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The Totem 1934

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 *V*
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MINISTER OF EDUCATION, PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. GEORGE   MOIR   WEIR PORE WORD
f
JLN THE presentation of this year's
Totem, economy has unfortunately been an important factor.
Nevertheless it is hoped that this volume will serve as a constant reminder to the Graduating Class, to whom we wish every
success, as a future guide to those who will return next year
to continue their studies, and as a perpetuation of the memory
of the days spent within the portals of the University of British
Columbia. H Word to the Graduating Class
TN DAYS like these it would be quite superfluous to repeat the utterance of more
■*■ prosperous times and to remind the Senior Class that Graduation means the
fearless assumption of adult responsibility. Many of you have learnt, even while
you were acquiring a college education, how difficult it is to make one's way in a
time of depression; and those of you who have as yet no personal experience of
such difficulties are likely very soon to encounter them. To have worked with
more than common seriousness and industry for several years, and then to find
it hard to obtain even the least lucrative, the least attractive employment—truly
this is a test of your perseverance and your fortitude.
But it is not sufficient to guard against self-pity or to preserve the resolution
that carries one over the mere personal obstacles.    The community looks to you
Page Three for more than an example of individual enterprise and tenacity. Had you learnt
nothing more in lecture-room and laboratory than a way to outdistance financially
your less privileged fellows, your education had been a sorry and sordid thing.
Study of modern social problems is in itself an act of courage: as educated people you possess more than the ordinary perception of the difficulties and the perils
that confront the community, but if your education is worthy of the name, you will,
undismayed by this deeper realization of the problem, sanely and steadily
endeavour to help the world to reach firmer, higher ground.
Whatever path may be yours to tread, this, at least, you know: courage and
insight and sympathy and faith will be, as they have always been among men,
supremely important. And as I speak thus of the future, my mind dwells for a
moment upon a figure of long ago—that sturdy Roman who was publicly thanked
by his countrymen because, in the dark hour when the Republic reeled beneath the
blows of Hannibal, "he had not despaired concerning the State."
L. S. KLINCK,
President.
Page Four The real permanent tribal record of the West is (the totem.   Here we see
Haidas at work perpetuating some tradition of their family. THE FACULTY OF
rXSj.f'SCIENCE
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DEAN D. BUCHANAN
Page Five Arts 34
ONCE there came to the University of British Columbia a freshman class of which
the sages prophesied, "Yea, verily and forsooth, this class called Arts '34 shall
be a superclass."   And so it came to pass even as they had forseen.
Arts '34 was one of the last classes to go through the ordeal of hazing by the
sophomores. It still remembers the exciting
days of the Stadium Drive with the accompanying hot-dogs, yo-yos and noon-hour dances in
the Gym.
As sophomores. Arts '34 journeyed to North
Vancouver to gather signatures for the petition
against the cut in the government grant.
In the matter of class parties Arts '34 claims
to have no equal. The party held at the Commodore was the first class party to be promoted to the rank of "Junior Prom." The senior
party at the Hotel Georgia on election night
was voted a huge success.
On Presentation Day last Spring, the Arts
'34 representatives were loaded down with
cups and awards received on behalf of their
fellow classmen. In English Rugby '34 claims
such stars as Ken Mercer, Chris Dalton, Gordon Brand, Harry Pearson and Dave Pugh, and
in Canadian Rugby, Dick Farrington, Doug.
Mclntyre and Milton Owen. Other outstanding athletes in the class are those two basketball players George Pringle and Bob MacDonald, Dave Todd and Paul Kozoolin of Soccer fame, Don McTavish, Bill Stott, Max
Stewart, Herb. Barclay and Sid Swift of the Track Club, and the golfer Sandy
Marling. The women, too, were active with Audrey Munton, Myrtle Beatty, Margaret Hall and Violet Mellish in Basketball; Hope Palmer in Badminton; Mary
McLean and Dorothy Rennie (who broke the world's record in plunging) in the
Swimming Club.
Many Arts '34 students share in literary activities. Such able people as Nancy
Symes, Midge Ellis, Margaret Powlett, Gordon Hilker and Olive Norgrove represented the class in the Players' Club. Eleanor Walker, Gordon Stead, Biff McLeod
had leading parts in musical productions. Milt Owen, Nathan Nemetz and Ernest
Brown are our golden-tongued orators. The position of Editor-in-Chief of the
Ubyssey was held by Norman Hacking.
In the field of student government, Mark Collins has held positions on Council
for three years and Milt. Owen for two. Other Council members from '34 are
Dorothy Rennie, Eleanor Walker, Max Stewart and Gordon Stead.
To Dr. Shrum, Honorary President, the executive gives its sincere thanks for
never-failing interest in the four years of activity. In these years lasting friendships
have been formed between the students of Arts '34 and Dr. Shrum.
The executive for the senior year includes Art McLellan, Myrtle Beatty, Roy
Eyre, Olive Norgrove, Nathan Nemetz, Dave Todd and Dorothy McLaren.
DR. G. M. SHRUM
Page Six THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
HADDON W. AGNEW
English Rugby.   Track.   Big Block.
JESSIE W. ALSTON
Honors    in    Classics.     President    Classics    Club.    "H.M.S.
Pinafore."
ARTHUR L. ANDERSON
English and Economics.    Varsity Y.M.C.A.
FREDENA L. ANDERSON
Vice-President in '31.   Tennis Club.   Inter-class Basketball.
Senior '"B" Basketball.
STANLEY H. ANDERSON
Major:  Economics.    Minor:  Government.    Khaki University
Scholarship.    Canadian Rugby.
KATHLEEN J. ARMSTRONG
Victoria.     Major:  Mathematics  and  History.     Maths  Club.
Swimming.
LORNA G. R. ARMSTRONG
Honors  in  History.   Historical  Society.    International  Relations Club.   Vice President Literary Forum.   Musical Society.
KATHLEEN M.  BAKER
Victoria. Honors in Latin and French. University Women's
Scholarship. Alliance Francaise Scholarship. Classics
Club.    Vice-President La Canadienne.    Art Club.
HARRY BARCLAY
Honors  in Biology.    Biological  Discussion Club.    President
Munro Pre-Medical Society.    Ubyssey.
MOLLY BEALL
Honors in Biology (Zoology Option).    Vice-President Biological Discussion Club.   Munro Pre Medical Club.  N.U.S.
Page Seven THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
MYRTLE BEATTY
Latin and English.    Vice President Arts '34.    W.U.E.    Senior
"B" Basketball.
DON T. BELITZKY
CHARLES  HOWARD  BENTALL
Major:   Philosophy.     Minor:   Economics.     Secretary   V.C.U.
President V.C.U.
BETTY A. BLACK
Major:  Philosophy.     Minor:  English.
DAVID W. BLACKALLER
English and Philosophy. Secretary Treasurer Rowing Club.
"H.M.S. Pinafore," "Iolanthe." Philosophy Club. Grass
Hockey.
UNA BLIGH
Bacteriology   and   Chemistry.     Physics   Club.     Chemistry
Society.
GEORGE BLOOR
HILDA M. BONE
JOHN A. BOURNE
Economics and History. Parliamentary Forum. Swimming
Club. English Rugby. Canadian Rugby Big 4. Big Block
Club.
RICHARD A. BRIGGS
President Ice Hockey Club.
Page  Eight THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGINALD  B.  BROMTLEY
Honors in Philosophy.
ERIC C. BROOKS
Biology Honors.
ERNEST W. H. BROWN
History and Economics. International Relations Club. Vice-
President. Parliamentary Forum. McGown Cup Debates.
Member Western Canada Debating Team. President Parliamentary Forum.
YVONNE BROWN
Major: Bacteriology. Minor: Biology. Musical Society. Home
Economic  Club.    Chemistry  Society.    Swimming  Club.
MARY BURDITT
Texada   Island.      Majors:    Mathematics   and    Philosophy.
Minor: English.    Gym Club.    Mathematics Club.
AGNES BURG
French and Latin. L'Allouette.   Classics Club.  Der Deutsche
Verein.
ALEX. G. CAMPBELL
Bacteriology and Biology.
I. MERYL CAMPBELL
Majors: History and Philosophy.    Minor: German.    S.C.M.
PATRICIA CAMPBELL
Nelson. Honors in History. Literary Forum. Historical
Society. Art Club. Tennis. Swimming. Grass Hockey.
La Causerie.
MARJORIE I. CARRICK
Major: Philosophy.    Minor: Latin and German.    Swimming
Club.
Page Nine THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
SARAH CHAN
Victoria.   History and English.   Cosmopolitan Club. Chinese
Students' Club.
CYRIL S. CHAVE
Victoria. Major: History. Minor: English. Players' Club.
President Historical Society. President International Group
of Speakers.
ISOBEL R. CHODAT
MURIEL ELLEN CHRISTIE
German and English.   Art Club.   German Club.   Vice-President Outdoors Club.
ROSE CHU
English and Education.    International Relations Club.   Vice-
president Cosmopolitan Club.
MARGARET P. CLARK
MARY COOK
Philosophy   and   Education.     Literary   Forum.     Art   Club.
Classics Club.    Reporter on Ubyssey.
BEATRICE M. COOKE
M. FAITH K. CORNWALL
Victoria.   Honors in Latin and Mathematics.   Vice-President
Arts Club.    Maths Club.    Swimming Club.    Outdoors Club.
MARGARET COTTER
Page Ten THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
WILLIAM S. CREAMER
Major:  Mathematics.    Manager Senior Soccer Team.
WINNIFRED M CREIGHTON
CONSTANCE  L.  CRUMP
French  and   History.
AGNES D. DAVIE
Major: English.   Minor: German.    Letters Club.   Publications
Board.    Swimming Club.
ETHEL N. DAVIS
Major: Latin.    Minor: French.    Classics Club.    L'Allouette.
Gym Club.
CHARLES  E.  DENNE
Powell   River.     Major:   Physics   and   Chemistry.     Manager
Junior Soccer.    Vice President Soccer Club.
ARTHUR W. DOBSON
GWLADYS DOWNES
Victoria.    Honors in French.    Letters Club.    Art Club.    La
Canadienne.    L'Alliance Francaise.    Khaki Bursary.
PAULINE EDGE-PARTINGTON
Nanaimo.   Vice-President Newman Club.    Golf Club.
IRENE GRACE ELGIE
French and English.    La Causerie,
Page Eleven THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNIE A. ENSOR
Latin and English.    Classics Club.    Philosophy Club.    Cosmopolitan Club.    Gym Club.
REBECCA  ERENBERG
Bacteriology and Chemistry.
REYNOLDS ESLER
Major:   English.    Minor:  Latin.     Musical  Society.     "Pirates
of Penzance,"  "H.M.S.  Pinafore."    Players' Club.
ARNOLD B. CLIFF
Major: History. Business Manager Basketball Club (Dominion Champions). Advertising Manager Canadian Rugby
Club.    Players' Club.
WILLIAM FARENHOLTZ
E. LORRAINE FARQUHAR
Victoria.   English and History.   Players' Club.  Der Deutsche
Verein.    Secretary-Treasurer Gym Club.
JANEY N. FINDLAY
Majors: Latin and French.   Minor: English.   Literary Forum.
Classics Club,
ROBERT A. FINDLAY
Chemistry.    Secretary  Chemistry  Society.     S.C.M.    Chess
Club.
FLORENCE B. FOELLMER
"H.M.S. Pinafore," "Iolanthe," "Mikado."
M ANNIE FOTHERGILL
History   and   French.     Historical   Club.     Literary   Forum.
S.C.M.    Cosmopolitan Club   Gym Club.
Page Twelve THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
B. A. EILEEN FULTON
English, French and Latin.
ELIZABETH GAGE
Slocan.   History and Latin.   Classics Club.   Art Club.  Gym
Club.
DOROTHY I. GALLOWAY
English and History.    Philosophy Club.    International Relations Club.    Cosmopolitan Club.
ROBERT W. GAUL
Treasurer Men's Athletic Executive. Vice President Men's
Athletic Executive. McKechnie Cup English Rugby. Big
Block, Track.
THOMAS E. GAUTIER
JOHN D. GRANT
Honors in English.    Letters Club.
JOHN G. GRAY
JOHN D. GREGSON
Courtney.    Honors in Zoology.    Biological Discussion Club.
President Outdoors Club.    Musical Society Orchestra.
ANDREW GUTHRIE
Ladysmith. Honors in Mathematics and Physics. Parliamentary Forum. I.R.C. Physics Club. Mathematics Club.
C.O.T.C.   Soccer.
ARTHUR H. HALL
Majors:   Economics   and   History.     Golf  Club.     Pep  Club.
President Newman Club.
Page Thirteen THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
RUTH CHEESEMAN
NORMAN R. HACKING
Honors   in   History.     Canadian   Club   History   Scholarship.
Senior Editor.    Editor-in-chief Publications.
MARGARET C. HALL
Majors: Mathematics and Philosophy.    Secretary Basketball
Club.    Senior "A" Basketball.
MARY E. HANNING
MARGARET B. HARLEY
English and Philosophy.    Gym Club.    V.C.U.
ARTHUR M HARPER
Senior  "B"  Basketball.
DOROTHY Z. HARRIS
Victoria.    Bacteriology and Chemistry.    Grass Hockey.
T. ALLAN HARRISON
Honors in Chemistry.    Chemistry Society.    Gym Club.
MARGARET McL HENDERSON
Cranbrook. Physics and Mathematics. Physics Club. Math.
Club. Cosmopolitan Club. S.C.M. Vice-President. Grass
Hockey.
JOSEPHINE M. HENNING
Page Fourteen THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
HAROLD H. HERD
BERTRAND B. HILLARY
Honors in Biology (Botany Option).
J. GILBERT HOOLEY
Honors in Chemistry.    Chemistry Society.    Outdoors Club.
CLARENCE C. HULLEY
Hartney,  Man.    Major: History.    Minor: English.
CLIFTON P. IDYLL
Major: Chemistry. Minor: Zoology. Chemistry Society. Biological Discussion Club. Swimming Club. Tennis Club.
Senior "B" Basketball.
GERTRUDE L. INGHAM
BEULAH M. JAMES
Major: English.    Minor: Economics and English.    Swimming
Club.   Players' Club.   Musical Society.   Philosophy Club.
MARJORIE B. JENKINS
Majors: English and French.   La Causerie.
M. WINNIFRED JOHNSTON
Majors: Latin and French. La Causerie. S.C.M. Classics
Club.    Cosmopolitan Club.    Gym Club.
MARY KATO
Philosophy and English. L'AUouette. S.C.M. International
Relations Club. Cosmopolitan Club. Japanese Students
Qub.
Page Fifteen THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
WILLIAM KEENLEYSIDE
M. PATRICIA KERR
English and Philosophy.    Editor 1933 Totem.    Senior Editor.
MAURICE G. KLINKHAMER
Honors in French.    Minor: Latin.   President La Canadienne.
Track.
S. KORENAGA
Major: Chemistry.
PAUL KOZOOLIN
Tientsin, China. English and French. Captain Senior Soccer (3 years). B. C. Junior Badminton Champion. Big Block
Club.
IRENEE E. LAMBERT
Sidney.    History and English.    Tennis Club.
HAROLD LANDO
Economics Honors.    Players' Club.    English Rugby.   Tennis.
Rowing.    Parliamentary Forum.
F. MARY LATTA
ISABEL LAUDER:
Merritt. Biology and Chemistry. Musical Society. Biological Discussion Club. Literary Forum. Vice-President Chemistry Club.
C. GORDON T. LEA
Players' Club.
Page Sixteen THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
ELEANOR SARAH LEACH
English,   Latin   and   French.     Classics   Club.     L'AUouette.
President Literary Forum.
PHYLLIS E. G. LECKIE
Major: French.    Minor: English.
ELSPETH LEHMAN
Honors in English and French.    Letters Club.    Parliamentary
Forum.    La Causerie.
VERA LITTLE
HARRY LOTZKAR
HELEN E. LOWE
Bacteriology and Chemistry.    Home Economics Club.    Vice-
President W.U.E.    Secretary Arts  '34 in  1931.
JEAN A. LOWRENCE
English and History.    Art Club.    Swimming Club.
E. A. GEORGE LUXTON
Victoria.     President   International   Relations   Club.     Parliamentary Forum.    S.C.M.
MARGARET E. MARLATT
Major: Philosophy.   Minor: English.   Badminton.   Philosophy
Club.   Literary Forum.
ALEX.  J.  MARLING
Victoria.    Honors  in  Mathematics.    Players'  Club.    President  Golf  Club.    Rowing  Club.
Page Seventeen THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
M. JUANITA MILLER
JAMES F. MUIR
Victoria.    Mathematics Club.    Swimming Club.
F. AUDRY MUNTON
French and Latin.   La Causerie.    Senior 'B" and Senior "A"
Basketball.   President Women's Basketball Club.   Big Block.
HOWARD G. MacALLISTER
JOSEPHINE McDIARMID
Bacteriology   and   Chemistry.     Chemistry   Society.     Vice-
President Big Block Club.    Swimming Club Secretary.
Robert s. Mcdonald
Economics and Government.    Senior "A" Basketball.
robert a. McDonnell
J. INNES MACDOUGALL
Major Mathematics.    Minor: Physics.    Treasurer Parliamentary Forum.    Math Club.    Reporter "Ubyssey."
RICHARD B. McDOUGALL
Economics and English.    International Relations Club.   Vice-
President  Parliamentary  Forum.    Radio  Debate.
KATHLEEN A. MacFARLANE
Page Eighteen THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
WILLIAM H. MACKENZIE
English and French.
D. F. MacINTYRE
WILLIAM M. McGILL
Mathematics and French.    Canadian Club Bursary.   Senior
Soccer.    Boxing Club.    Badminton.
WILLIAM MacINNES
Canadian Rugby.    Shooting,  R.M.S.  in  C.O.T.C.
RUTH MACKAY
Majors: French and German.    Minor: Philosophy.    Musical
Society.    L'AUouette.    Der Deutsche Verein.
MARGARET MACKAY
History and English.
WILLIAM McKEOWN
English and History.
DONALD J. McKINLEY
Major: Economics.    Minor: Philosophy.    Rowing Club.    Ice
Hockey.    Canadian Rugby.    Swimming.
NATHANIEL NEMETZ
Honors in History. McGown Cup Debater (4 times). Exchange Editor. Advertising Manager Ubyssey. Stadium
Investigation Committee.
ELMA M. NEWCOMB
Page Nineteen
jrti*
£ifii THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
PATRICIA MacKINNON
DOROTHY McLAREN
Victoria.     Majors:  Mathematics  and  History.     Math.   Club.
Athletic Representative.    Swimming Club, Gym Club.
SCOTT McLAREN
Economics and Government.
RUTH D. McLENNAN
Latin,  Mathematics,  English.    Classics Club.    Maths Club.
Gym Club.
ARTHUR K. MACLEOD
English History and Education. Senior "B" Basketball. President Basketball Club. Vice-President Musical Society.
"Iolanthe," "Mikado."
PAULINE K. McMARTIN
Major:   Bacteriology.      Minor:    Biology.      Swimming   Club.
Inter-class Basketball.    Munro Pre-medical Club.
ROBERT J.  McMASTER
Economics and Philosophy. Treasurer and President S.C.M.
President Cosmopolitan Club.    Grass Hockey.
DONALD S. McTAVISH
History and Economics. Players' Club. Advertising Manager Publications Board. Canadian Rugby. English Rugby.
President Track Club.
G. MORLEY NEAL
Victoria.    Honors in Zoology.    Biological Discussion Club.
President Victoria College.    Players' Club.
ELSIE L. NELSON
Page Twenty THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
IVAN NIVEN
Honors in Mathematics.   Physics Club.   Maths Club.   Swimming Club.
TOM NIVAN
OLIVE NORGROVE
Latin and History. Players' Club. Letters Club. W.U E.
Vice-President '34 in  1933;  Secretary '34.
DAVID MILTON OWEN
Major: Economics. Minor: History and English. Class
Treasurer in '30. President of class in '31. Junior Member.
President Men's Undergrad. Debates. McKechnie Cup
Rugby.    Big 4 Rugby.    Big Block Club.
GUY S. PALMER
Zoology Honors.    Biological Discussion Club.    Chess Club.
Scribe of the Papyrus, Thoth Club.    Ubyssey, Muck Editor.
HOPE E. PALMER
Badminton.
JOHN L. M. PARNELL
MARGARET J. REID
Latin and English.    Vice-President Tennis Club.
MARGARET  W.  REID
Honors in French. Classics Club. German Club. Secretary-
Treasurer La Causerie.   Gym Club.
DOROTHY J. RENNIE
Mathematics, Latin and Philosophy. Swimming Club. Athletic Representative Arts '34. Big Block. President Women's
Athletics.
Page Twenty-one THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
ELIZABETH M PATMORE
Mathematics, English and History.
DOROTHY S. PEARSON
Nanaimo.   Major: English.   Minor: French.   Musical Society.
President L'AUouette.
DOUGLAS W. PERKINS
DONALD S. PERLEY
THEODORE S. PLUMMER
Honors in English.    Letters Club.
MARGARET H. E. POWLETT
Secretary Players' Club.
GEORGE  R.  PRINGLE
English    and    Philosophy.      Intermediate    "B"    Basketball.
Senior "B" and Senior "A" Basketball.
DANIEL C. QUIGLEY
Economics and English.   Players' Club.    Swimming Club.
GLADYS REAY
Nanaimo.    English and History.
HELEN MARY REID
History and English.
Page Twenty-two THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
ALICE G. ROBERTS
Honors in Latin. McGill Graduates Scholarship. 'H.M.S.
Pinafore." L'AUouette, Secretary-Treasurer. Classics Club.
Gym Club.
HARRY NASH ROBERTS
Vernon.    Major: Economics.    Minor:  French.    Boxing Club.
Swimming Club.    C.O.T.C.
MARY G. ROBERTS
DORIS ROBINSON
Majors: French and English.    Minor: Philosophy.    La Caus
erie.    Swimming Club.
BERYL ROGERS
English and History.    Players' Club.    Gym Club.
DAVID ROME
MARIAN E. G. ROSS
DORIS MURIEL SALTER
Major: English.    Minor: Philosophy.    Art Club.    Badminton.
CATHERINE E. SANDERSON
English,    Psychology    and    Economics.     Musical    Society.
Swimming Club.
WILLIAM SCHULTZ
Page Twenty three THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
MILTON SHARE
Major: Chemistry.    Minor: Zoology.    President Menorah Society.    Munro Pre-Medical Club.    Tennis.
M. FRANCES G. SIMMS
Vernon.    Latin, French and Mathematics.    Badminton Club.
L'AUouette.    Classics Club.
PETER SIMONDS
Victoria.    Ice Hockey Secretary.    Tennis.    Track.
JOHN H. SLATER
DOROTHY R. M. SMITH
Major: Botany. Minor: Zoology. Vice-President Biological
Discussion Club. Chemistry Society. Munro Pre-Medical
Club.    Outdoors Club.
MERVYN M. SMITH
Vernon.    Mathematics and Physics.    Maths Club.    Physics
Club.   Gym Club.
RICHARD G. SMITH
SIDNEY W. SMITH
JESSIE A. SOUTH
Penticton.    French and Latin.    Classics Club.    L'AUouette.
KAY F. SPENCE
Physics and Chemistry.    Senior    B" Basketball.
Page Twenty-four THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
J. ALLAN SPRAGGE
GORDON WILSON STEAD
Honors in Economics. Players' Club. "Iolanthe," "Mikado,"
"H.M.S. Pinafore." President L.S.E. President Combined
Graduating Class of 1933. President Commerce Men's Undergrad. English Rugby. Tennis. Badminton. Men's Athletic Executive (2 years).   C.S.M. in C.O.T.C.
MAXWELL McL. STEWART
History and Economics.   Historical Society.   President M.A.E.
President Track Club.    English Rugby.    Track.    Ice Hockey.
WILHEMTNA P. STOKVIS
G. GORDON STRONG
Honors in Economics.    Golf.    Swimming.    Ice Hockey.
RIGENDA SUMIDA
Major: Economics.    Minor: Philosophy.    President Japanese
Students' Club.    Treasurer Japanese Y.M.C.A.
JOHN SUMNER
Former President International Relations Club.    Parliamentary Forum.    Intercollegiate Debate.    English Rugby.
JAMES O. SWAN
Nanaimo.    Ma.'or: History.    Minor: English.
NANCY I. SYMES
President Players' Club.
YUKIO TAKAHASH1
Victoria.    Players' Club.    International Relations Club    Letters  Club.    S.C.M.
Page Twenty-five THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHRISTOPHER L. TAYLOR
Mathematics and English.
KENNETH M. TELFORD
MEGAN THOMAS
Majors: Philosophy and Education.
MARGARET THOMPSON
Victoria.   Honors in Latin and French.    Classics Club.
VIOLET K. THOMSON
French Honors. President La Causerie (2 years). Classics
Club. Vice-President German Club. Musical Society
Orchestra.    Gym Club.
GRACE V. THROWER
Majors: History and French.    Minor: English.    International
Relations Club.    Literary Forum.    L'AUouette.
MARY TMPERLEY
Majors: English and French. Minors: German and Philosophy. Musical Society. S.C.M. Art Club. Literary Forum.
Cosmopolitan Club.
DAVID PARKER TODD
Senior Soccer. President Tennis Club. President Boxing Club.
KENNETH G. TRYON
PHYLLIS W. TURNER
Page Twenty-six THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
RITSUKO R. UCHIYAMA
English   and   German.     S.C.M.     Art   Club.     Der   Deutsche
Verein.    International Relations Club.
EDGAR VICK
GEORGE M VOLKOFF
Harbin, Manchukuo. Honors in Physics and Mathematics.
Royal Institution Scholarship. Terminal City Scholarship.
University Scholarship.    President Physics Club.
E. MADELINE WADE
Major: Bacteriology.    Minor: Biology.
MURIEL WALES
Honors in Physics.    Physics Club.
ELEANOR WALKER
President Women's Undergraduate Society.
ROBERT C. W. WARD
DAVID WESTON
Cranbrook.    Chemistry  Society.    Tennis.     Ice  Hockey.
PHYLLIS J. WESTOVER
History, English and French. Literary Forum. Historical
Society. Vice-President La Causerie. Vice-President Gym
Club.
D. MACKAY WHITELAW
Major: English.    Minor: Economics.    Letters Club President.
Golf Club.    Cox Varsity Eight.
Treasurer La Causerie.    Gym Club.
Page Twenty-seven THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
RUBY E. WILLIAMS
Ma.ors: French and History. Minors: German and Philosophy. Secretary and Librarian V.C.U. L'AUouette French
productions.
ERNEST C. DUFF WILSON
Victoria.     Economic   and   English.     International   Relations
Club.    Treasurer S.C.M.    Badminton Club.    Golf Club.
JESSIE C. WILSON
Honors in French.    La Causerie.    Classics Club.
J. NORTON WILSON
Honors in Chemistry.    President Chemistry Society.    S.C.M.
Chess Club.    Ubyssey Reporter.
SOPHIE W. WITTER
Major: English.   Minor: Philosophy.    V.C.U.    "Pirates of Penzance," "H.M.S. Pinafore," "Iolanthe."
SYBIL ANNIE YATES
English and History.    Basketball.    Track.    Swimming.
Honors in Chemistry.    Chemistry Society.    Track.
TSUGI YOSHIMURA
GILBERT YOW
Major: Chemistry.
ANNE M. ZUBACK
French and Latin.   La Causerie.   Classics Club.   Basketball.
Track.
ROBERT M. ESLER
Page Twenty eight THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
FREDERIC D. BOLTON
Players'  Club.    Big  4 Canadian  Rugby (5  years).    Senior
ARCHIE DICK
President Canadian Rugby Club.
ELENA B. MacDONALD
DORIS K. McDIARMID
English   and   French.     "Iolanthe."     L'AUouette.     Art  Club.
Ubyssey.    Badminton  Club.
KATHERINE L. ROBERTS
ALICE F. WILSON
Page Twenty-nine Etthe totem^-t:
President
Vice President
Arts '35
LAST class to undergo the torments of the old-style initiation, Arts '35 came into
being in the hectic days of "big petition year." The Juniors look back upon
their beginnings with satisfaction. Perhaps it was the discipline, perhaps the very
real menace to the University at the time; but be that as it may, the spirit which
the class showed at its inception has not been allowed to lapse.
'35 is well represented in most branches of student activity. On Council we
have Murray Mather, and our athletes include such aces as Murray Little and
Frank Alpin, basketball, Jimmy Pyle, English Rugby, and Sid Swift and Bill Patmore,
track.
Among the women, Claire Brown has done excellent work this year in connection with the Co-ed, while Margaret Cunningham scintilates in Players' Club
performances.   Nancy Miles conducts a spicy and popular column in the Ubyssey.
In spite of financial difficulties, the class party, held at the Spanish Grill for
the first time in University history, was a marked success. Expenses were covered,
and the Executive even reports a few dollars on the right side of the ledger.
When it comes to honorary presidents, '35 rates the cream of the crop with none
other than the immortal Dr. G. G. Sedgewick, the most popular man on the campus.
To him the class extends its thanks for valuable advice and help on many occasions.
Harold Johnson has shown himself to be an altogether capable class president. Backing him on the Executive are: Ardy Beaumont, Vice-President; Margaret Winter, Secretary; Henry Clayton, Treasurer; Arthur Mayse, Literary Representative, Jean Thomas; Women's Athletic Representative, and Sidney Swift,
Men's Athletic Representative.
A class of fair women and mighty men; and if you disagree, just watch us
next year .... especially when our "back-to-the-gown" movement gets under way!
Page Thirty ■A^i^ITi
IJNtVlntSWXrOOlTiSirttfLIJMBIA^i
.
President
Vice President
Arts '36
ARTS '36 has a unique boast that it has no less than seven members on the Arts
'36 executive, which they justly claim is the best in existence, and which includes Tim Ferris, President; Kay Bourne, Vice-President; Bruce Robinson, Treasurer;
Darrel Gomery, Secretary; Molly Locke and Allan Mercer, Athletic Representatives;
and Margaret Buchanan, Literary Representative.
This year they vowed a solemn vow to put over their party single-handed,
which remarkable feat, after three weeks of determined collecting and one complete
evening spent in personally phoning every member of the class, was voted a success, although the function lacked refreshments.
Members of the class in the Players' Club are: Masala Cosgrave, who takes
the lead in Caesar and Cleopatra, Molly Locke, Margaret Buchanan, Eleanor
Bossy, Audrey Phillips, Margaret Ecker, Mina Bodie, Betty Muscovich, Violet
Ferris, Lyall Vine, L. Allen, T. Burch, L. Stewart, D. Fulton, B. Thomson. On the
Publications Board we shine equally as well, having in our midst no less than a
Totem Editor, a Senior Editor, a Sport Editor, a Muck Editor (oh, sad disgrace), and
reporters innumerable. While the future generation would be quite willing to place
the government in the hands of one James Ferris, who has represented the University at the Inter-collegiate debate at Winnipeg.
In the Canadian Rugby uniforms can be seen any early morning the following
stalwarts: F. Price, P. Patterson, H. Poole, G. Snelling, and R. Begg. While at the
time of going to press we have turned out for the McKechnie Cup team Al. Mercer
and Ed. Maguire. In other realms of sport we field such men as L. Wilson, Stadiotti,
J. Martin and others of no less fame.
Arts '36 votes itself the most up and coming class in the University, bar none,
so what does it matter if the rest of the student body disagree.
What's the matter with '36?   We're all right!    Who's all right?    ARTS '36!
Page Thirty-one President
Vice-President
Arts '37
THE AZTEC BALLROOM of the Hotel Georgia, the syncopated strains of Earle
Hill's Orchestra, felicitous faces of fastidious freshmen and freshettes as they
flayed the fantastic, these were the features of the Freshman Informal held on
George Washington's 201st birthday, under the patronage of Dean and Mrs.
Buchanan, Professor and Mrs. Wood, and Dean M. L. Bollert. Need you be reminded
that it was the only spring informal with a supper or that it was conceded the best
class party of the year?
Freshmen demonstrated their high class spirit by taking leading part in all
the various extra-curricular activities on this campus. Representing the class on
the Pub. were Clarence Idyll, Donna Lucas, Stuart Devitt, Alan Walsh, Connie Baird,
John Logan, Freth Edmonds, Warren James, and Pauline Patterson.
The Musical Society was honored by the membership of the following freshettes: Anne Macleod, Phyllis Cosens, Betty Street, Margaret Atkinson, Kay Darby,
and Pauline Patterson, and the freshmen: Jack Worthington, Gordon Freeman, John
Logan, Jack Sanders, Callum Thompson, and Bill English.
Representing the Class on the Players' Club were: Elinor Gibson, Ethelyne
Chandler, Lloyd Hobden, Pat Larsen, Amy Seed, Connie Baird, Allan Walsh, Don
Ingham, Norm McDiarmid, Louise Kennedy and Peggy Naysmith.
It was in the field of sport that Freshmen became the by-word for victory.
Making the Rugby teams were: Ed. Maguire, Ed. Kendall, John Harrison, Norm
Hager, Eric Kenny, Jack Cox, Gordon Crosby, and Fred Wood. Basketball was
graced by the presence of Frank Hay, Ralph Henderson, John Logan, Harold Phair,
Clarence Idyll. Track was aided by McCammon and Lambert, and among the
natators were Marg Smith and Bill Rae.
This super-class (to quote the Ubyssey) was fortunate enough to be under the
Honorary Presidentship of one "Freddy Wood." The freshman government was in
the hands of Freth Edmonds, President; Connie Baird, Vice-President; Dot Eastman,
Secretary; Bruce Bardwell, Treasurer; Beth Evans, Women's Athletic Rep.; Clarence
Idyll, Men's Athletic Rep., and Ludlow Beamish, Literary Rep.
Page Thirty-two £__^__
i ffrt       rmh ft^5"^    , ■        tr.t~^m
President
Vice-President
Education '34
T rERY LITTLE is seen on the campus of Education '34, chiefly because its members
» are too busy flitting from lecture to lecture, and also because they are not at
the University part of the time. But nevertheless it is one of the best organized
classes in the student body. Bob Osborne holds the post of President, while Molly
Bardsley assists as Vice-President. Helen Jackson acts as scribe and cashier and
has under her the two class athletic representatives, Helen Ferguson and Deny
Tye, and Anna Fulton.
Interclass sport is one field where the embryo teachers make a decided impression. At present the class soccer squad is at the head of the Arts league and the
basketball team is shaping up finely under the direction of Harold West. To the
feminine members of the year goes the highest honor yet won by the class. Their
skating relay team won its event at the Rotary Ice Carnival and now Helen Ferguson, Lou Harper, Mildred Kastner, Anna Fulton and Morea Bowles have nice
shiny medals as souvenirs. The Women's Interclass Basketball League contains a
team from Education '34.
In the field of social events the pedagogues also do their part. A class theatre
party was the first event of the season and the others have yet to come, but the
Entertainment Committee plans a hike and another class party.
Other ways in which the Teacher Training Class is making its mark on the
campus are varied. Chief amongst these are the Library Endowment for works pertaining to topics in teaching, and the skit presented at Homecoming. Besides these
worthy endeavors, the class gives an at-home on Mondays and Thursdays in the
gymnasium.
Page Thirty three fcTtiETOTEMz^
bimt A-
Commerce 34
A GREATER area than Vancouver is represented in the 1934 class for "bigger and
better" business men. The Okanagan contributed the speedy Hyland, from
New Westminster we have Howard Jones, and from Burnaby we welcomed the
one and only George Jones, statistician de luxe. Lake Cowichan sent us Gordie
Brand, a forester and man of many parts. Victoria deemed a triumvirate to be necessary and
sent Campbell, Crothall, and Purves. To prove
that we are really "Pacific-minded," we asked
Ikuta and Korenaga from Japan to join the
parade.
Commerce '34 has maintained the Commerce tradition of a high per capita ratio of
campus celebrities. When leaders are wanted
we supply them—at no extra charge (special
discounts for large quantities). Mark Collins,
president of the A.M.S., is numbered among
the comptometer experts. (We leave other
Commerce classes to partake of the glory of
A.M.S. Treasurer Jack Shaneman and President L. S. E. Gordon Stead). Art McClellan,
president of Arts '34, and Roy Eyre, treasurer
of Arts '34, are also chefs-to-be in the school
for balance-sheet cookers. They have worthy
assistants in Gordie Hilker, of Pep Club and
Players' Club fame, and Dick Farrington, captain of the Varsity Canadian Rugby squad.
Nor can we forget the work of such athletes as PR    ■ '■   ■
Bill Stott (Varsity's fastest human), Doug McCrimmon (Varsity hoopster), Hughie
Smith (soccer star), and Messrs. Henderson, Mercer, Pearson, Pugh, Dalton, Brand
& Co., of rugby renown. Sanderson and McCadden are leading golfers. They
undertake to get the signature on the dotted line if all else fails. They are great
men on an adding machine and have been known to carry one round the course—
just to practise on. Our influence has penetrated to even the Pub. office. There we
have Jack Balcombe, Ubyssey advertising manager (also secretary of soccer),
Howard Jones, assistant sports editor, and Elmer Simpson, circulation manager of
the Ubyssey.
So our activities are many and varied. Having more than supplied our quota
of campus statesmen, athletes, pubsters, etc., etc., we turn to music. Behold then,
Try on and Turvey, as they lead the chorus in Applied Science 100 in that pathetic
little ballad, "Is Your White Ticket Yellower Than Mine." Or Arthur, Boyes, Lydiatt
and Millar, in a special rendition of "Blue Monday, You Sure Ain't a Credit To Me."
We owe a great deal to Misses Balfour, Hutchinson, and Morley. As our only
refining influence, they have carried a heavy load. Miss Balfour is our last word
in arguments about Statistics.
To Professor Day we are sincerely grateful. He has set a high standard and
freely given of his time and energy to help us in our attempts to rise to that standard.
Our debt to Professor Angus, Dr. Carrothers, Professor Drummond, Mr. Field, and
Mr. Collins, is no less real. The Economics Department is making the B. Com.
degree (U.B.C.) a degree of which we may well be proud. It will be up to the
holders of that degree to make the business community of our province proud of it
also.
Page Thirty-four THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
KELVIN M. ARTHUR
Players' Club.    Canadian Rugby.
JACK K. BALCOMBE
Circulation Manager Ubyssey.    Advertising Manager Ubyssey.    Secretary Soccer Club.
JEAN BALFOUR
ROBERT  LIONEL   BOYES
Commerce.
A. GORDON BRAND
President   English   Rugby   Club.    McKechnie   Cup   Rugby.
Big Block.
DAVID D. CAMPBELL
MARK COLLINS
Treasurer A.M.S. (2 years).   President A.M.S.   Vice-President
N.F.C.U.S.    Players' Club.    Canadian Rugby.
WILLIAM L. CORNWALL
WILLIAM CROTHALL
CHRISTOPHER A. J. DALTON
Ice Hockey.    McKechnie Cup Rugby.    Big Block.
Page Thirty-five THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
C. A. ROY EYRE
Vice-President  Canadian  Rugby  Club.    Canadian  Rugby.
Treasurer Arts '34.
RICHARD T. FARRINGTON
Captain Big 4 Canadian Rugby.   Big Block.
GEORGE HENDERSON
Secretary  M.A.E.  Canadian Rugby Big  4.    Big  Block.
J. GORDON HILKER
CLARA K. HUTCHISON
JAMES N. HYLAND
KATSUTARO QCUTA
Kobe, Japan.
GEORGE F. JONES
HOWARD JONES
Senior City Canadian Rugby.    Assistant Sport Editor.
YUJIRO KORENAGA
Page Thirty-six THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
T. EVANS LOUGHEED
WALTER M. LYDIATT
Senior City Canadian Rugby.
R. KENDALL MERCER
Captain English Rugby.  McKechnie Cup Rugby.   Big Block.
JAMES McK. MILLAR
Players' Club.    Ubyssey.
EVA E. MORLEY
Musical Society.    Gym Club.
CHARLES McCADDEN
Varsity Golf Champion.    Secretary-Treasurer Golf Club.
"W. ARTHUR McCLELLAN
President Arts  '34.    "Iolanthe,"  "H.M.S.  Pinafore."
DOUGLAS F.  McCRIMMON
Senior   City   Canadian   Rugby.     Big   4   Canadian   Rugby.
Intermediate "A" Basketball.    Senior "A" Basketball.
HAROLD B. PEARSON
McKechnie Cup Rugby.   Big 4 Canadian Rugby.   Big Block.
DAVID V. PUGH
McKechnie Cup English Rugby.
Page Thirty-seven THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
DONALD F. PURVES
Victoria.    President Commerce Class.
GEORGE B. SANDERSON
English Rugby.   Golf Club.   Track.   C.O.T.C.
W. ELMER SIMPSON
Tennis.    Swimming Club.    Circulation Manager Ubyssey.
HUGHIE L. SMITH
Track, Junior and Senior Soccer,
WILLIAM G. STOTT
Track Club.    Vice-President Commerce Club.
KENNETH G. TRYON
JOHN NELLIS TURVEY
Musical Society.    Manager Canadian Rugby Club.    President Skating Club.    Ubyssey Business Staff.
Page Thirty-eight THE FACULTY OF
PLIED SCIENCE
Page Thirty-nine Science 34
'"pHE general trend of the history of an engineering class seems to be that fewer
and fewer learn more and more about less and less.   Carried to the limit, this
would probably end with nobody knowing everything about nothing.   But University careers are too short to necessitate evaluating the limit of the function.
Speaking of University careers, ours are
nearly over, and speculating on the future, at
times, does not seem as interesting as reminiscencing on the past.
How times change! Once upon a time,
1930, or thereabouts, we belonged to the best
second year class of redshirts that ever pulled
the pants off a panting artsman, or gave a nonplussed professor a sizzling skyrocket. At that
time the halls of the various buildings were
haunted with a few conceited seniors. Now we
have reached our final year and look with disdain upon the lower years removing artsmen's
pants with a lack of finesse which we never
displayed.
Five years at University have taught us a
lot (especially those of us who are far from
home). Among our accomplishments are such
things as borrowing a fellow boarder's tux without starting a world war, obtain
caf coffee on credit, and ability to haggle over second-hand books. In our extra-
curicular activities we have learned things which should prove of great value to us
in the next few years. Whether we can analyse a solution, design a bridge, or
manage a mine is neither here nor there. We probably won't have a chance to
even try such things for some time.
As University careers must end, so must this write-up, and having finished both,
we will leave this house of learning. What is in store for us we do not know, but
armed with a few dog-eared text-books, several dozen pages of more or less legible
notes, and a beribboned sheepskin, we will set forth to conquer the world.
PROF. F. A. WILKIN
Page Forty THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
GORDON M  ANDERSON
Chemical Engineering. Swimming Club. Intermediate Canadian Rugby. Big 4 Canadian Rugby. Vancouver Chemical
Society.
JOHN E. ARMSTRONG
JAMES M BARDSLEY
Senior "A" Basketball.    Big Block.
ALFRED J. BOWERING
Civil Engineering.
COURTENAY E. CLEVELAND
Geology Engineering.   Secretary G. M. Dawson Club.
JOHN UTTING COPEMAN
Civil Engineering.
JOHN DEANE
Electrical Engineering.    Secretary Outdoors Club.    Rowing
Club.
WALTER BRIAN DINGLE
Civil Engineering.
PETER J. DURKIN
HARRY S. EDWARDS
Page Forty one THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
J. JECKELL FAIRLEY
Civil   Engineering     President   Science   '34     President   Outdoors Club.
LORNE G. S. FORD
Chemistry.    Chemistry  Society.
RICHARD R. HILTON
Electrical Engineering.    Chairman Radio Section.    A.I.E.E.
PATRICK M HURLEY
WILLIAM E. HUSKINS
Chemical  Engineering.    Speakers'  Club.    Engineering  Society.    Sport Reporter.    Big 4 Canadian Rugby.
RONALD F. HYND
Electrical Engineering.
WILLIAM INGLIS
Civil Engineering.
ERIC W. JOHNSON
Metallurgy.
C. ARTHUR A. LYND
DOUGLAS V. MANLEY
Chemical Engineering.    Ski Team Captain.    Ubyssey Sport
Reporter.
Page Forty-two The totem
university of british columbia
ERNEST A. MITCHELL
Chemical   Engineering.     Engineering    Socie'.y.      Outdoors
Club.    Skiing.    Canadian Rugby.
JACK D. MITCHELL
Electrical Engineering.    Secretary A.I.E.E.    Outdoors Club.
WILLIAM B. MOFFAT
THOMAS  W.  MOUAT
Mechanical Engineering.
ROY MACONACHIE
Victoria.    Geology.    English Rugby.    President Science '33.
President S.M.U.S.
DANIEL L. McMULLEN
Forest Engineering.    President Forest Club.    Track.
IAN MacQUEEN
Forest Engineering.
J. DOUGLAS McMYNN
Electrical Engineering. Vice-President University Engineering Society. Vice-Chairman A.I.E.E. President U. Engineering Society.    Secretary S.M.U.S.
LAURENCE J. NICHOLSON
Chemical Engineering. Member Dominion Championship
Basketball Team. Senior '"A" Basketball. Vice-President
Basketball  Club.    Athletic  Representative  Science  '34.
ERIC H. PARR
Mining Engineering. President Science '34. Treasurer
S.M.U.S.   President G. M. Dawson Club.
Page Forty three THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
WILLIAM W. PULLINGER
HERBERT E. SLADEN
Electrical Engineering.    Musical Society.    Publicity Bureau.
Outdoors Club.   English Rugby.   Chairman A.I.E.E.
DOUGLAS McC. SMITH
Mechanical Engineering.    C.O.T.C.
ANDREW STIRLING
Mining Engineering.    G. M. Dawson Club.    Outdoors Club.
Rugby.    Skiing.
G. TRAVERS VINCE
Mechanical  Engineering.
HENRY A. S. WEST
Civil Engineering.
HERBERT G. WHEELER
Civil Engineering.
J. DEAN WHITTAKER
Civil Engineering.
Page Forty-four a*H,   A.
-■^■'■^vV'
LNlVtlWfTY^BRiTiSircgLIIMBIA
^    w.i a->^«.
President
Vice-President
Science 35
npHIS year, Science '35 celebrates its third anniversary as a Science class, and
■*■ for most of its members it is a case of four up and one to go. Despite the
obstacles in the way of all Sciencemen, over sixty of our original members are still
with us, which is quite good going. This year marks our division into the respective branches of engineering. Fifteen of our men chose Chemical Engineering as
their future career, fourteen Electrical, eleven Mechanical, eight Mining, eight Geological, four Forestry, two Civil, and two Metallurgical Engineering.
We are well represented in University Athletics. Dick King, Eddie Senkler,
Tiny Rader, Doug. Malcolm, and Lofty Davies play Big Four Canadian Rugby,
Bobby Gaul, Eddie Senkler, and Gleib Goumeniouk play First Division English
Rugby, Archie McDougall is our representative on the First Division Soccer team,
Cy. Phillips plays Intermediate "A" Basketball, while Phil. Northcott and Reid
Fordyce run and Ron Wilson swims.
In Interclass sport we have done extremely well this year. Our Soccer team
is playing Education in the final of the Inter-class Championship, and stand an
excellent chance of emerging victor in the third and final game to be played next
week. Two games have already been played—and both drawn. Our Basketball
team has not lost a single game so far, and are well on the way towards the
championship. We finished third in the Arts '20 Relay Race. Don Baker, John
Mortimer and Tiny Rader play Senior City Canadian Rugby.
The class executive consists of: Honorary President, Professor A. B. Lighthall;
President, Walter Kennedy; Vice-President, Tiny Rader; Secretary, Bernard Brynel-
son; Athletic Representatve, Dick King.
Page Forty-five IE TOTBHh.1-^^ ^
'      ""
I Al ill
President
Secretary
Science 36
SCIENCE '36 has now passed the half-way mark in its University career. We
have stuck together well during the past two sessions and are now looking
forward to our senior years. We are a representative group engaged in most
forms of student activity, and can be seen at almost any time, day or night, in
applied Science, 212, occupied in mapping the University grounds in some form
or other.
Scholastically, the class did exceedingly well at Christmas, being complimented by Dean Brock on its showing. McArthur and Bremner continue to lead
the class in brilliant style, but many of the rest are right on their heels. It is hoped
that April will show equally pleasing results.
Our studies by no means eclipse our athletic prowess. In class soccer we are
at present at the top of the Science, league and at the time of writing have yet to
see our first defeat. Playing Big Four Rugby we have Kirby and Gwyer, and in
English Rugby is Mitchell. Ridland and McGinn uphold the class in the swimming club. Track is well represented with several members turning out, including
the one and only Alfie Allen. Other sports such as soccer, basketball, and skating
also attract their enthusiasts.
Under the guiding hand of a wide-awake executive, the class takes its share
in S.M.U.S. activities. Dr. Archibald is the Honorary President and is always ready
to lend a helping hand. The executive, consisting of President Doug. James, Vice-
President Tom Bremner, Secretary-Treasurer Ernie Catherwood, and Athletic Representative Al. Kirby, is often seen huddled over peculiar problems presenting ponderous perplexities.
Page Forty-six H
mm.    A*~mdA. \
^NtVEnSITY-BRITISH COLUMBIA
President
Vice President
Science 37
QCIENCE '37 started the year with one  hundred  and  twelve   good   men,   and
although a few have left, only one departure was traced to the Christmas
horrors.   McPhail led four of our men above the coveted first class mark, and the
general standing was considerably better than average.
Following the best traditions of Science, all our energy is not expended on
books, and we are well to the fore in athletics. Three of our men played First
English Rugby, and two more made the Second team. Campbell and Keillor represented us on the Big Four squad, while Shelly, Minns and Lunde take time off
from swimming meets here and in Seattle to attend the occasional lecture. Ned
Pratt, Olympian, supplies the competition for the rowers, and at basketball our
men welcome all comers.
A large percentage of those at the Science Banquet wore a '37 pin, and we
expect an almost perfect turnout for the revived Science Ball.
Mr. Gage, late of Victoria College, heads our executive, while G. Bain, President
de-luxe, is aided and abbetted by G. Armstrong as Vice-President, W. Byers as
Secretary-Treasurer, and W. Morris as Athletic Representative.
Page Forty-seven THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
DORIS BARTON
H. JEAN DORGAN
Outdoors Club.
MARGARET JENKINSON
NANCY LAW
MARGARET  B.  MOFFAT
Victoria.    Grass  Hockey.    Swimming  Club.
ALISON REID
Hospital  Representative.    Vice-President  N.U.S.    President
N.U.S.    W.U.E.    Hospital Students' Council.    Gym. Club.
Page Forty-eight 333
^^^^__
tNtVtR^tTY^BRITiSirCgLIJMBIA
ut&
hA *-->"""
Nurses' Undergraduate Society
WE, THE NURSING CLASS, led by Alison Reid, began our adventure up the
mountain 1933-34. Finding the fall mid-term rather arduous we decided to
stop and hold our annual faculty tea. Next we joined in the Home-coming programme, giving our version of the "Hospital Days (Daze)." We entertained at a
Southern Party for our freshette sisters and Public Health friends. Our ascent has
been facilitated by directions given at various meetings throughout the year.
Amidst Science pep meetings and yells we climbed onwards. We reached the
outpost "Hi-jinks" and there attempted a skit despite volcanic interruptions from
pep gangsters. At the "Chalet Georgia" we danced to the ticking of "S-c-i-e-n-c-e"—
and so another peak was reached in the progress of the Nursing Undergraduate
Society.
Page Forty-nine THE FACULTY OF
GrRICULTURE;
DEAN F. M. CLEMENT
Page Fifty ati
A-*-*
UNlVEn^tTY^^RITiSirtyLtJMBIAd|
Agriculture 34
WELL folks, this is the last of a series of broadcasts sponsored by the graduating
class of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Of the present fourteen graduating members, only two of them can claim
Agriculture '34 as their first love, the others having come from Arts, Science, Nursing
and Victoria College. Incidentally they are a cosmopolitan group hailing from
all parts of the Province as well as the United
States, Russia and Manchuria.
Their athletic interests are as varied as
their academic pursuits. As a class they have
long been the mainstay in inter-class soccer,
basketball, tug-of-war and track. It is rumored
that Harry Andison, their aquatic star, has
attained his sprinting powers eluding the mythical Ogopogo. Dick Locke prefers to skim the
surface of the water and consequently has
gained a berth on the Senior Crew for the last
three years as well as being a past president
of the Varsity Boat Club. Boris Gouminiouk,
until chess absorbed him, represented the class
on the Canadian Rugby squads. And where
would the champion tug-of-war team be without the "Man-Mountain" Derrinberg?
The classes' artistic temperament has not
been suppressed as shown by the activities oi
many of the other members. Harry Katznelson
is an ardent Rubinoffite, Connie, the fair one,
is a budding prima donna; Bill Aalbersberg
pounds out old tunes on the piano, while Jack
Bickerton emulates Ole Olson, and Alex. Hall
competes with Jesse Crawford on the pipe
organ.
We must not forget the future McClelland Barkley, Ray Fedoroff of the commercial advertising ability. Walt Touzeau frightens them all by telling them that
he is going to be a phytopathologist. Four members of the class, Brink, Locke,
O'Neil and Derrinberg, covered themselves with dust and glory at the World's Grain
Show at Regina last summer while representing the University in the inter-collegiate
competitions. Jim O'Neil was on the Portland Dairy Cattle Judging Team 'way-
back in the fall of '31; while three members of the class made up the team of '33,
namely, Derrinberg, Tennant and Locke. Before signing off I would like to introduce to you the present class executive: Mr. R. L. Davis, who has been Honorary
President for the four years; Alex. Hall, President, and Bert Brink, Secretary-Treasurer.
PROF. R. L. DAVIS
Page Fifty-one THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
WtLLEM J. G. AALBERSBERG
Horticulture.    Soccer.
HARRY ANDISON
Kelowna.     Entomology   and   Horticulture.     Captain   Swimming Club.    Big Block.    Aggie Athletic Representative.
JACK M.  BICKERTON
Plant  Pathology.    Secretary-Treasurer  Aggie  '34.     Athletic
Representative Aggie '34.
VERNON C. BRINK
Plant Genetics.    Grain Judging Team, Regina.   Track.  Outdoors Club.
ROBERT C. DERRINBERG
Saanichton.     Animal   Husbandry.     Grain   Judging   Team
Regina.    Cattle Judging Team, Portland.
RAYMOND FEDOROFF
Harbin, Manchukuo.    Captain Inter-class Soccer Team.
BORIS GOUMENIOUK
Dairen, Manchuria.    Big 4 Canadian Rugby.    Track.    Interclass Soccer.
ALEXANDER McD. HALL
Victoria.    Agronomy.    Agriculture Club.    V.C.U.
HARRY KASZNELSON
Moscow, Russia.    Soil Bacteriology.    Musical Society,
orah Society.    Agricultural Discussion Club.
Men-
RICHARD  P.  LOCKE
Vernon. Agricultural Economics. David Thom Bursary.
Khaki Scholarship. President Agriculture Undergrad. President Agricultural Club. Outdoors Club. President Boat
Club. Senior Varsity Crew. Grain Judging Team World's
Fair, 1933.
Page Fifty-two THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
JAMES B. O'NEIL
Class President Sophomore year. President Agriculture
Club. Member Judging Team Regina Grain Show. Member Portland Team. Intermediate "B." Senior "B" Basketball.    Manager  Senior  "B"  Basketball.
CONSTANCE L. PLUMMER
Secretary Musical Society. Secretary Agriculture Undergrad.    President Gym Club.
J. F. WALTON TENNANT
Salmon Arm.    Agronomy.    David Thorn Bursary.    Agriculture Club.    Portland  Judging Team.
WALTER D. TOUZEAU
Plant Pathology.    Vice-President Aggie '34 (1931-32).   President Aggie '34 (1932-33).
Page Fifty-three President
Treasurer
Agriculture 35
UNDER the guidance of Professor King the class of Agriculture '35 has enjoyed
a most profitable year.
Although lacking in numbers we are proud of our class, and why not? We
have three fair co-eds, Nancy, Helen and Kay, who have won distinction mountain
climbing. Tnen we have a blond Beau Brummel who, we are led to believe, is
responsible for some of the strange things that happen behind the scenes at the
theatrical performances. John Miller, another member of the year, has had the
honor of being elected secretary of the Agricultural Discussion Club.
In the realm of athletics "we do our part," a number of the boys taking part
in the inter-class sports, Rugby and Track.
From West Vancouver comes Geof. Cornish, who, we believe, holds all records
for climbing Hollyburn and running to Horseshoe Bay. Geof. is given keen competition in his favorite pastimes by Jim Allan and Jack Bowen.
We are confident of the future for scientific agriculturalists, and all are ploughing in hoping to reap a harvest of degrees in 1935.
The executive for the year include: Honorary President, Professor N. M. King;
President, Don Black; Treasurer, Nancy Brand, and Secretary, Roger Wood.
Page Fifty-four Mfo
jggTT
liNlVEnStTY^BRITiSirtgLIJMBIA^I
President
Secretary
Agriculture 36
7\ LL the original members of Agriculture '36 are back this year, plus a few from
Senior Matriculation.   Only one Artsman, however, realized his mistake and
joined the Aggies.
Entirely fooling the originators of the Christmas exams., Aggies '36 is off to
a good start and pulling in the traces. Bill Moxon distinguished himself by being
the only Aggie to swim in the meet against the University of Washington. Paul
Clement is doing his best to uphold the Aggies on the Senior English Rugby team.
The class is well represented on the Agriculture soccer team, and we hope to
have a good showing on the Basketball team.
The officers for the class were:   Hon. President, Professor King; President, Paul
Clement; Secretary-Treasurer, Bill Moxon.
Page Fifty-five President
Agriculture 37
T^HE class of Agriculture '37 greets you.   This year's class has a truly cosmopolitan membership and many of its members hail from distant places.   However,
our class! spirit is not lacking and we are doing our duty by placing a few players
on every team fielded by Agriculture.
In the realm of sport we are represented on the Soccer teams and on tho
Canadian Rugby team by our Vice-President, Doc Nicol. We have high hopes
for the Arts '20 relay and for the inter-class basketball.
One of our members, Don Clandinan, is a well-known poultry breeder who
ran off with so many of the prizes at the Winter Fair. The only girl in the class is
a budding newspaper woman who is the author of the Campus Explorer. Two
other members, namely, the President and Secretary, are ardent skiing enthusiasts.
The officers for the year are: Honorary President, Professor E. A. Lloyd; President, J. S. Allin; Vice-President, R. E. Nicol; Secretary-Treasurer, D. Moodie.
Page Fifty-six fe-(MN.       A--
-**-'-W,
LNIV^I^TY-PRiTlStfCtfLllMBIAdi
Back Row—T. E. Harris; R. C. W. Ward; L. T. H. Pearson; D. J. Addison.
Front Row-R. S. Faulks (Lit. Vice-Pres.); S. W. Semple, B.A. (Pres.); P.R.Ellis (Ath. Vice Pres.)
Literary and Athletic Association of the Anglican
Theological College
THE LITERARY AND ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION of the College has had a successful year. The two main functions, the "At Home" and the Oratorical
Contest, were well attended and considerable talent was evidenced within the
College. Bi-weekly literary meetings were held when interesting addresses were
given by outside speakers. Two debates with Union College proved beneficial not
only to the debaters but also to all those present. The forensic honours were divided
equally between the Colleges. The traditional exchange of entertainments with the
students of Union College afforded us ample scope to air our grievances in a
hilarious fashion without "damaging the fabric." Members of the Association have
taken their part in University activities, claiming membership in the Musical Society,
Philosophy Club, Arts Club, Players' Club and the C.O.T.C.
The athletes kept themselves in condition during the term by means of the
weekly Egg Cup races through the University woods. The Annual College Track
Meet was a thorough success. We were only able to break even with the Unionites
in a two-game soccer series, but we expect not only to win the soccer play-off but
also to retain the Scott Cup for Inter-Collegiate sport which we won from Union College last year. At the University we are well represented in Soccer, Track, Grass
Hockey, English Rugby and Badminton.
It is with regret that we record the resignation from the faculty of the Reverend
C. H. Shortt, M.A., who had been Warden of the College for fourteen years, and
had been a true friend to the students both individually and collectively. There
is this consolation, however, his loss to the members of the College and his many
friends in Vancouver is the gain of his relatives and friends in Toronto, where he
now resides. We wish also to welcome the Reverend C. B. Reynolds, M.A., who
returns as a lecturer in Old Testament.
Page Fifty-seven 1THE TOTCMi^r
-kU.
, j^kfea&i    i^Jmrn
Back Row—W. W. Latimer; W. D. More; A. A. Dobson; J. Bell.
Front Row   K. Nomoto (Vice-President); W. Selder (President); Principal J. G. Brown; A. Broatch.
Union College
QEVEN YEARS AGO theologians were first transplanted from the West End to our
Campus. In the intervening period things have happened. Many have come
and gone. Of the hardy "originals" who kicked their way through shavings and
plaster to set up cots in the new rooms, just two remain. When Selder and Broatch
graduate this spring the famous stories of Morality Squads, Inter-college raids, Crab-
tricks, and all the enthusiasm belonging to a new institution, become tradition.
There is, however, the good name and fame of Stobie to perpetuate the spirit of
old, and to lead to finer and newer relationships on the Campus.
Against our traditional opposition, the Anglicans, we scored a victory and a
loss in both Soccer and Debating.
Olaf Grondahl finishes his college work only to spend two years preaching
before Ordination. Broatch, Harvey, Nomoto and Selder complete the graduating
class.
To replace these old stagers are such hopefuls as Sam Roddan, Art Wirick,
Gerry Hunter, Geof Smith, Yoshi Ono, Hugh Herbison and Hamilton Smith.
Our family has grown so large of late( years that we are looking forward to
the construction of our Library Tower. It will be a splendid addition to our present
equipment.
Page Fifty-eight THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANGLICAN COLLEGE
JOHN L. ANDERSON
Edmonton. President Philosophy Club. President Anglican
Literary and Athletic Association.
SIDNEY W. SEMPLE
Irish Free State. Class President Sophomore year. President Anglican Literary and Athletic Association. President
Grass Hockey Club.
LESLIE G. CHAPPELL
London, England.
DAVID L. CHI CHAN
Cant n, China.
DAVID B. HOUGHTON
Soccer.   Musical Society.   Oratory.
RONALD S. FAULKS
Edmonton. Treasurer. Anglican Lit. and Athletic Association (2 years). Vice-President Literary and Athletic Association.
Page Fifty-nine THE   TOTEM
UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANDREW BROATCH
UNION COLLEGE
(pA
OLAV GRONDAHL
Theological  Society.
G. LLOYD HARVEY
KYUICHI NOMOTO.
Vice-President Student Society.
WILLIAM SELD
President
Page Sixty STU D
COVER
The wise men of the village axe here gathered at council debating the
policies of their tribe. IJNtVtlWtTY^WITlStfCOLlJriBjAdi
(1) President A.M.S., Mark Collins; (2) Honorary President, President L. S. Klinck; (3) Treasurer, Jack
Shaneman; (4) Secretary, Isobel Wales; (5) President, W.U.E., Eleanor Walker; (6) President, M.U.E.,
Milt Owen;  (7) President M.A.E., Max Stewart;  (8) President W.A.E., Dorothy Rennie;  (9) Junior
Member, Murray Mather; (10) President L.S.E., Gordon Stead.
Page Sixty-one Students' Council
"AAARK COLLINS' REIGN," as the 1933-34 term of office has been called, has
iVl given the members of that body a complete training in domestic management. If they have learned nothing else during their University career, they have
at least acquired a full and complete understanding of the sufferings attendant on
what Shakespeare termed "consumption of the purse." After a year of almost
vain endeavor to convince club executives that they could not be granted funds
which the Society did not possess, they should be qualified to operate anything
from a modern two-room apartment (with dinette) to an equally modern orphanage
(with orphans). If they do happen to become exposed to the latter experience, we
should like to inform their young charges that their overlords will not feel at home
unless they are constantly beseiged with requests "for more."
Grappling with this problem has frayed the nerves of the Councillors to such
an extent that, though few major issues have arisen, the diversity of opinion
on such occasions as the problem of social programmes, stadium budgets, committees and constitutions has often led to minor wars. Even these outbursts, however, have had their advantages, for if they have unveiled the weakness of the
individual members they have to an even greater extent revealed their strength;
and in consequence there has developed in each member a respect and affection
for the others.
Mark Collins, President, brought with him a wealth of experience gained from
his two previous years on Council. He has borne himself with the dignity the office
demands and has brought to our deliberations a sober judgment and levelheadedness which at times has been all too necessary. Mark's ownership of "Jumpy"
has been particularly useful, for, though only a roadster, "Jumpy" has transported
the entire Council home from many a weary meeting. Mark's ability has been
recognized and has brought honour to the University in distant fields, for at the
conference he was elected First Vice-President of the N.F.C.U.S.
The Secretary, Peggy Wales, will always be remembered by the members
of this year's Council as the girl with certain legal affiliations which considerably
aided the Councillors in their deliberations. Her cheery smile and winning manner
were also a source of much merriment at the Council meetings. The way she
copied down those long motions of Owen and Stead would have done credit to
the most exacting of business men. Always a pal, and ready at any time to do
more than her share of the work—that was Peg.
Jack Shaneman, as all good Treasurers should, has approached all problems
from the standpoint of "How much will it cost?" He has held the noses of the
other members to the grindstone with his round of reports, bills, bad debts, and
budgets, and has sometimes delighted them by cutting short long discussions with
a terse "so move."
Eleanor Walker has performed the duties of the President of the Women's
Undergraduate Society with characteristic dignity and loyalty. Normally silent
and gracious, she is ready to battle to the end for the rights of women as evidenced
Page Sixty-two JL22>.
Am*
bNfVtRSITY 'BRITlStfCOLDNBlA^i
by her fiery debates with the men on Council regarding the profits of a certain
W.U.S. function. The dignified Eleanor only once astounded the councillors by
arriving at a meeting on the night of the dress rehearsal of the Musical Society's
production, the "Mikado," in the regalia and make-up of the terrible Katisha.
Milton Owen, President of the M.U.E., is also equipped with previous Council
experience. He forms his opinions and has no hesitation in expressing them, in
spite of the fact that they almost always differ from those advanced by the President
of L.S.E. His witticisms (puns to you), though sometimes worthy of being classed
as major crimes, have relieved many a tense moment and have led his colleagues
to sane lines of discussion.
Dorothy Rennie has held high the banner of the Women's Athletic Executive
and has gone forth to battle like a champion of old, whenever the men have failed
to treat the problems with sufficient respect. Her knowledge of athletics took her
to Victoria with the Women's Basketball Team and thus earned her the distinction
of being the only woman on Council to carry the Blue and Gold to foreign parts,
Limitless energy and optimism coupled with maturity and sound judgment
have made Max Stewart, as President of Men's Athletics, an asset to Council and
a splendid servant of the Student Body. His whole-hearted advocacy of all measures tending to promote interest in athletics has kept the other members "Athletic-
conscious" at all times. Max also holds the record for making motions for adjournment.
Gordon Stead, President of Literary and Scientific Executive, has achieved a
reputation for wordy motions preceded by lengthy discussions which sometimes
managed to unearth the vital point of the subject under discussion. His unbound-
ing energy and passion for work make it clear that his role in life be "Pooh Bah"
(the man who does it all) rather than the "Mikado."
Early in the fall the resignation of Stuart Keate necessitated another election for
the position of Junior Member. Murray Mather was elected office-boy, custodian of
rooms and dates, father of the Freshmen, and organizer of Home-coming Week-end.
He has handled these duties ably and efficiently, and has exercised his vote on
Council with wisdom and impartiality.
Page Sixty-three jjTHE TOTEM^r
_^_
M
(1) Pres., Eleanor Walker; (2) Vice-Pres., Claire Brown; (3) Hon.-Pres., Dean M. Bollert; (4) Sec'y, Mary
Thompson; (5) Vice-Pres. Education, Molly Bardsley; (6) Vice-Pres. Arts '34, Myrtle Beatty;
(7) Vice-Pres. Arts '35; Ardy Baumont; (8) Vice-Pres. Arts '36; Kay Brourne;
(9) Vice-Pres. Arts '37, Connie Baird; (10) Pres. Nursing, Alison Reid.
(1) President, R. Maconachie; (2) Honorary President, Col. Wilkin; (3) Treasurer, E. Parr; (4) President
'34;  J. Fairley;  (5) Vice-President, D. King;  (6) President '36, D. James;  (7) Secretary,
D. McMynn; (8) President '37 G. Bain.    Absent—W. Kennedy, President '35.
Page Sixty-four r#^M*Sl
LNlVtRSITY^PRmSH COLDMBIA
(1) President, Alison Reid;  (2) Secretary, Asenath Leitch;  (3) Honorary President, Miss M. Gray;
(4) Treasurer, A. Martin; (5) Vice-President, D. Barton; (6) Athletic Representative, R. Mouatt;
(7) Hospital Representative, L. Creelman; (8) Literary Representative, F. Jackson.
(1) Pres., R. R. Locke; (2) Secretary, Constance Plummer; (3) Hon-Pres., Dean Clement; (4) Pres. '34,
A. Hall; (5) Vice-Pres., J. O'Neil; (6) Pres. '35, D. Black; (7) Pres. '36, P. Clement;
(8) A. Rep., J. Bickerton; (9) Treas., J. Salisbury.
Page Sixty-five "THE TDreMKHT^T
(1) President '37, F. Edmonds; (2) President '34, A. MacClellan; (3) President, W. Sargeant;
(4) President '36, J. Ferris; (5) President '35, H. Johnson.
(1) President S.M.U.S., R. Maconachie; (2) President A.M.U.S., W. Sargeant; (3) President A.U.S.,
R. Locke; (4) President M.U.E., Milt Owen.
Page Sixty-six Here the Indians are shown
recording with graphic simplicity
an incident all important in the
activities of their tribe. These picture stories are still to be seen on
the sheltered cliff walls of many
B. C. islands. 1
_^^^__
tJNlVETlStTY-BRmSiyCtfmriBIA
SWk.
(1) Editor-in-Chief, Norman Hacking;  (2) Senior Editor, Pat Kerr;  (3) Senior Editor, T. B. Cornish;
(4) News Manager,  A. Thompson;   (5) Sport Editor, R. Elson;  (6) Exchange Editor,  Nancy Miles;
(7) Literary Editor, A. Mayse; (8) Feature Editor, Darrel Gomery; (9) Associate Editor, Zoe Brown-
Clayton; (10) Associate Editor, B. Agnew; (11) Associate Sport Editor, D. MacDonald.
Page Sixty-seven Publications Board
7f NOTHER year has "came and went" and the Publications Board has forsaken
■**■ its native haunts for the Library, theoretically. Only some fifty or sixty people
seem to be left to wile away the careless hours.
A feature of the Ubyssey this year has been the lack of the customary friction
between Council and the Pub., except for the momentous classic basketball tilt in
which the Pubsters were swept to new heights of glory and Council retired igno-
miniously from the field. Relations with the Players' Club were mildly antagonistic
on several occasions, and violently so on one, when the C.O.T.C. and the unemployed militia were called in to sweep up the bodies. All was sweetness and light
with the Musical Society and the Badminton Club.
Socially the Pubsters had a bang-up party at Darrel Gomery's home, where
there was an orgy of hot-dog consumption, not to speak of msutard and doughnuts
on the side. The Pub. also perpetrated an issue of the Vancouver Sun, in which the
staff cavorted nobly, particularly Freth Edmonds, who spent an enjoyable afternoon in the City Morgue, and Tad Jeffery and Archie Thompson who improved
the shining hour by invading the divorce courts. Later in the term Nancy Miles
was the guest of honor at a wild carousal in the Faculty Tea Room, which commemorated the attainment of her majority (of what, you may ask?). Twenty-one
years. The guest was forced to dig in with both feet in order to distribute the
mountainous quantities of multi-colored ice-cream which flowed down many a
pubbish gullet.
The generalissimo of the Pub forces was Norman Hacking, notable for many
reasons, in particular for his fourteen different ways of telling people to go to hell
so that they don't know what he's telling them, and for his three ways of telling
them so that they do. Also for writing uplifting editorials with grim intensity just
after the deadline on Mondays and Thursdays.
The assistant generalissimo for the Tuesday issue was Pat Kerr. This issue
was a fine example of mind over matter, since nothing ever happens between
Friday and Monday. The Vancouver Institute, however, deserves a vote of thanks
for the millions of words they supplied for page one, on all topics from medieval
water supplies to the science of musical sounds. Pat enhanced the literary aspect
of her issues by contributing instalments of that great drammer, "Three Fingered
Joe."
Her associate was Boyd Agnew, six stalwart feet of progressive journalism.
The Friday corps was commanded by John Cornish, that stem upholder of the
finest traditions of dramatic art. John was the silver-tongued Demosthenes of the
Pub. board, and did his share to spread enlightenment among the good folk of
North Vancouver.    Other accomplishments were wrestling and a ready blush.
He was assisted in his agonies (not in wrestling, however) by Zoe Browne-
Clayton, also known as the Campus Explorer, who emphatically denies the ownership of hairy knees.
Page Sixty-eight WL *-L*u ^— uNiyaiwrir^RTO^
The stern dictator of the reportorial staff was Archie Thompson, notable
because he once turned down a free beer, and also because he is the only member
of the staff who never wastes time around the office.
Christie Fletcher commanded the sports staff for the first term with savoir-faire
and aplomb. He resumed his studies in the second term and his office fell to Dick
Elson, who exhibited a weakness for hounding the rest of the staff, and a penchant
for weird and original make-up. His associate was Don Macdonald, notable for
the nonchalance with which he could produce a Sport Page between two-thirty and
three on press day.
Editorship of the Muck Page fell to Darrell Gomery, who spent her week-ends
pursuing the Muse of Muck. Darrel's brain-child, Fanny Freshette, has become
the dominating personality of the Campus.
Nancy Miles was the most persistent habitue of the Pub. office. On Mondays
she was always seen poring through a melee of exchange papers picking out
such literary gems as met her eye. For the Friday issue, with the assistance of
her amphibian friend Arthur Walrus, she produced her engaging column of chatter,
"The Time Has Come."
The literary boss was Arthur Mayse, known more simply as Bill. It was his
duty to judge the mass of poetry that corroded his drawer. The least reprehensible
efforts greeted the public gaze through the medium of his Tuesday column, "Apes
and Ivory."
The Campus Crab, Alan Morley by name, distributed venom and vituperation
with joyous abandon, much to the delight of sundry clubs and correspondents.
The assistants were Esperance Blanchard, Murray Hunter and Gerald Prevost.
Their chief duties were the reading of proof, and the unpopular task of reporting
Council meetings.    Sport assistants were Morley Fox and Clarence Idyll.
Don McTavish was advertising manager for the first term, his canny Scottish
blood coming out chiefly in loud plaids. He was succeeded by Jack Balcombe,
who managed to drag even the hardest-boiled advertiser into his net. The circulation manager was W. E. Simpson.
The reportorial staff were Freth Edmonds, John Logan, Warren James (who
wrote the radio column), Helen Taylor, Donna Lucas, Margaret Ecker, Jack
McDermot, Jim Findlay, Rosemary Edmonds, Margot Greene, Pauline Patterson,
Donald Hogg, Breen Melvin, Peter O'Brien, Allan Baker, Stuart Devitt, Doreen
Agnew, George Hill, Paddy Colthurst, and Allan Walsh.
Page Sixty-nine (1) Ted Madeley; (2) Tad Jeffery; (3) Connie Baird; (4) Fred Richards; (5) Morley Fox.
IN SPITE of the manifest handicaps of a decreased grant from Council, the Totem
staff has worked manfully to produce an Annual that will bear comparison in
every respect with previous editions. Many innovations have been introduced,
notably the wider panels, all of which serve to give the volume a most striking and
modernistic make-up.
The brunt of the arduous work has fallen on the shoulders of Ted Madeley, who
has splendidly carried on the old Madeley tradition in the University Publications
Board. His life has been a constant round of interviewing printers, photographers
and engravers, and endeavouring to stimulate apathetic students into getting their
photographic proofs and write-ups in on time.
He has been ably assisted by his staff,'who have wallowed for some months
in a maze of club write-ups, tangled photographs and scrappage pictures. Tad
Jeffery could be seen nearly every day pounding away at the typewriter, endeavoring to satisfy the insatiable demands of the printer. Connie Baird had an exhausting but enjoyable job on her hands phoning up recalcitrant students for their
timetables or persuading Club secretaries to show a little energy. She was in her
height of glory, however, with a dummy volume and a pot of paste, sticking together
all those composite parts that make a completed volume.
Morley Fox divided his time between the sport page of the Ubyssey and the
Totem typewriter. His broad grin never lessened under the constant demands
made on his time and energies. The Science aspect of the Totem was ably handled
by Fred Richards. For some reason the Sciencemen are often the last to hand in
the necessary information, so consequently the Science representative on the staff
must always be on the alert to stimulate his classmen. In this respect Fred has
been unceasingly energetic, and due to his efforts the Sciencemen appear in all
their glory.
The production of an annual of the size of the Totem requires a really enormous expenditure of time on the part of the staff, particularly as the brunt of the
work comes around exam. time. Nevertheless there is always the satisfaction of
seeing that the completed work is well worthy of carrying on the tradition of the
Publications Board of producing a volume of outstanding merit. In this respect Ted
Madeley and his assistants have every reason for congratulation for their 1934
production.
Page Seventy CLUBS AN
SOCIETIES
Cannibal Society of the Winter Ceremony. Upon reaching manhood the
young Indian enters into a weird performance of mock cannibalism symbol-
bed by biting the arms of his relatives. Here we see villagers awaiting the
arrival of the novice. 2424.
_^—„,
LNfVERSITYrBi»ITISirCgLI)MBlA
'-*- a
Literary and Scientific Executive
THE Literary and Scientific Executive have been moving forward steadily this
year under the guidance of Gordon Stead.
The Parliamentary Forum has shown wonderful results in its debating, having
entered teams in debates against teams from other parts of Canada
as well as play ing host to a visiting team from the United States.
The Musical Society made a distinct success of their production
this year which proved to be an artistic and financial triumph.
The Players' Club are working very hard on their performance
for the spring, and are producing the entire show from talent and
workmanship within the Club.
The executive for the past year have been:  Gordon Stead,
President; President Parliamentary Forum, Ernest Brown; President
Musical  Society, Alice Rowe; President Players' Club, Nancy Symes; President
U.B.C. Engineering Society, Doug. McMynn; Secretary, Ardy Baumont.
The G. M. Dawson Club
THE GEOLOGICAL DISCUSSION CLUB has had, as usual, a very successful
season.    The programme of addresses this year has been made to follow a
path of variety.
Among the interesting papers given was one by Dr. G. Shrum on a "Device for
the Detection of Radium Ores," and another, "The B. C. Nickel
Property," by Dr. Cockfield of the Geological Survey of Canada.
The aims of the Club have been to promote interest in geological problems and the papers dealing with such problems.
The Club is of great advantage to the student, in that it affords
him an opportunity to become better acquainted in an informal way
with his professors and also enables him to meet outside men who
are prominent in the professions of mining and geology.
The executive for the 1933-1934 season was: Honorary President, Professor J. M. Turnbull; President, E. H. Parr; Vice-President, J. G. Gray, and
Secretary-Treasurer, C. E. Cleveland.
The Physics Club
THE OBJECT of the Physics Club is to provide students interested in physics an
opportunity to present, hear and discuss papers pertaining to that subject.
Open meetings are held fortnightly. Papers are presented both by graduate members of the Club and by outside speakers.
During the first term two outside speakers addressed the Club.
Mr. W. E. Harper of the Victoria Astrophysical Observatory spoke
on "Shadows," and Mr. C. C. Smith, of the Ottawa Observatory
spoke on "Work of the Ottawa Dominion Observatory." Upon his
invitation a group of the Club members visited the Longitudinal
Observation Station at Brockton Point.
Some of the papers presented by the Club were: "Electric
Clocks," by R. Christie; "An A. C. Timing Device," and "The Positron," by G. Volkoff; "Some Applications of the Photocell," by A.
Goudenkoff; "Electron Optics," and "The Neutron," by A. Guthrie; "Ion Content of
the Atmosphere," by T. How; "Heavy Hydrogen," by G. Mossop, and "Amateur
Glass Grinding," by P. McTaggart-Cowan.
The members of the executive for the year were: Hon. President, Dr. G. Shrum;
President, George Volkoff; Vice-President, G. Mossop; Secretary-Treasurer, H.
Clayton.
Page Seventy-one The Chemistry Society
THE EXECUTIVE of the Chemistry Society for 1933-34 consisted of the following:
President, Norton Wilson; Vice-President, J. Allan Spragge; Secretary, R. A.
Findlay; Treasurer, Jack Fisher; Women's Representative, Isobel Lauder. Dr.
Archibald was Honorary President.
Meetings are held every two weeks, open meetings alternating
with closed meetings. The open meetings, which anyone may
attend, are addressed by chemists from outside the University and
by professors of the department. At the closed meetings, which
are restricted to students from the upper years taking advanced
courses in chemistry, papers are given on various phases of chemistry by members of the Society. The papers are followed by discussions and refreshments. A prize is offered for the best paper
of the year.
This year the Society has been especially fortunate in the speakers it has
obtained for the open meetings. Dr. Nil Carter from the government station at
Nanaimo, gave a very entertaining outline of oceanographical chemistry. Dr. Clarke
told an interested audience about the magic which chemistry has wrought in
modern industry, and outlined several interesting explanations of the formation of
complex substances occurring in nature. Equally interesting talks were given by
such men as Dr. Chalmers, Dr. Gallaugher, and Mr. J. F. C. B. Vance, Vancouver's
chemical criminologist.
Historical Society
THE Historical Society chose the "British Empire" as a general subject for discussion this year. A wide range of controversial topics helped to make the
year a lively one. Margaret Fothergill and Cyril Chave began the series of papers
by presenting the affirmative and negative sides of the question; "Is the British
Empire in Decline?". Sonny Nemetz pointed out the potential
source of danger of Russia to British interests in India, in a paper,
"Is the U. S. S. R. a menace to the British Empire?". A comprehensive treatment of modern Ireland was given by Bill Keenleyside
in a paper, "Why an Irish Republic?". At th© last meeting of the
Fall term Gwendolyn Armstrong gave an able survey of "Migration Problems of the British Empire".
The first two papers of the spring term dealt with the relations
between white and black in Africa. Norman Hacking gave a clear
interpretation of the racial struggle in South Africa. This was followed by a
sympathetic treatment of the native question in tropical Africa, by Phyllis West-
over. Patricia Campbell dealt with the question, "Is the Mandatory System Veiled
Imperialism?" and Howard McAllister discussed the possibility of a united foreign
policy for the commonwealth.
The final paper for the year, "What Are the Economic Bases of British Imperialism?" was given by Margaret Cotter.
The executive of the society for the year consisted of: Honorary President, Prof.
A. C. Cooke; President, Cyril Chave; Vice-President, Murray Hunter; Secretary-
Treasurer, Patricia Campbell.
Page Seventy-two ao.
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Jhjj
LNlVEWSfr¥^BRITlSirtOLl)riBIAdi
Letters Club
THE LETTERS CLUB was formed on the Campus over ten years ago for "the
study of literature as a joy." It consists of twenty active and four associate
members, elected from the third and fourth year students. About ten men and
women are chosen each spring to fill the places of those who intend to graduate.
The Club meets regularly every two weeks during ths session to
discuss papers given by the senior members on some aspects of
nineteenth or twentieth century literature. The range of the subjects
discussed is wide, includng such divergent topics as the poetry of
Edward Arlington Robinson and Robert Bridges, the novels of Victoria Sackville-West, George Meredith, and Knut Hamsun, the art of
William Blake, the aspects of the drama, novel and poetry during
the decade 1920-1930. There is also once a year an "original contributions meeting" at which original work by the members of the
Club is read and discussed; and the last meeting of the spring term is held in conjunction with the Senior Letters Club, formed over a year ago by the graduates of
the Undergraduate Club who wish to continue their study of literature as a joy.
The officers of the Club are as follows: Honorary President, Professor Thorlief
Larsen, Critic; Dr. F. C. Walker, Archivist; Mr. Lionel Haveis; President, Mackay
Whitelaw; Secretary-Treasurer, Gwladys Downes.
Mathematics Club
THE object of this Club is to provide students interested in Mathematics with an
opportunity to hear and present papers pertaining to the subject. Membership
is limited to twenty-five undergraduates who, on graduating, become honorary
members. Meetings are held every two weeks when papers are presented by
professors and graduates and often by students taking their senior
year. The subject matter of these papers is not confined to various
phases of mathematics alone but also deals with the part played
by mathematics in the other sciences.
Papers presented this year included: "Philosophy in Modern
Science," by Mr. W. Gage; "Probability," by G. Volkoff; "Space
and Time," by A. Guthrie; "The Equilibrium of Strings," by L.
Richardson, and "Nomography," by I. Niven and A. Marling.
The executive for the year were: Hon. President, Dean D
Buchanan; President, A. Guthrie; Vice-President, G. Mossop; Secretary-Treasurer'
Miss M. Henderson.
The Literary Forum
THE CLUB celebrated its fifth birthday this year by issuing an open invitation to
campus women to hear a talk by Dr. Mawdsley on "The Huntingdon Art Gallery, which was enthusiastically received. For its fortnightly noon-hour meetings
members chose as subjects a series of talks on "Famous Canadian Women," which
have proved most enlightening and encouraging to members who
are looking forward to starting on a career. For their final meeting,
the Club is looking forward to hearing an address by Judge Helen
Gregory McGill; at which Dean Bollert will again be hostess to
members and their friends.
No account of the Club's activities would be complete without
some mention of the great care and interest taken in it by the Honorary President, Dean Bollert, to whom great thanks is due.
This year's executive:   Honorary President, Dean Bollert; President, Eleanor Leach; Vice-President, Gwendolyn Armstrong; Secretary-Treasurer,
Lucy Currie.
Page Seventy-three fcTM^jOTCIfe^
Forest Club
THE aims of the Forest Club are to foster interest in Forestry within the university,
and to establish closer connections with outside interests in forestry and the
lumber industry.
Every two weeks meetings were addressed by outside speakers. Two meetings were held in conjunction with the University Engineering
Society and the Commerce Club. Speakers included R. V. Stuart,
Sec'y-Mgr. B. C. Logger's Assoc; H. Rindal, Superintendent Can.
Creosoting Co. and J. McDonald, Ass. Forrester, Vancouver District.
The executive for the year were: Hon. Pres. Prof. F. Knapp,
Pres. D. L. McMullen, Vice-Pres. C. F. McBride, Sec'y-Treas. R. W.
Wellwood, Alumni Rep. J. H. Jenkins.
Cosmopolitan Club
THE PURPOSE of the Club is to promote intellectual and social intercourse
amongst the various races represented on the Campus. While the meetings
have been few, a large and representative membership has been built up. There
are now thirty-nine members from eight different races, and many others have
shown cm interest in our programme. This latter has consisted of
three ordinary meetings at which we had an informal talk and a
social hour. The speakers on these occasions were Dr. Topping,
Captain W. Armstrong, and Dr. N. Black. The other meeting of the
Club took the form of an international tea and concert, at which the
music of the various nations made up the programme. Dean M. L.
Bollert was the hostess on this occasion.
The Club was under the direction of Hon. President Dr. C. W.
Topping; President, R. McMaster; Vice-President, Rose Chu; Secretary-Treasurer, E. Ouchi.   Membership Committee, Ruth Abbott and Sarah Chan.
Canadian Officers' Training Corps
THE University of British Columbia Contingent of the Canadian Officers' Training
Corps, has become increasingly popular year by year since its inception in
1929.
Again this year, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. F. G. Letson,
M.C, there has been a considerable increase in membership, the
strength being 14 officers and 90 other ranks. The training given
in the Corps is recognized as one of the best sources for the supply
of future officers, and many graduates of the University are active
as officers in local units.
The number of candidates for "A" and "B" certificates of proficiency this year has exceeded that of previous years.
Twenty-four enrolled for qualification for a Lieutenancy and
seven for a Captaincy.   Examinations for both certificates were held
on March 13th and 14th.
Daily, during this year, the miniature range has been in use, and some very
high scores were made. The Corps won a place in every match it entered. The
general average of scores showed a marked improvement.
The Annual Training Camp at Work Point Barracks, Victoria, had an enrollment of fifty-two, and a most enjoyable five days was spent.
The Officer Commanding Military District No. 11, Major-General E. C. Ashton,
C.M.G., V.D., inspected the Corps in the Beatty Street Drill Hall on March 7th.
Jericho Country Club was again the scene of the annual dance.
Page Seventy-four IE
__^^_^.
UNtVtnStTY^BRITiSirttfLIJMBIA
rrr>       *i^i ft^'*
Biological Discussion Club
THE FIRST meeting of the Club was held at the home of Dr. and Mrs. C. Fraser,
where a short resume of the season's activities was followed by an evening of
contests and games. Papers read during the rest of the fall term were Harry Barclay, "Coloration in Animals;" Dr. C. Fraser, "The Pacific Science Conference."
Papers for the spring term were: C. Carl, "Water;" Isabel
Lauder, "Biology and the Laymen;" E. Brooks, "Some Theories On ^^^^
the Origin of Life;" Guy Palmer, "Some Experimental Notes On
Intelligence;" Dr. G. Smith, "Blood, and Its Evolutionary Significance;" T. Moillet, "Some Aspects of Human Evolution."
The Executive for the year included: Dr. C. McL. Fraser, Hon.
President; J. Gregson, President; Dorothy Smith, Vice-President;
Charlotte Dill, Secretary; Harry Barclay, Curator.
The Agriculture Club
THE AGRICULTURE CLUB has completed another active year. Its object has
been to promote the discussion of Agricultural subjects amongst the Aggies.
At the first meeting of the year, the members of the Regina Grain Judging Team
gave an illustrated talk on their trip to the World's Grain Show during the previous
summer. They outlined their experiences and achievements whilst
at the show.
Meetings were held throughout the year at the homes of different members of the Faculty. Addresses from outside speakers
included, "When Is Milk Not Milk;" "Why a District Agriculturist"
and "What the Farmers Read."
The year's activities were brought to a close with the ever-
popular Agriculture Club Banquet where the trophies for judging
and debating were presented.
The executive for the year 1933-34 consisted of:   Honorary President, Professor
H. M. King; President, Jim O'Neil; Secretary-Treasurer, John Miller, and Manager
of Evening Meetings, Walt Tennant.
International Relations Club
THIS CLUB is committed to no special outlook towards international relations
other than that of intelligent study and discussion. At the fortnightly meetings
the Club had the opportunity of hearing Prof. H. Angus, "The Banff Conference;"
Mr. A. Webster and Miss K. Portsmouth, "Impressions of Russia;" Miss J. Hallamore,
"Student Life and Attitude in Germany Today;" Prof. C. Topping,
"Oriental Exclusion in Canada;" and Prof. F. H. Soward, "A Survey
of International Relations, 1933-1934." In addition papers were
presented by members on: "Causes of International Friction in
Manchuria,-" "Fascism and Communism."
. Membership reach the new high of thirty-nine but will be
reduced to the more satisfactory total of thirty next year. The
Carnegie Endowment sent their annual instalment of ten books to
the Club Library, which is growing increasingly valuable in providing information on the various aspects of present-day relations.
Officers for the current year were: Hon. President, Professor F. H. Soward;
President G. Luxton; Vice-President, V. Cummings; Secretary, Rita Uchiyama; Committee:   Duff Wilson and Helen Taylor.
Page Seventy-five j^RTfeTCM^-
Commerce Men's Undergraduate Club
THE Commerce Men's Undergraduate Club was formed in the fall of 1932, the
membership being restricted to men of the third and fourth year Commerce.
The major part of the programme of this year's group has consisted of a series of
addresses covering some of the chief industries of British Columbia. Outstanding
^^^^^^^ men in the industrial and commercial life of the province have honored us in contributing these addresses. Among the speakers have
been: Mr. P. Z. Caverhill, Chief Forester of B. C, whoj spoke on
"Forestry, and Its Place in the Commerce and Industry of B. C.;"
Dean Clement, Dean of the University Faculty of Agriculture, who
discussed "Apple Marketing Difficulties in the Okanagan;" Mr. F.
W. Smelts, sales manager of the by-products division, B. C. Electric
Railway, who outlined problems of the coke and coal-gas industry;
and Mr. J. D. Galloway, Provincial Mineralogist, who summarized
the position of the mining industry in the economic life of British Columbia.
The following was the executive for the 1933-34 session:   President, Don Purves;
Vice-President, Sid Swift; Secretary-Treasurer, Charles McCadden.
Philosophy Club
THE OBJECT of the Club has been to provide an opportunity for students to discuss certain aspects of psychology and philosophy which are not included in
the courses offered by the Department of Philosophy.
During the fall term Dr. Pilcher gave a paper on "Psycho-analysis" outlining
the methods and the history of the Psycho-analytical School. This
was followed at subsequent meetings by papers on "Sleep" and
"Dreams," by David Blackaller and Annie Ensor. The two papers
discussed outlined the various theories that have been advanced
to explain these phenomena.
As has been the custom of the Philosophy Club, the first meeting of the spring term took the form of a dinner at which Dr. Topping
spoke on "The Ethics of the Criminal." At the succeeding meetings
the following papers were given: "The Present Status of Instincts,"
by Mildred Orr; "Some Aspects of Delinquency," by Ruth Abbott; "Religious Mysticism," by William Selder.
The officers for the year were: Honorary President, Dr. H. T. J. Coleman;
Official Critics, Dr. J. Pilcher and Mr. J. Henderson; President, John L. Anderson;
Vice-President, Helen Hall; Secretary-Treasurer, Robert Ward; Members of Executive, Mildred Orr and Reginald Bromiley.
S. C. M.
THE STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT seeks, through study, prayer and practice, to know and follow Jesus, and to unite in its fellowship all students in
Canadian Universities who have the desire, together with those who are willing to
test the principles of Christianity in their own lives.
Several study groups have been meeting regularly discussing
such subjects as "Jesus In the Records." Another feature of the
programme was a series of noon-hour lectures at which prominent
city men spoke.
The year's executive were: Honorary President, Dr. W. A. Carrothers; President, Jean Fraser; Vice-President, Yukio Takahashi;
Secretary, Hugh Herbison, and Treasurer, Winnifred Johnston.
Page Seventy-six if-SM-l
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LNlVl^tTY^BfllTlSirtdLlJMBIA^
The Art Club
IN THE five successful years of its existence the Art Club has evolved from the
Sketching Club, for which it was originally intended, into a Club solely for the
promotion ot aesthetic appreciation of the different branches of art.
The programme this year has been as varied as it has been interesting. The
Club was fortunate in procuring such prominent artists and critics as Mr. F.
Horseman Varley, Mr. John Ridington, Mr. A. C. Cook, Mr. Lionel Haweis,
Dr. A. F. B. Clark, Mrs. Gregsby, Mr. McCarter, Mrs. B. M. Clarke.
An innovation in the Club's programme was introduced in the holding of
Student's Night at which several members gave papers on various phases ot art
that interested them.   We hope that this feature will become an annual venture.
The Club feels that it owes the success of this year's meetings, as in the
past, to the unfailing help of the Honorary President, Mr. John Ridington.
The executive consisted of Honorary President, Mr. John Ridington; Honorary
Vice-President, Mr. A. F. Clark; President, Leslie T. H. Pearson; Vice-President, Faith
Cornwall; Secretary-Treasurer, Mildred Pollock. Committee: S. w. Clarke, Gwladys
Downes, Elizabeth Garrett.
Classics Club
THE CLASSICS CLUB has been very active this season. Under the leadership
of a capable executive, it has presented a series of interesting papers which
prove a real inspiration to all those interested in classical life and history. This
year in addition to the longer papers, we have had short papers on the "City of
Rome, its hills, roads, walls, rivers, aqueducts, temples and theatres."
^^^^ Among the papers presented were the following: "Child life in
Ancient Rome," "Roman Coins," "Roman Pottery," "The Chariot in
Peace and War, Pageant and Sport," "Slavery seen through Roman
Eyes," Mrs. Merchison's Novels of Classical Life," and "Epicureanism versus Stoicism."
The executive for the term was as follows: Honorary President,
Professor L. Robertson; President, Winnifred Alston; Vice-President,
R. Poisson; Secretary-Treasurer, Alice Roberts; Reporter, Margaret
Clarke.
La Causerie
THE meetings of the Club had a novel beginning in the form of initiation of new
members. In the good old 1798's best manner they were brought before the
tribunal, sentenced to death, imprisoned and carried to the gullotine, where amid
shrieks and groans they were executed.
The succeeding meetings presented a variety of entertainment,
a musical evening, a French bridge, an address given by Mme.
Darlington, a French dinner held in conjunction with L'AUouette and
La Canadienne.
During these meetings all conversation was carried on in
French, and every effort was made to stress its educational value.
Those interested in music and dramatics also found entertaining
and educational the production of "Chasons d' autrefois."
Officers for the year were:    Hon. President, Mme. Darlington;
President, Violet Thomson; Vice-President, Jean Thomas; Secretary-Treasurer, Margaret Reid, and Entertainment Convenor, Jessie Nelson.
Page Seventy-seven Varsity Christian Union
THE session 1933-34 has been one of consistent activity and encouraging progress. Large numbers have attended the Wednesday open meetings. The
Friday Bible Studies led by city ministers have also been well attended. This
year the Union inaugurated a course in "World Missions" in which different members spoke on the missionary activity in various countries.
The social activities of the Union during the year included our
annual Christmas Re-union Party with the Ex-V. C. U., an Italian
Dinner, and several coffee squashes.
A number of inspiring church services were conducted by the
V. C. U. in city churches. These aided greatly in acquainting the
public with our work.
In the fall semester a splendid conference was held in Seattle,
which the Union from the University of Washington and another
will be held at Bellingham immediately following the spring examinations. After
this a V. C. U. camp will be held.
A summary of the Union's activities and progress for the year would not be
complete without a statement of its object. It is "to unite those who are earnestly
desiring to extend Christ's kingdom by seeking the spiritual help and conversion
of those around them."
The personnel of the executive for 1933-34 was as follows: President, C. Howard
Bentall; Vice-President, Miss M. Audry Reid, Secretary, Miss Ruby Williams; Treasurer, Miss Olive L. Day; Advertising Secretary and Librarian, David F. Rice.
A. I. E. E. E.
THE U.B.C. branch of the A.I.E.E.E. has completed a very successful session.
Meetings have been held every second Thursday afternoon throughout fall
and spring terms. The change of meeting time from the evening to afternoon has
made it convenient for a larger number to attend.
Technical papers on the various phases of electrical engineering have been presented by the members of the Society, and discussion on these papers has been quite thorough. The speakers
took pains to make their talks more instructive by the use of slides,
photographs and sketches.
A particularly interesting field trip was made during the fall
term when the branch inspected the Ruskin and Stave Falls plants
of the B. C. Electric Co. Officials were very courteous in the explanation of features of these plants.
To commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the inception of the A.I.E.E.E. a
special demonstration is being arranged for the students' night in March. At this
meeting the members of the Vancouver section will be entertained.
Under the auspices of the Radio section, a field trip to station CKMO was organized in the fall term and much enjoyed.
Professor E. G. Cullwick, as branch counsellor, has given much helpful advice
and taken a keen interest in the work of the branch.
The executive consisted of: Chairman, Herb Sladen; Vice-Chairman, Wilfred
Jeffries; Secretary-Treasurer, Jack Mitchell,; and Junior Member, Italo Rader.
Executive of the affiliated Radio section: Chairman, Ronald Hilton; Secretary,
S. J. Wallace; Treasurer, T. W. Mouat.
Page Seventy-eight Aa
IJNtVEimTY ^P^m^CtfLilMBIA^
La Canadienne
DURING the session 1933-34 twenty-five members of the upper years made up
this Club, the purpose of which, apart from the social pleasure, is oral practice
in a better understanding of the French language. Fortnightly meetings were held
during the session at the homes of various members, at which the programme consisted of addresses, debates, discussions, games and songs, thus
helping students to gain a speaking knowledge of a language
learned almost entirely from books. Two meetings were held in
conjunction with the other two French clubs on the campus, the one
taking the form of a very enjoyable dinner party, and the other
being a suitable closing for the year's activities.
The Club, while connected in no official way with the Department of Modem Languages, offers the best possible opportunity to
students, especially those specializing in French, of gaining some
facility in a spoken language, and in an enjoyable and highly entertaining manner.
The executive for the year was as follows: Honorary President, Dr. Dorothy
Dallas; President, Maurice Klinkhamer; Vice-President, Deborah Aish; Secretary,
Kathleen Baker; Treasurer, John McLauchlin.
Monro Pre-Medical Society
THIS Club was formed October 3rd, 1933, in honour of the late Dr. A. A. Munro,
by whose will the University is to receive its first grant for Medical Research.
The primary aim of the organization is the furtherance of interest and its subsidiary
branches.   Meetings are held regularly for this purpose as well as
for giving members the opportunity of viewing the more practical
side of the medical field.
Papers given during the year included "Methods Used in the
Prevention of Foreign Diseases in Canada," by Dr. A. Amyot; "Methods in Diagnosis of Inter-cranial Lesions," by Dr. F. Emerson- "Public
Health Supervision," by Mrs. Lucas; "The Life of Wm. Osier," by
Mr. W. Gibson. In addition, two surveys were undertaken, the first
to the Mental Hospital at Essondale, and the second to the Vancouver General Hospital.
The present executive are:  Honorary President, Dr. R. E. McKechnie; President,
H. Barclay; Secretary-Treasurer, S. Evans.
Pep Club
INAUGURATED in 1931 with the original intention of fostering student enthusiasm
both on and off the Campus, the Pep Club, although possessing a somewhat
small membership and in spite of much unfavourable feeling and unfounded publicity, has since striven successfully to uphold its object. Always reasonably
willing to help out in student affairs and publicity, its members have done much for
the benefit of the Alma Mater Society, usually to the complete ignorance of the
students. For the current season the Club's activities probably reached their height
during the week of the inter-collegiate Canadian Rugby series with the University of
Alberta, when among other things a pep meeting, a radio broadcast, and student
organization at the game—to say nothing of a great deal of publicity, claimed its
attentions. New members, always freshmen, are taken in after due trial during
the Spring term to take the places of those graduating at the end of the term.
Officers for the past session include Sid Swift, President; Doug. Perkins, Vice-
President; Bill Tremame, Secretary; Lyle Stewart, Treasurer.
Page Seventy-nine Panhellenic Association
THE Panhellenic Association of the University of British Columbia is an organization composed  of  three delegates  from  each  of  the  eight  international
women's   fraternities   on   the   Campus.     The  purpose   of  the  Panhellenic is  to
strengthen amicable inter-fraternity relations, and to decide upon all matters pertaining to the joint, work of the fraternities on the Campus, and by
co-operation to benefit and unify the interests of the fraternities.
The most important undertaking of the 1933-34 session was the
revision of the rushing system. It is hoped that the revised regulations are the most advantageous possible for both the fraternities
and those being rushed.
All fraternities, in conjunction with their alumnae, have been
actively engaged in philanthropic work.    As a means of raising
money to carry on this work the various chapters have sponsored
bridges, cabarets, fashion shows, and dances.
The executive for the 1933-34 session have been Honorary President, Dean
M. L. Bollert; President, Margaret Clark, Alpha Gamma Delta; Vice-President,
Isabel Wales, Alpha Delta Pi; Secretary-Treasurer, Jean Henderson, Kappa Alpha
Theta.
Page Eighty H
Nmbi    A*m.
tJN8VERITY "BRITISH COLUMBIA
(1) Secretary, Margaret Powlett;  (2) President, Nancy Symes;  (3) Honorary President, Dr. F. C.
Walker; (4) Vice-President, G. Hilker; (5) Treasurer, C. Fletcher; (6) Margaret Stewart; (7) Director,
Miss D. Somerset; (8) G. Prevost; (9) W. Sargeant.
THE PLAYERS' CLUB, in its 19th year, has tried to play the part of maturity by
becoming a more self-contained and self-reliant unit. This has given the year
special interest and significance and kept the mass of members more closely in
touch with the Club than usual.
The most important innovation has been the construction of scenery by a
technical crew under Tommy Lea as stage manager, instead of by a theatrical carpenter.
"Ceasar and Cleopatra," the spring play, also creates a precedent. It has a
large cast, giving a part to practically every member, and strictly limiting the usual
tour of the province.
In this production the Club is attempting to do what it conceives to be its duty
in leading the University to an appreciation of advanced modern theatrical methods.   It is taking its place as an art theatre, rather than a commercial theatre.
Efforts are being made to interest the members themselves in more than acting.
Magazines and a notice board of theatrical news aid in this. The more experienced members were given an opportunity to be assistant directors at Christmas.
Committee work is encouraged.   Make-up training is being given.
The play distribution bureau, sending plays on request to amateur societies
all over the province, has functioned actively under Margaret Palmer.
The executive is: Nancy Symes, president; Gordon Hilker, Vice-President;
Margaret Powlett, Secretary; Christie Fletcher, Treasurer; Margaret Stewart, Bill
Sargent and Gerald Prevost.
Plays and actors are chosen by an advisory board consisting of Dr. F. C.
Walker, Honorary President; Miss Dorothy Somerset, Dramatic Director; Dr. D. C.
Duff, Art Director; Miss Dorothy Jeffered, Miss Marjorie Ellis, Mr. T. Larsen, Dr. H. V.
Warren and Mr. W. Buckingham.
Page Eighty-one IrTHEIotEM^-
aa
S
(1) M. D. Owen; (2) I. Conway; (3) President, E. W. Brown; (4) N. Nemetz; (5) I. Sumner;
(6) J. Ferris; (7) E. Fox.
Parliamentary Forum
THIS is the third year of the Parliamentary Forum's existence on the Campus as
a major Club. In these three years, debating at the University has been resurrected from its former state of suspended animation to its present high level. The
Forum failed by a narrow margin to bring back the coveted McGown Cup,
emblematic of Western Collegiate Debating supremacy, but the standard of debating was much higher in all debates and promises well for the future.
STANFORD DEBATE
A team from Stanford University met the U.B.C. in November on the subject,
"Resolved, that the United States is Largely To Blame for the Present Crisis In
World Affairs."   The Forum was represented by Ernest Brown and John Conway,
but lost by a unanimous vote after a spirited tussle.
McGOWN CUP DEBATE
This year the travelling team consisted of Jack Sumner and James Ferris, who
went to Winnipeg, and the home team of Nathan Nemetz and Edward Fox. The
subject was, "Resolved, that the Economic Salvation of Canada Lies in the Socialization tof Her Finance and Major Industries." The Vancouver team registered an
overwhelming victory, and the away team lost by a very narrow margin to the
University of Manitoba.
RADIO DEBATES
During the Spring term the Canadian Radio Commission has sponsored a series
of inter-collegiate debates. Richard McDougall and Frank Millar represented the
U.B.C. against the U. of Alberta, and won easily. Jack Bourne and George Luxton
debated against the U. of Manitoba on "Resolved, that Capital Punishment Should
Be Abolished."   They lost in a very close fight.
Ernest Brown, President of the Forum, has asked to be one of the Western
Debating Team to tour the United States under the auspices of the N.F.C.U.S.
The Executive, elected last spring, consisted of Honorary President, Professor
J. F. Day; President, E. W. Brown; Vice-President, R. McDougall; Secretary, Elspeth
Lehman; Debates Manager, F. Millar, and Committee, J. Sumner and J. Fisher.
Page Eighty-two iiSfc.
AJriiiSlW"
LNlVtn^ffY^ BRITISH COLllMBIA^i
(1) President,  Alice Rowe;   (2) Business Manager, F.  Patterson;   (3) Honorary President, Dr.  W.
MacDonald;   (4)  Secretary,  Margaret Cotter;   (5)  Vice-President,  A.  K.  MacLeod;   (6)  Production
Manager, Kay Johnson;  (7) Director, Haydn Williams.
Musical Society
'~pHE MUSICAL SOCIETY is the only organization on the Campus devoted wholly
A to the study and interpretation of music. Its aims are to give to students who
have a musical talent the opportunity for expressing themselves through their
chosen medium, and to foster a love and appreciation of good music at the University.
During the spring term several noon-hour recitals were presented in the Auditorium. Featured on these recitals were the Barbour String Trio, Callum Thompson,
Anne Macleod, Dean Millar, Grenfell Allen, and Mary McDougal.
This year's production was the "Mikado," the most popular of the Gilbert and
Sullivan plays. In this the Society scored one of the biggest hits of the year on
the Campus. Again this year members of the cast broadcasted excerpts from the
play.
The Chamber Symphony Orchestra have also presented a brief noon-hour
recital which won rounds of applause from the audience.
The executive for the year consisted of Dr. W. L. MacDonald, Honorary President; Professor W. Gage, Honorary Vice-President; President, Alice Rowe; Vice-
President, A. K. Macleod; Secretary, M. Cotter; Production Manager, K. Johnston;
Business Manager, F. Patterson; Orchestra Representative, H. Sladen; Director, Mr.
Haydn Williams.   .
Page Eighty three  Shown here is the greatest of all B. C. Indian sports—the war canoe race.
Carved from a single cedar log these priceless craft were the pride of their
respective tribes. m
^^^^_^^__.
^NlVtR^ITY-B^mSH COLlJMBIA^l
(1) Dr. G. Davidson; (2) Dr. G. Shrum; (3) Secretary, G. Henderson; (4) Vice-President, R. W. Gaul;
(5) President, Max Stewart; (6) President Big Block Club, R. Farrington.
Men's Athletic Executive
rT~,HE Men's Athletic Executive consists of the officers and presidents of all the
■*■   athletic clubs on the Campus.   Those whose photographs do not appear above
are:   Basketball, Biff Macleod; Canadian Rugby, A. Dick; English Rugby, G. Brand;
Track, D. McTavish; Soccer, E. Costain; Swimming, J. Millburn; Golf, A. Marling
Rowing, Ned Pratt; Badminton, P. McTaggart-Cowan; Grass Hockey, M. Ritchie
Outdoors Club, J. Orr; Tennis Club, D. Todd; Boxing and Wrestling Club, D. Todd.
Varsity has done well in outside competition, the outstanding features of the
season being the successful defence of the Hardy Cup against U. of Alberta Canadian Rugby Team; a decisive victory by the Track team over Victoria Y.M.C.A.;
winning of the knock-out series by the first division English Rugby team; the winning of the G.V.A.A. League by the Senior "A" Basketball Team; the defeat of the
U. of Washington and the College of Puget Sound by the Outdoors Club at a Ski
Meet, which was the first of its kind on the Pacific Coast.
The most important change in the ranking of the various athletics on the
Campus was the reinstating of Soccer as a major sport. A new Managerial System has also been approved by Council, which will go into effect next year.
There is one suggestion that the Men's Athletic Executive would like to make.
They feel that there has been a decided falling off of student support at University
games during the last two years, and its suggestion is that students support the
teams which are trying to make a name for the University of British Columbia in
the realm of Sport.
Page Eighty-five •■^si
TOTEM^^ A
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jLt.
(1) President, Dorothy Rennie; (2) Hon.-Pres., Mrs. Boving; (3) Vice-Pres., Marnee McKee;
(4) Secretary, Helen Joost; (5) Pres., Big Block, Gladys Munton.
Women's Athletic Executive
/^vTHER MEMBERS of the Executive besides those whose pictures appear above
are: Basketball, A. Munton; Grass Hockey, I. Wallace; Outdoors Club, M.
Christie; Gym., C. Plummer; Tennis, H. Palmer; and the athletic representatives of
each year: Helen Ferguson, Dorothy McLarin, Jean Thomas, Mollie Locke and
Beth Evans. The co-operation of these girls with the President, Dorothy Rennie, has
made possible a successful, though not outstanding, year.
To encourage women students to take part in athletics, inter-class competition
in swimming, basketball and badminton.
Page Eighty-six L-*-*s*i
rfao.
(1) Hon. Pres. Col. H. F. Letson; (2) Pres. M. Stewart; (3) Hon. Pres. Dr. G. Davidson; (4) Basketball, R. Osborne;  (5) English Rugby, G. Brand;   (6) President Big Block, R. Farrington (7) Soccer,
P. Kozoolin; (8) Track, G. Heron.
Awards Committee
npHE Awards Committee, a branch of the Men's Athletic Association, is entrusted
with the task of making awards to men in recognition of meritorious performances
of athletic activities at the University. The Committee is composed of a Faculty
representative, an Alumni representative, the President of Men's Athletics, and the
Captains of the five major sports.
The four different rankings of awards given are: Honorary Awards, Big
Blocks, Small Blocks and Plain Letters. Decisions are based on the standards set
by the Men's Athletic Association, recognition being given to exceptional performances not covered by these regulations. It is the policy of the committee to keep
the standard of winners high. Factors taken into consideration are playing time,
ability, enthusiasm, and sportsmanship displayed. No athlete may apply for his
own award—all recommendations must come through the formal channels of the
athlete's own club.
The committee for the 1933-34 season were: Max Stewart, Chairman; Dr. Davidson, Faculty Representative; Col. Letson, Alumni Representative; Ken Mercer,
English Rugby; Dick Farrington, Canadian Rugby; Bob Osborne, Basketball; Paul
Kozoolin, Soccer; G. Heron, Track.
Page Eighty-seven THE TOTEM^r—-^ -
t yc r .
Back Row—F. Hay; R. Henderson; D. McCrimmon; L. Nicholson; G. McKee.
Front Row—G. Allan (Coach); R. Wright; B. MacDonald; B. Osborne (Captain); A. Willoughby;
J. Bardsley; K. Bremner (Manager).
Senior "A" Basketball
HPHE 1933-1934 season started well with the return of four of last year's team. Of
-*■ these men, Osborne was a guard, Nicholson a centre, Bardsley a forward, and
Wright was either a forward or a guard. Henderson, Hay and Willoughby, players
from last year's Ex-King George squad, were great on the floor, but the; former two
were declared ineligible as a result of the Christmas Exams. Doug. McCrimmon,
a previous Senior "A" player, and Bobby McDonald and George Pringle of last
year's Senior "B" team were welcome additions. George McKee and Tom Mansfield signed on after Christmas.    Gordie Allen returned as coach.
During the holidays they missed their regular trip, but in a home game they
held the strong Gilmore squad of Seattle to a small lead.
They entered the G.V.A.A. league this year and won out against Adanacs in
a thrilling play-off series.
At the time of writing, Varsity is engaged in a series with the Province aggregation of the Burrard league for the Lower Mainland Championship.
"Biff" McLeod, President:  Biff has been the man behind the scenes this year.
Gordie Allen, Coach:   This is Gordie's second year as mentor of the squad.
Dr. Rutherford:   Team physician.
Ken Bremner, Manager:   Ken looked after the equipment and handled the finances
of the team.
Page Eighty-eight m
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Senior "A" Basketball (Cont'd.)
Bob Osborne, Captain: A forty-minute man with lots of experience at guard. High
scorer of the league, and one of Varsity's greatest players.
Laurie Nicholson: An elongated, hard-working centre; a veteran who snares his
share of the points.
Jimmy Bardsley: Varsity's super forward, always on the ball, and one of the play-
makers of the team.
Dick Wright: A dead shot who plays either forward or guard.
George Pringle:   Varsity's safety-man; a good shot and a fine team-player.
Art Willoughby:   A Freshman forward who plays an exceedingly fine game.
Bobby McDonald:    Light and very fast; "Chipper" is excellent at long shots.
Tom Mansfield: An old-timer who returned to the squad after Christmas; a good
guard.
George McKee: Came up from Intermediate "A" at Christmas; good material for
next year's squad.
Doug. McCrimmon:   Varsity's giant relief centre; comes through when needed most.
Frank Hay:   Old Man Ineligibility bounced him at Christmas; a guard that is hard
to get by.
Ralph Henderson:   Brother of the famous Arnold.   Also missed at Christmas; he is
a promising utility man.
Page Eighty-nine THE TOTEM^
W. Patmore;  K. Spence;  A. Harper
C. Phillips; G. Crossan (Mgr.); C. Idyll
Senior "B" Basketball
SENIOR "B" PERSONNEL
BIFF MACLEOD—A wealth of experience with great playing ability.
HOWIE SUTTON—A reliable guard and a scoring threat.
CY PHILLIPS—A guard who is always on the job.
KAY SPENCE-   Shifted from guard to forward during the season.   He scores many
baskets with his tricky shots.
CLIF IDYLL—Always on the move.   Has had much experience on U.B.C. teams.
ART HARPER—A forward whose scoring ability is known to other teams.
BILL PATMORE   The centre-man who can snag rebounds well.
FRANK RUSH—Joined us late in the season but played well.
MURRAY LITTLE—A little live-wire; and a good ball handler.
MANAGER GEORGE CROSSON—Handled the boys well from the bench, and did
his best to get a good turn-out.
Page Ninety fl^       ^^ LNlVD^tTY-BRITISH COLtMBIA^
$ £ n # ft
C. Idyll; E. McAllister; J. Prior; Machin; H. Phair
B. Thurber;  R. Morrison;  T. Pallas.
G. V. A. A. League Intermediate "A" Basketball
HPHE team started the season well, winning their first four games by good margins.
■*■ They led their league during most of the first half schedule, their first loss
coming at the hands of the strong Christ Church squad, who later won the league
title. This game Varsity lost by one point after staging a fine rally that nearly won
for them. During the Christmas Exams, they were forced to default several games
and finally ended up about the middle of the league in standing.
This squad should provide good material for the senior team in a few years.
The line-up was changed several times during the year, but the team at the end
of the season consisted of Harold Phair and Bud Machin, centres; Clarence Idyll,
Rex Morrison, Howard McAllister, Les Clark and Tom Pallas at forward; and Bill
Wolfe and Bish Thurber, guards; John Prior managed the team throughout the
season and played several games as well.
All the boys show promise, and with consistent coaching should provide higher
divisions with valuable material. The line-up was changed several times during
the year, but the team at the end of the season consisted of the following:
Machin:   Bud plays good combination and works in well under the basket.   Played
centre.
Idyll:  Clarence is an accurate shot and plays well on the forward line.
McAllister:   Ernie joined the team late in the season; steady player in any position.
Prior:   John was a very successful manager, playing several games as well when
the team was in a pinch.
Phair:   Harold plays a fast game at centre; should develop rapidly.
Thurber:    "Bish" plays guard; a rebound hound and a fast dribbler.
Morrison:    Rex is a hard fighter and fast on the breaks.   Plays forward.
Pallas:   Tom works hard at forward and plays good combination.
Not in photo:
Wolfe:   Bill plays guard and is very hard to get past, as opposing forwards found.
Clarke:   Les plays forward and has a fine long shot.
Page Ninety-one -
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Back Row—T. Rader; A. Kirby; C. Campbell; R. Keillor; W. Williscroft; E. Senkler; D. Malcolm;
A. Dick (Pres.); J. Price (Coach).
Middle Row—W. Morrow (Coach); Dr. Burke (Coach); R. King; I. Bourne; J. Roberts.
Front Row—F. Price; G. Snelling; D. Mclntyre; D. Farrington (Capt.); F. Rush; H. Poole;
P. Patterson; S. Ackhurst
Big Four Canadian Rugby
npHE CANADIAN RUGBY CLUB, under President Archie Dick, and a capable
*■ executive, got away to a good start and had cm excellent year. Doc Burke
was again head coach, with Joe Price and Bill Morrow assistant coaches; and with
a large amount of green material they turned out a team good enough to win the
Western Inter-collegiate Championship. The year opened by Varsity playing two
games in the Big Four League and valuable experience resulted.
The big event of the season arrived when the University of Alberta came out to
compete for the Hardy Cup, held by U.B.C, who had won it in 1931. The Cup
was not competed for in 1932. The team was unfortunate in having Captain Dick
Farrington on the injured list, with the result that he was not at his best. The first
game was played in a dense fog, and was won by Alberta, but was ruled out
because the fog made proper playing impossible. At times the spectators completely surrounded the players on the field. The second game, played the following Saturday, was won by U.B.C, thus re-winning the cup. This game featured the
playing of Doug Mclntyre.
The executive for the year consisted of Archie Dick, President; Jack Turvey,
Business and Publicity Manager; and Roy Eyre, Secretary.
Page Ninety two — ■   ■ ■ ■   ' ■  "+JfJ*'—~^~-	
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Back Row    B. Morrow (Coach); Tony Mclntyre; T. Rader; D. Ferguson; J. Mortimer;
R. Henderson;  P. O'Brian;  F. Rush;  G. Crosby;  G. R. Parady;  G. Snelling.
Front Row—M. Cox; E. Kenny; R. Beqg; F. Patterson; W. Moffat; L. McHugh; D. Baker; B. Wallace;
G. Housser,
Senior City Rugby
/^vWING to the lack of weight in the second string team last fall it was deemed
^ advisable not to enter in the Senior City League. However, a strong Interscholastic team was built up under the direction of Bill Morrow, who certainly
taught the boys a lot of football "sense."
In the spring things looked a lot better. A new system was instigated on the
recommendation of Doc Burke. "Doc" suggested that the Senior City team be
turned into a spring-training for next year's Big Four team. This has been put into
effect with very promising results. Quite a few of last year's Big Four players
were allowed to play, and together with a lot of new material they gained some
real football knowledge, under the able guidance of Bill Morrow and Dick King.
Although the team did not end up at the top of the league they showed a
keen spirit and always put up a good fight. On the whole the season has been
successful, and some good results can be expected from these boys in next fall's
Big Four Team.
Page  Ninety-three ■V     *?*    >^      «|>    >'•  >%'.    «►•
Back Row—I. Tyrwhitt (Coach);  J. Harrison; S. Leggatt; W. Morris; R. Upward;  E. Maguire;
E. Senkler; A. Mercer.
Middle Row—T. Mitchell; M. Owen; H. Pearson (Vice-Captain); K. Mercer (Captain); G. Brand
(President); C. Dalton; D. Tye.
Front Row—R. Gaul; P. Clement; D. Pugh; I. Pyle.
McKechnie Cup Rugby Team
THE English Rugby season opened up well with at least fifty men turning out to
play this sport. Coach Jack Tyrwhitt had a nucleus of experienced men as well
as a wealth of newcomers to Varsity Rugby from which to choose the first-string
team. Because Howie Cleveland did not return the team elected Ken Mercer as
Captain.
For the first few games there were many changes on the team in order to
insure that everybody available had an opportunity to play under senior rugby
conditions. Despite the unsettled nature of the team it was able to come from
behind to beat the Rowing Club in the first game by a score of 14-12. The next
game was the traditional annual match between Varsity and the Grads' team.
After a poor exhibition on Varsity's part the game ended 8-5 in the Grads favor.
After this set-back the team settled down and won consistently until they came up
against the All-Blacks. The game was played in North Vancouver, and Varsity
play was good in the first half but bad in the second. The final score was 15-0.
The return game was the best English Rugby game seen at Brockton Point for
years. Although the game ended 11-3 for the All-Blacks, the game was close and
the Varsity team was given credit for a very good performance.
Much of the credit for the team's success must go to Jack Tyrwhitt. With untiring regularity and patience he spent Wednesday afternoons chasing the teams
around rocky practice fields.
Those who played during the term were: Fullback, Gordon Brand; three-quarters, Dave Pugh, Chris. Dalton, Strat Leggat, Al. Mercer, Norm Hager; five-eighths,
Ken Mercer (Captain); half, Deny Tye; forwards, Jim Mitchell, John Harrison, Jimmy
Pyle, Paul Clement, Ron Upward, Bill Morris, Ed. Maguire, Eddie Sinclair, Harry
Pearson (Vice-Captain).
This year the Christmas Day game was revived. A team of California and
Stanford University men defeated the Varsity team 10-8.
Page Ninety-four A*-
UNlVtRSt
-du£
L* ... u..i.   .    .......
Back Row -H. Sladen; R. Wood;  B. Arkwright;  B. Vrooman; P. Colthurst;  G. Armstrong;
R. Maconachie (Coach).
Front Row—G. Sanderson; L. Wilson; T. Madeley; P. Ellis (Captain); G. Johnston; R. Roberts.
Absent—A. Rennie; P. Douglas; S. McMullen.
2nd Division English Rugby
"\ rARSITY'S second division English Rugby Team has been unable to repeat the
v success that was experienced last year, but in spite of being defeated on a
good many occasions the season has by no means been a failure. The team has
gained valuable experience, and has put up some stiff opposition for the other
teams in the league.
Varsity's chief weakness has lain in the inability to put the same team on the
field two weeks running. Serious injuries deprived them of two of their best forwards, while the scrum-half position had to be filled by three different men. The
first of these left Varsity in the middle of the first term. Then half-way through the
second term their new scrum-half was removed by illness, so a third had to be
found to fill the position. This constant changing, coupled with the necessity of
parting with some men for Senior ranks, did not enable the back field to work
together.
On three occasions the team played to a draw. One of these was against
Ex-Tech, who are one of the leaders in the second half of the league. Only three
times was the team defeated badly. One wag the first game of the season, when
Varsity, of necessity, fielded an untrained and inexperienced team. Another was
when a team composed largely of Third Division men was defeated at Nanaimo.
The team is much indebted to Ray Maconachie for his untiring efforts as
coach. Although handicapped by lack of experience in his men, he produced a
team which was well up to the standard of Second Division Rugby. He took a
great interest in his team and spared no efforts in their behalf.
Among those who have played during the season are: Full-back, B. Goumeniouk; three-quarters, G. Sanderson, P. Ellis, B. Vrooman, L. Wilson, D. Macdonald; forwards, T. Madeley, R. Wood, A. Rennie, P. Douglas, S. McMullen, H. Sladen,
B. Arkwright, P. Colthurst, G. Armstrong, R. Roberts, and G. Johnston.
Page Ninety-five fc THE TOTEM
SBZIj
3&
Back Row—G. Sutherland; R. Stewart; W. Wolfe (Business Manager); S. Greenwood; J. Waugh;
A. MacDougall.
Middle Row—J. E. Costain (Honorary Vice-President);  J. Balcombe (Secretary);  E. J. Costain
(President); P. Kozoolin (Captain); D. Todd; W. Creamer (Manager); Dr. D. Todd (Hon. Pres.)
Front Row   B. Thurber; H. Smith; J. Martin; M. McGill.
Senior Soccer
THE SEASON of 1933-34, whatever the results as regards league standings or cup
series, will be remembered as a banner year for the Soccer Club, for it marks
the return of the Club to its former Major Sport Standing. This is the* culmination
of work started in 1929 by Ernie Roberts and his colleagues, and carried on by succeeding executives.
The showing of the Varsity team in the Mainland Cup Series after the University closed last spring was the high-light of the past year's campaigning. In this
series, the Blue and Gold eleven defeated Cowan-Dodson, who shortly after carried
off the B. C. Championship, and reached the finals. They lost there by a score of
4-3 to Chinese Students in a scintillating game.
This year the team is stronger than in any of the previous five seasons. The
players showed marked improvement in defence and have a vastly better offence.
Stan Greenwood, a freshman, plays a steady game in goal, while the expert McGill
and husky Waugh are a splendid pair of full-backs. Russ Stewart and Bill Wolfe,
last year's freshmen, along with veteran Ernie Costain, form a half line noted for its
close checking and constructive play.
Another freshman, Jack Martin, leads the forwards, and is quickly finding his
feet in higher company. Captain Paul Kozoolin, inside right, is the schemer of the
attack, making many openings and scoring many goals. Dave Todd and Archie
MacDougall form a strong left wing.
The executive for the year was headed again by Dr. Todd as Hon. President,
with Ernie Costain as President; Ted Denne, Vice-President; Bill Wolfe, Business
Manager; Bill Creamer, Senior Manager, and Paul Kozoolin, third time Captain.
Page Ninety-six H9E
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Back Row—J. E. Costain (Hon. Vice-President); F. Orme; W. Irish; C. E. Denne (Vice-President)
J. Balcombe (Secretary).
Front Row—R. Chester; D. Atwater (Captain); Moodie; A. Lloyd; Darwin; B. Bardswell.
Junior Soccer
7\ S IN previous years Varsity has entered a team in the Junior Alliance League of
Vancouver. At present the Juniors rank seventh out of ten teams, having won
two games, drawn four, and lost five. However, this ranking is not a fair indication
of the calibre of their football. Varsity was the team that stopped the West Van.
Rangers after they had won eight straight games. Furthermore, they have scored
twenty goals as opposed to only ten last season and have a lesser total against
them.
The personnel of the team is as follows: Francis Orme, who always has been
a safe bet in goal; Dawson Moodie, who has been a steller full-back; Ted Denne,
who can always be relied on at half-back; Hugh Goddard, a hard-working forward;
Wingett Irish, who can be depended on for fine centres from the right wing; Alan
Lloyd, the main reason for the increased goal average; Don Atwater, who does his
share at inside right; Bruce Bardwell, who stars on the left wing; Bishop Thurber,
who, as captain, did many good things at centre half before becoming a Senior;
Roger Chester, an equally good forward or half-back.
Page Ninety-seven I' >■».>
THE TOTEM^
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VICTORIA TEAM
Back Row—M. Stewart; A. Allen; H. Agnew.
Front Row - H. Barclay; W. Stott; D. McTavish; J. Roberts.
Track Club
rT~*HE TRACK CLUB, during the season 1933-34, has been exceptionally lucky in
*■ securing the services of Bob Dixon of V.A.A.C. as coach. The value of his
work has already been seen in the indoor track meet held at Victoria on January
19th. In this meet Varsity was conceded little chance to make a good showing
against the strong Victoria team, but Varsity decisively won the affair by the overwhelming score of 67-33. On March 24th the Varsity team journeys to Tacoma
for a dual meet with the College of Puget Sound, and in view of the showing made
against Victoria the hopes of the U.B.C. supporters are optimistic for a win over
their southern rivals.
Last fall the annual Varsity-Frosh meet was held, which ended in an unusual
Frosh victory. The Arts '30 road race was won easily by Herb Barclay. The spring
programme includes the cross-country run, the traditional Arts '20 run, the Inter-
faculty meet and the Inter-class meet. This is an intensive programme and the
indications all point to a very successful season.
Last summer members of the Varsity team took part in numerous meets throughout the Province with considerable success. The achievements of two men stand
out—Jim McCannon was granted Canadian Junior Records in three events, Shot-
Put, the Discus, and the Javelin, and Gordon Heron made a similar record in the
Broad Jump. These two men, and also Herb Barclay, who recently defeated the
B. C. Half-mile champion at his favorite distance, seemed potential Olympic material, and should bring great credit to the Club which they now represent.
Page Ninety-eight taifc,
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IJNtVtRStTY^BmTiSHCtfLilMBIAdl
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Back Row—P. Kozoolin;  M. Klinkhamer;  H. Agnew;   H. Barclay.
Front Row—J. Todd; M. Stewart; G. Brand;  D. Pugh.
Arts 70 Relay
■pOR the third time in four years Arts '34, so-called "Super-class," has won the
major race of the year, the Arts '20 Relay. This is indeed enviable, but is
only in keeping with other achievements of the class.
In its freshman year, Arts '34 won by a large margin. The following year,
however, with almost the same team, they could come no better than third. As
juniors, they entered a very strong team and would have broken the existing
record had they had keener competition. This year the team, with five of last year's
members, added three strong runners to the line-up and literally "cleaned-up."
Expectation of victory was not as great as in former years—in fact members of the
team were frankly dubious, but the margin of victory was as great as ever.
Max Stewart, Gordon Brand, and Dave Todd have run the same lap at least
three times; Pugh and Barclay have helped the team win twice; Agnew and Klinkhamer and Kozoolin did not run last year, but combined to give Arts '34 much
needed strength. Swift and Spragge have also run for the team three times, but
this year were unfortunately unable to run.
Each year that '34 has won the race, the team has never been headed from
the second lap to the end. Three triumphs in four years is a record that will probably never be bettered.
Page Ninety-nine TOE TOTEM
Back Row—R. S. Bans; R. Ward; A. Ames;  T. Vance; Hoyka;  J. Gray; P. Bremner.
Middle Row    B. McMaster;  Dr. H. Warren;  M. Ritchie (Captain);  Professor Logan (Honorary
President); W. Barr; Professor Black (Coach); P. Disney.
Front Row—J. Sargeant; D. Blackaller; C. Clarke.
Men's Grass Hockey Club
\T TlTHOUT doubt the 1933-34 season has been the best within the history of the
W Men's Grass Hockey Club.   This year the Club won the O. B. Allan Cup in
the series, and finished up in second in the league.
As usual, the Club fielded two teams throughout the year. Much of their
success was due to the untiring efforts of the president, W. Barr, and the captain,
M. Ritchie.
With most of last year's team returning for next year the chances of the
Varsity team coming out on top of the league next year are very promising. Professor W. G. Black and Dr. Harry Warren acted as coaches again this year, and
they have done much to improve the technique of the individual members. It is
also due to their unfailing work that the Club has made such a good standing.
The Annual Banquet was again a feature of the year, but unfortunately the
turn-out was not as good as last year's. The speakers were: Honorary President,
Col. H. F. Logan and Professor W. G. Black.
Executive for the 1933-34 season were: Honorary President, Col. H. F. Logan;
Coach, Professor W. G. Black; President, W. Barr; Captain, M. Ritchie; Secretary,
P. Bremner. The executive for the 1934-35 season will include: President, I. Knight;
Captain, P. Bremner, and Secretary, P. Disney.
Page One Hundred J.
SBBIkj
^NlVtRMTY-BRITiStfCdLilMBIA^i
Back Row—M. Whitelaw;  K. Hentig;  G. Livingstone;  T. Wilkinson.
Front Row—L. Teetzel; A. Marling (President); C. McCadden; T. Charlton.
Golf Club
'-pHE Golf Club started out this year with what looked like a record season ahead
of it. In an effort to obtain revenge for the terrible defeat given our team by
the University of Washington in Seattle last year, our men spent all September and
October practising. A strong team was chosen to meet the U. of Washington,
but they were disappointed when the match was cancelled one day before it was
scheduled to take place owing to some technical obstacle. However, March 10th
has been set aside as a tentative date for the playing of the match.
Many players have shown especial enthusiasm this year in turning out to
try for places on the team. Some of the new men are: J. Berry, A. Wood, A.
Mcintosh and Mackay Whitelaw; while the many veterans who returned include:
A. Marling, T. Charlton, C. McCadden, T. Wilkinson, G. Livingston, K. Hentig,
G. Prevost and L. Teetzel.
February 24th and March 3rd have been set aside for the playing of the 36-hole
Varsity Championship.   Prizes will be given for the low gross and low net scores.
The executive for the year consisted of Hon. Pres., Prof. Knapp; Pres., Sandy
Marling; Secretary, L. Teetzel.
Page One Hundred and One TOTEM^rr
i^hiT
INTERCOLLEGIATE SKI TEAM
Back Row- -J. Deane;   A.  Morton.
Front Row—J. Orr;  D. Manley;  J. Fairley.
Absent    J. Mitchell;  E. Mitchell;  S. Bruce;  B. Taylor;  D. Bell;  D. Northcott;  B. McGinnis.
Varsity Outdoor Club
UNDER the capable executive, composed of J. M. Orr, President; Muriel Christie,
Vice-President; John Deane, Secretary; Jack Mitchell, Marshal; Margaret
Buchanan, Archivist, the Outdoor Club has again had an active year, several innovations having been added to the usual programme.
About twenty-five members made a successful trip to the Lions last May after
the exams. The Club chartered a small boat and went by way of Brunswick Beach.
It was an excellent climb, marred only by the cold wind on the ridge. However,
the journey back by boat on one of the clearest of May nights more than made
up for that.
In October the Club, as usual, put all its prospective members through the
hard grind of work guaranteed to quell all but the most enthusiastic. This year a
new woodshed was built, a most magnificent edifice. Those not engaged on the
shed cut the quantities of wood necessary to fill it. The women, as usual, dished up
the piles of delectable food to feed the workers. As a final test the prospective
members were taken up Seymour through a driving rainstorm. After these preliminaries about twenty-five members were elected.
In November the first party took place at the Fraser Roller Skating Rink, where
it was discovered that roller skates are as hard to control as skis.
As usual, a large crowd gathered at the cabin over New Year's to eat the two
turkeys cooked by the Club's best cooks. The second party of the year was held
in the ice rink at the Auditorium in February.
This year, for the first time, an inter-collegiate meet has been arranged between
U.B.C. and the University of Washington. It is scheduled to take place about the
middle of March. The Varsity team has been receiving constant coaching from
Nels Nelson, former world champion ski jumper. They have also participated in
several races ^gainst other Vancouver ski clubs and made a good showing. So
maybe the Washington boys will be shown a thing or too when they come up.
After the meet the Club is sponsoring a dance at the Grouse Mountain Chalet.
Page One Hundred and Two :jfsmh.    A*^W)
U NlVfltSITY-BRITISH COLDMBIA
Back Row- Harold Lando; Claire Green; Alan Lloyd
Front Row    Peggy Reid; David Todd; Gladys Munton.
Tennis Club
npHE Tennis Club's main event of the year is its annual tournament which commenced at the beginning of the Fall Term. Bad weather, however, generally
halted the play and the matches were concluded in the Spring. At the time of
going to press only the second round has been played, but there are an unusually
large number of candidates entered. Among those making a bid for the trophies
are: Harold Lando (former U.B.C. singles champion), Lionel Backler, Don Matthews,
Dave Todd, Jack Parnell, while among the female entries are: Clare Green and
Peggy Reid.
The executive of the year is as follows:   President, Dave Todd; Vice-President,
Peggy Reid; Secretary-Treasurer, Alan Lloyd; Executive Member, Gladys Munton.
Page One Hundred and Three Back Row—L.  Boyd;   G.  Samis;   E.  Seldon;   R.  Allen.
Front Row-  M. Locke;  P. McTaggart-Cowan;  H. Palmer.
Badminton Club
THIS YEAR was a successful one for the Badminton Club.   With a membership
of over forty it has kept the four courts in the University gymnasium well-filled
on two evenings a week.
The annual tournament of the Club has not ben held yet, but it is expected
that there will be many participants like last year.
Three of the boys on the first team, Ronald Allen, Gordon Samis and Elliott
Seldon are newcomers to the Varsity Badminton Club. Gordon and Elliott are
sophomores but did not play with us last year. Ronald, the North-western B. C.
champion, is a freshman. The other new member of the team is Lillian Boyd, a
freshette, Molly Locke, Hope Palmer, Margaret Palmer and Pat McTaggart-Cowan
are from last year's first team.
The second team has been represented by various members of the Club, including Kay Armstrong, Joy Campbell, Molly Hanning, Marjorie Manson, Lillian
Walker, Pat Constance, Chris Loot, Ralph Moore, Bill Prentice, Gerald Prevost and
Bill Tremaine.
Executive for the year was as follows: Honorary President, Mr. W. Black; President, Pat McTaggart-Cowan; Vice-President, Hope Palmer; Secretary, Marjorie
Manson; Treasurer, Bill Tremaine.   Committee:  Gordon Samis.
Page One Hundred and Four WL' a^   ^^^^IJNimtSfTY^
The Swimming Club
'-pHIS year the membership of the Club was about fifty.   The executive consist-
*■   ing of Jack Milburn, President; Florence Jackson, Vice-President; William Wain-
wright, Secretary; Pat Hurley, Treasurer, and Jack Bourne, Team Captain.
Practices were held all season at the Crystal Pool and the attendance was
very good. The mentor for the Club was Norman Cox, the well-known authority on
swimming.
In the fall term the only competition was with the Associated Vancouver clubs
when several of our members successfully took part in an open gala. W.
Lougheed, G. Minns, and W. Trapp were successful in their events.
During the Spring term a new field of inter-collegiate activity was opened up.
The Swimming Club journeyed to Seattle to take part in a meet with the University
of Washington Swimming Club. U.B.C. came off second best, but since both
clubs hope this will be continued in the future, we have strong hopes of seeing this
defeat avenged next year. Those who made the trip under the direction of Jack
Bourne were: H. Andison, W. Moxon, W. Wainwright, M. Lougheed, C. Ridland,
W. Ray, M. Lund, G. Minns, and J. Milburn.   Coach Cox accompanied the team.
Invitations were received from the Victoria "Y" and Victoria College for meets,
but the Club was unable to accept them, having already made the Washington.
However, it is hoped that next year all these trips can be undertaken.
This season we were only able to hold one inter-class meet. This was held at
the Crystal Pool in February. As far as the men were concerned, the points counted
towards the Governor's Cup. First place was won by Science '37, with Arts '36
runners-up. The high point winners were George Minns, Science '37 and "Muff"
Lougheed, Arts '36. In the women's division Arts '36 placed first with Arts '34 in
second place. High point winners were Kay Bourne of Arts '36 and Edna Carter
of Arts '36.
The outstanding swimmers in the Club this year were: Harry Andison, one of
the fastest fifty-yard men in the province; "Muff" Lougheed, rated about the best
diver in the City; Dorothy Rennie, one of the best plungers in Canada and the
world; and Kay Bourne, the fastest girl swimmer in the Club.
Page One Hundred and Five * ^^m^**
9 f 4 •*»**■* Sis
t  1   til:  i - •
nut   W
Back Row—J. Mitchell; D. Tye; C. Dalton; M. Stewart; J. Bardsley; P. Kozoolin; F. Bolton; M. Owen.
Middle Row—H. Agnew;  E. Senkler; R. Osborne; L. Nicholson; R. Keillor; N. Pratt;  H. Pearson.
Front Row—Col. Loqan;  A. Kirby;  G. Brand;  R. Farrington (Pres.);  F. Rush;  F. Alpen;
K. Mercer; Dr. Burke-
Men's Block Club
T^HE BIG BLOCK CLUB has been rather restricted in its activities this year because
of lack of funds. Its main activity, that of cultivating comradeship among the
athletes on the campus, has been, however, continued. To this end the Club has
held monthly meetings which have been preceded by informal suppers in the
cafeteria.
An attempt has been made this year to form a link between the athletes of
the University and those of the various city High Schools. The movement is only
in its infancy but, when more fully developed, should prove beneficial to athletics
both on the Campus and in the High Schools.
The Club has continued to act as a general service club on the Campus, providing officials for track meets and ushers for games and theatrical productions.
The executive for the year has been: Honorary Presidents, Col. Logan, Col.
Letson, Dr. Burke, and Phil Willis; President, Dick Farrington; Vice-President, Bobby
Gaul, and Secretary, Ned Pratt.
Page Qne Hundred and Six SL.      .A^1**^ "i
IJNlVEnStTY^B«ITJ^irCgLI)rVlBIA^|
•&*?&£■•*.--•
Back Row—Audrey Munton; Phae Van Dusen; Molly Locke; Helen Joost.
Front Row—Audrey Harper; Beatrice Delbert; Gladys Munton (Pres.); Kay Bourne; Dorothy Rennie.
Women's Big Block Club
T-HE WOMEN'S BIG BLOCK CLUB has been an organization on this campus for
the past four years.   Its members consist of graduates and undergraduates who
have won the Big Block, the highest award for women's sports.
The aim of the Club is to foster women's sports, to encourage more women to
participate, and to maintain a high degree of awards.
Early this fall members of the Club interviewed all freshettes and informed
them of the various organizations on the campus. In the spring a committee was
chosen to make out an awards list for Presentation Day.
The Club holds a lunch every three weeks at Union College and in the fall
the girls were guests at a lunch given by Dr. Pilcher.
The executive consists of Honorary President, Dr. Pilcher; President, Gladys
Munton; Vice-President, Verna Dellen, and Secretary, Kay Bourne.
Page One Hundred and Seven f itm*■».*
J. Porter (Coach); A. Munton (Captain); V. Mellish; M. Hall; J. Henning; J. Thomas; B. Evans;
M. Mellish.
Senior "A" Basketball
THE Senior Women's team was entered this year in the Senior "B" division of
the Vancouver and District League, competing against Gadgets and Spencers.
The girls were disappointed in not having as coach, for the first time in several
years, Jack Barberie, who was chiefly responsible for Varsity's former success in
Women's Basketball. We were fortunate, however, in securing the services of
Jerry Porter, who acted as coach this year.
This year's team consisted of: Jean Thomas, Audrey Munton, Margaret Hall,
from last years Senior team; Violet Mellish and Jo Henning, former Intermediate
players, and Beth Evans and Marjorie Mellish, freshettes. The loss of Gladys
Munton, because of a recent illness, and of several other members of last year's
team because of other activities, was a serious blow to the team. Much hard
practice and constant effort was necessary to get the team in shape and only
the faithfulness of the few girls turning out made it possible to carry on. We
hope that next year's team will have more luck and wish them every possible
success.
Beth Evans—Centre.   A first rate centre with a good long shot.   Has the makings
of a star.
Jean Thomas—Guard.   A fine defense player is always dependable.   The most
valuable player on the team.
Marjory Mellish—Guard.   A newcomer to Varsity who showed up well at guard.
She snared her share of the baskets.
Violet Mellish—Guard.   Has plenty of energy and determination.   Played forward
as well as guard.
Jo Henning—Forward.   Always did her best; a good sport and supporter.
Margaret Hall—Forward.   Light but tricky.   Uusually good for several points each
game.
Audrey Munton—Forward.   Our diminutive captain who plays a good game and
keeps the team well in hand.
Page One Hundred and Eight w
h*H.
l****,
^ax,
UNlVtRStTY^BRITiSirCffLIJWBIA
Back Row- J. Porter (Coach);  R. Elliott;  A. Zuback;  J. Dawson.
Front Row    M. Haspel; M. Cunningham; B. Morris.
Intermediate "A" Women's Basketball
■\ rARSITY again entered a team in the Intermediate "A" Division of the Vancouver
and District League. A more varied competition was offered in this division as
seven teams were entered. The team, coached by Jerry Porter, met with considerable success up to Christmas, winning four out of six games. After Christmas
however, it was necessary to withdraw this team from the league as several of the
girls were out-of-town students and could not be present for games over the weekend.   The other girls turned out for the rest of the season with the Seniors.
The Team:    Jean Dawson, Anne Zubeck, Margaret Haspel, Ruth Elliott, and
Margaret Cunningham.
Jean Dawson—Guard.   Dependable.   Ability to make the senior grade.
Margaret Cunningham.    Forward.    A promising player with lots of speed.
Betty Morse—Forward.   Smooth, steady player, but only turned out for a few games.
Anne Zuback—Forward.   A good shot and team player.
Margaret  Haspel   Centre.    Used  one-handed  shots  effectively.    Showed  great
improvement during the year.
Ruth Elliott—Guard.   Tried hard but lacked experience.
Page One. Hundred and Nine fcTH£TOTEM=
Back Row—I. Wallace, H. Mayers;  J. Whaston;  T. Campbell; P. Johnston; A. Beaumont.
Front Row—B. Mowat; D. Yelland; M. Henderson; B. Brandon; S. Allachin.
Women's Grass Hockey
THE season 1933-34 has been a fairly successful year for the Women's Grass
Hockey Club.   As usual, two teams were fielded, the "U.B.C." and "Varsity."
This year the league introduced two divisions in place of the one of previous
years because with the new teams the season would be too long.   At the time of
going to press the "U.B.C." team is sure of second place and has a very good
opportunity to work into the first berth.
The University was honoured this year by having Helen Mayers chosen to
play on the Vancouver Women's All-star Team against the High School Representative Team.
The executive for the year was as follows: Honorary President, Mrs. Boving;
President, Irene Wallace; Vice-President, Margaret Henderson; Secretary-Treasurer,
Eileen Allchin; Captain "U.B.C." Team, Helen Mayers; Captain "Varsity" Team,
Ellen Raphael.
PERSONNEL OF THE "U.B.C." TEAM:
Helen Mayers—Captain.   The best defence player on the team.
Irene Wallace—President.   An excellent stick handler.
Margaret Henderson—Vice-President.    A goalkeeper who very rarely fails.
Eileen Allchin—Secretary-Treasurer.   A small girl who does big things.
Margaret Atkinson—A speedy wing and a good scorer.
Dorothy Yelland—One of the best, a hard worker who is always on the job.
Joan Wharton—Centre and chief scorer.
Ardy Baumont—Has shown great improvement on the wing.
Ruth Brandon—The smallest girl on the team but makes up for its as a sure
tackier.
Robina Mouat—Fast, faithful and dependable.
Pat Johnson—A most useful spare.
Page One Hundred and Ten 23^*1
LNtVtRSfTY^BRITiSirC^mriBIA
rrrt        fnf. Arf—"
Back Row    M. Youds;  J. Kennedy;  F. Wright;  J. McDonald;  J. Wilson;  A. Hackman.
Front Row—E. Blanchard; E. Houston; E. Raphael (Capt.); K. Scott; E. Spragge.
Women's Grass Hockey
"VARSITY" TEAM PERSONNEL
Ellen Raphael—Captain.   The team would fare hard without her.
Janet Kennedy—A good reliable wing and a consistent scorer.
Jeam McDonald—Works well with Janet.
Essie Blanchard—A new-comer but promising.
Joy Wilson—Centre half who checks well.
Molly Youds—Right wing, and fleet of foot.
Elsie Spragge—A faithful and steady player.
Frances Wright—A hard hitter.
Marian Brink—Keeps close check on her opponent.
Kay Scott—A formidable obstacle to the opposing team.
Elizabeth Houston—Very dependable and can fill two positions.
Annie Hackman—A spare who is always willing to turn out.
Page One Hundred and Eleven  LITERARY
SUPPLEMENT
:s:  A Rat in the Nettles
(Tsa-al, a Haida Prince of the North Island, tells the story)
Now that we're north of The Cape, you can untie his hands. I've got a use for
him up in Haidaland, and I don't want him to die on the way. Only if you see
him reaching for the little cedar box amidships there by the heads, knife him.
Southland magic is strong stuff, and if he once gets his fingers on that box, we
might as well jump overside to the dogfish.
I learned a lot about Southland magic while I was a slave at Cowichan.
Considering that I'd accounted for a good many of his people on one raid or
another, my master treated me very decently. You'd laugh at me if I tried to pronounce his name; Fisher-by-night it means in our language. He was rich as these
southerners go, with several canoes, plenty of gear both for fishing and war, and
three quite passable wives.
Rich, and just a little conceited; he liked to hear himself talk, and he wasn't
always careful as to what he said. Now in the south you can say just about what
you please even to a tyee, but when you're dealing with a shaman, it's best to
speak him soft and fair.
This old crow here had just come down from the hills, where it seems he went
every so often to renew his magic. He came down thin and shaggy, so that he
made one think of a dead man walking; but his eyes were hard and bright as the
sea-agates we pick up on the beaches of the North Island.
"Look on me," he cried, "and be afraid! I have seen the white grouse that only
a shaman may see. I have been far up where the trees grow small and the stars
are close.   Be afraid now, for there is no stronger shaman than I who walk among
it
you.
The people shrank back and gave him room. Not so Fisher-by-night, however: short-tempered he was, you see, and forever running headlong into trouble.
"My child was sick," he said, "and you could not cure him. While you were
sleeping in the hills came the shaman from Koksilah with a cure. So I look on you,
and am not afraid."
No word from the shaman of Cowichan. But that night he stalked into the
rancherie, thin and tall in the shadows. He shook his rattle in one hand, while the
little demons inside it talked softly. In the other hand he held the cedar box, the
one here in the canoe with us.
He set the box between his feet and stood, eyes on Fisher-by-night, muttering
to himself, over and over the same: "Soul," he whispered, "soul, come out and into
my box!"
My master sat as one in a trance, unstirring. Sweat stood out on his forehead,
and his gaze was on the box of cedar between the shaman's feet. Then the rattling
stopped and the muttering stopped, and in the hush that followed we heard a faint
scratching, as of some small, prisoned animal.
It came from the box!
Page One Hundred and Fifteen lETOTEftfarr
The shaman whirled cackling into the dark. Fisher-by-night sat very still, and
the women lifted their voices in a wail.
There was a rat in the nettles outside the rancherie the next morning. A big
rat, bending the nettle-stalks this way and that as it scurried about. It must have
been either sick or crazy, or it would certainly have run away when the children
came up from the beach. The shaman came, too, with the box, empty now, under
his arm.
"See," he called. "Oh, the large rat! Who will spear it for me? I have a
bow, a fine seas-otter bow, for the lad that kills it."
They were after it on the instant, of course. It was one of Fisher-by-night's own
children who finally ran it down. He stabbed at it with his short flounder-prod . . .
and, as if this were a signal, one high, agonized scream rang from the dark interior
of the rancherie.
Fisher-oy-night was dead, quite dead, when we reached him.
Then, before we could realize just what had happened, the canoes swept around
the point, and the killing was on. And here am I, a Long-Knife and a free man
again, cruising home to the north with as many heads and slaves as anyone could
wish for.
What am I going to do with the shaman?
Use him for my new house: I'd like to see how much his Southland magic helps
him a foundation-post is settling into the small of his back!
Strike up the Wolf Song, bow.   We've a long pull yet to The Islands.
—A.M.
For My Friend
Lovely one, my wistful one, here you shall lie
Dreaming, hidden apart;
Quietly, oh quietly, under the drifting sky,
And over your heart
Fireweed will flame, and the low winds go by.
Lost to all men, even to me who love you,
When the night falls
You will hear them singing, the low winds above you
Until God calls.
Until God calls us, making of death a jest,
And if He forget
I will bend to the kind brown earth over your breast,
Remembering yet,
And with one word, low-spoken, break your rest.
—T.M.
Page One Hundred and Sixteen £m<    A*S*J»j«.l
UNIVERSITY ^BRiTlSIf COLUMBIA
WHAT'S  THE ERROR
'INTRODUCING-
HAPPY DAYS       HOW FAR TO EDMONTON? FROSH
VIVE  LE   PUB
COOKIE PUSHING
HIYA BOYS
IN THE  PUB DO DROP IN
Page One Hundred and Seventeen The Sword of  Koheleth
"K XT ORE than two thousand years ago there lived a man in Israel. He was old
■*■"■*• and he was wise. He had seen many things and done many things. But
he had no satisfaction from them. So he brooded on the life of man and wrote
what he saw therein. His words were like sharp swords: men read them and were
afraid. "He cuts too deep," said the Elders. "Let us blunt his sword or he will hew
down the temple." They blunted his sword by putting soft putty round the edge.
Then said the Elders' "This sword is now our sword; we will hang it up before God
and men shall worship it."
Thus we have the book called Ecclesiastes, so beautiful, so haunting, yet withal
so sad and so terrible, that it inspires an allegory to describe it.
Who was he that forged the sword? We do not know; antiquity has swallowed
him up. He was rich and mighty in the land, he had observed widely and pondered darkly, he called himself Solomon but was not Solomon—this much we reasonably surmise. But we cannot tell how he looked. Was he tall, thin and tired,
or squat, sturdy and strong? He had a white beard, I am sure, and grey eyes that
twinkled yet—but am I sure? I am not. I do not even know his name. Koheleth,
the book calls him, but that is not a name. It is a title, "leader of an assembly," or,
as the English render it, "the preacher."
But Koheleth does not write like a preacher; he writes like a diarist jotting down
thoughts from day to day. He pours out his mind in mournful observations. He
gives vent to the bitterness that fills him. Here he says, It is good; and again, It
is bad, logic is not in him. He lightens his words with poetry, darkens them with
sarcasm, sharpens them with epigram. None other of his country-men has written
with the moan-ful force of Koheleth.
So his sword was sharp and the Elders feared it. It pierced to the heart of things.
It glittered with a mockery of faith. "All is vanity," it wailed. "The world is chaos;
man is dust; God does not care." These were evil words. They tempted like a
poisoned pill coated with the tasty fruit of truth. They fascinated like the hooded
snake. They drained the blood of faith like the vampire of the Amazon. So the
Elders took these words and added new words: "God does care," they wrote. They
said then, These words are now good words; and they canonized them and dedicated them to God, that the sharp sword might do good.
In the temple where the Elders hung it, smudge pots of incense obscured the
sword, but lo! when I looked, the pristine ores came forth and spoke of the things
that are. The core of the blade is the unchangeable order of the world, rolling to
an end that no one knows. The tempering of the blade is the questing for a purpose
that does not exist. The pointing of the blade is the fruitless struggle for pleasure
that is vain, for riches that are empty, for wisdom that is forgotten, and for goodness
that is not to be found. The polishing of the blade is the pursuit of moral government
in a chaotic world. The hilt is the beastliness of man. The crosspiece is the dreary
nothingness of death.   The scabbard is an unloved God.
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Page One Hundred and Nineteen JaTOE TOrafa"=j
What is the sword as a whole? What flashes up when the smudges smoulder
out? "Take thy pleasure while thou canst, for all is vanity!" That is the sword of
Koheleth.   That is the song it sings.
This song of the sword is not a new song. It was cut on stone in ancient Babylon and Hammurabi the lawgiver, read it thus:
"Why, O Gilgamesh, dost thou wander about?
The life that thou seekest, thou wilt not find.
When the Gods created man,
Life they kept in their hands.
Thou, O Gilgamesh, fill thy belly,
Day and night be joyful!
Daily be glad!
Day and night make merry!
Let thy garments be white,
Anoint thy head, and purify thyself!
With the children at thy side,
Enjoy the wife of thy bosom!"
The poet of Naishapur heard the song in the desert. He looked into the star-
flecked sky; he gazed upon the purple sands; he put solitude into verse:
"Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend,
Before we too into the Dust descend;
Dust into Dust, and under Dust, to lie,
Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and- sans end!"
Aristippus and Epicurus heard the song in their pleasant grove. They set it
to the tune of twittering birds and growing things:   "Be happy, be happy, be happy!"
The winds of the Black Forest wailed the song to Schopenhauer; the pines
moaned his woeful dirge: "Thy reach exceeds thy grasp; thy want is greater than
thy strength; thou shalt not be satisfied."
So the sword of Koheleth sings songs as many as the thoughts of Koheleth who
made it. And Koheleth did not say, I will melt down my thought into one metal and
make my sword of that metal, so that men shall either look with delight upon it or
turn their heads away. Nay, I will make a sword of many metals, quoth Koheleth,
and he who loves the silver will gaze upon the silver, and he who covets gold will
gaze upon the gold; he of leaden thoughts will look upon the lead, and he of iron
spirit will think upon the iron.
Thus said Koheleth.   Thus did Koheleth.
Behold his swordl
—GERALD PREVOST.
Page One Hundred and Twenty >■?.**
UNlVTJtSITY^^niTiSirtyLUMBIA^
REVERIE
APRIL IZ th ? WHERES TILDEN?
CAME THE DAWN
MORE DAWN
Page One Hundred and Twenty-one The Islands
Out of the main the Islands roll,
Lifting their backs like a porpoise-shoal;
The surf runs snarling in on the beaches
And, drifting over the windy reaches,
The white gulls circle and swoop and cry
And watch the little black ships go by
Between the sea and the windy sky.
Royal are the Island names, and sweet:
Big Vancouver and small Lasquit',
Galiano and Gonzales,
Texada low in the long sea-ways ....
These and a thousand more beside
Echo the voice of the restless tide,
Perilous names, and names of pride.
But the spell of the Islands, who shall name?
Arbutus brighter than wind-whipped flame
By golden noon and by velvet night;
Red arbutus and lilies white.
And somber darkness of cedar-wings
And dogwood foaming in Island springs
Weave a magic of beautiful things.
Under the sun, under the sky,
The Islands dream as the years drift by.
And sure at the end of my faring forth
The Island magic of south-in-north
Will trouble my heart with a vagrant pain
Till I know that my Odyssey was vain
And turn from the world's rim, home again.
—ARTHUR MAYSE.
Page One Hundred and Twenty two Flowers have  been the  beginning
and the means of cementing
lifelong friendships
You can make no error when
you say it with flowers,
especially from
C2/bencer s CZ/L
ower
Ojlio
*
340 Seymour Street
Telephone: Seymour 1768
We Extend a Cordial Invitation
To All University Students
To Visit Our Vancouver
Showrooms
Here you will find on display, amid pleasant
surroundings, a Complete Line of our
Books
J. M. DENT 8C SONS, Ltd.
PUBLISHERS
Aldine House,  1300 Robson Street
Vancouver, B. C.
YOUR NEAREST BANK IS
THE CANADIAN
BANK OF COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branch
A general banking business is transacted and
accounts of the Faculty and Students of the
University  are   Invited
BANKERS TO THE ALMA MATER  SOCIETY
C. R. MYERS, Manager
The
University Book Store
T^HE BOOK STORE which occupies a room in
the Auditorium Building, was established for
the convenience of the students, and has effected
a considerable saving to the students in time and
money. It is prepared to supply all the text
books required for the various courses offered in
the University, also such articles as note books,
loose-leaf sheets, fountain pens, drawing paper
and instruments.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-three EfflTromi^ — -       — -- ,.^  a
The Horn
(From the French of Alfred de Vigny)
I love the sound of the horn calling through woodland grey
Whether it sings the tears of the frightened doe at bay,
Or the hunter's adieu the forest echo receives,
And the chill northwind carries, breathing among the leaves.
How often, in the shadows that night wears,
That sound has reached me, and has moved to tears,
For I seemed to hear the sad, prophetic call
That heralded the warrior hero's fall.
Majestic mountains, where the rapids roar,
Frazona, Marbore, graveyard of the Moor,
Above the river sources cold winds freeze;
Below, clear run the streams of the Pyrenees.
Throne of two seasons, frozen and flower-strewn hills,
Forehead of ice, and foot of lawns and rills,
There we must sit and listen .... there at times are borne
The sad and tender notes of some far-distant horn.
Often a traveller, when there is no sound
With that clear voice of brass makes all the night resound,
And with these cadenced notes there mingle sweet
Murmuring bells, and the young lamb's plaintive bleat.
Careless of hiding at the ominous sound
A doe stands frozen on the rocky mound;
And the cascade unites in splendid fall
Eternally its plaint to dim Romance's call.
Souls of the Chevaliers, return you thus forlorn?
Is it you who speak again with the voice of the horn?
In Roncevaux's dark valley, tomb of the bold
Roland's great spirit is not yet consoled!
—THEODORE PLUMMER.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-four MlV**m.    A*-
Z&**~
_»~
TO 75V£ RESCUE ARTS
i ii!
5/?/W 77?6(5T
CAUGHT UNAWARE
THE MISSING LINK
TUT TUT
Hft8l!|'-?    -N-J
^|
lA//^7" /!/?£ 77/£X WAITING FOR? THIS PARTS EAS Y
Page One Hundred and Twenty-five TWE TOTEMS
ifHttiiil    iIiiihwttH
The Mountain Man
On the trail called the Bright Angel, when the dawn was grey,
I met a horseman riding out of yesterday ....
He carried a long rifle across his saddle-bow,
Behind where the little pack-ponies stepping all arow,
The little, tough hill ponies, halfway up to the sky,
And I reined to the side in wonder as the cavalcade jogged by.
For I knew by his blackened buckskins and his hard, scarred tan
That over the Bright Angel had ridden a Mountain Man.
He sat his horse like a savage; his eyes were fixed and keen,
Searching the empty desert, and the tumbled hills between
Our trail and the high Sierras, where spire upon gleaming spire
Flamed out like an altar candle, touched by the eastern fire.
What strange thing was he seeking, back of the sunrise glow?
Where had he come from, riding out of the long ago?
Under the diamond-hitches what did his kyacks hold,
Pelts of otter and beaver, or the rough, red mountain gold?
There at the nm of the desert I watched them pass and fade,
The man with the long rifle, and the pack-horse cavalcade.
On the trail called the Bright Angel, when the dawn was grey,
I met a horseman riding out of yesterday ....
—ARTHUR MAYSE.
Styled to the Young Man's Taste
The young fellow who likes to have that extra
bit of snap to his shoes will certainly find it
in Leckies. Several of the newer numbers
have been specially designed for him . . . And
do they wear? Any man who knows leathers
will see at once these shoes were built for
■service as well as good looks!
See the Full Leckie
Line al Your
Dealer's
Priced for the Young
Man's Pocket, too!
LECKIE
I. LECKIE CO. LTD., Vancouver, B. C.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-six FELIX
Dry Ginger Ale
FELIX
Orange Dry
FELIX
Club Soda
Delicious, different refreshment.
If your dealer is out of stock,
Phone Bay. 4200 for a carton.
Always Remember .
You get the best results with
KEYSTONE SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Smith, Davidson &
Wright, Limited
Wholesale Stationers and Paper Dealers
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
Diether's Ltd.
Dealers in
HIGH GRADE COAL
Seymour 6761
Granville Island
Cold Storage is for Eggs,
Not Business
WARD & PHILLIPS
LIMITED
318 Homer Street Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone Seymour 2364
You must keep your business moving.
You can't put it in cold storage. And to
keep it moving you must continue to make
sales today ... tomorrow. There is no
way around it; you MUST. How important, therefore, that your bids for business
be carefully thought out, and just as carefully executed by a printer who is "sales-
minded." Such a printer will keep you on
the right track because he knows from past
experience that advertising is something
like fishing. He knows it takes patience
and persistence to "pull 'em in," even
after your line is excellently baited.
Maybe we can help you "pull in" some
business.  We'd surely like to try.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-seven JfjHE TOTEMit
Raven
Out of the blue of Saghalie Illahee
I came to earth.
Wisdom I brought for men who welcomed me,
Sadness and mirth.
Now on a totem's crest my wings are furled,
My sightless eyes stare out beyond the world.
-W. C. COOK.
Chanson  d'Avril
Here in my arms you lie,
The moon is a golden bow,
The winds are singing low . .
Dark Angel, pass us byl
how many nights like this
Until the aching, sweet
Hunger of lips that meet
In one last golden kiss?
April will bloom again
Flowing in purple wine,
And our keen stars will shine
On other happy men.
But in my arms you lie,
The moon is a golden bow,
The winds are singing low . .
Dark Angel, pass us by!
-T.M.
Page One Hundred and Twenty-eight Be sure and see the new 1934
Jantzen     Ladies'     Molded-Fit
Swim Suits and Men's 'Sunaka'
Trunks
for ultra modern styles and Guaranteed Permanent Fit.
We now manufacture "Jantzen"
Hand Tailored Ladies' Knitted
Sportswear, stylish, different and
exclusive, in addition to the regular
Universal Knitwear.
Jantzen Knitting Mills of
Canada Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
The
PROTT
,HAW
CHOOLS
Give First Class Courses in
BUSINESS. SECRETARIAL STUDIES, WIRELESS
TELEGRAPHY, and RADIO SERVICE.
Some   one   of   these   might  dovetail  nicely
into your University training
or
would  undoubtedly  prepare   you   hurriedly
for Success
in the Employment Market
Five Schools in Greater Vancouver
Attend the one nearest your home
Phone Sey.  1810-9002 lor full particulars
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.     MRS. R. J. SPROTT, P.C.T.
President Supervisor Shorthand Depts.
MRS. K. MAYHEW-WILLIS
Schools' Secretary
A
dead
heat
for
Quality
NABOB
LEADS
Equal  in  QUALITY  to  the
three winners illustrated are:
NABOB
Jelly Powders, Spices, Extracts, and
Nabob   Pure   Fruit   Juices,   Lemon,
Orange and Lime
KELLY, DOUGLAS & CO.. LTD., VANCOUVER. B. C.
Page One Hundred and Twenty nine TTHE TOTfJfltfcg^r:
Jewel  Thoughts
Crimson fires at a velvet throat
Crystals clear on a fragile hand,
Eternal gleam in the emerald dusks,
Her eyes gaze dumbly into sand.
Necklaces of gold and blue,
Blue that burns yet never dies,
Toys of a forgotten queen,
Clutched by the reeds her pale head lies.
Lady, gems in lovely hair,
Sparkling at a creamy wrist,
Yet remain when shining strands
In the tide's grip rusty twist.
—GWLADYS DOWNES.
Impression
A crescent of ducks cast loose of mooring
Sails westward
Drawing an airy line
Into the soft-falling sun.
Out of the closing lid of day
A ferry boat thrusts heavily
With empty haste,
Smudging its wake
Into the vague relief of shrouded city.
—BOB HEWETSON.
Dead Orchard
An orchard .... dead, forsaken, and forgotten!
The rain came down, a sodden harvester
Who, with grey palsied fingers, plucked the fruit
Or passed it by to wither on the branch.
A row of poplars stood against the wind
(Poor thin grey ghosts .... poor thin grey wraiths of trees)
Who watched night come, and flung grey arms on high
Until the moon, aghast, swooned from the scene.
Page One Hundred and Thirty Fraternity Jewellery
With our exceptional manufacturing
facilities and expert craftsmen we
can execute orders for Fraternity
Insignia with dispatch and precision.
BIRKS
UNION STEAMSHIPS
Limited
WISH
Good Luck and Good Fortune
To this year's Graduates
and
Prosperity and Happiness
to the U. B. C.
THE
New Vacuum Jar
It's handy . . . It's Vacuum Pack
... It contains MULTI-BEAN BLEND
COFFEE
B.C.   PAYROLLS
The Life-Blood of this Province
MERIT YOUR SUPPORT
Che Standard of Quality
HOME OIL DISTRIBUTORS LTD.
is the only 100 per cent. B. C. Company manufacturing and
marketing Gasoline in this Province.
Page One Hundred and Thirty-one C. P. Foster & Co.
LIMITED
COMMERCIAL STATIONERS and
PRINTERS
Mathematical and Surveying
Instruments
592 Seymour St.       Vancouver, B. C.
§JM*}VI!M:bMI*
BUTTER
"The Best in the West"—Ask for it.
Mr. Farmer:
We want your cream and eggs.
Top prices; cash returns.
Central Creameries (B.C.) Ltd.
325 Railway Street Vancouver, B. C.
The Staff of the Totem Board
wish to express their thanks
to all those who -strived to
make this Annual a success.
VANCOUVER
ENGRAVERS
LIMITED
Engravers  :   Artists
Stereotypers   :   Etectrotypers
445 RICHARDS STREET
Vancouver, B. C. Sey. 6672
To the 1934 Graduates . . .
We wish to express our thanks for the
privilege and pleasure of making the pictures of you in this book, and hope to serve
you in the near future when you need
photographs for business, professional or
social purposes.
833 Granville Street
(Opp. Capitol Theatre)
Page One Hundred and Thirty-two ..INDEX.
FOREWORD-
FRONTISPIECE
Page
A WORD TO THE GRADUATING CLASS     3
CLASS RECORDS—
THE FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
Arts   '34   	
Arts   '35   _	
Arts   '36     	
Arts   '37  _ ._ _   	
EDUCATION   '34   ..
COMMERCE  '34  ,
. 30
31
32
33
THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE.
Science   '34   _
Science   '35	
Science   '36  	
S ience   '37   ....
.. 34
39
40
_ 45
__ 46
NURSING  '34
 48
THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE. 50
Agriculture  '34 . ^   51
Agriculture  '35 54
Agriculture  '36 _    55
Agriculture  '37  56
LITERARY AND ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OF
ANGLICAN   THEOLOGICAL   COLLEGE _.. 57
UNION   COLLEGE  	
ANGLICAN  THEOLOGIANS
53
59
UNION  THEOLOGIANS     60
STUDENT GOVERNMENT—
Student's Council      61
Women's   Undergraduate   Executive   64
64
65
65
66
66
Science Men's Undergraduate Executive .
Nursing  Undergraduate Executive	
Agriculture   Undergraduate   Executive   ...
Arts Men's Undergraduate Executive....
Men's Undergraduate Executive   	
PUBLICATIONS—
Publications  Board
Totem  Staff _.._...
  67
  70
CLUBS AND SOCIETIES—
Literary and Scientific Executive .
G. M. Dawson Geological Discussion Club
Physics   Club   	
Chemistry   Society    	
Hist irical Society	
Letters Club _   	
71
71
71
72
72
73
Mathematics  Club
Literary  Forum  	
Forest Club 	
  73
  73
   74
Cosmopolitan   Club   .    74
Canadian Officer's Training Corps  74
Biological Discussion Club    75
Agriculture Club    	
International Relations Club 	
Commerce Men's Undergraduate Club_
Philosophy   Club    	
Student Christian Movement  	
Art Club    	
Classics  Club    _ 	
La Causerie 	
Varsity Christian  Union
A.  I.  E.  E.  E 	
La Canadienne        	
75
75
76
76
76
77
77
77
78
78
79
Monro Pre-Medical Society   79
Pep  Club     79
Panhellenic Association    80
Players Club  _.._.     8!
Parliamentary   Forum   .     82
Musical  Society _  83
ATHLETICS—
Men's  Athletic  Executive       ...        85
Women's  Athletic Executive  .         86
Awards   Committee     87
Senior "A" Basketball Team    88
Senior "B" Basketball Team            90
G.   V.   A.   A.   Intermediate   "A"   Basketball
Big  Four Canadian Rugby Team	
Senior City Canadian Rugby Team
McKechnie Cup, English Rugby Team  94
91
92
°2
Se ond  Division,  English  Rugby  Team.
Senior Soccer Team    	
Junior Soccer Team    	
Track  Club      ~.	
Arts  '20  Relay Team  .
Men's  Grass Hockey Team 	
Golf Club    --.-	
Varsity Outdoors Club
Tennis Club      _	
.. 95
._ 96
97
98
99
. 100
...101
102
.103
Badminton  Club    ..104
Swimming  Club      _   —   105
Men's Big Block Club      . 106
Women's Big Block Club      107
Senior  "A"  Women's Basketball Team 108
Intermediate     "A"     Women's    Basketball
Team   „ .       109
Women's Grass Hockey, "U. B. C." Team  110
"Varsity"   Team       Ill
LITERARY SUPPLEMENT .
113
SNAPSHOT COMPOSITES ._.117,  121,  125 Printed by
WARD & PHILLIPS, LIMITED
318 Homer Street
Vancouver
Canada

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