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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

1936 Totem 1936

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THE UNIVERSITY OFHBRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER In Memoriam
Our Late Sovereign
King George V
Page   Two TOrem for 1936
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER
CONTENTS
FOREWORD
CLASS RECORDS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
PUBLICATIONS
CLUBS AND SOCIETIES
ATHLETICS
ARTS SUPPLEMENT
Page    Three ~X \Z
t
eni
President's
Message
PRESIDENT KLINCK
N.
INETEEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SIX means for the University of British Columbia a coming of
age, for it was in nineteen hundred and fifteen that the University first began as an independent
institution. The very date of its foundation is deeply significant, for it was the second year of the
Great War — a time for the renunciation of easy optimism, a time for the redoubling of effort and
endurance. That a university should be founded at such a time was in itself an act of faith and a
declaration of confidence.   Surely we are not unjustified if we accept the omen as auspicious.
In spite of temporary reverses, the University, still maintaining the tradition of those early years,
continues to widen its sphere of usefulness and activity; of late it has striven to serve not only its
students in classroom and laboratory, but also the public at large that seeks interpretative guidance
rather than college "credits." The Art Collection, which the University owes to the munificence of the
Carnegie Corporation; the lectures on music, which, sponsored by the University, have evoked so
marked a response; the co-operation of the University in the illuminating lectures and demonstrations
given by the Vancouver Institute—these are some of the ways in which the University is trying to
serve the community. Even more important than these activities themselves are the things that they
represent first, the realization that the well-being of the University and the well-being of the Province
are inextricably linked, and secondly, the determination to keep abreast of current developments, to
supply contemporary needs, and to prepare wisely for the educational requirements of the future.
<v.
President.
Page   Four i&zy*** **a*-<°*?~ a.
J-ke J-o
t
aient
FOREWORD
T
1.HE years 1935 and 1936 will be recorded as memorable
ones in the history of the University of British Columbia.
During 1936, as citizens of the British Empire, the students
mourned the death of George V. A few months earlier the
University lost two of its most sincere friends, Dean and Mrs.
Reginald Brock.
In 1936 Canada's most western university reached its
twenty-first anniversary. The coming-of-age was celebrated
by a student campaign to raise funds for the erection%on the
campus of the Brock Memorial Union Building. In^the same
year, a few months later, the Players' Club, the outstanding
campus organization, also celebrated its twenty-first birthday.
1935 and 1936 have been momentous years, and the
"Totem" has tried in a very small way to keep stride with the
times. This has necessitated much change, seemingly radical
now, but really a mere short step toward making our annual
an adequate and credible record of university life. We believe that the "Totem" should be a pictorial presentation of
campus activity, of personal interest to each student enrolled.
We have done all that has been in our power to make it so,
and we wish to thank those whose co-operation has aided
in the publication of the twenty-first annual of the University
of British Columbia.
Page    Five oZ/eA
tu
Lcauatt
This volume is dedicated to the
memory of the late
MILDRED BROCK
B.A. (Queens)
REGINALD W. BROCK
M.A., LL.D. (Queens)
LL.D. (Hong Kong)
F.G.S., F.R.S.C.
Dean of the Faculty oi
Applied Science
Page   Six Page   Seven * H  Blr^            "xaK^        **iir**
^ft lift
ftfTtX   ■
Wr        \
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The permanent tribal record of the
. West is the totem. We offer this annual
as the tribal record of the members
of   the   graduating   classes   of   1936.
Page   Eight lL I.
t
ewi
Sunset across the
campus.
Page    Nine J-h&  patent =
In the shadow of the
Science Building.
Page   Ten •J-L J-v
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ewi
The Colleges
Page    Eleven ■J-L J-o
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cm.
Autographs
i
Page   T-welvt ill
Mil
I
Ml
II = J-ke,  ^/-atewi
»
Dean
Buchanan's
Message
DEAN BUCHANAN
I
NVESTIGATION will undoubtedly show that the idea of the "Totem" was evolved
from the more or less sacred pile which used to adorn grandmother's parlour table.
Just run up the parlour blind a bit—no, no, not so much, for parlour carpets never
could stand sunlight nor parlour atmosphere ozone. There on the table, conspicuously between the parlour lamp and the front window as an emblem of respectability, and just reaching the level where the wick climbs out of the oil you will
observe a laminated pile consisting of the family album, daughter's autograph
album and the stereoscopic views. You will find the stereoscope on the lower deck
of the table, but one of the lenses is missing.
Let us now in imagination join the class of '63, and with them scan the pages
of the laminated pile which is sacred to '36. We shall all smile as we turn over the
pages. The members of '63 will be amused at the changes in fashions and appearance, but our smile will be one of affectionate recollection of college days and
college friends. My autograph, as the one who served as Dean during your college years, and who always endeavoured to guide you in a way which would
lead to your best interests, will be:
May your life have more of joy than of sadness,
More of success than of failure,
More of happiness than of discontent, and
More of service than of self.
Page    Thirteen ■*/** J-*
t
CI4t
Arts '36
PROFESSOR H. T. LOGAN
T
J. HIS is the year in which the University comes of age. It is also the year in which
the members of Arts '36, whether of age or not, must assume the obligations of
maturity. That they will be willing and able to undertake those obligations is
evidenced by the active part they have played in the affairs of the University during
their undergraduate life.
During those four years the members of the class have displayed energy and
ability in all branches of student activity.
With Peggy Wales, Ardy Beaumont, Darrel Gomery, Cam Gorrie and John
Harrison prominent on Students' Council, the class may be said to have done its
part so far as student government is concerned. *
In literary activities the members of the class have also distinguished themselves. Hugh Palmer, Margaret Ecker, Davie Fulton, Bill Sargent, Bill Robertson,
Frank Stevens, Bob Thomson, Len Nicholls and Masala Cosgrave have contributed
to the success of the Players' Club. Vera Radcliff, Lilian Walker, Jayne Nimmons,
Muriel Bloomer, Ewart Hetherington and James Findlay were leaders in the activities
of the Musical Society. Peter Disney and Davie Fulton have represented the University in inter-collegiate debates; and John Cornish, Margaret Ecker and Alan Morley
have kept up the standards of the Publications Board.
Our athletes have been many and varied. Laurence McHugh, Rudy Paradis
and Rex Morrison were members of the American Football team. John Harrison
and Allan Mercer will be remembered in English Rugby circles. Ewart Hetherington, Albert Dobson, Gordon Hall and Robert McKeown represented the class on the
basketball floor. Bish Thurber and Hiroshi Okuda were Soccer stars; and Len
Nicholls and Gerald Ward shone on the Track. In Grass Hockey the class was
represented by Herbert Bremner; in Rowing by Frank Stevens; and in Badminton
by Elliott Seldon. The women, too, distinguished themselves in athletics: Joan
Wharton, Beatrice Hastings, Ellen Raphael and Frances Wright in Grass Hockey;
and Margery Mellish in Basketball.
Colonel Logan, our Honorary President, has aided us with his friendly advice,
and has earned the gratitude and respect of the executive and all who have come
in contact with him.
The executive for the year 1935-36 consisted of: President, Ewart Hetherington;
Vice-President, Margaret Buchanan; Secretary, Peggy Wales; Treasurer, Rudy
Paradis; Literary Representative, Tom Vance; Men's Athletic Representative, George
McKee; Women's Athletic Representative, Margery Mellish.
Page    Fourteen = J-hc  J-otewi
Doreen Agnew
Vernon
English and History, German
Letters Club, Fencing Club,
Student League
Elaine Adams
Victoria
History and English
Newman Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
I. Millard Alexander
Vancouver
Philosophy and English
Philosophy Club
Jean Allin
Vancouver
Bacteriology
Gamma Phi Beta
Margaret Anderson
Alberta
Mathematics and English
Math. Qub, S. C. M., Phrateres
Marjorie Batzold
Vancouver
English and History, Philosophy
Phyllis Baxendale
Vancouver
German and English
President, German Club
Margaret Beaumont
Vancouver
English and Latin
President, W. U. S.,
Grass Hockey
Delta Gamma
Jill Biller
Vancouver
English and French
Art Club, Letters Club,
La Canadienne
Winnifred Bingham
Vancouver
French and German
■   President, Art Club,
Cosmopolitan Club
Page   Fifteen J-lu  J-e
t
ewi
Myrtle Blatter
Lethbridge, Alberta
Philosophy and Economics
Gym Club, Art Club
Alpha Delta Pi
Morris Bloom
Vancouver
Muriel Bloomer
Vancouver
Mathematics and Latin
Phrateres, Musical Society
Kathleen Bourne
Vancouver
Economics and Philosophy
Women's  Big  Block  Club
Kappa Kappa Gamma
H. J. Bremner
North Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
Grass Hockey, Chemistry Society
Marian Brink
Vancouver
Economics and English
Grass Hockey, Art Club,
Phrateres, Cosmopolitan
Club, I. R. C.
Constance Brown
Victoria
English and History-
Kappa Alpha Theta
Donalda Carson
Vancouver
Economics and History
Kappa Alpha Theta
Lorna Carson
Vancouver
History and Economics
Kappa Alpha Theta
Edna Carter
Vancouver
French and Philosophy
Swimming
Alpha Omicron Pi
Page    Sixteen C2.3
t
Helen Chang
Vancouver
R. P. Claydon
Vancouver
English and Economics
Badminton
Phi Kappa Pi
James Currie
Victoria
Mathematics and Physics
C. O. T. C.
Olive L. Day
New Westminster
History and English
V.C.U., Grass Hockey, Phrateres,
Cosmopolitan  Club
em, =
Grace Cavan
Vancouver
Bacteriology and Chemistry
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Cecil Chatfield
Victoria
Mathematics and Physics
Junior Soccer, Math. Club
John Cornish
Vancouver
English and Philosophy
Editor-in-chief,  "Ubyssey"
Jean M. Dawson
Vancouver
English and History
Basketball, Outdoors Club
Delta Gamma
Alan Day-Smith
Vancouver
Zoology and Chemistry
Pre-Med Club, Outdoors Club
Mary De Pencier
Vancouver
Philosophy and English
Art Club
Alpha Phi
Page   Seventeen 1L 1
I
em
Mary Dickson
Victoria
Zoology and Chemistry
Kappa Alpha Theta
Peter J. Disney
Edmonton. Alta.
History Honors, Theology
Grass Hockey, Soccer
President Historical Society; President Parliamentary Forum; S.C.M.
Gordon Draeske
Vancouver
Philosophy and
Economics
Dorothy B. Elliot
Vancouver
English History
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Madeline B. Ellis
Vancouver
French Honours, Latin
Marian Dignan
Vancouver
Mathematics, English,
French
Albert Dobson
Vancouver
Zoology, Chemistry
Basketball, Track
S.C.M., Monro Pre-Med.,
Cosmopolitan Club
Margaret A. Ecker
Vancouver
History and English
Players Club, Letters Club
Feature Editor, "Ubyssey,"
"Totem" Editor
Alpha Phi
Ruth M. Elliot
Vancouver
Math. Honours
Basketball, Math. Club
Patrick Ellis
Comox
Latin and Greek
English Rugby
Anglican College Athletic Society
Page   Eighteen J-L J-e
t
ewi
James Findlay
Vancouver
Honours in Economics
"Ubyssey," Musical Society
E. D. Fulton
Kamloops
Economics and Latin, English
Players' Club, Newman Club,
Parliamentary Forum
Phyllis E. Gifford
North Vancouver
English and German
Darrel Gomery
Vancouver
History Honours
Publications, Secretary of A.M.S.
Kappa Kappa Gamma
William L. Grant
Victoria
Classics Honours
President, Classics Club
Page    Nineteen
Louise Farris
Great Central. V. L
History and English
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Mabel Folkins
Vancouver
History and English
Phrateres, Art Club
Alpha Delta Pi
Christine Garner
Vancouver
Chemistry and Bacteriology
Ellen Godfrey
Victoria
English and French
Phrateres, La Canadienne
Cameron Gorrie
Vancouver
Economics and History
Students' Council, Varsity "Y,'
Rowing Club
Delta Upsilon 1l~1
t
ewi
Robert Gross
Vancouver
Second winner. Big Block in English    Rugby;    Senior    Manager,
English   Rugby;    President,   Big
Block Club
Phi Kappa Pi
Gordon Hall
Kelowna
Physics and Mathematics
Musical Society, Physics Club,
Outdoors Club
John Harrison
Vancouver
Honors, Latin and English
English Rugby, President of
M. A. A.
Phi Kappa Pi
Hugh Herbison
Vancouver
History and English
Letters Club
President, S. C. M.
Faith Hodgson
Albemi
Mathematics and English
Math. Club, Phrateres
H. Haikala
Victoria College
English  and  Government
President, International Relations
Club
Harold Harper
Vancouver
Biology Honors, Botany Option
Varsity Band
Beatrice Hastings
Victoria
Latin Honours
La Canadienne, Classics Club,
Grass  Hockey,  "Ubyssey,"  Big
Block Club
Ewart Hetherington
Vancouver
English and Economics
President, Arts '36
Treasurer, Arts Men's Undergraduate Society
Musical Society
Delta Upsilon
Harry C. K. Housser
Vancouver
History and Economics
Rugby, Rowing, Squash
Phi Delta Theta
Page   Twenty lL J*
t
em
Evelyn Irving
Kamloops
Bacteriology and Chemistry
Gamma Phi Beta
;   ! -a
Harold Jeffery
Vancouver
History and English
Soccer, "Ubyssey," Outdoors Club
Phi Delta Theta
Francis R. Joubin
Victoria
Chemistry and Geology
Parliamentary Forum, Boxing
and Wrestling Club
George Kane
Saskatchewan
English and Latin
C. O. T. C., Classics Club
Kathleen Kermode
Victoria
French and German
Page   Twenty-one
Dorothy Hudson
Vancouver
Honours in Bacteriology
Leo Jantz
Vancouver
Economics  and  History
Debating, Sports
George Johnston
Vancouver
English and Philosophy
Players' Club, Philosophy Club
English Rugby
Joseph Kadzielawa
Vancouver
Mathematics and  Physics
Math. Club, Cosmopolitan Club
Gertrude Keller!
Vancouver
English and  Economics
Art Club * -
V£-
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Wr A
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■32.2
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Douglas Kirk
Vancouver
Economics  and Government
Badminton
Delta Upsilon
Dagmar Lieven
Vancouver
French  and  German  Honours
La Canadienne
FJzaLovitt
Victoria
Double Honours French and
Latin
Kappa Alpha Theta
r
Hugh Matheson
Vancouver
English and History
S.  C. M., Boxing Club
Cosmopolitan Club
Margery Mellish
Vancouver
Honours in Mathematics
Senior "Basketball, Secretary Big
Block  Qub,   Math.   Club,   Phrateres, Athletic Rep. Arts '36
H. R. Libby
Vancouver
Chemistry and Mathematics
Mary C. Little
Victoria
Mathematics and English
Math, aub, Outdoors Club
Kappa Alpha Theta
Velia Marin
Vancouver
French and History
Art Club, Musical Society
Mary C. Mathews
Kamloops
English  and  History
Kappa  Alpha  Theta
Harold Menzies
Vancouver
Honours  in Biology,  Zoology
Option
Curator of Biological Discussion
Oub
Page   Twenty-two J-L /*
t
ent
Allan Mercer
Vancouver
Senior English Rugby
Alpha Delta Phi
Flora Mitchell
Steveston
Latin  and  English
Classics aub, Phrateres
Donna Willa Moorhouse
Vancouver
President of Panhellenic
Alpha Omicron Pi
Yuriko L. Mizuno
Yokohama. Japan
Honours  in Biology, Botany
Option
Vice-President, Biological Discussion   Club;   Vice-President,   Japanese  Students'  Christian  Association of North America
Alan Morley
PenUcton
Honours  in  English and History
"Ubyssey,"   President,   A.M.U.S.
Rex Morrison
Vancouver
History and English
American Football, "Ubyssey"
Betty Moscovitch
Lethbridge. Alberta
Economics and Philosophy
Players' Club, Parliamentary
Forum
Kenneth F. MacDonald
Victoria College
Chemistry and Physics
Chemistry  Society, C. O. T.  C.,
University Rifle Association,
Boxing Club
Sigma Alpha Phi
Janet McElhanney
Vancouver
Education and Philosophy
Badminton
Alpha Phi
J. L. McHugh
Vancouver
Zoology Honours
Outdoors  Club, Big Four Canadian  Rugby,  American Football
Sigma Alpha Phi
Page   Twenty-thn J-L J-o:
t
ewi
Alex S. Maclnnes
Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
Chemistry Society, Musical
Society
George McKee
Courtenay
Biology and Oiemistry
Senior "A" Basketball
Neil McKeUar
Vancouver
Economics and Political Science
Delta Upsilon
Vivian MacKenzie
Pioneer Gold Mine
English and Education
Phrateres, Musical Society
Alpha Gamma Delta
Robert McKeown
Vancouver
English and History
English Rugby
R. V. MacLean
Kamloopi
Mathematics and Physics
Math. Club
Phi Delta Theta
Margaret Jean McLean
Vancouver
History and English
Phrateres Historian, President of
Literary  Forum,  Art  Club,  Philosophy Club, S.  C.  M.,  Cosmopolitan Club
Catherine McLeod
North Vancouver
Honours in French and Latin
Classics  Club,  French  Club
Betty McNeely
Vancouver
History and English
Kappa Kappa Gamma
J. L. Nicholls
Victoria
English and History, French
Track Club, Players' Club, International Relations Club
Page   Twenty-four TlJ,
t
Peter D. O'Brien
Vancouver
Sports Representative, 'Arts '36;
Big  Four Canadian Rugby,
Badminton Team
Phi Delta Theta
Joe Paine
Vancouver
Zoology and Bacteriology
Outdoors Club, Biological Discussion Club, Monro-Pre-Med. Club
ent
Jayne Nimmons
Vancouver
History and English, Philosophy
Musical  Society
Alpha Delta Pi
D. Wilson McDuffee
Vancouver
History and Economics
Parliamentary   Forum,   President
Rowing Club, Musical Society
Rodolphe Paradis
Vancouver
Chemistry Honours
American Football, Basketball,
Chemistry  Society
Pi  Kappa
Emma Parks
Vancouver
English and French
Secretary, S. C. M.; Letters aub,
Literary   Forum,   Phrateres,   Parliamentary  Forum
Douglas MacRae
Patterson
Victoria
English and Economics
Historical   Society,   International
Relations Club
Psi Upsilon
K. Donald T. MacRae
Patterson
Victoria
Economics and History, English
Historical   Society,   International
Relations Club,  "Ubyssey,"  Parliamentary Forum
Elizabeth Petrie
Qualicum Beach
French, English, Latin
Musical Society, La Canadienne,
Das Deutche Verein
Page   Twenty-fivi
Mae Peacock
Victoria
Pre-Medical
Monroe  Pre-Med.  aub,
Basketball
Gamma Phi Beta J-lu.   J-V
t
ewi
A. Norman Martin
Vancouver
Economics  and History
Senior  Manager,  Canadian
Rugby
Sigma  Alpha  Phi
Dorothy Planche
Vancouver
French and German
V. G. Pinhorn
Victoria
Economics  and  History
Junior Rugby Manager
Phi Kappa Pi
Lennie H. Price
Vancouver
History, English and French
Secty.-Treas.,   Historical   Society;
Vice-Pres., Swimming aub
Alpha Omicron Pi
Phyllis Poulson
Saanichton
English and French
La Canadienne, Phrateres
Nan Quelch
Vancouver
Mathematics and History
Alpha Delta Pi
Gwen Pym
Vancouver
History and Philosophy
Phrateres, Secretary L. S. E., Secretary Art aub, Musical Society
Alpha Delta Pi
E. Ellen Raphael
Vancouver
Chemistry and Mathematics
Grass  Hockey,  Math.  Club,
Outdoors Club
Vera Radcliff
Vancouver
History and French
Historical  Society,  President
Musical Society
Alpha Delta Pi
Helen M. Reeves
Vancouver
Honours in Latin and French
La Canadienne, Art Club,
Classics Club
Page   Twenty-six -Jlu  J-e
t
Betty de Large Robertson
New Westminster
History and English
Vice-President  Philosophy  aub
Alpha Phi
Florence Roussel
Agassiz, B. C.
French and History
Phrateres, La Canadienne,
Newman Club
John M. Russel
Vancouver
French and English
Norma M. Schroeder
Victoria
English and History
ewi =
Vaughan E. Richardson
Vancouver
Mathematics and Physics
William T. Robertson
Vancouver
English and History
Players' Club, President of
Letters  Club
Jean W. Roxburgh
Vancouver
Honours  in  English and French
Letters Club, La Canadienne
Irene Savitsky
Mount Lehman
French and History
S. C. M.
Margery Scott
Vancouver
Chemistry and Biology
Secretary,   Chemistry   Society;
Biological   Discussion   Club,
Phrateres
Alpha Omicron Pi
Page   Twenty-seven M
t
ewi
G. Elliot Seldon
Vancouver
Economics and  English
President of Badminton Club
Delta Upsilon
Jack D. Smith
Victoria
Physics and Mathematics
Boxing
Frank S. Stevens
Victoria
Honours in Economics
Rowing Club, Players' Club
Zeta Psi
P. Clayton Stewart
West Vancouver
Economics and History
Canadian Rugby Manager,
Badminton
Sigma Alpha Phi
Juliet Sullivan
Vancouver
English and French
Kappa Alpha Theta
Betty Smith
Wakamun. Alberta
Philosophy and Sociology
Philosophy Club
Linda Smith
Victoria
History  and  Economics
Secretary, International Relations
Club;  Musical Society
Jack H. Stevenson
Vancouver
English and History
Book Exchange, "Ubyssey,1
Badminton
Winnifred M. Stewart
Victoria
Mathematics and French
La Canadienne, V. C. U.
Page   Twenty-eight J-L J-o-t
Fuji Tanaka
Steveston
Economics and Political Science
Debating, Public Speaking
Mary Thomson
J. B. Thurber
Prince Rupert
Honours in Geology
Big  Block. Club,   Senior  Soccer,
Basketball, G. M. Dawson Club
Thomas Vance
Vancouver
Vice-President, Historical Society
Executive, Parliamentary Forum,
Senior  T.   S.   E.  Representative,
Manager, Book Exchange
Phi Delta Theta
ewi
Patience Sweetman
Archie Thomson
Prince Rupert
English and History
Editor-in-Chief,  "Ubyssey,'
Letters Oub
Phi Delta Theta
Robert M. Thomson
Vancouver
English, History and German
Musical Society, Players' Club
Zena A. Urquhart
Vancouver
English and Economics
Delta Gamma
Lillian Walker
Brentwood Bar, V. L
Bacteriology and Biology
Musical Society
Alpha Omicron Pi
Page   Twenty-nine J-L J-e
t
em,
Jack Wallace
Victoria
Honours in Mathematics, Physics
President, Math. Club
Psi Upsilon
Gerald Ward
Victoria
English and Philosophy
Track Club
Charles Watson
Vancouver
English and History
Horace West
Victoria
Greek and Philosophy
International Relations Club,
V.  C. U., Parliamentary Forum,
Biology, Discussion aub
"V
Arthur J. Wirick
Vancouver
History and Government
Parliamentary   Forum,  Historical
Society, S. C. M.
Kathleen S. Webb
Heffley Creek
English and Philosophy
Musical Society, Phrateres
Joan Wharton
Victoria
English and Economics
Big Block Club, Captain and
Vice-President of Women's
Grass Hockey
Alpha Phi
Thelma Witton
North Vancouver
English and French,
Education
Phrateres, Badminton
Bruce Woodsworth
Winnipeg. Manitoba
Honours in Geology
Outdoors Club, G. M. Dawson
Club
Page   Thirty J-L. J-v
t
Mary Young
Victoria
English and Philosophy
"Ubyssey"
Delta Gamma
ewi
Frances M. Wright
Kamloops
Honours in Chemistry and
Mathematics
Players' aub, Math, aub, Grass
Hockey, Chemistry Society
Margaret Buchanan
Vancouver
French and English, Latin
Players'  aub, Outdoors Club,
Vice-President, Arts '36
Gamma Phi Beta
Donald B. Cameron
Vancouver
Economics and English
Letters aub
Psi Upsilon
F. H. Golightly
Vancouver
Grant Paterson
Vancouver
H. Ritchie
Vancouver
Peter J. Sharpe
Vancouver
Economics and Philosophy
Golf Team, Musical Society
Sigma Alpha Phi
Isobel M. Wales
Vancouver
Economics and Government
Secretary, A.  M.  S„  two years;
Secretary, L.  S.  E.;   President of
Panhellenic;   Secretary, Arts  '36
Alpha Delta Pi
Hugh Palmer
Vancouver
History and English
President, Players' aub;  Letters
aub, International Relations
Zeta Psi
Page   Thirty-one Upper Left:   (1) Before.   (2) After.
Upper Right:  (3) Vancouver from the Peak.
Centre Left:  (5) The road up.
Centre:  (6) Vashti.
Centre Right:  (4) Breaking camp.
Lower Left:  (7) A. Buckland at play.
Lower Centre:  (8) Basalt cliff.
Lower Right: (9) Ski-ing.
Page   Thirty-two ~LL-l
t
ent
Arts '37
PROFESSOR F. C. G. WOOD
I. LOGAN
B. STREET
D.
URING the past year Arts '37 has consolidated its position as one
of the best classes on the campus. The members of the year have shown
an interest in the affairs of the class and have given the executive satisfactory support. In the realm of sport the Juniors have done well,
standing high in the intra-mural sport competitions. Paddy Colthurst
brought us honour in the Arts '30 road race by winning the event from
a strong group of contenders. Our chances to wjrn the Arts '20 relay
look correspondingly good. With the basketbalfc" team also showing
strength, and possibly heading for a third straight championship, the
class's chances of taking the Governor's Cup seem good.
During the Union Building Campaign, Arts '37 demonstrated its willingness to make sacrifices for a good cause by cancelling the Junior Prom
in favor of a cheaper dance in aid of the building fund. Although its
plans for a successful prom were already advanced, the executive cancelled the arrangements and united with the Frosh Executive to sponsor
the Union dance. There was only a short time to make arrangements
and advertising, but the preliminary ballyhoo included a most successful
pep meeting put on by the two classes. The dance took place on February 13 in the gymnasium, and proved very popular with those present.
A substantial sum was realized and turned over to the Union Building
coffers.
For the past year the class has continued under the kind direction of
Professor F. G. C. Wood as Honorary President. The executive included:
President, John Logan; Vice-President, Betty Street; Secretary, Madge
Neill; Treasurer, George Crossan; Literary Representative, Leslie Allen;
Women's Athletic Representative, Helen Parker. Mansfield Beach, Men's
Athletic Representative, unfortunately left 'Varsity during the term.
Page    Thirty-three M
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Arts '38
PROFESSOR THORLEIF LARSEN
Th
I. DAVIDSON
^HERE was once a class whose Totem report did not consist exclusively of a catalogue of its contributions to campus activities. The class
was not Arts '38.
This year's Sophomore class, in keeping with the tradition of other
Sophomore classes, furnishes a large share of the driving spirit that
crowns University affairs with success. It is constituted of handsome,
energetic people, fully imbued with the class spirit, which same was in
colorful evidence at the splendid Class Party staged amid the mellow
warmth and congeniality of the Spanish Grill.
Professor Thorleif Larsen is honorary president of the class, whose
executive, headed by Janet Davidson, compiles Peggy Fox, Secretary;
Jack McRae, Treasurer; Dave Carey, Men's Athletic Representative; Patsy
Lafon, Women's Athletic Representative; and Alvin Rosenbaum, Literary
Representative.
The amount of talent and ability infused by Arts '38 into the respective spheres of athletic, dramatic, journalistic, musical and oratorical
activity is impressive. John Bird, of the McKechnie Cup and Vancouver
Rep. teams—the latter playing the visiting New Zealand All-Blacks—and
Dave Carey, who shares in the above distinctions, in addition to having
been selected for the Hon. R. C. Matthews cricket team to tour England
next summer, are two of the University's most outstanding athletes.
The Christmas plays of 1935 were cast largely of '38 actors and
actresses; Eunice Alexander and Mary Moxon are two particularly able
and valuable members of the Players' Club. The Musical Society has
in Barbara Beney, Catherine Washington and Marjorie Findlay, three
obvious reasons for its success this year.
Editorial ranks of the Ubyssey staff are thickly sown with Sophomore
students. Kemp Edmonds and Dorwin Baird are, respectively, Sports and
Tuesday Senior Editors; others are Jim Beveridge, Milt Taylor, Frank
Turner and Bill van Houten.
The cause of forensic debating has been triumphantly upheld by the
ability and aggressiveness of Alvin Rosenbaum, who has figured prominently in Parliamentary Forum, and has travelled to Edmonton in the
McGoun Cup debating series. Dorwin Baird likewise made a rapid
advance to membership in the Inter-Collegiate Debating Society.
Altogether, Arts '38 can look with reasonable pride to its record as
Sophomore class at U. B. C. in 1935-36. It has established a glowing
standard towards which it is hoped other Sophomore classes will strive,
and not too far surpass.
Page   Thirty-four JL J
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Arts 39
DR. GORDON SHRUM
E. JONES
A,
.LREADY stripped of the greenery and confusion which inevitably
go along with the Freshman class, Arts '39 has caught the spirit of the
University, and shows signs that much will be addea to university life
by this class.
At an enthusiastic meeting at the beginning of the spring term the
following class executive was elected: President, Elmer Jones; Vice-President, Olive Cummins; Secretary, Bob Smith; Treasurer, Miriam Cosens;
Men's Athletic Representative, Alex. Lucas; Girls' Athletic Representative, Jean Adams; Literary Representative, Bob McDougall.
When the drive for the Students' Union Building was announced,
Arts '39 decided not to hold a class party in order that the campaign
might receive the undivided attention of all the members of the class.
One result of this decision was that Arts '39 and '37 combined to sponsor
a Union dance in the Gym., the proceeds of which went to help provide
the student quota of $30,000.
Dr. Shrum kindly consented to act as Honorary President of the class.
Page   Thirty-five JL Jo-
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education '36
PROFESSOR W. G. BLACK
L. McKILLOP
L. NELSON
A,
,N undergraduate is a mouse: a graduate proceeding towards an
M.A. degree is a bat: an Education student is a mouse-with-wings. One
mouse-with-wings is a lonely beast, but it has been found that sixty of
them manage to have a good time.
The hypercritical Shaw has said, "Those who can, do; those who
can't, teach"; and a distant evil one has added, ". . . and those who
can't teach, teach teachers!" Our time on the Campus has been a time
of constant rushing from lecture to lecture, and many days have found
us in groups of two and three, travelling on hesitant street cars to far-off
unknown schools, yet we have carried on, utterly to disprove the
Shavian epigram; while the many lectures and less formal discussions
with Mr. Black, Mr. Wood and Dr. Pilcher, as well as sessions with other
faculty members and outside speakers have confounded its extension.
Our Honorary President, Mr. Black, has been a constant and ready
aid in our student affairs. As President, Lex McKillop has proved himself
a capable and energetic organizer, assisted by Leona Nelson as Vice-
President, and Alice Daniels, Secretary-Treasurer. The class has been
represented in athletic circles by Audrey Munton and John Prior, who
were well supported in the fulfilment of a splendid intra-mural sports
programme.
Social arrangements were in the hands of George "Sandy" Austin
and George H. Nelson. In the Fall term, a "draw" dance was enjoyed,
while the functions of the Spring term included a "Co-Ed-Eddy" party,
which was a decided success. The success of that party, however, was
clouded by tragedy. "Eddy" and "Katy," little stick-people, our mascots,
were saved from the auction block of slavery only to be cruelly kidnapped.   May their ashen ghosts return to haunt the malefactors!
Page   Thirty-six M
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Commerce '36
PROFESSOR J. F. DAY
J. OR the twenty members of Commerce '36 April is, or ought to be, the smashing
climax of four strenuous years involving the absorption of theoretical and practical
intricacies of commercial life. These young hopefuls enrolled with an object of
developing into incipient financial barons and business magnates. With their
mental obfuscations and intellectual dubieties cleared up, and secure in the knowledge of their chosen careers, these apostles of truest learning are about to distribute
their sparkling ideas for the enlightenment of a darkened world.
Their interests throughout four years of undergraduate life have been many and
varied. The Golf Club, for example, suffers severe loss through the graduation of
Ted Charleton, John Berry and Peter Sharp. The Rowing Club will miss a strong
supporter in the person of Bruce Robinson. Tony Mclntyre represented the class in
Canadian Rugby. Throughout the last year Sholto Marlatt and Peter Sharp, as
business and advertising managers, guided the financial destinies of the Musical
Society.
Some parting memories: Peggy Wales as Secretary de luxe, occupying, among
many other activities, that position for Arts '36, and twice in the past for the Alma
Mater Society. James Malkin, as another ex-council member, Treasurer during the
1934-35 session. Sid Swift, as the March of Slime pepster. Margaret Gillett, partly
for being ever liberal in her weekly donations of suspiciously up-to-date accountancy exercises. And, finally, the ill-fated Commerce Club with its executive, Frank
Thornloe and Alan Patmore.
Page    Thirty-seven JL Jo
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aient
Roger Mann Bain
Vancouver
Economics and Government
Badminton, Tennis, Rowing
W. Beckett
Vancouver
C. O. T. C.
D. Eellie Bell
Vancouver
Economics and Philosophy
Musical Society
John P. Berry
Vancouver
Golf Club, Newman Club
F. W. Charlton
Vancouver
Economics
President, Golf Club
Phi Gamma Delta
W. E. Holborne
Victoria
Stuart C. Lane
Vancouver
Economics  and History
Rowing aub
Zeta Psi
Alan Lunn
Quesnel, B. C.
Tennis
Pi Kappa
S. P. Marlatt
Vancouver
Musical Society
-
Zeta Psi
•
Alan Mayhew
Victoria
Zeta Psi
Page   Thirty-eight Jke Jo
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Alan M. Patmore
Vancouver
Commerce Club
Peter J. Sharp
Vancouver
Economics and Philosophy
Golf  Club,  Musical  Society
Sigma Alpha Phi
Frank Thornloe
Isobel M. Wales
Vancouver
Economics and Government
Secretary, L. S. E., A. M. S., Arts
'36; President, Panhellenic
Alpha Delta Pi
em
A. Gordon McGeachie
New Westminster
Bruce L. Robinson
Vancouver
Boat Club,
President, Inter-fraternity Council
Phi Delta Theta
J. D. B. Scott
Vancouver
Economics  and  English
Boris Turin
Vancouver
Economics and Government
Margaret Gillett
New Westminster
Page   Thirty-nine J-lu   J-0>
tem =
Literary and
Athletic Assn.
ANGLICAN THEOLOGICAL
COLLEGE
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANGLICAN COLLEGE
L. T. H. PEARSON
P. R. ELLIS
R. C. W. WARD
V V E wish to take this opportunity to express our deep sorrow and
sense of loss due to the passing of our late Principal, Rev. W. H. Vance,
M.A., D.D. The College itself stands as a fitting memorial to the contribution he has made to religious education in the west. We trust that
the work which he so ably set forward will progress favorably with the
coming years.
Decreased registration and the large graduating class of 1935 have
limited the college activities this academic year. Traditional tilts with
the Union College in football, track and debating have been curtailed,
but we look forward to a brighter future. Oyc "at home" this year was
an unqualified success, due to the informality^'of the occasion and. to the
party spirit that permeated the guests who struggled through snow and
slush to attend. Of special note was the exhibit of the College archives,
to which additions of historical interest have lately been made. The
oratorical contest for the G. G. McGeer Cup was also a success, the
speeches being of high calibre, worthy of the association.
The College was represented at the Quadrennial conference of the
Student Volunteer Movement at Indianapolis in the person of Mr. Peter
Disney, who is well known in University circles as an able debater.
As usual, the members of the College have been active in various
University clubs, such as Psychology Club, Classics Club, Historical
Society, Art Club, S. C. M., Parliamentary Forum and Publications Board.
The College executive this year consisted of: L. T. H. Pearson, B.A.,
President; R. C. W. Ward, B.A., Literary Vice-President; P. R. Ellis, Athletic
Vice-President; T. E. Harris, Secretary; J. H. H. Watts, Treasurer; T. D.
Somerville and E. W. Slater.   •
Page   Forty REV. W. H. SMITH
R. P. Stobie J. E. Bell        S. H. Pinkerton   A. L. Anderson      D. W. More        G. R. Pringle D. J. Tait G. B. Punter
Th
Union College
, HE combined ages of our graduates, speaking in terms of ^campus life only,
amounts to thirty-three years. Or, to state the same fact a little differently, this year
will see the conclusion of something in excess of five hundred and thirty units of
University and College work. This represents the recent educational activities of
five men—but why bother with further statistics? What we intend to say is that we
bid them farewell, and wish them every success in the future.
It is gratifying to note that the enrolment of students has been steadily increasing
in spite of a condition which has occasionally been referred to as "the depression."
We understand that there is a goodly quota of men coming on to take the place of
those who leave us.
Deep regret is occasioned by the fact that we have been unable to renew our
perennial soccer feud with the Anglican students. George Pringle, who ably represents us in athletic affairs, was able, however, to secure opposition for us in the
shape of 'Varsity Junior soccer team—so far we have not succeeded in demonstrating superiority over them, but—"hope springs eternal." In various other
campus activities we are glad to see that Union College men are, as usual, taking
a prominent part.
Page   Forty-om ^777777/7
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John Bell, B.A.
Vancouver
Theology, Union College
Arts,   '33
Vice-President, U. C. T. S. S.
D. Wilcox More
Executive, U. C. T. S. S.
Roy P. Stobie
Vancouver
Theology, Union College
President, U. C. T. S. S.
Thomas E. Harris
West Summerland
Theology
Secretary of Literary and
Athletic Association
Phi Gamma Delta
Robert W. Ward
Victoria
Theology, Anglican
Grass Hockey, Track,  Soccer
Wesley Latimer, B.A.
Vancouver
Theology, Union College
Arts,   '35
Stanley S. Pinkerton, B.A.
Theology, Union College
Arts,   '35
Secretary-Treasurer,   U. C. T. S. S.
H. J. Grieg
Duncan
Theology
Willoughby M. Lamb
Montreal, Quebec
Anglican Theological College
Page   Forty-two PI
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>*<
-r j/-ke  J-otem
To the Graduates
in the Faculty
of Applied Science
ACTING DEAN J. M. TURNBULL
Students Awake! The glow of dawn
Has broken through depression's sky:
The phantoms of its darkness fly,
The day is yours, when night has gone.
Awake! Awake! Throw wide your door.
Let in the light, the life, the love,
The joy of beauty from above
To flood your hearts for evermore.
Sing glorious songs. The Sun of Light
In morning's joy has banished tears,
The toil and griefs of bygone years,
The dreams and shadows of the night.
Sing loud! The cloudy doubts of old
Dissolve in dawn, and dawn in day,
And faith in knowledge, if his ray
Within your glowing hearts you hold.
With kindling spirits breathe the fire,
And, blown by love to glorious flame,
Consume   the   forms   of   fear   and
shame,
And give your substance to inspire.
ACTING DEAN TURNBULL.
Page   Forty-thn 'J** J*'
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Science '36
A:
, S we come to our Senior year, our horizon is marred by the loss of our Dean.
We shall be the first Science Class to graduate without the founder of the Faculty,
but, nevertheless, during our first four years we came enough under his influence
to grasp something of his breadth of vision and strength of character, to profit by
the principles on which the Faculty is built. We will do well, as we separate to our
various engineering professions, to keep in mind Dean Brock and the ideals for
which he worked.
Science '36 have always been leaders. In our second year we attained one of
the highest averages in the exams of any Science class in the history of the University. We are represented in all sports—English and American Rugby, Basketball, Track, Soccer, Ski-ing. We have a host of personalj^ies*among us. Early in
our career we were lucky enough to secure Dr. Archibald a'S'our honorary president,
and we shall always remember his kindness and graciousness to us. Tel Potter, a
past president of the class, is president of S.M.U.S. this year, and has led the
Faculty through a successful term. In this he has been backed by Bruce A. Robinson as vice-president, and perhaps the hardest worker for the Faculty. Bruce is the
founder of the famous S.M.U.S. Smutterings, and is willing to put his efforts into
anything to help Science. Alf Buckland, our lone forester, is the energetic president
of U. E. S. Tom Brock, this year's class president, joined us last year after being
away from U. B. C. for some years. With Gordon Cumming as vice-president, Lou
Cunningham, secretary-treasurer, and Al Kirby, athletic representative, we have a
good executive. Why need mention names when each member of Science- '36 is
a fine fellow?
Now, as a parting shot, we are putting our backs into the Student Union Building
campaign, and, as always in the past, Science '36 will do its share.
Page    Forty-four 7lJ
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W. Lewis Cunningham
Lewis recrived his education at West
Kilbride School and Greenock Academy,
Scotland. Since his arrival, at U. B. C,
distinguished himself as the star backstroke of the Swimming Club, on the
Junior soccer team, as treasurer of
S. M. U. S., and viC3-president of the
U. E. S.   Sigma Phi Delta.
Hugh P. Godard
After washing bottles in a jam factory
for two summers, Hugh decided to become a Chemical Engineer. Spent last
summer at Anyox. When not blowing
glass, finds time to play centre forward
in Senior soccer. Four yeais in C.O.T.C,
Second Lieut., with Captain's papers.
Robert A. King
A science man from Burnaby who
claims the fair sex do not interest him,
throws the odd basketball and is a
maestro with the violin and trombone.
Favorite expression is, "I don't know
what you're talking about."
James St. George Mitchell
Brentwood College and King George
High School. At 'Varsity he has been
busy with a double degree course and
First Division English Rugby, winning
his Big Block in 1932. For the past two
years he has been athletic representative of Science '36.   Zeta Psi.
Thomas L. Brock
President of Science '36, with time
from his double degree course to be a
star on skis and the cinder track. He
is a graduate of the Royal Military
College, and supplements his interest
in chemical warfare by investigating
the effect of butyric acid on oil shale,
human beings, and bacteria.
Edward H. Gautschi
Blonde, good-natured, and foot-loose,
Ed has hitch-hiked over most of B. C.
and prospected in the Yukon; an expert mechanic and owned one of the
original "bugs"; has also tried his
hand at rowing and soldiering with
considerable success.   Sigma Phi Delta.
Thomas A. Haslett
Born in Paisley, Scotland, educated in
Ocean Falls; entered U. B. C. with
Arts '30, took several years off to work
in the Powell River mills, and returned
to enter Science '36 to study Chemistry.
Sigma Phi Delta.
John F. Melvin
Matriculated in Regina, but seeing
his mistake he hastened to the coast
and U. B. C, where his basso pro-
fundo has led many an unofficial
academic chorus. Other activities:
arguing with professors, inter-class
sport and the Chemistry Society.
T. W. "Wenry" McGinn
T. W. wants to be either a Chemical
Engineer or a Field Marshal. Favorite
expression, "Shut Up." Member of
Swimming team and C.O.T.C.
Page    Forty-fivi w
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Robert Duff Walker
Arrived at U. B. C. from Penticton in
1931, and has spent the intervening
years at basketball, track, boxing, and
worrying over marks under 100 per
cent.
George Stanley Williamson
Stan is claimant for the title of tallest
member of the Chemical Engineering
Class, but he always ranks near the,
top of his class. President of the
Chemistry Society, he is working on
a fractionating column intended to
separate gasoline from crude oil or
whiskey from mash or something.
George Fyke
From Moosomin, Sask., and Victoria,
Gym has remained a staunch member
of '36 while serving as secretary of
S.M.U.S. and playing Canadian and
English Rugby. Last summer Gym
worked on engineering staff for road
construction near Hope. Sigma Phi
Delta.
Sam L. Lipson
Another Civil six-footer who hails from
Odessa, Russia. He mangges to keep
at the head of his class and play
Canadian football, basketball, and
with the Players' Club.
Kenneth E. Patrick
Another Victoria College boy, Ken entered Science '34, but followed the lure
of Barkerville gold for a year and also
worked on the Victoria City Engineering
staff. His object is to become a municipal engineer.
^7s777777>
Bruce A. Robinson
The originator of "S.M.U.S. Smutterings,"
editor of the Science Song Book and the
mainspring of all Scienc 3 activities;
takes time off from his double degree
course to be vice-president of S.M.U.S.
and president of this year's Graduating
Class. Spends week-ends ski-ing on
Hollyburn Ridge. His summers are
spent on Forestry and Geological Surveys.
A. K. G. Blakeney
A product of Victoria College, Kel
came to U. B. C. to study the engineering profession. He took two years off
to study the practical side, but came
back still determined to be a contractor.
William K. Gwyer
Arriving at U. B. C. from Prince
Rupert in 1930, Bill has taken an active part in Canadian and English
Rugby. He spends his summers surveying the B. C. Hinterland, but he
means to take up structural engineering" after he  graduates.   Zeta  Psi.
Murray McDonald
Saskatoon's elongated contribution to
the Civil Class, Murray has helped
build half the roads and bridges between here and his home town, including the Burrard Bridge. He intends
to build more roads and bridges after
graduation.
Page   Forty-six «
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G. Brodie Gillies
"Broadeye" is another overworked
Electrical double-degree man. An active member of the A. I. E. E. and the
Radio Club, he is well known in the
radio domain as VE5BG. Spent the
last two summers wielding a Swedish
banjo in a gold mine.
Richard A. Hamilton
Dick is an electrical who spends his
time mincing differential equations,
his summers answering a ship's bell,
and his evenings getting starry-eyed
over willowy blondes. A product of
Vancouver Tech, he is an active member of the A. I. E. E.
Russel McArthur
Mac is another Nelson boy who came
down to the bright lights for an education, and also, it is rumored, to
escape a shady past. He always
makes honours and relaxes with the
Track Club.
J. J. Garnett McLellan
From Penticton. J. J. didn't like the
winters, so he came to U. B. C. Now
that the time has come to graduate, he
doesn't know where to go. Hopes to
be a Mining Engineer, but so far has
done all his mining with a pencil.
Teller Heath Potter
Born at Trail, B. C, he was a member
of Science '35 until he was frozen in,
one year at Manson Creek, where he
spent the winter. He also worked several years at Trail, and surveyed
claims on Great Slave Lake. For the
past year he has been President of
S. M. U.  S.
G. Frederic Green
Fred is another short wave fiend
(VE5CH for your information), dividing
his spare time between his super-X
and amateur radio. On the campus he
is best known as chairman of the
Student Branch of the A. I. E. E.
Lome R. Kersey
Lome has the open circuit disposition
of a three-phase alternator; spends his
days working, his nights frivolling,
and the in-between hours sleeping and
Eating. When the in-between hours are
too brief for these activities he leaves
them for lectures and labs.
Robert S. McDonald
Bob was a radio fiend until he took
E. E. 11. Now his ambition is to
learn to play the accordion and mouth
organ simultaneously. Drives horses in
the summer.
Page    Forty-seven
7777777/t ^777777/>
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J. Richardson
Another Powell River boy who was
lured to the big city and a Science
course. He is secretary of the A. I.
E. E., skates, skis and plays basketball.
Alfred C. Buckland
In a class by himself — our forester!
Completing a career started with Arts
'32 and made outstanding in Science
'33 during Stadium Campaign days.
Has taken time out to learn something
about farming, gold prospecting and
hard rock mining in Quebec—but is
back to the tall timber again. President
of U.E.S. Psi Upsilon.
A. G. Cummings
"Silver" has relieved the monotony of
his industrious academic career with
intervals spent coal mining, assisting
geological surveys, and a brief period
in the administration department of
the Department of National Defence.
At U. B. C. he is president of the
G. M. Dawson Club, and a member of
the Players' Club; also reported to
belong to the Squawmen's> Union
(Whitehorse). .*£
Yit P. Chew
Yit suspects everyone of working
harder than he does, in spite of the
fact that he usually ranks on top. One
of the star players on the Class socc:r
team, his chief ambition is to dam
[or damn) the Yangtse Kiang River
when he returns to his fatherland.
Dante Ciccone
In spite of his classic name, Dante is
quiet and unobtrusive except for his
walk; one of the few Sciencemen to
complete his course with a record un-
-marred by supplementals; refuses to
make any statement to the press concerning his rumoured intentions of returning to his fatherland to help Mussolini.
Alex M. Urquhart
Victoria. His proudest possessions are
his library of four books, a one-tube
radio with seven dials, and his curly
hair.
Bernard Brynelson
A graduate miner who returned last fall
from mining pursuits at Iron Creek, Y.T.,
to excel as president of the Alma Matei
Society and to obtain his degree in
Geology. Secretary-treasurer of Science
Class for two years, vice-president oi
U.E.S., vice-president and president oi
S.M.U.S.   Sigma Phi Delta.
Ewart G. Langille
"Hughie" was a member of Science '2S
and returned last year to finish his
geological engineering course aftei
many years' experience in northerr
mining camps. He holds the monej
bags  for  the  G.  M.  Dawson Club.
Carman Ridland
A quiet Geologist who played outstand
ing basketball with the Adanacs anc
the U.B.C. Senior "A" team. Carm spen
the last two summers on Geologica
Surveys in Northwest Territories anc
the Yukon.   Phi Delta Theta.
Page    Forty-eight JL Jo
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Fred S. Foerster
Formerly a member of Science '29,
Fred joined '36 last year after several
years mining and prospecting. Born
on the prairies, but came to B. C. in
time to graduate from King Edward
High School. Although he played McKechnie Cup rugby in 1927 and 1928,
Fred has not taken up any sport since
his return.
Norman F. Moodie
A cheerful mining engineer whose
home town is Calgary. Besides being
Vice-President of the G. M. Dawson
Club, he finds time to play Second
Division Rugby, be Company Quarter-
Master-Sergec-nt in the C. O. T. C.
Alpha Delta Phi.
James MacP. Orr
Jimmy comes from Nelson, not a
Doukhobor. Besides starring in Canadian and American football, he has
been secretary-treasurer of his class,
president of the V. O. C, vice-president of men's athletics, chairman of
the Intra-mural Sports Committee, and
athletic   representative   for   S. M. U. S.
Donald C. Smith
Coming from Burnaby South High
School, Donald is another hard-working
Mining student of Science'36. He hastens
home to New Westminster every night
to study, except on Wednesdays, when
the G. M. Dawson Club meets.
George Herbert Wilson
Bert is a Mining student who delights
in doing research work during regular
ore-dressing periods. He is a baseball addict.
Page   Forty-nine
Al Kirby
"Al" is a Nelson boy studying to be a
Mining Engineer. He has played Canadian and American football, ice hockey
and inter-class basketball and soccer.
Sigma Alpha Phi.
J. Gilmore McLellan
"Gil" is a lanky radio fiend who intends to succeed Graham McNamee
as chief announcer for N. B. C. He
also plays badminton.
Elliot A. Schmidt
Born at St. Paul, Minn., Elliot came to
Vancouver in 1927 and graduated from
Prince of Wales High. A member of
Psi Upsilon fraternity, he is secretary
of  Inter-Fraternity   Council.
William H. White
A. mining engineering student, Bill hails
from Roberts Creek, B. C, but was
educated at King Edward; a member
of the G. M. Dawson Club, plays Second Division English Rugby. Aim in
life: To find a coal mine on Baffin
Land. /^ J-c
ot
James S. Motherwell
A product of a character-building institution known as Shawnigan Lake
School, Jim claims that fair co-eds do
notinterest him. Played English Rugby
until he was made vice-president of
the U. E. S. and a member of the
M. E. Club.   Zeta Psi.
em
Victor Rowland Hill
Graduated from Vancouver College in
1929 and entered the Lily Pond the following October (Arts '32). Later entered
Science '36, and now feels he has had
enough. Known around the campus
as the "brigadier," he is really only
a Second Lieutenant in the C.O.T.C,
his chief interest.
V. A. Zanadvoroff
Globe trotting and engineering form
most of this quiet Scienceman's career.
At. present his home town is Victoria.
Specializing in Metallurgy.
Edmund J. Senkler
Since emerging from the Lily Pond,
this large chunk of Victoria's population has managed to win a Big Block
and get positions on Council, the
Discipline Committee, English and Canadian Rugby teams. He usually wears
a black eye.   Valedictorian.
Stanley G. Bruce
Vernon High School. Attended Victoria College for one year before entering the Lily Pond. For the past few
years an outdoors man, smoking a
pipe, walking with his Cocker spaniel
and ski-ing with' the Outdoors Club.
Robert J. Craig
Another Mining Engineer, Bob Craig
was born in Vancouver and educated
at Magee; played two years' English
Rugby before settling down to work,
and now only takes time off for the
G. M. Dawson.
Donald R. Ferguson
A Kootenay hill-billy, educated at
Rossland, Trail and Vancouver, "Big
Boy" Ferguson (6 ft 4 in.) studied
Mining Engineering, rugby and soccer.
He hopes to be a "big shot" back in
his native hills.
Keith C. Fahrni
Born at Gladstone, Manitoba, Keith attended the University of Manitoba for
three years, and came to U- B. C. for
his fourth and fifth years of Mining
Engineering; famous for his soccer,
his eloquence at the Dawson Club,
and his piccolo playing.
Pa g e   Fifty a 2
t
em
Eleanor Scott Graham
New Westminster
Public Health
Badminton
Frances V. McQuarrie
Vancouver
Teaching and Supervision
Vice-President, N. U. S.
Alpha Delta Pi
Ethel Jean Rolston
- Vancouver
Teaching and Supervision
President of Nurses' Undergraduate Society
Alpha Phi
Lyle Creelman
Lorna Makepeace
Madeline M. Putman
Creston
Public Health
Alpha Omicron Pi
Vivian Williams
New Westminster
Public Health
Badminton Club
Page   Fifty-one JL Jo
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Nurses' Undergraduate
Society
MISS  M.  GRAY
T
XHE year 1935-36 has proven to be one of unique character in the annals of
nursing undergraduate history. It has been a great thrill to watch the gradual
evolution in the nature of the nursing course, and the increase in membership. At
present the enrolment is almost 80, with the trend towards higher Cursing education
increasing. •»-
Although, with this great increase, we yet feel keenly the loss of Charlotte Nix,
from the University of Alberta, who, after a brief illness, passed away in Edmonton
in November. As well, we regretted exceedingly to see Norma Cameron withdraw
owing to ill-health.
Nursing activities began with an animal party early in October, in honour of
the Freshette Nurses. In varying symbolic costumes the new flock mingled with
the old.
Our Fall tea, held at the home of Kathleen Taylor in November, provided us
with the delightful opportunity of meeting Mrs. Dolman, wife of the acting head of
the Department of Bacteriology and Health.
Nursing is proud to acknowledge its victory over the other women students in
the Rotary Ice Carnival. Under the leadership of Janet Kennedy, our athletes are
something of which to be proud.
Owing to the death of the King, the Nurses' dance, planned for January 20,
was postponed indefinitely. At present we are all looking forward to the Science-
Nursing-Phrateres Stag party soon to take place.
With the close of this year. Nursing anticipates many successful ones to come.
To the class of 1936 "prosperity and good luck."
Page   Fifty-two -7l J.
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Science
'37
Q
\*J CIENCE '37 completes its fourth year with only fifty per cent of its original members. The other half were victims of mid-terms, finals, Demon Matrimony, and the
other pitfalls besetting the path of all Science students. The gallant remnant of
the class are steeling themselves for one more year, and then—peeling potatoes
in a relief camp! -   ■»
The survivors of the Chemical course, Ames, Armstrong* Bell, Bianco, Fraser,
Gould, Hartley, Moore, Morris, Nemetz, Potkins, Ross and Trethewey, are producing
bigger and better smells every day.
Dolphin and McLeod, the last of the Civil Engineers, are still studying road-
making between parties.
The elusive electron will not be at liberty for long now, with only one more
year till graduation for the Electrical Engineers, Gissing, Hawkins, Hodge, Kiel,
Long, MacKenzie, McLeish, Obata, Poison, Shelling, Sowerby and Taylor.
The class optimist, Hemmingsen, hopes to graduate in his Forestry course
before all B. C.'s trees have vanished.
Byers, Hendry, Irvine and Watson are not so worried, being students of
Geology, and fairly confident in the durability of local rocks, even if they have to
go to Okalla to find them.
Alexander, Cazlet, Clark, Darling, Luttrell, McPhail, Thompson, Witbeck and
Wolfe, the Mechanical squad, are still as eager as ever to push their grubby
fingers into gear boxes and flywheels.
The remaining members of the class hope to earn their livelihood by the underground methods known only to mining engineers. They are Boe, Clayton, Emery,
Gwyn, Hammersley, Lee, Monroe, Morris, MacKay, Porter, Teal and Wright.
Page   Fifty-three 'J** J*-
tewi—
Science
'38
wE
ELL, here we are; another year behind us, and still two more to go. At the
rate our numbers are diminishing, there will be few of us left in 1938. Last year we
were 120 strong, and boasted the stock-worn phrase, "the best class Science ever
had." This year we are a mere 70, but still boast the jjartte, and what's more,
believe it. You laugh when you read this, but we laugh,'too, in a different sense.
We laugh because we're in Science '38, and darn proud of it. We look forward
eagerly to the time when we will graduate, and optimistically face the world with
the same spirit and co-operation that we have built up during the two years thus
far that we have pulled together.
We haven't blazoned our name in huge red letters in the annals of the University for any one outstanding thing, nor will our fame go down into posterity as
having the nuclei of many budding Einsteins—but we shall always be remembered
as being in there fighting all the time to help keep "Science" on top.
We are glad to say our executive has not only been on its toes all year, but
has distinguished itself in University life in general. Harvey Carrothers, president,
has worked hard on intra-mural sports and campus politics generally. Pat Love,
vice-president, has played a fine game of basketball for the University, and has
continually helped us along with his cheery smile and willing efforts. Wilf
Williams, secretary-treasurer, has won renown as having organized and led the
Science Band; and Strat Leggat, athletic representative, has shown all Vancouver
he can "play a real game of Rugby on the 'Varsity senior team.
University—again we say we're proud we're Science '38.
Page    Fifty-four iLl,
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Science
'39
T
J. HE Beginning: 140 prospective engineers registered in Science '39. In two
confusing weeks Dean Turnbull has packed them all into the Science Faculty (only
a B. C. E. bus driver could do better). „,
Athletics: Many members of the class take part in both maj«r and minor sports.
First inter-class event of the year, the Mall Sweepstake, won by Science '39; 56 of
the 112 entries were from this class.
Music: Under the leadership of Monsieur Lambert, the class produced many
choral programmes that were the envy of the Musical Society and the despair of
professors who were trying to instil a semblance of education into the Artsmen.
Christmas Exams: Christmas and a new record for Science set by this class,
25 B.A.C.'s being conferred on 25 members of this brilliant class.
The Science Ball: '39 contributed largely to the success of the major social
function by doing most of the decorating in the afternoon and appearing in large
numbers in the evening.
The Executive: Major Finlay, Hon. Presidink; Bud Burden, Dictipator; Bud
Killam, Vice-Dictipator; Alan Hill, Dictipator's "write" hand man; Bill Craighead,
Dictipator's banker; Maurice Lambert, Dictipator's trainer.
The Spring Exams: Many high marks, but further decimation of our ranks.
The Future: Many' of the University's outstanding engineers graduate in '39.
Page   Fifty-fiv( Science
Scrap
First row:   (1) Mr. Satan.   (2) Arts-Science or Science-Arts?   (3) Still, McGinn and Williamson.   (4) Soap Works Gang.
Second row:  (5) What's the trouble, Phil?  (6) Geologicals or Prospectors?
Third row:  (7) Yes, that's a fine microscope!   (8) Do you see it?   (9) You can't fool us, Stan!
Fourth row:   (10) "Signing" for the Ball.   (11) 5th-year Chemicals with Deacon's cocktail shaker.  (12) Sleepy.   (13) "For Adam was
an Engineer."   (14) And she's Irish, too, by gum!
Page   Fifty-six «%
AGRICULTURE JL Jo
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To the Graduates
in the Faculty
of
Agriculture
DEAN   F.   M.   CLEMENT
VvVER and over again the human race in its successive generations goes through the same impatience
and the same restlessness, the same resistance to authority and the same vague hankering after untried
novelties and discredited antiquities, which have been characteristic of youth from the beginning." The
present graduating class has not been different from youth in general.
There can be no doubt that education came into existence in order that the experiences of the past
might be made available for the immediate and distant future, and that those perpetually recurring
manifestations of infancy as displayed by different generations might be reduced to a minimum. I do
not know what university education has meant to each and every one of you. As a class you have
been somewhat restless, but if you have profited even a little from your experiences and the binding
influences of your swaddling clothes, the efforts put forth will net have been in vain.
Outstanding achievements in literature, in the arts, in science, in practice, have been brought
within your mental horizon. You have studied and worked with men and women of high integrity and
balanced mind and character. You have had held before your vision the pictures of some of the great
personalities and contributors of the past. You have been asked to observe them before being permitted
to graduate, when you will be out in the world and asked to form judgments for yourselves. The
standards of judgment have been held before you.   Can you advance or improve upon these standards?
The true test of the results of your studies will be found in your character and your conduct. Possibly I should say conduct and character, because conduct is the outward expression of character. Have
you obtained a clear balance in understanding between the past and the problems of today, and have
you a high ideal based on knowledge?
Growing pains are often mistaken for new ideas.   Don't confuse them.
F. M. CLEMENT.
Page   Fifty-seven «
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Agriculture '36
PROFESSOR H. M. KING
Th:
.HE province of British Columbia is well represented among the members of'Aggie '36, many of whom come from various points on the coast
and from all over the interior. Thus the knowledge absorbed during their
all too short stay at U. B. C. will be doubly valuat% in that it will be
spread out over a large territory.
The outstanding achievement of the graduating class this year was
the splendid record made at the Pacific International Exposition at Portland by the U. B. C. judging team, which was made up entirely of the
class of Aggie '36.
The annual Faculty party, which was so well initiated last year by
Aggie '35, has, by our efforts this spring, become one of the more notable
functions in 'Varsity entertainment circles.
The class executive has been: Honorary President, Professor H. M.
King; President, James Sadler; Secretary-Treasurer, Frank Clark.
Page   Fifty-eight JL Jo
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Zoe Browne-Clayton
Okanagan, Mission
Agriculture Economics, English
Senior   Editor   and   News   Manager of "Ubyssey," Outdoors Club
Alpha Phi
em
J. S. Allin
Vancouver
Dairy Chemistry
President, A. U. S. Cattle Judging   Team,   Portland;    Executive,
Intra-Mural Sports
Frank C. Clarke
Kamloops
Dairying and Animal Husbandry
Secretary-Treasurer,    Agric.   '36,
Portland   Dairy   Cattle   Judging
Team;  Arts '20, Relay '34, '35
Robert P. Forshaw
Greenwood
Animal  Husbandry,   Agricultural
Economics
Basketball, Portland Judging
Team
Cedric A. Hornby
Ryder Lake
Horticulture,   Agronomy
Donald Clandinin
Poultry Husbandry
Paul W. Clement
Vancouver
Horticulture, Agriculture
Economics
English Rugby, Badminton
Phi Delta Theta
Lloyd Easier
Page   Fifty-nine
^77s777? Jkc Jo
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Evelyn E. Jenkins
North Vancouver
Animal Husbandry, Biology
Outdoor Club, Gym Club,
Fencing
William E. Lindsay
Powell River, B. C.
Zeta Psi
H. B. Pearson, B.Comm.
Horticulture
Big Four Canadian Rugb*^1932),
Captain,   English  Rugby ^Senior
XV (1935-36), Big Block Club
Phi Delta Theta
James A. Sadler
Vancouver
Animal Husbandry,  Agricultural
Economics
President, Aggie '36
Sigma Alpha Phi
Barbara Jones
Vancouver
Dairying
Alpha Delta Pi
A. H. V. Moxon
Vancouver
Agronomy
Agriculture   Club,   Portland
Judging Team
Pi Kappa
Arthur J. Renney
Nanaimo
Plant Genetics, Agronomy
English Rugby
Phi Kappa Pi
C. William Wood
Vancouver
Poultry  Husbandry,  Animal
Husbandry
Canadian Rugby
Delta Upsilon
Page    Sixty 7l J*
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Agriculture '37
PROFESSOR E. A. LLOYD
C D. MOODIE
V,
'ARIETY is the keynote of Agriculture '37, which includes representatives from northern and interior British Columbia and Saskatchewan.
The majority of the members are from the Lower Mqinkmd and Vancouver Island. No feminine face graces this hardy cla^s of fifteen, most
of whom are taking different courses. The Agriculture course includes
most of the basic sciences of the Applied Science Faculty, and several
specialized studies, such as Animal Husbandry, Poultry, Dairying,
Agronomy, Horticulture, and Agricultural Economics.
The lighter side of University life is not neglected by the Aggies, who
have representatives in almost every sport, and who provide strong
teams in inter-class sport tourneys. Aggie '37 also played an important
part in the Annual Aggie Barn Dance and Klondike Night.
Class executives for the year were: Honorary President, Professor
E. A. Lloyd; President, Dawson Moodie; Vice-President, Charles Hardwick; Secretary-Treasurer, Arthur Kadzulawa.
Page    Sixty-one Jlu Jo
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Agriculture '38
PROFESSOR •T.   A.  BOVING
♦ "V
JtM
S. GRIFFIN
N. HOCKIN
R:
, EMARKS: The class of '38 continues to flourish. Unfortunately they
are only six in number, due to proper feeding and watering methods
being neglected. However, under the watchful* eye of their honorary
president and Aggie II instructor, Mr. Boving^ those that are left have
developed from the embryo state, and are now showing signs of shaping
into well-formed specimens. These outstanding show animals (which
.are being groomed for exhibition purposes only) are: Joan McTaggart-
Cowan, Anna Rogozinsky, Paul Trussel, Maurice Welsh, Neil Hockin,
Shirley Griffin.
JUDGE'S NOTES: (1) All members of the class are on the executive.
This makes for better class spirit and ensures a full turnout of the class
at meetings.
(2) No class fees are paid. This is arranged to prevent the unfriendly
feeling which sometimes crops up between the treasurer and the rest of
the class.
(3) The class party had to be cancelled due to the fact that no satis-
tory accommodation could be found.
Page    Sixty-two JL Jo
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Agriculture '39
PROFESSOR  A.  F.   BARSS
F. K. BERRY
P. RUNKLE
"I'm going a-milking, sir," said the classical miss;
But now-a-days it's not done like this,
The modern maiden gains her B. S. A.
To convince the cow that she knows the way,
To prove that things are all above-board,        ,   ■*
So she may draw of the lactic hoard.
And so for prospective farmerette (farmer wouldn't rhyme)-
Agriculture in the course was set.
And the work that it did was very fine,
Showing its best in Aggie '39.
So here we are: we labour and learn
Earth to sow, and profits to earn;
"To water the horse, and milk the cow";
To distinguish the poppa pig from the sow;
And in all things the Aggies shine,
Showing their shiniest in " '39."
And we know our chickens (with feathers, of course),
We can tell the difference 'twixt cow and horse.
Yes, we know our cows, and this is no bull,
For the cup of knowledge we've drunk to the full;
Yea, the cup of all wisdom we've drunk to the dregs—
Though Science may crow, WE supply the eggs.
And so when you meet for "Auld Lang Syne"
Sing one song for Aggie '39.
Page   Sixty-thr< -.' - jjg It
£A^t
*fc- "^Nl
STANDING (left to right):
A. J. Wood, R. S. Bans, B. A.
Campbell, W. Vrooman, J. B.
O'Neil, J. C. Berry, M. F.
Clarke.
SEATED (left to right):
J. D. Black, V. C. Brink, Helen
Farley, Dean F. M. Clement,
Kathryn Milligan, J. F. Bowen,
P. M. West.
ABSENT:
Igor Kosin, J. P. Miller.
Agriculture Post-Graduate Class
T,
HIS year's graduate class in Agriculture is one of the largest on record. There
are many interesting and valuable research problems being undertaken by the
members of this class. Some of them are: An Economic Survey of the Beef Situation
in British Columbia, Range Taxation and Land Utilization Problems on the Pacific
Slope, The Thermophylic Bacteria of Milk, An Economic Survey of the Small Fruit
Industry in Canada, Economic Aspects of the World's Sugar Industry, A Milk
Survey of the Fraser Valley, A Study of the Proteins in Alfalfa, Studies of Sterility
in Alfalfa.
It is generally appreciated that the contributions that these men are making in
the field of scientific agriculture are exceedingly valuable and indicative of the
large opportunity agriculture offers for the profitable pursuance of research.
Page   Sixty-four 1
c
^
STUDEN
GOVERNMENT ~X 7»
t
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B. BRYNELSEN
President, Students'  Council
D
Students' Council
ESPITE Dr. Sedgwick's charge that the 1935-36 Council was chosen for its
beauty, it has been unanimously acclaimed the most popular and%efficient Council
in campus history. «;
Headed by Bern Brynelsen, the golden-haired Scienceman, who fulfilled all his
campaign promises, it has weathered one of the busiest years since the University-
was built, and has not only carried out its own duties thoroughly, but given very
material support to the Union Building campaign and other student activities.
Darrel Gomery, the very, very efficient secretary, deserves great credit for her
capable handling of the Alma Mater Society's vast correspondence. Clarence Idyll,
known in the sacred precincts of the Council Chamber as "Rothschild," budgeted
so skilfully that, in spite of a deficit inherited from the previous Council, the Alma
Mater Society finished the year with a small surplus.
Ardy Beaumont and Ed Senkler, presidents of the W. U. S. and M. U. S. respectively, directed the social programme of the year with great success in spite of many
upsets caused by the Union Building campaign.
Jay Gould, L. S. E., representative and head of the Campaign Committee, was
the mainspring of most discussions. Jay knows his A. M. S. Constitution backwards,
and with his knowledge of every detail of parliamentary procedure, he saved many
a weighty problem from going astray and wasting time.
Molly Locke and John Harrison, representing the athletic organizations, attended
to the programmes of games both on the campus and with other universities.
Ralph Killam ("Honest R. J.") defended the rights of the Great Unwashed in the
capacity of Junior Member, and could always be counted on to deliver some
wisdom-weighted platitude in a moment of crisis. His duels of wit with the rest of
the Council, and his olive sandwiches, made with his own little hands in the Caf,
provided many moments of sunshine in otherwise dull hours. An orchid to Killam.
No Council should be without one I
Page   Sixty-fivi •Jltz Jo
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Students'
Council
i
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
Jay Gould, Darrel Gomery.
SECOND HOW (Left to Right):
Clarence Idyll, Ardy Beaumont.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
Ed Senkler, Molly Locke.
FOURTH ROW (Left to Right):
John Harrison, Ralph Killam.
Page   Sixty-six J-lte  J-atem
Men's
Undergraduate
Executive
TOP ROW (Left to Right):
E. Senkler, president; T. Potter.
BOTTOM ROW (Left to Right):
A. Morley, J. Allin.
■*
Women's
Undergraduate
Executive
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
A. Beaumont, president; B. Waite, P. Patterson,
Dean M. L. Bollert, honorary president.
SECOND ROW (Left to Right):
K. Scott, A. Horwood, E. Rolston, L. Nelson.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
M. Buchanan, B. Street, J. Davidson.
Page   Sixty-seven J-ke  J-atem
Nurses'
Undergraduate
Executive
Fairley,   E.   Rolston,
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
Miss  M.   Gray,   Miss  G
president.
SECOND ROW (Left to Right):
K. Taylor, T. McQuarrie, B. McCann.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
L. Grant, K. Curtis, J. Kennedy, F. Jackson.
Page    Sixty-eight
Agricultural
Undergraduate
Executive
TOP ROW (Left to Right):
J. Allin, president; R. Cudmore.
BOTTOM ROW (Left to Right):
P. Clement, B. Jones. JL Jo
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Arts Men's
Undergraduate
Executive
TOP ROW (Left to Right):
A. Morley, president;  E. Hetherington.
BOTTOM ROW (Left to Right):
L. McKillop, J. Logan, E. Jones.
1
f\
*p)
gf 0
*                                         A*
/
Science Men's
Undergraduate
Executive
TOP ROW (Left to Right):
T.   Potter,   president;   B.   Robinson,   Dr.   J.   M.
Turnbull, honorary president.
BOTTOM ROW (Left to Right):
J. Witbeck, J. Orr, S. P. Burden, H. Carruthers.
Page    Sixty-nine 1
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Autographs
Page    Seventy BLICATION
^^■•■i JL. Jo
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Publications
Board
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
John Cornish, editor-in-chief; Dorwin Baird, John Logan, senior
editors.
SECOND ROW {Left to Right):
Kemp  Edmunds   sports   editor;   Lloyd  Hobden,   feature   editor;
Zoe Browne-Clayton, news manager.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
Peter Higashi, exchange editor; Jim Beveridge, Norman DePoe,
associate editors.
Page   Seventy-oni 'Jb* J°
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em.
Ubyssey"
By Z. B-C. and J. C.
Th
, HE Pub, home of conscientious idlers, broken crockery, the community
telephone, mumps and bridge contests, also puts out the "Ubyssey." And
the "Ubyssey," in case you have not heard of it, is the focal point for the
English Department's collective wrath, and the handbook of the Caf
intellectuals.
Pubsters, if you ever run into, or over, them, are distinguished by a
certain haggard appearance. This is because they are perpetually
recovering from their last binge. The official binges this season have
been:
Imprimis—A very successful party held at La Fonda in October.
Sec-erheml Scads of special, unreadable supplements for the Grads,
Sciencemen, the Union Building enthusiasts and the Literary Jessupites.
Thricum—A grand and glorious binge in the Editorial Room of The Vancouver Sun on February 4. Quartz—Two Pub teas, featuring world-
renowned guest artists. Dionne—The last night of publication, which is
as yet but an unholy glint in the editors' eyes. "*'
The ringleader of the reprobates this year has been John Cornish,
which would be "us." Editorial modesty prevents the enumeration of our
excessive virtues.
The first hench(wo)man has been Zoe Browne-Clayton, who, being this
article's part author, is also constrained by editorial modesty from relating her mountainous achievements. A group of efficient but frightened
reporters testify to these.
The Tuesday issue has taken it on the chin frequently, but has bobbed
up again persistently. Among the casualties were Alan Morley, who
went down in the first round, and John Dauphinee, who survived till
Christmas. His successor, Dorwin Baird, took command with the enthusiasm of youth, and is still going strong. Both John and Dorwin have
been devotees to the more sensational type of make-up.
John Logan on the Friday issue favored a more reactionary policy.
He has surmounted all difficulties as Senior Editor, and survived to the
bitter end.
Page    Seventy-two Jke Jo,
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Regret was caused by the resignation from Associate Editorship of
Donna Lucas. Her place was filled by Jim Beveridge, whose headlines
have that primitive muckish appeal. A promising lad. After the meteoric
rise of Dorwin Baird from Associate Editor, Norman DePoe filled his shoes
with aplomb on the Tuesday issue.
That Colonel of the Dea' ol' South, Kemp Edmonds, suh! ruled the
Sports staff with aristocratic grace. Milt Taylor, world-renowned owner
of the Baby Austin, was responsible for much of the new and startling
make-up on the last page. Howie Hume, a Sports associate, also did
neat work as Cartoonist. John Davidson, whose spiritual associations
are the Muse of Muck, also did cartoon work. Both artists showed excellent workmanship.
Reg Jessup, litterateur extraordinary, flagellated the flaccid brains of
the Caf loungers and delighted the highbrows with his weekly column,
"The Crackling of Thorns," and his Literary Supplement. Nancy Miles
conducted her whimsical column from Cranbrook, where she is standing
for the Cranbrook Courier. Her column, called "Prancing on Parnassus,"
proved one of the most popular features of the year.
Lloyd Hobden, despite the handicap of mumps and unsympathetic
Senior Editors, managed to keep the spirit of Chang Suey alive on the
campus.   Pete Higashi handled the Exchange with relish.
Assistant Editors were Ken Grant, Madge Neill, Pauline Patterson,
and in the Sports line, Dave Petapiece, Frank Turner and Bill Van
Houten. Reporters included Doreen Agnew, Margaret Armstrong, Denis
Brown, John Brynelsen, Dave Crawley, Dorothy Cummings, Tim Dauph-
inee, Irene Eedy, Peggy Hicks, Bob Knox, Jim Macfarlane, Alison Macintosh, Gait Martin, Frank Perry, Chuck Rines, Norah Sibley, Bill Sibley,
David Smith, Doris Tobin, Stan Weston and Mary Young.
Page    Seventy-three BOB  KING
BRUCE ROBINSON
PAULINE PATTERSON
DICK  ELSON
The Totem
By D.  R.  B.
MARGARET ECKER
1 HE 1936 "Totem" comes as a tribute to the energy and forethought of the Editor,
Margaret Ecker. Together with a staff far too small for stich an undertaking she
has made every effort to bring forth a year book worthy of the University of
British Columbia.
Few students who peruse these pages will have any idea of the tremendous
amount of work that goes into the publishing of the "Totem." Pictures, which
decorate the pages so suitably, provide one of the major problems. Members oi
the Senior Class, prominent athletes, club executives, and members of Faculty must
all make and keep their appointments with the "Totem" photographer. Many, not
realizing the trouble involved, caused the editors countless hours of worry by failing
to arrange for their picture at the proper time.
But in spite of the troubles this year's "Totem" can be said to live up to the
tradition of other days. New covers, different paper, and an increased number of
scrap pages will greet the reader. The campus views should be treasured and
appreciated by U. B. C. graduates in days to come when they are far from the
campus.
Sport pictures and write-ups—always a major feature of any "Totem"—have
been handled this year by Dick Elson. Familiar himself with campus sport, Dick
has performed his duties with a dispatch that speaks well for his organizing ability.
Pauline Patterson, Bruce Robinson and Bob King have been busy assisting the
Editor. To them fell the task of re-writing stories sent in by clubs, arranging photo
time-tables, contacting class executives, and looking after many other details of
publication.
And so the 1936 "Totem" has evolved—after a great deal of work on the part
of its editors. They hope, and we think, that it is the best yet. The approval of
the readers should substantiate this fact.
Page    Seventy-four CLUBS and
k    SOCIETIE' 'J** J-*
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Players' Club
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
Hugh Palmer, president;  Amy Seed, vice-president; Prof. T. Larsen, honorary president.
SECOND ROW (Left to Right):
Hazel Wright, secretary; Eleanor Gibson, treasurer; Ludlow Beamish.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
William Robertson, Hazel Merton, John Davidson, members of the executive.
Musical Society
TOP ROW (Left to Right):
Vera Radcliffe, president; Pauline Patterson,
vice-president; Dr. W. L. MacDonald, honorary
president.
BOTTOM ROW (Left to Right):
Margaret Atkinson,  secretary;   Sholto  Marlatt,
business manager; Jayne Nimmons, production
manager.
Page    Seventy-fivi •J** J°
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Players' Club
DOROTHY SOMERSET
As
lS old as the University itself, the Players' Club celebrated its twenty-first anniversary by a year of
outstanding achievement.
Guided by its Faculty leader, Professor Larsen, whose friendship as well as advice we all value,
the Club, under the presidency of Hugh Palmer, continued to endorse the policy inaugurated last year,
namely, to present plays of true artistic and intellectual content, worthy of University tradition.
Well in line with this policy was the Spring play, that rollicking comedy, "She Stoops to Conquer,"
by Oliver Goldsmith, the production of which trained all members of the Club in acting and technical
ability. The cast consisted of Diana Drabble as Kate Hardcastle, Adelia Thurber as Mrs. Hardcastle,
Audrey Phillips as Constance Neville, Eunice Alexander as the maid, Hugh Palmer as Marlowe, Davie
Fulton as Hastings, Fred Hobson as Tony Lumpkin, Ludlow Beamish as Mr. Hardcastle, Arthur Sager as
Sir Charles Marlowe, and Graham Darling, Jim Beveridge, Sam Roddan, George Johnston and Monty
Fotheringham as the yokels. Directed by Miss Dorothy Somerset, who has won a distinguished name
for herself in British Columbia drama circles, the play captured everyone's admiration.
Miss Somerset also conducted Voice Culture classes, which proved so popular that the auditorium
reverberated with repeated letters of the alphabet, and the stage rocked under the strain of supporting
gesticulating Thespians.
Mention must be made of the Christmas production of four plays, two scenes from "Hamlet" among
them; the sponsorship of the Cornish School's puppet show, "The Prince and the Dragon," a delightfully
whimsical illustration of the new art cf Marionette stage-craft, the profits of which went to the Union
Building fund; and the continuation of the play-reading and make-up groups. The play-distribution
bureau continued to send plays to amateur groups, and the usual prize for an original one-act play
was offered.
Members of the executive were: President, Hugh Palmer; Vice-President, Amy Seed; Secretary, Hazel
Wright; Treasurer, Eleanor Gibson; Stage Manager, John Davidson; Committee, Hazel Merton, William
Robertson, Leslie Allan, Ludlow Beamish.
Plays and casts were chosen by an Advisory Board consisting of: Honorary President, Professor
Larsen; Dramatic Director, Miss Dorothy Somerset; Art Director, Dr. D. C. B. Duff; Mrs. F. G. C. Wood,
Miss Dorothy Jefferd, Professor Ira Dilworth, Professor Walter Gage.
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The Musical
Society
C.   HAYDEN  WILLIAMS
T
J. HE Musical Society, now in its twentieth year, is the only organization on the
campus devoted wholly to the study and appreciation of music. All musically
talented students are given an opportunity to express themselves through their
chosen medium.
The Society has attempted to foster a love and appreciation4bf good music, and
with this end in view helped to sponsor during the Spring term a series of lectures
on "Orchestration and Form" by Allard de Ridder, conductor of the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra, assisted at the piano by Elsje de Ridder. The keen interest
evinced by students in these lectures augurs well for the future of music on this
campus. Through the Society passes were obtained to the final rehearsals of the
Symphony Orchestra for all Faculty members and students.
Following the customary procedure, several noon-hour recitals were presented,
two of which featured outside artists, including Mrs. Boothroyd, Miss Elsa Halpin
and Archie Runcie. As their annual production this year the Society chose the
Gilbert and Sullivan opera, "Pirates of Penzance."
A new departure took the form of Modern Choir work, which aroused considerable interest among the students. As creditable progress was made the executive
feel certain that it will be continued next year.
The 1935-36 executive comprised: Honorary President, Dr. W. L. MacDonald;
Honorary Vice-President, Professor Walter Gage; President, Vera Radcliff; Vice-
President, Pauline Patterson; Secretary, Margaret Atkinson; Business Manager,
Sholto Marlatt; Production Manager, Jayne Nimmons; Musical Director, Haydn
Williams; Stage Director, E. V. Young. The Advisory Board consisted of Miss Abernethy and Professor Dilworth.
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Parliamentary
Forum
TOP ROW (Left to Right):
Peter  Disney,   president;   Professor  J.  F.  Day,
honorary president;   Ludlow Beamish.
BOTTOM ROW (Left to Right):
Alvin   Rosenbaum,   Davie   Fulton,   Madeleine
Bowden.
Phrateres
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
Audrey  Horwood, president;   Dean M.  Bollert,
honorary president; Madge Neill, vice-president.
SECOND ROW (Left to Right):
Gwen Pym, recording secretary; Beverley Cunningham, treasurer.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
Mary   Black,   corresponding   secretary;   Peggy
Fox, publicity;  Jean McLean, historian.
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Parliamentary Forum
Ti-
HE year 1935-36 has been the most successful in the history of the Parliamentary Forum. True, we
did not manage to achieve our ambition of bringing home the coveted McGoun Cup, emblematic of
debating supremacy in Western Canada, but the standard has been raised. John Conway and Alvin
Rosenbaum went to Edmonton, where they met the University of Alberta, while Peter Disney and Dorwin
Baird met the University of Manitoba at home.
The Forum took part in the interchange of debating teams between colleges and universities of
Eastern and Western Canada organized under the auspices of the- National Federation of Canadian
University students. Sid Hermant, of Toronto, and Eli Kelloway, of McGill, were successful in persuading
the judges against the case set up by Lex McKillop and Davie Fulton for a Social Credit government,
but again the debate was close. Jay Gould, who journeyed to Eastern Canada with Maurice Western,
of the University of Saskatchewan, was on the winning side in five out of seven debates, winning both
at McGill and at Hart House—the most creditable showing, probably, that a U. B. C. debater has
ever put up. '
But undoubtedly the most encouraging feature of the year has been the remarkable attendance at
the regular Tuesday night meetings, which has been the best in the history of the Forum, more members
having spoken than ever before. This is a hopeful sign, as it is disclosing a good deal of promising
talent. Several noon-hour debates have attracted a capacity attendance. The omens are good, and
with the new Union Building likely to be on the campus in the near future, the Parliamentary Forum, in
common with the other activities under the Literary and Scientific Executive, looks forward with confidence
to the future.
The executive for the past year has consisted of Peter Disney, who took over Collins' position as
President; Ludlow Beamish, Davie Fulton, Alvin Rosenbaum and Madeleine Bowden; with our indefatigable godparent, Professor J. F. Day, as Honorary President and Faculty Adviser.
Phrateres
T*
HE first Phrateres chapter was organized in 1924 at the University of California, at Los Angeles, by
Dean Helen Matthewson Laughlin. Since then eight chapters in United States universities, and Theta
Chapter, installed at U. B. C. in May, 1935, have become affiliated.
The organization purposes to extend a spirit of friendliness and good will among the students on the
campus and to give to every woman opportunities for active participation in University life. Its name
is the Greek word meaning "Sisterhood," its motto is "Famous for Friendliness." The fees are kept low,
and membership is open to any woman, sorority and non-sorority, on the campus, who is sincerely
interested in its ideals of equality, simplicity and friendliness.
Theta Chapter at U. B. C. has over three hundred initiated members. Those who have left the
campus have organized into an Alumni association. The chapter is divided into eight sub-chapters,
which hold regular meetings and have their own executives. At its monthly social meeting each subchapter worked on projects for a sale of work, the proceeds of which will go into Dean Bollert's bursary
fund. The chapter programme for the year included a party to welcome the new members, the annual
initiation ceremony and banquet, a monthly entertainment (each sub-chapter in turn acting as hostess),
and the ceremony for the installation of the new executive.
Our honorary president, Dean M. L. Bollert, in her twin capacity of Faculty Adviser, gave invaluable
assistance to the executive. The Phrateres Council, composed of the all-Phrateres executive, the subchapter presidents and the president of the Woman's Undergraduate Society, included the following:
Ardy Beaumont, President of the W. U. S.; Audrey Horwood, President; Madge Neill, Vice-President;
Mary Black, Corresponding Secretary; Gwen Pym, Recording Secretary; Beverley Cunningham, Treasurer;
Jean McLean, Historian; Peggy Fox, Publicity Chairman; Norah Sibley, Initiation Chairman; Faith
Hodgson, Membership Chairman; Jessie McRae, Enid Williams, Juanita Falconer, Kay Scott, Mabel Folkin,
Ruth Brandon, Merle Turnbull, Laurel Carter, Sub-chapter Presidents.
Page   Seventy-nine 'J**  Jv
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Th
Literary and Scientific Executive
. HE Literary and Scientific Executive has completed a highly successful year in point of performance. The major organizations have carried
on their customary activities in exemplary fashion, befitting the standards
established in previous years.
Musical Society—Produced one of the best operatic performances
of its career, "Pirates of Penzance," Gilbert and Sullivan,
j. gould Players'   Club—Again   sponsored   an   appearance   of   the   Cornish
puppeteers in the University Theatre,  besides maintaining the usual
high standard of dramatics in their spring production.
Executive consisted of: Honorary President, Professor F. H. Soward;
President, John Gould; Secretary, Gwen Pym; Parliamentary Forum, Peter
Disney; Players' Club, Hugh Palmer; Musical Society, Sholto Marlatt;
Engineering Society, Dick Sandwell.
Panhellenic Council
IN 1928 the U. B. C. Panhellenic Council was established on the
campus in order to strengthen friendly inter-fraternity relations, to benefit
the fraternities and unify their interests, and by co-operation to work for
the best interests of the university.
The association is composed of three delegates, Qne alumna, one
senior and one junior woman from each chapter*^ the national fraternities on the campus. "'
During the college year, 1935-36, the executive has been as follows:
Honorary President, Dean Bollert; President, Willa Moorhouse, Alpha
Omicron Pi; Secretary-Treasurer, Vivian McKenzie, Alpha Gamma Delta.
Each of the women's fraternities has been engaged in some philanthropic work during the year. Alpha Gamma Delta maintained two summer camps for underprivileged children. Kappa Alpha Theta provided
hampers at Christmas and donated to Dean Bollert's Bursary Fund for
needy students on the campus. Alpha Delta Pi provided Christmas
hampers and also donated to the Province and Sun Christmas Funds.
Gamma Phi Beta held a Christmas party for underprivileged children, as
well as maintaining for them a summer camp for two months at Boundary
Bay. Delta Gamma held a children's Christmas party for a group of
orphans. Kappa Kappa Gamma donated the proceeds of a cabaret,
and also held a Christmas party for the underprivileged children of
Seymour School. Alpha Omicron Pi packed Christmas hampers and
gave donations to the Unemployed Girls' Co-operative Club. Alpha Phi
gave money to Dean Bollert's Bursary Fund, and donated the proceeds
of their annual Mardi Gras Cabaret to be used for philanthropic work.
During this year Panhellenic Association has clarified its rushing rules
and revised the constitution. In the recent Student Union Building campaign the association combined with the Inter-Fraternity Council in putting on a raffle, three noon-hour dances in the gym, and a carnival, all
of which proved highly successful.
In conclusion the association wishes to thank Dean Bollert for her
kind assistance and co-operation during the past year.
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Letters Club
ROBERTSON
D
OWN through the years the Letters Club has maintained its high
purpose—the "study of literature as a joy," and this year has been no
exception. Indeed, the traditional foundations seem to have been strengthened. The Club has suffered loss through the resignation of its founder,
Mr. Larsen, and its great friend, Mr. Lionel Haweis. Keen interest, however, has prevailed at every meeting, and many lively discussions have
been enjoyed.
Eight excellent papers, covering a wide range of subjects, have been
received by the Club during the past season. All were highly informative, and several were delightfully characteristic. This intangible
presence of the author's personality in the paper brings a certain vigour
into the meeting that makes the object of the Club an actuality. Some
of the widely divergent topics discussed in 1935-36 were: Archibald
McCleish, William Beebe, Sara Teasdale, James Joyce, Short Stories of
Kipling, Nursery Rhymes, Honore de Balzac and Leo Tolstoy.
The most interesting meeting of the year, Original Contributions
Night, was most successful, with Reg Jessup winning the laurels for both
prose and poetry.
The Club again owes its thanks to those friends whose warm hospitality has made meetings possible, and to the executive who guided
the club through another year.
Faculty Adviser, Prof. T. Larsen; President, William T. Robertson;
Secretary-Treasurer, Doreen Agnew; Archivist, Hugh Herbison.
Historical Society
P. J. DISNEY
1 OLLOWING upon last year's general topic of "British Foreign Policy,'
the Historical Society chose for this year's topic the subject "American
Foreign Policy." The papers were on the whole less provocative than
last year, perhaps because the nature of the subject raised fewer distinctively British and Imperial questions, but they remained instructive.
The first paper, "The Genesis of American Foreign Policy," was read
by Peter Disney. Vera Radcliffe and Barbara Baird read papers on the
Monroe Doctrine—Vera Radcliffe giving its background and Barbara
Baird presenting its importance in history. Douglas Patterson read the
last paper for the fall term on "The United States and Her Neighbours,
1867."
Arthur Wirick opened the Spring term with a paper on "The United
States and the Far East." Tom Vance and Lennie Price dealt respectively
with "The United States and the World War," and "The United States
and the World Peace." Marion Root and John Conway debated the case
for retention or abandonment of War Debts; and at the final meeting,
Donald Patterson delivered a paper on "The United States and Disarmament."
The Honorary President for this year was Professor F. H. Soward, and
the remainder of the executive consisted of: President, Peter Disney; Vice-
President, John Logan; Secretary, Lennie Price.
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I. McLEAN
T*
Literary Forum
HE Literary Forum was founded some years ago under the leadership
of Dean Bollert, who felt an urgent need for a club where girls could
learn to have more self-assurance when speaking before an audience.
For this purpose the members meet every second week at noon hour.
The meetings, which are carried on with due parliamentary procedure,
consist of short impromptu or prepared debates and talks given by
several of the members. Dean Bollert, our very able critic, then gives
constructive criticism of the speeches.
This year, on January 14, the Literary Forum sponsored a tea in the
lower common room, where members and other girls interested gathered
to hear a very interesting address on current events given by the guest
speaker, Mrs. J. Stuart Jamieson.
The Literary Forum is indeed very fortunate in having Dean Bollert as
its Honorary President. The executive for the year consisted of Jean
McLean, President; Mary Rendell, Vice-President; Cynthia McLean, Secretary; and Patience Sweetnam, Treasurer.
I. PRIOR
Student League of Canada
In the fall of 1934 the 'Varsity Radical Club, then existent one year,
affiliated with the Student League of Canada, a national organization
active in protecting student interests and in promoting liberal thought.
Locally our aim is "to encourage a body of progressive opinion on the
campus by the study and discussion of problems relating to economics,
science and the arts."
Subjects for talks and discussion this fall have included "Imperialism
with Special Reference to the Ethiopian Question" by Professor A. C.
Cooke; "Contemporary American Poetry," by A. M. Stephen; "Industrial
Unionism," by Mr. Summington, and "Philosophy of Education," by
Professor Ira Dilworth. In addition, the Student League sponsored the
meeting addressed by Howard Scott on Technocracy.
For the Spring term the League plans further campus activity which
will include, if possible, the presentation of C. Odet's play, "Waiting for
Lefty" (by the Progressive Arts Club), in addition to lectures and discussions on economic, artistic and scientific subjects.
For this term the executive has been: President, John Prior; Secretary-
Treasurer, Una Bligh; Committee, Bill Ford, Dave Smith and Tom McCallum.
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COL. LETSON
Th
Canadian Officers Training Corps
. HE University of British Columbia contingent of the Canadian Officers'
Training Corps has again completed a successful training season under
the command of Lieut.-Col. H. F. G. Letson, M.C, E.D. It is to be
regretted that Col. Letson has completed his tenure of command of the
Corps, and it is hoped that the spirit of his work will be carried on in
the future.
Membership in the Corps this year was about the same, strength
being 70 all ranks. Candidates for Certificate "A" numbered 20 Infantry
and three Engineers; for Certificate "B," three Infantry. The examinations were held on the 10th and 11th of March.
A detachment of 43 members, including three officers, attended the
annual training camp at Work Point Barracks, Esquimalt, during the
Christmas holidays. The camp was thoroughly enjoyed by all of them,
and considerable polish was added to their military training. The only
regret was lack of time.
The Corps made its first public appearance this year by taking part
in the Memorial Service to His late Majesty King George V.
The annual inspection was held on March 4th in the Beatty Street
Drill Hall, the salute being taken by Brigadier D. J. MacDonald, D.S.O,
M.C, D.O.C., M.D. No. 11.
N. HARVEY
International Relations Club
iHE year 1935-36 has been an exceptionally successful one for the
International Relations Club. World affairs during the past twelve
months have been crowded with momentous events; and such toptes as
the Italo-Ethiopian crisis, the rapid growth of German nationalism, and
the Japanese advances in Northern China have been made unusually
vivid for Club members by a series of able papers. The latter include
an address by Signor della Vedova on "The Case for Italy" (an open
meeting, owing to its general interest), a detailed discussion by Professor
Soward, "Ethiopia and the League," and talks by Professors Thrupp,
Morsh, Cooke and Warren. To all of these speakers the Club wishes to
express its thanks.
Thanks are also due to the hostesses who kindly threw open their
home for Club meetings, and who, by their generous hospitality, added
much to the pleasure of the year.
The Spring convention for 1935-36 was held'at Pullman, Wash., on
March 21, and entertained several representatives from the unit of the
University of British Columbia. The important political events mentioned
above seem to have given all International Relations Clubs an active
year.
In the elections held on January 22 the following executive was
created: President, Netta Harvey; Vice-President, Alex Chartres; Secretary, Al. Carter; Treasurer, Margaret Smith. Professor Soward continues
as Honorary President; his active interest has contributed more than
any other single factor in making the Club possible.
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W. BINGHAM
Cosmopolitan Club
IN the third year of its existence, the Cosmopolitan Club has again
accomplished a great deal in promoting intellectual and social intercourse
between the various nationalities represented on the campus. This year
the club co-operated with the Vancouver Folk Song and Dance Festival
by selling student tickets at the University, and attending the performance
en masse.
As previously, the meetings have taken the form of Sunday suppers,
enjoyed in the friendly atmosphere of private homes. Dr. C. W. Topping
opened the term with an address on "Civilization, Is It Worth While?"
Mr. Inglis Hosang spoke on "Some Aspects of Modern China." Miss
Lois Sanderson and Mr. Bob McMaster presented some ideas of the
Indianapolis conference, dealing particularly with national problems.
The Cosmopolitan Club this year intends to institute a candle-lighting
ceremony similar to that held by the Cosmopolitan Club at Columbia
University.
The executive for the past year was: Honorary President, Dr. C. W.
Topping; President, Winnifred Bingham; Vice-President, Fern Lea; Secretary, Patience Sweetnam; Treasurer, Quon Wong.
s. HIGASHI
Japanese Students' Club
T
1 HE Japanese Students' Club was organized on thtf. campus by a small
group of energetic students who saw the necessity'of a group wherein
Japanese attendants at this University could form firm acquaintanceships
with each other.
Since its affiliation with the A. M. S., the club has carried out annually
a most imposing programme. During the past summer, members of this
organization participated in a province-wide survey of children born to
Japanese parents residing in this province. Using the material garnered
from this study, debaters representing this club disputed with the Parliamentary Forum the giving of the franchise to British subjects of Japanese
origin.
Furthermore, through the efforts of this organization, two students, one
Occidental and one Japanese, were sent to Portland during the summer
to represent this University at the Second Japan-America Students' Conference.
Besides sponsoring a speaking tour of two second-generation leaders
from the United States, the club has undertaken a concert for the purpose
of raising money to finance various undertakings. Three debaters are
scheduled to meet the Japanese Students' Club of the University of Washington in the near future.
The celebration of the Girls' Doll Festival of Old Japan has been
initiated this year. On this occasion the girl members are to invite
various persons of this campus to an informal tea.
Professor H. F. Angus and Honourable Ko Ishii are honorary members
of the club. The executive are as follows: President, Shinobu Higashi;
Vice-President, Roger Obata; Treasurer, Shuichi Kusaka; Secretaries,
Thomas Shoyama and Albert Takimoto; Convenors, Ken Kitamura and
Kimiyo Kagetsu.
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L. ALLEN
Th
Menorah Society
HIS society has for its membership both students of the Jewish faith,
and those interested in the society's aims and ideals. With the co-operation of the Intercollegiate Menorah Association at New York, the local
group pursues a policy of fostering Jewish ideals, traditions, and better
relationship between various religious groups. The society's programmes
usually include a symposium on some problem connected with the
society's stated ideals. Alumni members and outsiders present the
problems and lead the consequent discussion.
In the Fall of 1935 activities were late in beginning, but two interesting
discussions took place under the guidance of Mr. Nathan T. Nemetz, a
recent Honours graduate in History from U. B. C, and a student-at-law.
The plans for the Spring session of the society included a discussion
on Jewish-Christian relationship held on January 17, which was of great
interest to many, and which is to be continued at a future date under the
leadership of Mrs. Steeves, M.L.A.
Officers for the 1935-36 session were: President, Leslie A. Allen; Vice-
President, Janice Grossman; Secretary-Treasurer, Alvin Rosenbaum; Press
Representative, Leon Holt.
Student Christian Movement
Th
.HE season 1935-36 has been an outstanding one in the history of the
Student Christian Movement, under the able presidency of Geoffrey
Smith and a hard-working executive. Through the assistance of friends
amongst Faculty, graduates and business men, the Student Christian
Movement was able to engage Bob McMaster as full-time General Secretary.   His work went far to vitalize the movement.
The year's work has been featured by many successful activities.
Nine study groups, covering a variety of religious and social problems,
were conducted throughout the year, and were attended by some 125
students. A noon-hour lecture series featuring several outstanding
speakers, such as Rev. Richard Roberts, Prof. King Gordon and Geoffrey
Allen, and a peace meeting were well attended. Several social gatherings and student conferences were other highlights of the term. Visits
from the two national secretaries, Beverley Oaten and Margaret Kinney,
contributed much of value. The movement assisted nine U. B. C. students
to attend the Student Volunteer Movement convention at Indianapolis,
where they met such world leaders as Kagawa, Koo and the Archbishop
of York.
The year's activities will be complete when 100 people gather at the
eleventh annual Spring camp at the close of the term.
Advisory Board: Dr. L. S. Klinck, Hon. President; Dean M. L. Bollert,
Hon. Vice-President. Executive Committee: Geoffrey G. Smith, President;
Miss Emma Parks, Secretary; Alfred Kitchen, Treasurer; Robert McMaster, General Secretary.
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E. D. FULTON
T
Newman Club
HE Newman Club has had a very successful season during 1935-36.
Four meetings were held during the Fall term, all well attended. A paper
was read at each one, the first being "The Aftermath of the Reformation,"
completing a discussion begun last year. The other papers dealt with
matters of Church Doctrine. They were, in order, "The Doctrine of
Indulgences," "Papal Infallibility," and "The Church's Attitude to the
Bible."
The club is unfortunate in losing this year Father Kennedy, C.S.S.R.,
its chaplain for the last seven years. Father Kennedy's term in- Vancouver is coming to an end this summer, when he will leave on another
appointment.
According to custom, the last meeting before Christmas was held at the
home of Mrs. J. Lefevre, Honorary President. His Excellency Archbishop
W. M. Duke attended this meeting as usual and expressed his interest
in the work being done and his appreciation of it.
Officers for the past year have been as follows: President, E. D. Fulton;
Vice-President, F. Cruise; Secretary, M. Cecil; Assistant Secretary, K.
Care; Librarian, E. Adam, and Treasurer, J. Forster. ^.
G. WARD
'Varsity Christian Union
1N addition to its three noon-hour meetings each week, the 'Varsity
Christian Union has enjoyed many outside social functions during the
past year, including a really Chinese dinner. One of the most outstanding events of the year was the Fall conference with the University
Christian Union of the University of Washington, held at Covenant Beach,
near Seattle. The Spring conference will be held on the U. B. C. campus,
and representatives from four colleges are expected. The executive for
the past year has been: President, Gerald Ward; Vice-President, Olive
Day; Secretary, Ellen Colevell; Treasurer, Robert Melville; Advertising
Secretary, George Hargreaves.
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La Canadienne
A:
.IMING to encourage spoken French among students, "La Canadienne" has met fortnightly through the past year. Programmes have
included charades, bridge, music and informal talks on French life and
letters. The season concluded with a French dinner, which has been an
annual event for some years, in conjunction with "Le Cercle Francais."
The executive for 1935-36 has been: Honorary President, Dr. D. Dallas;
President, Clare Green; Vice-President, Dagmar Lieven; Secretary,
Beatrice Hastings; Treasurer, Elizabeth Houston.
Le Cercle Francais
A'
T the end of last term La Causerie and L'AUouette decided to join
forces, getting away to a fine start under the name of Le Cercle Francais.
At a series of informal meetings held in the evening the members have
earnestly tried to improve their French speaking knowledge.
Many interesting speakers were heard at meetings during the Fall
term, some of whom were Connie Reid, speaking on "Maria Chapde-
laine"; Mrs. Frank Smith, of the University Women's Club; Madame
Darlington, speaking on her favorite French authors, and in the Spring
term, Miss Grieg and Dr. Dallas.
The year will be ended with the traditional French banquet, when the
two French Clubs, La Canadienne and Le Cercle Francais, unite to
celebrate another successful season.
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P. BAXENDALE
Das Deutsche Verein
f^OUNDED ten years ago, "Das Deutsche Verein" has endeavoured to
offer German students an opportunity to use German conversationally
and to study German life and culture.
Fortnightly meetings were held during the past year, and programmes
included German music, art, literature and several illustrated lectures on
German beauty spots and student life.
The very successful season culminated with a German dinner, which
is expected to become an annual event. The club wishes to thank Dr.
Maclnnes and Dr. Hallamore for their kind assistance, and also the following executive: President, Phyllis Baxendale; Vice-President, Mr. Mac-
Daniels; Secretary-Treasurer, Madeleine Vance.
Classics Club
L. GRANT
A.
.LTHOUGH few in numbers, the Classics Club has had a very successful and edifying year, and the papers given by members of the club
have all been of a very high standard. v
The first paper of the year was read by Mr. Leonard Grant on "The
Wandering Scholars and the Medieval Latin Lyric." Two papers were
read at the next meeting, the first by Mr. George Kane on "Lyricism and
Sappho," and the second by Miss Helen Reeve on "Catullus and the
Latin Lyric." At the last meeting for the Fall term there was an illustrated
paper on "Greek Architecture" by Mr. Patrick Ellis.
For the first meeting of the Spring term we were very fortunate in
having a report by Dr. Homer Thompson, a graduate of Arts '25, on his
excavations in the Athenian Agora. Colonel Logan very ably read
this report, which was illustrated with lantern slides.
At the time of writing there are still two meetings to be held. The
papers at these meetings will be "Roman Implements of Warfare" by
Miss Beatrice Hastings, and "Greek Papyri, Literary and Non-Literary"
by Mr. Leonard Grant.
As usual at its last meeting of the year the club will stage one or two
short classical plays.
We extend our thanks to the members of the Classics Department for
their kind and generous help throughout the year.
The 1935-36 executive was as follows: Honorary President, Col. H. T.
Logan; President, Leonard Grant; Vice-President, Miss B. Hastings; Secretary-Treasurer, Patrick Ellis; Junior Member, Miss Sheila Buchanan.
Page    Eighty-eight Jkc Jo
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G. JOHNSTON
A:
Psychology Club
.LTHOUGH the name Psychology Club may be new to the campus,
the club itself is over ten years old. Due to the gradual change of
emphasis from philosophy to psychology of the past five years it was
thought advisable to change the name so that now for the first time the
term Psychology Club, rather than Philosophy Club, is to be found in
the "Totem."
Meetings have been held at the homes of members throughout the
year, and our special thanks are due to Dr. Pilcher and Dr. and Mrs.
Coleman for their kindness in opening their homes to the students.
The annual banquet was held at the Mikado Tea Room and the final
meeting of the year at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Coleman, when, after the
business was concluded, the members donned a party spirit to celebrate
the last of the season's gatherings.
The officers of the club for the year 1935-36 were: George Johnson,
President; Betty Robertson, Vice-President; R. Ward, Secretary-Treasurer;
Betty Smith and Leslie Pearson, members of the executive.
M. BLOOM
Physics Club
TE
HE object of this club is to provide an opportunity to its members to
give, hear, and discuss papers on subjects of particular interest to
students of Physics. The membership is open to anyone who has taken,
or is taking, a course in Physics. Due to the fact that only a few students
major in Physics, these meetings are open to all students, and are held
during the noon-hour periods. The speakers at these meetings are either
outside guests or students engaged in advanced study. Since the papers
are never very technical, an average student can follow easily. They
are, moreover, usually illustrated with lantern slides, or are accompanied
by demonstrations with laboratory apparatus.
Among the speakers and their subjects, for this session, were the
following: Dr. Petrie, of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, "The
Architecture of the Stars"; Mr. G. Mossop, "The Positron, Neutron and
Atomic Structure"; Mr. Christy, "Induced Radioactivity"; Mr. Vanderpant,
of the Vanderpant Galleries, "Modern Photography"; Mr. G. Volkoff,
"The Principle of Radio Transmission"; Mr. M. Bloom, "Superconductivity"; Mr. K. McKenzie, "Geophysical Prospecting."
The executive for this session was as follows: Honorary President,
Dr. Hebb; Honorary Vice-President, Dr. Shrum; President, Mr. M. Bloom;
Vice-President, Mr. English; Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. S. Kosaka; fourth
member, Mr. G. Volkoff.
Page   Eighty-nine a 2.
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Chemistry Society
R. McKEOWN
1 HE aim of the Chemistry Society, organized in 1915, is to promote and
encourage interest in topics of a scientific nature among the students of
the University, and to give them an opportunity of listening to or presenting addresses on technical subjects.
This year has been a very interesting one for the Society, as the
subjects chosen by both the outside speakers and the members have
been quite varied. At the first open meeting, Dr. Blythe Eagles spoke on
the "Chemistry of Milk." At a later open meeting Mr. Stone, from loco,
gave an address on "A Few Developments in the Oil Industry and the
Industrial World in General." Then we had Dr. J. Allan Harris, who
spoke on "Does Theoretical Research Pay?"
At the closed meetings we have had some very interesting papers by
the members. Mr. Norton Wilson spoke on "The Logic of Physics." Mr.
Stan Williamson read a paper on the topic, "The Manufacture of Nitrocellulose Gunpowders." Mr. Alex. Mclnnis told us all about "Vacuum
Pumps" and Mr. John Melvin gave a talk on "The Catalyst with Reference to Hydrogenation."
The executive for the year has been: Honorary President, Dr. Archibald; President, Stan Williamson; Vice-President, Arnold Ames; Secretary, Peggy Scott.
A. G. CUMMINGS
G. M. Dawson Club
u
'NDER the able guidance of its Honorary President, Dr. M. Y. Williams,
the G. M. Dawson Club enjoyed a satisfactory year. A large membership
attended numerous entertaining meetings at the homes of its honorary
members, where practising geologists and mining engineers were heard.
The programme, slightly at variance with those of previous years,
included a series of University meetings, at which student speakers,
Fred Forrester, S. C-Robinson, L. Millward, James Orr and others, gave
instructive accounts of their geological and mining experiences.
The first meeting of the year was given over to a review of the life
of the late Dean R. W. Brock, who was a highly valued and enthusiastic
member of the club up to the time of his death.
Activities were wound up with an annual banquet, which undoubtedly
strengthened this function's tradition of good cheer, so solidly built up
in the past.
Officers for the year were: President, A. G. Cummings; Vice-President,
N. F. Moodie; Secretary-Treasurer, E. G. Langille.
Page    Ninety «
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J. WALLACE
Mathematics Club
lHE Mathematics Club, aiming to foster an interest among students in
the mathematical arts, has completed another successful year. Papers
were delivered by students, graduates, professors and outside authorities,
and included such subjects as "Space as the Geometer Sees It," "Famous
Problems of Antiquity," "Mathematics and Art," and "Some Aspects of
Sir James Jeans' 'Through Time and .Space.' " The executive for the
year 1935-36 has been: Honorary President, Dean Buchanan; Honorary
Vice-Presidents, Dr. Nowlan, Mr. Gage, Mr. Richardson; President, Mr. J.
Wallace; Vice-President, Mr. W. English; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss M.
Little.
R. CUDMORE
Th
Agricultural Discussion Club
. HE Agricultural Club has completed another very interesting and
profitable year by fulfilling its objective of promoting the discussion of
agricultural subjects amongst the students of agriculture*,;   *
A series of successful meetings have brought before the1 club speakers
from outside the University, who dealt with agricultural subjects ranging
from "Rural Education" to "Cooke's Episodes Along Our British Columbia
Coast."
The Agricultural Club party held in January was an outstanding
success. The party manifested itself in the form of a Klondike Night,
and was held in the Vocational Building, which was decorated to resemble an old-time saloon and dance hall.
The annual trip to Agassiz was held during the early part of March,
and it proved to be one of the greatest attractions of the year. An enjoyable day was spent in livestock judging, tug-of-war, and in an inspection
of the Experimental Farm.
The Club's activities were brought to a close with the ever-popular
banquet, held in the University cafeteria, where the winners of the
Judging Competition received their awards.
The executive wishes to thank the members of the Faculty for their
assistance, and the students for their hearty co-operation in making the
Club a success, and, in retiring, extend to the executive of 1936-37 wishes
for a most successful term of office.
The executive for the year was as follows: President, Ralph Cudmore;
Secretary-Treasurer, Robert C. Brown; Manager, H. A. W. Moxon.
Page   Ninety-one lL-%
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W. TOMKINSON
A
Biological Discussion Club
REASONABLY successful year was experienced by the club, the
membership consisting of students in the departments of Biology, Botany
and Zoology in Junior and Senior years, together with several graduates
and members of the faculty in these and other departments.
The club year of 1934-35 was wound up by the customary picnic, this
year to Ocean Park, where a thoroughly enjoyable time was had by all.
The year of 1935-36 was opened by a social evening at the home of
Dr. and Mrs. C. McLean Fraser, Honorary President of the club. Of
special note was the evening of February 10, when the meeting was
held at the residence of the Japanese Consul, the Hon. Ko Ishii.
The programme consisted of the following papers and discussions
thereon: "Introductory Notes on Ecology," Mr. R. W. Pillsbury; "Photography," Dr. Frank Dickson; "Biological Observations" by the members of
the club, all of whom participated to make this a very interesting evening;
"The Crab and Its Relations," Mr. I. E. Cornwall, of Victoria; "Fish
Diseases and Pests," by H. H. Menzies; "Comparison of Plant and Man,"
by Yuriko Mizuno; "The Living Past," by Dr. G. M. Smith, and "Amphibians and Reptiles in B. C," by Mr. G. P. Holland.
The executive for the year was: Hononary President, Dr. C. McLean
Fraser; President, W. Tomkinson; Vice-President, Yuriko Mizuno; Secretary-Treasurer, Alice Gerow; Curator, H. H. Menzies.
A. C. BUCKLAND
T
University Engineering Society
HE University Engineering Society was organized in 1932, with its
object to sponsor a series of lectures of general interest to the students
of engineering, and in this way promote intercourse between students
and practising engineers.
As "Open House" was not held this year, the highlight of the season
was "Student Night," which was held in the Medical and Dental Auditorium. On this occasion J. L. Witbeck, A. G. Cummings and H. P.
Godard, members of the Engineering Society, spoke before a gathering
of professional engineers.
The 1935-36 season has been very successful in that the programme
of addresses has been arranged along a great variety of subjects. Among
the excellent talks given were Dr. D. F. Kydd on "The Geology of the
MacKenzie River Basin," Mr. John Ridington on "The Use of the Library,"
Mr. C. E. Webb on "The Grand Coulee Dam," and Mr. E. Goulston on
"Asphalts."
Officers for the past year were: Honorary President, Major A. H.
Finlay; President, A. Buckland; Vice-President, A. Motherwell; and Secretary-Treasurer, N. W. Hendry.
Page    Ninety-two JL J*,
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l\»    X*    de    de
Th
lHE Student branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers
came into being on October 4, 1930, due to the energetic classes of
Science '31 and '32.
It was formed with the idea that every young engineer who looks
forward to a career of accomplishment should join his fellows to gain
their aid and fellowship and ideals. The American Institute of Electrical
Engineers' student programme includes the delivery of informative papers
at the regular meetings, held every third Wednesday, also field trips to
power houses, engineering works, etc., and instructional films.
Mr. G. F. Green was chairman of the local branch for the 1935-36
session.
A. C. BUCKLAND
Forest Club
r OUNDED in 1928 with the object of bringing Forestry students into
closer touch with the lumbering industry and with Forestry research
activities, the Forest Club has concluded its eighth successful year.
Noon-hour meetings were held twice monthly, and some of the
speakers for the past season were Mr. A. C. Buckland, Mr. W. Mathews,
Chief of Surveys Mr. Mulholland, Chief Forester Manning, and Vancouver District Forest Manager Mr. St. Clair.
The executive for the past year has been: Honorary President, Prof.
Allan; President, A. C. Buckland; Secretary-Treasurer, J. D. Hemmingsen.
Page   Ninety-three JL Jo
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Behind Scenes
with the
Players' Club
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
Villa for sale.
SECOND ROW (Left to Right):
Directors Gage and Palmer talk it over.
Green Room conference.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
Dr. Duff and the stage manager plan the set.
Green Room scene.
Page   Ninety-four c
JM
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ATHLETICS
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EXECUTIVES
Page   Ninety-five J-ke  J-atem
Men's Athletic
Executive
TOP ROW (Left to Right):
Dr. Davidson, Dr. Shrum.
BOTTOM ROW (Left to Right):
Harrison, Lewis, Orr.
"»-
President for 1935-36 of the Men's Athletic Executive was John Harrison, assisted
by faculty members Dr. Shrum and Dr. Davidson.
The policy of the men's Athletic Executive this year to sponsor inter-collegiate
competition whenever possible has been quite successful. The Basketball, Ice
Hockey, Ski-ing, Swimming and Football Clubs all played games with colleges south
of the international boundary. We believe we have made definite progress in
strengthening our association with American universities, and hope that activities
in this direction will be continued in future years.
The University has been exceedingly fortunate this year in obtaining the services of Maurice Van Vliet, of Oregon State College, as Director of Physical
Education.'
Page   Ninety-six JL Jo
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Women's Athletic
Executive
TOP ROW (Left to Right):
Locke, Mrs. Boving.
BOTTOM ROW (Left to Right):
Evans, Nixon, Lafon.
.TOR the year 1935-36 the Women's Athletic Executive was in the capable hands
of President Mollie Locke. Members are: Basketball, Jo Henning; Grass Hockey,
Dorothy Yelland; Outdoors, Evelyn Jenkins; Badminton, Jean Meredith; Swimming,
Lennie Price; Education, Audrey Munton; Nursing, Janet Kennedy; Class Representatives, Marge Mellish, Helen Parker, Pat Lafon and Jean Adams.
The enthusiastic support given Miss Moore and her new athletic system augurs
well for this most important phase of University life.
Page   Ninety-seven —J-ke  J-vtem, =
The Awards
Committee
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
Harrison, Dr. Hutchinson, Dr. Ure.
SECOND ROW (Left to Right):
McPhee, McHugh.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
Pearson, Pringle, Thurber.
PHYSICAL DIRECTORS
MISS MOORE MR. VAN VLIET
Both Miss Moore and Mr. Van Vliet have
had fine training and experience in teaching physical education, Miss Moore in the
East, Mr. Van Vliet at Oregon State College. The University is glad to have them
here working with us, and hopes they
will have a long and enjoyable sojourn at
Point Grey.
Th
HE Awards Committee, a branch of the Men's
Athletic Association, is entrusted with the task of
making awards to those individuals whose performance in athletics during the year was considered
outstanding.
There are four different awards: Honorary
Awards, Big Blocks, Small Blocks, Plain Letters.
Decisions are based on standards set by the Men's
Athletic Association, but rest finally upon the judgment of the committee. The committee not only considers carefully the time played by the student, but
also the type of sportsmanship displayed and the
enthusiasm of the players.
The committee for 1935-36 was composed of: Dr.
Hutchinson, Faculty Representative; Dr. Ure, Alumni
Representative; McPhee, Track; Pearson, English
Rugby; Pringle, Basketball; McHugh, Canadian
Football; Thurber, Soccer; Harrison, Men's Athletics.
Page   Ninety-eight JL Jo
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MAJOR SPORTS
Page   Ninety-nine I l-r^ III
I I
w&^flfcjfrfl
THE TEAM, 1935-36
'-■  BACK ROW (left to right):
Smith,  Capt.  Dobbie (coach),  Leggatt,  Maguire,  Colthurst,  Senkler,  Harrison,  Robson, Gross
(manager), Walker (trainer).
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Porter, Bird, Andrews, Mercer, Carey (vice-captain), Pearson (captain), Pyle, McPhee, Wilson.
Roberts absent from picture.
MANAGER
R. W. GROSS
CAPTAIN
E:
RUGfiY
NGLISH Rugby has attained this year a position
of outstanding prominence in the field of University
sport. Three strong teams were entered in city
leagues, and their success may be attributed to
the untiring energy of Captain Dobbie, the English
rugby coach.
The record for the first team is particularly brilliant. After beating Vancouver Rep. by a score of
9-3 Varsity lost to Victoria Rep. by a close margin,
and thus lost the historic McKechnie Cup. But to
make up for this, the following week they defeated
the Rowing Club 3-0 to take the Miller Cup. Then,
to climax the season, they gave the Stanford University team, on March 25, at the U. B. C. Stadium,
a 21-6 beating, to take the "World" Cup!
Harry Pearson, Dave Carey, Ed Maguire, Ed Senk-
- ler, Al Mercer and Johnny Bird deserve honourable
mention for gaining positions on the Vancouver
All-star side that met the famous touring New Zealand All-Blacks.
H. PEARSON
Page   One   Hundred 1L-L
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Football
MANAGER
N.  MARTIN
T
XHE Canadian Rugby Club carried on with its inter-collegiate
policy more thoroughly this year than ever before. No Canadian
games were played, the schedule consisting of four American
football games, which resulted in wins for Western Washington
College of Education (Bellingham), Eastern Washington College of
Education (Ellensburg), Pacific Lutheran College (Parkland, Washington), and College of Puget Sound. .   ■*
The managerial staff this year consisted of "senior manager
Norman Martin, associate managers Gordon Grant, Clayton Stewart, Peter Winckler; junior managers Keith Porter, Joe Robinson,
Lome Robinson, and John Quigg.
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
McHugh,     Warkin,     Deptford,
Orr, Hodgson, Boe.
SECOND ROW (Left to Right):
Price, Vine, Hay, Gray, Paradis, Twiss.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
Morrison,     Runkle,     Charlton,
Parkinson, Morrow, Schultz.
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TRACK
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
Lucas, McPhee, Allen, Towne (manager).
SECOND ROW (Left to Right):
Ward, McRae, Stewart, Kenney.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
Colthurst, Wilson, Allen, Swift.
lHIS year the Track Club for the first time in many years is
composed of an almost entirely new group of men. The runners
are: Howard McPhee, Alex. Lucas, Norman McRae, Jerry Ward,
Mansfield Beach, Ronald Allen, Walter Stewart, and Paddy Colthurst. The coach again is Percy Williams, to whom the whole
club is obliged for his patient training. Vic Towne is senior manager,
assisted by Leslie Barber, Eric Kenney, and Joe Rita, associate
managers.
Besides the annual road and cross-country classics, the club
entered into competition with numerous other cinder-burning aggregations, acquitting itself nobly in outside meets.
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SOCCER
FIRST ROW (Left to Right):
Quayle, Croll, Wolfe.
SECOND ROW (Left to Right):
Thurber   (captain),   Sweetman,
Okuda.
THIRD ROW (Left to Right):
MacBurrey,    Morrison,    Chapman.
T»
.HIS year the senior squad has suffered considerable loss from
the annual graduation tolls. The team has been built up for the
most part of juniors and freshmen who were trained by Coach
Hitchins, who for the past two years has been an invaluable asset
to the Soccer Club.
It is very hard to pick any outstanding player, for every one
has shown very keen interest in the sport, and the team as a whole
has accomplished a remarkable feat by staying in the first half
in the Senior League.
Next year the Thunderbird soccer squad should threaten this
year's league top-notchers.
Other members of the team who do not appear in the above
picture are Gladstone, Southerland, Chester, Goddard, Mizuhara,
and Manager Stradiotti.
Page One Hundred
and Three MANAGER
G.   CROSSON
Basketball
GEORGE PRINGLE—Captain and veteran, plays guard or centre, a real scoring threat.
LLOYD DETWILLER—Guard, probably most improved player on team.
CARM. RIDLAND—Centre, also much improved.
BILL PATMORE—Forward, consistent scorer and hard worker.
CHARLIE HARDWICK—Forward, wild man of team, chepksVell.
KYLE BERRY—Forward and wisecracker, tricky ball-harMler.
ALEX. LUCAS—Forward, regular scorer, showed great improvement.
BRUCE MILLAR—Guard, hard and fast dribbler, good on defence.
JACK DAVIS—Centre, accurate shot, all he lacks is confidence.
FRANK MITCHELL—Forward, joined team late, a real comer.
FRANK TURNER- Forward, forced out with a crocked knee.
GEORGE CROSSON—Senior manager, handled finances, some early coaching.
ART EASHAM—Team manager.
DR. MONTGOMERY—Coach, "Doc" took over when Ivor Moe left early in season.
Men's Senior "A"
TOP ROW (Left to Right):
Lucas, Berry, Ridland, Patmore,
Pringle.
BOTTOM ROW (Left to Right):
Davis, Detwiller, Eastham,
Miller, Hardwick.
Page   One   Hundred   and   Four
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MINOR SPORTS
Page    One   Hundred   and   Fivi em
BACK ROW (left to right):
Grant (Assoc. Mgr.), Russell, Van
Houten, Gross, Robinson (Jr.
Mgr.), Dolphin, Spohn, Paradis,
Davie, Stewart (Assoc. Mgr.).
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Runkle, Hoskins, Boe, Morrow,
Gray,    Charlton,    Renshaw,
Parkinson, Porter, Hodgson.
Junior Canadian Football
1 HE junior Canadian football season was something of a disappointment this year.
Due to poor weather conditions the schedule was deferred to a late date, which forced
'Varsity to drop out of the league, as games would have to have been played too
near examinations.
There was, in spite of this discouragement, evidence of some very promising
material, and prospects are very fine indeed for next year.
The boys were coached by Bill Morrow and managed by Gordon Grant. Maurice
Van Vliet, physical director, gave the players building-up exercises.
Second Division Rugby
L HIS year 'Varsity's Second Division English R&gby team is one of the best second
teams that have been produced in these parts for a good number of years, and it was
only by a hairbreadth that the Provincial Intermediate championship eluded their eager
grasp.
Playing two men short in the initial game of the season they lost to the North Shore
All Blacks, but after that first defeat went ahead and won all the rest of their games
in the first half of the schedule. However, 'Varsity's defeat by the All Blacks necessitated a playoff against the New Westminster team for the final, and in their second
encounter with that team 'Varsity was defeated by a scant two points. Shortly after,
New Westminster scored an easy victory in Victoria for the Provincial championship.
BACK ROW (left to right):
Cunningham, Ellis, Leckie-
Ewing, Colthurst, Preston, Billings, Kendrick, Brown.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Trussell, Walsh, Robertson, Carruthers, Smith, Andrews, Potter,
Absent: Watson.
Page   One   Hundred   and
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BACK ROW (left to right):
Walsh, Campbell, Pettapiece,
Wood, Knox, Killam, Veitch,
Pinhorn.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Linklater, Robertson, Harrison,
McCullough,    Griffin,    Rennie,
Trussell, Wilson.
Ti
Third Division Rugby
HE freshman rugby team has enjoyed a very successful season. It held the leading
position in the city intermediate "B" league throughout the season, losing only one game.
The team comprised the following: Wood (captain), Harrison, Campbell, Knox,
Walsh, Rennie, Griffin, Robertson, Wilson, McCullough, Veitch, Pettapiece, Killam,
Linklater, and Pinhorn (manager).
Junior Soccer
1 HE junior soccer team is really a training squad for future senior players. Starting.»,'
with a good turnout, the junior eleven was selected. A good line-up, however, suf- T
fered by a shortage of senior men after Christmas.
The junior squad has maintained a fairly good standing in the Second Division,
G. V. A. A. League, in the city.
Under the able guidance of Captain Dawson Moodie the juniors can boast of a
few up-and-coming men, in particular Jack Logan, right back; Fred Morris, left wing.
A steady improvement was evident as the year progressed, and better success
is looked for next year.
BACK ROW (left to right):
Free (manager), Walden, Lut-
trell, Emery, Howatson, Mac-
Taggart,  Moodie  (captain).
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Logan, Kirkpatrick, Gladstone,
Mizohara, Ikeda, MacLaren.
Page    One    Hundred   and
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"THE EIGHT"
Mcintosh, Pearce, Darling,
Jamieson, McDuffee, McLeish,
Stevens, Morris, Saunders.
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Rowing
HE great measure of the Rowing Club's improvement this year is due to excellent
coaching. Mr. Brand, of the faculty, and Tom Brown, '32, were both Rhodes scholars
and made outstanding records in rowing for Oxford, while Mr. R. R. West, of the
faculty, learned his strokes at Cambridge University.
Local competition this year included an Intra-mural regatta, a four-oared race
with St. George's School, and the annual meet with V. R. C. Away from home the
boys outdid themselves to hold both Oregon State at Corvallis and University of
Washington at Seattle to two lengths.
Club executive has been: President, Wilson McDuffee; secretary, Bill English;
treasurer, Bill McLeish; crew captain, Alex. Mcintosh.
Swimming
L OR the first time in the history of the swimming club a team was entered in the B. C.
championships and won the distinction of placing in every entry. Other meets were
held with Normal and Magee Schools, 'Varsity winning both.
Among the many fine swimmers this year were the following outstanding performers: Lennie Price, Peggy Higgs, Edna Carter, Archie Byers, Jim Hinton, and Dick
Cline. The club executive was: Honorary president, Mr. Larsen; president, Jim Hinton;
vice-president, Lennie Price; secretary, Doug. Patrick; treasurer, Bob Bianco; captain,
Archie Byers.
BACK ROW (left to right):
Hinton,   Smellie.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Byers, Roberts, Margetts.
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BACK ROW (left to right):
Davidson,   Hanbury,   Seldon,
Stewart,  Burke,  Hayden.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Kirk,    McLeod,   Seldon,   Lock,
Martin, Vance, Allen.
At
Badminton
Tf
HE Badminton Club enjoyed a most successful season, with around seventy
enthusiastic members turning out for Monday and Thursday night play.
Stan Hayden and Ron ATiSn upheld the honour of the club in the B. C. championships, being finalists in the "boys under twenty" and "men's handicap" singles
events, respectively.
The 'Varsity championships were held in February, with over seventy-five
entries in ten events. Stan Hayden, a new member of the club, won the men's open
singles, with Ron Allen took the men's open doubles, and with Janet Seldon won also
the open mixed doubles. Peggy McLeod, another newcomer, won the ladies' singles,
and teamed with Jean Mendeth to take the ladies' open doubles. Five handicap
events were also on the card.
'Pep Club'
lNOTHER year of great activity for the Pep Club was the '35-'36 Session. An
unusually large number of Pep meetings were staged this year, primarily because of
the Brock Memorial campaign, which will stand out as the biggest single event
of the year. Two hundred campaign signs were painted in the space of three days,
and on the day of the opening of the campaign, the Arts and Science buildings were
practically re-papered by the Clubbers.
Applications were this year not limited to Freshmen. As a result of the usual
competitive try-outs, the following were admitted as members: Alf Killin, Malcolm
Chapin, Stuart De Vitt, Ken Shaw, and Ray Brunt.
BACK ROW (left to right):
Williams,     Swift,     MacAulay,
Shaw, Galpin, Chapin.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Grant,     Hobden,     McDiarmid,
DeVitt, Walsh, Killin.
Page One Hundred
and Nine em
BACK ROW (left to right):
Cdt.  Chowne, Cdt. Mann,
R.S.M.   Macdonald,   Cdt.   Ken-
drick.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Cpl. Jones, 2nd Lt. Greenwood,
Cpl.   Jones.    (Maclnnes  Shield
won by Cpl. Jones.)
Ti
Rifle Association
HIS year the Rifle Association was again in full swing. Outdoor work was
carried out at Blair Range. With the aid of several very promising recruits the
score for the Inter-University match was bettered by 24 points over last year. The
Maclnnes Shield was won by C/Cpl. F. B. Jones and the Leckie Shield won by C/Cpl.
F. R. R. Jones.
The indoor range was in constant use all year, and some very promising shooting
was accomplished. Results for the Garrison competitions were a little disappointing,
but there is hope of bringing home the silverware at some future date.
Golf. -
T -
1 HE U. B. C. Golf team successfully defeated Btellingham Normal on the latter's home
course in May, 1935. Later the same month the Bellingham team travelled to Vancouver
where they again met defeat, as did also the College of Puget Sound team. The local
men are contemplating a tour after examinations. It is to be hoped that they will be
as successful with their new golf sweaters as they were last year when they wore
anything they could get their hands on.
Last fall Peter Sharp won the 'Varsity handicap tournament by the narrow margin
of one stroke over John Berry and Ted Charlton. This spring the U. B. C. Championship
will be decided by a thirty-six hole medal round, to be played in March.
BACK ROW (left to right):
Allen,  Sharp,  Livingston,
kinson, Berry.
Wil-
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Lightstone, Charlton, Prof.
Knapp.
Page    One   Hundred   and
Ten =J>™ <A
t
em
BACK ROW (left to right):
Yelland (president), Boving,
Wharton (captain), Norrie, Nev-
ison.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Wilson, Adams, Houston, Hastings, Evans.
£    as    s- &   a.    r
■mii
4                 ,   «
I        /     ^
Ti
'U.B.C." Grass Hockey
HE "U.B.C." women's grass hockey team has enjoyed a brilliant season, and
has yet to lose a league game. In the first half schedule, twenty-one goals were scored
as against only two adverse tallies. Dot Yelland and Bea Hastings had the great
honour of being chosen for the Lower Mainland Rep. team. As the "U.B.C." team will
lose only two players this spring, an even better year looms.
The team: Sheila Wilson, Ellen Boving, Joan Wharton, Myrne Nevison, Jean Adams,
Margaret Evans, Bea Hastings, Dot Yelland, Pat Hembrowe, Elisabeth Norrie and
Elizabeth Houston.
o.
'Varsity" Grass Hockey
'NLY four of last year's team were playing this year. Janet Kennedy and Ellen
Raphael have done much to hold play together, Mary Rendell has done fine work in
goal, and Frances Wright has worked hard as fullback and captain. The new players
all show ability, lacking only experience. They are: Kay Curtis, Gladys Laycock,
Margaret Deas, Elizabeth Morris, Betty Vickery, Kitty Carr, Eileen Dorman, and Josephine
Staniforth.
BACK ROW (left to right):
Staniforth,   Kennedy,   Vickery,
Wright, Laycock, Morris.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Carr,   Curtis,   Rendell,   Deas,
Davidson.
Page   One   Hundred   and
Eleven JL Jo
t
aiem
BACK ROW (left to right):
Soul, Mouat, Col. H. T. Logan
(hon. president), R. S. Bans
(captain), Professor W. Black
(coach), G. J. Boisjoli, P. Disney.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Trumpour,   Cornish,  Trumpcur,
Bremner, Ames.
INSET:   Knight.
Ti
Grass Hockey
HE Men's Grass Hockey Club has made a better showing than last year, at
the time of writing standing fourth in the Mainland League. At the beginning of the
year the team was not at full strength, due to late registrations and lack of condition, but is at present atoning for former defeats, with Henry Law and Boisjoli
playing again after an absence of several years.
The club appreciated the inclusion of grass hockey in the schedule of Intra-mural
sport, and is supplying the necessary equipment.
Professor Black coached the team again this year. The Executive was as follows:
Honorary President, Col. Logan; President, Ivan Knight; Secretary-Treasurer, D.
Trumpour; Captain, R. S. Bans.
Ice Hockey
/\N entry was placed in the Junior City Leagiie this year, and a very fine showing
was made by the promising squad of juniors who turned out. Most of the players
were in their first year at the University; hence it appears that the next few years will
see 'Varsity with some strong teams playing.
Inter-collegiate hockey was resumed this year with the University of Washington.
It is hoped that the University of Southern California will be included in the schedule
next year.
The club feels that the raising of its status to that of a sub-major sport is fully
justified by the fine showing it has made this year.
Officers were: President, Ralph Cudmore; Vice-President, Frank Burnett; Secretary,
Bill Lea.
BACK ROW (left to right):
Burnett, Trussel, Mouat, Phelps,
Usher, McKenzie, Wood, Price,'
Cudmore.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
McKenzie,   McLeod,   Barchard,
Perry, Lambert, Sanderson.
Page One Hundred
and Twelve JL Jo
t
aiem
BACK ROW (left to right):
McLellan, Mason, Wright,
Clarke   (manager),   Straight,
Love, Lafon.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Machin, McFie, Jones.
Senior "B" Basketball
Ai
lLTHOUGH senior "B" team won but few games during the season, many were lost
by extremely small margins. The members of the team are to be commended for their
fine team spirit and good brand of basketball. Credit is also due to Fred Dietrich, team
manager, whose encouragement helped the team considerably.
The team: McLellan, McFie, Mason, Machin, Wright, Straight, Love, Lafon, Jones.
Intermediate "A" Basketball
A
TEAM was entered in the Vancouver and District League, but small measure of
success was achieved. The team was without a vestige of coaching, even being minus
a manager most of the time. In January a game was played and lost at Sardis. All
players show promise.
BACK ROW (left to right):
Physick,    McLaren,    McLagan,
Grant, Scott.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Miller, McDiarmid, Campbell.
Page    One   Hundred   and
Thirteen atem
Left to right:
Evans,  Clark, Thomas, Campbell,   Yelland,  Nixon,  Munton,
McCoullough.
Senior "A" Basketball
BETH EVANS—Captain.  Centre.  Fast and most enthusiastic.
DOT YELLAND—A new member.  Energetic.  Has a natural ability for the game.
JEAN STORDY—Also a new member.  A very dependable guard.
ISABEL CAMPBELL—Forward.   One of the best scorers.
INA CLARK—Guard.   Fast and a good shot.
LAURA NIXON—Forward.  A good member of a team.
MARY McCOULLOUGH    "Mike".   Guard.   Very steady.
AUDREY MUNTON—Forward.   A good shot.
JEAN THOMAS—Guard.   A steady guard and a good shot.
TRUDEAN SPENCER—Centre.    Shown remarkable improvement.
MARGARET RALPH—Forward.   Very dependable.
DR. MONTGOMERY—Coach.  Untiring; improved the team.
Intermediate "K' Basketball
MARGARET HASPEL—Centre.   Her experience shows.
HELEN PRATT—A newcomer, who is developing a good game at guard.
MARGARET PORTER—A dependable forward.
MARGARET WALKER—Fast player at either forward or guard.   Bags her share of
baskets.
MONICA FRITH—A newcomer who has shown much improvement.   Plays centre.
ILSE LORENZEN- A forward and an enthusiastic player.
PEGGY JONES—Forward.   Fast and steady.
MARGERY TODD—Taking to the game with much aptitude.    Plays forward.
RUTH ELLIOTT-   A steady guard. Missed her in the last few games due to a bad ankle.
Left to right:
Todd, Lorenzen, Jones, Walker,
Pratt,   Porter,   Elliott,   Haspel,
Frith.
Page    One   Hundred    and
Fourteen JL Jo
t
em
FIFTH ROW (left to right):
Martin, Crosson, Towne.
FOURTH ROW (left to right):
Leggatt,   Dr.    Shrum,    Pringle,
Campbell.
THIRD ROW (left to right):
Keillor, Pearson, Twiss, Kirby,
Pyle, Morris, Thurber.
SECOND ROW (left to right):
Senkler, Robson, Snelling, Maguire, Harrison.
FIRST ROW (left to right):
Gross, Dr. Davidson, Dr. Hutch-
A,
Men's Big Block
..LTHOUGH restricted in its activities through lack of funds the Big Block Club has
confined itself this year to cultivating the spirit of comradeship between outstanding
athletes on the campus.
On the whole, the club continued to act as a general service organization on the
campus.
Included on the executive along with President Bob Gross were Dr. Davidson,
Dr. Hutchinson and Dr. Shrum.
Th
Women's Big Block
HE women's Big Block Club did not act officially this year in encouraging freshettes
to enter some line of physical activity, but this work was carried out by the girls through
their own affiliated clubs.
Soon after Miss Moore, our new women's physical director, started her gymnasium
classes, a luncheon was given for her at Union College, at which the question of awards
for proficiency in the classes was discussed.
Dr. J. Wyman Pilcher was again our honorary president. Pat Lofan was president
and Margery Mellish acted as secretary-treasurer.
BACK ROW (left to right):
Thomas, Wallace, Mellish,
Wharton,   Locke,   Beaumont,
Munton.
FRONT ROW (left to right):
Yelland,   Evans,   Lafon   (president), Bourne, Hastings.
Page    One    Hundred   and
Fifteen Outdoors Club
He
LONORARY president, Mr. E. Ker; honorary vice-president, Miss Olive Selfe; president, G. E. Clayton; vice-president, Evelyn Jenkins; secretary-treasurer, G. H. Gwyn;
marshal, F. M. Cazalet; archivist, T. E. Jackson.
Page    One   Hundred   and    Sixteen iinrnuir
        3111111
-llllllllll
LITERARY
UPPLEMENT JL Jo
t
OLem,
Campus
Snaps
Top Left:   (1) Winter morning.
Top Right   (2) Doughnuts for Science.
Centre Left: (3) Science portals.  (4) Morning practice at Coal Harbour.
Centre: (5) January 20th.
Centre Right:   (6) Rowers at Corvallis.   (7) After
the snow.
Lower Left:  (8) From the Science Building.
Lower Right:  (9) Rowing team at Corvallis.
Page    One   Hundred   and   Seventeen "Pirates of Penzance"
C
ROWNING an imposing list of musical successes was this term's production
of "Pirates of Penzance." The Musical Society deserves tH<= highest compliments
for a delightful interpretation of this rollicking Gilbert and Sullivan composition.
Probably no other light operas retain the universal popularity of this Savoy
group, and we sincerely hope that the Musical Society will continue to use them
as their medium.
Outstanding among the performers were Ian Douglas and Biff MacLeod. The
former's deep bass voice boomed merrily through the hearty solos of the Pirate
King who displayed a leniency foreign to most pirates. The portrayal of Gilbert
and Sullivan's comic characters is often dangerously overdone. Biff, however,
adroitly avoided this pitfall and made the role of Major-General Stanley a highlight of the opera. Throughout the performance the conceits of the perky little Major
provoked well-merited applause.
The poise of an experienced singer was exhibited by Douglas Ford, eighteen-
year-old tenor lead. Cast in the part of Frederic, he was especially delightful in
his scene with the major's daughters.
In the unsympathetic role of Ruth, Frederic's old nurse, Miss Lillian Walker
proved her ability as a character actress. In absolute contrast, but equally charming,
Miss Alice Rowe won her audiences with her beautiful rendering of Mabel's soprano
solos.  Undoubtedly Miss Rowe possessed the finest voice of the performers.
Sustaining the fine acting of the principals, the colorful chorus of twenty-four
in their quaint mid-Victorian costumes presented a charming tableau against the
calm sea of Dover backdrop.
Page    One    Hundred    and    Eighteen "She Stoops to Conquer"
A
PLAY brimming with fun for actors and audiences alike, artistically delightful
and one whose presentation brought enthusiastic tribute to the Players' Club was
Oliver Goldsmith's robust comedy "She Stoops to Conquer," staged by the Club
in the Auditorium in March.
All the zest and sparkle written into the play were given rich development in
its direction by Miss Dorothy Somerset, who has added to her fine record as
dramatic director another genuine achievement.
Several difficulties confronted the cast and director in their work. The conversation of the 1790's, despite its elegance and quaintness today, demands skilful
handling if it is to retain the interest of modern audiences. In the brisk, sparkling
pace maintained, the Players gave effective demonstration of their ability to
manage period plays.
For its pictorial charm the production earned many compliments. The hall in
Mr. Hardcastle's country mansion, in which the greater part of the action ensues,
was an attractive set in dark tones, given colour by elaborate silver candelabra,
brass and pewter pieces, and tapestries. Here the ornate colour and detail of the
costumes found an attractive frame.
An inn scene in stippled and panelled Elizabethan decor, lit by candles, and
an amusing garden set, with bizarre stylized trees cut into ornamental shapes and
set against dark velours, were enthusiastically received.
Characterization and comedy values were nicely treated, and real appreciation
of the buoyant humour of their roles was shown by the student actors.
Altogether, in its thoughtful and artistic treatment and sincerity of presentation,
"She Stoops to Conquer" celebrated with fitting dignity and success the twenty-first
anniversary of the Players' Club's activity.
Page   One    Hundred   and   Nineteen Give Us 6 Hours
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The
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The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium Building, was established for the convenience
of the students, and has effected a considerable saving to the students in time and money. It is prepared
to supply all the text books required for the various
courses offered in the University, also such articles
as note books, loose-leaf sheets, fountain pens, drawing paper and instruments.
Page   One    Hundred    and   Twenty DUFFUS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Wishes the Students of the U.B.C.
Success for 1936.
SUMMER SCHOOL
June — July — August
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Seymour 4214
Page    One    Hundred   and   Twenty-oni •HnttiFrBal
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A smart appearance will help
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Branch:   537 Richards Street, Seymour 6200
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592 SEYMOUR ST.
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Page    One   Hundred   and   Twenty-three Wi
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DAVID SPENCER
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YOUR NEAREST BANK IS
THE CANADIAN BANK
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Tenth and Sasamat Branch
A general banking business is transacted and
accounts of the Faculty and Students  of the
University are Invited.
BANKERS TO THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
C. R. Myers, Manager
BIRKS
Now united for service in Canada with
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Page    One   Hundred   and   Twenty-ioui More Than a
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938 Robson St
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Under the expert and conscientious instruction of Mr. and
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Page    One   Hundred   and   Twenty-fivi Page    One    Hundred   and   Twenty-six CAMEO STATIONERY
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Before you buy . . .
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Page    One    Hundred   and   T w e n t y - e i g h t IF YOU WISH TO SUPPLEMENT
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Page    One    Hundred   and   Thirty Whether for Home or Business Office
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Page    One   Hundred   and   Thirty-one INDEX
w
IN MEMORIAM.
Page
...     2
PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE..
FOREWORD 	
DEDICATION   6
THE FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE  13
Arts '36    14
Arts   37  33
Arts '38  34
Arts '39  35
EDUCATION '36.
COMMERCE '36.
LITERARY AND ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OF
THE ANGLICAN THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE
UNION COLLEGE	
THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE....
Science '36	
Nurses' Undergraduate Society	
Science '37	
Science '38	
Science '39	
THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE.
Agriculture '36	
Agriculture '37	
Agriculture '38	
Agriculture '39	
Post-Graduate Class_
STUDENT GOVERNMENT-
Students' Council	
Men's Undergraduate Executive	
Women's Undergraduate Executive	
Agricultural Undergraduate Executive—
Nurses'  Undergraduate  Executive	
Arts Men's Undergraduate Executive	
Science Men's Undergraduate Executive .
PUBLICATIONS—
Publications Board	
Ubyssey	
The Totem	
36
37
40
41
43
44
52
53
54
55
57
58
61
62
63
64
65
67
67
68
68
69
69
71
72
74
CLUBS AND SOCIETIES—
Players' Club	
Musical Club	
Musical Society-
Parliamentary Forum.
Phrateres	
Literary and Scientific Executive..
Panhellenic Council	
Letters Club	
Historical Society.
75-76-94
     75
     77
 78-79
 78-79
     80
     80
     81
    81
Literary Forum.
Student League of Canada	
Canadian Officers' Training Corps..
International Relations Club	
Cosmopolitan Club	
Japanese Students' Club.
Menorah Society	
Page
... 82
_ 82
... 83
_ 83
_ 84
_ 84
... 85
Student Christian Movement     85
Newman Club.
'Varsity Christian Union..
La Canadienne	
Le  Cercle  Francais	
Das  Deutsche  Verein	
Classics Club	
Physchology Club..
Physics   Club	
Chemistry Society 	
G.  M. Dawson Club..
Mathematics Club	
Agricultural Discussion Club.
Biological Discussion Club	
University Engineering Club_.
A. I. E. E. 	
Forest Club	
86
86
87
87
88
88
89
89
90
90
91
91
92
92
93
93
ATHLETICS—
Men's Athletic Executive..
Women's Athletic .Executive..
Awards Committee.	
English Rugby	
Canadian Rugby..
Track 	
Soccer 	
Basketball 	
Junior Canadian Football..
Second Division Rugby	
Third Division Rugby	
Junior Soccer	
Rowing   	
Swimming	
Badminton 	
Pep Club	
Rifle Association.
Golf   	
Grass Hockey..
Ice Hockey	
Basketball	
Men's Big Block-
Women's Big Block.
Outdoors Club	
  96
  97
  98
  100
  101
  102
  103
  104
  106
  106
  107
  107
  108
  108
  109
  109
  110
  11Q
111-112
  112
113-114
.  115
  115
  116
LITERARY SUPPLEMENT—
The  Pirates  of  Penzance.
She Stoops to Conquer ..
118
119
SUN   PUBLISHING   CO.   LTD.
VANCOUVER,   B. C.

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