Commerce '37 found no need for
organization throughout its graduating year. Stat, labs., research, and
pursuit of the amenities during the
term occupied most of the time
available. With splendid unconcern,
the bureaucracy of an executive was
dismissed from thought.
Professor j. Friend Day was honorary
president, by tacit understanding.
Page   Forty Rosemary J. Bawden
Moose  Jaw
German Club
Phrateres
Harry A. Berry
Vancouver
Phi  Kappa Sigma
John W. Charlton
Vancouver
Phi   Gamma   Delta
Golf
Football
Julio N. Berrettoni
Vancouver
Madeleine M. M. Bowden
Vancouver
Alpha Omicron Pi
Roger Chester
New Westminster
Soccer
Harry  Cicconi
Vancouver
Josephine 0. Dickie
Vancouver
Badminton Club
Treas, Women's Undergrad Society
Kappa Alpha Theta
Marjorie K. Hill
West Vancouver
Gamma Phi Beta
George B. Deacon
North Vancouver
L.  Peirce Douglas
Vancouver
Rugby
Zeta Psi
Lyman M. Hunt
Vancouver
Page  Forty-one T. David Kato
Vancouver
Mgr., Soccer Club
F. Molly Locke
Vancouver
Badminton Club
Big Block Club
Gamma Phi  Beta
Donald A. Matson
Vancouver
Ralph J.  Killam
Vancouver
International   Relations Club
Golf
Fencing
John S. Maguire
Vancouver
Zeta Psi
Alex. J. Miller
Vancouver
Psi   Upsilon
C. O. T. C.
Valetta B. Morris
Matsqui
Alpha Omicron Pi
James A. Macintosh
Vancouver
Vice-Pres.,  Rowing Club
Golf
Delta Upsilon
Helen R. Parker
Revelstoke
Sec.-Treas., Film Society
Outdoor Club
M. Jean McDonald
Vancouver
Alpha Delta   Pi
Desmond L. O'Brien
Vancouver
William Ryall
Vancouver
B. C. E. R. B. D.
Page  Forty-two John M. Shaw
Chilliwack
International  Relations Club
Varsity Ski Club
S. C. M.
Beta Theta Pi
Walter F. Silverton
Vancouver
D. Earl Stafford
Vancouver
Badminton Club
Kunito T. Shoyama
Vancouver
Russell M. Smith
Vancouver
G. A. Sutherland
Vancouver
Soccer
Stanley E. Thorne
Vancouver
W. J. S. Wainwright
Vancouver
Swimming Club
Delta Upsilon
Johnstone A. Weber
Vancouver
William F. Veitch
Victoria
C. A. Blake Wallace
Vancouver
Canadian Football
Boxing
Zeta  Psi
Edw. D. H. Wilkinson
Vancouver
A'pha Delta Phi
Golf
Page   Forty-three James Bardsley
Elza Lovitt
education
Professor C. B. Wood
Once again those who have chosen teaching as their life profession go out into the
world filled to the brim with pedagogical theory, fully determined to mould little
minds, and to set the younger generation on the paths of righteousness.
Whereas in former years we scanned the calendar, mapped courses, counted units
and lecture hours, perused prospectuses and earnestly re-read those sections devoted
to prizes, medals and bursaries—this year we come to the University to find that
our courses are all planned out for us, and all our time allotted to lectures.
Who can forget those first few weeks of being initiated into the methods of primary
teaching when we found that the humble teacher was to be a walking revised edition
of the world's total knowledge? Who can forget the early morning street cars, the
surprise that so many people got up early in the morning ... the waiting in corridors
for criticism . . and the heated arguments in the Caf. over the respective merits of
the various teaching methods?
These seem to be ephemeral things, yet they have served to bind the class of 36-31
into an insoluble unit which we hope may persist as long as its various members are
concerned with time-tables, curriculums, and ungraded rural schools.
The executive of this inestimable and most worthy class is as follows: Honorary president, Prof. C. B. Wood; president. Jim Bardsley; vice-president, Elza Lovitt; secretary-treasurer, Dolly Elliott; W A. representative, Bea Hastings; M. A. representative,
Dave Ellis.
Page   Forty-four t h
c o
e g e s
Page  Forty-five angncan    college
Dr. Maurice Trumpour
~9sr\
Leslie Pearson
In his incomparable "Discovery of England," Stephen Leacock, in discovering
Oxford, says that if someone were to give him money with which to found
a university, the first thing he would build would be a smoking-room; then
a dormitory, then a library, and, finally, if he had any money left over, he
would perhaps build lecture rooms, buy text-books, and engage a few professors. The longer the writer stays on the campus, the more surely does
he realize the great truth behind Leacock's statement. Each year we say
farewell to brothers; each year we welcome those who are destined to
become brothers. Yet, behind all this seeming flux and change, there is the
abiding reality—the College; the home of the family; the place where, in
contemplation of those who have occupied one's own very room in the past,
one feels that one is a link with past and future; and the place where one
learns that all-important part of true education, to give as well as to take.
This year, five have joined the family—Ave! Atque, Vale—this year has
seen us without five, some of whom had been with us for a goodly number
of years; and this year will also witness the departure of yet other four.
Regret at their pending departure, however, give's birth to the realization
that more will come to take their place—to carry the torch one lap further.
Though small in numbers, we have fielded a soccer team on the only two
occasions that opportunity has offered: the one, against our perennial
opponents, Union College, who defeated us by one goal; the other against
the city clergy, whom we defeated. Before this appears in print, we shall
no doubt have defeated U. C. in the return match, as also in the annual
inter-college track meet.
Our "At Home," held in January, passed off with the success which we are
gradually coming to look upon as only natural. This year, "Cinderella—in
the modern mode" was written, staged and presented (with four-piece
orchestra!) by the men as entertainment for the guests. We have had
several outside speakers; and, at the time of writing, we are almost on the
eve of the literary event which rounds out our year's programme—th-2
Oratorical Contest.
With the "ascending climax," remembered from distant Eng. 1 days, we
record the appointment this year of our new principal, Rev. H. R. Trumpour.
After serving faithfully on the staff as professor for twenty-five years, he
has taken over the reins of the college he has known and loved for so long.
We are approaching the end of another academic year; but it is one which
has indeed marked the beginning of a new chapter in the history of the
college.
Page   Forty-six union    college
students executive
1936-1937
A. L. Anderson, B.A., President
G. B. Punter, B.A., Vice-President
G. R. Pringle, B.A., Secretary-Treasurer
comm ittees
J. Millard Alexander, B.A., Social
Basil Hartley, Devotional
Frank Golightly, B.A., Athletic
Arthur Wirick, B.A., Literary
W. H. Vernon Smith, B.A., Editor "Pacific Coast Theolog"
Dr. J. G. Brown
The Students' Society of Union College, at the time of writing, is in the perennial whirl of track
meets, soccer games, and annual meetings; but out of the confusion, indications are that the college
will emerge with another successful year for its history. For three men, this is the last year of life
at Union College, and to these three new ministers of the United Church in British Columbia we
send our best wishes for success in their ministry.
Last November marked the second annual series of student services held in over 25 United churches
in and around Vancouver. Valuable as experience to the students, these services have likewise
strengthened the standing and effectiveness of the college in church life through the city.
We were fortunate this year in having as special additional lecturers Dr. J. A. Cormie, superintendent
of Home Missions in Manitoba; Dr. Cordon Dickie, of this city, and Dr. Gerald Switzer, of Victoria, a
recent graduate of this institution.
In addition to academic work, students enjoyed the two annual social evenings spent with the
"feminine contingent."
Athletically considered, the students asserted their supremacy in soccer over the Anglicans with
decided authority in both games played. Track championship between the two colleges is yet to be
settled; but by virtue of past performances of Art Anderson, George Pringle and Frank Golightly,
Union College has installed itself as favorite to retain the cup. anglican college graduates
Leslie Pearson, B.A.
Bashaw
Pres., L. and A. Assn.
Dramatics and Art
Christopher Loat, B.A.
New Westminster
Pres., Psychology Club
Soccer
Track
Badminton
Vice-Pres., Anglican College Athletics
Edward Slater, B.A.
Victoria
L. and A. Assn. Executive
Soccer
Peter Disney
Edmonton
Track Soccer
Grass Hockey
Pres., Parliamentary Forum
Historical Society
S. C. M.
Vice-Pres., L. and A. Assn.
Archivist
union college graduates
Gerald B. Punter, B.A.
University of Manitoba,  1933
Vice-President, Students' Council
William E. Dovey
Musical Society
Arthur L. Anderson, B.A.
University of B. C, 1934
President, Students' Council
Page  Forty-eight science
'3 7
Page   Forty-nine d
f
ean or science
The Totem departs from custom. Rather than demand a message of congratulation from the Dean of
Applied Science, addressed to his graduating class, we extend a message of congratulation and of
welcome to him on their behalf.
From Merigomish, Pictou, McGill, Dalhousie, Manitoba, and early construction work in British Columbia, Dean Finlayson has come to fill a position of prime importance in the University. With competence and understanding, he has assumed his place in University and in its relations with the city.
We welcome him again, after his first year of service with us; and with every confidence that under
his direction the Faculty of Applied Science will attain to the distinguished position it has known
among academic circles of America.
Page  Fifty W. Dayton
R. D. Hodge
D. W. Thompson
science
'37
Professor W. H. Gage
After five long years the class of Science '37 becomes labelled as mentally developed
along engineering lines, and is eligible to go out into the cruel world to do or die.
The examination curse has inflicted its toll of casualties to an extent a little over
fifty per cent of the initial class in '33.
The scholastic standing of Science '37 has been an enviable one, the class boasting
of such outstanding students as Don MacPhail, Bill Morris and Bill McLeish.
In the field of sport we are well represented by such men as Bill Morris, Bill Wolfe,
Barney Boe and Clarence Taylor.
The traditional Science spirit was displayed by the class when they obtained, as a
valedictory gift to the Science Faculty, a neon-lighted Science shield to be used at
social functions, open-house, etc. Due credit goes to Phil Emery, who has given a
great deal of time and energy as president of S. M. U. S., and who originated the
idea of the shield.
The executive consists of: Honorary president, Prof. W. H. Gage; president, W.
Dayton; vice-president, R. D. Hodge; secretary-treasurer, D. W. Thompson; athletic
representative, W. Wolfe.
Page  Fifty-one Arnold M. Ames
North Vancouver
Pres.,  Chemical   Society
Men's Grass  Hockey
Norman  Bell
Vancouver
Outdoor Club
Joseph W. Fraser
Vancouver
James H. Armstrong
Revelstoke
Robert H. Bianco
Victoria
James P.  Hartley
Mission  City
Debating
Soccer
Harold D. Knight
Chilliwack
Herman Nemetz
Vancouver
Rupert  Ross
Vancouver
Chemical Society
William M. Morris
Vancouver
McKechnie Cup Rugby  (Three years)
Jack E. Potkins
New Westminster
John W. Dolphin
Vancouver
Canadian  Football  Club
Page   Fifty-two J. Douglas McLeod
Vancouver
Harold R. Gissing
Merritt
Phi Kappa S'gma
Robert D. Hodge
Vancouver
Sec'y, A.  I. E. E.
Phi Kappa Pi
Marvin L. Calhoun
Vancouver
A   I   E. E.
Harold G. Hawkins
Vancouver
A.  I. E. E.
Hugh D. Keil
Vancouver
Phi  Kappa Sigma
Moses Long
Vancouver
A I E. E.
Swimm ng
S. C. M.
Charles W. McLeish
Vancouver
Row ng Club
A.   I.  E.  E.
Jack A. Poison
Vancouver
A.   I.  E.  E.
Malcolm H. MacKenzie
Oliver
A. I. E. E.
Golf
Roger S. Obata
Prince   Rupert
Pres.,  Japanese Students'  Club
Cosmopolitan Club
A. I. E. E.
Intra-mural Basketball and Volley Ball
John C. Sowerby
Vancouver
Intra-murals
A.  I. E. E.
Page   F i f ty-th ret Clarence R. Taylor
jasper
Big Block Club
Ice Hockey
A. I. E. E.
Willson F. Byers
Vancouver
Sigma  Phi  Delta
William T.  Irvine
Vancouver
John 0. Hemmingsen
Victoria
Sigma Phi Delta
Noel W. Hendry
Vancouver
Pres.,   G   M.   Dawson   Club
Vice-Pres., U. E. S.
Sigma Phi  Delta
Kenneth DeP. Watson
Vancouver
Howard F. Alexander
Prince Ceorge
Pres.,   M.   E.   Club
C. 0. T. C.
James R. E. Clark
Vancouver
Winner of Engineering Essay Book Prize
David  A.  Darling
Vancouver
Sigma Phi  Delta
Frank M. Cazalet
Vancouver
Outdoor Club
Donald C. MacPhail
Vancouver
Rowing
Page   Fifty-tour Daniel W. Thomson
Vancouver
Sec'y-Treas., Science '37
Beta Theta Pi
William Wolfe
Vancouver
Big Block Club
Soccer
Athletic Rep., Science '37
Phi  Delta Theta
Leonard F. Wright
Vancouver
Volleyball
Senior "B"   Basketball
G M   Dawson Club
Phi  Delta Theta
John L. Witbeck
Vancouver
Pres.,  M.   U.  S.
Psi Upsilon
Bernard Boe
North Vancouver
Canadian Foo'ball
Phi  Kappa Sigma
George E. Clayton
Philip C. B. Emery
Victoria
Vancouver
Hiking
Ski-ing
G M. Dawson Club
Pres., S   M. U   S.
Soccer
G. M. Dawson Club
William A. Dayton
Vancouver
Pres., Science '37
English   Rugby
Badminton
Tennis
Beta Theta Pi
Allan P. Fawley
North Battleford
Pres., Tennis  Club
C. O. T. C.
Pres., Salisbury Lodge
Gerald H. Gwyn
Duncan
Pres, Outdoor Club
G  M   Dawson Club
Page   Fifty-five Hugh L. S. Hamersley
Victoria
Outdoor Club
University Ski Club
Lin K. Lee
New   Westminster
Tennis and Grass Hockey
G.  M.  Dawson Club
Ralph Mason
West Vancouver
English Rugby
G. M. Dawson Club
Arthur B. Irwin
North  Vancouver
Outdoor Club
Track Club
G. M. Dawson Club
David L. Monroe
Nanaimo
Tumbling and Swimming
G.  M.  Dawson Club
Zeta Psi
Gordon B. Morris
Vancouver
Rowing Club   (Three years)
Ice Hockey
Vice-Pres., S. M.  U. S.
Vice-Pres.,   I    F   C.
Vice-Pres.,  G.   M.  Dawson Club
Beta Theta Pi
Robert F. Ohlson
Turner Valley
C. O. T  C.
Badminton Club
G M. Dawson Club
Robinson M. Porter
Victoria
McKechnie Cup  Rugby
Big Block
Sec'y-Treas., G. M. Dawson Club
Zeta Psi
James M. MacKay
Vancouver
Sydney Teal
Burnaby
English Rugby
Basketball
Page   Fifty-six Maisie Clugston
Teaching and Supervision
Ambition and perseverance
have been dominant in Maisie's
character thus far After all, a
B.A. and B.A.Sc. in nursing following her training is quite an
achievement. Along with these
assets, her natural sophistication and sparkling personality
will take her far in "this game
of living."
Eleanor Gerwin
Public Health
Eleanor hails from University of
Alberta. She is completing her
course leading to BSc, specializing in Public Health Her
brilliance in study is surpassed
only by the charm of her personal ty, which makes her a
favor.te with everyone. We're
proud to welcome her to the
nursing profession.
Evelyn Claire  Maguire
Public Health
Who could resist that genuine
whole-heartedness with which
Evelyn meets everyone, and
even her work? That's why she
has succeeded so far in her
career She's now a qualified
Public Health nurse, and we
wish her all the success she
deserves.
Elizabeth Martinovsky
Teaching and Supervision
Slender and dark with a wealth
of quiet dignity and poise—
that's Susie Ambition—to find
scientific facts underlying all
nursing principles!
Are you acquainted with the Nursing Department?
After all, we really are one of the most interesting groups on the campus. Why?
Because we are different! The nursing group is the only group of women undergraduates who are working towards a common objective. Each of us is possessed
of an ambition to reach a definite goal, to foster higher ideals, and eventually to
make a worthwhile contribution to the nursing profession.
To enter the hospital to train, and having done that, to become an efficient public
health nurse, or to mount the "Pedestal of Pedagogy" as a ward supervisor or
instructor of student nurses—to fulfill such a purpose is surely a fine ambition for
any young woman.
We are a varied group in all stages of progress. For two years at University we
struggle with chemistry, physics, zoology and bacteriology. Then the next adventure
begins and we become "nurses in training" at the Vancouver General Hospital. Here
for the first time we come in contact with life situations and develop a sense of
responsibility toward suffering humanity. During these three years a good physique,
sustained effort, and a real interest in the work are essential factors for a successful
completion of our training.
In addition to the six years spent in obtaining the nursing degree, a course of one
year is offered to graduate nurses who wish to prepare for institutional or public
health positions these courses attract graduate nurses from all the western provinces.
These students are noticeably more mature and conscious of the r purpose in life.
They come with a varied background of experience in such fascinating fields as
pediatrics, psychiatric nursing, foreign health centres and district nursing. We hope
you realize your loss if you have not made the acquaintance of such interesting
persons I
Fun! Why, yes, we have had plenty! Our social parties, our teas and our dance were
especially entertaining. Indeed, the nurses won first prize for their skit at Hi-Jinx!
We who see our long-sought goal in sight, pass on to our younger sisters an affection
for the nursing department and a realization that
"Our lives deal much with heartaches,
n||      ^      C*      f\      C* With sorrow and with pain,
M S     H     S Yet  if we could go back, I know
^"^ ^^      ^^     ^^ Wed al! be nurses again.
Evelyn Claire  Maguire
Page   Fifty-seven Marjorie A. Butler
Olive M. Clancy
Audrey V. Dick
Margaret L. Dobbin
Nain B. Grimmett
Agnes A. Mclnnes
Marjorie Maynes
Sally V. MacCallum
Hazel Ingram
Valma T. North
Elisabeth Ochs
Kathleen J. Patterson
Honora S. Porritt
E. Dorothy Priestly
Grace Shandruk
Kathleen E. Sheppard
Eileen Snowden
Grace H. White
Ruth Wilkinson
Public Health Nursing—Of the above, Kay Patterson, Sahy MacCallum, and Sue Porritt are enrolled in the One Year
Certificate Course in Teaching and Supervision.   All others are taking the one year course in Public Health Nursing.
also
Helen W. Conner
Grace R. Cowan
Marion L. Granger
Isabel C. McVicar
public health nursing
Page  Fifty-eight VIEWS    AROUND   THE   AGGIE   BARNS
agriculture   '3 7
Page  Fifty-nine dean of agriculture's
message
You, members of the nineteenth graduating class of the University of British Columbia, are carrying
out into the world a portion of the accumulated influence of centuries of cultural endeavor. While
it is true that your University is comparatively young, it has behind it the consciousness of great traditions—traditions which have captured the minds and hearts of scholars throughout the ages.
Look to your predecessors! In these days of specialization, of necessary concentration upon the means
cf livelihood, it is too easy to forget that there was once a time when scholarship was a profess;on in its
own right. The man who possessed a diversity of talents and occupations, the man who might be an
architect, a musician, a farmer, according as he wished, was not always a rarity. Students of history
today are amazed to find that famous painters were scientists in their spare time, or that great
philosophers were also composers of music. It is too easy, I affirm, to forget that education has to do
with the whole man—soul, mind and body.
If, in your years at the University, you have learned to study, you have accomplished something; if you
have learned to like to study, you have opened for yourself a wide field of intellectual delights; if you
have learned to select what is most worthy of study, you have assured yourself of a future that will
be culturally successful. Your material success depends a great deal upon your personality, and upon
the manner in which you apply your knowledge.
F. M. CLEMENT.
Page  Sixty Walter Charles
Richmond LeGallais
agriculture '27
This year, the class of 37 was unique in that the president and secretary were chosen,
contrary to all rules and regulations, by coin-tossing. This class should properly be
known as "The Unholy Sixteen," since four members are scions (Horticultural
technical term) of noted ministerial families.
The class boasts a man of the world; one who has been places and has done things.
This probably accounts for the ability with which he managed the position of president of the Aggie Undergraduate Society. Four members were the winning stock-
judging team at the Pacific International Live-stock Exposition at Portland, in 1937.
As well as some social celebrities, we have a little prairie dust sifting among us.
The class executives for the year were: Prof. E. A. Lloyd, honorary president; Walter
Charles, president; Richmond LeGallais, secretary-treasurer.
Professor Lloyd
Page  Sixty-one Ben Baru
Vancouver
Horticulture
Plant Nutrition
James Chin
Vancouver
Animal Husbandry
Chinese Varsity Club
Peter W. H. Crickmay
Vancouver
Walter D. Charles
Summerland
Horticulture
Botany
Pres., Aggie Speakers' Club
Ralph E. Cudmore
Moose Jaw
Horticulture
Botany
Pres., Aggie Undergrad Society
Pres.,   Ice  Hockey Club,   1935-6
Farley B. Dickinson
Chilliwack
Poultry Husbandry
Pres., Aggie Discussion Club
Vice-Pres., Aggie Undergrad Society
Treas.
Member,
Ralph H. Gram
New Westminster
Agronomy
Animal Husbandry
, Aggie Undergrad Society
Portland Stock-judging Team
Musical Society
Charles S. Hardwick
Sea Island
Agronomy
Basketball
Margaret E. Dyson
Vancouver
Horticulture
Arthur S. Kadzielawa
Vancouver
Dairying
Page   Sixty-two D. Richmond LeGallais
C. Dawson Moodie
John C. Scholefield
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Plant  Physiology
Horticulture
Sec.-Treas., Aggie Undergrad Society
Agronomy
Soccer
Ski-ing
B ta  Theta   Pi
Roderick H. Longmore
Maurice P. D. Trumpour
Duff
Vancouver
Horticulture
•
Horticulture
Member, Portland Judging Team
others   in   senior   classes
arts
Jean Balfour
Florence T. Garrison
Warrena N. Oliver
Mary M. Warden
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Ralph K. Bell
Philip J. Kitley
Edward T. Ouchi
Roscoe B. Williams
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Hugh E. Farquhar
Mary K. Black
J. Douglas B. Scott
R. Cecil Wright
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
John McGechaen
Joseph S. Terry
Vancouver
Vancouver
Stanley A. Copp
New Westminster
commerce
Helen I. Dawe
Vancouver
A. Norman Martin
Vancouver
Margaret C. Porter
Vancouver
Sidney A. S. Swift
Vancouver
Leslie R. Gould
Port Moody
app
lied
science
T. Wentworth McGinn
Vancouver
Graham D. Trethewey
Vancouver
Page  Sixty-three Picture of Mann
shooting gun
Woman having
her say
A Beta's dream
Sunny faces and
graceful attitudes
Secretary,
taking minutes off
Science table
Page   Sixty-four juniors Beverley Cunningham
Helen Crosby
Ron  Andrews
Dave  Lewis
Mary  Craig
Professor Thorleif Larsen
Malcolm   Brown
Page   Sixty-five
arts    '3 8
The class of Arts '38 now finds itself one year older, with probably more wisdom, and
certainly more laurels. The Junior Prom was our largest undertaking this year, and
after several weeks of strenuous publicity, the night arrived with success in its train.
Vote for Queen was based on the colour of hair, and brunettes proving to be popular,
Peggy Fox, as representative of this class, reigned as Prom Queen for the night.
While we shone as a class, we also shone as individuals. Several of our numbers are
on Council and other executives. Two athletes on Council were Dave Carey, men's
athletic representative, and Howie McPhee, junior member. Though no women
from the class were on Council, Jean Meredith was vice-president of the women's
athletics, and Patsy Lafon was secretary.
In sports we were well represented with Dave Carey and John Bird prominent in
English rugby, under the managership of Syd Walker On the track we boast of
Howie McPhee and Gordon Heron, while in the gym our basketball artists include
Frank Turner, Rann Matthison and Hank Hudson. Soccer has for its senior manager
Dave Kato and the following players from 38 Yeomans McBurney, Alan Croll,
Art Sager, Art Chapman, and Bob Kirkpatrick. Playing Canadian rugby are Lyon
Lightstone, Jack Wark and Dave Lewis, not to mention those taking part in numerous
minor sports.
In other activities, Arts '38 also took a lead. As journalistic men we have in our fold
Kemp Edmonds, Ubyssey senior editor; Jim Beveridge, Totem editor, and Frank Turner,
assistant sports editor To complete the versatility of the class are debaters, actors^
singers and musicians      . what more could be desired?
Our energetic and hard-working executive was guided by the sound advice of our
honorary president, Prof. Thorleif Larsen, and Prof. Frederick Brand.
Executive included: President, Malcolm Brown; vice-president, Beverley Cunningham;
secretary, Helen Crosby; treasurer, Ron Andrews; W. A. representative, Mary Craig;
M. A. representative, John Bird; Lit. representative, Dave Lewis.
■
1
it
■H
■pi ^H      ■V
MwP^M            '   4 ^^^ Mm
\%m\    lEgf*-*-'         m^^   ^^a. Robert P. ap Roberts
Lloyd C. F. Bannerman
Hilary D. Bastin
Mary S. Black
Audrey Blackbourne
Kathleen M. Bladen
Ellen M. Boving
Priscilla A. Boyd
Mary G. Bradshaw
M. Ailsa Braidwood
Barbara Brooks
J. Stewart Calvert
H. Donald Cameron
Catherine L. Carter
Alexander N. Charters
Harry Chu
Ena C. Clarke
Iris Corbould
Phyllis L. Cowan
E. Mary Craig
Alan S. Croll
Helen L. Crosby
Beverley K. Cunningham
D. Ursula Dale
Esther J. Davidson
Doreen F. Davie
George E. Davies
lessie Day
Page   Sixty-six Ward F. DeBeck
Clymene L. Dickie
Beverly B. Douglas
W. Freth Edmonds
W. Irene Eedy
Winnifred W. Fair
Jean A. Ferguson
Marjorie C. Findlay
Fred T. Fitch
Margaret Fox
Gertrude L. Freeland
Richard R. Galpin
Hilda L. Gibbon
Mary G. Gibson
Louise Mary Gilmour
Mildred B. Gow
Helen W. Gray
Hyslop B. Gray
Janet D. Gray
Gertrude S. Grayson
George F. T. Gregory
Janice C. Crossman
Marcel J. Guiguet
Douglas B. Harkness
Basil S. S. Hartley
Yoshimitsu Higashi
F. Ruth Hind
Ian G. Hind
Page  Sixt/-seven Barbara J. Hutton
Betty A. Jones
Margaret L. Jones
H. Jean Kempton
MissX
Edna L. Kerr
Patsy Lafon
Mary W. Lane
Maurice C. Latornell
Alison M. Law
Elizabeth C. Leslie
So Won Leung
Fern M. Lew
George E. Lighthall
Elspeth M. Lintott
Eugene L. Lopatecki
G. Richard K. Lynch
Kathleen M. Mann
Thomas C. Marshall
H. Frances M. Matheson
Hazel W. Merten
Carol E. Menchions
C. Rann Matthison
Cathalin I. Miller
Margaret Miller
William H. Mitchell
Frances M. Moran
John G.  Morrison
Page  Sixty-eight Mary W. Moxon
Donald F. Munro
Albert Y. McBurney
Mary McCulloch
Margot C. McDermott
James A. MacDonald
Margaret J. Macdonald
Donald W. Maclver
Jean S. McKellar
Jean C. MacLaurin
Cynthia McLean
Jean M. McLeod
Howard McPhee
Peggy E. Nasmyth
June Porter
John R. Quigg
L. Margaret H. Rae
Mary D. Rendell
May Reston
Margaretta G. Rice
Jack E. Richardson
James V. Rigbey
Eva A. Robarts
C. Eric Robertson
E. M. Gillanders
Anna B. Root
Jack E. Ross
Arthur H. Sager
Page  Sixty-nine Jean M. Seaton
Phyllis Shaw
Norah Sibley
M. Inez Smith
Gordon E. M. Sparkes
Edith E. Spencer
Elsie D. Stangland
A. Shinichi Takimoto
George T. Tamaki
Albert P. Tambellini
Nan L. Thomson
Marjorie D. Todd
Phyllis H. Trafford
Olive St. C. Tufts
Laurence j. Wallace
George C. Walsh
Jean H. Walton
Catherine L. Washington
Kathleen E. Webster
Evelyn W. Wellwood
Julius H. Whellams
Georgina L. M. Wilson
Charles G. Wood
Quon Wong
John B. Wright
Mildred M. Wright
Arthur Collier
Morva Longfellow
Page   Seventy Ronald C. Andrews
Kathleen M. Armstrong
J. J. Andrews
J. G. Aldous
Florence L. Bain
W. R. Balderston
Barbara Beney
J. A. Beveridge
Lillian Boyd
G. F. Booth by
W. R. Butler
Alda B. Clarke
D. J. Carey
Robt. S. Clark
J. L. Colbert
C. R. Craster
C. D. Crawley
Florence Cruise
R. E. Darnborough
E. W. Disher
Gerald S. Denby
Marjory E. Denby
A. S. Davie
Winnifred C. Field
Page  Seventy-one E. N. Fiorillo
A. M. Fotheringham
Mary Gibson
A. S. Gracey
Thomas Grieve
Agnes M. Gwyn
G. P. Grant
F. S. Hayden
Joan F. Hall
J. W. Hudson
Eveline Hebb
Jessie M. Heather
Mary W. Holdom
Regis A. Hicks
C. P. Idyll
M. Isobel Irwin
H. W. Iwasaki
Marjorie Jessup
Marion Kersey
Robt. Kirkpatrick
Chas. J. Knox
A. T. Karsgaard
Una Knipe
Alan G. Kirkby
Page   Seventy-two Albert C. Lake
Wm. A. Laidlaw
David A. Lewis
Norman S. Lea
Eleanor Leith
J. R. Lindsay
Lyon Lightstone
Jean Meredith
P. G. Margetts
S. T. Madeley
J. R. Martyn
J. S. Michell
W. Bruce Millar
G. I. Morrison
Gordon H. Muttit
Roy B. Morrison
Gordon McCullough
E. S. McDaniel
James B. L. McDonald
Mary H. McDonald
Phyllis I. McKean
John McMillan
Irene B. McLaghlan
Marjorie B. Macdonald
Page  Seventy-three Margaret McKenzie
Margaret McRae
Patricia McRae
Aser Rothstein
C. J. A. Powlett
Clifford A. Robson
Agnes A. Shewan
David A. Spencer
Wm. H. Sutherland
Kunio Shimizu
B. R. Stevenson
Dorothy E. Saville
Lois M. Still
Fronia E. Snyder
Nancy P. Saddler
Caroline J. Stewart
James W. Thomson
Lois M. Tipping
W. F. S. Walker
J. C. Whitelaw
G. Ronald L. Kenwrick
Victoria
Mathematics Club
Canadian Officers' Training Corps
Died February, 1937
Page   Seventy-four Faculty
Professor
Leacock
Professor
Gage,
Professor
Orchard,
Doctor
Hebb—
-Bill,
enshrined
in the
Tahitian
museum.
Jay and
Zoe . . .
Machiavellian
Conference
Page  Seventy-five Gordon Snelling
Jack Harris
Bob Peebles
Jim   McCammon
science
'38
Dr. T. C. Hebb
This year the class of Science '38 has carried on its work in traditional style. No one
was unfortunate enough to have to be deleted at Christmas, and we are looking
forward with optimism to our final year.
In the athletic field the class has excelled itself, being represented by such men as
Bill Swan, Jim McCammon, Ron Upward, etc. Inter-class sports have always been
our specialty, and still are, since our class, after a good start, is still in the running
for the honours.
On the present council the class is represented by Lyall Vine, while other members
are contending for executive positions for next year.
The class executive consists of: Honorary president, Dr. T. C. Hebb; president, Gordon Snelling; vice-president, Jack Harris; secretary-treasurer, Bob Peebles; athletic
representative, Jim McCammon.
Page   Seventy-six Raymond C. Bell
Charles H. Davenport
George F. Davies
Jack E. Harris
John G. Light
Laurence E. Machin
Thomas G. Moore
Oliver H.  Newmarch
Rex F. Pearce
Maurice M. Wright
Eiji Yatabe
H. C. Bentall
T. S. Bremner
P. A. P. Brown
J. M. English
H. T. Ramsden
Wm. McK. Swan
W. A. Cloke
N. j. Dunlop
L F. Cray
F. T. Kolisnek
R. M. Peebles
J. H. Radcliffe
R. C. Robinson
P. D. Smith
Page  Seventy-seven Abe Uretzky
Arnold B. Anderson
John H. Benton
E. W. Hall
C. A. Lyall Vine
John W. Hoadley
Allan F. Killin
Walter A. Lammers
James W. McCammon
Russel E. Beach
Wm. J. Boyce
J. D. Hogg
G. A. Snelling
Irvine J. Adair
T. G. Church
R. H. Elfstrom
P. C. Love
G. J. Boisjoli
Thomas Buckham
C. McK. Campbel
Daniel L. Lee
H. W. Little
C. H. Macdonald
P. W. MacMillan
Stephen Burden
Page  Seventy-eight Paul Trussell
Neil Hockin
agriculture '3 8
Professor Boving
"What a lovely day, just reminds me of the time we ploughed Varsity's Boulevard"
... a sigh ensues. Idly we turned the pages of the Aggie '38 Family Album. On the
page of distinction is the portrait of Honorary President Prof. T. A Boving, just as
benevolent as ever.
Next follow in logical order:
Paul Trussell: Just a little phantom president . . .
Neil Hockin: Vice-pres. . . . sec.-treas office boy . . . etc.
Kyle Berry: Basketball beauty or . . .
Gerald Bowering: "Lend me two-bits till the end of the week."
Donald Ken: . . . school bored ... by himself.
Tong Louie:  Driver of the B.  C.  Electric's mammoth competitor,  the "Shanghai
Express."
Glenn Mason: "Trail, Trail, the gang's all here" . . .
Cecil Morgan: "Lend me the notes, I came in late."
loan McTaggart-Cowan: North Van's farmerette who wields a mean plough.
Harvey Ozard: Clark Cable Stand-in.
Wilfred Pendray: The cinderman . . . just see his dust.
Ross Robinson: "The artist's model."
Anna Rogozinsky: The Manchurian delegate to Aggie '38.
Philip Salisbury: "Paging LeGallais."
Maurice Welch: Lost—a Botany 6 book, German 1, Chem. 3 text, etc.
Yes, they were a pretty good crowd, fifteen perfect Aggies and one little Arts stooge
who was camera-shy.  Ho, hum! Grand specimens everyone . . . even Rosalind's twins.
Page  Seventy-nine Neil Hockin
Joan McTaggart Cowan
Donald Kerr
Acia Rogozinsky
Tong Louie
Paul Trussell
Cecil Morgan
Maurice Welsh
also
Francis Berry Philip Salisbury Elsie Jack
Gerald Bowering Glenn Mason
Page  Eighty ower    years Kitsilano
Varied
Analytical
Observations
Retreat
Waivers, for
Bigger and
Better Totems
First week,
October—
First week,
December
Page   Eighty-one The strenuous
side—
Activities
demanding
consistent
practice, vast
skill, and
a terrific
sense of
humor
Page  E i gh ty-two Miriam Cosens Peggy Thompson Philip  Griffin
Bob   McDougall Harry Lumsden
Polly  Brand
Dr. Gordon Shrum
Bob Smith
Page  Eighty-three
arts    '3 9
During this academic year the students of Arts '39 developed into a fine sophomore
class. The co-operative spirit was undoubtedly a factor in putting the class on top.
This co-active force facilitated the holding of a Pep meeting with Bob Lyons, and a
class party on October 28th at the Commodore. About the only function of this
kind to be held on such a large scale, it was socially and financially successful.
The substantial surplus became our initial contribution to the Valedictory Fund.
In sports, however, the sophomores have especially excelled. In intra-mural sports
the girls have exhibited much enthusiasm and enterprise. In the first term they
defeated all the other classes at badminton, the team consisting of Peggy McLeod,
who plays for Varsity; Audrey Chowne, Janet Seldon, Polly Brand, Marian Vance and
Peggy Thomson. They were also victorious in volleyball, and have high hopes of
winning the basketball this term. At the Ice Carnival the class skated away with
valuable prizes. In grass hockey We had notable representatives, such as Myrne
Nevison, Margaret Evans, Anne Carter and Molly Field.
No less successful were the men of Arts '39. They, too, won the inter-class race at
the Rotary Carnival, and have been consistent winners in intra-mural basketball. The
volleyball team, however, proved to be the strongest that the class had seen for some
years. At the time of writing, such stars as Elmer Jones, Bruce and Moir McLagan,
Arthur Clarke, Walter Robertson, Jack McLaren and Bill Watson, have put us in top
place for the intra-mural cup. The class had also good reason to expect a victory in
the Arts Twenty relay with runners Walt Stewart, Robert Smith, Norman Renwick
and Alex Lucas.
Nor has the literary field been neglected. Douglas Ford, Charles Locke, Graham
Darling and Alec McDonald are a few of our brilliant representatives in the Musical
Society, Players' Club and Parliamentary Forum.
This admirable class was supported by the following judicious committee: Honorary
president, Dr. Gordon Shrum; president, Robert Smith; vice-president, Miriam
Cosens; secretary, Peggy Thomson; treasurer, Philip Griffin; literary representative,
Robert McDougal; athletic representatives, Polly Brand and Harry Lumsden. Mary  Covernton
Pauline  Scott
Dick Montgomery
Bunry  Butters
Albert McDowell
arts    '40
The Freshman class of '36-'37 was formally welcomed by President L. S. Klinck at
the commencement of the term. Before a few days had passed this wonder class
had fused itself into the life of the University both scholastically and athletically.
Initiation—always a period of intense interest, if not of fear and trembling, for the
Frosh, was a most varied programme of events, regulations and rules, all compiled
by the master mind of John Witbeck, who acted as junior member in the absence of
Howie McPhee. As a result of the schemes and plans for initiation, the campus
was dotted with green-nailed, placarded Frosh—the men carrying a jaunty Glengarry
bonnet, and the women wearing a coy Holland cap.
Many a noon-hour battle centred around the "shoe-shine stand" in the Quad, and
many an unsuspecting spectator received a portion 'of the tomatoes, eggs, or spray
from the firehose, that were used as weapons.
Other features on the programme were the smoker for the men, children's party for
the women, and as a climax, the Frosh reception. At this function the Frosh discarded their green finery and entered the symbolic arch of the student body of the
Alma Mater.
Under ,the chairmanship of Howie McPhee, the election of the executive took place
in November The results were as follows. Honorary president, Dr. William Ure;
president, John Pearson; vice-president, Mary Covernton; secretary, Bunty Butters;
treasurer, Peter Mathewson; men's athletic representative, Albert McDowell; women's
athletic representative, Pauline Scott; literary representative, Dick Montgomery.
The last formal function of the year for Arts '40 was the Frosh Frolic, which took
place at the Commodore. Preceding the Frolic a draw for partners was held with
Dr. Ure, honorary president officiating at the boxes. This revival of an old-time
custom—of making the Frosh function a take-your-chance affair—added to the
frivolity of the event. A hard-working committee decorated the Commodore for the
Frolic, and this, combined with the dreamy music of Bob Lyons and his orchestra
made the evening a memorable one for all. Patrons for the evening were Dr and
Mrs. William Ure.
In conclusion, Arts '40, the largest freshman class in the history of the University,
has made, has shown a class spirit and loyal enthusiasm that is hard to beat. With
these qualities it ought to go down in the epics of campus life as the perfect class . .
Tuum est.
Doctor Ure
John Pearson
Page   Eighty-four jack Davis
P. Leckie-Ewing
Dan Burnett
science '3 9
Professor Finlay
Despite a year fraught with dangers (physical, climatic and academic), Science '39
has come through with flying colours. Very few degrees of B.A.C. were granted this
year, and we have struggled along, finding J^i and E. M. F. of dizygocrinus with a
certain amount of success. g
In the athletic field we were represented by Strat Leggat, star of the English rugby
team; "Spud" Davis, a crack sharpshooter of the basketball team, and last, but not
least, Maurice "Crooner" Lambert, on the hockey team that beat Washington. Many
other members of the class, too numerous to mention, have starred in minor sports,
covering everything from track to ping-pong.
Our social life has also been very successful. A grand time was had by all at the
class party in November and at the Science Ball in February, while quite a large
percentage of the class was present at the Co-ed. The class has been well represented at every major event of the year, with the possible exception of Hi-Jinx.
The thoughtful nature of the class was noticeable during January, when we were
careful to avoid breaking windows in the Arts building, breaking only windows in
our own building. The only weakness apparent was in the production of a Pep
meeting.
The executive, which was well supported by the class in everything it undertook,
consisted of: Honorary president, Major Finlay; president, |ack Davis; vice-president,
Peter Leckie-Ewing; secretary-treasurer, Bud Killam; athletic representative, Dan
Burnett.
Page  Eighty-five John Brynelsen
Jim Ussher
George Lightall
Jim Collins
science
'40
The class of Science '40, to whom has been entrusted, or rather upon whose shoulders
has fallen, the task of keeping the University spirit alive (take note Arts 39) have
had, as was to be expected, a very successful year
The Arts faculty offered no resistance to the assertion of Science '40 that they were
the greatest kindlers of that flame which is the spirit of the University. The rest
of Science, however, quite justly deserving a share of the credit, contested the claim
of their brethren of '40, and were convinced only after the success of the gigantic
Pep meet put on by the students of Science '40.
In the field of sport, Science '40 is proud to state that they have yet to lose their
first basketball and volleyball games; this, coupled with their success in the Arts
'30 road race, makes them the leading contenders for the Governor-General's Cup.
Their nearest competitor being Arts '39, they are a "cinch to win."
In basketball, Canadian football, track, ski-ing and hockey, Science '40 is represented
by Mitchell, Stradiotti, Burden, Pogue, and Shea, each a star in his own field, and
each proud to say that he is a member of this class.
Dean Finlayson
Page   Eighty-six Bill Johnston
Odetta Hicks
agriculture '39
Professor Barss
Kla-how-ya, Class of '37! We, the members of Agriculture '39, extend congratulations to the graduating classes, and wish them luck in succeeding years. Although
the original fifteen have dwindled down to five, with four new recruits this year, the
kind of energy that makes things hum is very abundant in our midst. We claim the
distinction of being the smallest class in the University.
Jack Campbell and Dick Cousins distinguish themselves playing intermediate basketball for ye olde Alma Mater; our president, Bill Johnston, forms a hefty part of the
stage crew in the Players' Club; and Jack Gray belongs to the publicity end of the
Musical Society. Though suffering from an infatuation, Miss Josephine Staniforth,
our "Farmer Jo," manages to attend her lectures, often with a faraway look in her
eye. Frank Hardy, an outstanding member of our class, is a former student at
Ontario Agricultural College, and calls Ocean Falls his home town. That exclusive
air, which comes only from Victoria, is lent by Bert Saunders, the class Don Juan.
We are represented among the debaters of the University by Bob Parkinson. After
several years of teaching, Jim Campbell has returned from the Okanagan to pursue his
horticultural aspirations. The second feminine member of Aggie '39, Odetta Hicks,
is a popular member of the Badminton Club, and is a young lady who can talk on
any agricultural topic with authority, and ad infinitum on Experimental Farms. (You
see, she comes from Agassiz.)
The Creed of Aggie '39:
We plow the fields and scatter seeds,       And Sciencemen who puff and blow.
And dominate the lesser breeds; We know our Faculty supreme,
By this we mean the Artsmen low And for its future plan and dream.
The executive- Honorary president, Dr. A. F. Barss; president, Bill Johnston; vice-
president, Dick Cousins; secretary-treasurer, Odetta Hicks; sports representative,
jack Campbell; press representative, Jack Gray.
Page  Eighty-seven Len Zink
Les Steele
Kay Harris
agriculture   40
Variety, as far as courses are concerned, is the keynote of Aggie '40. Upstanding
members of this aggregation absorb, it is hoped, splatterings of soil technology,
agronomy, animal husbandry, dairying, poultry husbandry and horticulture. By the
end of the academic year we should glitter with the above social accomplishments.
This year Aggie '40 boasts the largest registration recorded in freshman classes. We
are thirty. Women are represented in numbers equal to those of the entire faculty in
previous years.
The class has taken an active part in the Agriculture Discussion Club. We anticipate with pleasure the scheduled trip to the Dominion Experimental Farm at Agassiz.
This event, held in early spring, takes us to a grand location, and is keenly enjoyed.
Mr. W. H. Hicks, superintendent, makes each and every freshman feel entirely
welcome.
Our class executive comprises: Honorary president, Professor Blythe Eagles; president,
Len Zink; vice-president, Les Steele, and last, though hardly least, secretary-treasurer, Kathleen Harris.
Dr. Blythe Eagles
Page   Eighty-eight Frosh . . .
they fight,
duck fruit
and vegetables,
don paraphernalia,
perform
menial chores,
wait in line,
rush to their
lectures . . .
... but
not for long.
Page  Eighty-nine Campus   in
Early Fall
Foliage
Splashed with
Autumn Colours
. . . New
Keenness and
Crispness in
the Air . . .
Early Snow
Dusts the
North Shore
Hills
Page   Ninety publications the   ubyssey
Amid smoke, superlatives, overdue library books, discussions of life, re-armament, erotica, movies and
proletarian poetry, the Bohemian personnel of the Pub. office compiles and edits 40 issues of that
strapping student publication—The Ubyssey.
Each Monday and Thursday throughout the term typewriters crackle, reporters scurry, editors devise
strange new heads, phones buzz as mats, cuts, ads, dummies, and other sundries are ordered or
traced.   This feverish action heralds the arrival on the subsequent day of the paper aforementioned.
The 1936-37 Ubyssey has been characterized by newer and fresher make-up, an initial fourteen-page
edition, a terrific volume of advertising copy (Ah there, Council), controversy, and splendid efficiency.
Presided over by the vast organizing and directing genius of Zoe Browne-Clayton as editor-in-chief,
a sound business and editorial policy has been maintained. Senior editors were Kemp Edmonds and
Dorwin Baird, both of whom indulged whole-heartedly in experiment as regards make-up and editorial
tone.
Dick Elson, distinguished by his casual and airy regard for his sports page, entrusted it to the capable
hands and volatile brains of Associate Sports Editors Frank Perry and Frank Turner, while he compiled Totem sport in the grand manner with fine, sweeping efficiency.
Associate editors on general have been Ken Grant and Dorothy Cummings, both competent and conscientious journalists. Peggy Higgs, who achieved her professed ambition of reporter on a downtown
paper during the spring term, was awarded associate editorship for her continuous and enthusiastic
work on the Ubyssey.
Assistant editors Bill Sibley, Dave Smith, Monty Fotheringham and Jack Mair all strove to retain order
and decorum within the Pub. The numbers of bubbling reporters included: Rosemary Collins, Beverley
McCorkell, Doris Tobin, Annette Smith, Kay Mann, Stewart McDaniel, Bob Knox, Bob Nelson, Emil
Bjamson, Hugh Shirreff, John Crowhurst, John Bartholomew, Irene Eedy, Norah Sibley, Myrne Nevison,
Art Jones and Frank Van Perry.
Columnists Student Prince, Darby and (in October) Campus Crab, have commented crisply and
brightly on current campus phenomena and foibles. Exchange editor Jim McFarlane, writing in characteristic deft and brittle vein, drew interesting comparisons with college life elsewhere from the
50-odd collegian publications received weekly at the Pub, and mailed U. B. C. news through the
Western Intercollegiate Press Union with the assistance of Bill Knox.
All in all, '36-'37 has proved wholly enjoyable in the Pub. office. Murals grace the room, sport glosses
line the west wall, conversation flows fast and free, journalistic bonhomie, consolidated by the November jaunt to Seattle for the purpose of editing the University of Washington daily, by two select teas,
one explosive party, and dinners at press, has generated a successful year of Ubyssey publication.
Page   Ninety-one *%p#al L
editoria
staff
Zoe Browne-Clayton
Editor-in-chief
Kemp  Edmonds
Tuesday Senior
Dorwin  Baird
Friday Senior
Dick  Elson
Sports
Ken Grant
Associate
Frank Turner
Associate
Sports
Frank Perry
Associate
Sports
Dorothy Cummings
Associate, Society
Peggy Higgs
Associate
Jim  McFarlane
Exchange
Page   Ninety-two Editorial
hierarchy
Call from
the outer
office
Pub. goes
walking . .
fields a team
. . . edits
Washington's
Daily .. .
Totem staff
laughs—it
was only
once
Page   Ninely-three Jim Beveridge
the   totem
The Totem staff, homeless stepchild of the Pub., has this year, in spite of a varied and hectic career,
managed to put out the finest and biggest year-book ever seen in the Canadian West.
This great achievement has been due almost entirely to the initiative and foresight of editor Jim
Beveridge. Single-handed, he encountered numberless photographers, printers and engravers, at the
same time collecting eight hundred waivers from reluctant students and energetically laying plans for
a completely revolutionary Totem. The results of his work were graying hair, symptoms of telephone
voice, and this splendid blue and gold record of 1937.
The editor was handicapped in his great work by an extremely variable and elusive staff. Early in
October, enthusiastic freshmen were marshalled under the Totem banner, but before January contact
had dissolved in little flurries of postponement and vagueness. Unperturbed, Jim set about assimilating a new staff.
Ubyssey sports editor Dick Elson came to the rescue of the sport sections of the book, and for the
second year handled teams, athletic managers and sports write-ups with experience, aplomb, and the
aid of Ron Andrews and Lee Straight.
David Crawley, associate editor, with the assistance of Morva Longfellow, performed the hitherto
untried task of collecting the Greek Letter organizations into the Totem. David also doubled for Jim
at the phone occasionally, and regimented vast amounts of detail with unenthusiastic efficiency.
The class and club write-ups were overseen by Dorothy Cummings, Jean MacLeod and Irene Eedy,
all of whom put in long and devotional sessions at the typewriter.
The new pictorial sections, such a prominent feature of the 1937 Totem, were made possible by the
Contax camera and continuous application of Stewart Calvert, which took scores of candid shots about
the campus; and by the Exacta camera of Jim Collins, responsible for most of the Science scrap pages
as well as many of the scenic shots.
The proofreading of layouts was done by the sole remaining member of the original freshman staff,
Ken Kahn.
Page   Ninety-four Jean MacLeod
Dorothy Cummings
David Crawley Morva Longfellow
Ron Andrews Lee Straight
Irene Eedy Jim Collins
also Ken Kahn
Dick Elson
Stewart Calvert
Page  Ninety-five the surrealist to his love
This, glittering literary fragment, that could
have emerged only from such a cultural
hothouse as the Pub., was printed in several
Canadian university journals and in the
Daily Province. It was inspired by a report of the New York exhibition of
Surrealist art last winter, at which a lady
fainted.
Roots groping from my chest
Are thoughts of you,
Small red canoes your lips,
Teeth sheets upon a line,
Eyes basins of cold water
Grey with soap.
Dainty pink cornflakes
Fill your antiseptic skull,
But plum juice
Is your kiss . . .
Roots groping from my chest
Are thoughts of you.
Hasten, Jason, the basin. . . .
epitaph
Am I then to be resolved
Into so many hormones . . .
"An ulcerated stomach bothered him;
"Indigestion his besetting sin . . ."
Pierced with pins on little boards
In classified sections;
Or poured in Volumes I and 11
On dusty shelves . . .
Here are the moons of a thousand nights,
The clouds of a thousand days;
Here is my breath on the wind.
"His life was sped to the click
Of a million heel beats";
"Fifty thousand cups of coffee
And his spirit passed gently
In a cloud of cigarette smoke."
I who have felt my footsteps,
Firm as becomes a hero,
Spurn the mountains—
To speed my life on whirring tires
Across a million miles of paved highway . . .
"Lies here in a chromium-plated coffin (guaranteed)."
Oh, I should like to feel in sleep
The coolness of green things, twining about me.
"Epitaph," crystallized out of the rarer
atmosphere of the Letters Club, displays
none the less a literary kinship with its
neighbour. Both manifest an undergraduate intensity and sensitivity which
a gross world, unhappily, seldom suspects.
Page   Ninety-six athletics executives
Page  Ninety-seven Dave Carey
Bob Wilson
Dave Lewis
Dean Clement
men's   athletic
executive
The faculty members on the executive for the past year have been Dr. Shrum and
Dr. Clement. The responsibility of co-ordinating and directing athletic activities
lay with President Dave Carey.
Inter-collegiate competition was somewhat less active this year, but, as ever, the
future looks brighter, especially concerning sports on the campus. Intra-mural sports
functioned well and, with Mr. Van Vliet's physical training classes, were a source of
healthful enjoyment for many students.
Remaining members of the executive are: Vice-President, Bob Wilson; secretary,
Dave Lewis.
Dr. Shrum
Page   Ninety-eight Jean Meredith
Patsy Lafon
Marjorie Mellish
Mrs. T. A. Boving
women's  athletic
executive
For the year 1936-37 the Women's Athletic executive was in the capable hands of
President Beth Evans. Members of the executive included: Jean Meredith, vice-
president; Patsy Lafon, secretary-treasurer; Margot Martin, badminton; Betty Street,
outdoors; Marg. Evans, grass hockey; Peggy Higgs, swimming; Laura Nixon, May
Craig, Polly Brind and Pauline Scott, class representatives. Honorary president was
Mrs. Boving.
The executive was most successful this year in helping Athletic Instructor Miss
Moore, especially in the intra-murals.
Beth Evans
Page  Ninety-nine Dave Carey
Barney Boe
Jim Bardsley
Jim McCammon
Dr. Ure
men's awards
committee
The Awards Committee, a branch of the Men's Athletic
Association, is entrusted with the task of making awards
to those individuals whose performance in athletics during the year is considered outstanding.
The committee for 1936-37 was composed of Dr.
Hutchinson, faculty representative; Dr. Ure, alumni representative; Bardsley, basketball; Boe, football; Thurber,
soccer; McCammon, track; Carey, rugby and men's
athletics (two votes).
Dr. Hutchinson
women s
awards
committee
The Awards Committee has been changed
this year so that there is a representative
from each club affiliated with the W. A. A.
Margaret Haspell, basketball; Margot Martin,
badminton; Betty Street, outdoor club; Margaret Evans, grass hockey; Marjorie Mellish,
Big Block; Beth Evans, president W. A. A.;
Miss Gertrude Moore, director of Women's
Physical Education.
Beth Evans
Marjorie Mellish
Page  One   Hundred Front row:
Crosson
Grant
Pringle
Campbell
Hutchinson
(hon. president)
Leggat (president)
Davidson (hon. vice-
president)
Carey
Second row:
Bird
Wilson
Quayle
Snelling
Walker
Rita
Back row:
Sutherland
Swan
McHugh
Godard
McPhee
Price Henderson
Derwiller     Lucas
Willoughby Eastham
Colthurst    Twiss
Harvey        McCammon
Taylor
men's   big   block  club
The Men's Big Block Club continued its policy this year of acting as a general service
organization on the campus.
They mostly confined themselves to their one main aim: to cultivate a spirit of comradeship between the outstanding athletes on the campus.
Strat Leggat, prominent English rugby player, acted in the capacity of president.
men's   physical
d irector
"Maurie" Van Vliet, the man who has never yet been beaten at chink and will take on
anyone else. Besides taking on the coaching of the Senior "A" basketball, which has
done so well, Maurie looks after all the men's work in the gym. He supervises regular
classes of boxing, tumbling, wrestling, etc., of which more students every week are
taking advantage. He also directs men's intra-murals, which need more support'—
however, they are definitely "catching on."
'Maurie" Van Vliet
Page   One   Hundred   and   One Back row:
Clarke
Bourne
Mellish
Houston
Locke
Front row:
Ralph
McLeod
Evans
Lafon
Hastings
Evans
women's   big   block  club
The Women's Big Block Club altered its policy somewhat last fall in handing many
of its duties to the Women's Athletic executive. The nomination of the awards
committee and the maintenance of standards of different awards is now out of their
hands entirely, leaving the club with more time for social activities.
This  year's  executive  are:   Honorary  president,
Mellish; secretary, Peggy McLeod.
Dr.   Pilcher;   president,   Marjorie
Miss Moore
women's   physical
di rector
Miss Moore, a graduate of the Margaret Eaton College, has been of inestimable
value during the past year. Filled with an unlimited vitality, Miss Moore has made
her gymnasium classes very popular, and has been a great help to the W. A. E. with
her many useful suggestions.
Page  One   Hundred   and   Two major    sports
Page   One   Hundredand   Threa !*[/V/AfDMAm
Left to right: Orr, Williams, Straight, McDowell, Pearson, ap Roberts, Boe, Charlton, Angus, H or wood, and inset, Grant (manager).
Their first year back in the folds of Canadian football after an experimental sojourn with American
football was not very successful for the Senior Football squad. With very few of last year's squad
returning, "Doc" Burke and Maurie Van Vliet had a green squad to work with, and thus had an
inauspicious showing for the year. Playing three games in the Big Four League, the men of the
gridiron finished in last place.
In the three games against Meralomas, North Shore and V A. C. the students scored two points with
26 scored against them. But, as in former years, they lacked none of the spirit which characterizes
college teams, and thus were never out of the fight.
The high-light of the season was the Hardy Cup game against University of Saskatchewan, when
Varsity came from behind in the second half to tie it up, only to lose the game in the dying moments.
It was the big day for Varsity, including a Pep meet and a snake parade through town to the park. Left to right: Parkinson, Lewis, Twiss, Lightstone, Wark, McHugh, Campbell, Cuiget, Wallace, Burnett, and inset, Burke.
In spite of the unsuccessful showing of the students this year it looks like a big season next year.
With only one of the squad leaving school this term, Van Vliet will have a wealth of material to work
with.    In addition to this, a series has been arranged with the prairie colleges for a real schedule for
the Hardy Cup.    In all probability the squad will travel to the prairies to play, with return games at
the coast.
There will also be floodlights installed on the upper field to do away with early morning practices,
thus allowing a greater percentage of the students to get out.
Much credit is due for the fight the boys displayed, including that put up by a very promising group
of freshmen, who will be out with us for four more years.
Among the players during the season are: ap Roberts, Williams, Orr, Straight, McDowell, Pearson,
Horwood, Angus, Guiget, Boe, Mclvor, McHugh, Wark, Lewis.
"Doc" Burke, Maurie Van Vliet and Bill Morrow were the coaches for the year, while Barney Boe was
their very able captain.   Gord Grant was manager. rf/v/&#/#/$/tfj
Left to right: Bird, Leggat, Lumsden, McPhee, Wilson, Willoughby, Carey, Andrews.
The Senior English Rugby squad, playing in both the McKechnie and Miller Cup play-downs, has
probably had the most successful season that it has enjoyed for many years. Dubbed the "miracle
team" by the publicity boys, the ruggers went out and showed everyone that they were deserving of
the name. The squad played two games for the McKechnie Cup against Vancouver and Victoria Rep
to pile up a total of 30 points with none scored against them. The students went out determined to
bring the mug back home, and had little trouble in doing so.
For the third consecutive year the prized Miller Cup, emblematic of city honours, will rest in the
Varsity Trophy Case. The long awaited game, after being postponed several times, was finally played
late in the spring term, with the Varsity team outfighting North Shore All Blacks to win by a score
of 8 to 3. JA
>   ■ ■-■#* '•. r\'
*jf ^~   ^*^-i-
"•V
__—- -
Left to right: Pyle, McCammon, Harmer, Upward, Maguire, Watson, Swan.
The ruggers were undoubtedly lucky to have such an array of material on the campus from last year's
squad with also a few very likely recruits from the High Schools. Jim Harmer and Harry Lumsden
were the rookies of the team, and showed everyone just how rookies should act in their first year in
"big time." Art Willoughby and Bill Swan were also out doing their stuff for their "Alma Mammy"
after a year out of school, and showed the advantage of a year away from the books.
From last year's team the following boys got into the fight: Ron Upward, Jim Pyle, Ed Maguire, John
Bird, Dave Carey, Bill Watson, Lyle Wilson, Strat Leggat, Jim McCammon, Joe Andrews.
With practically the whole squad returning next year, everything points to another big year for the
ruggers, which we hope will be a repetition of this year. The squad, captained by Dave Carey, was
handled very ably by Captain Dobbie, who spent a great deal of time with the boys.
Mft»l
"V' &
>.< .5^^
A
Left to right: Eastham, Bardsley, Willoughby, Matthison, Turner, and inset, Van Vliet.
Led by six Varsity stars who have returned to school after a year's lay-off, the Senior "A" squad has
been riding high all year. Art Willoughby, Jim Bardsley, Ralph Henderson, Rann Matthison, Bill Swan
and Ed Armstrong were the returning prodigals who, together with the remnants of last year's team,
grabbed second place in the league standings. In the league play-offs the Thunderbirds took Forsts
in two games to enter the finals with Province. After losing the first game to the Giants, Varsity
came back to beat Province in three stirring games. At the time of writing, the team has just defeated
the highly touted Victoria Dominoes in the first two games of the Provincial play-offs.
Before Christmas, the team was without the services of Swan, Willoughby, Henderson and Armstrong,
and at the holiday lay-off the boys were in third place. Following the holidays, the squad really went
to town and avenged the defeats they took at the hands of Adanacs and Province before Christmas by
handing their arch-rivals two sweet defeats. All set to grab the bye into the play-off, the lads struck
a snag when they were handed their second defeat by Forsts. The loss came unexpectedly, and gave
Province the bye into the finals. Left to right: Hudson, Davis, Swan, Pringle, Detwiller.
In the league schedule the college squad won eleven and lost eight games, making it three straight
over Munros and Ryerson, taking two out of three from Adanacs and Province, and dropping the
odd game of three to Forsts.
The squad this year was under the very able coaching hands of Maurie Van Vliet, who took on the
job when "Doc" Montgomery decided to concentrate his efforts with the girls alone. Maurie got
right in the fight, and is bringing the squad through a very successful year. Jim Bardsley, returning
for his teacher's degree, was the captain of the squad.
The team showed up very well in the individual scoring race, with Matthison, Pringle and Bardsley
placing right up among the leaders.
Following is the gang who did their stuff for their Alma Mater throughout the year- Bardsley, Henderson, Willoughby, Matthison, Pringle, Armstrong, Swan, Turner, Davis, Mitchell, Hudson, Berry, Gross,
Detwiller, Hayman.    Manager was Art Clarke.
%
l»jf»
Spa
ff
A^J^i^r^
\i
fjM
2
1   "^
mH.                                              JmWW\ Tl
I^L.^^^H.
-■
M.   m^^mmmt**
^^I
V
' ■
Left to right: Rita, Stewart, Colbert, Campbell, Mason, McPhee, Lucas, ap Roberts, McCammon.
With one of the best aggregates of cinder men in the last five years, 'Varsity's blue and gold
team finished the year very successfully.   Up to the time of writing, the cinder men have partici
track
i^u o,,^u mt ,^i vt,x outt^^.ij,,/.   ^K ,u iiic nine w, wining, the cinder men have participated
in one major meet, avenging the defeat of last year against the Victoria "Y" squad. Although handicapped by the absence of Howie McPhee, who was on the 'flu list at the time, they defeated the
Island boys by two points.
Before Christmas, the 'Varsity-Frosh meet was won by 'Varsity by a wide margin in one of the most
thrilling meets that has been witnessed for some time.
The Arts '30 relay also proved a great drawing card for the students, who turned out to see the bunion
men do their stuff. Vance McComber, freshman, led the boys in, and was closely followed by Wilf
Pendray, of Aggie '39. Science '40 led the classes in points for the Governor's Cup, grabbing 108.
Arts '39 were close behind with 102. Left to right: Harvey, Renwick, Burden, Pendray, Gilmore, Sage, Williams, Colthurst, Fields, and inset, Van Vliet.
The team has still two big meets to run off. They meet College of Puget Sound at home and the
New Westminster squad at the Royal City.
Although greatly hampered by weather conditions, the track men were able to keep in fair shape by
means of practices in the gym under their coach and trainer, Maurie Van Vliet.
The squad was very ably managed by Manager Joe Rita, and Jim McCammon was the choice for
captain of the team.
Following are a few of the outstanding men who took part in the year's meets
Alex Lucas, high point man of the season; Jack Harvey, holder of the Western Inter-Collegiate record
for the hurdles; Howie McPhee, Olympic sprint ace; Jim McCammon, perennial winner of the field
events; Wilf Pendray, freshman and outstanding 880 man; Vance McComber and Paddy Colthurst,
milers of merit. Left to right: Thurber, Croll, Sutherland, Rush, Quayle, Chester, McBurney, and inset, Hitchins  (coach).
Soccer this year has suffered from lack of support on the campus, with the inevitable result of a poor
season. Notwithstanding the excellence of individual players, and the intensity of training, the
Soccer Club was forced to drop out of the V. and D. League. A large proportion of the lack of success
is directly attributable to the attitude of the high schools towards this time-honoured game. Very
few men coming to the University from secondary schools know anything at all about the game, and
recruits to the ranks of soccer-playing men here are exceptionally rare.
The junior division, playing in the G. V. A. A. League, met with a greater degree of success, and at
the time of going to press was in second place. It might have been possible to take men from this
team for the senior group, but Manager Dave Kato felt that it would rob the second team of their
due honour. Left to right: Foster, Chapman, Mizuhara, Moodie, Free (associate manager), Perry, and inset, Kato (senior manager).
Hampered by lack of experienced material and placed in a league a little above their head, Varsity
senior soccer team had a very unsuccessful year. Throughout the year they were the victims of bad
weather and bad breaks. Finally, with the coming of the snow, the students were forced to cut out
one-quarter of their season.
They were forced to play in the Vancouver and District League against some of the best teams in the
city, thus cutting down their chances for any kind of success. However, in spite of the bad breaks,
they turned and fought every game with the best of Varsity spirit.
Versatile Alan Croll, goal-tending fullback; Gerry Sutherland, Bish Thurber and Art Chapman were the
outstanding men on the squad, acting as the backbone for the less experienced players.
Charlie Hitchens was coach for the year, and in his untiring methods was greatly liked by the whole
squad.   Dave Kato was the very able manager. Front row, left to right: Nixon, Winslow, Trapp, Mellish, Lorentzen, McCulloch.
Back row, left to right: Wilson, Clark, McEwan.
The hard luck team of the year, the girls' senior "A" basketball squad turned in an excellent performance in the City League, but rallied too late to try for championship honours. Although they
won most of their games this spring, the wins of last fall were too few to gain a play-off berth. Next
/ear, however, Coach "Doc" Montgomery has high hopes of a Canadian championship quintet.
Three outside trips were planned: Chilliwack, Cloverdale and Nanaimo.
weather have as yet prevented these outings, but they still hope.
Anyway, next year keep a weather eye open for the senior "A's"—they'
should be played.
No cars, no money, and bad
show you how basketball
Page   One   Hundred   and   Fourteen Back row:
Lambert
Price
Stevenson
Ussher
Cuiget
Fiorillo (manager)
Front row:
Guiget
Perry
Shirreff
Trussell
Taylor
ice
hock
ey
After three years of competition with the University of Washington, Varsity succeeded this year in winning the inter-university
title.   The Blue and Gold won the series in two straight games.
The team was markedly strengthened this year by Jim Harmer,
Hugh Shirreff, Jack Stevenson and the Guiget brothers, Charles
and Marcel. Clarence Taylor, Jim Ussher, Paul Trussell, Frank
Perry, Framp Price, Angie Provenzano and Maury Lambert make
up the rest of the team.
Because of the definite improvement shown over previous years
there are prospects of a league next year to include Idaho, Montana State, Oregon State, Washington State, Washington and
U. B. C.
This year's club executive is composed of: President, Maury Lambert; vice-president, Jim Ussher; secretary-treasurer, Frank
Perry, and manager, Erman Fiorillo.
Perry
Lambert
Ussher Senior Crew:
Cox—Carr
Stroke—Pearce
7—Chapin
6—Jamieson
5—Williams
4—Gordon
3—Hetherington
2—Melville
Bow—Macintosh
rowing
McDuffee
In their first year as a sub-major sport, the Varsity Rowing Club had many setbacks,
all because of inclement weather. The traditional Arts-Science race had to be
called off for this reason. However, the turnout has been good, especially by the
three faithful coaches, Mr. Tom Brown, Professor Fred Brand, and Professor R. West.
Two important regattas lie ahead of the club; the triangle meet between U. B. C,
Oregon State and University of Washington, and the annual contest with Vancouver
Rowing Club.
Erection of a still-water float on the campus has been the club's big project this
year.  Materialization of these plans will, it is hoped, increase interest in rowing.
The executive consists of: President, W. McDuffee; vice-president, Alec Macintosh;
crew captain, Bill McLeish; secretary, Bob Pearce; treasurer, Graham Darling; publicity, Bob Melville; equipment, Don McPhail.
Senior Crew: Cox, John Ker; stroke, Bob Pearce; 7, Mai Chapin; 6, Stu Jamieson; 5,
Wilf Williams; 4, Bruce Gordon; 3, Wordie Hetherington; 2, Bob Melville; bow, Alec
Macintosh.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Sixteen minor    sports
Page   One   Hundred   and   Seventeen Brown
Whittle
Maitland
Knox
Williams
Lafon
Housser
Tupper
Cull
Robinson
Morisson
(manager)
Centre row:
Johnson (manager)
Wallace
Tick
Robertson
Spohn
Campbell
Robertson
Drabble
Pyle
Mackie
Calder (manager)
Front row:
Robertson
Day-Smith
Runkle
Madely (captain)
Smith
Billings
College
rugby    teams
|unior   soccer
Back row:
Kirkpatrick
Zink
Neary
Morris (assoc.
Fiorillo
Reid
Ferguson
Front row:
Cousins
Sager
Logan
Godard
Moodie
mgr.)
Minichiello
captain) Back row:
Hardwick
Hayman
Lafon
Wright
McKeown
Front row:
Coach Van Vliet
Jones
Copp
Martin
Bacon
Charters (manager)
senior
«l "    j.
b    team
b a s k e I b a
intermediate  "a"  tea
m
Back row:
Jones
Clarke
McLagan
MacLaren
Stewart
Front row:
Campbell
McLeod
Scott
Miller
Grant (manager) Back row:
Trumpour
Ellis
Mouat
Ames
Cook
Crickmay
Black (coach)
Front row:
Bremner
Macaulay
Soule (captain)
g rass
hock
ey
Back row:
Leckie
Allen
Livingston
Lynch
Front row:
Beach
Finlayson
Stark
9 o
If Back row:
Parsons
Willcox
Williams
McAuley
Eedy
Walsh
Grant
Front row:
DeVitt
Cameron
Chapin
Perry
Hobden
pep  club
swimming
Back row:
Rattenbury
Walton
Millar
Margetts
(secretary)
Mearns
Front row:
Burgess
Butters (girls' team
captain)
Wellwood
(treasurer)
Dimock
Byers  (president) Back row:
McEwen
Laycock
Soule
Field
Carter
Wilson
Houston
Centre row:
Evans
Lorentzen
Chowne
Nevison
Front row:
Hastings
Wright
xx     L     "    j.
u.b.c    tea
m
grass    hockey
w
v a r s i t y"  team
Back row:
Hutchinson
Norie
Rice
Avis
Bamford
Lean
Centre row:
Deas
Mair
Collins
Front row:
Collins
Scott Back row:
Fleck
MacLeod
MacDonald
Martin
Lacey
Westby
MacLeod
Front row:
Waddel
Hayden
badminton
basketball   intermediate
a
Standing:
Collins
Ryan
Johanson
Scott
Collins
Sitting:
Jones
Porter minor    sports
grass   hockey
Varsity is entered in the Mainland Grass Hockey League.
Although most of the players have learned their hockey
since coming to University, with a little more practice, they
have a good chance of regaining the Allen Cup.
The executive consists of: President, Peter Bremner, vice-
president, Francis Cook; captain, Norman Soul; secretary,
Gavin Mouat; treasurer, Michael Crickmay; coach, Dr.
Black.
golf
Under the leadership of Gordon Livingston, prominent city
golfer, the Varsity Golf Club had a fairly successful year.
Ward Allen, another Vancouver golfer of note, won the
annual U. B. C. championship in the fall. Because of
unusual weather conditions the club was inactive during
the winter months. However, a tour of northwest colleges
is planned for this spring following exams.
swimming
This year has not been one of great activity in swimming.
The Swimming Club has only taken part in three meets, all
of them during the fall term. The next meet was somewhat
of a blow to the club's hopes, since they took a beating
from an unexpectedly strong Victoria Y. M. C. A. team.
In the last meet, our two lone entries, Archie Byers and
Bruce Millar, tied for second place in the fifty yards freestyle event.
U.b.
grass
hockey
The U. B. C. Grass Hockey team enjoyed a successful year,
although they had no coach. All the players turned in good
performances, while Margaret Evans, president of the club,
and Bea Hastings were rated so high that they were chosen
to play on the Lower Mainland "rep" team.
Grass hockey has just got under way again, and with the
increased interest shown, there is every chance that the
team will do even better this spring.
badminton
The Varsity Badminton Club team is entered in the "B"
League of the Vancouver Badminton Association, and has
had a very successful year in competition.
The executive is composed of: President, Margot Martin,
vice-president, Helen Westby; secretary, Stan Hayden.
Those on the team are: Peggy MacLeod, Betty Fleck.
Jacqueline MacLeod, Molly Lock, Oliver Lacey, Dave Wad-
del, Alex MacDonald and Stan Hayden.
varsity   grass   hockey
The Varsity eleven did quite well this season in spite of the
fact they had no coach. Kay Curtis was captain and
Frances Mair, high scorer. Many excellent players were
discovered, and will prove valuable additions to the U. B. C.
team next year.
Because of the loss of most of last year's team, who moved
up to the U. B. C. squad, the Varsity eleven was undecided
in many ways as to who should be played in the games, but
with the start of the spring season, all their troubles have
been smoothed over, and the girls should prove a real threat
in their league.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Twenty-four minor    sports
rugby  teams
This year, Varsity, due to a very gratifying rally to the cause
of English rugby, was able to field three teams n the Second
Division in addition to their McKechnie cup team—an all-
time record.
Of these three teams, "B" team, captained by Bob Smith,
was the most successful. Nothing dismayed by the three
losses, they pushed through and defeated the league leaders,
ending the season in second place.
The "A" team commenced the season in very promising
style, but, due to a lack of enthusiastic co-operation, they
did not finish the season as they had started.
On the other hand, "C" team turned in a very creditable
record of performances, considering the choice of material
that was at their disposal.
junior   soccer
The Junior Soccer Club is having one of its better years.
At the time the Totem is going to press the team is in
second place in the G. V. A. A. League, and if the fine
co-operation of the players is any indication, they should
take and hold the lead.
There is still time to win the league, although practices will
have to be cancelled because of the exams.
ntermediate
a
basketball
The Intermediates had a more successful year and have
turned out some good future material for the h'gher teams.
Lack of practising time told on record of games won, but
the boys did beat the top team of the league, showing that
with this much-needed practice, they will be a threat at
all times.
The team was managed by Alastair Grant and coached by
George Crosson.
intermediate
a
basketball
Owing to unusually stiff competition the team gained only
third place in the league. The players were unable to turn
out regularly, and so there were rarely many substitutes.
However, under the competent coaching of Ian McLeod,
the girls gained valuable experience for next year.
Adrienne and Rosemary Collins were the team's high
scorers.
Players: Pauline Scott, guard; Adrienne Collins, guard;
Mary Ryan, guard; Peggy Jones, guard; Rosemary Collins,
forward; Margaret Porter, forward; Margaret Ralph, forward; Lilian Johanson, centre.
senior   ub"   basketball
Entered in the Community League, the Senior "B's" got
away to a slow start. They lost six of their ten league
games, although Art Willoughby, Bill Swan and Jack Davis,
all Senior "A" men, played on the team. They played consistently smart ball, and were always a threat.
Leading lights on the team were John Lafon and Aser Roth-
stein.
The team: Lafon, Love, Jones, Rothstein, Copp, Martin,
McKeown, Hardwick, Wright, Bacon, Hayman.
lub
pep   c
Braving sophomore lunch papers, engineer yells, and the
barbed shafts of the English department, the Pep Club concluded another successful season in its effort to bring noon-
hour entertainment down to the level of the undergraduate
mind. Contrary to public belief, however, the club has
other functions less spectacular, including ticket sales,
advertising campaigns and noon-hour announcements.
The executive for the 1936-37 term was: President, Malcolm Chapin; vice-president, Alan Walsh; secretary,
Stewart DeVitt; treasurer and publicity man, Ken Grant.
Page  One  Hundred  and  Twentv-five *»  ^
■aj Tyy00Rs
outdoors   club
With the spring term drawing to a close, the Outdoors Club looks back upon another very successful
year, and to a further step forward in its development.
Attended by fine clear weather, the fall trip up Howe Sound was an unqualified success. Some sixteen
members of the whole party succeeded in scaling the West Lion, while others spent an interesting
day upon Mount Haney.   To Art Moir and Cam Stewart goes the credit for climbing the East Lion.
Work hikes were accomplished with more than average enthusiasm, and thirty new members were
accepted and welcomed into the club at the fall party held at Killarney.
The cabin was the scene of the New Year's turkey dinner, in which twenty-five hardy enthusiasts
indulged.   Since then every week-end has seen its quota of skiers at the cabin.
This year a cup for ladies' ski-ing was presented by H. Davidson. The men are industriously polishing
up on the fine points of ski-ing.   Their goal is the Kerr Shield—just the thing for the cabin.
As a result of much work, several improvements have been accomplished at the cabin, including a
penthouse to accommodate the more bird-minded males.
On February 3, at Killarney, more than sixty members donned colourful array for the annual spring
party.   To say the least, everyone enjoyed themselves thoroughly.
All considered, it has been a great year ... not even the complaint that there was a lack of snow.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Twenty-six  the
Canadian   officers'
train ing   corps
c. o. t. c. rifle association
Lieutenant-Colonel G. M. Shrum, M.M. the  Canadian   officers'
training corps
In all respects the year 1936-37 has been one of progress and achievement for the University of B. C
contingent of the Canadian Officers' Training Corps. The enrolment has been increased, greater
efficiency inculcated in all ranks in drill, musketry and technical courses, and a revival experienced in
"esprit de corps."
Owing, probably, to a timely change of public opinion on the question of national defence, an unusually
large number of recruits were enlisted in the fall. Regimental re-organization into permanent sections
with an active efficiency contest in operation resulted in much intensive work on the part of the
members, with gratifying results.
Musketry practice, favored by unusually fine weather, resulted in some remarkable scores, the range
record on Blair Range being equalled by two members during the inter-university contest, which the
unit won with the high score of 803 out of 840, so bringing the Dominion title west of Winnipeg for
the first time.
For the first time in several years the unit took part in public parades in 1936 and 1937, appearing in
the King George V memorial parade, the Armistice Day parade, and in February, 1937, holding its first
church parade at Union College, with Captain the Rev. George C. Pringle, D.D., delivering the sermon.
President Klinck and other Faculty members were the guests of the contingent on this occasion. Much
favorable comment on the smartness of the contingent was in evidence at all three parades.
The regimental dance was held in the Jericho Country Club on March 9, and the best traditions of the
British forces were nobly upheld by all ranks on this momentous occasion.
During the year the contingent lost its popular commander, Lieut.-Col. H. F. G. Letson, M.C, who
was promoted to command Brigade, but gained an equally well-liked 0. C. in the person of Lieut.-Col.
G. M. Shrum, M.M., who assumed command in February, 1937.
Quartermaster-Sergeant Instructor A. A. Smith, P.P.C.L.I., of the instructional cadre continued to be
the much respected and appreciated Permanent Force warrant officer in charge of the unit's training.
One serious loss was inflicted on the corps early in 1937 by the death from influenza of Regimental
Quartermaster-Sergeant G. R. L. Kenwrick. Although of a retiring and unobtrusive nature, R. Q. M. S.
Kenwrick had, by his unselfish, modest and friendly disposition, won himself the respect and affection
of the entire contingent, and was noted for his strict and unfailing fulfilment of his duties. By his
death the contingent was deprived of a gentleman and a true comrade.
During the year, eight commissions were won by members of the unit, Sergeants McGinn, Logan and
Fawley, Company Quartermaster-Sergeants Layard, Holland and Dickie, Regimental Sergeant-Major
McDonald and Staff-Sergeant Morley becoming second lieutenants. Second lieutenants Hill and
Godard were promoted to lieutenants.
At Christmas more than 40 members of the contingent devoted their holidays to training at Work
Point Barracks, Esquimalt.
co.t.c. rifle association
This association enters teams in both outdoor and indoor competitions under the Dominion of Canada
Rifle Association and the Vancouver and District Rifle Association.
During the fall of each year the members of this association go through a course of instruction in the
use of the service rifle. On November 15, 1936, the inter-university match was fired at Blair Range,
in North Vancouver, and the score made was one of the highest turned in by any university in several
years. Lieut. R. F. Ohlson and Cpl. A. Daunt equalled the range record of 104 out of 105, and the
total score was 803 out of 840.
Throughout the winter, practice is carried on every week in the very excellent rifle range situated
in the basement of the Arts Building. On this range are fired the Inter-University and Vancouver
Garrison small bore competitions. Shields, cups and engraved spoons are awarded as prizes in these
competitions.
Page    One   Hundred   and   Twenty-nine . . . with a
Science camera
to Grand
Coulee Dam
. . . new
Fraser bridge
. . . dizzy
pinnacles
of Frisco's
Bay Bridge
Page   One Hund red
and   Thirty I u b
n d
societies Lloyd Hobden
Helen Parker
Don Munro
Allan Walsh
Mary Moxon
film   society
Leslie Allen
This newest society has filled a place long vacant in student organization. It has
brought within the reach of all students films they could never see otherwise—opera,
documentary, propaganda and controversial films—this is the fare served. A
division of the Vancouver branch of the NFS, the campus organization has grown
from a modest one hundred in October to four hundred in January. Four shows have
already been presented, and two more are definitely billed, the entire year's programme being financed by membership fees.
The executive feel that the interest shown in the films have justified their choice.
Beyond a doubt "Thunder Over Mexico" was the best film presented and received.
"Fra Diavolo" gave us all a taste of Italian opera with Tina Pattiera of the Scala de
Milano in the leading role. Another film of great interest was "The Plow That Broke
the Plains," filmed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Those who know our
own prairies felt the urgency of that film, and can realize the devastation portrayed.
George Pals' colour cartoon, "Ali Baba," was a great relief after an overdose of
Mickey Mouse—the Gasparcolour is a colour process unknown to American art.
Besides presenting these films, the society has undertaken the rather large task of
compiling a film guide for Vancouver theatre-goers. This guide conta;ns reviews, by
competent critics, of the current films showing in the city. It will be published
monthly and distributed on the campus, in the city and throughout the province.
The executive. Honorary president, Dr. D. 0. Evans; president, Leslie Allen; vice-
president, Lloyd Hobden; secretary-treasurer, Helen Parker; committee, Mary Moxon,
Allan Walsh, Graham Darling, Donald F. W. Munro.
Three' WrjRLo/
'•'<
£'-0 -S-
G3f £s>    '•••. •
m ""* .J
Hazel Wright
Pat Larsen
Hazel Merten
Les Allen
Ellen  Boving Ludlow Beamish
players'  club
Professor Gage
Eleanor Gibson
A familiar scene involving a controversy between Sir Peter and Lady Teazle ushered
in a host of new and enthusiastic members, as it did the twenty-second year of the
Players' Club's existence. A year of great activity and progress in all the varied
departments of its activity, 1936-37 likewise saw new student talent tested and
enlisted with the annual Christmas plays.
Eugene O'Neill melodrama, A. P. Herbert farce, Renaissance costume comedy, all
figured in the Christmas play programme. The club continued its policy of staging
scenes from Shakespeare by including the poetic garden scene from the "Merchant
of Venice."
Mr. Walter Gage, new 'honorary president, was assisted in his directoral policy by
Miss Dorothy Somerset, Professor Dilworth, Miss Jefferd, Miss Margaret Powlett,
Mr. Bill Buckingham and Dr. Duff, comprising the Players' Club advisory board.
Stoutly maintaining the choice of plays with real artistic and intellectual content for
spring production, they chose Alfred Sangster's recent London success, "The Brontes."
This drama, a study of the lives of the famous literary family, was directed by Miss
Dorothy Somerset, producer of three former Players' Club successes.
Audrey Phillips, after consistent good work in "Hedda Gabler" and "She Stoops to
Conquer," assumed the lead and stardom in her role of Charlotte. The cast,
uniformly intelligent and thorough in their interpretations, included: Arthur Sager,
Graham Darling, Beth Gillanders, Mary McLeod, Edith Spencer, Adelia Thurber,
Ludlow Beamish, Don Cameron, Charles Locke, Bob
McCormick, Bob McDougall, George Shiles, Lorraine
Johnstone, Les Sugarman and Lois Still. Costumes
were designed and made on the campus, and make-up
done by girls in the club. All members were absorbed
in spring play committees.
Mime classes and play-reading groups are two other
features of Club activity. Mime work, combined with
choral speaking, was directed by Miss Somerset and
offered valuable dramatic training.
The executive President, Eleanor Gibson; vice-president, Pat Larsen; secretary, Hazel Merten; treasurer,
Hazel Wright; committee, Ellen Boving, Ludlow
Beamish, Graham Darling, business manager, Leslie
Allen, stage manager, John Davidson.
Dorothy Somerset
Page   One   Hundred   and   Thirty-two production work on
"the  brontes"
Miss Dorothy Somerset rehearses five of the cast . . . Committee meeting on stage, Norah Gibson
presiding . . . The Bronte sisters gather on a rainy Sunday with their sewing, using make-shift properties—they are Audrey Phillips, who has three spring play major roles to her credit; Beth Gillanders,
who discloses genuine emotional power; and Mary McLeod, soft-voiced and competent freshette . . .
the stage crew poses, a little unhappily, for a picture—here are some of the hardest-working, most
conscientious, able, and least publicized men on the campus—their high quality work has come to
be accepted as a matter of course.
christmas   costume   plays Bill Cameron
Dr. W. L. MacDonald
Margaret Atkinson
Marjorie Findlay
Robert McLellan
musical   society
Once more the Musical Society has completed a year that can be termed highly successful, not only in furthering musical appreciation amongst its own members, but
also amongst the whole student body on the campus. This work was accomplished
by means of recitals, lectures and the annual production of a light opera. In carrying out these plans the executive was given the full co-operation of the faculty as
represented by Dr. W. L. MacDonald and Prof. W. H. Gage.
In the fall term, Mr. Ira Swartz gave a pianoforte recital under the auspices of the
society. A similar feature was presented by the Symphony String Quartette. These
recitals were open to the public and were held in the University Auditorium.
On November 6th the annual party was held at the Marine Drive and Country Golf
Club, to welcome new members into the society.
A studio group was formed in the spring term, and was composed of a limited number
of senior members. The object of this group is to study and analyze both classical
and modern music. At the first meeting, Dr. A. F. B. Clark was both host and
speaker. His topic was modern music and he supported his opinions by recordings
from Ravel, Delius, Sibelius and Debussey.
As a climax to the season's activities, the society presented Reginald de Koven's
operetta "Robin Hood" in the University theatre on the evenings of February 17, 18,
i9 and 20. Mr. C. Haydn Williams was the musical director; Mr. E. V. Young,
dramatic director; Dr. W. L MacDonald, assistant musical director; Prof. W. H. Gage,
assistant dramatic director, and Miss G. Moore, dance director.
Executive for 1936-37: Honorary president, Dr. W. L. MacDonald; honorary vice-
president, Prof. W. H. Gage; president, William Cameron; vice-president, Margaret
Atkinson; secretary, Marjorie Findlay; production manager, Catherine Washington;
business manager, Harry Bigsby.
C. Haydn Williams
Page   One   Hundred   and   Thirty-four from   urobin   hood
//
Sheriff Gordon Heron, of Nottingham, accuses Robin Hood while Friar Bill Cameron
Tuck, who has shed his wig in rehearsal, glowers in background. . . . Tender moments'
romantic leads, Willa Elliot and Callum Thompson; Kay Patterson and Marjorie
Thompson, who does a little male impersonating with her bow and contralto.
Page  One  Hundred  and  Thirty-five Ludlow Beamish
Leslie Allen
Tom Marshall
Tom Ladner
parliamentary   forum
Professor J. Friend Day
The Parliamentary Forum has concluded another year under the splendid
guidance of its honorary president, Professor J. Friend Day. For many
years Professor Day has been associated with Forum activities, and the
club is again indebted to the unstinted time and labour he has given it.
In the above set of pictures there is an unfortunate om'ssion—that of Alf
Carson. Because of a breakdown in his health after returning from a
debating tour in Saskatchewan, Alf was forced to resign his position as
secretary, and leave the university.
The aims of this organization have been two-fold—to make debating a
more popular activity on the campus and to emphasize the advantages to
be gained from constant practice in public speaking. Although our intercollegiate debates have been little more successful than in past years in
bringing decisions back to the campus, debating activities within the
University have been given a great impetus.
Several innovations of policy were introduced with marked success. Former evening debates were
superseded by noon-hour meetings, bringing regular attendance that ranged from sixty-five to two
hundred. Outside speakers were also invited to air their opinions ,on the platform. In addition,
Professor Angus and Dr. Sedgewick kindly consented to debate the merits of the League of Nations.
The meeting took place in January, and was attended by capacity audience.
In November, Jay Gould and Dorwin Baird represented the University against the visiting Imperial team,
two speakers from the University of Edinburgh and the London School of Economics. A split decision
favored the Britishers. Also in November, Tom Marshall and Alex McDonald defeated John Conway
and Hugh Palmer, both U. B. C. alumni, representing the Vancouver Law School. In the McGoun cup
debates held in January, a home team comprised of Len Martin and Alex McDonald, brought a
unanimous decision to U. B. C. from Alberta. Alfred Carlsen and Tom Marshall, travelling to Saskatoon, were less successful, losing out to University of Saskatchewan.
B. C.'s entry in the Western Canada Radio Series again proved unsuccessful, Ludlow Beamish and
Leslie Allen losing against the University of Manitoba in the first round of a knock-out series.
A novel feature of the year's activities was -the debate against the Women's Literary Forum, when
Jim McDonald and Bill Sibley met the ladies in verbal battle.
Altogether, the year has been notable for successful innovation and range of activity. Forum hopes
that through experience gained last year, the incoming executive will be able to extend still further
the interest in this major student organization.
Page   One   Hundred   a nd Thirtv -six Norah Sibley Olga Webber Margaret Evans        Jessie MacRae Fronia Snyder Agnes Shewan
Madge Neill
ph rateres
First organized in 1924 at the University of California, Phrateres has founded chapters
in Pacific Coast universities from New Mexico to Canada. Theta, founded at the
University of B. C. in May, 1935, is the most recent. Founder of the society on our
campus was Clare M. Brown, the President of Women's Undergrad. First president
was Mary McGeer, now active president of the Alumnae Association.
The purpose of the organization is to extend a spirit of good will and friendliness to
all women students on the campus. There are over two hundred and fifty initiated
members on the campus as well as the Alumnae Association. The chapter is divided
into six sub-chapters, each with its own executive to carry on its work.
A philanthropic programme was carried out by sub-chapters during the Christmas
holidays. It consisted of a number of hampers being sent out, and several parties
for under-privileged children.
The All-Phrateres schedule for the year included annual initiation ceremony and
banquet, the Faculty tea, and a variety of smaller parties.
Dean M. L. Bollert is honorary president, and has given wonderful assistance to the
chapter.
Dean Bollert
Page   One   Hundred   and   Thirty-seven I     x   -■-■'■ ''<
Allan Fawley Bernard Neary Bill Tater Howard Alexander
Salisbury   lodge
This year some forty U. B. C. students have realized a campus dream of long standing. In Salisbury
Lodge they have laid the cornerstone of student residence at this University, and the idea has proved
to be as good in practice as it was in theory.
Fall activities included two dances, one at the Commodore and a second at La Fonda, both of which
exhibited the congenial spirit abroad amongst the lodgers.
A road race was held on Armistice Day when Bobby Ohlson splashed in through the rain for a close
win over Maurice Lambert.
Early in the spring term a very successful party was held at the Peter Pan, where John Wood distinguished himself as a superb master of ceremonies. Another dance and possibly a baseball game
with Union College will round out the year.
Management of the house has been in the capable hands of Mrs. M. Hassel, the owner; while organization and regulations have been under the jurisdiction of a committee of seven headed by Allan Fawley.
Life within the house is given added interest by a well-equipped lounge room, where those who wish
may read, play bridge or checkers, or just enjoy the music. Checkers and cribbage keep up the
enthusiasm, while between supper and breakfast a holy silence reigns when those who would study can
do so without disturbance.
With the first year drawing to a close, the future of co-operative housing system seems assured, while
the cheerful countenances of its members speak well for the success of Salisbury Lodge.
Executive Committee is as follows   President, Allan Fawley; vice-president,  Bill Tater;
committee, John Wood, B. Neary; house committee, T. Jackson, H. Alexander, G. Turner.
recreation
Page   One   Hundred   and   Thirty-eight the   biological   discussion   club
This year the Biological Discussion Club has enjoyed a successful year with a record membership.
The programme has been both varied and interesting. The first meeting of the autumn term consisted
of a social evening held at the home of Dr. and Mrs. C. McLean Fraser. At later meetings during this
term, papers were given by Alice Gerow and Janet' Ba i I lie on "The History of Biology," and D. B.
Quayle on "Oyster Culture in British Columbia." The final meeting of the term was devoted to
"Biological Observations" by the members of the club.
The programme arranged for the spring term consisted of the following papers: "Caste Differentiation
in Termites," presented by J. K. Jacob; "The Scope of Paleobotany," presented by Dr. R. Graham;
"A Symposium on Parasitism," "Pioneer Botanists in British Columbia," presented by Colin Curtis,
and "International Commission on the Halibut Industry," presented by Clarence Idyll.
The executive for the year was as follows: Honorary president, Dr. C McLean Fraser; president,
Hugh J. MacKay; vice-president, Alice Gerow; secretary-treasurer, Janet M. Baillie; curator, John
B. Poole.
chemistry  society
The activities of the Chemistry Society were highly successful during the past year. Both "open"
and "closed" meetings were very well attended and a large number of exceedingly interesting and
instructive papers and talks were given. The speakers at the "closed" meetings were Bob Walker,
Art Eastman, G Hartley, John Light, Howard MacMahon, Gordon Fields, Ray Bell, Rupert Ross, R.
Shipton, Bob Bianco and Tom Brock.
At the fall "open" meeting, Mr. Brackenbach, of the B. C. Sugar Refinery, gave a talk on "Diatom-
aceous Earths." Dr. Chalmers, a graduate of U. B. C, now of Western Chemical Industries Limited
also addressed an "open" meeting of the society, his topic being "High Polymers." In his lecture, Dr.
Chalmers pointed out the commercial possibilities of polymerization. There was also a combined
meeting of the Chemistry and Physics societies, which was addressed by Dr. G. M. Shrum.
The executive for the year consisted of: President, Arnold Ames; vice-president, John Light; secretary,
Agnes Schroeder
Page  One  Hundred  and  Thirty-nine chinese   students'   association
To our Alma Mater on her twenty-second anniversary we extend felicitations and congratulations.
Founded in 1930 by eight Chinese students then attending the University, the membership of our
club has grown to the number of twenty-three active and fourteen associate members. Last term,
when the organization asked for recognition on the campus, the Alma Mater Society readily granted
acceptance.
The purposes of this group are to prcmote, first, friendly and closer relations among the Chinese
students, and, secondly, international good will among the various campus organizations. To accomplish these purposes, many meetings both cultural and social, are conducted during the academic year.
To illustrate concisely the extent of the accomplishments of this association, the following highlights
of our activities for the current year are given.
The club has had addresses by such prominent men as Dr T Z. Koo, on "Recent Trends in China";
Dr Kiang Kang-Hu, on "Chinese Culture"; General J M. Feng, on "Sino-Japanese Relations"; and
Professor H. F Angus, on "The Chinese in B. C."
Other important functions are the graduation banquet, the freshmen's reception, the Christmas party,
joint meeting with the Historical Society, and the first International Dance on the campus, in which we
co-operated in convening.
In the past, two notable contributions have been made by our club to its Alma Mater. During 1931,
when the students were campaigning for the Stadium Fund, the very few members of the then existing
Chinese Students' Association carried an energetic project in the Chinese community and brought
back a large sum of money. Last year, when the drive for the Brock Memorial Fund was being conducted, our group repeated the good work done in the Stadium Fund project by raising more than its
quota. Incidentally, our group was the first to bring in their fund, which was also the highest contribution on a per capita basis.
Now that the club has been fully recognized as a campus organization, we hope that in the
future more intercourse with other societies on the campus may be had, to carry out more fully the
original intentions of the association.
The executive and the members wish all other societies and members of the staff the best of luck
and success.
The officers President, Quon H. Wong; vice-president, Lin K. Lee; secretary in English, Daniel L. Lee;
secretary in Chinese, T  Kwong Lee, treasurer, Tong Louie, social convenor, James W. Chin.
g. m.   dawson   club
This club affords the members an opportunity to become acquainted with their professors in an
informal manner, and also enables them to meet men prominent in the professions in which they
themselves later hope to enter.
Following the practice of former years, meetings were held every alternate week, and speakers, both
students of engineering and professional men, were invited to present papers.
Dr. C. 0. Swanson, first president of the club, was guest speaker at the first meeting when he discussed "The Iron Ore Deposits of the Lake Superior Region." Dr. Desmond Kidd showed some very
interesting motion pictures to illustrate his topic, "Mine Development in the North-West Territories."
Dr Victor Dolmage presented the highlights in the work of a Consulting Geologist. Before the end
of the year Mr H. M. Richmond and Mr C. M. Campbell will also give lectures.
The traditional banquet will be held again this year as a climax to an enjoyable and successful season.
Officers for the year were. Honorary president, Mr J. M. Turnbull; president, Noel Hendry; vice-
president, G. Morris, secretary-treasurer, R. M. Porter
Page   One   Hundred   and   Forty german   club
The German Club has completed a wholly successful year Though few in number, the meetings have
been instructive and at the same time educational.
Meetings have included talks by Dr. Hallamore on University Life in Heidelberg, by Mrs. Roys on
Dutch and German painters, and by Dr. A. F. B. Clark on Wagner's music, supplemented by music from
his library of records.
Conversation at the meetings is in German, providing valuable practice and considerable amusement
to members.   Plans for a final German dinner are still under discussion.
Executive. Honorary president, Dr. Maclnnis; honorary vice-president, Dr Hallamore; president,
Allen Walsh; vice-president, Clymene Dickie, secretary-treasurer, Louise Fitzgerald.
h istorica I   society
It has been the custom of the Historical Society to choose each year some one particular country or
period of history on which to centre its discussions. This year the country chosen was China, the
aim of the papers presented during the autumn term being to give some slight understanding of the
background of the Chinese people. With this as a foundation, the spring term papers were devoted
to events in the growth of modern China.
During November a joint meeting was held with the Chinese Students' Club. Through their kind
co-operation the meeting took the form of a dinner at the Mandarin Gardens, followed by an address
by Miss Frances Higgenbottam, B.A., and a display of some of her Chinese treasures. It was well
attended, and all those present showed their ability with chopsticks, though sometimes not without a
little instruction.
At the beginning of March the society received a very generous invitation from Mrs. Clark, of the
Pagoda Shop, to pay a visit to her South Granville Street store, where a special Chinese exhibit had
been arranged. A unique feature of the exhibit was the way in which each dynasty was marked by
some common object connected with it, such as the compass, tea, or paper Thus the double purpose
was served of giving a significance to the name of the dynasty and an aid in remembering it, and also
of setting the period of the article's discovery.
Though the subject chosen for this year was one with which the members were perhaps not quite so
familiar as with some others, nevertheless discussions were carried on with the usual vigour and interest,
The executive for 1936-37 consisted of: Honorary president, Professor Cooke, president, Geoffrey
Smith; vice-president, Fronia Snyder; secretary-treasurer, Joan Pinhorn.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Forty-one international   relations   club
During the year 1936-37 the International Relations Club has enjoyed many an excellent meeting.
One of the highlights of the term was the spring conference of the North-West, which was held in
Victoria on March 12 and 13. Representatives from the campus included Betty Leslie, Claire St. John,
Alfred Carter, Paul Volpe, Jim Colbert, Wilfred Calvan, Margaret Smith, Dick McTaggart, Bob
Melville and Alex Charters.
Many interesting speakers were included on the year's programme. Dr. W. N. Sage gave a short
talk, the topic being the "British Cabinet." An illustrated lecture on "A Trip to Vimy Ridge" was presented by Col. W. W. Foster, Chief of Police. Col. Foster had visited Vimy Ridge in the last
pilgrimage, and was able to recount his own impressions, which proved most interesting. Prof. Ira
Dilworth spoke on "International Poetry" and Monsieur Pierre Auge gave a short talk on "The Rhine."
The concluding meeting was in the form of a supper, the speaker for the event being Prof. F. H.
Soward.
Officers for the year: Honorary president, Alex Charters, Arts '38; vice-president, Jim Colbert, Arts
'38; secretary, Fronia Snyder, Arts '38; treasurer, K. Momose, Arts '39.
the  Japanese  students'  club
The purpose of this club is to promote intellectual and social intercourse among the Japanese students
and between them and students of other races represented on the campus.
An energetic and able Scienceman as president, a willing executive, the largest membership in the
club's history, and the changing tenor of Japanese students, have all contributed to the successful
fulfilment of the annual ambitious programme.
During the past summer and earlier, outstanding members of this club have been largely instrumental
in the formation of the Japanese Canadian Citizens' League, whose prime purpose is to make better
citizens out of Canadians of Japanese origin. Also, work toward the Brock Memorial Fund was carried
on into the summer.
With the opening of the fall session, the club has put much time and energy in trying to create better
relationships with other groups on the campus. To this end, the club did its share in establishing the
"International Party" as, what is hoped, an annual tradition.
Our monthly social-educational meetings have featured topics of current interest. Professor Angus
gave an address on "Impressions of Europe," and Hon. H. Nemichi on "Modern-day Japan and the
Far East."
The annual debate with the Japanese Students' Club of the University of Washington has become one
of the major activities of the club. Three debaters and their friends travelled northward to return the
invasion of five of our members into Seattle last year.
The celebration of the Girls' Doll Festival, a picturesque custom of old Japan, revived on the campus
last year, is to be continued.
Professor H. F. Angus and Hon. Ko Ishii are honorary members of the club. Members of the executive
were as follows: President, Roger Obata; vice-president, A. S. Takimoto; recording secretary, G. T.
Tamaki; corresponding secretary, Kimiyo Kagetsu; treasurer, H. W. Iwasaki; social convenors, Irene
Uchida and K. T. Shoyama.
Page  One   Hundred   and   Forty-two di
a   canadienne
La Canadienne has enjoyed a most successful year in bringing together, informally, students interested
in French. This session the club welcomed many new members, who have displayed much enthusiasm
in its activities. We were again fortunate in having as our honorary president, Dr. Dallas, whose
interests and suggestions have been a great aid in planning the programmes of the club. Among those
who have kindly lent their homes for the meetings of La Canadienne are MadameDarlington, Dr. Dallas
and Dr. Clark, who gave at his home a delightful talk on French music, illustrating it with numerous
phonograph records. Especially enjoyable were those soirees when Le Cercle Francais and La
Canadienne met together. One of those meetings was the occasion of a most interesting address by
Dr. Tipping; and another, that of a charming talk by Miss Margaret Large, as well as the presentation
by Le Cercle Francais of a French play. In addition, La Canadienne together with Le Cercle Francais
had the pleasure of sponsoring the presentation on the campus of two French plays, acted by the
members of the Alliance Francaise and of the Comite France-Canada.
The executive for the year has been: President, Elizabeth Houston; vice-president, Joan Carter; secretary, Evelyn Prisk; treasurer, Kitty Bladen.
le  f
e   cercie   rranca is
During '36-'37 this young society made great progress in promoting interest in French culture on the
campus. With the aid of a live wire executive, the club presented many interesting and varied
programmes.
Under the auspices of the society, there were presented to the student body two French comedies,
enacted by L'Alliance Francaise and Le Comite France-Canada. Both Monsieur Pierre Auge, French
consul for Western Canada, and his wife, took an active interest in the presentation, Madame Auge
directing one of the comedies. There were exchange invitations between the two French clubs of
the campus, our own and La Canadienne, the occasions being an illustrated lecture by Dr. D. Dallas
and Dr. W. Tipping, and selections of French music as outlined by Dr. A. F. B. Clark.
Brimming over with ambition, the members chose and presented a two-act comedy, "L'Homme qui
epousa une femme muette." The cast included Norman Beattie, Stella Bridgman, Clymene Dickie,
Irene Eedy and Sadie Makinnen.
Officers are: Honorary president, Dr. W. Tipping; president, Clymene Dickie; vice-president, Peggy
Jones; secretary-treasurer, Irene Eedy.
Page   One   Hunarea   ana   Forty-three letters  club
Cecil Day-Lewis' Communistic propaganda, an interpretation of Gertrude Stein, and Ezra Pound's
Oriental Studies, give a broad view of the wide range of subjects hotly discussed by the Letters Club
at its meetings this year.
An enthusiastic group of members has made pdssible very interesting meetings, as well as several
innovations, the most important of which has been a joint meeting each term with the Art Club.
The first of these, arranged through the hospitality of Prof. Ira Dilworth, had as its topic for the
evening "Leonardo da Vinci, the Renaissance figure." The second joint meeting was entertained by
Dr. A. F. B. Clark, who presented a varied programme of modern music.
Another result of enthusiastic membership was the provocative Literary Page published in the
Ubyssey at the beginning of the spring term. The members' own work again appeared at the Original
Contributions meeting held in January, when helpful criticism of the literature submitted was given
by all those present. Albert Lake carried off the laurel wreath as Poet Laureate, and Sam Roddan won
the award for Prose Laureate.
A joint meeting with the Graduate Letters Club was held at the University, at which members from
both clubs treated the subject of the contemporary short story from the English and the American
point of view.
The presence of Prof. Thorleif Larsen once more as honorary president, an enthusiastic membership
and the kindness of many friends of the Letters Club has produced results which may be termed
highly successful.
The executive for '36-'37 has been: Honorary president, Prof. Larsen; president, Albert C. Lake;
secretary-treasurer, Betty Street; archivist, Shinobu Higashi.
literary  forum
As part of the programme for this year, the Literary Forum continued its policy of giving practice in
impromptu speaking. Meetings were held at which each member spoke briefly on an unprepared
subject.    In addition, a new departure has been made by devoting some meetings to prepared debates.
Literary Forum has debated against two other organizations during the active season. On February
25, two women from the University of Washington opposed Forum members on the question of relative contributions to world peace by the British Empire and the United States. A week later, a
debate was held with the Parliamentary Forum, on the desirability of a government controlled national
radio hook-up.
The year's executive: President, Kae Farquhar, Arts '37; vice-president, Rosetta Martindale, Arts '37;
secretary, Mary Rendell, Arts '38; publicity, Cynthia MacLean, Arts '38.
Page One  Hundred  and  Forty-four m
athematics  club
The purpose of the Mathematics Club is to encourage an interest among the students in mathematical
and allied subjects. The membership is limited to twenty-five undergraduates who are honouring or
majoring in mathematics.
Meetings are held every second week, and papers are given by professors and graduates as well as by
the members. Among the papers presented were the following: "English Mathematicians," "Hyper-
geometric Series," "Some Theories in Projective Geometry," "Mechanical Integration," and "Galois'
Theory of Groups."
The club regrets the death of its vice-president, Mr. Ronald Kenwrick. He was a faithful member,
and will be greatly missed in the activities of the club. Miss Phyllis Shaw filled the position on the
executive for the remainder of the year.
The other members of the executive were: Honorary president, Dean Buchanan; honorary vice-presidents, Dr. F. S. Nowlan, Mr. F. J. Brand, Mr. W. H. Gage, Mr. L. Richardson; president, Mr. W.
English; secretary-treasurer, Miss A. Hamiltcn.
m. e.   c
ub
The Mechanical Engineering Club was originally formed with the object of giving the members some
practice in public speaking. The bi-monthly meetings of this session have fulfilled this aim with
subjects ranging from casket making to steam heating.
The advantages of affiliation with some engineering association were fully discussed in an early
meeting. Due to the aggressive interest of our secretary, Donald Hogg, a full application has been sent
to the American Association of Mechanical Engineers, and the Club should be affiliated with this
society before April.
The new head of the Mechanical and Electrical departments, Dr. H. J. Macleod, has taken advantage
of the club to meet its members personally, and his friendly interest was shown in an informal discussion of our work and progress.
Executive: Honorary president, F. W. Vernon; president, H. F. Alexander; secretary-treasurer, J. D.
Hogg.
Page  One   Hundred   and   Forty-five menorah   society
During the past year the bi-monthly meetings of the Menorah Society have consisted of a number
of discussions concerning current Jewish problems.
Rabbi Zlotnick addressed the first meeting on the topic of "The Youth Federation." Our three subsequent meetings were devoted to discussions on the book, "The Intelligent Man's Guide to Jew-
baiting," by Sachs of the London School of Economics. Three of our own members, Mr. and Mrs.
N. T. Nemetz, and Mr. Leslie Allen presented the book to us in shortened form and led the discussion.
Early in November a party was held to welcome the new members to the club.
The speakers for the spring term were Mrs. D. G. Steeves, M.L.A., on "Facism in Canada"; Mr. Hymie
Koshevoy on "Sports," and Dr. J. E. Morsh on "Bootleg Psychology."
The executive for the year 1936-37 has been as follows: President, Betty Moscovich; vice-president,
Janice Grossman; secretary, Herbert Fisher; treasurer, Lester Sugarman; press correspondent, Doris
Tobin.
monro   pre-medical   club
The Monro Pre-Medical Club was founded March 2, 1933, in honour of the late Dr. A. S. Monro, by
whose will the University received $80,000 for medical research. Since there was not then, and is not
yet, any faculty of medicine on this campus, it was hoped that the club would serve to promote the
educational interests of all students engaged in pre-medical work and acquaint them with the requirements for admission to the leading medical universities.
The president for the year 1936-37, Elmer Jones, was elected to office at the close of the preceding
year, while the remaining officers were elected at the first meeting of the club this session on September 29, 1936. The officers elected were: Vice-president, Jim Vance; secretary, Marion Reid;
treasurer, Malcolm Brown.
At the request of the members, letters were written to the Faculty of Medicine at various universities
to obtain information concerning the requirements for registration. This having been kindly forwarded
us is now on file.
Only one speaker has been present at the meetings this term—Dr. Hatfield, who is head of the T. B.
Preventorium in Vancouver. He gave an interesting address, illustrated with slides, concerning the
spread and prevention of T. B. throughout British Columbia.
Before Christmas, a 'survey was made of the mental hospital at Essondale. The group was personally
conducted around the institution by Dr. Burns.
A second survey, that of the General Hospital, was made in smaller groups of six and seven. After
inspecting the buildings, the members were permitted to watch the performance of any operations or
autopsies which were in progress at the time.
It is to be hoped that many of these pre-medical students will return to this University for research
when Dr. Monro's gift is instituted as a research fund.
Page  One  Hundred  and   Forty-six physics   club
The Physics Club is organized to give an opportunity for its members and anyone who may be interested,
to hear papers on miscellaneous scientific subjects. These lectures are given either by outside speakers
or by students doing advanced work at the University. The papers are seldom of a technical nature,
and are usually accompanied with slides and with laboratory demonstrations. Two outside speakers
this term were Dr. McKellar and Dr. C. S. Beals, both from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory at
Victoria, B. C.
The executive for this year was as follows: Honorary president, Dr. T. C. Hebb; honorary vice-president, Dr. G. M. Shrum; president, S. Kusuaka; vice-president, D. C. MacPhail; secretary-treasurer,
A. Covington.
psychology   club
A new experiment was carried out this year in the Psychology Club which resulted in considerable
success. Instead of the method of the past whereby one person presented a comprehensive paper
dealing with a certain subject, this year three or four members treated the same topic from different
aspects in short ten-minute addresses, providing fertile field for many animated discussions.
The first meeting of the fall term, at the home of Dr. Pilcher took the form of an "Ice-breaker," at
which psychological games were played, and at this meeting it was decided that the central theme for
the next four or five meetings would be "Adjustment." During the fall term the phases of this theme
discussed were: (1) "The Pre-marital Adjustment of University Students"; (2) "The Economic
Factor and Adjustment in Marriage"; (3) "The Inter-racial Factor and Adjustment in Marriage";
which subjects were dealt with by student or faculty members of the club.
In the spring term, the central theme, "Adjustment," was carried over for the first two meetings. At
the annual banquet, held at the Gables Inn, which took the form of the first meeting of this term, the
subject dealt with was "The Psychology of Adjustment in Mixed Religious Marriages." Here again
there was a divergence from the usual procedure, in which two religious leaders in Vancouver were
present to treat the topic from their particular point of view; Rabbi Cass, representing the non-
Christian Jewish group, and the Rev. W. J. Minto Swan, representing the Church of England. Students
presented the United Church and the Roman Catholic Church points of view.
The subject of "Important Psychological Factors for a Successful Marriage" was discussed at some
length at the second meeting of the spring term. The two concluding meetings dealt with the topics,
"Vocational Guidance," and "Hypnotic Demonstrations." The final meeting of the year took the
form of an informal social preceded by the regular annual meeting of the club, during which the
new officers for the year were elected.
It has been one of the most successful years in the history of the club. The meetings have never
been better attended, and few in the past have created more interest or discussion, and it seems only
fair to say that the Psychology Club has now taken its place among the leading clubs on the campus
by virtue of the high quality and standard which have characterized its activities during the past
academic year.
The officers for the past year were: Honorary president, Dr. J. W. Pilcher; official critic, Dr. J. Morsh;
president, Chris. J. Loat, B.A.; vice-president, Dorothy Peterson; secretary-treasurer, Phyllis Black;
members of the executive, Margaret Collins, Millard Alexander, Dorothy L. Brown. radio   club
After a year's inactivity, the Radio Club was reorganized in October. Officers were elected, and it
was decided to install an amateur radio transmitting station. A suitable location was found in a
storage room above the Thermodynamics Laboratory in the Mechanical Building.
The club as yet owns very little equipment, but the engineering staff of a local broadcasting station—
CJOR—has very kindly offered to donate some used equipment. This year, two members of the club
kindly loaned sufficient equipment to build a station. F. Nanson, Arts '40, loaned the club his short
wave receiver, and L. Gray, Science '38, loaned his transmitter. The equipment was in operation
during the spring term, and was used for both code and radiophone communication on the 3.5 and
14 Mc. bands with a power input of about 75 watts. The Dominion Government granted an operating
licence and an appropriate call signal—VE5UR.
In the spring term technical papers were presented by Wilbert Smith, an Electrical graduate from
U. B. C, and chief engineer at CJOR. The officers were as follows: President, L. Gray, Science '38;
secretary, J. Hill, Science '39, and treasurer F. Jamieson, Science '40.
student christian movement
The Student Christian Movement is an independent University organization, unhampered by formula
or creed, which exists for the purpose of bringing together students of varying opinions who are
seeking to find the meaning of Christianity and its implications in life.
With reference to this purpose during the past year the S. C. M. has sponsored ten weekly study
groups, in which over 125 students have participated. These have been supplemented by several
prayer and action fellowships. It has brought a number of outstanding speakers to the campus,
including Dr. Visser t'Hooft, Dr. Stanley Jones, Miss Muriel Lester and Prof. King Gordon. In addition,
the Movement sent delegates to three conferences: nine to the Pacific Area Conference in California;
one to the Central Area Conference in Ontario, and twenty-seven to the Northwest Canada-America
Conference in Washington. As one of its service projects the S. C. M. took the lead in organizing the
student-controlled boarding house at Salisbury Lodge. The final activity for the year will be the
Twelfth Annual Spring Camp at Gambier Island April 23-30.
The S. C. M. of U. B: C. is a unit of the Student Christian Movement of Canada and the World
Student Christian Federation.
The officers are: Honorary president, Dr. L S. Klinck; honorary vice-president, Dean M. L Bollert;
chairman of advisory board, Mr. W. H. Malkin; president, George Nicolson; vice-presidents, Sam
Roddan and Norah Sibley; secretary, Eleanor Leith; treasurer, Arthur Wirick; general secretary, Bob
McMaster.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Forty-eight university association of the
b. c teachers' federation
This spring the school teachers attending University organized what promises to be one of the most
successful and beneficial groups on the campus. A branch of the parent B. C. T. F. was formed to
enable the teachers to retain a close connection with their professional organization and to improve the
academic standing of members of their profession. Mr. Charlesworth, secretary of the B. C. T. F.,
assisted at the organization meeting.
The teachers secured a franchise on the membership vote, and also representation at the Teachers'
Annual Convention held in Vancouver from March 29 to April 1. They have also instituted an
exchange to facilitate teachers attending winter sessions at U. B. C. This group, in conjunction with
the Summer School Association, will be of value and interest to all teachers and student-teachers on
the campus.
The club held a most enjoyable dance at the end of February.
The executive is: President, John Wood, Arts '39; vice-president, Jack Wright, Arts '38; secretary,
Miss Margaret Windt, Arts '40; committee, George Cormack, Arts '37; Miss Betty Lamb, Arts '39.
The primary organizers were: George Cormack, Bill Mouat and John Wood.
varsity   christian   union
"... a fellowship of students drawn from all faculties on the campus, who, knowing Jesus Christ as
Saviour, desire in University to make Christianity significant and vital . . ." so reads the preamble to
the club's programme. In order to help realize this desire, study, discussion and prayer groups, open
meetings and conferences form a major part of the club's activities.
The visit of Stacey Woods, general secretary of the L. U. C. F. last term, and the meetings where he
addressed students here and at the inter-university conference in Bellingham, were outstanding in the
club's experience.
This term, study groups based upon "A Student Looks at the Parables" and "The World Mission of
Christianity" have proved an undoubted success. The V. C. U. looks forward to its final activity of
the term when it leads a student conference drawn from University of Washington, Oregon State,
Bellingham Normal and U. B. C. at Bellingham on April 24 and 25.
Executive: President, R. Melville; vice-president, Phyllis Trafford; secretary, Edna Howard; treasurer,
A. Karsgaard; publicity, R. McAllister.
Page  One  Hundred  and   Forty-nine Three forces
for reform
Fall
congregation
Charm,
operative
upon the
pineapple
machine .
. . . slugs
worked,
too
Formative
moments
in
academic
life
Dissemination
of pep
Page  One   Hundred
and   Fifty \\
fraternities
and   sororities
//
Page   One   Hundred   and   Filtv-one Knight
Morris
Dayton
Minshull
Shaw
Fields
Nicolson
Scholefield
Thomson
Moore
Peebles
Snelling
McClelland
Laidlaw
Elfstrom
Charters
Davie
Burke
Twiss
Clapperton
Ozard
Harmer
gamma   omicron
of
beta   theta   pi
Beta Theta Pi was founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, on August 10, 1839.    There are 89
chapters.   Gamma Omicron was installed in 1936.
J. A. Deptford
H. J. Morris
D. P. Wyness
R.  D. Clapperton
J. Fields
H. Ozard
F. Harding
J. Harmer
H. McKim
J. Granger
H. D. Knight
J. C. D Scholefield
J. R. Roberts
A. N. Martin
D. W. Thomson
R. H. Elfstrom
G. B. Morris
J. L McHugh
A. N. Charters
W. A. Dayton
K. F. Macdonald
A. S. Davie
J. H.  Harvey
T. G. Moore
H. C. Burke
1
R. G. Minshull
R. M. Peebles
R. J. N. Davidson
J  M. Shaw
G. A. Snelling
R. H. Parkinson
■
W. C. Fields
R. McClelland
R. K. Porter
G. A. Nicolson
W. A. Laidlaw
R. D. Twiss
Page   One   Hundred   and   Fifty-four '4' Hetherington
Pringle
Cade
Crosson
Leckie
Mcintosh
Price
Wainwright
Machin
Harkness
McCullough
B. Millar
Hayden
Whitelaw
Finlayson
Finch
Daubner
Drabble
Lumsden
1. Millar
Robertson
Ross
british   Columbia   chapter
delta   upsilon
Delta Upsilon was founded at Williams College, New Jersey, on November 4, 1834.   There are 61
chapters.   The British Columbia Chapter was installed in 1935.
E. Hetherington
W. Wainwright
C. Whitelaw
W. Blair
G. Pringle
L. Machin
N. Finlayson
W.  Daubner
J. Cade
D. Harkness
L. Detwiller
C. Drabble
G. Crosson
G. McCullough
G. Finch
H. Lumsden
J. Leckie
R. McElhanney
R. Smith
1. Millar
A. Mcintosh
B. Millar
A. Staples
W. Robertson
F. Price
S. Hayden
F. Field
J. Ross
S. Strong
Page   One   Hundred   and   Fifty-five Allen
Nemetz
Aqua
Potter
Sugarman
White
Narod
Kahn
Goldberg
Rothstein
Rome
Wolfe
kappa   theta   rho
Leslie Allen
Herman Nemetz
Sidney Aqua
Charles Potter
Lester Sugarman
Jim White
Milton Narod
Kenneth Kahn
Arnold Goldberg
Norman Rothstein
Harold Rome
Sam Wolfe
Page  One  Hundred  and   hitty-six Barber
Housser
Wright
Wolfe
Carey
Matthison
King
Holmes
McBurney
Lowe
C. Robson
C.  Robson
Vance
Robinson
McDaniel
Avery
Cruise
Darling
Criffin
Class
Cross
Hoskins
(ones
McDougall
Pearce
Smith
Robertson
Runkle
Stewart
Wallace
Watson
Alexander
Maitland
McLeod
british   Columbia   alpha   chapter
phi   delta   theta
Phi Delta Theta was founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1848.   There are at present 105
active chapters.   British Columbia Alpha chapter was installed in 1930.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Fifty-seven McMillan
Charlton
Stevenson
Ussher
Wilson
Taylor
Morrison
Gordon
Bardsley
Willoughby
Elson
Williams
Andrews
Dwinnell
Motley
Straight
Orr
McDowell
Grant
Copp
Dunne
phi   gamma   delta
John McMillan
Jack Charlton
Ben Stevenson
James Ussher
Ridgeway Wilson
Ray Taylor
John Morrison
Bruce Gordon
Ralph Henderson
James Bardsley
Art Willoughby
Dick Elson
Fred Pearce
Ron Andrews
Jim Dwinnell
Doug Motley
Lee Straight
Oscar Orr
Curley McDowell
Tom Williams
Stan Harris
Gordon Grant
Stan Copp
Bill Prentice
Bill Dunne
Ken McRae
Page  One   Hundred   and   Fifty-eight Vine
Mathias
Hodge
Hobson
Colthurst
Coulter
Morrison
Andrews
Hogg
Walker
MacDonald
Beach
Rae
Crickmay
Downing
Robertson
Fitzpatrick
Madeley
jamieson
alpha   iota
of
phi   kappa   pi
Phi Kappa Pi was founded at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, in 1913.    There are six active
chapters.   Alpha lota Chapter was installed in 1924.
Lyall Vine
Gordon Mathias
Bob Hodge
Fred Hobson
Paddy Colthurst
Art Coulter
Ted Madeley
Roy Morrison
Joe Andrews
P. Crickmay
Don Hogg
Sid Walker
C. MacDonald
R. Beach
Fraser Jamieson
Art Rae
Noel Harrison
M. Crickmay
J. Downing
R. Robertson
W. Calder
T Fitzpatrick
A. Wallace
Page   One   Hundred   and   Fifty-nine Berry Boe Keil Gissing Morrison Marshall Burnett
Mason F. Edmonds Rita Braidwood Martin Lucas K. Edmonds
Byers Perry Campbell Renwick Angus Mclvor Calvert
alpha   omega
of
phi   kappa   sigma
Phi  Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of Pennsylvania, Hershey, Pennsylvania,  in  1850
There are 39 chapters in existence.   Alpha Omega was installed in 1936.
Harry Berry
Milton Taylor
Archie Byers
Bernard Boe
Gordon Heron
Arnie Swanson
Douglas Keil
Stewart Calvert
Edward Armstron
Harold Gissing
Roy Leckie
Frank Perry
Gillmor Morrison
Frank Rita
Don Mclvor
Thomas Marshall
Bill Braidwood
Norm Renwick
Daniel Burnett
Leonard Martin
Jack Tindale
Glen Mason
Alec Lucas
Milt Angus
Kemp Edmonds
Bob Brooks
Freth Edmonds
Bill Campbell
Page  One  Hundred  and  Sixty Logan
Manning
Miller
Petapiece
Witbeck
Anderson
Brown
Collier
Randall
Denby
Gregory
Lightstone
Margetts
McPhee
Wallace
Bigsby
Ford
Fulton
Graham
Jagger
Armstrong
Dowrey
Montgomery
Pearson
Sloan
Stark
zeta   zeta
of
psi   upsilon
The Psi Upsilon fraternity was founded at Union College, Schenectady, N. Y., on November 24, 1833.
The fraternity has 27 active chapters. Zeta Zeta Chapter was installed at the University of British
Columbia on October 19, 1935.
John Logan
Ralph Manning
Alex Miller
David Petapiece
John Witbeck
Brook Anderson
Lawrence Wallace
Malcolm Brown
Arthur Collier
Edmund Davis
Pat Denby
George Gregory
Lyon Lightstone
John Pearson
Phillip Margetts
Howard McPhee
William Randall
Harry Bigsby
Douglas Ford
Clarence Fulton
David Sloan
William Cameron
David Graham
Stuart J agger
Lewis Freeman
John Armstrong
Dick Dowrey
Dick Montgomery
Jack Stark
Page   One   Hundred   and   Sixty-one Darling
Hemmingsen
Bacon
Boyce
Collins
Emery
Haskins
Hendry
Ker
Lighthall
Love
Upward
Brynelsen
Adair
D. Mcintosh
J. Mcintosh
Craighead
Burgess
MacDermot
Byers
Lougheed
sigma   phi   delta
D. A.  Darling
N  W. Hendry
Durkin
. H. Hemmingsen
W  A. Ker
1. J. Adair
j. G. MacDermot
C. G. Lighthall
Pogue
J. W. Scott
Lougheed
G. K. Mason
J. R. Allen
P. C. Love
J. S. Mcintosh
C. B. Archibald
Macrae
P. G. Mcintosh
W. R. Bacon
Minns
Karl Johnson
C. A. Bain
Nelson
Cick
W. J. Boyce
Upward
Downey
J. B. Collins
Byers
Craighead
P. C. Emery
John Brynelsen
W. Burgis
P. E. Haskins
May
J. Beaty
Page   One   Hundred   and   Sixty-two Gould                Ainley                Ladner             Whitelaw              Porter Wallace J. Maguire
Monroe           Lammers          Sutherland           Hudson        J. MacDonald Leckie-Ewing Crawley
Lynch              Kennedy      Bob ap Roberts    G. Killam           Branson Wark                Locke
D. Killam              Eadie              Hanbury              Mann             Campbell Wilson Hayman
A. MacDonald         Darling        Evan ap Roberts      Whittle Mathewson
Not photographed:  Douglas, E. H.  Maguire.
zeta   psi
Zeta Psi was founded at New York University in 1847.    There are 29 active chapters.    Sigma Epsilon
Chapter was installed in 1925.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Sixty-three Cain Daugherty Grayson McLeery McDonald Nixon Reid
Beney Craig Findlay Gilmour Hicks Kersey MacLeod
McKenzie Todd Field Gavin Eastham House
a i pna
beta   kappa
of
ha   delt
a   pi
Alpha Delta Pi was founded in 1851, and at present has 55 active chapters.   Beta Kappa was installed
on the U. B. C. campus on February 7, 1931.
Elizabeth Cain
Peggy Daugherty
Gertrude Grayson
Betty McLeery
Jean McDonald
Laura Nixon
Eileen McDonnell
Jean Reid
Barbara Beney
Mary Craig
Marjorie Findlay
Louise-Mary Gilmour
Regis Hicks
Mavis Eastham
Marion Kersey
Jean MacLeod
Marjorie Todd
Margaret McKenzie
Molly Field
Alice Gavin
Kay House
Barbara Jones
Marion Patton
Page   One   Hundred   and   Sixty-tour Brandon
Hemberow
Horwood
Langley
Lee
Mann
Murphy
Pinhorn
Read
M. Smith
Scott
Turnbull
Webber
Bain
Black
Braidwood
Cruise
McLaurin
Porter
Rendell
Shewan
Webster
Wilson
Campbell
Harvey
Kemp
McEwen
D. Smith
Wayles
also Dixie Taylor
alpha   gamma   delta
Alpha Gamma Delta was founded in 1904, and has 45 chapters.   Delta Zeta was installed at U  B. C.
in 1930.
Page  One   Hundred   and   Sixty-five Armstrong Betchley Bowden Boyd V. Clark A. Clark Gerow
Gourney Hoffmeister Jones Morris Shone Strachan Thurber
beta   kappa
of
alpha   omicron   pi
Alpha Omicron Pi was founded in 1897, and has 48 active chapters.    Beta Kappa was installed at
U. B. C. in 1932.
Doris Betchley
Madeleine Bowden
Violet Clark
Anna Clark
Alice Gerow
Mary Gourney
Betty Hoffmeister
Molly Shone
Margaret Strachan
Kathleen Armstrong
Priscilla Boyd
Willa Elliot
Peggy Jones
Adelia Thurber
Betty Morris
Page   One   Hundred   and   Sixty-six Patterson
Clayton
Blair
Woodhead
Stiell
Stewart
Peterson
M. Miller
Salter
J. Gray
Rae
H. Gray
Pratt
Hicks
Biggs
Lorentzen
C. Miller
M. Miller
St. John
Cummings
beta   theta
of
alpha   phi
Alpha Phi was founded in 1872, and has 36 chapters.   Beta Theta was installed at U. B. C. in 1929.
Pauline Patterson
Nora Blair
Evelyn Woodhead
Marjorie Stiell
Margaret Stewart
Dorothy Peterson
Zoe Browne-Clayton
Margaret Miller
Audrey Salter
Janet Gray
Hyslop Gray
Cathalin Miller
Doris Pratt
Odetta Hicks
Use Lorentzen
Claire St. John
Dorothy Cummings
Marnie Millar
Page   One   Hundred   and   Sixty-seven iiiitJB
Haspel
Seed
Crossley
Smith Cunningham Fox
Sadler
Hatton Wright
Clugston
Jones
Wilson
Heyer
McRae
alpha   phi
of
delta   gamma
Delta Gamma was founded in 1874, and there are 49 chapters.    Alpha Phi Chapter was installed
at U. B. C. in 1928.
Margaret Haspel
Beverley Cunningham
Amy Seed
Pat McRae
Marjorie Hobson
Olive Tufts
Audrey Phillips
Hazel Wright
Eleanor Smith
Nancy Sadler
Peggy Higgs
Betty Crossley
Maisie Clugston
Miriam Cosens
Constance Harvey
Mary Heyer
Peggy Fox
Sheila Wilson
Barbara Hutton
Frances Jones
Page  One   Hundred   and   Sixty-eight Bonnell
Darnborough
Evans
Falconer
Hebb
Hill
Locke
Meredith
Schroeder
Neill
Seaton
Stangland
N. Thomson
White
Bearce
Johnson
Jones
G. Thomson
Hall
Stordy
Maguire
alpha   lambda
gamma °phi   befa
Gamma Phi Beta was founded in 1874, and has 49 active chapters.   Alpha Lambda was installed at
U. B. C. in 1928.
Beth Evans
Juanita Falconer
Marjorie Hill
Madge Neill
Evelyn Maguire
Jean Bonnell
Betsy Darnborough
Eveline Hebb
Mollie Locke
Jean Meredith
Agnes Schroeder
Elsie Stangland
Grace Thomson
Nan Thomson
Betty White
Joan Hall
Jean Sea ton
Barbara Bearce
Amuri Johnson
Betty Jones
Shirley Lynn
Jean Stordy
Betty Moxom
Page  One   Hundred   and   Sixty-nine Boyd
Douglas
Irwin
Manson
Armstrong
Robarts
Westby
Dickie
Mackintosh
Street
Stewart
Martin
Gibson
Fields
Sellens
Brand
Vance
Lightheart
Longfellow
Whiteford
McCallum
Hall
Brown
beta   upsilon
of
kappa   alpha   theta
Kappa Alpha Theta was founded in 1870, and has 63 active chapters.    Beta Upsilon Chapter was
installed at U. B.C. in 1930.
Lillian Boyd
Marguerite Manson
Kay Armstrong
Helen Westby
Joe Dickie
Cathrine Mackintosh
Betty Street
Carol Stewart
Beverley Douglas
Isobel Irwin
Audrey Robarts
Margot Martin
Nora Gibson
Freda Field;
Morva Longfellow
Betsy McCallum
Edith Sellens
Joanne Brown
Polly Brand
Marian Vance
Margaret Lightheart
Barbara Hal
Edith Whiteford
Page   One   Hundred   and   Seventy Atkinson
Baird
Ladner
Lowery
Newcombe
Gow
Crosby
Jessup
McKean
B. MacLaughlin
MacRae
Saville
Green
H. MacLaughlin
McLennan
Lowrie Maclntyre Nasmyth
Lafon M. MacDonald M. McDonald
Birmingham Cowan Burd
MacLeod Jean MacRae Thomson
gamma   upsilon
kappa   kappa   gamma
Kappa Kappa Gamma was founded in 1870, and has 72 chapters.
U. B.C. in 1929.
Gamma Upsilon was founded at
Margaret Atkinson
Connie Baird
Yvonne Ladner
jean Lowery
Jean Lowrie
Jean Maclntyre
Peggy Nasmyth
Dorothy Newcombe
Betty Bingay
Helen Crosby
Mildred Gow
Marjorie Jessup
Patsy Lafon
Margie MacDonald
Mary McDonald
Phyllis McKean
Betty MacLaughlin
Peggy MacRae
Dorothy Saville
Virginia Birmingham
Beattie Burd
Ruth Gowan
Eleanor Green
Nancy Housser
Helen MacLaughlin
Betty McLennan
Peggy McLeod
Jean MacRae
Janet Seldon
Peggy Thomson
Page   One   Hundred   and   Seventy-one graduation,   1937
permanent   executive,   class   of   1937
PROFESSOR WALTER CAGE, Honorary President
PROFESSOR F. G. C. WOOD, Honorary Vice-President
GORDON MORRIS, President
PAULINE PATTERSON, Vice-President
WALTER CHARLES, Treasurer
MOLLY LOCKE, Secretary
JOHN LOGAN, Valedictorian
valedictory   gift
THE ARTS 37 LOAN FUND
graduation   programme
MAY 1—BOWEN ISLAND BOAT TRIP
MAY 2—BACCALAUREATE SERVICE, ST. ANDREWS-WESLEY CHURCH
MAY 3—GRADUATION BANQUET AND BALL, THE COMMODORE
MAY ^r—CLASS DAY: PROPHECY, HISTORY, POEM, VALEDICTORY
PLANTING OF THE CLASS TREE
MAY 5—PRESIDENT AND MRS. KLINCK'S RECEPTION,  HOTEL VANCOUVER
MAY 6—CONGREGATION, CONVOCATION BANQUET, HOTEL VANCOUVER
Page  One  Hundred  and  Seventy-two apologia
Kathleen Armstrong
Merritt
Arts '37
History
Kappa Alpha Theta
Lyall Vine
Vancouver
Arts '37
Economics
Treasurer, A. M.
Phi Kappa Pi
Charles Lightall
Vancouver
Class Executive,
Science '39
Sigma Phi Delta
Page  One  Hundred  and  Seventy - three poio   m ii lone
dromedaries kneeling in the
purple twilight
gold-backed, with firelight behind .
swift robed idolaters pacing between
black boulders
. . . and the stars . . .
they weep on Venice, too—
the sin is not forgot in strangeness.
MODERN   I I MSLS\
Complete
Secretarial
and
Book-keeping
Courses
Individual
Attention
Pitman
Shorthand
Gregg
Shorthand
Stenotypy
Special
Summer
Courses
for
University
Students
Night School
$3.50
Month
HTV4AN ELSINESS COLLEGE LTD.
Granville at Broadway—Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone Bayview 8824
Eveline A. C. Richards, President
Page   One   Hundred   and   Seventy-four • • # and all other Students at our splendid University, THE BAY extends greetings and
best wishes for success and prosperity in
your chosen field of endeavor.
We wish, also, to express our appreciation
of the happy relationship that has always
existed between the Student Body and our
^Company.
INCORPORATED    2??' MAY  1670. th
e   year
Twenty-two years after the first undernourished childhood weeks of the University of British Columbia
—Session 1936-37. Big names, big news, excitement, stirring events shaping, whither away no one
is quite sure. An upset world, stuttering forward, stubbing its toe on Ethiopia and Fascism, party
patronage, pulp magazines, strikes, war talk.
How will the class of '37 remember it? By swing music and Mrs. Simpson, who will doubtless exude
for their grandchildren as fresh an aura as did Lily Langtry and the military two-step for us. "Cone
With the Wind" was the big-selling book of the year; "Organ-Grinder's Swing" was a tune played;
"Dodsworth," "Camille," "San Francisco," were pictures of what we might call "The Period."
Vancouver had completed her Jubilee summer, and a new city hall blocked itself starkly against the
Fairview skyline. Snowfall was phenomenal in January and February. The Jooss Ballet, Nelson Eddy,
Martha Graham, John Charles Thomas passed through. Loyalist Spaniards stirred a turbulent mass
meeting at the Auditorium to financial sympathy with the falling government. Ludwig Lewissohn
spoke in the Hotel.
The eligible co-ed featured slim lines, wide skirts, flowers in her hair, sandals and jewelled clips at
formals and major functions. Callow undergraduates battled through the academic haze in draped
striped suits, tweed sports coats with belted backs, pleated flannels and slacks in small checks.
International news was devoted largely to Spain and the British Royal Family. New enthusiasm built
up for the third king within a year, and his queen. Edward had confronted Baldwin's government with
the dreadful problem of industrial decay in Wales and the Midlands. .Italy and Germany played their
sinister role in Spain while hot-blooded enthusiasts from every nation streamed to the support of the
popular government.   Armed camps restored themselves on the old footing.
Joan Crawford and Simone Simone, Louise Rainer and Myrna Loy, Merle Oberon and Claudette Colbert
continued to command a vast and unquestioning public. Eddie Cantor, Jack Benny, Fred Allen, Human
Relations, Voices of Experience, Community Sings, Quizz programmes, thrived without shame. Canadian Radio Commission underwent startling changes. Maxwell Anderson's literary prolificity was
noteworthy. Two productions of "Hamlet" played together in New York. Shakespeare came to
the screen.
Dance music included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "It's De-Lovely," and "When My Dream Boat
Comes Home," and was distinguished neither by brilliance nor great originality of sentiment.
On the campus there were as yet no signs of a student union building nor a stadium. A student peace
petition from McGill, its objective the abolition of conscription in Canada, gained 450 signatures. A
pineapple machine, installed in the cafeteria, failed on account of the dubious authenticity of the
nickels paid into it. Council's pass system, bent but sound after its brush with University administrators, was accepted. A new Dean of Science came from Manitoba. Films destined for the screen
libraries of posterity showed privately in the Auditorium—productions by Pabst, Eisenstein, Rene Clair.
Senior "A" basketball and English rugby put in immensely successful seasons. There was a Victoria
invasion.
In all, it was a lively and thorough session. Much happened about us that was significant, probably
more that was not. From close distance it is difficult to judge. From a vantage point more remote,
perhaps the year was one rich in portent.   At any rate, we enjoyed it.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Seventy-six i t e r a r y SWAN  BROS
LIMITED
Cleaners and Dyers
A smart appearance will help
you win. Have your clothes
refreshed often by Swan Bros.,
the cost is so small.
Twelfth Avenue and Kingsway
Phone Fairmont 6200
Branch: 537 Richards Street.    Seymour 6200
Official
Jewellers and Stationers
to
Greek Letter
Fraternities
a
Unequalled Facilities ior Supplying
Fraternity Needs
□
Diamond Merchants
Vancouver, B. C.
THE NORTHERN ELECTRIC
COMPANY'S Engineering Laboratory specializes in the development
and manufacture of:
Radio Broadcasting Equipment
Speech Input Equipment
Aircraft Radio
Point-to-Point Radio
Public Address Systems
Theatre Sound Equipment
Vacuum Tubes
Police and Traffic Signals
Fire Alarm Systems
Radio Receivers
("SUPREME IN SOUND")
Northern
Electric
smart... sophisticated
. . . New as the dawn of day,
EVERGREEN GINGER ALE
AND EVERGREEN CLUB
SODA have swept into favour.
These perfect party companions leave no regrets and
make firm friends . . . EVER-
GREEN CLUB SODA is
lithiated and alkalized . . .
EVERGREEN GINGER ALE is
sparkling, pure, and has a
distinctive flavour.
FELIX BOTTLERS LTD.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Seventy-seven No ghosts haunt here where man has never been;
No dreams of startled woodsmen going home.
An endless silent loneliness that breaks
Off branches, snaps the twigs from leafless boughs,
Alone lives here with me, while overhead
Remote tree tops swing creaking in the breeze
Like cargo winches or loose cable wires,
Or roaring in a sudden gust of wind
Like surf on distant shores.   Up there the sun
As sifted sand through fingers drops in streams
Through needled patchwork in silent stealth.
The Grecian herdsman knew a kindred spirit
In every knotted trunk and lichened rock;
Little people dwell in every English copse;
But here among .our trees lives but one thing,
Silence, a catlike lurking beast of prey,
■Creeps off the boughs and curls about the trunks.
f
ear
I am afraid, afraid of many things, but mostly of loneliness, the darkness
and no one there.
I see them every day on my way to work and they turn and look and I
feel their eyes and sometimes I want to turn and run to them and pull
them close to me and then to hold them back and gaze at their strength;
at their head, hair, eyes, the soft brown tinges on their cheeks, their
mouth and I want to feel the play of muscles and touch their rough faces.
But there was one ... He was on a corner selling newspapers. His
voice was deep from the continual calling, but it wasn't harsh or bitter.
I went up and bought a paper from him and he looked at me. His eyes
were soft and warm, but it was his mouth that my eyes saw. Lips that
were meant to sing the only song, this the one of procreation. I stared
at him, too long I suppose, for he suddenly blushed and turned away to
his work..
I came back next day, but he had changed his corner and I have never
seen him again.
I am not afraid to confess it (there is no shame in it), I am still afraid of
loneliness and the long nights and their awful emptiness and no one,
no one there.
Page  One   Hundredand   Seventy-eight •L
Umuersiiu Book Store
1
L
The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium Building, was established for the convenience
of the students, and has effected a considerable saving to the students in time and money. It is prepared
to supply all the text books reguired for the various
courses offered in the University, also such articles
as note books, loose-leaf sheets, fountain pens, drawing paper and instruments.
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Education
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
VICTORIA AND VANCOUVER
July 5th to August 6th
The Department of. Education extends congratulations and best
wishes to the Editorial staff of   "THE TOTEM,"   1937 edition.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Seventy-nine grade   one
I was eight when I started to school. I didn't go before because I had scarlet fever and spent a long
time in the hospital where I grew up suddenly and became very wise. My mother took me the first
day and explained to the teacher.
He is a little older than the other pupils you have Mrs Wright but he will be a good boy.
Mrs Wright was tall and stiff. Her hair was done up in a great ball and pulled tight from her forehead.
It made her face look very small and sad. She had lovely hands and I watched them as she wrote
my name on the list, then she smiled and said. We will take good care of him and I am sure John
will pay attention, Oh yes he will make a fine scholar. For a moment her hand rested gently on my
shoulder    Mother went quickly away.
The room was warm and smelled of fresh plasticine and paste. A little chalk box was overflowing
with tiny scissors. I sat quiet in my seat and felt very lonely. A girl came in with a jug of water and
tended a withered geranium. A bell rang and we all went out and kicked a soft football around.
They said this was recess. Then they lined us up in rows and we marched into our rooms. One
teacher stood at the door and made sure we took off our caps. Mrs. Wright played the piano. A
strange pleasant feeling ran through me.    It was grand music and I knew I would like marching.
Then we were all seated again and Mrs. Wright stood up very straight and told us a story. I began
to think about all the stories I had heard in the hospital. This one was about a king who could not sleep.
There was once a fierce and warlike young king who seemed to possess everything that the heart of
man could wish. He was very rich and very powerful and he had a great army. But in spite of all his
wealth and his strength he was the unhappiest man in his kingdom. At night he could not sleep. He
summoned to his court the most famous doctors in the world but none of them was able to cure him of
his sickness. At last he said that he would give half of his kingdom to any person who could make
him sleep but he added that if anyone failed to cure him they would be imprisoned.
Everybody was sitting up straight and listening hard to the story. Mrs. Wright just seemed to change
into someone else.
One evening, she said, a pretty shepherdess came to his palace and said that she could heal him
But the king looked at her sadly and told her to return home. He said, you can not possibly succeed
where all the wisest of doctors have failed.
No, I cannot go away, said the little shepherdess, until I have done .my work—until I have tried to
save you.
Well, before you try, said the king, tell me what your remedy is. Some simple thing that your mother
taught you?
(Turn to Page 182)
Page   One   Hundred   and   Eighty honor graduates
first in their classes by popular acclaim, NABOB tea and
coffee face the future with
confidence ... for two score
years this name has been the
hallmark of quality foods.
KELLY, DOUGLAS & CO. LTD.
IF  YOU  WISH  TO  SUPPLEMENT
YOUR UNIVERSITY EDUCATION
by
A   COURSE   OF   PRACTICAL   TRAINING
which will assist you in making the most of your Academic Preparation
THE
Sprott Shaw Schools
Are at Your Service — Five of Them
They have been successfully serving your predecessors for well nigh 40 years.
•
You need not worry about your location.   They have brought their services almost to your door.
•
For Appointments
Phone: Sey. 1810-8002: Fail. 41; Bay. 2740; North Van. 45; and ior Wireless and Radio: Sey. 7451.
HEAD OFFICE AND MAIN SCHOOL: 812 ROBSON STREET. VANCOUVER. B. C.
President. R. I. SPROTT. B.A.
Page  One  Hundred  and   Eighty-one grade   one   (continued)
Yes, she replied, it is something my mother taught me. Here it is, and leading the king to an open
window she pointed up to heaven.
What, you have come to mock me, said the king.
No, said the little shepherdess, I have come to teach you to pray.
just then the devil got into me and I knew I was going to laugh. Mrs. Wright saw that something
was going to happen and she coughed and looked very fierce at me.
We will finish the story this afternoon, she said.    I knew I was to blame and felt cheap and old.
And now we are going to play a game I didn't want to play any game but we all stood up.   This is
a breathing game, she said severely, but with love. I could see Mrs. Wright loved her duties and I
was sad I bothered her. She showed us what to do, then she took a long pole from behind the door
and pulled the windows down.
Are you ready?   Breathe she would cry, everybody breathe	
And each of us would take a deep breath of the morning air and hold it in.
Then she would say, exhale, and all of us would let out the morning air making a large and sorrowful
sigh. We did this six times and then I forgot about my regrets and made a false groan saying
aaaaaaaaaah making everybody laugh and she looked at me sternly and said,
Ready, are you ready again?
Then
Inhale she would cry.
Then,
Exhale
Again I made a false groan. This time the other boys got some courage and began to groan so that
the room was filled with misery. Mrs. Wright tried to silence us gently yet severely and I felt sorry
for her and stopped. She clapped her hands and stood up very tall and said that the game was over.
Take your seats. For a moment all you could hear was the breathing. Then Mrs. Wright started to
tell us about the pencils and paper which we would need but the bell rang and everybody jumped up.
Take your places again boys and girls. We will leave in rows. My row was last and I was the last
boy to leave.
She touched my shoulder gently with her hand as I slipped past her and smiled sadly. I ran home
quickly to mother and told her I never wanted to go back to school again.
I was in my place at one o'clock but I don't remember much else. They have torn down the old
school building and Mrs Wright is dead and all of us are changed but somehow everything is the same
and Mrs Wright is there and so is the school and every last one of us breathing the morning air.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Eighty-two "GESTETNER"
The World's Premier Duplicator
Reproduces all types of Circular Letters, Bulletins, Examination Papers, Ruled Forms, and
Sketches.
A complete stock of Stencils, Inks
{any color) fine Scottish and Canadian papers.   Demonstrations  on re-
D. GESTETNER (Canada) LTD.
660 Seymour Street Seymour 5880
VANCOUVER. B. C.
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
Graduates of '37
from
THE BROWN BROTHERS
LIMITED
Manufacturers of
SUPERFINISH COVERS
For the Year Books
100 Simcoe Street
Toronto, Ont.
Always Remember . . .
You got the best results with
KEYSTONE
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Made in Vancouver by
Smith, Davidson & Wright Limited
Wholesale Stationers and Paper Dealers
VANCOUVER                                                         VICTORIA
YOUR NEAREST BANK IS
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branch
A general banking business is transacted and accounts
of the Faculty and Students of the University are invited.
■
BANKERS TO THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
C. R. Myers, Manager
YOU'LL GO FOR "RITZ"
IN A BIG WAY
Toasted and tasty, slightly salted little
wafers with an exceptionally delicious
nutty flavor that has captivated everybody. Try Christie's "Ritz" with cheese,
salads, preserves . . . they really do
make good things taste better.
Christie's
Biscuits
yhere'* 9 Christie Biscuit for every taste'
ENGRAVINGS
For "The Totem"
Made by
CLELAND-KENT
ENGRAVING COMPANY LTD.
534 Cambie Street
Seymour 1624
Page  One   Hundred   and   Eighty-three quiet   rain
When quiet rain drops softly through the dark,
And peacefully shines the street,
And everything is moist and gray and dim,
I think of some retreat
Far from the weary, wistful ways of men—
Cray stone and spacious halls
Serenely stand, and in the distance trill
Faint crystal waterfalls.
she walked down the road
She walked down the lonely road,
And no man cared,
The leaves stood still in the air,
The sun flashed on her straggling hair,
Hers was a weary load
That no soul shared.
The quiet held the dusty road,
And on she fared,
The clouds stood gray in the skies,
The shade softened her staring eyes,
She walked down the lonely road
And no man cared.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Eighty-four BORLAND'S
QUALITY
Ice Cream
•
Made with Rich Jersey Cream
Borland Ice Cream Co. Ltd.
1520 West 6th Avenue                                 Bayvlew 1524
What are your Greatest Assets?
A UNIVERSITY EDUCATION
and a
CROWN LIFE POLICY PENSION BOND
Let me talk it over with you.
RALPH M. BROWN, '31
■
Crown Life Insurance Co.
820-S Rogerc Euilding
Douglas 5101
C. P. FOSTER & CO. LTD.
COMMERCIAL STATIONERS AND
PRINTERS
Mathematical and Surveying
Instruments
592 Seymour Street
Vancouver, B. C.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO.
LIMITED
Wholesale Paper Merchants
Manufacturers of "Columbia" Quality
Scribblers and Exercise Books
VANCOUVER, B. C.
VICTORIA. B. C.
WORLD ACCEPTANCE!
JENKINS VALVES
used in 71 different countries
Jenkins valves have the acceptance oi
Engineers and Architects the world over.
For 73 years Jenkins Bros, have maintained a high standard of quality that
embodies fine craftsmanship and metals
of greater tensile strength.
Rigorous testing guarantees efficiency and
dependability.
Made in Canada by
JENKINS BROS. LIMITED — MONTREAL
enkins Valves
T UNCI  IBC4
aJHKjXp* Always marked With the Diamond"
BRONX B » IRON - STEEL
BRONZE VALVES
IRON VALVES
STEEL VALVES
•
MOTOR OPERATED
HYDRAULICALLY
OPERATED
GEAR OPERATED
Page   One   Hundred   and   Etghty-five the   reca Icitra nt
We will not obey our fathers
they live in old houses rusted and crumbling
with yesterdays
We will not heed our fathers
who show us proudly
old ways of doing old things
We will not recognize our fathers
who have sinned and would have
us sin too
We will not forgive our fathers
as they did not forgive theirs
only forget them and go on.
We are dreamers
in a land of reason.
We build our worlds of not-at-all,
Alas, but for a season
and then they fall!
But tho' it seem,
they are not vain
So dream and dream again.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Eighty-six Cameo Stationery
CANADA'S  MOST  POPULAR   WRITING  PAPER
Made in Four Finishes
CAMEO VELLUM
CAMEO LINEN
CAMEO RIPPLE
CAMEO LAID DECKLE
ON    SALE    AT    ALL    LEADING    STATIONERY    AND    DRUG    STORES    IN    CANADA
tlwJu
■MSB III •£.
CAS
This flag
stands for
Gasoline and other petroleum products of highest quality.
A $2,225,000 Investment in British Columbia.
A 100 per cent British Columbia Company.
"YOU   —   CAN   —   BUY   —   NO   —   BETTER"
Home Oil Distributors Limited, Vancouver, B.C.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Eighty-seven sea   sicKness
kn
Five piles
worm-eaten, weak
stand groggy
in a mist-rapt sea
and gesture.
In mirror'd surface—
Shell-encrusted, sea-smelling
Sea-weedy green
In broken light and half-shades
Shimmer,
Five piles.
And the faint throb of passing phantom craft,
The seagulls muffled cry,
The hush before the breaking of the buds,
And early spring beside the sea.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Eighty-eight •4f for  your  autograph
With winged words you bade me play—
Yes, bright winged words for thee,
But these are weak as the deer at bay,
And light as the wings of the bee.
With armed words you'd have me fight   -
With armed words for thee,
But these are faint as the leaden sight,
Yea, fickle as waves of the sea.
0, have me toil with mightier things—
Say, beauteous deeds for thee,
If these in later years will bring
Some pleasant thought of me.
And with these deeds, I'll rear a dream—
A dream that ne'er need end—
Strong memories which you'll ever deem
True image of a friend.
Page  One  Hundred  and   Eighty-nine she  was  waiting  for  me
She was waiting for me. She stood, one hand on hip, one knee bent,
under the strong, white, overhead light. Her dress was plain, tight,
virgin white. Her black hair, tightly pulled back over the high, proud
brow, streamed icily and her shoulders were marble white. She was an
Ionian pillar of ice. All brilliant highlights and revealing black shadows.
I moved closer. She held out her hand. I took it and she pulled me
closer still. Not closer to a pillar of ice now, but closer to the fierce
silverness of a magnesium flame. Her hand left mine and moved slowly
and relentlessly up my bare arm. Not cold, not feverish, not moist, a
hand symbolic of all that is woman, and cool and sensitive, and restrained yet caressing. I looked into her eyes. They were shadowed
over by her brows, but the tips of her lashes were silver black in the
strong down-beating light. The eyes were black and black-shadowed,
but yet the silver flame was in them. Her hand tightened on my arm.
The flame flared past my eyes and murmured in my ears. My arm
tightened under her hand but she did not loosen her fingers. The
flame-roar surged into my blood, into my hands, into my lips. The
carbon-black shadows of her crumbled under the flaming whiteness and
blew with flashes of crimson past my eyes, into her cheeks, into her lips.
Crimson and Silver.   And Cold. Whether for Home or Business Office
OUR STATIONERY and
PRINTING DEPARTMENTS
will serve you in many ways
GEHRKE'S LTD.
566 Seymour Street Trinity 1311
UNION STEAMSHIPS
Limited
Offer an Unrivalled Series of
Vacation Trips
From One Day to Six Days
From $1.00 to $4.50
Illustrated Folders and Information at
City   Office,   795   Granville   Street,   phone
Seymour 9331; or Union Pier, foot Carroll
Street, phone Trinity 1321.
UNIVERSITY GOLF
COURSE
TENTH and BLANCA
Starting times may be booked by phone.
Times  for  Saturday  and  Sunday  booked
from Tuesday morning.
H. WINDER, Professional
Phone Point Grey 144
ASSAY, INDUSTRIAL and
EDUCATIONAL
LABORATORY SUPPLIES
CHEMICALS
CAVE & COMPANY
Limited
567 Hornby Street
Vancouver, B. C.
PIONEER LAUNDRY &
DRY CLEANERS LTD.
Seymour 8334
'Send Your Dry Cleaning
with Your Laundry"
SAMTOM
The New Dry Cleaning Process
Guaranteed by "Good Housekeeping,'
as Advertised therein
Qualified to Teach
BALLROOM DANCING
(Teaching certificates from the highest teaching associations in the world)
Miss
Avril Aitken
Mr.
Al Robertson
Principals of
AVAL
University of
Ballroom
Dancing
603 W. Hastings
Seymour 2482
Special Low-
priced Courses
for Beginners
and Advanced
Students.
Teachers and
Professionals
Trained and
  Certificated.
AV and AL {Positions
Vancouver's Best Dancers and Qualified Teachers Guaranteed)
Page  One  Hundred  and  Ninety-one garden   imagined
Wistaria sleeps on a sunlit wall,
Heavily sprawled at length;
A cataract of jasmine stars
Pours from an arbor down;
In the shadows of a lily-laden pool
Fish like flames dart to and fro—
All this is mine.   Mine, too,
The gaiety of maples
And the mystery of cedars—
For they are there
And the gate is always open.
spring  thoughts  from   at  home
When this rich life ye leave (the prophet saith)
As entered ye the world, so naked go to death:
Possessions—all that moth and rust corrupt—
Must be abandoned with your final breath.
Think you that after painful daily toil
With broom, brush, duster and O'Cedar oil
I hear with anything but heartfelt glee
That the next world of treasures shall be free?
Page  One   Hundred   and   Ninety-two METROPOLITAN
BUSINESS COLLEGE
Special Summer Courses for University Students at low Summer Rates
422 Richards St. Trinity 933
VANCOUVER, B. C.
1 ^H
it
\wL\
_.
lii
"Leaden Since 1888"
Filing Systems
and Office
Equipment
Desks, Chairs, Files, Safes, Lockers, Shelving, Partitions,
Bookcases. Filing Systems and Supplies
Made in Canada
^FFICESPECIALTYMmfi-
NEWMARKET. CANADA
Vancouver  Branch:
536   How*   Street Telephone   Seymour   2403
Printing
and
Engraving
of  the
HIGHEST
QUALITY
Social Stationery    Dance Programs
Announcements and Invitations
Fountain Pens
Educational Stationery
Slide Rules, Etc.
The (ime & Stuart (o. Ltd.
PRINTERS AND STATIONERS
550 Seymour Street Vancouver, B. C.
GRADUATES,
EXECUTIVES,
FACULTY,
JUNIORS,
FRATERNITY,
SORORITY
and SPORT
—OVER 1000
PORTRAITS IN
the 1937 TOTEM.
iVtatwud 6y    /
Trinity 633
933 WEST GEORGIA STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Ninety-three day in the life of an artsman
8.10 Up
8.20 Stewed prunes, shredded wheat, bacon, toast, coffee
8.35 Five people with books, in an auto
8.57 Cafeteria
9.02 Professor with acid tongue
9.25 Essay returned—professor with acid pen
10.05 "I was unable to get the book from the Library, sir, but it'll be ready tomorrow
morning . . ."
11.00 Library door goes round and round
11.10 Concentrated study
11.14 "You should have seen her—after we left the house, she came up and said . . ."
11.24 "I thought I'd go over the week-end if anybody could get a car. . ."
11.40 "Going over?"
12.00 Bean soup, pork sausage, mashed potato, stewed rhubarb, coffee
12.20 "The executive is confident that it will be the best party of the year, and
every member has tickets . . . just to show you, the orchestra will . . ."
1.50 "The paper will cover the whole period in detail, and you will be expected to
know thoroughly ..."
2.50 Reserve loan, 2 hours only, not to be taken out of Library building
3.00 "Going down town?"
3.30 "Three here . . ."
4.00 "Aw y'crazy . . . th' only thing about it is 'at it's . . ."
7.00 "Sure, I'm keeping right up—we work in the Library every afternoon . . ."
7.10 "Well, the fees were due last week, and there's a class party, and I had to get
a pair of shoes, and . . ."
7.50 "I thought if you weren't busy we might go down and see . . ."
12.20 "Is there any hurry?"
. . "Good-night"
. . Key under edge of sill
. . Slumber
Page   One   Hundred   and   Ninety-four School of Business Ltd.
wishes the students of the
U. B. C. success
for 1936.
Summer School—
June, July, August
DIETHERS
Limited
Sand and Gravel
True Mix Concrete
Builders' Supplies
Coal
GRANVILLE ISLAND. VANCOUVER. B. C.
Phone Seymour 6761
Athletes would be
wise to buy their
Sporting Goods
from . . .
LISLE   FRASER
Sporting Goods
— Two Stores —
1020 GRANVILLE ST.     719 W. PENDER ST.
Too Many Cooks Spoil the Broth
A  Ljaitt ft-Sutitittfl ^Jaal
WE don't know any recipes for successful soup-making—but we do know how to turn out successful
advertising literature. That's our business, and we specialize in it. We're not only specialists in
each small phase of our business, but in combining the various elements into a satisfactory finished
product. That's the secret of our growth—we can do the whole job, from the planning to the mailing.
Competent Artists; clever Copy-writers who know how to merchandise; Engravers who have been trained
to produce quality with speed; Lithographers working with the latest processes. These, combined with
Typographers and expert Pressmen, assure you of the highest quality at minimum expense. Our special
mailing department is equipped to give you the same high standard of service. Place your requirements
with an institution who can do the whole job under one roof, and eliminate "buck-passing."
Catalogues
Market Letters
Folders
Photo Retouching
Circulars
Menus,
Office Stationery
Halftone and Line Etchings
Mining Reports
Labels
Booklets,
Flat Color Zinc Plates
Prospectuses
Wrappers
Lettering, Layouts
Color Process Plates
Bulletins
Calendars
Illustrations
Color Ben Day
Maps
Package and Label Des
gns
THE SUN PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
ARTISTS      PRINTERS
Telephone Trinity 4111
ENGRAVERS      LITHOGRAPHERS      TYPOGRAPHERS      BOOKBINDERS
Page   One   Hundred   and   Ninety-five a u
• • •
t o g
the   little
r a p h s
dandy acquaintance   char
Great
Minds
Lab.
Partners
People whose
signatures
will give your
book tone
Beautiful
People
Athletes
Page  One   Hundred   and   Ninety-six . help your friends to find themselves
Who rides
out mornings
in the
same car?
Well-wishers
Fraternity
Brothers
and
Sorority
Sisters
and Rowdy
Friends
Personalities
Page   One   Hundred   and   Ninety-seven I shall sing!
Of the victory that is to be,
but will be not.
My song shall be a hymn of battle
To those who go forth;
Hair in the wind, white teeth laughing—
naked,
Who yearn for battle.
It matters not that they shall find no foe,
That the living steel they clench—
blazing,
Will be rust and mould.
My song shall tell of the victory,
that will be not.
Of the heroes;
of the laurels;
of the joy and shouting.
Tree in fine-branched sharpness,
Sky bursts with gold,
Peach clouds, bulked peaks—
Day grows old.
Here is indeed completeness.
Things are all kin.
Great Cod! What magic worlds
Leap up within!
Page   One   Hundred   and   Ninety-eight contents
Dedication
Foreword -
Students' Council
Arts 37   -      -
Commerce 37
Education
Arts 38
Arts 39 -
Arts '40 -
Science 39
3 President's Message
4 Pictorial   -
Faculty
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
15 Undergraduate Executives
SENIOR CLASSES
Agriculture 37
21 Theological Colleges
40 Science 37    -     -
44 Nurses
-----       59
JUNIORS
65 Science 38
Agriculture 38
79
LOWER YEARS
83 Science '40     -
84 Agriculture 39
85 Agriculture '40
5
6
17
45
49
57
16
86
87
88
The Ubyssey
Sport Executives
PUBLICATIONS
91 The Totem
ATHLETICS
94
-      -      -      -       97 Major Sports ------      103
Minor Sports  -      -      -      -      -      -      117
CLUBS AND SOCIETIES
Film Society   -      -      -      -      -      -      131 Parliamentary Forum     -      -      -      - 136
Players' Club   - 132 Phrateres ------- 137
Musical Society     -      -      -      -      -      134 Salisbury Lodge      -      -      -      -      - 138
Minor Clubs and Societies   -      -     -      139
Fraternities
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
153 Sororities -
164
LITERARY
Page  One   Hundred   and   Ninety-nine SUN  PUBLISHING  CO.  LTD.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubcyearb.1-0119012/manifest

Comment

Related Items