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Totie 1944

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Array U m V E RSi T V Of B.C. • AP R1..L 1944 Soil nf f muntr - Htrtwrattg of Irittah fflolumhia
David   Harold   Armitage,   Arts   '39,
R.C.A.F., killed In plane accident.
Lloyd   Livingstone   Armour,   Aggie
'39,    R.C.A.F.,    killed    on    active
service.
Oscar Ludwlg Auer, South African
Artillery,  killed  In  action.
David     Lachlan     Bain,     R.C.A.F.,,
presumed dead.
Donald Thomas Bain, DFC,  R.C.A.
F., wounded overseas.
Dacre    Lowther    Barrett-Lennard,
Arts   '39,   Seaforth    Highlanders,
killed In action.
Frank    Bradner    Beaton,    Seaforth
Highlanders, kliied In action.
Leys   Middle'on   Beaumont,   R.C.A.
»ifF.,;. killed  In  action.
Ronald George Bell. DFM, R.C.A.F.,
killed on  active service.
Keith     Gregory     Berry,     R.C.A.F.,
.. killed in action.
'John   Hudson   Benton,   Science   '38,
R.C.A.F., killed In action.
John Hannah Black, R.C.A.F., died
overseas.
Robert   William   Bonner,   Arts   '42,
C.A, (A), wounded In action.
John     Allan     Bourne,     Arts     '34,
Seaforth Highlanders, wounded in
-   action.
William   John   Boyce,   Science   '38,
R.C.A.F., killed In action.
William   Thomas   Braun,   R.C.A.F.,
presumed killed.
Reginald   Harry   Brown,   Arts   '40.
Johore    Engineers,     prisoner    of
war.
Armour   McKenney   Bull,   Arts  '25,
Navy, presumed dead.
William James Caulfield,  R.C.A.F.,
killed on active service.
Colin     Gartell     Child,     R.C.A.F.,
presumed dead.
James   Charter,   R.C.A.,   presumed
killed.
Edward     John     Maxwell     Church,
Army, wounded in action,
Donald  Hartford Clark,  DFC,  R.C
A.F., missing after plane collision.
John   Lionel   Clarke,  Arts  '35,  R.C.
A.F., killed in plane accident.
Arthur    Charles    Cochrane,    DFC,
R.C.A.F.,     missing     after    air
operations.
Gordon Willard Coldwell, R.C.A.F.,
Missing.
William Wilson Colledge, R.C.A.F.,
killed on active service.
William   Thomas   Cormack,   R.C.A,
- F., presumed  dead.
Oliver   Mansell   Cornish,   R.C.A.F.,
presumed  dead.
Arthur Coulter,  Arts '37,  R.C.A.F.,
killed In plane crash.
Edmund   Thomas   Cox.   Aggie   '41,
R.C.A.F.. presumed dead.
Peter   William    Hedley   Crickmay,
Aggie   '38,   R.C.A.F.,   missing   on
active service.
Robert Gordon Crosby, Science '39,
R.C.A.F.,   missing.
Richard     Noel     Crult,     R. C A. F.,
presumed dead.
John Patrick Custance, Science '39,
R.C.A.F., killed In action.
James Lloyd Darby, R.C.A.F., killed
In action.
Acton   Daunt,   Arts   '41,   R.C.A.F.,
killed on  active service.
Charles Peers Davidson. Commerce
'35.     R.C.A.F.,     killed     in     air
operations.
Mervyn    Davis,    R.C.A.F.,    missing
after air operations.
Pierce James Axel   Dennis,   R.C.A.
F., missing on active service.
Eric   Soulls   Ditmars,   R.C.N.,   presumed lost.
Joseph  Frederic Dockrlll, R.C.A.F.,
killed In action.
Robert Spender Doherty,  R.C.A.F.,
presumed dead.
A,   W.   H.   Donaldson,   prisoner   of
Lionel'  Peirce   Douglas,   Commerce
'37,     R.C.N.V.R.,    missing    and
presumed killed.
George    Eric    Dunell,    Science   '43,
R.C.N.V.R.,    killed    on    active
service.
John   Hamilton  Edwards, R.C.A.F.,
missing overseas.
Robert   Douglas   Falrbalrn,   R.C.A.
F., killed In action.
Robert    Charles     Field,     R.C.A.F.,
killed.
Edmund       Davidson       Fleishman,
DFM,   R.C.A.F.,  missing.
John    Ansley    Foster,    R. C. A. F.,
killed In action.
William   MacMillan   Fraser,   R.C.A.
F., presumed dead.
David     William     Frost,     R.C.A.F.,
listed missing.
William     Reid     Glen,     R.C.A.F.,
missing on active service.
Arthur William Goulding, R.C.A.F.,
killed In action.
John Dow Granger, R.C.A.F., killed
In action.
William      Donald      Gunn,      R. N.,
prisoner of war.
Clarence   Edward   Haggitt,   R.A.F.,
killed in air operations.
Francis   Constant    Hall,   Arts   '31,
Seaforth    Highlanders,   killed   In
action.
W.   Hall,   MC,   Science  '32,   R.C.E.,
attached Imperial Army, wounded
In action. - .
David     Allan     Hamilton,     R.A.F.,
presumed  dead. ,,,
David Alan Harper, Commerce '42,
Army, wounded  in  action.
Ralph    Reynolds    Henderson,    R.C.
A.F., prisoner of war.
John    Kenneth    Hentig,    Arts    '35,
Seaforth    Highlanders,    wounded
In action.
Ronald   George   Hodges,   R.C.A.F.,
killed  overseas.
Sydney Richard Horswlll, R.C.A.F.,
killed In action.
George Redpath Johnston, Arts '36,
R.C.A.F., prisoner of war.
George    Joseph     Kane,    Arts    '36,
Army, prisoner of war.
Stuart    Clarke    Lane,    Arts    and
Commerce   '36,   Navy,   presumed
dead.
Henry     Law.     Arts     '36,     R.A.F.,
presumed dead.
John   David    Lemare,   Science   '40,
R.C.A.F., presumed dead.
Richard   Philip   Locke,   Aggie   '34,
R.C.A.F., presumed dead.
Gerald     Alfred     Lunn,     R.C.A.F.,
presumed dead
Geoffrey deFlyton Mackle, Arts '39,
R.C.A.F., killed In flying accident.
William   John   Maitland,   R.C.A.F.,
killed on active service.
Douglas  A.  W.   Markham,  Science
'41,  R.C.E., killed In train  crash.
Sholto   P.   Martlatt,  Commerce  '36,
R.C.A.F., killed In action.
Arthur   Norman   Martin,   Arts   '36,
Commerce  '37,   R.C.A.F.,  missing
after air operation.
Robert   Addison   Mather,   R.C.A.F.,
presumed dead.
William Whelan Mathers, Arts '33,
Army, wounded In action.
Charles   Alan    Mayhew,   Arts   '36,
R.C.A.F., posted as missing.
Allan    William    Mercer,    Arts    '36,
Army, wounded in action.
William   Francis  Mlllerd,   R.C.A.F.,
reported missing.
Colin  Stuart   Milne,   R.C.A.F.,  died
of Wounds.
Bernard     Joy     Moffatt,     R.C.A.F.,
reported missing In action.
John   P.   Monkton,  Aggie  '41,   R.C.
A.F., killed in action.
Donald     Beverly     Moody,     R.A.F.,
presumed dead.
Gillmor  Innls   Morrison,   Aggie  '39,
R.C.A.F.,     died     from     injuries
received on active service.
Samuel  Lome McBurney,  R.C.A.F.,
presumed dead.
James   Joseph   McCarry,   R.C.A.F.,
missing and presumed dead.
William   Donald   McCulloch,  R.C.A.
F.,     killed     on     active     service
overseas.
Robert   Law   McDougall,   Arts   '39,
Seaforth    Highlanders,    wounded
In action.
Thomas Alexander McDowell, R.C.
A.F., missing in air operations.
Robert Francis  Mclntyre, Arts '40,
R.C.A.F., presumed dead.
Ross Sheldon   McLachan,  R.C.A.F.,
prisoner of war.
William    Fraser    McLellan,    Commerce   '40,   South   Saskatchewan
Regiment, killed in action.
Joseph  Donald  Penn  McLeod,  R.C.
A.F., prisoner of war.
Francis   Hugh   McMullln,   R.C.A.F.,
- killed on active service-
Jack    Alexander    Foster    Neilson,
Army, wounded.
Arnold   Maurltz   Nordale,   U.S.A.F.,
killed In training accident.
Alexander     Gray     Orr,     R.C.A.F.,
missing.
David Milton Owen, Arts '34, Army,
wounded  In  action.
Ernest     Roy     Pellant,     Arts     '40,
Seaforth   Highlanders, missing  In
action.
Keith   Oliver  Perry,   R.C.A.F., died
In German prison camp.
Owen     Fraser     Plchell,     R.C.A.F.,
missing.
Gordon     Chelsey     Pike,     R.C.A.F.,
.prisoner of war.
Harold   Cantelon   Poole,   Aggie   '40,
Johore     Engineers,    prisoner    of
war.
• Charles   Edward   Porter,   R.C.A.F.,
killed  in  air operations.
George   Robert   Pringle,   Arts   '34,
R.C.A.F., killed In air operations.
Carson    Carysford    Proby,    R.A.F.,
presumed  dead.
Henry   Fred  George   Puder,   R.C.A.
F., killed overseas.
Richard  Michael   Hastings  Purdon,
R.C.A.F., presumed dead.
John Askey Quick, R.C.A.F.,  killed
In air accident overseas.
Kenneth    Wilfred    Reed,    Seaforth
Highlanders', wounded In action.
Robert    Frank    Struan    Robertson,
Arts '34, P.P.C.L.I., wounded.
Struan Turner Robertson, Arts '39,
U.S.   Army   Antl   Aircraft,   killed
in train accident.
Arthur   Leslie   Robinson,   Arts   '34.
Rocky    Mountain     Rangers    and
Seaforth    Highlanders,    killed   In
action.
Edward   LaPage   Robinson,   R.C.A.
F., kliied in air operations.
Stephen    Gregory    Rose,    R.C.A.F.,
killed.
William Ryall. Arts and Commerce
'37,     R C.A.F.,    killed    In    plane
accident.
Lloyd    Norwood   Sarles,    R.C.A.F.,
missing on air duty.
John   Charles   Melvin   Scott,   Seaforth  Highlanders, wounded.
George     Edward    Sendall,     Army,
prisoner of war.
Arnoid     Belden    Shlves,    R.C.A.F.,
killed overseas.
Robert   Meade   Sinclair,    R.C.A.F.,
killed In action.
Hugh    Douglas   Steeves,   R.C.A.F.,
killed In action.
Gordon Stead,  DSC, Commerce '34,
R.N., wounded In action.
Donald  Egllnton Stewart, Arts '34,
R.C.A.F., killed In air operations.
Harold   Charles   Edward   Stewart,
R.C.A.F.,    died    from     Injuries
received In flying accident.
Maxwell Maclean Stewart, Arts '34,
R.C.A.F.,   reported   missing   and
believed lost at sea.
George Frederick Strong, R.C.A.F.,
killed  in  bomber crash  returning
from  raid.
Richard   Charles   Stuart,   R.C.A.F.,
reported    missing     after    air
operation.
Semon     George    Tater,     R.C.A.F.,
reported missing.
Ralph     Wllbert     Tully,     R.C.A.F.,
prisoner of war.
Alexander   Norland   Urquhart,   R.C.
A.F., missing and presumed dead.
Thomas Cullen  Brown Vance, Arts
'36,   Seaforth   Highlanders,   killed
In action.
Phil:lp    Arthur    Vickery,    R.A.F.,
missing and believed killed.
Clarence    Alfred     Blake    Wallace,
Commerce '37, R.C.A.F., reported
missing after air operations.
Leslie John Ward, R.A.F., interned
In Eire.
Stanley Weston,  Agqle  '39,  Singapore   Volunteer   Militia,   prisoner
of war.
William    Alfred    White,    R.C.A.F.,
presumed dead.
Frederick  George  Whitehead,   R.C.
N., presumed lost at sea.
Arthur Weatherby  Willoughby,   R.
C.A.F., killed in plane crash,
Hugh     Ross     Wilson,     R.C.A.F.,
reported missing In air operations.
Richard    Alexander    Wilson,    Arts
'41,   Seaforth   Highlanders,   killed
In  action.
Robert   Alfred   Wilson,   Commerce
'40, R.C.A.F., missing.
Ernest Maurice Witt, Post-grad '37
and    '40,    R.C.A.F.,    reported
missing.
Thomas Clinton Stuart Wood, R.C.
A.F., presumed dead.
A FOREWORD...
Into four years of a normal university life are crowded many
"experience years", what are sentimentally referred to in later
times as "The best years of a person's life".
Only vivid glimpses survive through the years—the drone
of a professor on a warm spring day, the alive and vibrant bustle
of the Caf, a quiet afternoon in the Brock with the sun slanting
through the windows—
The impressions are remembered—A Red Cross Ball, a
riotous pep meet, spring play, Saturday parade, sombre stacks
at night, sorority tables, bus crowds, Caf food—and kept as
momentos of "the best years".
Four years is a long time today. A university life for many
is condensed further so that only the high spots persist to be
recalled later.
To mirror a precious year at UBC, this graduation issue is
published as a picture record of 1943-44. "Totie" is primarily
for those students who are graduating, be they in first or fifth
year. It too, is condensed in trend with the times, and experienced
the difficulty peculiar to the present in becoming a reality.
UBC's year book, formerly the Totem, a 300 page annual
which evolved from a small booklet in the early years of the
university to an "All American" annual in 1941 and 1942, was
voluntarily discontinued by the students two years ago, and
replaced by this smaller edition. Because Totie is so condensed,
many features could not be included, but it is hoped that those
clubs and activities left out will realize the wartime difficulties
under which the staff worked.
Remember—Totie is a mirror. It contains only what you
yourself have reflected in it. It is presented to you with an
earnest wish that it has caught some phase of university, that
it will be re-opened in future years and touch a chord of
remembrance.
DENIS BLUNDEN, Editor.
PUBLISHED BY THE PUBLICATIONS BOARD,
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1944
EDITOR DENIS BLUNDEN
Assistants: Bruce Bewell,
Don Ferguson
PHOTOGRAPHY ART JONES
Assistant: Les Canty
SPORTS CHUCK CLARTOGE
/   " President Leonard S. Klinck
•    SYNONOMOUS  with the rise of the University  of British
Columbia is the career of Dr. Leonard S. Klinck, president of
the province's highest educational institution from 1919 to 1944.
Twenty-five years ago, when UBC was struggling for its
rightful place in B.C. life, Dr. Klinck was appointed president.
Since then he has guided the university with a sure hand until
today it stands as a fitting tribute to his foresight, ingenuity, and
devotion.
President Klinck entered the field of education in 1903 when
he graduated from the University of Toronto (Guelph), with a
B.S.A. degree, becoming a lecturer at Iowa State College in 1904.
The following year he obtained his M.S.A. from that institution
and was appointed head of the Cereal Husbandry department of
MacDonald College.
In 1914 he came west to British Columbia as Dean of
Agriculture and Professor of Agronomy at the then small U.B.C,
a post he held until his appointment as President in 1919.
President Klinck is a fellow of the Canadian Society of
Technical Agriculturists, received his D.Sc. of Iowa State College,
LLD. of Western Ontario, and has received the Order of
Agricultural Merit and Officier de l'lnstruction Publique.
On his official retirement, June 30, 1944, President Klinck has
expressed the desire to exchange his office for a home on the
west shore—"small, with plenty of sun."
Who's Who lists him as an educator. Graduates of this
university will forever list Dr. Klinck as a friend and advisor who
strove unceasingly for the welfare and development of the
University of British Columbia.
m  - '-   ■^-^v*HhTTV-.va»Mr'V,v.   ORGANISATIONS  Student Council guides .
•    BLESSED WITH a persuasive tongue, the unique
ability to pacify anxious minds of student dabblers
in the campus political-pie, and a first class average
in Commerce, Bob Whyte, president of the AMS,
shouldered the largest part of the burden of student
activities in 1943-44.
The tall, be-spectacled, exciteable president
guarded the rights of the student and student
government with undivided loyalty. Rising from the
ranks of the Commerce faculty, he brought with him
to office wide practical experience as well as an
idealism of purpose which has not been apparent in
recent years.
With his treasurer and general aide-de-camp,
Donald H. MacRae Ross, Whyte completely reorganized the management of the Alma Mater office
by simplifying the method of accounting so that an
outside office manager was unnecessary under the
present conditions.
Diplomatically aggressive, Whyte's efforts
succeeded in providing innovations which had
heretofore been considered impossible, and a complete
report of his activities have been prepared by him
for the guidance of future executives.
Second-in-command of the doings of the Dirty
Nine was the wee Scot, the aforementioned Don Ross.
Also armed with a comprehensive knowledge of
accounting and economics, the treasurer was able to
present   perfectly   balanced   books   for   the   critical
inspection of the auditors, despite the increased
difficulties of his job which came as a result of the
alteration in office routine and management.
His habitual gesture of dramatically discarding
his black gown in the heat of discussion always served
as a warning to petitioning students that their pleas
were in danger of rebuff. Ross, however, by dint of
various economies, was able to allow generous budgets
for student activities and still to show an admirable
surplus at the end of the year.
Helen Welch, blonde and sophisticated secretary,
was in charge of the minutes and the correspondence
of Council. Her duties also included keeping a
watchful eye on the part-time stenographers who
assisted Miss Pearson in the office.
A mint of energy packed into one small being was
the plodding president of the Men's Undergraduate
Society, Harry Curran. Refusing to be rushed into
any decision, and daring to defy the wishes of the
majority if his ideas were contrary, Curran held the
.chair in innumerable committees, compiled endless
reports, rearranged the booking system, and integrated
the activities of all the organizations subsidiary to
MUS.
Despite his diminutive proportions, his presence
on the Discipline Committee was formidable, and it
was mainly through his efforts that the minor vices
on the campus were curbed.
Also   one   of   the   custodians   of   the   Court   of
Bob  Whyte,  A.M.S.   President
Treasurer Ross adds up the dollars as Whyte and McKenzie work
In the background. Council members Phyllis Bishop,
Harry Curran, Murdo McKenzie,
Don Ross, Lois Reid, Bob Whyte
(president) Dick Bibbs, Helen
Welch, and Harry Franklin,
poss demurely In the meeting
room after a Monday night
session.
Clubs and Organizations through .
Discipline was the pert president of Women's
Undergrad Society. Phyllis Bishop, "Bish" for short,
graced the Council chambers with her effervescent
personality every Monday, and utilized same to evoke
the greatest show of spirit on the part of the women
of the campus for many a Hi-Jinx.
Bish's unlimited supply of energy, and her knack
of wheedling recalcitrant coeds into activities which
they soon discovered were a lot of fun, were the chief
ingredients of her recipe for an extremely successful
year for the girls on the campus.
Relic of the Mamooks, and staunch supporter of
the interests of his cohorts, the members of the Literary
and Scientific Executive, President Murdo (Mud)
MacKenzie fought for the rights and budgets of his
forty clubs with continued fervour.
Furnished with his policy of "practical idealism"
(to quote his own words), MacKenzie handled his
business with despatch, and also imported professional
talent for the many Pass Features for the noon-hour
entertainment of the student body.
With the determination born of an inquiring mind,
MacKenzie was a valuable addition to this year's
Council. His full knowledge of the various clubs and
his ability to enlist their support whenever he needed
it, aided not a little in the success of many campus
drives.
The silver-throated tenor of the cloaked figures in
Monday night melodramas was the loquatious Harry
Franklin, who also acted as Men's Athletic
Representative for the session 1943-44. Harry's
interest in athletics was by no means a side issue,
however. Not only was he active in the executive
duties of his position, but he also found time apart
from his studies to play for the Thunderbirds, Varsity's
basketball team, and to take a vital part in other
sports.
He managed to promote more extra-mural games
for the different sports than there have been since the
beginning of the war and the subsequent reduced scope
of activities. Besides the annual visit of the Harlem
Globe Trotters, special feature games with Washington
State teams, Army and Air Force teams were brought
to the campus. Almost every major team on the
campus had the privilege of sending a travelling team
to some part of British Columbia or Washington.
No need of athletics was too small to receive the
attention of Franklin, be it a basketball or a backstop.
His untiring efforts in maintaining association with
other colleges for the promotion of sports after the
war have been admirable. He has set a worthy
example for his successor to follow.
His feminine aider and abettor in the interests
of athletics was the forthright Lois Reid. Rather quiet,
but quick to take the initiative when the rights of
women athletes were in question, Lois has worked
extremely hard, and has overcome major difficulties
to unite the women on the campus and incite an
increased participation in athletics.
Since the time allowed for the girls to use the
gymnasium was restricted because of military
requirements, Lois, with her executive and instructors,
was hard put to it to arrange schedules of classes and
competitive meets between years and groups. However,
the Intramural schedule was amplified, and every
physically fit girl on the campus received at least one Women's Undergraduate Society
was responsible for the
University activities of co-eds.
Seated from the left are
Bernice Williams, Daphne Ryan,
Joan Fischer, Phyllis Bishop
(pres.), Peggy Burton, Sylvia
Anderson. Standing: Mae
Munroe, Margaret Livingstone,
Aldythe Ireland, and Pat
Cunningham.
hour of "PT" each week.
The appreciation of the women for her ability
and achievements was fully expressed when she was
elected by acclamation to hold the position for another
year. Her past experience in the problems of athletics
on the campus will be invaluable, and she will bring to
next year's Council an established reputation for
earnest endeavour and devotion to her duties.
Smooth-spoken, with a lively wit and a genuine
appreciation of humour, the "kid", officially the Junior
Member, was this year, paradoxically, one of the more
mature members of Council. Dick Bibbs of Science
and McGoun Cup debating fame held the office of
water-boy, one of his most important duties being that
of filling the respective glasses of the members every
Monday night at approximately seven o'clock.
Dick's responsibilities were mainly "joe jobs,"
with a great deal of work to them, and not very much
recognition. He was in charge of Freshman
Orientation Week, Convenor for the Homecoming
Celebration, and organizer of the Cairn Ceremony
which was held in April.
Proof of his recognized ability is the fact that he
has been elected to the office of president of the AMS
for 1944-45.
Perhaps the most notable achievement of the
1943-44 Council was the establishment of a complete
unity of purpose within itself. There was no split;
the members played no favorites; they abided by the
decisions of the majority in Council and bore no
petty grievances.
The by-word of their policy has been post-war
"expansion," and it is to be hoped that incoming
Councils will continue their work and that sometime
their visions may be realized.
. fast-moving year of action
Men's Undergraduate Executive:
Norm Wright, Bob Davidson,
Harry    Curran,    Maury   Glover. —
Commerce Club executive
relaxes after the banquet. Front
row from left are John Short,
Phyllis Morgan, Vic Johnson,
Margaret Morgan, Leslie Wong,
Grahame Baillie, Miriam Buck-
land, Don Chutter, Mary
Handling, Ed Snyder. Standing
from the left are Jack Lee,
Beth Renwick, Dorothy Payson,
Ed Frlesen, Margaret Morrow,
Percy Glover, Beverly Guy,
Maurice Glover (pres.).
• TASKS of the Men's Undergraduate Society-
freshmen orientation, arranging the social calendar,
discipline committeeing—were handled with despatch
this year despite increased loads of compact timetables.
In the most publicised of their jobs, jealous
guarders of UBC's discipline, the MUS worked long
and hard to curb the bubbling spirits of exuberant
students and under their watchful eye even the sport
of tossing pennies died an impoverished death.
This year's executive included President Harry
Curran; Bob Davidson representing Science; Norm
Wright representing Agriculture; Maury Glover
representing Commerce; and Dave Housser
representing Arts.
•    BANQUET,    dance,    Commerce    Issue,    special
speakers, a trip to Woodfibre add up to the major
activities of the Commerce Club during the year.
Piece de resistance for Commerce was the
graduation banquet in the Georgia Hotel, attended
by graduates, businessmen, and faculty members.
President for the year was Maury Glover with
Margaret Morrow, vice - president; Ed Friesen,
treasurer; Phyllis Morgan, secretary; Year
Representatives: Barbara Bell and Jim Wilson, third
year; Helen Duncan and Alan Ainsworth, second year;
Program Committee: John Short, Gordon Hardy, Pat
Cunningham; Publicity: Dorothy Payson, Stuart
Porteous. Ed Friesen was also chairman of the public
speaking class.
• GUIDING the affairs of co-eds during the year
was the executive of the Women's Undergraduate
Society. The executive directed a great deal of the
campus Red Cross effort and women's compulsory
war work, as well as organising a reception committee
for all Freshettes at the first of the year.
Also under the jurisdiction and organisation of
WUS was the annual "stag party" the Hi-Jinx, and the
Co-ed Ball, held this year with the theme Dogpatch
Leap Year Frolic, and the Fashion show.
On the executive were Phyllis Bishop, president;
Dean Dorothy Mawdsley, honorary president; Pat
Cunningham, vice-president; Bernice Williams,
secretary; Daphne Ryan, treasurer.
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Arts   Undergrad   executive.     Right:    David    Housser    (president),
Doris Thompson,  Harry Pitts,  Bill McKinlay. Players Club and Musical Society . . .
• GOADED   by   the   taunts   of   red-sweatered
sciencemen,    the    Arts    Undergraduate    Society
succeeded in injecting a little more class spirit into
the Arts Faculty. With the Aggies they arranged one
of the more successful Arts-Aggie Balls, held at the
Commodore in November.
On the executive this year headed by president
Dave Housser, were Doris Thompson, Harry Pitts and
Bill McKinley.
• ALL THE university was a stage for the Players
Club efforts, and Green Roomers worked long and
hard to give the maximum entertainment to students
and to help UBC's war effort.
The club put every effort behind its spring
production and also presented the traditional
Christmas plays to students in November.
The usual tours to army camps and through the
valley were planned, but at the last moment the mild
'flu epidemic depleted the cast.
But the mummers recuperated and concentrated
their efforts in presenting the Christmas Plays and
their successful twenty-ninth annual production.
After long deliberation on the part of the
executive, with many nights spent in "play-reading"
to choose a suitable play for the feature effort of the
year, "Dover Road," a comedy by A. A. Milne, was
decided upon.
The three Christmas plays formed the proving
ground for testing out the many applicants showing
acting ability worthy of gaining them a place in the
spring play cast. Successful club members chosen
presented "Dover Road" four nights in the auditorium
to student and public audiences.
After hectic try-outs and a following period of
calm deliberation by the executive, the cast was finally
chosen. Allan Ainsworth took the leading role of
Latimer; Norman Campbell played Leonard; Joan
McCallum, Eustacia; Peggy McCall, Anne; Don
Chutter, Dominick; James Argue, Nicholas; George
Hamilton and Jack Duffus, servants; and Frances
Schofield and Rita Standeven, maids
The play was directed by Mrs. E. G. Grahame,
until she became ill two weeks before opening night.
Mrs. J. Hann directed in Mrs. Grahame's absence, with
Jean Christie assisting.
Responsibilities of guiding the club during the
year rested with President John Powell. He was
assisted by the executive, which included Jean
Christie, vice-president; Olive Headrick, secretary; Don
Chutter, treasurer; and a committee of Don Newson,
Arthur Jones, and Biackie Lee.
Players Club executive members
languish In comfort on their
new chesterfield in the Green
Room, happy over the success of
the spring play. Standing from
the left are Don Chutter,
Biackie Lee and Don Newson.
Seated from the left are Jean
Christie, John Poweli (president), Olive Headrick and Art
Jones. ,  -.    ...   frA^p!!&
Agriculture    Undergraduate    Society    executive.     From    the    left,
standing:   Doug   Haggart,   John   Robinson,   Norm   Wright   (pres.).
Seated: Peggy Burton, Jerry McManus.
Mountararat, and Dave Holman as Earl Tolloler ably
handled their parts. The part of the Queen was well
sung by Irene Kennedy.
Others of the cast included Alfred Shepherd, Jean
Mcintosh, Winnie Irwin, and Margaret Vaughn.
C. Hayden Williams again shouldered the
responsibility of directing the operetta, a job he has
fulfilled for over fifteen years. He was capably assisted
by dramatic director E. V. Young and Professor Walter
Gage, the honorary president.
Winner of the LSE award, president Brenda
Goddard worked tirelessly throughout the year to
bring about the success enjoyed by the society this
season.
Vernon Grigg, a veteran of several productions
serving his second year as treasurer and business
manager, also was presented with an LSE award.
Other members of the executive were Elinor
Haggart, vice-president; Walter Wasylkow, secretary;
Pat Whelan, production manager; Pat White,
advertising manager; Perry Hooper, stage manager;
and Joan Johnston. Valuable assistance was given by
. productions entertain students
Professor Walter Gage, Honorary President; Prof,
and Mrs.  F.  G.  C.  Wood,  Ira  Dilworth,  and Miss
the make-up class, under the tuition of Vera Radcliff
and Renee LeBlanc.
This year the  Glee  Club blossomed  forth  and
Dorothy  Somerset  were members  of the  Advisory     became   ^   integral   part   of   the   club,   giving   a
Board for 1943-44. successful public performance in December.
• WITH THE Arts Undergrad Society, the Aggies
held the Arts-Aggie Ball in November, organised their
annual Barn Dance, this year at the Peter Pan, and
held class parties throughout the year.
President of the Aggie Undergrad Society was
Norm Wright, with Doug Haggart, vice-president;
Margaret Burton, secretary; John Robinson, treasurer;
Gerald McManus, athletic representative. President
of Aggie '44 was Dave King with secretary Kathleen
Lacy. President of Aggie '45 was David Blair and
secretary John Farrow. Earl Butterworth was
president of Aggie '47 and secretary Connie Still.
President of Aggie '46 was Ian Miller.
• SUCCESS  AGAIN  crowned  the  efforts   of  the
Musical   Society  this   year.    Capacity   audiences
came, saw, and enjoyed Gilbert and Sullivan's
"Iolanthe", presented for three nights, February 24
to 26, in the auditorium.
Alice Stonehouse as Phyllis, and Max Warne as
Strephon, provided the chief love interest of the
operetta and together they captivated the audiences
with several lovely duets.
Elinor Haggart as Iolanthe, Keith Simpson as the  Musical Soclety executive: Front row from left are Brenda Goddard.
Trfirrl     Phnnrpllnr      RnV»    MrT.pllan     a<!    the     Earl     nf   Joan Johnston, Pat Whelan, Eilnor Haggart, and Walt Wasylkow.
Liora   t^nanceuor,   rsoD   mcLieuan   as   me   r^ari   oi Back row |„C|Udes Vernon Grigg and Pat white. Varsity Time goes over the air:  On  the   ieft  Norman  Campbell  I mitates a fictitious character and Ken Belcher ieans on the sound-
effect door.   Right:   Dick Atree,  Eric AJello,  Bill Stewart, Gordon   Carter, Gwen Spargo, and Anne Baxter wait for the time signal.
"Down the Mall" with Varsity Time
•    FOR THOSE who  liked their entertainment  a
mixture of serious news and wacky take-offs, the
Radio Society's series of Saturday night broadcasts
were built to order.
Each Saturday night at 6:45 over station CKWX,
members of the Radio Society gathered around the
microphone in the Playhouse and presented listeners
with a resume of the week's news together with a good
portion of comedy routine. Variations were numerous,
and often unexpected.
Presiding over the business of the club was hardworking Al MacMillan, who took care of various
executive duties on the campus and during the
broadcast. Untiring, MacMillan also spent many hours
during the year manipulating the P.A. system in the
auditorium for pep meets and pass features and in the
Brock for dances.
One man script writer for Varsity Time was Eric
Ajello, who shouldered the task of writing 20 weekly
scripts for the program, besides sharing in announcing.
Single-handed, Ajello revitalized Varsity Time into a
fast-moving 15 minute review.
One of the mainstays of Varsity Time was Norman
Campbell, who grimaced and pantomimed before the
microphone when doing his comical character voices.
Norman's record for different voices during one
program is 9.
Gordon Carter lent a smooth touch to the
announcing with his opening "Varsity Time takes you
down the mall". Gwen Spargo, Bill Stewart, Dick
Attree, Anne Baxter, Margaret Radcliff (secretary),
Peggy Holtz, Bill Watts, Peter Pudney, Ken Belcher,
all contributed to the programs.
Misplaced sound-effects, lost scripts, slips of
announcers, and the general strain of radio
broadcasting, endeared the program to UBC students
and made for a successful, innovating year.
Besides the regular program the Society arranged
several programs in conjunction with the' Musical
Society; a portion of Iolanthe was given over the CJOR
concert hour and the leads in the operetta sang over
CKMO, as well as a fifteen minute preview over CBR.
The regular Mussoc program was arranged Monday
evening over CKMO.
Al McMillan, Radio Society Director •    UNDER    THE    jurisdiction    of    the    Women's
Undergraduate Society, the Nurses Undergraduate
Society extended its activities this year and kept up
the same record of service of former Executives.
The Society guided the affairs of the University
of British Columbia's nurses in training. Besides the
regular executive work, the nurses organised the
successful annual Nurses' Ball, held in January.
Heading the executive was President Mae Monroe
who shouldered much of the responsibility of the
Society's activities and organisations during the year.
Acting as a capable and helpful assistant to the
president was vice-president Phyllis Rowe. Allison
Mann handled all social activities in her office as
social convenor and Nancy Montgomery as treasurer
took care of the financial business. Margaret Campbell
took the minutes and kept an accurate account of the
meetings throughout the term as secretary.
The Society also sponsored vocational talks by
faculty members on various phases of engineering.
Assisting President Davidson, the executive included
Roy Morton, vice-president; Paul Hookings, secretary-
treasurer; Tommy Syme, athletic representative; Dr.
H. C. Gunning was honorary president.
• FINDING SUMMER and part-time employment
for students this year was the job of a hardworking group of students who comprised the staff of
the Employment Bureau.
Industrious Ed Friesen, the ultimate of business
efficiency, directed the efforts of the Bureau and saw
to it that any student who wanted a job, had a job.
"Want job?"—"Got same" was the Bureau's motto.
Working in close connection with the local
headquarters of National Selective Service, the
Bureau was responsible for the task of placing the
entire student body in suitable summer jobs.
Employment Staff gets down to work
• HEADED BY President Bob Davidson, the
Engineers Undergrad Society was mainly
responsible for the successful Engineers Spring
Offensive at the Commodore, February 10, the Science
Banquet, and the Fall term informal.
The problem of controlling a band of red-sweatered
sciencemen was no easy task yet the Engineers
executive succeeded in co-ordinating all science
activities and conducting affairs with the greatest
efficiency possible. One of the most eagerly awaited
products of the faculty was the red-inked science issue
of the Ubyssey which was published February 8, two
days before the "Spring Offensive".
The activities of the Bureau increased so much
in 1943-44 that the job-seekers were moved to a
special place in the AMS office where they had the
use of a phone.
There they patiently handled the long lines of
students who filed job applications, making sure that
everyone was satisfied with his position.
Downtown businessmen and other employers of
students hailed the Bureau as an answer to the
businessman's prayer.
Assisting Friesen this year was Percy Glover.
Helen Duncan, Barbara Ellis, Pat Taylor and Norman
Black were in charge of the office.
Director   Ed   Friesen   and   assistant   Percy  Glover  check the   Employment   Bureau  files.    Louie   Chekov  signs   up with   Norm   Black
while  Helen  Duncan  and  Pat Taylor watch. Mamooks start on the dav's
work. Seated from the left are
Frances Hillier, Nina Sedroff,
Bob Yeastlnq. Bob Armstronq,
Yvette Morris, Mary Lou
Jeffrey. Standing: Fred Whowell,
Don Aiderdlce, Paul Harris,
Sidney Flavelle, Bob Nickells,
Ron Grantham. Bill Stewart
(pres.), Alex Gray, Bill Smith,
and   Waverly  Watson.
Fraternities and Sororities help
• "FAMOUS   for   Friendliness"—the   international
smile,   is   the   motto   of   the   largest   women's
organization on the campus, the Theta chapter of the
International Phrateres Clubs.
Object of Phrateres is to promote social mingling
among women students and acquaint freshettes with
campus life. On the executive this year were; Joan
Fischer, president; Julia Van Gorder, vice-president;
Kay McGarry, secretary; Alice Stonehouse, treasurer;
Muriel McDermid, social service chairman; Ada
McLaren and Billie Oliver, publicity.
• PEP MEETS . . . posters . . . dances . . . cheer
leading . . . ticket taking . . . decorations . .  .
behind the myriads of campus functions are the men
and women of the Mamooks.
Capably led by president Bill Stewart, the
Mamooks painted 500 posters, made 800 P.A.
announcements, checked coats for 12 dances, handled
the decorations for four dances, led cheerleading,
staged two tea dances in the Brock and sold $1000
worth of tickets throughout the year.
Bob Nickells, Bob Yeasting and Bob Armstrong
handled most of the posters. Special mention is needed
for AMTOG and his poster girls. Tickets were under
Frances Hillier; M.C. was Ron Grantham; Yell King,
Paul Harris; and cheer leader, Yvette Morris.
Phrateres members Ada
McLaren, Mary Chatwin, Julie
VanSorder, Sheila Kirkpatrick,
Nsncv Pitman, Ivy Pronger, Kay
Mac~arry, Alice Stonehous".
Joan F'scher (pres.), Billy
Oliver, Jackie Vance, Thelmi
Behnsen. The Inter-Fraternity Council,
above, directed the affairs of
Fraternities during the year.
Seated from the left are Terry
McLorg, Frank Francis, Barry
Sleigh (president), Dr. J. A.
Harris, Paul Griffin, Paul Buck,
Dick Bibbs. Standing from the
left are Irwin Disher, Don
Newson, Louie Checov, Vaughan
Mosher, Jim Reid, Bob Bentali,
Cam Warrender, Harry
Marshall, Bob Chalmers, Alan
Eyre, Arnold Johnson, and Tom
Fisher.
make '43-'44 a successful year
Honorary President was Dr. J. Allen Harris, and
secretary treasurer, Sidney Flavelle. Membership
included Alex Gray, Nina Sedroff, Waverlie Watson,
Charlie King, Bill Smith, Fred Whowell and Don
Alderdice.
• ACTING as a central governing body of the eight
Sororities on the campus, the Pan Hellenic Council
supplied the "Big Sisters" at the first of the year and
joined with the IFC in promoting the Red Cross Ball
and the Inter-Fraternity song fest.
Executive this year was Sylvia Anderson,
president; Margaret Reid, vice-president; Mary
Francis Turnbull, secretary; Barbara McPherson,
treasurer; Norma Fleming, athletic convener.
• UNDER President Barry Sleigh, the Inter-
Fraternity Council ran the affairs of the
University's 12 men's Greek Letter Societies smoothly
and efficiently during 1943-44 in addition to assisting
in many other campus projects.
One of the most successful of these, was the
Religion and Life Conference, held in conjunction with
other campus organizations. The n?C also was co-
sponsor with the Pan-Hellenic Association for the
Song-Fest, the annual inter-fraternity competition
Rushing occupied much of the attention of the
council during the first of the year, and at the end
of the rushing period, more than 130 men were ushered
into fraternity life under the auspices of the IFC.
Other members of the executive include Ken
Creighton, vice-president; Frank Francis, secretary-
treasurer; and Dr. J. A. Harris, faculty representative.
PanHellenic   council   members   Phyllis   Bishop,   Helen   Morgan,  Annette   Campbell,    Barbara    McPherson,    Mary    Frances   Turnbull,
Muriel   Whimster,   Teenie   Fleming,   Joan    Rodgers,   Florence   Mercer,   Margaret   Morrow,  Sylvia Anderson,   Margaret  Reid,  Thelma
Behnsen,  and    Beverly Buy. Past and Present Parliamentary
Forum Executive: Jack Hetherington, John Cowan, Allan
Ainsworth, Les Raphael, Les
Canty (past): Jim Wilson, Ted
English, Jim Clement, Hugh
McLeod, Ted Chambers.
• UPHOLDERS of the art of public speaking on
the campus, the Parliamentary Forum members
under Jack Hetherington were in good voice
throughout the year, holding as their major activities
two Mock Parliaments—one each in the Fall and
Spring Terms.
Government for the first parliament was CCF,
with "Prime Minister" Jim Wilson leading his party.
Les Raphael was "Premier" for the second event, the
government being formed by a Liberal-Progressive
and Conservative Coalition. Both governments
survived caustic debate from the floor and succeeded
in passing their main bills.
Assisting Hetherington were Jim Wilson, first
vice-president; Les Raphael, second vice-president;
Allan Ainsworth, secretary; John Cowan, treasurer.
Honorary President was Professor F. G. C. Wood.
•    PLAYING AT pep meets and dances, the Varsity
Dance Orchestra, under direction of Dave
McLelland satisfied both sweet and hot music fans on
the campus.
In keeping with the trend of the times, the
orchestra included a string section for the first time,
and specialized in the popular sweet swing stylings.
Particularly notable were the two vocalists, Mona
Quebec, and Greg Miller.
Trombones were spotlighted, Dave Pepper
handling the hot solos and leader Dave McLelland
the sweet passages. The brass section gave the band
the drive that set the fans' feet tapping, and the saxes
were hot, but the sweet strains of the strings gave
gave the orchestra its smooth style.
Never before has such an ambitious musical
aggregation been assembled on the campus, and the
industry of the members was rewarded by the
thunderous applause of the student audiences.
Varsity Orchestra swings out: Seen are Dave McLelland, leader and trombone; Mona Quebec and Greg Miller, vocals; Stu Lafaux,
Bob Estey, Vidar Norden, trumpets; Dave Pepper, Martin Goodwin trombone; Johnny Bayfield, Jack Cribb, alto; Ron Ptolemy, BUI
Pollock, tenor; Arvid Rekston, clarinet; Jack Cohen drums; Herby James, piano; Gordy Bell, guitar, Murray Walker, base; Henning
Jensen, Gerald Jenvey, Nelles Glover, Jocelyn Dyke, Rosemary Lee, Fred Lipsett, Wilf Evans, Madelalne Van de Putte, Margaret
McLeod,  Gerald   Evans, violins;  Newton   Hopkins, cello;  Bill  Nelson, steel guitar; Bob  Nickells. PUBLICATIONS Margaret Reid,  Editor-in-Chief of the Publications Board, 1943-44.
Through the smoke and haze, Margaret Reid, the
red-headed goddess of the Publications Board moved
unperturbed, calmly writing constructive editorials
and stooping to edit copy as the minute hand of the
electric clock silently prophesied an approaching
deadline.
Better known as "Dinah", the editor-in-chief kept
an unruly band of journalists from too many youthful
extravagances by using a firm hand when needed, and
generally added charm to the editor's office with a
pleasing and gay personality.
Extremes in personality were represented in the
two senior editors, John Scott and Virginia Hammitt.
With straightforward efficiency, Scott pounded a sense
of news into the staff and competently put together his
Tuesday share of the forty issues. Hammitt edited copy
with womanly preciseness and also displayed instances
of a woman's wrath on the desk.
Pubsters combine talents to produce
•   TWENTY-FIVE HUNDRED students made news
this year—and read it in the Ubyssey.
From the wide-open, noisy hub-bub of press days,
characterized by the clacking of Underwoods and
Remingtons, plaintive cries of the news manager, blunt
commands of senior editors, and perverseness of
reporters, came forty issues to mirror the activities
of one year at UBC.
Calm to a certain point, but a deadly writer when
aroused, "J. T." gave vent to his feelings in a column
"On The Mall", in which many organizations felt the
sting of an acid typewriter. Virginia occasionally
produced a "Colyum" for her Friday issue and tried
various experiments with make-up while doing her
best to educate reporters in the intricacies of news-
writing.
Virginia Hammitt, Friday Editor.
John T. Scott, Tuesday  Editor. With a firm hold on the purple covered
"Doomsday" book, News Manager Marion Dundas laid
down the law on assignments, firmly demanding that
they be handed in on time. Industrious and on the
quiet side, Mardee rallied cubs twice her size into a
closely knit force that covered the campus with a giant
news gathering grape vine. With a characteristic
worried look and dignified speech, Mardee exerted a
restraining influence on boisterous pubsters.
• GRACED by the cheery countenance of editor
Chuck Claridge, the sports department maintained
a sporting attitude in the nether regions of the Pub,
except when the weekly case of coke put in its fleeting
appearance.
Shortages of manpower reduced the staff to a
minimum but Jim Schatz, Luke Moyls, Ernie Roy, and
co-ed reporters Peggy Wilkinson and Donna Meldrum
kept a steady stream of sport jive copy rolling down
to press.
Editor Chuck Claridge reviewed the sport world
in his column "Off the Cuff" in between editing the
sport page and composing the sports section of the
Grad Issue—and amazingly still retained his sense of
humour in spite of chaotic press days.
Mardee Dundas, News Manager.
forty-one issues of the Ubyssey
Associate Sports editor Jim Schatz handled one
sports page during the week and startled the campus
with his column "Awful of Thought."
Luke Moyls kept students up on basketball at the
first of the year with "Hoop Chatter" and also took over
the sports desk on odd occasions towards the end of
the year.
Associate Editors on the Ubyssey were few at the
start of the year, but the positions were filled once
green cub reporters had been transformed by senior
editors into a light shade of pink.
Main job of the associates was helping edit copy
on press days and assisting the senior editor at press.
Working in this capacity were associates Grahame
Thompson, Ken Weaver, Don Ferguson, and Bruce
Bewell. Anne Dewdney was also an associate and
Pub secretary before leaving late in the term for her
home in sunny California.
In his job as Canadian University Press editor, Cal
Whitehead kept close contact with other universities
across Canada and in the Pacific Northwest and sent
wires hither and yon across the country in search of
Sports staff discuss the day's
work. Standing are Ernie Roy
ahd Jim Schatz.- Seated: sports
editor Chuck Claridge talks It
over with  Luke  Moyls. news.  He somehow found time to write his share of
stories for the paper besides the CUP.
Assistant editors, one pip below associates were
kept mainly for irksome jobs like carrying coke,
picking up the mail, and proof reading. Appointed
during the year were Nancy MacDonald, Diana
Bampton, Marian Ball, John Green, and Bill Stewart.
Nancy MacDonald worked industriously distributing
Ubyssey's to every corner of the campus in Tuesday
Art Jones, Photography Editor.
and Friday noon hours. John Green wrote a widely
read column in the lighter vein—"Folderol"—under
the pen name "g.w."
Hardworking reporters, backbone of news work,
were Nancy Pittman, Helen Worth, Bob Weber, Betty
Stacey, Bob Armstrong, Harry Castillou, Anna White,
Audrey Gerrard, Roy Lowther, and Gerry Adams.
Reversing a trend of the year before, the Ubyssey
suffered from no lack of columnists or feature writers.
Besides Scott, Hammitt and Green, Denis Blunden
periodically filled the space below the editorials with
Den.'s Blunden, Grad Issue Editor.
"Vis    Comica"    and    Ed    Brown   turned    out   his
"Paragramma" durjng the first term.
• MOTHERLESS children of the Publications Board
was the staff of the Graduation Issue of the
Ubyssey, made up of Denis (deebee)) Blunden, Art
Jones, and Chuck Claridge. From an obscure corner
in the Pub, decorated with exquisite photographic art,
the staff laboured over problems of war time shortages
—and the editor particularly, in trying to combine
studies and editing, was the cause of grey hairs in
the Publisher's head.
Photographer Art Jones managed to squeeze time
in between thousands of pressing engagements to
shoulder the bulk of photography work. He was
assisted by Les Canty. Chuck Claridge found time
in between issues of the paper to handle the sports
section with speed and ability born of practise.
Associate editors were Bruce Bewell and Don
Ferguson.
Pubsters  relax  after  press  day.   Women  on  the  left  are  Marion   Ball,  Grahame Thompson,  Vlcian  Vincent,   Mardee  Dundas,  and
Nancy  MacDonald.   Arthur Jones  and  camera  are  peeping through   the   partition   in   the   upper   left.    Right:   Bruce   Bewell,   Les
Canty,  Dundas again,  Ernie  Roy, John  Green, Schatz and paper sprawl over the desk. Pubsters all: (1) Chuck Claridge, J. T. Scott, Denis Blunden, Art Jones, and Dinah Reid spread themselves across the top of the
page. (2) Versatile woman this Reid ■ . . now she's helping to sweep out the Caf for the Clean-Up campaign. (3) Concentration
on the sports desk as Luke Moyls and Chuck Claridge edit copy. (4)Lukey again, holding tight to his coke. (2) Bruce Bewell and
Grahame Thompson work on a story as Jim Schatz mugs In the background with bow-tied Moyls. Ken Weaver's curly locks show
in the foreground. (6) The Ubyssey being made up at press. Dave the compositor consults with J. T. as deebee slouches in the
back.   (7)  Those  lighter moments with the  News  Manager:  Cal   Whitehead,   Don  Ferguson,  John  Green,  Marion   Dundas and   Bill
Stewart. ACTIVITIES  Red Cross Contribution Swellei
t
Beauty and the escorts:  Bill  Hill, Art Jones,  Harry Pitts, and Ken Pedlow escort Queen of the Bail Anne Bennett. 3y Greek Sponsored Ball
Lou Chekov tears his attention away from Esquire to reach for a Turkish cigarette lit by Dorothy Moxon as Maxine Johnson and
Betty Mlllins wait the royal command . . . Upper right: Betty Foster, Joan Clark, and Audrey Buchanan weave a seductive pattern
on the Commodore floor for Red Cross Ball patrons . . . Beauty and the Sciencemen:  Millie  Nairne poses sweetly for the scrutiny
of three science "supermen", John Oliver,  Maury Glover, and Cam Coady at the  Ball Pep meet Lower Left: Three more
sciencemen from a night In a laboratory harem show their drape shapes at the Pep  Meet. Sciencemen Cavort at the . . .
•    EVER   PRESENT —in   war   or  peace —is   the
university student's capacity to make the best of
conditions, relax every so often, and let loose built up
energy by patronising campus activities.
In the fifth year of war, restrictions on social
functions were increased but most of the traditional
affairs were retained and carried out successfully.
Major social functions this year were confined
to the Arts-Aggie Ball, the Red Cross Ball, and the
Engineers extravaganza, with many class parties and
private affairs well attended by students.
Taking top honours for social events during the
year was the gigantic Red Cross Ball. Sponsored by
Fraternities and Sororities and backed by everyone
on the campus the Ball this year proved an
overwhelming success and added $2800 to the
University Red Cross Fund.
With the theme "Arabian Nights", the Ball
featured a chorus and miniature harem for the
entertainment of those attending. Sixteen lovely
Arabian co-eds rehearsed months in advance for the
affair under the direction of Joan Crewe Straight and
succeeded in presenting one of the most fascinating
chorus routines yet seen at any of the four preceding
Balls.
Co-eds were nominated from groups on the
campus for the desired title of "Queen of the Ball".
Competing were Lorna Shields, Maxine Johnson,
Teenie Fleming, Florence Mercer, Phyllis Morgan,
Bette Anderson and Mildred Nairne. Anne Bennett,
Alpha Gamma Delta, was voted Queen at the Ball.
A preview of the Ball was held in the form of a
pep meet in the auditorium two days before, under
the direction of Doug Edwards with Phil Ashmore
taking over the job of Master of Ceremonies. The
nominees for queen were shown to whistling students
and the chorus gave a brief display of their Arabian
Nights show. The engineers presented their usual
hilarious take-off of the chorus.
In the chorus, twirling and whirling in the fashion
of the sultry belles of old Arabia, were Dorothy Moxon,
Booty Hebb, Betty Millins, Joan Clarke, Daphne Laird,
Audrey Buchanan, Mary Hammond, Meryl Shields, Annabel Sandison, Margie Beale, Betty Foster and
Joan Anderson.
Sultan for a night was harem chief Louie Chekov
who reclined on soft divans reading Esquire as the
lovely maids lighted his water-smoker, stroked his
beard, and adjusted his pillows.
Heading the committee for the first time was a
co-ed, Anne DuMoulin. She was assisted by Les
Raphael, Virginia Hammitt, Harry Pitts, Doug
Edwards, Joan Fischer, Don Newson, Norman Hay,
Meryle Shields, Florence Mercer, and Joan Rodgers.
February 10, the Engineering faculty combined to
hold their annual ball, this year under the title of the
"Spring Offensive". Mute evidence of the enthusiastic
support given by the sciencemen was the groanings
and strainings of the Commodore as the offensive
began rolling.
First prize for the best decorated table went to
the G. M. Dawson Club for their model of a mine
complete with a toy train. The tables were adorned
with intricate devices reminiscent of an alchemist's
laboratory and were a complete mystery to any
artsmen at the ball.
You  n:.me them.    Upper ieft a group of student mingle and talk   over the paraphernalia surrounding the Chemistry '44 tabie, while
on the  right "Littie   Bertha" gathers an  admiring crowd at the   Mech '45 table Just before firing the opening salvo of the Engineers
Spring  Offensive.    Lower ieft a serious scienceman  goes back to   his childhood days to doodle with the G. M. Dawson prize winning
display, as a crowd of civil engineers and escorts partake of nourishment at the lower right..
Engineers "Spring Offensive" Redskins whoop at Arts-Aggie .
The Red Shirts gave a rip-roaring pep meet
as a preview of the ball. Science '46 produced
Shakespeare's "all the world's a stage" and the Civil
Engineers gave a demonstration of winning the
mystery prize for the best decorated table. The Varsity
Dance Orchestra under Dave McLelland provided the
music.   Doc Morton was MC.
In charge of all arrangements for the "Spring
Offensive" were Bob Davidson, Doc Morton, Paul
Hookings, Tommy Syme, Stan Beaton, John Burton,
Dave Burns, John Shaw, Vaughn Mosher, Fred
Shumas, Donn Wales, and Ted Kirkpatrick.
Earliest affair of the season was the two-faculty
Arts-Aggie Ball. The keynote of the affair was Indian,
with red-cardboard Injun heads and little wooden
Indian maids decorating the Commodore. War whoops
were provided by the students, and redskin rhythm
by Ole Olsen and Band. Totem poles and teepees graced
.. the floor, adding to the Indian motif.
Preceding the dance, a co-ed Indian chorus
performed at a pep meet, dancing in the fashion of
bygone pow-wows. Under the direction of Dorothy
Moxon, the chorus included Annette Campbell, Pat
Chenoweth, Booty Hebb, Lib Nation, and Casey King.
.   Headed by Dave Housser and Norm Wright the
committee  included  Ruth Killam  and  Harry Pitts.
President and Mrs. Klinck sponsored the formal, aided
by Dean and Mrs. Buchanan, Dean Dorothy Mawdsley,
and Dean F. N. Clement.
The WUS Co-Ed Ball, packaged in neat dogpatch
style, was held at the Brock, February 29. Six campus
specimens were nominated for the title of "King of
Dogpatch" and each put on a spirited campaign to
raise votes from the feminine set on the campus.
"Snowball" Estey captivated the hearts of dogpatchers
attending the dance and was crowned "King" at an
impressive ceremony.
To the music of Don Williamson's orchestra,
varsity men spent an enjoyable four hours in an
atmosphere reminiscent of L'il Abner's habitat. The
WUS executive planned the ball, headed by Phyllis
Bishop, president.
The Junior and Senior classes combined again
this year, and held an informal two-class party at the
Commodore. This was felt necessary to help cut down
unnecessary expenses in war time.
The Sophomore and Frosh Class parties were both
held in the Brock Hall, the Sophs dancing to the music
of the Air Force Band and the Frosh jiving to the
tunes of Dal Richards. The Soph party was handled
mainly by Phil Ashmore.
Mary Ritchie and John  Boyd demonstrate the latest In cheek to cheek styles as   Bill   McKinlay shows  little   interest  In  the camera
man and guides Ann McLellan into the background . . . Joan Anderson, Lorraine Large and Marlon McLachlan enjoy themselves at the
Phi  Delt table In the back row as Kendall  Begert asks for a second   helping.    "J.  T."  Scott  steals the show  In  the front  row  by
mugging while Doris Thompson on his left smiles for the birdie and Virginia Hammitt looks for more refined company. From four days on the "Dover Road": Norm Campbell fishes for
a fishbone above while Butler Don Chutter maintains a strict
aloofness. George Hamilton holds the tray and Peggy McCall is
disgusted with Campbell's antics. On the right Allan Ainsworth
welcomes another couple, Heather Blundell and Gerald Newman
in the closing scene of the play.
Freshmen went "big time" this year and held
their dance with the theme "The Big Top",
representing a circus. Students danced until 10:00
p:m. then scurried to the Gymnasium during
intermission for a buffet supper and entertainment by
Gymnastic artists.
At the beginning of the year the Frosh reception
was held, with all freshies being introduced to
Chancellor R. E. McKechnie, President Klinck, and
the Deans, by all members of Student Council.
Dancing and refreshments followed.
Afternoon Tea Dances were held frequently
throughout the year in the Brock Hall for various
functions or drives on the campus. In addition to
these major functions, clubs sponsored dances and a
new UATC Wing Dance was held in February in the
Brock.
Homecoming also added to the year's festivities
October 31, with an English Rugby game in the
stadium in the afternoon, a potlatch in the auditorium,
and a windup dance in the Brock.
Theatre' thrives as Thespians and
Members of the 1SS Committee
drape themselves over the "Car
of the future". Left to right are
Max Warne, Harry Penny
(chairman), Bob Yeasting, and
Murdo   MacKenzie.
■ . . . Mussocs score with Successes
Plans for an International Student Service drive
were laid early this year and more than $700 was
raised. Under chairman Harry Penny, a pep meet
was held in the auditorium and tags were sold to
students, while a penny drive competition added to
the fund.
Climax of the drive came February 4 with a
basketball game in the gym and a dance in the Brock
with Dave McLelland and the Varsity Dance
Orchestra supplying the music.
In addition the "car of the future", a dilapidated
jallopy was raffled off to a surprised co-ed holding the
lucky ticket.
On the serious side a popular "Religion and Life"
program was arranged during the year and held at
the university for one week in January.
Guest speakers at the conference, which took up
problems of religion related to the university student
were: Dr. G. P. Gilmour, Dr. Leslie G. Kilborn, Dr.
W. P. Remington, and Miss Gertrude Rutherford.
Special meetings were held in the Brock, an
assembly heard the speakers in the auditorium, and
various downtown activities supplemented the
program. Responsible for a major part of arrangements
was Professor J. A. Irving, and a committee of faculty
members, students, and ministers of the city.
Ranking high in UBC's entertainment world were
the respective productions of the Players Club and
the Musical Society. "Dover Road" was the Spring
production for the Mummers and Gilbert and Sullivan's
operetta "Iolanthe" for the Mussoc.
Lead parts in the Players Club effort were taken
by Allan Ainsworth, Norman Campbell, Don Chutter,
Joan McCallum, Peggy McCall, and Jim Argue. The
production was acclaimed by students and the public.
Overwhelmingly successful this year, "Iolanthe"
attracted capacity crowds to the auditorium for three
nights. Leading parts were taken by Alice Stonehouse,
Decked out in their fancy costumes for "Iolanthe", the singing stars of the  Musical Society are shown  posing dramatically for the
camera.   From the left, they are Max Warne, Alice Stonehouse, Keith  Simpson,  Irene  Kennedy,   Bob  McLellan,  Elinor  Haggart and
Dave Holman. Max Warne, Keith Simpson, Irene Kennedy, Elinor
Haggart, Bob McLellan, and Dave Holman.
Many were the functions carried out during the
year under the restrictions of the fifth war time
session and students found in their functions the
needed chance to relax in their quest for knowledge
and training.
The Brock—silent matron of UBC's social events
and quiet haven for weary students, bridge players,
and record fans alike—played host to the university
during the year and fulfilled its purpose more than
ever before as a student building for the enjoyment
and relaxation of students.
By day and by night for functions, the Brock was
kept clean and tidy by the vigilant procter, Mr.
Mitchell, who watched over the building with loving
care, arranging for work before and after dances,
shooing to the cloak room wet students in dripping
overcoats, and guarding the lavish furniture from
unnecessary roughness at the hands of forgetful
students. Through his efforts the Brock has become
known for its clean, restful, never-changing
appearance.
The Caf remained the same topsy-turvy, lovable
institution in spite of vigorous attempts at "Clean-Up"
campaigns throughout the year. Only change was the
slightly perceptible diminishing of Caf Society during
spare hours. In noon hours, however, it remained
the social heart for the campus and the center of
flotsam and jetsom of gossip and perennial cups of
early morning coffee.
Frosh  Prexy "Pidge"  McBride and   President  Klinck.
Mr. Mitchell, custodian of the Brock, poses with the editor-in-chief.
Members of the COTC and their dates line up for the cameraman   at one of the corps' company dances, which were held during the
year in the   officers' mess. WAR EFFORT  IS
111
UBC at
Lt. Col. G. M. Shrum
Air foice, Navy, join the COTC . . .
•CO-EDS in 1943-44 were a little more fortunate than
their   sister   undergraduates   of   four   other   war
sessions.
The old saying that "there's nothing like a soldier"
thrilled feminine hearts when first in 1940 the men of
the campus blossomed forth in their wartime khaki,
but in the fall of 1943 the saying had changed to
"nothing like a soldier—or a sailor, or an airman" as
the other two services invaded the khaki stronghold
of UBC.
The khaki found rivals for co-ed attention as the
Navy and Air Force established schemes similar to
that of the Army and began training students in
preparation for eventual service in those branches of
the armed forces.
For five years a dominating factor on the campus,
the Canadian Officer's Training Corps bowed
gracefully to the other two services, and welcomed to
UBC the University Naval Training Detachment and
University Air Training Corps.
Cadets of all three services, however, were still
under the stern, watchful eye of Lt.-Col. Gordon M.
Shrum, commanding officer of the COTC, who was
appointed director of military training at UBC. A
strict disciplinarian, the colonel smoothly co-ordinated
the three services into a compact campus task force.
The UNTD, COTC and UATC presented a striking
picture of concentrated war effort of which the
University could well be proud.
Under the command of Lt.-Cmdr. H. M. Mcllroy.
the sailor-students took their position of senior service
on the campus very seriously, and quickly acquired
naval manners and polish to become the envy of their
fellow trainees.
Undergraduates soon became used to the sight of
navy blue bell bottom trousers marching briskly about
the campus as the student tars, 180 strong, acquired
their shore legs.
Major  C.  W.  Topping Training both on the campus and at HMCS
Discovery, the naval cadets were instructed as other
sailors in the ways and means of fighting on the sea.
Wearing white lanyards, denoting ordinary
seamen in training, the cadets were drilled in signals,
Morse, semaphore and flags, and taught types of ships,
ship markings and naval law.
At HMCS Discovery they learned the ancient art
of boat pulling and the traditional slinging of the
hammock, or as it is known in the Navy, a "mick".
Other time-honored sailor duties, the tying of
complicated knots and splices, boxing the compass and
manoeuvering the helm were taught the naval cadets
of UBC.
The Navy believed in keeping its men in fighting
trim at all times and made the cadets do most
everything on the double. The cadets took five hours
of drill and one hour of physical training a week.
Most of the students in the Navy were enrolled as
ordinary seamen, but a few students in mechanical
. . . On The Campus
and electrical engineering enlisted as stokers for
technical navy jobs.
The navy cadets finished their year's training at
HMCS Naden in Esquimalt, where they were
instructed in more advanced types of training.
Training for the COTC in the fifth war session
came one step closer to modern battle methods as
newly-developed fighting schemes were adopted and
training stepped-up to the pace set by fighting men
all over the world.
Most important of the new training methods to
be adopted was the assault course, which was laid out
on the west side of the armouries at the first of the
year. Here all the toughening-up devices of World
War II were lined up like medieval torture racks, and
cadets went through the mill twice in the year.
Clad in brownish-yellow "boiler suits", tin helmets,
and carrying the ever-present rifle, cadets climbed
over 10-foot walls, crawled through small box tunnels,
scurried up slender teeter-totter poles, scratched
through barbwire tangles, inched monkey-fashion over
high horizontal limbs, and swung on ropes like
pendulums over watery moats.
Ater a period on the assault course on the double,
cadets felt quite prepared to storm any fortress in
sight. A few months after, many were likely to be
doing so in all parts of the world.
Other types of military preparation also occupied
the attention of cadets during the seven months of
training as Major Johnny MacLeod and Capt. Bob
Osborne, training officers, put the men through all
phases of war on land.
Sqdr.-Ldr. J. A. Harris
Lt.-Cmdr. H. M. Mcllroy Capt. S. E. Walmsley and C.S.M. Irving,  E.  N.
Capt.  Bob Osborne and Major Johnny MacLeod.
Officers work hard to make .
Cadets were drilled in the use of the rifle, Bren
gun and gas respirator and were taught, besides parade
ground drill, the rudiments of fighting in the field.
They were taught how to fight back at the airplane,
how to attack and defend a position, how to bayonet
the enemy. Signals, map-reading, and lectures on
battle conditions were drilled into cadet heads steadily
throughout the year.
A miniature rifle range was built in the basement
of the Arts building for cadets to improve their
marksmanship in their spare periods. Using "22"
rifles, the men of the COTC made good use of the
range.
At the end of the year, cadets went for a four-hour
route march around Marine Drive and the Point Grey
District to Sasamat in battle order in final preparation
for their two-week camp period at Courtenay, where
the Canadian Army trained commandos.
At the end of their camp training, a much harder
and tougher one than ever before experienced by
the corps, the UBC contingent of the Canadian Officers'
Training Corps was a far cry from the ragged, civilian-
clothed group of student soldiers of the fall of 1939.
The youngest arm of the fighting force of Canada,
the Royal Canadian Air Force, attracted more than
200 air-minded students to its ranks when the
University Air Training Corps established itself on
the campus.
The blue-grey of the Air Force uniform soon
became a familiar sight on the mall as the airmen set
mmWl
C.S.M. Cole, J.; C.S.M. Goodland, W. F.; C.S.M.   Ross, N. G. M.j and B.S.M. McCord, J. E. D. out to prove that, although not steeped in years of
tradition, the Air Force could hold its own against
any comers. Under Sqdr.-Ldr. J. A. Harris, the air
cadets quickly set themselves to the task of learning
how to fight in the air.
For six hours a week, they were instructed in
navigation, meteorology, signals, airmanship, aircraft
recognition, First Aid and military drill. The majority
of the cadets were preparing for air crew, but a few
were trained for technical personnel.
To a great extent, their training was scholastic,
in order to learn all the complex mechanics of flying
which must be inculcated before the cadet learns to
fly. At the end of their course they went to an Air
Force camp to finish their training.
They were laden with Air Force exams, in
addition to their other exams, and cadets soon learned
that flying was not an automatic, habitual response,
but a thinking process entailing long hours of study.
Although they spent a great deal of time in the
lecture room, the Air Force cadets of UBC were not
put to shame when they appeared on the parade
ground. Their first inspection was held in the late
fall, when the corps was only a few weeks old and
the cadets drew steady applause from their fellow
students in the COTC, who were on hand to watch
President L. S. Klinck's inspection of the corps.
The three services at UBC took their training
separately and rarely met on the campus. A fitting
climax to an eventful year was held, however, at which
all three came together and paid tribute to two
traditions of their university.
Flt.-Lt. W. Ure and Flt.-Lt. G. A. Mills
Transcending the war years, the fast-paced time
in which they were living, a symbol of what they
meant to remain forever, the pursuit of knowledge, an
isolated, ivy-covered pile of rocks in the centre of the
mall was surrounded one sunny day in April by the
uniformed students, and Alma Mater was pledged by
student eyes for all time.
.. . Students 'Men of the COTC
The  UATC  lines  up  in  front  of
the armories during a Saturday
afternoon  parade. Basic Training mastered quickly .
• •
Pausing for a brief moment in war preparations,
students forewarned the world and assured the Cairn
that this madness would not last and that intellect
would again rise above stupidity.
They also gave the last undergraduate farewell
to the man who guided their Alma Mater through its
adolescence, the man whose term of office as president
of the University bridged two such rages of mankind,
Dr. Klinck, who retired at the end of June after 25
years in office.
The ceremony was short, the proceedings simple,
but the impact of hundreds of minds thinking alike
on that day in April, 1944, will not be lost in succeeding
years.
Quarters and quarters:  Ft.Q.M.S.  E. A. Gillette and Maury Glover.
R.S.M.  Fowle, C D.
• UBC CO-EDS rolled up their sleeves, and carried
on a spirited campaign during the second year of
compulsory war work.
The campaign was requested by the women
students themselves, and they backed the program
with the maximum support, knitting sweaters,
attending the day nursery school, parading with the
Red Cross Corps, and many other war work activities.
Two new features made a sizeable addition to the
war-work and gave more scope to the program.   A
The three services at UBC, Navy, Air Force and Army are shown       here  in typical  training  scenes  which  were  enacted   nearly  every
day on th  e campus. -
Shades of Tarzan:  Note the expression.
Saturday afternoon canteen for members of the
university training services and an official university
detachment of the Red Cross Corps made their
appearance early in the fall session.
Sixty co-ed officers joined the Red Cross Corps
and followed an energetic and useful three-hour-a-
week program. The girls soon mastered basic drill
and added a touch of feminity to various affairs on
the campus. They participated during the filming of
the National Film Board's picture dealing with the
university at war, and were a part of the Cairn
Ceremony in April.
Assualt course:   Up and  over on the  left as Cadet  Sparks teeters
nicely.
The corps also took periods of physical education,
were taught the life-saving methods of first aid, and
kept up with Red Cross room work.
Corps members with special qualifications were
given opportunities to volunteer for a course in map
reading and those who were interested in technical
work were enabled to take up motor mechanics
courses.
Candidates showing special ability were selected
from the corps in November for an Officers' Training
course given by Mrs. E. A. Robinson, RSM. of the
Vancouver Red Cross Corps division.
These candidates were given special drill training
enabling them to compete for officer positions with
co-eds who took an extra training course during the
Army grunts over tough obstacles]
Identification would  be neither practicable  nor possible.   The obst   acle course is no easy push-over, but the man in the middle seems
to   be  having   no      trouble  going   up. Red Cross adds feminine touch .
Fit. Sgt. Slsk,  UATC.
summer. Final selection of corps officers was made
in January.
In the armouries, March 28, visitors watched as
the corps displayed their marching ability during a
formal inspection by Mrs. E. J. deSatge, Provincial
Commandant.
The grey military cut uniforms of the Corps,
highlighted by the blue university arm-crest and royal
blue ties blended artistically with the Air Force, Navy,
and Army uniforms on the campus.
Faculty representatives who played a large part
in organising the detachment were Dr. Joyce
Hallamore and Dr. Sylvia Thrupp.
Foot weary students of the campus military units
with that "middle day slump" were given a pick-me-up
in the form of coffee and doughnuts by workers of the
canteen.
Under the direction of Barbara McPherson, the
canteen workers supplied airmen, seamen, and cadets
of the three services with soft drinks, coffee, doughnuts,
and sandwiches during parade break-offs.
From their little booth in the quad on Saturday
afternoons the girls dispensed refreshments in
wholesale lots at bargain prices, and campus soldiers
testified that the work of the canteen was invaluable
in keeping up morale.
Proceeds of the sales amounted to fifty-one dollars,
which was turned over to the Red Cross fund to boost
the university's donation.
Other students selected as their contributions a
day nursery course which centred around daytime
care of children. Co-eds travelled to various Vancouver
nurseries to learn the trials and tribulations of looking
after spirited young children.
Three services take rifle drill
with a clear backdrop formed
by the North Shore. Photographer Art Jones took this
from the auditorium roof while
National Films Board cameramen    were    filming    the    scene. Red Cross Corps steps out on parade.
Many with a flair for more technical work went
into a course on motor mechanics or the map-reading
courses. Alternate choices for co-eds in war work were
home nursing, typing, first aid, and Red Cross room
knitting and sewing.
Articles which were churned out from the busy
needles of the campus women amounted to the
hundreds. The beginners in the knitting groups worked
on wash cloths, while the more experienced hands were
responsible for the many heavy sweaters which were
turned into the Red Cross center.
Those who preferred the hum of a sewing machine
to the clack of knitting needles were occupied with all
manner of women's and children's clothing. Their
contributions included pajamas, nightgowns, skirts,
and suits . Some of the finished articles were modelled
at the WUS Fashion Show in the fall.
University Women's War Work Plan 'B' was
designed to balance by providing physical education
under a compulsory training plan. Among the courses
offered were archery, basketball, badminton, volleyball
and tennis.
Special courses in physical fitness came under the
Keep Fit program. In these classes, the girls mastered
all the known forms of physical jerks, and introduced
a few new twists as well.
Tumbling mats, boxes, spring boards, were all
called into use by the enthusiastic gymnasts.
Special training in folk dancing, apart from its
value in building for physical fitness, was eagerly
received, especially by the women who planned to
carry on in teachers' training. All the basic folk
dances of all countries were taught, as well as the
popular ballroom dancing.
Occasionally errant sciencemen were called in to
provide partners for the co-eds in these periods.
Weary feet on route march . . .
Boots, boots,  boots, on the great COTC route march.  First aid for the weary in one of the 10 minute breaks. . . . Co-eds back their War Work courses
With the great variety of classes offered, every girl
was able to find an interesting and valuable way of
aiding the campus war effort.
• SO WENT the year's war effort at the University
of British Columbia. Looking back over the year
it is possible to pick out the outstanding events from
among the maze of small incidents that, nevertheless,
contributed heavily to the enjoyment—and the sweat
and toil—of an accelerated year of war work.
The first appearance of the newly formed Naval
Training Division and the Air Training Corps was the
outstanding addition to 1943-44 war effort program.
Their formation was significant in that it marked .a
sturdy step forward to complete the varied training
courses offered to university students. It brought home
to students the fact that war training is not limited
to one branch of the services but is spread with equal
importance over all phases of a modern, complex
victory machine.
The first attempt at the assualt course, the
memorial Cairn Ceremony, the COTC route march,
the inspections of the Airmen and seamen, the smart
and proud appearance of the girls in the new Red
Cross Corps, will always be remembered as factors
that made the passing year a memorable one.
An integral part of the program was the women's
contribution, enlarged, streamlined, and improved this
year so that co-eds found their time well spent, both
from the viewpoint of pleasant enjoyment of their
Needles clack for Red Cross.
work and the evident usefulness of their handiwork.
On the crest of serious "invasion talk" that pointed
to action for Canadian Servicemen, the year ended with
the University detachments bound for two weeks hard
training at summer camp, a suitable climax for the
months spent on the campus learning the rudiments of
various phases of war training.
The girls are serving too.   Four
co-eds  mix  afternoon  shop-talk
with  their war-work.
. COTC on parade: 1. Capt. Capon; 2. CSM Claridge demonstrates bayonet technique; 3. woodpile work; 4. Worm's eye view; 5.
Sgt. Blnnie's one man bayonet assault; 6. Quartermaster's blues, CQMS Lee; 7. Cpl. Evans; 8. Capt. Osborne gives bayonet drill;
9.   Band  boss Sgt.   Bowell   blows; 10.  p|2 Lt.  Kaine,   Lt.   Edmonds,   2nd   Lt.   Barton—D   Company   officers;   11.   Orderly   duties:   Sgt.
Reid and 2nd  Lt. Reyman. ATHLETICS
A  Big year for UBC Sport...
Maury Van Vliet, director of men's physical education.
•    UNDER THE GUIDANCE of M. L. Van Vliet,
Director of Men's Physical Education, and Miss
Gertrude Moore, head of Women's Physical Education,
with  the  assistance  of students  Pete  McGeer  and
Barbara Greene, the large Intramural program went
through another successful season.
Largely through the work of these four people,
students seeking relaxation in sports were able to
satisfy themselves at almost any noon hour throughout
the year with games and activities to add a lighter
vein to their University lives.
Maury Van Vliet, in addition to his work on the
intramural program, also coached the Senior A
Basketball team and was commanding officer for "H"
Company in the COTC. This was Maury's ninth year
at UBC.
Miss Moore, in her eighth year at this University,
has largely concerned herself outside of the intramurals
with the girls classes of Keep Fit, folk and tap dancing.
She has managed, though, to save a bit of time for
her favourite sport of Archery.
The Men's Big Block Club this year was an active
organization maintaining its policy or policing at
University functions in the auditorium, stadium and
gymnasium.
The club, with president Al Narod, vice-president
Jim Morton and secretary Art Johnson in charge,
aided in the Freshmen orientation program and helped
with the annual Homecoming ceremony.
Mens Big
Block Club
Back    Row:    Robsrtson,    Sykes,
McKercher,   Shadweil,   Stilwell,
Yorke,.
Front   Row:   Franklin,   Hooper,
Bakken, Narod, Morton, Philllx. Miss Gertrude  Moore, director of women's physical education and
Barbara  Greene.
Early in January they attempted to sponsor an
invitation High School Basketball Tournament, but
only the narrow-mindedness of some of the school
principals prevented it from being held.
The Big Block Club sponsored a "Hunk"
Henderson benefit basketball game and gave their
support to the accident insurance program and the
Pete Mc3eer, assistant director of intramurals.
drive for the establishment of a Physical Education
department.
The Women's Big Block Club aided in the
Henderson benefit game and also gave their support
to the Physical Education Department drive. The few
members in the club elected as president, Jean
Handling and Doreen Parks.
Women's
Big Block
Club
Left to right: Marg Rodger,
Irene Pearce, Jackie Vance,
Barb Greene and Doreen Parks. Back   Row:   Van  Vliet,  Johnson,  Scott,   Bakken,   Robertson,   Wood house, Sykes, Moyls. Front Row: Weber,  Franklin, Stilwell, Yorke,
McGeer,   McLeod.
Hoop men active . . ,
• THE SENIOR A Thunderbirds started off last fall
with promise of cleaning up any and all comers in
basketball circles. They entered the Vancouver and
District Senior A League as has been the custom in
past years, and promptly proceeded to make a clean
sweep of it.
The loop consisted of four teams: Varsity, Shores,
Lauries and Stacys. In the opening game of the 1943-44
Art Johnson and Gordie Sykes.
season, the UBC outfit had little trouble in downing
Shores 40 to 33. Varsity's next victims were Lauries
Pie-Rates whom they defeated with a 31-28 count.
In the third tilt of the year, Varsity went to town
in their first home game, walking through the Shores
quintet to the tune of 72-31 for their highest score
of the season. They completed their perfect record
with another win over the lowly Stacys, 59-45.
At this point, however, the City Loop folded
because of shortage of players, the downtown teams
finding it difficult to field teams. As a result, Shores
and Stacys decided to unite their efforts in a single
squad, the Vancouver Combines.
While there was no league available, the
undefeated Varsity squad turned to the Pat Bay
Gremlins for competition. The Thunderbirds played
two exhibition games with Pat Bay in the pre-
Christmas season, one on the Victoria Invasion, and
the other a return game in UBC Gym, both of which
they lost by narrow margins. In another exhibition,
they easily trimmed the newly-formed Combines.
The opening of the year 1944 witnessed the
formation of the Inter City Basketball League which
consisted of Varsity, Vancouver Combines and Lauries
from the Mainland, and Victoria Army and Pat Bay
Flyers from Vancouver Island.
The Thunderbirds wound up in a second place
tie with the Combines, each team winning five of their
eight league games.  The Varsity outfit lost out in the . ■ ,.?v ■ . '-.'
Lower Mainland Championships to Vancouver
Combines, three games to one.
In the opener of the playoff, the Vancouver crew
surprised the Students with a 51-47 upset. However,
Varsity came back with a solid 60-46 triumph in the
next game. The third tilt was one of the most exciting
contests of the season, although the Thunderbirds lost
out by a single basket, 57-55 in overtime. They were
finally ousted from competition by the Combines in
the fourth game with a 45-38 defeat.
During the spring season, the Senior A hoopers
played five exhibition tilts besides the 12 league
matches. On January 14 at noon in the Campus Gym,
the Harlem Globe Trotters gave their usual sensational
basketball show in aid of the Red Cross, defeating
UBC 36-27.
On February 24, the Big Block Club sponsored
the successful "Hunk Henderson Night" in honour of
the former Varsity hoop star, Ralph "Hunk"
Henderson who is in an airman's prison camp in
Germany. In the feature basketball game which
preceded the "Letterman's Limp", Pat Bay Gremlins
edged the Thunderbirds 45-43.
Coach Maury Van Vliet began organizing the
Senior A outfit at the commencement of the fall term,
using seven Thunderbirds from the previous year as
the nucleus. These included Harry Franklin, Art
Johnson, Bruce Yorke, Sandy Robertson, Art Stilwell,
Gordon Sykes, and Ole Bakken.
Pete McGeer, who played with the Varsity Inter
A's last year moved up into senior company. Ron
Weber and Don Woodhouse were picked from the
freshman crop to fill out the roster. Don Woodhouse
was    formerly    with   the    Canadian    Championship
Victoria Domino team.
With the formation of the Inter City League,
Varsity was permitted to take on two more players.
Jim Scott, a former Thunderbird who starred with
the Varsity Senior B's in the fall season, returned to
the fold after a two-year absence. Bud McLeod was
also added to make a total of 12 players.
Maury Van Vliet coached the outfit, and the
managerial duties were looked after by Senior
Basketball Manager Louie Checov and the manager
of the Senior A team, Luke Moyls.
Harry Franklin, nick-named "Hopper" was a
steady star as one of the first string guards. Sandy
Robertson was the other starting defenseman. He
saved many games with his efficient shooting both on
the field shots and at the foul strip.
Gordy Sykes was the star centre of the club,
with Don Woodhouse as his understudy. Sykes was
invaluable for his clever pivotting, and reliability as a
key man for the team plays.
Ole Bakken and Art Johnson made up the rest
of the forward line. Ole Bakken, a southpaw, was
sensational with his sharpshooting, being the top
Varsity point-getter in more than one game. Art
Johnson, as a speedy veteran, was a dependable
left forward.
Art Stilwell must also be considered as one of
the starting line-up since he played as much as any
of the other first stringers, ably filling in as a guard
or as a forward.
Jim Scott and Pete McGeer were the reserve
forwards, and Bruce Yorke, Ron Weber, and Bud
McLeod were spare guards, all of them serving well
throughout the season.
In a fast moment of the game against Western Washington State Teachers' College, Franklin and Stilwell attempt to check, Varsity-
English
Rugby
Back Row: Bakony, Lockhart,
Redpath, Jones, Wallace,
Chutter, Carmichael, Rush.
Front Row: Reid, Hicks,
McKercher,  Layard.
English Rugby Successful. . .
• THE ENGLISH RUGBY club can probably boast
of being the most successful sport club on the
campus this season. They not only brought both the
Miller Cup and the Tisdall Cup to the trophy cases
of the university but also they expanded into two
playing teams in the spring term.
The club started out under much the same
conditions that prevailed last season with the exception
that they had a great surplus of players.
This surplus of power grew until a second team
was formed in the middle of November.   It played
Bob Lawson.
*%7$*8L.
several exhibition games and showed very promising
power.
St. George's offered most of the competition for
the junior team but they usually wound up on the
short end of the score.
The regular team was entered in the Miller Cup
along with three other teams, Ex-Britannia, Rowing
Club and R.C.A.F. Triumphs were only a matter of
course for the campus kids except when they met
Ex-Britannia. The teams in the league met each other
twice before the play-off and both times that Varsity
and Ex-Britannia met the latter triumphed.
However these two teams met in the finals, which
was a sudden death game. In this tilt, played two
weeks before Christmas, the Blue and Gold rolled
over the favourite squad by the score of 18-5. This
victory naturally gave the students the Miller Cup
for this year. Ex-Britannia had held it for the previous
season.
On Boxing Day the team played an exhibition
game with a team from the Fleet Air Arm of the
British Navy. The score of this particular contest was
very much in favour of Varsity, but a return
engagement reversed the verdict.
The club reorganized after Christmas and formed
two teams for Tisdall Cup competition. The Varsity
team was made up entirely of freshmen and the UBC
team was composed of the upperclassmen.
Out of this re-shuffle came two teams that were
powerhouses, instead of producing two weak teams in
the place of the one strong team that was operating
before Christmas, as was expected. The two teams lost
no games to down-town interests. UBC won all games and consequently captured
the Tisdall Cup. The only game lost by the Frosh
team was to the senior squad.
Ex-Britannia, Ex-Byng, and Rowing Club were
the other participants in the league. Originally the
schedule called for the teams to play each other twice
and the league leader to take the cup, but lack of time
prevented the playing of the second half of the
schedule.
The Thunderbirds started out with fire in the
McKechnie Cup play but lost out when Victoria found
their footing and played such good ball that they
retained the cup for yet another year.
Varsity defeated Vancouver Reps in the first game
at the Homecoming Ceremonies by the count of 16-6.
They then lost their next McKechnie Cup game to
Victoria on the Island early in January by a 29 to 0
score.
The second tilt with Victoria and the last
McKechnie Cup game of the season was played in
Varsity stadium during the last part of January. The
Thunderbirds lacked enough strength to last the
invading team to the end of the game and lost 29-11.
After taking the lead in the first half of the game the
defending boys tired and let the Crimson Tide roll
over them.
Tough luck seemed to persist in all of the rugby
team's trips to the Island this year for they also lost
to Victoria Army in the Rounsefell Cup game in the
middle of January. Victoria Army had won the
Barnard Cup and the right to meet Varsity, who was
winner of the Miller Cup, and favourite for the game.
However, they could not face the older team of
soldiers and were defeated quite severely by the score
of 29 to 0.
As a finale for such a successful year, Dougie
Reid, centre man on the three-quarter line for the
students, was awarded the Howie McPhee Trophy at
the grand banquet for rugger players this spring. The
Howie McPhee Trophy is awarded to the player
showing the most sportsmanship, ability, and leadership
in the rugby circles of Vancouver. He, as Varsity's
highest scorer by a great margin, seemed to have the
U.B.C.
English
Rugby
Front    Row:     McGee,    Waters,
Morgan,     Jenvey,     Menzies,
Morrison, Sims.
Back  Row:   McKenzie,   McPherson,   McClusker,   McDonald,
Lawson,     Ross,     Kabush,
Shadwell.
whole team working with him and avoided selfishness
at all times.
Those men who played with the teams most
consistently during the season were: George Rush,
William Redpath, Jack Sim, Gordy Morrison, Doug
Reid, John Hicks, Jack McKercher, John Wheeler,
Bob Lawson, Norme Cooke, Cam Layard, Gerry
Genge, Gerry Lockhart, Jim Waters, Keith MacDonald,
Ed Bakony, Gerry Jenvey, Tom McCusker, Bob Ross,
Harry Kabush, Joe Peques, Al Jones, Paul Chutter
and Bill Wallace. There were also others who played
one or two games during the year.
At the completion of the season the two teams
had played a total of 20 scheduled games in the
different leagues, winning 13 of them. They played five
exhibition games and only lost one, that to the Fleet
Air Arm.
Dougie Reid. r
</•*•»■*. ff-
# V   *^
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>.   .• ^>*r       •*>      >£,
Varsity
Soccer
Teams
Back Row: Stone, Robinson,
Miller, Taylor, Rodd, Glover,
Williams, Petrie, Hole, King,
Bennie     Tautorous,     Campbell,
Baker.
Front    Row:    Sager,    C o w I e ,
Medland,   Edwards,   Wilson,
Smith,   Morton,   Philley.
• THIS YEAR, the University of British Columbia
entered two soccer teams into local competition.
The Varsity team was the more successful of the two,
reaching the Imperial Cup playoffs. However, the
second club, UBC, which was chiefly made up of
freshmen, did well throughout the season.
Both squads started out strong by winning their
first games of the fall session, Varsity defeating Pro-
Recs 2 to 1 and UBC downing East Indians 6 to 1. The
two teams received a setback the following week whei
.they both lost.
Front   Row:   Moyls,   Reid,   Wescott.    Back   Row:   Edwards,   King,
Hetherington,  Clltnle.
From there, however, the Varsity crew worked
their way up to the top of the league with three
straight victories. Following this, they were the
victims of a three game losing streak, but they came
through with two more wins before entering the
Imperial Cup play-downs.
In their first game against the Pro-Rec Rangers,
they were defeated by a 4-1 count, but the Varsity
team protested on the grounds that the Pro-Recs were
using players from the defunct Boilermaker team.
Varsity won the protest and replayed the game
with Pro-Recs, beating them this time, 4 to 1. This
triumph put the Blue and Gold squad in the semi-finals
against Army. Varsity was eliminated by the Army
outfit, which defeated them 3-0.
Varsity played 16 games during the season using
the following players: Herb Smith, Chuck Bennie, Emil
Tautorous, Jim Morton, Don Petrie, George Wilson,
Clem Philley, Pat Campbell, Roy McNeil, Fred Hole,
Marty Martin, Les Moran, Chuck Dowding, and Sandy
Robertson. Laurie Baker coached the squad and Bill
King was the manager.
UBC played 12 games altogether, including a trip
to Victoria where they drew with the Victoria team in
a scoreless tie. The players were: George Gamble,
Doug Edwards, Alex Jones, Con Miller, Hal Daykin,
Bill Lloyd, Alex Cowie, Dave Stone, Bob Taylor, Ken
Medland, Cy Olliver, Robby Robinson, and Norm
Sawer. The coach was Laurie Todd, and Alex Cowie
acted as playing manager.
Dr. O. J. Todd is Honorary President of the Soccer
Club which was headed this year by Senior Manager
Maury Glover. Rowing
Club
UBC's rowing team pose proudly
for the cameraman on the sands
of the  Fraser.
• THE VARSITY Senior B Basketball team had a
successful year, ending up on top of the Senior B
division of the Minor Basketball Leagues. Varsity
started out as an Intermediate A team, but after adding
Jim Scott and Bill Hooson to their line-up, they became
Senior B's along with another team, the West Van Vs.
These two squads played exhibition games against
the Inter A clubs in the minor Leagues, at King
Edward Gym throughout the season. Varsity started
out with two losses before they managed to obtain their
first win by downing Gregory Price, the New
Westminster outfit.
They lost two more before going on a four-game
winning streak which placed them ahead of the West
Vancouver team in the Senior B standings. The two
teams played off for the Senior B Championships in a
best-of-five series, which Varsity lost three games to
one. The West Van Vs proceeded on to the Provincial
title.
The team was managed by Luke Moyls and
spasmodically coached by Bill Norton, Harry Franklin
and Louie Checov.
• VARSITY'S lone entry into the Vancouver and
District Intermediate A League this year was the
UBC Frosh team. Coached by Bruce Yorke and
managed by Phil Malloy, the club consisted of Don
Charleston, Pidge McBride, Ernie Renouf, Al
MacDonald, Hubert Gabrielse, Jack Turner, Ken
McCurdy, Don Brown, and Tom Abbott.
Later in the spring they played two exhibition
tilts, one against the Jericho RCAF Senior B team
which they lost in an exciting noon hour affair, 31-30.
In the other, they soundly trimmed the Tommy Tucker
Redhots from Victoria.
• VARSITY'S ROWING Club became almost
inactive this year as far as actual competition goes,
but they did not drop entirely from the sport picture
for still maintained were their early Sunday morning
practices.
Most of the crew are freshmen and big things are
expected next season. The club consists of Keith
Lindsay, president; Norm Denkman, vice-president;
Grant Larkin, secretary, John Moran, crew-captain,
John Fleming, Harry Castillou, Dave Morgan, Ken
Thompson, Earl Butterworth, Dave Hansen, Peter
McGregor-Eadie and Ted Davis, cox. John Slater
acted as coach during the year.
Frosh
Basketball
Team
Back     Row:      Malloy,     Turner,
Renouf,   McCurdy,   Yorke.
Front     Row:     Brown,     Abbott,
McBride, McDonald. Bob McLellan puts a shot.
•    INTRAMURALS on the campus dropped off this
year in the number of teams entering the system,
with 16 groups being embodied in the various events.
Last year twenty two teams were listed.
This meant that the fraternities were the main
groups in the intramurals with outside teams entering
from the Engineers, Mu Phi, a group of freshmen,
Lambda, mainly composed of first and second year
men and Gamma.
Even with the reduced numbers of players, the
spirit of the intramurals has not diminished in any
way and players enthusiastically turned out to all the
events staged.
Eleven sports were put on the program this year,
the first being volleyball, followed by touch football,
cross-country, swimming, snooker, table tennis, golf,
basketball, track, badminton and Softball.
Intramural Sports
Ken McPherson and Keith  Ketchln.
At the end of the season's play the Kappa Sigma
entry were on top of the standings, followed closely by
Beta Theta Pi, Delta Upsilon, Phi Kappa Sigma and
the Engineers. This is the second year in a row that
Kappa Sigs have topped the league, being tied for
first place last season with Xi Omega.
Volleyball was the first event run off, play being
in a round-robin series. The DU's came out as
winners. Teams were split into a Blue and a Gold
League for this competition to simplify operation.
In the cross-country race held early in November,
the Engineers took the lead in team standings, although
Kenny McPherson, an independent, won the actual
race. McPherson later in November won the
International cross-country event in Spokane,
competing against runners from the University of
Washington, Washington State, Oregon and the
University of Idaho.
Touch Football was started in the Fall and finished
in the Spring when weather became more suitable.
Kappa Sigma won this event for the second year in
a row. This game was played in a double knockout
series.
Late in January, the YMCA pool was taken over
for the annual swimming meet which the Phi Kappa
Sigma entry won on total points. Although seating
capacity was limited at the pool, a small but
enthusiastic crowd witnessed the event.
Snooker was held as a single knockout tourney
early in February and Ernie Renouf from Lambda
walked away with the title. The event was staged in a
pool hall near Tenth and Alma.
Table Tennis and Badminton were both run off as
a double knockout series in the gymnasium. The Table
Tennis was held as a one night affair with Engineers
taking the total points, although Tom Keenleyside of Trainer's
Club
The men responsible for UBC's
fine showing on the athletic
front were the capable members
of the UBC Trainers' Club,
which included Johnny Owen,
Ernie Roy, Ed Zahar and R.
Laranta.
winning both of the finals games.
Badminton took two evenings of play to finish and
at the end the Delta Upsilon team copped top honours.
Basketball was started early in January as a
double knockout series. After many evenings of play
during January, February and March, the Kappa
Sigma crew finally won out with an 18-15 victory
over the Phi Kappa Sigma team.
Many interesting games were staged in the hoop
tournament and close victories by other teams
eliminated some of the earlier favourites in the series.
The golfing enthusiasts took to the University Golf
Course  early  in  March  and  Beta  Theta  Pi  came
Beta Theta Pi repeated his  victory  in the singles
competition.
through  with   this   event   with  their   team   of   Ted
Chambers and John Woodcroft.
The track event was finally staged during the
latter part of March after several postponements
because of poor weather. The freshmen crew of Mu
Phi took top points in the various events.
The Softball has been run off similar to the
basketball and touch football in a double knockout
series. In the finals were the Kappa Sigma entry and
the Gamma crew. In the finals Kappa Sigs
strengthened their lead in the intramural system by
With   the   starter's   gun   poised
UBC   sprinters   set  to   go. Varsity-
Grass
Hockey
Front row, left to right: Evelyn
Wright,   Irene   Pearce,    Doreen
Parks,  Marjorie Watt.
Back   row:   Barb   Breene,   Jean
Handling,  Dorothy Payson,  Bea
Inch,  Audrey Thompson,  Jenny
Rodenchuk.
Co-ed Athletics Featured by. ..
•   WOMEN'S SPORTS were handled in a similar
manner to the men's by the Women's Athletic
Directorate, composed of Faculty members Dr. D.
Mawdsley, Dr. J. Hallamore and Miss G. Moore anc
students Barbara Greene, Evaline Morton, Lois Reid
and Eileen McKillop.
One of the two women's major sports was in Grass
Hockey, which drew two co-ed teams from the
University in the Lower Mainland Women's Grass
Hockey Association. The junior team took on the
name of UBC while the seniors were called Varsity.
The playing season, divided into two halves, was
lead by the Varsity team for the fall season but the
seniors slipped in the spring, bowing out to the Ex-Kits
crew.
UBC, though not sensational in the standings, did
manage to establish some record when they defeated
the Ex-Britannia outfit in the fall season.
On February 19, the Varsity team made a trip to
Victoria to play the girls at Victoria College. They
won their game handily, 4-1.
The Senior team was composed of Helen Matheson,
Bea Inch, Evelyn Wright, Jenny Rodenchuck, Irene
Pearce, Audrey Thomson, Marg Rodger, Macrina
Boothe, Jean Handling, Marjorie Watt, Doreen Parks,
Barbara Greene and Dorothy Payson.
The seniors missed the services of Jean Handling
during the spring play who was forced to drop out
because of sickness but her place was ably taken by
Marjorie Watt.
Margaret George, Ada McLaren, Lois Reid, Joan
Stevens, Marg Hodgson, Mary McCollum, Mary Ann
U.B.C. Grass
Hockey
Team
Front Row, left to right: Yvette
Morris, Marg McCallum, Joyce
Coney,   Macrina   Boothe,   Peggy
Bowe.
Back Row: Joy Donegani, Mary
Ann   Norton,   Margaret   George,
Margaret     Hodgson,     Ada
McLaren. Senior B
Basketball
Team
Front   Row,  left to  right:   Mary
Bewick,   Norma   Ford,   Marjorie
Watt.
Back    Row:    Dorothy    McLeod,
Audrey McKim, Eleanor Gooder-
ham,    Barbara   Simpson,    Betty
Walton.
Norton, Peggy Bowe, Joyce Coney, Joy Donegani and
Yvette Morris played for the UBC team in the league.
Goalie Margaret George, who has been away from
Varsity for two years, returned this season to play
a good game for the juniors.
There are several promising players on the teams
from the freshettes who should make good material
for next season. Among these are Yvette Morris,
Peggy Bowe and Joyce Coney.
In the basketball picture, the girls fielded two
teams in the Vancouver Cagette League, an
Intermediate A and a Senior B crew.
The Senior B team finished in second spot in the
final standings, which put them in the semi-finals for
the championship with Normals. Here they lost out
by dropping the series in two close games.
The lineup for the team, which last year won the
Senior B Championship of British Columbia and the
Woodward Cup included Betty Walton, Norma Ford,
Helen Matheson, Marjorie Watt, Mary Bewick,
Dorothy McLeod, Audrey McKim and Barbara
Simpson.
The coach for the year was Ruth Wilson.
The Intermediate A team during the year became
known as the "winless wonders" for they failed to
capture a single game during the league play.
In the Cagette League they played against
Western Mutuals, Hedlunds, Normals, Ryerson United
and the Canadian Legion.
Helen Matheson, from the Senior B. team, coached
the girls throughout the year. Their lineup included
Coleen Brandon, Delphine Segur, Yvette Morris,
Shirley McLeod, Nita McDonald, Verda McGillvary.
Valerie Manning, Margaret Wright, Evelyn Wright,
Jennie Rodenchuk, Mary Ann Norton and Donna
Meldrum.
Christmas Grass Hockey Laurels
Int. A
Basketball
Front Row, left to right: Nita
MacDonald, Donna Meldrum,
Verda McGlllivray, Jenny Rodenchuk,   Delphine   Segur,   Marg
Wright.
Back    Row:    Colleen    Brandon,
Evelyn Wright, Shirley McLeod,
Eleanor   Gooderham,   Val   Manning, Mary Ann  Norton, Yvette
Morris. GRADUATES  ADAMS, BEVERLEY J.
ANDERSON, DONALD E.
ANDERSON, SYLVIA L.
BAKONY, LIONEL I.
BARTON, DOROTHY F.
BERE3FORD, L. GRACE
BERTRAND, RAOUL C.
E'iSHOP, MARION L.
t'LIGH, HILDRED N.
BONNER, BARBARA
BOOTHE, G. MACRINA
BOULTBEE, M. ELIZABETH
BRADLEY, EVELYN E. M.
BROWN, NORMA M.
BUCHANAN, JAMES B.
■BUDD, JOAN
BULMAN, NORMAN
CAMPBELL, JEAN A. K.
CAMPBELL, NORMAN K.
CAREY, AGNES M.
CHECOV, LOUIE
CHONG, YOKE
CHRISTIE, JEAN
CODE, RUTH L.
CONKEY, ELIZABETH E.
CONWAY, LORRAINE C.
CRAIG, M. PATRICIA
OURRAN, HARRY A.
DANEY, FLORENCE R. C.
DAVIE, ROBERT G.
DAY, JOAN I. L.
DODWELL, ROLAND B.
DuMOULTN, P. ANNE
ERRICO, ERNEST
ESTEY, BYRON T.
FALCONER, SHEILA K.
FARINA, C. OBIE
FARR, DAVID M. L.
FISHER, H. DEAN
FLEMING, NORMA W.
FOLEY, FREDERICK R FORSTER, JOHN H.
FOSTER, JEAN E.
FRANCIS, JOSEPH
FRANKLIN, DAVID ST. G.
GARRET, DOROTHY E.
GEORGE, MARGARET S.
GILLIS, GLENNA H.
GODDARD, P. BRENDA
GODFREY, BARBARA E.
GOODMAN, ABRAHAM E.
GOULD, BELLE
GRANT, DOREEN M.
GREER, PAULENE M.
GRIFFIN, F. PAUL
HAMMITT, VIRGINIA A.
HEADRICK, OLIVE
HENRIKSON, ARNE
HERBERTS, LEWIS T.
HEWITSON, JUNE M.
HIBBERSON, ROBERT J.
HIGGINS, RUTH E.
HODGE, MURIEL
HOLLINS, RAYMOND N.
HOOSON, WILLIAM
HOPE, AGNES C.
INKSTER, J. DONALD
IVEY, DONALD G.
JARVI, HELGA
JESZOP, HARVEY C.
JOHNSON, ARTHUR C.
. KIDD, MARY H.
LAM, ANDREW
LANE, WILLIAM T.
LAPWORTH, PHYLLIS
LARGE, LORRAINE D.
LEE, FRANCES B.
LEE, JEAN-CAROL
LONG, JOSHUA
MAITLAND, MARGARET
MANSON, GEORGE C.
MARSHALL, DORIS P.
MAR3HALL, M. E. KAY
MATHEWS, FRANK S.
MERCER, FLORENCE E.
MIKKLESON, PHYLLIS M. £12.
•iuH    **      %:J±
MTT.LTNS, BETTY P.
MORESBY, BARBARA
MORRISON, JOHN T.
MORTON, EVALINE A.
MORTON, JAMES W.
MORWOOD-CLARK, L. I.
MURRAY, R. ELAINE
MURRAY, R. MARJORIE
McCALL, M. BEVERLEY
McCALLUM, NORMA R.
McCAULEY, W. DOUGLAS
McDIARMID, LORNA K.
McDIARMID, MURIEL A. I.
MACDONALD, M. JOAN
McDOUGALL, ALEX D.
McFarlane, helen e.
McGARRY, KATHLEEN
McGEER J. PETER
MacKINNON, GEORGE L. C.
NAIRN, MILDRED M.
NIMMONS, PHILLIP R.
O'NEILL, MARGARET M.
PALLOT, MARGARET E.
PARKER, ALBERT M. L.
PARROTT, HAROLD N.
PATRICK, BARBARA A.
PAUL, MARY E.
PEARSON, GWENNETH L.
PHILLIPS, DAVID B.
PIERCY, MARY, J.
POLLOCK, JOHN M.
RAWLINGS, PHYLLIS T.
REDLICH, BERTA B.
REID, MARGARET McD.
REIMER, NICHOLAS
REYNOLDS, A. St. L. B.
RIDGWAY, WALTER S.
ROBERTSON, DONALD A.
ROBERTSON, RODERICK F.
ROSE, M. EVELYN
ROSE, MERYLE, E.
RYAN, DAPHNE M. M.
SAUNDERS, JOHN L.
SANDERSON, ALAN L.
SANDERSON, PHYLLIS A. SANDISON, ANNABEL, M.
SCOTT, ELIZABETH A.
SCOTT, NORMA E.
SEATON, NORMAN T.
SEYMOUR, E. AILEEN
SIMPSON, KEITH B.
SINGER, G. EDWARD
SMITH DOUGLAS S.
SMITH WILMA G.
SPARKS, JOHN E.
STEWART, WILLIAM E.
TAYLOR, ARTHUR E.
TAYLOR, BRUCE E.
TAYLOR, EDWARD R.
THICKE, JOAN C.
THOMPSON, DORIS L.
TOUHEY, THOMAS B.
TOUHEY, WILLIAM B.
TURYK, MICHAEL D.
VEREGIN, THOMAS A.
VILLIERS-FISHER, JOAN R.
WALKER, CLAUDE E.
WARK, BRUCE E.
WARNE, ROBERT M.
WATSON, MARY V.
WEBBER, ERMINIE L.
WEBER, VIRGINIA
WEINS, ELVIRA.
WELCH, HELEN P.
WHIMSTER, MURIEL F.
WILKIE, GAVIN G.
WILLIAMS, BERNICE M. S.
WILLIAMS, L. JUNE
WOO, MARY M.
WOOD, MARY ALICE
WYNESS, ELEANOR J.
ALMAS, JAMES D.
BAILLIE, GRAHAM C. B.
BAKONY, EDWARD G. J.
BISHOP, PHYLLIS D.
BOYD, NORA E. CARMICHAEL, ANDREW J.
CAWLEY, P. GUY S.
CHONG, PETER
CHUTTER, S. DONALD C.
EDWARDS, DOUGLAS A.
ELLIS, BARBARA
FLADER, SAMUEL
FRIESEN, EDWARD P.
GIURIATO, LINO
GLOVER, MAURICE H. A.
GLOVER, PERCY C.
JOHNSON, VICTOR W.
KOENIGSBERG, IRVING N.
LUCAS, COLIN R.
MANZER, CARSON G.
MARSHALL, HENRY J.
MORROW, MARGARET E.
MacKENZIE, MURDO G.
NOBBS, WILLIAM H. L.
BUCKLAND, MIRAM R.
ROS3, DONALD H. MacR.
SAUNDERS, RICHARD G.
SHORT, JOHN W.
SNYDER, EDWARD W.
TODHUNTER, S. CASWELL.
WALLACE, ROBERT B.
WHITELAW, GLENN R.
WHYTE, ROBERT S.
WILSON, CHARLES H.
YEASTTNG, ALICE M.
ASSALY, TOM C.
BONNUTTO, ALFRED L.
CARROTHERS, P. JOHN G.
EKMAN, FRANK O.
FROST, PAUL J.
GITTERMAN, LOUIS H.
HAILE, ISSAC
HOOD, JOHN A.
HOOPER, PERRY, McF.
LUCAS, ARTHUR R. MUIR, JOHN W.
MURRAY, JOHN M.
OLES, JOHN E.
ONTKEAN, ORVILLE M.
SHAW, A. JOHN
SLEIGH, E. BARRY
SOULSBY, ALAN ST. G.
SYME, THOMAS D.
TAYLOR, NORMAN E.
TTEDJE, JOHN L.
TOOMBS, E. HAROLD
TURNER, A. DESMOND
WORKMAN, ALLAN B.
BENTALL, ROBERT G.
CLAY, CHARLES H.
COOPER, ALEXANDER C.
MOSHER, VAUGHAN L.
NAROD, ALVIN J.
SCARISBRICK, RICHARD G.
SLATER, JOHN S.
SMITH, H. LESLIE
SWERDFEGER JOHN H.
WALLACE, JOHN M.
AUCHINLECK, GILBERT F.
BEATON, STANLEY, J.
CARLILE, JACK C.
CLARKE, EDNA A.
DAVIDSON, ROBERT A.
FILMAN, NORMAN J.
GODFREY, GERALD F.
GRUENBERG, HARRY
GUSH, JOHN B.
HAUSCH, ROBERT C.
HUGHES, R. B. C.
JULSON, O. MELVIN
LEGEER, RONALD J.
MOSHER, ALLISON F.
NOSWORTHY, FRANK M.
PEAR"ON, CARL E.
ROME, ALEXANDER H.
WILDING, MALCOLM F.
MATHESON, IAN D. BURNS, DAVID
ANDERSON, BLAIR W.
BOURNS, JOHN D.
BURTON, JOHN A.
CAINE, GEOFFREY, R.
CARNCROSS, CHARLES A.
CHESTNUT, R. GLENN
CHRISTIE, A. HUGH
CROSBY, ROBERT S.
DEPTFORD, JAMES A.
DOUGLAS, J. BOYD
JAGGER, PAUL S.
KANEEN, ARTHUR G.
LANGENEK, FREDERICK
LIVINGSTONE, DONALD A.
MARZOCCO, ALDO
MOORE, ROBERT G.
MacKAY, RONALD N.
McLORG, TERENCE W.
FORTER, JAMES A.
SAUNDERS, HAROLD L.
.CCOTT, H. JAMES
SHUMAS, FRED
SMALL, FRED
ABBOTT, HUGH M.
BENNETT, ORVAL W.
CURRIE, D. ALLAN
GOODMAN, JAMES E.
HOOKINGS, PAUL H. H.
ROBINSON, M. DENNIS E.
GALL, LOUIS J.
McLEAN, DONALD
ASH, A. BRUCE
BELL, RALPH R.
BLAIR, ROBERT C.
BUCK, PAUL A.
GILLINGHAM, JACK T. GITTERMAN, CHARLE3 O.
HAGGART, DOUGLAS A.
HAMMOND, PAUL L.
HANSON, ANGUS A.
HILL, ROBERT W.
LACEY, KATHLEEN M.
MARSHALL, REXFORD S.
McLEAN, ALASTAIR
McMANUS, GERALD F.
McMillan, robert h.
PEARSON, HAROLD H.
PINCHIN, VICTOR L.
REID, JAMES A.
REIFEL, GEORGE H.
ROBINSON, JOHN
ROBSON, MABEL G.
WEIR, JOHN
WOODS, WILFRED E.
WRIGHT, NORMAN S.
CROSS, JOSEPHINE
FLECK, JANET S.
JAMIESON, DOREEN L.
LADNER, DOROTHY M.
MANN, ALISON M.
MUNRO, MAE E.
MacKAY, JEAN C.
ROWE, PHYLLIS S.
CAMPBELL, MARGARET A.
CARTER, BERNICE E.
DENBY, DOREEN M.
GOODWIN, D. ELEANOR
HERON, ALICE C.
JONES, GWYNETH E.
LEHMANN, ELIZABETH
LOGAN, BARBARA
McCOLL, M. LORENA
MacKENZIE, E. L.
NEWBY, EDITH C.
PLUMER, BETTY G. READ, MARGARET K.
ROSS, RUTH
SCHUMAN, ELSIE C.
SHORT, BETTY
TOYNBEE, MARGARET C.
WYMAN, D. ONA
DAVIS, ETHEL M.
WILLIS, LUCY D.
H1IUATIII   CUSS   EXECUTIVE
President   Barry Sleigh
Secretary   Edna Clarke
Vice-President Alex Rome
Treasurer   Harold Parrott
Valedictorian Bernice Williams
Class Prophet  Jack Oles
Class Will John Shaw
Class Poet Fred Shumas
Honorary President Dr. H. J. MacLeod
Honorary Vice-President Professor A. H. Finlay AROUND TOWN
*     7* With 47 years of service in British Columbia,
we have faith in the future of this province.
We have the raw materials, the climate, the
water and land transportation, the markets—
and the electric power at low rates for industrial
expansion. Na industry has ever been turned
away from our territory beeause of the cost
of electric pov~~^™™W«| THESE SUITS ARE
"ofitL,
Books can be given a back seat
... and a young girl's fancy can turn,
but not lightly, to her wardrobe
... In undisputed first place
. . . SUITS ... and the BAY
should be your suit
headquarters, whether it's a
soft little dressmaker you j £"\
have in mind or a J %$!&
nonchalant casual. It's
the BAY for suits!
Fashion Centre,
Third Floor.
Tj^tttortltf "Bag (Somiwng.
*-iTr>  (*- m»v i^tcj
A SACRED BURDEN....
A  sacred   burden is  this  life  to  bear,
Look on it, lift it, bear it solemnly,
Stand  up  and  walk  beneath  it  steadfastly,
Fail not for  sorrow, falter not for sin,
But onward, upward, till the goal ye win.
—KEMBLE.
to the students who are graduating this year
and embarking on their chosen careers, or
preparing to serve in Canada's armed forces,
we extend our best wishes.
THE VANCOUVER
DAILY PROVINCE FROm  EVERV
PnGLE . . .
W \hocL *
VBHa wmitid
691 Granville Street
MEN'S SUITS AND
TOP-COATS
LADIES' SUETS AND
COATS
Braemar Sweaters from
Scotland
FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN
Fashioned and Loomed from the Finest
Quality Yarns available in Great Britain
YOUR INSPECTION INVITED
George Straith Ltd.
905 WEST GEORGIA
VANCOUVER, B.C.
"Always the Finest in Quality" It Pays To Attend  .  .  .
College of Business
At This Modern School You Enjoy All The
Advantages
• Fine Equipment
• Progressive Methods
• Experienced Teachers
• Individual  Instruction
WILLIS   Graduates   have   always   been   in
demand because of their Superior Training.
Begin Your Course at Our Summer School
For Information:
Telephone PAcific 0327        850 West Hastings
MACAULAY,
NICOLLS,
MAITLAND & CO. LTD.
Insurance, Financial and Estate Agents
•
435 Howe Street
Telephone
Vancouver, B.C.
PAcific 4111
I IETHEI *
LTD.
SAND and GRAVEL
TRUE-MIX CONCRETE
BUILDERS'  SUPPLY
COAL
Granville
Island          MArine 6231      Vancouver,
B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Union oil Compnnv
OF CANADA LTD.
BEST WISHES
TO THE STUDENT BODY OF U.B.C.
FOR SUCCESS IN
1943
McLennan, McFeely &
Prior Ltd.
VANCOUVER — VICTORIA — NEW WESTMINSTER
British Columbia's Pioneer Hardware Supply House
Established 1859
COMPLIMENTS OF.
DAN McLEAN
Motor Co. Ltd.
B. C.
Distributors of
NASH
1148 Georgia W.
MArine 2277 WE IRE PROUD .   .
to have so large a part in the production of this
Year Book and hope to serve you in the future
when you need ....
PHOTOGRAPHS
in your business, professional or social life
ARTOnP   STUDIO
833 Granville Street
Phone MArine 3932
COMPLIMENTS OF
W. & J. WILSON
IMPORTERS OF FINE BRITISH WOOLLENS
HOTEL VANCOUVER
Sweaters from Braemar of Scotland. New line
Coats   and   Suits   from  Jaegar   and   Chester
Barrie of London.
Shirts, Socks, Ties, etc., from well-known
Old Country Makers.
Best  Wishes
to  Totem
D. Gestetner
(Canada)  Limited
660 Seymour Street Vancouver, B.C.
MArine 9644
HEAD OFFICE FOR CANADA—TORONTO, ONT.
FACTORY—LONDON, ENGLAND DUFFBS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SUMMER SCHOOL
JUNE   —   JULY   —   AUGUST
3 Months - - $45
BOOKKEEPING
SHORTHAND
( Gregg & Pitman)
TYPEWRITING
COMPTOMETER
OFFICE MACHINES
FILING
OFFICE   PRACTICE
DAY AND NIGHT
OPEN ALL SUMMER
540 SEYMOUR
PAc. 7567
BEST WISHES TO THE
FUTURE SUCCESS OF
THE ENTIRE STUDENT
BODY
YOU MAY DO BETTER
WITH
KCVST0II6
BRAND
LOOSELEAF  SHEETS
AND BINDERS
Choose Keystone Brand for all
your class and study work
Smith Dauiddon
&Uhiqht£td.
VANCOUVER — VICTORIA — EDMONTON
CALGARY
BEST WISHES
To The Graduating Class
from
COAST CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY LTD.
VANCOUVER, CANADA still boasts the same informality
.... although the Brock Memorial Building
Lunch Room is getting some of its business. Eat in either place,
depending in the mood you're in ... . but don't forget to
patronize Campus Merchants. Your undergrad idiosyncracies
will be understood and overlooked.
The University Book Store
The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium
Building, was established for the convenience of the Students
and has effected a considerable saving to the students in time
and money. It is prepared to supply all Text Books required
for the various courses offered in the University, also such
articles as Note Books, Loose - Leaf Sheets, Fountain Pens,
Drawing Paper and Instruments. Our Best Wishes to UBC Students
in the Fighting Services
DE WALT DISHER CORP.
BAKER FORGE LTD.
VANCOUVER ENGINEERING WORKS
BOGARDUS WICKENS LTD.
JOHN R. KERR
ERIC C. DONEGANI
HENRY REIFEL
E. E. BUCKERFIELD
J. E. THOMPSON
A E. JUKES
SENATOR J. W. de B. FARRIS
ALFRED HYAMS
NELSON LAUNDRY LTD.
W. G. MURRIN
W. H. MALKIN
M. KOENIGSBERG
MAYOR J. W. CORNETT
GORDON WISMER, K.C.
E. W. HAMBER
SHARP and THOMPSON LTD.
ALBERTA LUMBER CO. LTD.
S.S. MacKEEN
I. J. KLEIN
chris spencer
pacific meat co. ltd.
h. r. McMillan, cb.e.
e. j. baynes
alaska pine co. ltd
george w. norgan
leo sweeny
* *
CAMPBELL, MEREDITH and BECKETT
T. S. DLXON
"Joe Blakes"
When an Australian soldier is low in spirits
he refers to his complaint as "the Joe Blakes".
A frequent cause of "Joes" is lack of cash when
needed. To avoid this malady make a practice
of setting aside part of your monthly income
regularly, in a savings account at the bank.
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
COLUfllBlfl
Paper Co. Ltd.
Wholesale
Paper Merchants
Manufacturers of "Columbia" Quality
Scribblers and Exercise Books
Vancouver, B.C.
Victoria, B.C. Foresight
is indispensable for security.
Never in history has it been so
necessary to take care of tomorrow
with the resources of today. And that
is exactly what you do when you
become a policyholder of the
sun LIFE
Of CflMDR
Assurance in force    -------   $3,173,292,000,00
Assets $1,108,458,666.77
Payments to Policyholders since 1870    -   $1,629,863,000.00
BRITISH COLUMBIA BRANCH OFFICE
8th Floor    —    Royal Bank Building
Vancouver, B.C.
A. L. Wright, Branch Manager Telephone PAc. 5321
LOOK TO THE LEADER IN TIMES
LIKE THESE
Buy Public Demand Branded Merchandise
IN SWEATERS . . . SWIM SUITS . . . SWIM
CAPS   .   .   .  PLAY SHORTS —IT'S STILL
JANTZEN
"GET ON THE BRAND WAGON"
JANTZEN KNITTING MILLS
OF   CANADA   LIMITED
Vancouver, B.C.
Our Studio of Furs feature smart fur Coats
and jaunty Jackets priced to college budgets.
You are invited to drop in anytime and inspect
this fine collection of quality pelts and latest
styles.
R. J. POP LTD.
Furriers
GRANVILLE at FIFTEENTH
BAyview 8311
Fireproof Refrigerated Fur Storage
Look To The  .  .  .
&<da>u
tt
tt
Insure Your Income
The Prudential Assurance Company
limited of London, England
"THE WORLD'S LARGEST MULTIPLE LINE
INSURANCE COMPANY"
N. £. COWAN AGENCIES
303 Rogers Bldg. MArine 4587
470 Granville St. COMPLIMENTS OF
Gordon Farrell
WE ARE ALWAYS
WILLING TO SERVE YOU
PRINTING
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
Anderson Printing Co.
LIMITED
Located at
Victory Square
455 Hamilton St.
Telephone:
PAcific 5838
WOODWARD'S
GREATER VANCOUVER'S
SHOPPING CENTRE
Ifou can save money en all the new Fashions
Eor  Campus  and  Social  Activities from  the
complete selection at Woodward's.
Misses' Fashions — Floor 2
Men's Fashions — Main Floor
COMPLIMENTS OF
BLAIN BOILER WORKS
LIMITED
VANCOUVER, B.C.
FOR   THE
SMARTEST
IN
FUR   STYLES   .   .   .
E.
RRDERSOR
Furs
PAc.
7654
653 Howe St. Assay, Industrial and
Educational
Laboratory Supplies
Chemicals
CAVE & COMPANY
LIMITED
567 Hornby Street
Vancouver, B.C.
NICELY
SMART
... is the tone of the
particularly selected
garments presented
at WH.LARDS.
mm
681 GRANVILLE
We like to sell clothes to men who
know that clothes mean a lot
in everyday life
BUSINESS AND SOCIAL
For Smarter Styling and Perfect
Fit see our new Lounge Models,
both in Business and Sportswear.
PERSONAL SERVICE ALWAYS
EDDIE R. DEERl
498 Seymour Street
Cor. Pender
Best Wishes to the
Graduating Students and
Boys Entering Armed Services
KER & KER Ltd.
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
475 Howe Street
PAcific 3241
COMPLIMENTS OF
BEVERLY
Hosiery and Lingerie Shop
648 Granville St.
Vancouver,   B. C. "REQUISITES OP AN
EFFICIENT VALVE   (
JENKINS BROS. LIMITED
617 St. Rend Street, Montreal
Bmnchts: Toronto, Winnipeg, Vmeoavtr and
6 Owt Quttn SL.Nnsmy, W. C 2, London, Ena.
JENKINS VALVES
For every industrial, engineering, marine and power
plant service . . , in Bronze, Iron, Cast Steel and
Corrosion-Resisting Alloys.
&iwanJi<> £Ci*ni£ecL
DIAMONDS
WATCHES
SILVERWARE
ENGLISH CHINA
LEATHER   GOODS
PAcific 4364-5
Seymour at Dunsmuir
Vancouver       Canada
SWEET SIXTEEN LTD.
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR
Five Stores for Your Convenience
137 W. Hastings; 807 Granville; 2438 E.
Hastings; 2315 Main St; 437 Columbia,
New Westminster
—UNION GARMENT HOUSE-
STUDENTS ENJOY BANKING
at the
BANK OF MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED 1817
"A Million Depositors Use Our Banking Service"
West Point Grey Branch—10th and Sasamat
E. J. SCHIEDEL, Manager
Experts...
Today the specialist is the man of the hour He builds
the tanks, the planes and the (runs. Keeping pace with
the eye needs of this man is also a job for experts, for
upon his ability to see depends the fitness of these
machines of war. Here for the past 20 years such skilled
technicians have been rendering this service, that of
maintaining your see-ability through the medium of your
Eye Physician's Prescription—Remember—
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL
ESTABLISHED 1924
413  Medical-Dental   Building
CO. LTD.
424
VANCOUVER. BLOCK. YOU'LL STAND OUT
... in a smartly tailored BOND CLOTHES
Model.
Co-eds, you too can get a genuine mannish
tailored model that's ultra smart.
BOND
CLOTHES   SHOP
312 W. HASTINGS
The  West's  Most
th
eres
LIFE
in
the SUN!
Order Now for Home Delivery Autograghs
Point Grey News-Gazette, Printers
Cleland-Kent Engraving Co, Ltd., Engravers The
Toronto General
Trusts Corporation
ESTABLISHED 1882
British Columbia Advisory Board
Hon. W. A. Macdonald, K.C., Chairman
Col. Hon. Eric W. Hamber
J. H. Roaf
W. H. Malkin
Vancouver Office:
Pender and Seymour Streets
Assets Under Administration:
$250,000,000.00
VANCOUVER'S
CKWX
980 on Your Dial
For the Best In Radio Entertainment
Tune to CKWX
It Looks Like
Another Big Year
'Yj^E had the pleasure
during this last year
of playing most of the
worthwhile Screen
triumphs. The coming
year promises again even
more worthwhile productions, and you'll be able
to see them all at ... .
Farnous Players
Theatres
CAPITOL — ORPHEUM
STRAND  — DOMINION
Good Luck to the Men in Service . . .
Boyles Bros. Drilling Co.
LIMITED
Diamond Drilling Contractors and Manufacturers
1291 Parker, Vancouver, B.C.
FEEL FRESH   ....
DRINK
ORANGE CRUSH
"CANADA'S MOST FAMOUS ORANGE DRINK"
BEST WISHES
Hume and Rumble
LTD.
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
AND ENGINEERS
1894 - 1944
Established 50 Years
EDUCATIONAL  STATIONERY
LOOSELEAF BOOKS
SLIDE RULES, SCALES, DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
FOUNTAIN PENS
The CLARKE & STUART
COMPANY LIMITED
Stationers, Printers, Bookbinders
550 Seymour Vancouver, B.C. Wherever You Go,
Whatever You Do,
We Wish You Well
PlRSOf S BROW! LTD.
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS
404 West Hastings Street
MArine 9211
Whether for Home or Business Office Our
Stationery and Printing Departments will
serve you in many ways.
G6HRKCS LTD.
566 Seymour
PAc. 0171
Plan now to spend your vacation at
BOWEN   ISLAND   INN
Open for season May 12
Everyone needs a va
cation  in   these  days
of tension.   Beautiful
Bowen   Island   will
provide complete rest
and   relaxation.    Reservations at
City Ticket Office
793 Granville Street
MArine 5438
or direct to
Bowen Island
Congratulations to the Graduates of 1944
AND
our sincere best wishes to those students
who are leaving on active service
BLOEDEL,  STEWART
!& WELCH LTD.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Dickson Importing Co. Ltd.
BLENDERS AND PACKERS OF
DICKSON BLOSSOM TEA
COMPLIMENTS OF
HEWERS HARDWARE
4459 W. 10th ALma 1552
With the Compliments
and
Best Wishes
to the Men in Uniform
for a safe and speedy return
Burrard Dry
Dock Co. Ltd.
Main Office and Works
NORTH VANCOUVER
British Columbia T
HROUGH the years of war and Peace this Company
has been privileged to serve the University of B. C.
with Art Work and  Engravings.    For this pleasant
relationship we are deeply grateful.
ARTISTSPHOTOENGRAVERS ELECTROTYPERS STEREOTYPERS
CLE LAND KENT
ENGRAVING COMPANY LIMITED
534- CAMBIE ST- VANCOUVER- B-C-
MORE POWER TO YOU,
1944 GRADS
VIVIAN
ENGINE WORKS LTD.
I I IMISf
POIRT GREY DEWS-GAZETTE
Theorem for Success
Problem: To keep at the top.
Formula: Ambition  plus   hard   work   equals
success.
Solution: Since   hard   work   demands   good
health
And good health calls for proper food
Therefore use plenty of
Milk I
Stt*
dcnts •
For your entertainment
and convenience ....
wherever you may live,
there is an Odeon suburban    theatre    nearby.
Get the Odeon Habit .  .  . Enjoy the Parade of Hits at Your Favorite
Odeon Theatre . . . USE YOUR STUDENT PASS FOR REDUCED RATE.
VOGUE
PLAZA
PARADIS6
ODEON THEATRES OF CANADA LTD.
fllARUieLL
CONSTRUCTION CO. LTD.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
540 Howe Street
Vancouver
COMPLIMENTS OF
BEGG MOTOR CO.
1062 W
Georgia                     Vancouver,
B.C.
WITH  COMPUMENTS  OF
GEORGIA PHARMACY
LIMITED
777 W. Georgia St.
Leslie G. Henderson, Oc.P. '06
Captain Gibb G. Henderson, B.A., B.A.Sc, U.B.C. '33
DeLuxe Bowling Centre
MArine 9940   Hastings at Homer   PAcific 0956
Home of the
U.B.C. SORORITIES' BOWLING LEAGUE
We Cater To Rushing Parties
COMPLIMENTS OF
Canada Permanent Trust Co.
432 Richards Street Vancouver, B.C.
Just A Few Words About Your Career
If You Have The Ambition
And Talent "To Sell
Life Insurance"
Then Why Not Consider Life Insurance
As A Career?
THE OPPORTUNITIES ARE LIMITED
ONLY BY YOUR ABILITY AND
INDUSTRY
—We'll Be Glad To Talk It Over With You—
TIEMACCAtfEl
J. B. LOVE—PROVINCIAL COMMANDER
ROGERS BLDG. VANCOUVER, B.C.
PAc. 5929 BEST WISHES
TO THE
MEN AND WOMEN
IN THE
CLASS OF '44
H6AP5 OIGinCCRIIIG
1940 LID1ITC-D
New Westminster, B.C.
For Successful Snapshots—
Kodak Films
and our careful finishing
Supplies of Kodak Film are limited, so make each
picture carefully. And remember, the snapshots you like
best, others will too. Order extra prints for Mother and
Dad . . . and don't forget prints to go with your letters
to those in uniform.
Efls.mnn ™ssrc  ltd.
G10 Granville Street, Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
commoDORE cabaret
FELIX GINGER
ALE
qtrct with
fELIX
COMPLETE MINING
PLANTS
INTERNATIONAL TRACTORS and POWER UNITS
MANCHA STORAGE BATTERY LOCOMOTIVES
EIMCO LOADERS
HOLMAN MINING EQUIPMENT
PETTER DIESEL ENGINES
WHEAT ELECTRIC MINER'S LAMPS
B. C. EQUIPmEflT CO. LTD.
Head Office
551 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Warehouses
Granville Island
306 Industrial Street BUSY HEW AND WOMEN
WEAR THE
(MLEU WATCH
For Appearance
For Accurate Performance
For Everyday Service
Anywhere
SOLD ONLY BY BIRKS
JEWELLERS
SILVERSMITHS
VANCOUVER
BEST WISHES TO THE STUDENT BODY
JOHN McKINNON
B. C. DISTRHtUTOR
Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co. of Canada Ltd.
Billiard Tables and Bowling Alley Supplies
BEST WISHES TO THE
GRADUATING CLASS
Reid's Prescription Pharmacy
224 Birks Building
WEST COAST
SHIPBUILDERS LTD.
once  more   congratulate
the U.B.C. lads who have
volunteered   for   active
service.
To The Student Body ....
Our Congratulations and
Best Wishes
Bell & Mitchell Ltd.
541 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
To the men and women who graduate this year and
enter their various fields of endeavor—
. . . and especially to those
men who have donned the
uniform in defence of their
country . . .
WE EXTEND OUR BEST WISHES
FOR SUCCESS AND "GOOD LUCK"
SITKA SPRUCE
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Vancouver, British Columbia
Congratulations
and
Best Wishes
from
JARVIS
ELECTRIC CO.
524 HORNBY STREET Silk Specialists
622-628 Granville
Phone PAc. 5561
One Flight Up
For Fashons ...  vv-
Clothes for the campus
. .. sportswear, housecoats, suits . . . featured the whole year
around on the upstairs
fashion floor. Choose
them now . . . they'll
be good sports through
the summer and a
perfect introduction to
your college life next
Fall.
Stairway to Style
To Fashions—2nd Floor
Modern construction demands the liberal use
of concrete. It's the foundation of all good
building projects everywhere. "Elk Brand"
cement has proved its merit for many years
and is a B.C. product.
British Columbia Cement
Co. Ltd.
500 Fort Street
Victoria, B.C.
Use CEMENT and conserve STEEL
for National Defence
COMPLIMENTS OF
WESTERN MUSIC LTD.
570 Seymour                                    PAcific 9548
COMPLIMENTS OF
Famous Cloak & Suit Co.
OUTFITTERS TO . .
HUNTSMEN - FISHERMEN - SURVEYORS
PROSPECTORS - LOGGERS - MINERS
Down Sleeping Robes - Silk Tents - Pack Boards
Waterproof Clothing - Mackinaws - Venetian
Blinds - Awnings - Window Shades - Garden
and  Camp  Furniture   -  Flags  -  Pennants,  etc.
Jones
43 West Hastings St.
TENT AND
AWNING
Limited
Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
•
O. B. Allen
Ltd.
JEWELLERS
DIAMONDS WATCHES
Granville at Pender
Vancouver
COMPLIMENTS OF
SHEARS &! CO. LTD.
FAir. 2202
PRINTERS
Vancouver
2218 Main St.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Alcock, Downing & Wright Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbing and Heating Supplies
Cambie St.
Vancouver, B.C. Message from the
Minister
of Education
HONOURABLE   H.  G.  T.  PERRY,
Minister of Education
In my message to the 1943 graduates I referred to three new branches that had
been added to the Department of Education, one being the Provincial Museum.
This institution provides free educational service regarding the natural history and
anthropology of the Province, both to the general public and to students, in the form of
material on exhibit, material in study collections, lectures and answers to enquiries. The
exhibit material consists of: |
(a) Mounted specimens representing the varied flora and fauna of the Province;
(b) Displays of articles demonstrating the arts and crafts of the native tribes found
within the Province;
The study collections consist of extensive botanical material and specimens of
mammals, birds, fishes, amphibians, reptiles and various invertebrates.
The publications include the Annual Report, Occasional Papers, Newspaper Articles
and contributions to scientific periodicals.
Lectures are given by staff members to various organizations and schools, and with
the co-operation of the Provincial Government Travel Bureau, motion pictures
depicting the natural history of the Province are being produced.
A new publication in the form of a "Hand-Book Series" is in the course of
preparation. It will provide information about the major groups of animals and plants
and will be made available to schools. Two of the series have already been printed,
namely, "Fifty Edible Plants of British Columbia" by Mr. G. A. Hardy; and "The
Amphibians of British Columbia" by the Director, Dr. G. Clifford Carl.
Cordial greetings to the Members of the Graduating Class of 1944. May they have
success and happiness in their life's work'.
H. G. T. PERRY,
Minister of Education.
^
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