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The Ubyssey Graduation Issue 1943

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 GRflDUATIOn ISSUE   april, 1943 GRADUATION ISSUE
Dedicated respectfully to the students of the University o'
British Columbia who have given their lives in the second
world war. The complete list of the University's war dead up
to the present time is not available, but we print below es
many of the names we could find of those listed as either
killed, reported missing, or prisoners of war. We sincerely
regret that names have been missed. The Registrar of the
University would appreciate your co-operation in making the
list complete.
jRnll nf iinmrnr
David  Harold Armitage, killed in plane accident.
Lloyd     Livingstone    Armour,    killed    on    active
service.
Oscar Ludwig Auer, killed in action.
Leys  Middleton  Beaumont,  killed  in  action.
Ronald    George    Bell,    DFM,    killed    on    active
service.
John  Hannah  Black, died overseas.
William   Thomas   Brown,   presumed   killed.
Colin Gartrell Child, missing, presumed dead.
John  Lionel  Clarke, killed  on  active service.
Gordon  Willard  Coldwell,  reported  missing.
William  Thomas  Cormack,  presumed  dead.
Arthur Howard Coulter, killed in plane accident.
Thomas  Edmund  Cox,  reported  missing.
Charles Peers Davidson, killed on active service,
Eric Soulis Ditmars,  presumed  lost.
Robert  Spencer  Doherty,   reported  missing.
Lionel    Pierce    Douglas,    reported    missing    and
presumed dead
Robert  Douglas  Fairbairn.  killed   in  action.
Edmund      David      Fleishman.      DFM,     reported
missing.
J. A. Foster, killed in action.
William   McMillan   Fraser,  reported   missing.
David  William  Frost,  reported  missing.
Arthur William Goulding, killed in action.
John   Dow  Granger,  killed  in  action,
William  Donald  Gunn,  prisoner of war.
David  Allan   Hamilton,  presumed  dead.
Ralph  Reynolds Henderson, prisoner of war.
Ronald George Hodges   killed overseas.
Clarence    Edward    Haggett,    killed    on    active
service.
Sidney Richard Horswill   killed in action.
Reginald  Robert  Laird, prisoner of war.
Stuart  William   Lane,   reported  missing.
Richard Philip Locke, presumed dead.
George  Joseph   Kane,  prisoner of war.
Geoffrey   de   Feylton    Mackie,    killed    in    plane
accident.
Douglas  Markham,  killed  in train crash.
Sholto P. Marlatt, killed in action.
Robert Addison  Mather, presumed dead.
William  Frances Millerd. reported  missing.
Colin Stuart Milne, killed in action.
Bernard Joy Moffatt, reported missing.
John P. Monckton, killed In action.
Donald Beverly Moody, reported missing.
Gillmor    Innes    Morreson,    died    from     injuries
received on active service.
Samuel  Lome  McBurney, reported  missing.
Robert     Francis     Mclntrye,     killed     on     active
service.
Francis Hugh McMullin, killed on active service.
Owen Fraser Pickell. reported killed.
George Robert Pringle. killed  in action.
Carson C. Proby. presumed dead
John Ashby Quick, killed in plane accident.
Struan Turner Robertson, killed In train crash.
Stephen  Gregory Rose, killed on active service.
Lloyd  Norwood  Sarles,  reported  missing.
Arnold Beldent Shivcs, killed In action.
Donald Eglinton Stewart, killed on active service
Maxwell    Maclean    Stewart,    killed    on    active
service.
George Frederick Strong, killed on active service
Richard Charles Stuart, reported missing.
Semon George Tater,  reported missing.
Alex   Nordlund   Urquhart. presumed  killed.
Clarence Alfred Blake Wallace, reported missing
Leslie John Ward, interned in Eire.
George   Frederick  Whitehead,  presumed  lost  at
sea.
Arthur   Weatherly   Willoughby,   killed   In   plane
accident.
Hugh   Ross  Wilson,  down   In  neutral  country.
Donald  Moir Palethorpe, reported  missing.
William Daubner, presumed dead.
John Henry, killed in action. FOREWORD
This special issue of The Ubyssey is intended for all students, but is
principally for the 370 graduating students who leave the University in April,
1943, to join the forces or to work here at home. UBC's yearbook, The Totem,
which evolved from a small booklet, back in the youth of the University to
a 300 page "All-American" annual in 1941 and 1942, was one of the
University's first war victims. Voluntarily abolished for the duration by the
students themselves, the Totem was replaced by this graduation of The
Ubyssey.
But, because a 300 page annual cannot be condensed into a 64 page
magazine, many features of The Totem could not be in this issue. The staff
had to choose what it considered were the most important events and organizations of 1942-43 to feature. It is to be hoped that those clubs and other
organizations which were left out and which were probably just as active as
others will understand the difficulties in the choice. It is also hoped that the
graduates of 1943, as they go through the years after graduation, will find
this magazine a lasting reminder of their final year at the University of
British Columbia.
JOHN T. SCOTT, Editor L. S. Klinck, M.S.A., D.Sc, L.L.D., Officier de I'lnslruction   Publlque,   president   of  the   University  of
British  Columbia  since  1919.
PRESIDENT'S  MESSAGE . . .
THIS year The Totem, the annual record in print and picture
of those student interests that lie outside of the classroom and
the laboratory, has become a war casualty. The place of that
admirable student publication is being taken, temporarily, by
this special number of The Ubyssey.
Some censorious critics may have opposed the issuing of
any form of special publication as being inappropriate in the
stern times through which the world is now passing. Such a
criticism is surely as superficial as it is lacking in vision. There
is real justification, particularly at this time, for issuing a special
number of The Ubyssey in which are recorded some of the
events, interests and achievements of the students during the
session. The records of these activities clearly indicate the
existence of a healthy, vigorous, individual and corporate student
life.
No small part of this issue is devoted to the University's
contribution to war service, whether performed on the drill
ground, in the laboratory or elsewhere. The many forms of
discipline, of service and self-denial represented I need not
elaborate here. They are but a means to an end, expressing
our belief in the individual and our determination to preserve
the rights of the individual insofar as these do not conflict with
the national interest.
L. S. KLINCK. A University at war retains its organizations and clubs,
directing the affairs of the students as in former years,
but behind each in 1942-43 is the common motive to
further the University of British Columbia's contribution
to the war. H. Rodney Morris, president of the Alma Mater
Society,  1942-43.
From the ranks of the Engineering faculty came the
1942-43 President of the AMS, diminutive, press-
battling Rod Morris.
Always faithful to his faculty, but with the interests
of every student at heart, Rod proved to be a hard
worker, and a good organizer. Enrolled in geological
engineering he found that the duties of AMS prexy
and studies combined to make a full program. A
former president of the Engineers' Undergraduate
Society, Morris realized the necessity of keeping the
various undergrad groups informed of the dark
doings of the Dirty Nine, and it was largely through
his efforts that these bodies were kept in touch with
the plans of the Council.
Aggressive, conscientious and with an eye to the
future he leaves behind him a copious report to
advise future presidents of the difficulty of office.
Far and away the most colorful inhabitant of the
council chambers was Arvid "Big Bill" Backman, the
treasurer. Early sounding his battle cry of "We
can't afford it" Bill fought tooth and nail to balance
the budget. With a wealth of experience on a wide
variety of campus clubs, Backman was able to advise
and to correct many student executives who submitted   budgets   to   him.     Ever   conscious   of   his
STUDENT EXECUTIVES CARRY ON . . .
Arvid Backman
for
responsibilities Backman proved
to be a most satisfactory treasurer.
An excellent orator, he could be
counted on to enliven any council
discussion. With an eye to the
future he supervised plans for
athletic insurance, trust funds to
provide equipment for future
years. He outlined a plan for the
1943-44 session to take care of any
drastic changes in the undergraduate set-up, which might occur
owing to war conditions. At time
of writing the plan had not been
presented to the student body but
the   Agenda   of  the   spring   AMS
John Carson
was   slated
meeting.
Secretary of the council was pretty and vivacious
Mary Werner.   Mary faithfully took the minutes of
the meetings and handled the correspondence of the
Council.
Probably the best known man on the campus was
John Carson, the president of the
Men's Undergraduate Society.
"Genial Jawn" was undoubtedly
the hardest worker on the council.
Head of the War Aid Council, he
directed the student drive for
funds for the Red Cross. Chairman of the discipline committee,
John found it his duty to show
miscreants the error of their ways
and, incidently, netted a good deal
of revenue as quite a number
pleaded guilty to the charges laid
against them by the discipline
committee.
Mary Warner
Sincerely wishing to be friendly
with all, Carson also wanted to
make a solid contribution to the
welfare of his alma mater, and it
was with this in mind that he
formulated a plan whereby certain
buildings would be turned over
to military personnel, who will be
stationed on the campus next
year, and the revenues obtained
in rent would be put into a fund
to pay for the erection of dormitories in the days after the war.
John's plan was forwarded to the
administration and will not be
accepted or rejected until late in April.
Whenever the discipline committee went into
session Carson had as a colleague on the bench comely
Mary Mulvin, the president of the Women's Undergraduate Society. Screened by flashing brown eyes
and a wonderful personality was Mary's executive
ability, second to none on council. Early in the year
all the bewildered little freshettes
were taken care of by the WUS.
Mary was also in charge of the
Frosh Tea Dance and she shared
the job of organizing the Frosh
Reception with Carson.
In the spring term Mary ran the
annual Hi-Jinx, the girls' answer
to the Frosh Smoker. The
"Cherub Chase", co-ed ball, met
with more success this year than
in the past few years, largely due
to the ideas and effort of Mary
and her fellow-workers.
On the more serious side of life
Mary Mulvin Bill  Mercer
the WUS has undertaken a great
deal of the work in connection
with the Red Cross room, and it is
the WUS that takes over the task
of getting girls to tag for self-
denial days. The tag days were
very successful and netted a large
return for the campus war total.
President of the Literary and
Scientific Executive, was pipe-
smoking Bill Mercer. Mercer
took over the Special Events for
the pass features and arranged for
the appearance on the campus of
the Victory Quintet, the Six Debutantes, Lionel Hampton, Helene Morton and many
others.
jj|Eteis ^features met with appreciative audiences this
y^S| the student body got the type of entertainment they were after and turned out in fulj force to
take advantage of the programs offered. Also, for
the first time, the pass feature agenda was kept full.
For the numerous clubs that come
under the jurisdiction of the LSE,
Mercer proved to be a real champion. He fought for their budgets
and their rights and generally won
out. He worked hard to help
them get publicity and support in
their various activities, and in
general did all that a good LSE
prexy should to keep the network
of minor clubs active on the
campus.
Analytic of mind and sceptical.
Helen Matheson gill was a valuable addition to
council. He kept up-to-date on
all matters and had many a good suggestion or well-
founded criticism to add to the discussions. A lover
of a good time he was seen at practically every social
function and somehow he managed to keep up his
standing as a first class student.
With the heavy military requirements which eat up
the time of the male population, athletics have gone
into something of a decline since 1939. This year,
however, they received the necessary shot in the
arm when Lynn K. Sully took over the presidency
of Men's Athletic Association.
There is no sport yet invented which Sully does not
love. Ajiyone with a plan to organize any sort of
athletic activity found plenty of support if they went
to Sully. This year a small group got together
to play American football, Sully lent his support
to the sport, previously unrecognized by the majority,
and the team became part of an organized league
turning in a good record for their initial season.
Sully drew up a tennis tournament last spring and
it was so successful that the main difficulty was in
getting all those who wished to play worked into the
draw.
Genial, and hard-working, Sully was the sparkplug
of the excellent intra-mural sports program which
the men ran off this year. In spite of the layoff in
January, which disrupted all schedules, Sully
managed to get the boys out for their games and the
events were run off with only minor changes.
Always willing to go to bat for "m'boys" whether
they wanted a pair of cleats or an expensive rowing
shell, Lynn's enthusiasm made it a banner year for
the campus muscle hounds, and one of the most
successful seasons in the history of the Men's
Athletic Association.
Lynn's running mate, the president of Women's
athletics, was Helen Matheson. An athlete of considerable note, Helen had as much enthusiasm as
Sully and by dint of determined effort she organized
a successful intra mural program as well as fielding
several women's teams in various branches of sport.
Women's Athletics do not enjoy the support that
the male athletes give to their leaders and it requires
a great deal of initiative and foresight to convert any
WAA plan into reality. Helen had both of these
qualities and she utilized every means to get support
for her programs.
In the fall season the girls put on a swimming meet.
Helen fought a budget through Council and supplied
cup and awards to further the competitive spirit. If
the response to the first meet is any indication then
■future years will include the swim meet as a major
date on the women's sport calendar.
One casualty was the annual "play-day" on which
various events take place in competition with selected
teams from an American college which visits the
campus. War-time restrictions forced the girls to
drop the date this year. On the whole, however, the
women's athletic program expanded this year.
The "kid", or Junior Member, was Paul Buck.  In
spite of the fact that the seniors on council force the
poor Junior Member to perform the menial tasks,
such as keeping the water jug
filled, the junior member has a
very    responsible    position    on
council.
It is the Junior Member who
organizes the annual home-coming
ceremony in the fall. This year
the possibility of doing without
the grad-welcoming program was
contemplated, because the war has
called so many grads away. It
was decided, however, that the
plan should be kept alive and
Paul Buck went to work with a ^nn Su"y
will.
Buck had a family tradition to follow in his office
as his brother Mack held the office last year. Paul
brought many personal qualities to office. Likeable,
exacting and with a determination to fight for his
ideas, he held his office in a creditable manner. He
also kept the water jug well-filled.
The 1942-43 council was conscientious and possessed
a strong feeling of its responsibilities of office. The difficulties of a
war session were overcome and
the various student activities received the maximum of support.
Much difficulty was experienced, however, in getting club
presidents to present budgets for
functions on time. This year's
Council introduced reforms in.
constitution, established sinking
funds to help out in lean years,
which may come after the war,
and all in all carried out their Paul Buck
jobs in a meritorious manner. Arts Undergraduate Society Executive Hugh Ritchie, Jim Morton.
Jean Caroi  Lee,  Harry Curan.
Handling the affairs of the Agriculture Undergraduate Society in 1942-43 were Johnny Roe, president;
Jack Merryfield, vice-president; Kay Lacey, secretary; Ian MacDonald, treasurer; and Doug Haggert,
athletic representative.
With the Arts Undergraduate Society, the Aggies
staged the Arts-Aggie Ball in November, held their
annual Barn Dance and numerous class parties
throughout the year. President of Aggie '43 was
Gerry Logan and secretary was Frances  Sandall.
president; Ron McBride, vice-president; Louella
Mannix, secretary; and Bill Welsford, treasurer.
The Nurses' Undergraduate Society, association of
UBC's nurses to be, had a very successful year.
Heading the executive was Mary Dunfield, president;
with Betty Jenkins, vice-president; Betty Scoones,
secretary; and Francis Davies, treasurer. These four
handled the affairs of the nurses throughout the year,
the main event of which was the Nurses' Ball.
The Engineers' Undergraduate Society, headed by
Agriculture   Undergraduate   Society   Executive   John   Roe,   Jack
Merryfieid, Kay Lacey, Ian  Macdonald, Doug  Haggert.
Engineers'   Undergraduate   Society   Executive,   Sandy   Buckland,
John Burton, Roy Deane, Charlie Moore, Roy Morton, Bob Davidson, Gordie  Rogers, Vern  Thompson,  Stan   Beaton.
President of Aggie '44 was Dave King with Norm
Wright, secretary. President of Aggie '45 was Fred
Cook and secretary Peggy Burton. Paul Stockstad
was president of Aggie '46 and Pat Taylor secretary.
The Commercemen were very active this year, continuing their campaign for a separate Commerce
faculty. Their activities included a Commerce Banquet, and a special issue of The Ubyssey.
Commerce executive was composed of Hugh Hall,
President Gordon Rogers conducted the business of
the Engineers during 1942-43 and was mainly responsible for the annual Engineers' Ball held in February.
Other members of the executive were Bob Davidson,
vice-president; Stan Beaton, secretary-treasurer; Al
Narod, athletic representative; and honorary president, Prof. H. M. Mcllroy.
The Arts Undergraduate Society was extended
this year to include women students. One of the first
duties of the new organization was to foster more
Commerce  Club  Executive  Hugh   Hall,   Louella  Mannix,
Bill Welsford.
Nurses'   Undergraduate  Society  Executive   Mary   Dunfield,   Betty
Jenkens,   Betty Scoones,   Francis  Davies.
spirit in the society and succeeded in rejuvenating the
Artsmen to a certain extent. The Artsmen held the
mixers this year and, with the Aggies, the Arts-Aggie
Ball.
President was Hugh Ritchie; vice-president, Jim
Morton; and secretary Jean-Carol Lee. Foster
Isherwood was president of Xrts '43 and Betty
Harvey, secretary-treasurer. President of Arts '44
was Helen Welch with Betty Millins secretary-treasurer. Patsy Cunningham was president of Arts '45
and Helen Morgan secretary-treasurer. CAMPUS  CLUBS CONTINUE ACTIVITIES
•    AND still the show goes on.    Green Roomers
carried on the tradition of aiding in UBC's war
effort with renewed enthusiasm and enlarged the
scope of their endeavours as well in 1942-43.
During the past three years of war, members of the
Players' Club have raised two thousand dollars for
the university war effort. In addition to the job of
raising funds, however, thespians have devoted much
bi! their attention to troop entertainment, making
frequent: forays into various nearby military headquarters such as Narrows North and Chilliwack
Training Camp with their famous Jabez skits.
Favourites with the men of the forces were the two
plays from the pen of the former Ubyssey columnist,
"Her Scienceman Lover" and "Guthrie Meek in the
Army, or, He's E2 in the Army but He's Al in my
Heart". Casts of the shows included Elizabeth Locke,
Doreen Dougan, Mary McLorg, Norman Campbell,
Ronald Heale, John Powell, Allan Ainsworth and
Dick Bibbs.
Because of wartime transportation difficulties, the
cast of the spring play has foregone its plans for the
annual tour through the Interior and will travel
instead to Fraser Valley, Vancouver Island, and
several coastal training camps whose locations remain
a military secret.
After some confusion and revision the club finally
decided to prepare the witty English comedy by
Gerald Savory, "George and Margaret" for the feature
of the year, the spring production.
Members of the cast were groomed for participation
in this event in the three Christmas Plays and the
frequent noon hour shows given for the students.
Those who were successful in the try-outs for parts
in "George and Margaret" presented a four-night run
to student and public audiences.
Backstage with Green  Roomers Margie Beale, Sally Panton,
Joan  Clark,  Phyllis Grant.
The cast which was finally chosen included Helga
Jarvi, as Gladys; Allan Ainsworth, as Malcolm;
Elizabeth Locke as Alice; Ronald Heale, as Dudley;
Sandra Gordon, as Frankie; Blair Baillie, as Claude;
Art Jones, as Roger Frankton; and Biackie Lee, as
Beer.
Executive responsibilities of the president changed
hands in the fall of 1942 when Michael Young left
Varsity for Gordon Head. Anne Du Moulin succeeded him in the chair. Other members of her
executive were: vice-president, Mary Buckerfield;
secretary, Jean Christie; treasurer, John Moran;
committee members, Don Newson, Helga Jarvi, and
Ronald Heal. Other committee heads whose duties
lie behind the backdrops were Sally Panton, Olive
(Left)  Harry Turney is made up for Christmas plays;
(Right) Allan Ainsworth as the rogue In "Rogue In  Bed" Player's Clubbers  Elizabeth Locke,  Blair Baillie,  Biackie Lee, John   Seyer,   Arthur   Erickson,   Avora   Tuck,   Pat   Keatley,   and   Anne
Du Moulin relax at Red Cross Ball whlie Forumite   Isherwood   and   partner  cut   in.
Headrick, Helen Morgan, Roy Jackson, and Arthur
Erickson.
Professor Walter Gage, honorary president, Professor and Mrs. F. G. C. Wood, Dean Dorothy Mawdsley, and Miss Dorothy Somerset, as members of the
Advisory Board lent valuable assistance and guidance
throughout the year's activities.
• ARTISTICALLY and financially, this year marks
one of the most successful in Musical Society
history. Despite transportation difficulties, from
February 11 to 13 the curtain fell on three packed
houses when a large cast sang in one of Gilbert and
Sullivan's gayest operettas, "The Pirates of Penzance."
The chief love interest of the opera was provided
by Cecil Cameron as Frederick and Frances MacLean
Bob McClelland and Irene Kennedy threaten Cecil Cameron In Musical Society Operetta "Pirates of Penzance";  (right)  Principals of
operetta Keith Simpson, Cecil Cameron,  Irene Kennedy, John  Fish,  Elinor Haggert and  Francis  McLean. Players' Club  Executive  Helga  Jarvi,  Anne  Du Moulin,  Don
Newson, Jean Christie, Mary Buckerfield with Ron Heal standing.
as Mabel and together they sang several outstanding
duets.
The hearty pirate chief was ably handled by Robert
McLellan, with Samuel, his lieutenant, well-sung by
Max Warne, a veteran Mus Soccer.
Others in the cast included Keith Simpson as
Major-General Stanley, John Fish as Edward, Alice
Stonehouse as Kate, Gwen Telfer as Edith, Elinor
Haggart as Isabel, and Irene Kennedy as Ruth,
piratical maid of all work.
C. Hayden Williams again assumed the strain of
directing the opera, as he has been doing for over
fifteen years. He was materially assisted by the
veteran dramatic director E. V. Young and Professor
Walter Gage, the honorary president.
Efficient president and winner of an LSE award,
Gwen Telfer not only found time between her other
duties to coach the male singers of the opera, but also
sang the part of Edith.
Max Warne, director of Musical Appreciation,
arranged the radio programs that were heard regularly throughout the year over CJOR.
Others aiding in executive positions were Kathy
Paterson. secretary; Brenda Goddard, production
manager; Vernon Grigg, treasurer and business manager; Ronald White, vice-president and social convenor; and Wally Marsh, advertising.
Holmes Gardiner, another winner of a gold LSE
pin was stage manager. He has been a leading back
stage man for several years. Valuable assistance for
costumes was given by Betty Carlile, Norma Brown,
and Barbara Godfrey.
Associated with the Society this year, the Glee Club
was organized under Max Warne's guidance, with the
original purpose of giving those who could not be in
the opera a chance to sing. Not an overwhelming
success, an attempt will be made to make it more a
part of the society next year.
Looking backward on the triumph of the "Pirates
of Penzance" and the record membership list of 200,
Gwen Telfer's statement can be aptly used, when she
sighed happily, "It's been a simply marvellous year."
• PRESIDING over the Publications Board in
1942-43 was unperturbed, story-telling Andy Snaddon
who, with his feet on his desk, directed the affairs of
Music  Society  Executive  Gwen  Telfer,  Wally  Marsh,   Kathleen
Patterson,   Brenda  Goddard  and  Ron  White.
The   Calgary    Herald's   gift   to
The    Ubyssey,    Andrew    W.
Snaddon,  Editor-in-Chief of the
Publications   Board,  1942-43. Totle, Photie and J. T.
The Ubyssey through many storms of differences of
opinion and technical difficulties.
Happy-go-lucky, yet serious when it came to The
Ubyssey, Snaddon was probably the most undignified
"God" to occupy the glass-enclosed inner office of
the Publications Board. Vigorously supporting
student activities, Snaddon not only campaigned for
a greater war effort and more co-operation from the
students, but also defended the right of university
students to remain at their studies in wartime and
succeeded in silencing UBC's downtown critics. It
was Snaddon also who shattered the Pub tradition of
a theorising and not a practical editor-in-chief when
he stooped to edit copy on the desk close to deadlines.
A shortage of reporters in November forced a reduction in size of The Ubyssey from seven columns
to its original six columns. After years of struggle
for a seven column paper it was not easy to return to
six and senior members of the staff argued long over
the decision. It was not that the students of the
University   of   British   Columbia   were   no   longer1
making news but that they no longer had as much
spare time to record it.
Two women ruled the desk this year. In charge of
editing copy and make-up were Senior Editors Lucy
Berton and Marg Reid, who each had their hands full
once a week with a Ubyssey.
Lucy Berton left her News Manager's position to
take over the Tuesday issue when Jack Ferry left the
Pub in November and capably managed it till the end
■ i the year. A Pub "legacy", sister of another senior
editor, Pierre Berton, Lucy has been a familiar figure
around the Pub for years. Again this year she wrote
"Mary Ann", a column devoted exclusively to mud-
slinging and gossip and many were the reputations
sullied.
Red-headed Margaret McDonald Reid, bettei
known as "Dinah", ran the Friday issue with a firm
hand and occasionally gave vent to her opinions in
a column called "Scrontch". With her favorite "Warm
Valley'' on the record player, she was noted for
calmly editing copy amidst the noise and bustle of
the Pub on press day, atmosphere which had
unnerved many a senior editor in former years.
Bringing a mixture of jazz, symphonies and Freud
to the Pub was tall, solemn-voiced Peter Remnant,
News Manager and columnist. His was the task of
keeping reporters in line and assigning stories.
Symbol of his power was the purple "Doomsday"
book, bible of all reporters, in which assignments were
placed. Temperamental as the proverbial wet hen,
News Manager Remnant kept his brood of reporters
subdued and dutiful throughout the year, and spread
malice with his "Malice Aforethought."
Holding forth in the far end of the Pub was
"Cheery" Chuck Claridge, sports editor of the
Ubyssey and graduation issue. Claridge took over in
November when Bill Gait left to join the airforce
and succeeded in holding the dwindling sports staff
together. Newcomer Maury Soward, an inexhaustible
writer who could have written the whole sports page
if given the chance, assisted Claridge in the editing
job. Sports reporters Jim Schatz and Eileen
McKillop also gave valuable assistance. Bill Welsford
also worked for awhile on the sports staff until he
joined the navy.
Young, Jacklin and Walker type
while Ajello, Lamborn, Tallman,
Blunden, Weaver, Long, Dundas,
and Holoboff mingle In background and Claridge on left
muggs with coke bottle. Cheery Chuck with Schatz and Soward.
Remnant rants with cubs Blunden and AJello.
Associate Editors, who helped the Senior Editors
on the desk and down at press were Vivian Vincent,
Virginia (By-line) Hammitt, Marion Dundas and
Marion MacDonald. Assistant Editors, whose main
job was proof reading, were Gypsy Jacklin, Percy
Tallman, Don Walker and Sheila MacLeish. Gypsy
Jacklin also wrote a popular column for the women
entitled "American Fad-shions".
Joyce Smith, industrious circulation manager, was
in charge of distributing Ubysseys about the campus.
Denis Blunden was CUP and exchange editor and
also found time to write more than his share of
stories. "Faithful" reporters^ a dire necessity for any
newspaper were Ed Brown, who also wrote a column
"Paragramma", Nickolai Holoboff, Bruce Bewell, and
Graham Thomson.
Black sheep of the Pub was the staff of the
Graduation issue of The Ubyssey consisting of John
(John Tom) Scott, Art Jones, and Chuck Claridge.
Photographer Jones found time between Players'
Club shows and various other odd jobs to take-
pictures while John Tom followed him around
carrying the film. Claridge, in between issues of The
Ubyssey, handled the sports section of "Issue 41".
•    McGOUN Cup debates, a Mock Parliament and
a Freshman debate with Victoria College have
this year high-lighted the activities of the Parliamentary Forum led by Foster Isherwood.
David Williams and John Hetherington, and Dick
Bibbs and Les Carbert were the two teams
representing UBC in the McGoun Cup debates.
Williams and Hetherington debated at Saskatoon,
with a team from the University of Saskatchewan
while Bibbs and Carbert remained here to meet the
representatives of Manitoba in the defence of the
McGoun Cup.
The Conservative party led by David Williams.
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Co-ed editors Virginia Hammitt, Dinah Reid, Lucy Berton, Mardee
Dundas and Vivian Vincent.
Parliamentary Forumltes John
Cowan, Mary Pickering, Dave
Williams, Jack Hetherington,
Les Carbert, Les Raphael and
Foster Isherwood check debate
topic, McGoun Cup debaters Les Carbert, Jack  Hetherington,
Dave Williams
Director Don MacMillan, activity started with
Varsity's opening in September. The same air-time
as last year was granted to the university by CKWX,
and the first show went on the air on October 3.
MacMillan, taking his radio seriously, had spent a
full summer with a Calgary station, and brought
back enthusiasm and a new Varsity show.
The "Varsity Time" series continued through the
winter and summer months, finally breaking in April.
New voices were added—both male and the other
kind—with Eric Ajello, Gordon Carter, Roy Jackson,
Malchia Sanford, Margaret Radcliffe and Elizabeth
MacLeod bearing the brunt of the announcing.
Half-way through the season, the series' theme
melody was changed, with Mart Kenney's "Hail,
UBC" retiring after years of service. The new
signature tune was "On the Mall"—still fitting the
Varsity program.
Early in November, a second series of program?
was launched, featuring musical stylings of Musical
Society songsters in a weekly CJOR series. The
final broadcast was a radio extravaganza, with the
full cast of the Mus Soc crowded into CJOR's Studio
"A"—orchestra, chorus and principals.   During the
representing the constituency of Churchill, was
elected to the Mock Parliament. Les Carbert, from
the constituency of Saskatoon, heading the CCF
party, led the opposition. Foster Isherwood was the
speaker of the House.
Allen Ainsworth and Jim Wilson represented UBC
in the Freshman debate with Victoria College at
Victoria. Victoria College won the hard fought
debate.
Members of the Parliamentary Forum's executive
were Foster Isherwood, president; Dick Bibbs and
Les Carbert, vice - presidents; David Williams,
secretary; John Cowan, treasurer; Les Raphael,
publicity director.
•    SECOND   only   to   the   Ubyssey   in   consistent
production, UBC's Radio Society enjoyed one of
its most successful seasons in 1942-43.  With a small
group   of  veterans   from   last   year's   club   led  by
Roy  Jackson   holds   Radio  Society  mike for   Marg   Radcliffe  and
Director Don MacMillan
Phil Nimmons and band mates
George Reifel, Ernie Defeaux,
Leo Foster, Ches Cotter and
Doug Parker ride a hot one
through  its paces. Members of the Mamooks look
over their work. Seated, Sidney
Flavelle, Eileen McKillop, Bette
Daniels, Julienne Harris, Audrey
Buchanan, Muriel Martin;
Standing, Bill Stewart, Murdo
McKenzie, Bob Hill, John Galbraith,   Don  Allyrdice.
hour-long broadcast, the entire first act of the "Pirates
of Penzance" was previewed for local listeners.
In addition to actual broadcasts, the Radio Society
followed precedent in supplying the homecoming
committee with a fantastic bit of foolery for the
Potlatch. Grads rocked to the antics of a band of
volunteers recruited by Bob Wilson, the producer of
the stage presentation — "the Shooting of Dan
McGrew". Radio joined the Mamooks to present the
ISS Pep Meet in their charity drive during the spring
term.
In the course of the year, Wilson and Ted Watson
were lost to the Radio Society—both going on Active
Service. Graduation this year will claim1 three more,
but there will be a nucleus left for the 1943-44 season,
with Alan MacMillan holding the Director's post.
Indicative of the work the Society has done was the
election, for the second year in a row, to the Major
division of LSE clubs.
• UNDER the direction of Phil Nimmons, the
Varsity orchestra completed a successful year in
1942-43. A small, compact group of six, the men
specialized on "hot" numbers and, according to
varsity's    followers    of    "true    jazz",    were    near
perfection in that category. But the band could also
satisfy the smooth fans who liked their music soft
and low. With Nimmons and his men in attendance,
mixers and pep meets were sure to be crowded.
Playing the clarinet and alto sax was Phil himself,
with Chris Cotter and his electric guitar, who also
doubled on the tenor sax, Doug Parker at the piano,
Leo Foster playing base, Jim McCulloch and his
trombone, and George Reifel at the drums.
• BEHIND the Pep Meets, the War Drives, and
campus publicity, were the men and women of
the Mamooks.
The Mamooks comprised the service organization
that sponsored and aided wherever possible any and
all campus functions. Daily they painted and
distributed all signs on the campus, gave Caf
announcements and supplied members for ticket
selling, cheer leading, and everything from stage
work to decorating.
Capably directed during 1942-43 by Murdo
MacKenzie, the Mamooks distributed nearly 500
signs, successfully survived the busy Homecoming
Potlatch, helped all campus war drives, and arranged
eight pep meets.   Bob Hill, Bill Stuart, Paul Buck
Inter-Fraternity Council members Paul  Hookings, Harry Weiner,   Bunny Graham,   Dr.  J.  Allan   Harris,  Paul   Griffin,   Dave  Lawson,
Stan  Killick,  President Al  Shore, Ted Stevenson, John  Gourlay, John  Muir,  Ralph   Brine, Stu   Harris, Vic Pinchin,   Franck  Francis,
and Sam Parnam. Pan - Hellenic Council members
Annabel Sandlson, Joceiyn
Danieli, Joyce Orchard, Hazel
Hutchinson, Pat Meredith, Betty
Harvey, Honoree Young, Muriel
Tindle, Mary Beth Des Brisay,
Norma Fleming, Doris
Thompson, Phyllis Bishop,
Muriel Whimster and Joan
Costello.
and Pearl Warner carried a large share of this work.
Members of the executive this year were: Honorary
President, Prof. J. Allan Harris; Murdo MacKenzie,
President; and Bill Stuart, Yell King.
• THE Inter-Fraternity Council, governing body ot
the University's twelve fraternities, completed an
active year in 1942-43 under the guidance of Al Shore,
president; Clary Mann, vice-president; and Ted
Stevenson, secretary-treasurer.
Rushing regulations, the Red Cross Ball, the Song
Fest and the purchasing of war bonds occupied the
attention of the 24 council members most of the time.
An important amendment was made to the IFC
constitution in March which permitted the rushing
of senior matric men in their first year at University.
Winners in the Song Fest were Beta Theta Pi,
Delta Upsilon and Psi Upsilon.
• SELF denial days .  .  . Red Cross Rally .  .
bowling .  .  . penny drive  .  .  .  big sisters for
freshettes . . . inter-fraternity song fest . . . fall and
spring rushing . . .
Added together, these activities make a grand total
of the. "work of the Panhelenic Council's work during
1942-43 on the campus. For it has been the "Pan-
Hell", representing eight women's fraternities, thai,
has been the power behind the power in the success
of many campus drives this year.
Executive this year was Joyce Orchard, president;
Jean-Carol Lee, vice - president; Pat Meredith,
secretary; and Sylvia Anderson, treasurer.
• PHRATERES, the Theta chapter of the "Famous
for Friendliness" International Phrateres clubs
for co-eds, has culminated another year at UBC in
which 12 0 new members were initiated and
introduced to social life on the campus.
On the Phrateres' executive for 1942-43 were: Dean
M. D. Mawdsley, honorary president; Bernice
Williams, president; Dorothy Spears, vice-president;
Bunny Arm, secretary; Barbara Hibbert, treasurer,
Pat Ball, sub-chapter chairman; Julie Carsley,
publicity chairman; Merrie Mulhern, social service
convenor; and Joan Fischer, membership and
initiation chairman.
Phrateres executive hold annual
elections. Left to right, Julie
Carsley, Julia Van Gorder, Billie
Oliver, Pat Ball, Dodie Spears,
Bunny Arm, Lois Reid, Muriel
McDermid, Joan Fischer, Mary
Mulhern  and  Dora  Menzies. A University at war trains its young men to fight and its
young women to aid the home and the war fronts—The
University of British Columbia in its fourth war session,
1942-43. A UNIVERSITY
PREPARES
The Men and Women of U.B.C. and
Their War Effort
"War Effort".
In those two words are summed up seven months
of military training, sewing, knitting, self denial,
physical education and seven months of study.
But monetary gifts were not all the University had
to offer. Many groups of men, trained by the UBC
contingent of the Canadian Officers' Training Corps,
left Varsity at different times of the year to go on
active service; co-eds spent hours knitting and sewing
for the Red Cross and the University's laboratories
trained scores of men in science as well as assisting
the government in war research work.
Under Lieutenant-Colonel G. M. Shrum, officer
commanding, the COTC enlarged and expanded its
training program in 1942-43, leaning more to the
practical side of fighting than in former years.
Acquisition of the new Armoury, paid for by the
men of the COTC themselves, made possible night
parades throughout the week and lectures were done
away with almost entirely. This new system of night
parades left some men free to work on Saturdays and
was greatly appreciated.
Chief instructors, who bore the brunt of drilling
military knowledge into cadets were RSM Henderson,
BSM's Mullins, Ross and later on in the year Sgt.
Firbanks. These men drilled1 the NCO's who in turn
drilled the cadets in rifle drill, bayonet practice, Bren
gun, gas, actual battle, drill and just plain marching.
Mutual training occupied a large part of the
military program. Each man in a squad was given
a chance to take charge, to put the men through
their paces and many d good NCO was found hiding
in the ranks.
Probably one of the most popular military drills of
all taken was bayonet practice. Cadets were given
a rifle and bayonet, told to make a face and run,
yelling at the top of their voices, at a bamboo enemy
with the avowed purpose to kill him. The phrase "to
kill the enemy" which resounded over the training
grounds typified the increased intensity of military
training at UBC in 1942-43.
Prevention against gas was also taught the CQTC
and the campus at times looked as if weird men from
Mars had invaded UBC when masks were donned.
Complete instructions as to what to do if the enemy
used gas were drilled into the men. At the end of
training in gas, each man was given a test to make
sure he knew the use of his gas mask.
Instruction in the use of the Bren Gun was also
given and at the end of the instruction period, the
men went on the range, actually fired the guns, and
compared marksmanship.   All men were also given
Lieutenant-Colonel G. M. Shrum,
officer commanding  UBC
Contingent COTC Saturday parade of COTC against scenic grandeur of North Shore mountains.
an oppoitunity to go on the rifle range.
During the year, active service units stationed
around Vancouver, came to UBC and put on battle
demonstrations for the COTC. Mortars, anti-aircraft
guns, battle drill, Bren gun carriers, military radios,
artillery were all demonstrated before cadets.
This year saw the inauguration of a drum and
bugle band in the Corps, under the direction of Sgt.
I. Parfitt. The band played at the Wednesday and
Saturday parades and brightened them up a great
deal. A little rusty at first, the band worked hard and
at the end of the year sounded like a regular army
band.
Many officers of the COTC were students selected
from the ranks early in the year. These men took
over the command of platoons and, along with student
RSM Goldie, were subjects of the good-natured
cursing of cadet and NCO.
Complimented at the end of the year by the Colonel
on their spirit, the student soldiers participated in a
ceremonial parade March 31 with an inspection by
Major-General G. R. Pearkes, G.O.C.-in chief, Pacific
Cadets  march  past  new Armoury. Top Row, ieft to right: Capt. A. W. Currie, RSM  Henderson, ROMS Gillette, RSM  Goldie;  Bottom  Row:  Major J.  McLeod, Major G.
Riddehough,  BSM   Mullins,  Lieut. J.  Fenn,  BSM   Ross.
Command.
This parade culminated the year's military training
on the campus and the Corps was on its best military
Major C W. Topping
second In command COTC and Lieut. S.
Walmsley, adjutant.
behavior as friends, relatives and other spectators
watched from the stadium bleachers. After the
general salute, a special squad demonstrated battle
drill tactics. The cadets then marched past and gave
eyes right to Major-General Pearkes. Uniforms were
laid aside after March 31 for two weeks of intensive
studying in preparation for the final exams which
still remained to be faced.
The men, however, were not the only ones to give
up their spare time for war training in 1942-43. At
a mass meeting of the UBC co-eds in the spring of
'42, the women asked the University to institute
compulsory war work for all women students.
The following summer a committee worked on the
scheme and when co-eds returned to varsity in the
fall a rigorous and strict course had been planned
for 1942-43.
Under Dr. Joyce Hallamore, faculty advisor in
women's war work, Dean Dorothy Mawdsley and
Miss Grace Moore, women's physical education
instructor, the co-eds were required to spend two
hours a week at either physical education, Red Cross
work, first aid, or home nursing. Upperclasswomen
were given other alternatives such as map reading,
motor mechanics, day nursery, or measurements and
instruments.
The Physical Education program, which required COTC squad takes mutual Instruction.
a medical examination, consisted of classes in sports
and exercises such as archery, rhythms, volleyball,
basketball, and "Keep Fit".
The Red Cross work, one of the most important
items in the war training plan, included lessons in
sewing, knitting and smocking. Two special rooms
were set aside in Brock Hall for Red Cross work
alone.
The first aid course demanded two hours a week
from the co-eds and was taken either before
Christmas or after. The St. John's Ambulance course
was the one used and entailed the payment of a dollar
fee.
Map reading and drafting supplemented the motor
mechanics course. The exam in map reading and
drafting, if taken after motor mechanics, gave the
student the rating of a third class army driver. The
course dealt with how to read maps, survey work
and other allied subjects.
A certificate from the day nursery course qualified
the student as an assistant in air raid shelters and
on completion of the measurements and instruments
course, the student was qualified for the position of
inspector in a war factory.
The women, therefore, did their share of war work
in 1942-43 and contributed greatly to the sum total
of the University's contribution of trained citizens for
war.
In addition to the two war programs, the men and
women of UBC combined their efforts when it came
Wally Lyle bayonets anemic enemy. COTC drum and  bugle band lends rhythm to parade
to raising actual dollars and cents for the war.
Last year they formed a War Aid Council to direct
their money-raising efforts and this organization
continued its work this year. Composed of student
leaders, the Council formulated a plan early in the
year to buy an ambulance for the Red Cross. This
was discarded later when the Red Cross stated that
they felt the money could be put to better uses than
the purchase of an ambulance.
Instead, the $5,000 raised by the students was
donated to the "Parcels for Prisoners of War" fund of
the Red Cross. To raise that sum of $5,000 students
conducted self-denial days every week, staged pep
meets, penny drives, mixers, dances and used every
other conceivable legal method of obtaining money.
Every Wednesday, co-eds would spend hours
roaming the campus and collecting "self-denial"
money, the Mamooks organized pep meets with
admission fees of nickels and dimes, and even the
insignificant penny was not overlooked. One week a
special penny drive was held to collect all stray
coppers about the campus. Lines of pennies were
laid down in the quad and penny games were
conducted by students. Sororities took it upon
themselves to collect big bottles of pennies and one
sorority held a bingo game, netting $27 until the
administration vetoed the game as "gambling".
The Mamooks held an auction at which various
worthless articles such as a grass skirt and an ersatz
bottle of El Stuffo were auctioned off to an
enthusiastic crowd of students.
Mixers held throughout the year contributed to the
general fund and the Red Cross Ball swelled the
Boots, boots, boots and Bren,
RSM Henderson gives gas Instruction. Knitting    circle    in    Red    Cross
Room as needles and gossip fly.
total greatly. In addition, many students waived their
caution money in favor of the Red Cross.
Other campaigns conducted on the campus in
1942-43 were for the George Pringle Memorial Fund
and the International Student Service Fund. The
Pringle Fund was an endowed bursary which would
continue in perpetuity and would be awarded
annually to a student for a university education. It
was named in honor of Flying Officer George R
Pringle, one of the most outstanding of UBC's
graduates who was killed in line of duty with the
Airforce.
Students sold tags, held pep meets and staged a
special basketball game to raise the sum of $670 for
the fund. This was $170 over the quota set for UBC.
International Student Service Week, sponsored by
the War Aid Council and arranged by Ed Wybourn,
was held in March. The ISS fund is for student
prisoners of war and students in enemy occupied
territory and is supported by universities in all the
United Nations.
A pep meet, self-denial day, international tea, tea
dance, student conference and a mixer were held to
raise the funds. Over $100 was realized by the student
effort.
Placed in black and white, the war effort of UBC
is impressive, one which any university would be
proud of, one which demonstrates that a university
can make a definite and immediate contribution to
the nation's war effort.
Another  part  of  Women's  War
Work, Co-eds sew for Red Cross. (1)Lt.-Col. Shrum, Inspector Major-Genera! B. W. Browne and Col. Sparling; (2) Cadet company marches from parade ground; (3)
Cadet Hal Burke guards Armoury; (4) Penny line in quad; (5) Tony Greer auctions In aid of penny drive; (6) Coles and Parizeau lay
money on the line; (7)Drummer Ede; (8) Maxine Johnson and Helen Morgan contribute their share to penny drive; (9) weird, Isn't it?
(10)  COTC companies parade;  (11)   Greer and  MacKenzie auction  off  Ei  Stuffo;   (12)   mutual   instruction;   (13)   "Pride of the  Band",
David   A.   Lawson. A University at war relaxes with athletic and social
functions although greatly curtailed in 1942-43 in favor
of the more important business of war. RED  CROSS  BALL  IS WAR  EFFORT
Arts-Aggie, Engineers' Ball,
Only Other Major
Social Functions
The fourth year of war found the advent of many
restrictions on social affairs, but most of the functions
of former years were retained and successfully
carried through.
Starting off the season was the Arts-Aggie Ball and
that annr ,1 two-faculty dance again attracted a crowd
of elaxation-eager students to the Commodore
Cabaret. Minutes 15 and 16 of the Student Council
clouded up the exact date of the ball for a time, but
difficulties were straightened out and the "Fiesta
Ball" was held as scheduled.
The South American theme was carried out with
exotic wall posters of Latin dancers, tables adorned
with cacti and dance programs in the form of
sombreros. Ole Olsen provided the rhumbas, tangos
and congas.
Queen Daphne and Dean Buchanan.
Preceding the dance, Phil Nimmons and his
"barefoot boys from south of the border" and El
Gaucho Montador staged a fun-packed pep meet. In
charge of arrangements for the ball were Hugh
Ritchie, Johnny Roe, Doug Haggart, Kay Lacey,
Jean-Carol Lee, Jack Merryfield and Harry Curran
Later on in January, the University's twenty
fraternities and sororities staged their third annual
Red Cross Ball at the Commodore. Twelve shapely
co-eds rehearsed months ahead an Hawaiian hula
dance under Joan Crewe Straight to present one of-
the most popular chorus numbers yet seen on the
campus.
Red Cross Chorus beauties Mona
Quebec, Dorothea Falrlelgh,
Dora Bailey, Marjorie Weber,
Virginia Weber, Florence
Mercer, Maxine Johnson, Mary
Francis Trumbull, Annabel
Sandison, Meryle Shields and
Marg   LeCouter. Top Row: Sciencemen burlesque chorus . . . real chorus shows how  it's done.    Bottom  Row: Snakehips Sandlson   .   .   .   Cheerleaders
Daniels and Greer . .  . Queen of the  Ball,  Daphne  Ryan  receives congratulations surrounded by admirers.
Ten co-ed groups nominated one of their number
for the coveted title "Queen of the Ball" which was
won by Daphne Ryan of Alpha Gamma Delta with
Helen Welch of Delta Gamma and Barbara Bell of
Kappa Kappa Gamma as maids of honor.
Raffle tickets were sold for prizes donated by
downtown firms. The affair was "dutch treat" and
$1,927 was netted for the University's Red Cross
Fund. The ball was termed a definite "success"
despite the severe snow storm which made
transportation difficult.
A preview of the ball was held the day before
under the direction of Jack Ferry and Russ Palmer.
Here the ten nominees for queen were shown to the
student voters and the chorus gave a demonstration
of their hula technique.
Cries of "Bring back the chorus" subjected the
audience to a grass-skirted male ensemble burlesquing the hula dance. The price of admission to the
preview was 10c and $100 was realized to be added
to the Red Cross Fund.
Hugh Ritchie headed the committee arranging the
ball and was assisted by Dave Lawson, Patsy
Cunningham, Betty Dickie, Lorraine Large, Audrey
Stormont, Byron Estey, Mary Beth Des Brisay, Bill
Inman and Bill Welsford.
In February, the Engineering faculty held their
formal ball under the title "Devil's Frolic," which
was just that. Crowded to capacity, the Commodore
Cabaret, groaned and bulged as the Engineers let
loose for their one big affair of the year.
Civil '44 won the prize for the best decorated table,
a model of Lion's Gate Bridge. The prize was a
certificate and 52 ounces of a liquid similar to El
Stuffo. Various scientific novelties such as a kiss-o-
meter; mechanical cow, complete with milk; cranes
and derricks were there to mystify Artsmen and
co-eds. "Li'l Red Devils" graced the ballroom as the
various departments of the faculty decorated posts
with drawings only Engineers could think of.
Before the ball, the red-shirted men held an
exclusive pep meet in Appl. Sc. 100, necessitated by Top  Row:  Phi   Delts and   Betas at Arls-Aggie.   Bottom   Row:   Under the arch  In the conga  line  ...   By  Estey and Shirley Graham
smile for camera . . .   Don  Pearson and   Dorothea   Falrleigh  mugg for camera with  Evaline Morion,  Elliot Montador and Anne Curie
In background.
the closing of the Auditorium, at which all outsiders
were banned. The varsity band was in attendance
and jokes and skits were presented to a howling
mob of Engineers.
In charge of arrangements for the ball were Roy
Deane, Gordon Rogers, Stan Beaton, Bob Davidson,
John Creighton, Sandy Buckland, Brick Elliot, Vem
Thompson, Al Narod and Don Bannerman.
The Aggie Barn Dance, annual "off the Campus"
party of the Agriculture students, was held in February with Phil Nimmons and the varsity orchestra
providing the music.
Costumed as country hicks, students danced and
caroused in barn yard fashion. A little quieter than
last year's affair, the barn dance was nevertheless
enjoyed by all.
In charge of the dance were Gerry Logan, Frances
Sandall, Johnny Roe, Jack Merryfield, Kay Lacey,
Ian Macdonald anda Doug Haggert.
- The WUS Co-ed Ball, UBC's Sadie Hawkin's affair
took place early in March. Co-eds reversed the usual
procedure and treated the men to a date. To the
music of Chuck Darby, varsity men enjoyed themselves at the expense of their escorts. The WUS
executive planned the ball, headed by Mary Mulvin,
president.
This year the Junior and Senior classes held an
informal party together in Brock Hall instead of two
Judy and Jim break Kiss-o-meter at Science Ball. Top Row:  Mariam McCaffery feeds mechanical cow while escorts   look on . . . Prize-winning Civil  Engineering table.    Bottom  Row:
Sciencemen and consorts pay homage to  Red   Devil  .  . .  Electrical  engineers show off table
formal dances down town.   This was felt necessary
because of the need to cut down expenses in war time.
Time out to sip cokes at Junior-Senior class party.
A date bureau was set up for the dance, headed by
Helen Welch, which culled about fifty Airforce men
and provided them with dates for the dance. Dal
Richards provided the music and the Class of '43 and
'42 danced till the small hours of the night, namely
1:00 p.m.
The Sophomore and Frosh Class Parties were also
held in the Brock to the tunes of Fred Hollingsworth
and Dal Richards respectively. In former years, the
Frosh and Soph parties were also held jointly, but
this year the two classes became exclusive and held
their parties separately.
At the beginning of the year the Freshmen were
introducer^ to Varsity life at a special reception held
at the end of Frosh week. The usal battles between
the first and second year men did not occur this year
and the Frosh Reception also was not marred by
inter-class fights.
The Freshmen were introduced to Chancellor R.
E. McKechnie, President Klinck, Deans Buchanan,
Finlayson, Clement and Mawdsley by Men's Undergraduate Society President John Carson. Dancing
and refreshments followed the introductions.
Several times during the year special afternoon
dances were held for various causes in the Brock. (Left)   Couples glide at  Junior-Senior Class  Party.    Left to  right,   Ken   Horton   and   Daphne   Henderson,   Pat   Chenoweth   and   John
Bennet,   Elizabeth   Locke   and   Blair   Baillie.    (Right)   John   Muir and Meryle Shields take time out for cokes and ice cream.
One was staged as a feature of the Freshmen initiation week, another during ISS week and a final
one as part of the welcoming program for the University of Washington Huskie Rowing Teams
March.
m
So went the course of University functions in
1942-43. In addition to these major functions, mixers
were held throughout the year, various clubs
sponsored dances and even the COTC went social
this year with company dances held in the upstairs
of the armoury.
Brock Hall became more of the centre of social life
at UBC in 1942-43 than in any other year since its
opening in 1940. This was principally because of the
need to reduce expenses. Student loungers in the
main hall, perhaps, decreased and the bridge fans,
feeling the axe descending, curtailed their playing, but
nevertheless the Brock came into its own in 1942-43.
Clubs and other organizations held their banquets in
the Dining Room of the Brock their meetings in the
committee rooms and other social functions in the
main lounge. There were situated the AMS. and
Ubyssey offices, the Mamooks, the Red Cross rooms,
the employment office and Council rooms.
Caf Society decreased slightly, also, but a small
group of holders-on remained, drinking coffee and
talking over the latest scandal, dying remnants of a
peace time university.
Tweediedee and Tweedledum
add lift to Aggie Barn Dance.
Left to right, Francis Gardiner,
Jack Merryfield, 'dee, Frank
Adams, 'dum, Virginia Weber
clad in traditional barn dance
costumes. The   University   Gymnasium,   center  of  the   wartime  sports  and   the   Intra-mural   program.
WARTIME SPORTS CURTAILED 01 CAMPUS
Despite the curtailment of sports activities on the
campus this year the fourth war session at the
University of British Columbia saw many athletic
teams and events in a successful season.
Under the guiding eye of the Men's Athletic
Directorate, the various University teams were held
to the rules governing all the Blue and Gold entries.
This directorate, composed of Faculty members, Dr.
F. Dickson, Dr. M. Cameron and Mr. M. L. Van
Vliet with students Charlie Long, Lynn Sully, Men's
Athletic Representative, and Harry Franklin were
called upon to make several forceful decisions
throughout the year.
Most notable was the maintenance of the ruling
forbidding Varsity students to play for teams outside
the University and the punishment brought upon
four basketball players and three men in English
Rugby.
Another organization among male athletes from all
major sports was the Big Block Club which became
almost non-functional this year. They did handle the
Homecoming program, though, and welcomed back
all the old grad award winners. President of the
club was Mack Buck with Johnny Farina in the
position of vice-president and Jim Morton as
secretary.
The single sport on the campus this year that again
had the largest following and most success was
basketball. Three men's teams from the University
entered in the V and D League, the Seniors, under
the guidance of Maury Van Vliet in the Senior A
M. L. Van Vliet, Director of Men's Physical Education and Harry
Franklin, organizers of the large and successful  Intra-mural
program.
Miss Gertrude  Moore,  head  of the  Women's  Physical   Education
and   Director  of   Keep-Fit  classes for Women's
War Work. Men's Big  Block Club, considerably reduced In number this year,
takes on the campus spirit with many members in uniforms.
division and two squads, Frosh and Varsity in the
Intermediate A section.
The Seniors had a very favourable season, and after
finishing third in the League, they went on to cop
the city championship in the playoffs and the Dr.
Gillespie Cup.
In the playoffs for the British Columbia Championships, the Thunderbirds met the Air Force entry from
Victoria, Vancouver Island winners. The Fliers came
through with narrow one-point victories in the first
two games 48-47 and 42-41. The students surged to
a 46-24 victory in the third contest but the Islanders
proved too strong in the fourth meeting and walked
away with the championship 46-39.
During the year the 'Birds played their customary
exhibition feature with the Harlem Globe Trotters
and also staged a league contest at noon in the gym
against the Air Force for the Pringle Memorial Fund.
During the Christmas holidays a jaunt was made to
the Island where they met and lost to the Army
outfit.
The team had only four players from the crew of
last year, namely: Art Barton, Art Johnson, Harry
Franklin and Harry Kermode. Kermode was forced
to drop out at Christmas and his loss was a hard
blow to the Thunderbirds. The remainder of the
lineup included five freshmen, Sandy Robertson, Art
Stilwell, Paddy Wescott, Gordy Sykes and Ole
Bakken with two members from last season's Frosh,
Dave Hayward and Bruce Yorke rounding out the
roster. Pete McGeer started with the team but
dropped down to the Intermediate A's where he saw
more action.
In the Intermediate A setup both teams reached
the playoffs with Frosh third in the League standings
and Varsity fourth. The Frosh were eliminated in
the first round against Higbies but Varsity got past
Gregory-Price in the semi-finals only to bow out to
the same Higbies for the championship.
The Fosh lineup with Art Johnson coach and Dave
Moyls manager, consisted of: Bill Hill, Jim Kelly, Vic
Vaughan, Don Anderson, Al McFarlane, Tony Greer,
Walt Wasylkow, Al Kenyon, Jim Teevan, Jack
Climie, Mart Martin and Don Petrie.
Demetrie Elefthery coached the Varsity entry and
Maury Soward served as a capable manager. Their
lineup read as follows: Bud McLeod, Pete McGeer,
Ches Pedersen, Pat Campbell, Bill Hooson, Don
Mann, Jack Hetherington, Jim Bryant, Basil
McDonnell, Dave King, Bill Matheson and Ollie
Ostrom.
In the English Rugby field, Varsity blossomed forth
with two entries in the Miller Cup race before
Christmas but enlistments in the armed services
forced the abandonment of the second fifteen in the
new year.
At the annual Homecoming ceremony, the first,
team supplied half of the sport program when they
took on the Navy outfit and forced them down 20 to 0.
After the festive season holidays, Coach Maury
McPhee drilled the single squad for McKechnie Cup
and Tisdall Cup play and dropped the team from the
Miller Cup competition. In a McKechnie game the
Vancouver Reps whitewashed the students 44 to 0
at the Brockton Oval. On January 16 the Birds
travelled to Victoria to meet the Islanders in another
McKechnie cup tilt but the game was postponed
because of hard grounds.
That was the last of these games and the Birds
then turned to the Tisdall Cup knockout competition.
They sailed through all the opposition in this, and
the Ex-Byng fifteen 27-6 in the final to bring the
Trophy out to the campus.
Scrum man Al Narod was a spark plug in the team,
which was composed of: Frank Ekman, Alec Jones,
In name only this year, the Women's Big  Block Club, Don Johnson, Gerry Lockhart, Bob Faris, John
Wheeler, Jack McKercher, Doug Reid, Fred Linsey,
John Hicks, Paul Jagger and Gerry Brown.
The Soccermen this season entered in the 12-team
Vancouver and District League, because of the
folding of the Wednesday afternoon set-up, in which
they performed last year. The students did well to
finish in the fourth spot after losing several men to
the Army in mid-season. Playing-manager Gordie
Johnson and Mel Oughton departed for Gordon Head
in January after Norm Tupper had left for the Island
training center the month previous.
In post season playoffs for the Imperial Cup, the
students downed Richmond in the semis but were
knocked out by the Maple Leafs in the finals. Laurie
Baker handled the coaching chores while Maury
Glover took over the manager's reigns from Johnson
in January.
The players were: Herb Smith, Stew Roach, Bill
Walker, captain; George Campbell, Eric Jones, Jim
Morton, Clem Philly, Pat Campbell, Frank Adams,
Les Moran, Ed Dzendolet, Bill Lloyd, Walt Green
and John Oliver.
Something new in the sport field this year was an
American Football outfit which was formed by
Johnny Farina to fit into the defunct Canadian code
picture. A local loop was set up, including Boeings,
Vancouver College and an Army eleven from the
Ack Acks.
The students came through with three victories as
against two defeats, both of the latter at the hands of
the strong Army outfit.
Farina and his players spent considerable time in
Action, as the Thunderbirds down the Air Force  in the  Pringle
Memorial Game.
Men's    Athletic     Directorate     members    Charlie     Long,     Harry
Franklin,  Lynn  Sully,  Dr.  F.  Dickson.   Absent,  M.   L.  Van  Vliet
and Dr. M. Cameron.
September and October practicing for the games and
their efforts were rewarded by the fine showing that
they made. This was the first season that the
American handling code had been played on the
Campus since 1936.
In the big Homecoming program the gridders took
the spotlight and handed the Boeing outfit a 26-6
lacing.
Besides Farina as coach and Harry Tourney as
manager the team included Cam Coady, Ranji Mattu,
Spud Murphy, Doug Reid, Phil Guman, "Si" Olliver,
Hank Sweatman, Bernie Guichon, Frank Campbell,
Jack Shillabeer, Bob Scarabelli, Doug McCawley,
Bud Davies, Len Mitten, Al Sully, Dusty Rhodes,
Chuck Wills, Ken Islaub, Bob Peacock, Lionel
Fournier and Andy Carmichael.
Perhaps the activity with the largest number of
active players was the Intra-Mural program organized
by Maury Van Vliet and Harry Franklin. These two
men arranged a program of a year's activity
embodying many sports.
Last year the Intra-Murals were put up solely for
the fraternities when the regular system of classes
failed to draw response from the stuednts. The result
was a lively and enthusiastic group of men
participating in the sport activities. Phi Delta Theta
came out on top then by a narrow margin.
This year the fraternities were the building blocks
of the Intra-Murals around which other teams were
added as they were formed on the campus by various
groups of interested students. The result was an
entry of more than thirty teams entered into the
competitions.
Volley Ball was the first event run off, which was
copped by Xi Omega. In the Cross Country event
Delta Upsilon came through with highest points as
Doug Lee won the event for the second year in a
row. Lee and second spot winner Bob Davidson of
Sigma Phi Delta represented UBC in an international
cross country event in Spokane late in November. Senior A
Basketball
Back Row: Louie Checov,
manager; Bruce Yorke, Sandy
Robertson, Gordy Sykes, Maury
Van Vliet, coach; Ole Bakken;
Paddy Wescott, Art Barton,
Howie Shadwell, Senior
Basketball  manager.
Front Row: Dave Hayward, Art
Johnson,   Harry  Franklin,
Art Stllwell.
Davidson came through with a victory in his race
and Lee finished well up in the other division in
which he ran.
Touch Football started in the Fall but was carried
over to Spring when the weather became more suited
for playing. Kappa Sigma downed Lambda in the
final game of this event 1-0.
The Table Tennis and Snooker series were both
carried away by Beta Theta Pi as Tom Keenleyside
repeated in the miniature tennis affair and Stan
Gustavson downed all opposition in the snooker.
In January the Swimming meet was staged at the
YMCA pool before a small but enthusiastic crowd.
Kappa Sigma were in front on total points at the
end of the evening and also copped individual
honours as Bill Hooson led the field.
The Basketball league was run on a single knockout basis this year because of the lack of time to
hold a longer tournament. Kappa Sigma fielded the
strongest team and waltzed through to the title.
These same Kappa Sigs took the knockout Softball
schedule when they downed Xi Omega in a final
tough battle.
The Track event which had to be postponed several times because of poor weather was finally held
during the last week in March. Xi Omega produced
the top track stars and came through with this event
under their belts.
For the final standings of the Intramural League
considerable dispute ranged as to whether Xi Omega
or Kappa Sigma copped the total points for the
championship.
After considerable delay and discussion the final
standing was declared a tie with the cup to be shared
by the two teams for the coming year.
Rowing returned to prominence this Spring when
the scullers staged a meet with two lightweight crews
from the University of Washington over a distance
of one mile 550 yards in front of the University Boat
House on the Fraser River.
The Frosh dropped a two-length decision to the
second lightweight crew while the Huskies' first team
came in ahead of the Junior Varsity by three boat
lengths.
After the race the American boys were feted to a
banquet in the Brock Hall before returning to their
homes south of the border.
Much of the credit for the Rowing teams goes to
Phil   Fitz-James   who   coached   the  boys   on  their
Varsity
Intermediate A
Basketball
Back    Row:    Don    Mann,    Bill
Hooson,    Ches    Pedersen,   J i m
Bryant,  Basil  McDonnell,
Front Row: Maury Soward,
manager; Pat Campbell, Bud
McLeod, Pete McGeer, Demetrle
Elefthery, coach. Absent, Jack
Hetherington. Frosh
Intermediate A
Basketball
Back    Row:    Bruce   Yorke,
assistant coach; Don Petrie, BUI
Hill,  Marty  Martin.
Front    Row:    Jim    Teevan,    Al
Kenyon,    Don    Anderson,    V i c
Vaughan, Al McFarlane.  Absent
Art  Johnson, coach.
Sunday morning workouts throughout the year. Last
Fall the University purchased a new shell for the
club which enabled them to hold inter-club races.
The acquiring of this new racing boat caused considerable discussion on the campus but it proved its
worth when the rowers made such a fine showing
against the University of Washington.
The Junior Varsity crew men were: Parker, Fitz-
James, Donat, Denkman, Carrothers, Goodwin,
Michas, Creighton and Gustavson while those rowing
for the Frosh were A. McKenzie, Wills, Lindsay,
Embleton, Guman, Moran, M. McKenzie, Scott and
Murphy with McPherson as spare.
Golf functioned as an organized club this season as
they elected Bill O'Brien, Dick Hanley and Bob Ford
to the executive. A series of faculty-student matches
were arranged throughout the year.
Another  minor  sport  was  the  Badminton   Club
which played the shuttled sport in the gym Monday
and Thursday nights. They scheduled several
tournaments with other city clubs and came through
with their share of victories.
During the summer the Varsity Cricket Club
played in the Mainland League and wound up in a tie
for the Gardiner Johnson Shield. Circumstances
prevented these two elevens from meeting in a
playoff. The lineup was: Lester Bullen as captain
with Jack Rush, Jack Warden, Jim Brandon, Jim
Morton, Jim Chatwin, Harry Warren, Dr. Clemens,
Charlie Pillar, Noel Bratcher, Pat Ellis, Dave Smith,
Dave Williams, Dave Housser, Dave Lawson, Charlis
Bullen, Brian Chew and Robin Yellowlees rounding
out the roster.
In the women's athletic side of campus sport, the
co-eds were guided in a similar manner to the men
by a Women's Athletic Directorate composed of
faculty and student members. Dr. D. Mawdsley, Dr.
J. Hallamore, Miss G. Moore, Helen Matheson, Lois
English
Rugby
Left to right: John McKercher,
John Wheeler, Fred Llnsey,
Norm Cook, Al Jones, Frank
Ekman, Bill Wallace, Bob Farls,
Gerry Lockhart, John Hicks,
Tony Tlmmons, Ed Bakony,
Norm Goodwin, Maury McPhee,
coach. Doccer
Back   Row:   Eric  Jones,   George
Campbell,    Walt    Green,     Herb
Smith.
Front   Row:   Frank  Adams,   Pat
Campbell,     Bill    Walker,    Clem
Phllley, Ed Dzendolet.
Reid and Evaline Morton.
This directorate controlled all the women's sports
and guided the limited Women's Intramural program.
The major team amongst the girls was the Senior
B Basketball squad. Although composed of only six
girls they finished the season in the top position in
the Cagette League. In the playoffs for the
championship, the co-eds defeated Normals in the
semi-finals and proceeded to down Pro-Rec 1 for the
title.
This series gave the students the Woodward
Trophy, which is emblematic of Senior B British
British Columbia Women's basketball supremacy.
This Woodward Trophy was awarded automoti-
cally to the girls because this local set-up was the
only Senior B Women's League in the province and
consequently further playoffs were unnecessary.
Capable Ruth Wilson acted as coach for the team
which was composed of Helen Matheson, Eileen
McKillop, Pauline Greer, Betty Walton, Jackie Vance
and Norma Ford. Eleanor Goodenham was their
manager.
Grass Hockey also came in for its share of support
amongst the women students. Before Christmas the
Blue and Gold was represented by two teams in the
Lower Mainland league and one of the squads
finished second before play ceased until the better
weather of the new year.
Recommencement of the functioning of the league
after the layoff saw the girls from the campus only
enter one team. The other was dropped when lack
of support and the Christmas exam bogey forced its
abandonment.
But the one entry did come out on top in the final
standing and the playoff against the Ex-Kits outfit
saw the co-eds tie the game at 2-all. A replay of the
contest was to be held.
Rowing
Club
Stan Gustavson, Ken Creighton,
Lucas Michas, Bob Banks, Brian
Carrothers, Norm Denkman,
Norm Donat, Phil Fitz-James,
manager and coach. American
Football
A new scene on the Campus this
year was the American Football,
shown here In the Homecoming
battle as the Thunderbirds
defeated the   Boeing  eleven.
Those girls turning out were Marg Rodger, Nonie
Carrothers, Jean Handling, Barbara Greene, Doreen
Parks, Irene Pearce, Rita Calverley, Bea Johnson,
Dot Payson, Helen Matheson, who also acted as coach;
Bea Inch, Joan Stevens, Eileen McKillop, Mina Miles,
Joan Clarke, Sandra Gordon, Sheila Hicks, Joan
Morris, Mary Ann Norton and Marcina Boothe.
The Women's Big Block Club became almost nonexistent this year and what few members there were
did elect Mary Bradley as president and Jean
Handling , secretary. They did aid in the Pringle
Memorial Fund Drive, though, along with the Men's
Big Block members.
This Pringle Memorial fund was set up in memory
of the late George Pringle, one of the University's
best scholars, all-round athletes and sportsmen. The
two Big Block Clubs, men's and women's, staged a
very successful tag day which aided considerably in
the drive to obtain funds to establish a bursury in
in honour of George Pringle.
Doug   Lee   and   Bob   Davidson,   University   of   British   Columbia's
representatives  at the  Spokane  Cross  Country   Meet.
Start  of  the   Intra-mural   Track   Event   In   which   over  one   hundred   men   participated. Wo
men s
Grass  Hockey
Back     Row:     Barbara     Greene,
Mlna   Miles,   Bea   Johnson,   Bea
Inch,    Nonle   Carrothers,    Mary
Ann  Norton.
Front   Row:   Marg   Roger,   Irene
Pearce,    Doreen    Parks,    Helen
Matheson.
Included in the Women's sports activities this year
were the Keep Fit and Archery classes held in the
gym under Miss Moore's guidance as part of the Wo-
■men's war work. The Archery club also held its
annual tournament during the year by wire with
other colleges across Canada.
A Sorority Bowling League functioned for seven
_ weeks during January and February again this season
;and Alpha Gamma Delta wound up in top spot, with
a narrow margin over Kappa Alpha Theta, while
Alpha Delta Pi finished third.
This gave the Alpha Gams the Pan Hellenic Cup,
awarded annually for sport supremacy among the
sororities. Usually swimming and softball were in
the list of sports included in the cup series but they
had to be abandoned this season because of lack of
time.
Although the war activities on the campus this
season curtailed many of the athletic events, the University of British Columbia was well represented in
all leagues entered and the calibre of the individual
teams kept at a high level.
Women's
. Senior B
Basketball
Left to right: Helen Matheson,
Eileen McKillop, Betty Walton,
Eleanor Goodenham, manager;
Jackie Vance, Pauline Greer,
Norma Ford, A University at war graduates 370 men and women
equipped mentally and physically to serve either on the
front or behind the lines at home. x^    UK
AICKEN, ALEX C.
ANDERSON, ELIZABETH D.
APPLEBY, JOHN
ARM, MARJORIE J.
ASHE, GEOFFREY T. L.
ASZKANAZY, C. LEONORE
BALL, PATRICIA E.
BARNETT, JOAN R.
BARSS, ELIZABETH M.
BARTHOLOMEW, GILBERT
BEAUMONT, ELIZABETH N.
BELL, MAUREEN
BENNETT, JOHN N.
BERTON, LUCY F. B.
BEVERIDGE, E. ISABEL
BONNER, MRS. BARBARA
BONUTTO, A. L.
BOOND, DOROTHY L.
BRADLEY, MARY E.
BRANDT, HELEN K.
BRIDGE, TOM
BROADHEAD, RONALD L.
BROWN, HARRY
BUCKERFIELD, MARY I.
BULLER, MARGARET H.
BUNTING, ROSAMUND G.
BURCHELL, SHERIDAN
BURKE, CORNELIA C.
BURRIS, D. STEWART
BUTLER, L. MAY
CARLSEN, ALFRED E.
CARSLEY, JULIE W.
CARSON, JOHN J.
CASSELMAN, W. G. BRUCE
CHATWIN, LEONARD W.
CHENOWETH, JOCELYN D.
CHRISTOPHERSON, KATH.
CLARIDGE, CHARLES A.
CLARK, KATHLEEN D.
CLEMENS, ANN M.
CLYNE, NORVAL S.
COOPER, W. CHARLES COSTELLO, M. JOAN
CREIGHTON, J. D.
CULLINANE, T. RAYMOND
CURRY, ROBERT M.
DALIN, WINIFRED H.
DALZIEL, JOYCE E.
DANIELL, JOCELYN M. D. B.
DESBRISAY, MARY E.
DESBRISAY, RUTH M.
DICKIE, BETTE F.
DILGER, V. VIVIAN
DIXON, HELEN B.
DRYSDALE, NORMA K.
DWYER, MELVA J.
EATON, ARTHUR R.
EDWARDS, DAIMA
ELEFTHERY, DEMETRIE G.
ELLIOTT, JEAN
ELLIS, ROBERT L.
ERICKSON, NORMA A.
FAIRALL, WALLACE H.
FARINA, A. JOHN O.
FARRELL, FLORENCE M.
FELL, J. MICHAEL G.
FISHER, E. BRIAN
FLYNN, MARGARET J.
GARDINER, MARGARET H.
GEORGE, MARGARET S.
GIBBS, M. GWENDOLYN
GILLARD, S. MEGAN
GRAHAM, EVELYN F. M.
GRIEVE, KENNETH E.
HALL, RANJIT S.
HALSTEAD, JOHN G. H.
HAMILTON, JAMET, A. R.
HANBURY, ARTHUR W.
HANSON, DON MCK.
HARVEY, ELIZABETH A.
HITCHCOCK, JOHN H.
HOLLAND, KATHLEEN A.
hunter, douglas r.
hunter, harry
hutchison, hazel h.
isherwood; thomas f.
jackson, douglas l. JACKSON, FRANCES C.
JACKSON, ROY V.
JENKINSON, ELIZABETH
JOHNSON, EVA C.
JOHNSTON, DONALD W.
KENNEDY, EVERETT B. M.
KITSON, C. EDITH
KNOTTS, WALTER E.
LANSDOWNE, ROSEMARY
LEE, JEAN-CAROL
LEE, RUTH
LEWIS, EMC E.
LIGHTSTONE, ROBERT
LIPSET, C. MARY
LOCK, VIVIAN E. R.
MABEE, JEAN M.
MANNING, HELEN B.
MATHESON, BERYL A.
MATHESON, HELEN R.
MATHESON, IAN D.
MATTHEWS, CHARLE3 A.
MEREDITH, PATRICIA M.
MICHAS, SOPHIA
MICKELSON, CECIL H.-
MILLIGAN, PHYLLIS H.
MILLS, LAURA E.
MOE, BARBARA M.
MORAN, CATHERINE
MORLEY, MONA R.
MOYLS, AMY C.
MOYLS, MARGARET L.
MULHERN, MERRIE N.
MUNDELL, PERCY M.
McALLKTER, JAMES A.
McDIARMID, LORNA M.
MacDONALD, JOHN L.
MacDONALD, MARION
MacDONALD, SHIRLEY
McINTOSH, MARY B.
McKAY, DONALD M.
McKENZIE, KENNETH R.
McLEARY, NAN
MacLEOD, ROBERT A.
McMAHON, VERNON H.
MacMILLAN, DONALD J. McPHEE, MAURICE D.
MCWILLIAMS, ROBERT W.
NELLES, THELMA M.
NeMETZ, PHYLLIS R.
NEVISON, JAMES H.
oakes, lila m.
orchard, e. joyce
peteb:on, maryan a.
pethick, derek w.
pickering, mary g.
PRONGER, RALPH C.
PROUDFOOT, AGNES E.
PROVEN, NETTIE I.
RICE-JONES, W. GEOFF.
RICKETTS, DONALD B.
ROBINSON, GRANT T.
ROCHE, ROBERT G.
ROWEBOTTOM, HOWARD G.
ROWEBOTTOM. LORNE E.
RUSSELL, ROSAMOND A.
SAVTTSKY, SONIA
SEYER, JOHN F.
SINCLAIR, ELEANOR W.
SLATER, MARY A.
SMITH, H. PAUL
SNADDON, ANDREW W.
SPEARS, DOROTHY H.
STEVENSON, THEODORE K.
STUSIAK, MRS. JOAN
SULLIVAN, LUCY JANE
TAIT, JEAN W.
TATROFF, DANIEL P.
TELFER, GWENDOLYN D.
THOMSON, HELEN
TINDLE, MURIEL A.
TWISS, MARY H.
UGLOW, ELIZABETH R.
VANDT, DAVID
VAUGHAN, DAVID L.
WALKER, GOLDIE E. C.
WALLACE, BETTY
WARNER, MARY E.
WATSON, WILFRED
WELLS, JAMES H.
WOO, ANNE M. WOOD, BETTY R.
WOOD, GEORGE A.
WRIGHT, SYDNEY C.
WYBOURN, EDBROOKE S.
YOUNG, HONOREE G.
9> *©  J5 h?
m*-   a        JmYmJmmT- —-*
BARTON, ARTHUR S.
BEDDOME, ANNE C.
BOLLANS, FRANK L.
CLARK, KENNETH P.
FIELDS, DONALD 1<
FORD, ROBERT W.
FRANCIS, IDA C.
GOURLAY, JOHN L.
GOYER, GERTRUDE E.
GRIGG, VERNON B.
HALL, HUGH U.
HORTON, KENNETH G.
HUME, DOUGLAS D.
HUTCHISON, GEORGE J
INMAN, HARRY C.
JAMEfl, DOUGLAS A.
LLOYD, MOIRA C.
LONG, CHARLES F.
LONG. ELIZABETH G. B
MAHOOD, BRIAN H.
MANN, WILLIAM T.
MANNIX, LUELLA
MERCER, WILLIAM M.
MORRISON, J. LEE
RITCHIE, HUGH J.
ROBINSON, ERIC W.
ROSS, DONALD H. MacR.
ROUSSEL, DAVID M.
SCHOFIELD, WILLIAM J.
SMEDLEY, JACK V.
WALLACE, ROBERT B. (no picture i
WELSFORD, WILLIAM D.
WILSON, JAMES H.
WINRAM, EDNA E.
WOLVERTON, N. E. ANDERSON, HAROLD W.
BUCK, F. A. MACKINNON
BUCKLAND, JOHN A. C.
CAMPBELL, GEORGE C.
COCHRAN, JOHN
DAY, ALVIN A.
GORDON, ARTHUR D.
GRAHAM, HAROLD M.
GREEN, WALTER C.
HOLE, JOHN S.
HORNE, LESLIE R.
KING, A. DAVID
MANN, CLARENCE W. J.
MILLER, JOSEPH G.
McCAY, JAMES T.
McLEOD, A. ALLAN
PRIETjT, JACK
PYLE, ROBERT G.
SELBY, ROY E.
STEEL, WILLIAM E. J.
STUSIAK, MICHAEL
SWEENEY, MAXWELL P.
WEINER, HARRY S.
WHITE, RONALD J.
WILLIAMS, F. CAMPBELL
ZABINSKI, JOHN
GORDON, FRANCIS J.
GARDENER, ALEXANDER H
FRASER, GEORGE B. R.
ELLIOTT, ALBERT H.
CARTER, RONALD B.
BOURNE, EDWARD A.
BALDWIN, JOHN H. G.
THOMPSON, JAMES V.
ROGERS, CECIL G.
COPP, STANLEY S.
BAKER, D. LEACROFT GRAY, JOHN S.
HANDFORTH, R. VICTOR L.
HAYLES, OLIVER J.
JE3SUP, DOUGLAS G.
LEONG, DENNIS T. S.
MILLER, RICHARD C.
McLELLAN, LEONARD R.
PATTERSON, LAWRENCE A.
PATTERSON, STANLEY G.
ROBERTS, STANLEY C.
STEWART, ALLAN J.
BACKMAN, ARVID H. V.
CREIGHTON, JOHN D.
FOSTER, RAYMOND E.
KULLANDER, MARVIN 0.
P.CKFORD, JOHN W.
SCHIEDEL, IAN H.
BLANCHET, PETER H.
DEANE, ROY E.
DeLEFN, JOHN L.
MORRIS, HARRY R.
MacRAE, HECTOR R.
McTAGGART, KENNETH C
BANNERMAN, DONALD K.
BLAKE, DONALD H. R.
BRYNELSEN, JOHN A.
CARLYLE, D. GORDON
COVERDALE, HAROLD M.
COX, LEONARD
DUNELL, G. ERIC
GOODWIN, WALTER H.
HADDAD, MICHAEL A.
HAMMOND, JOHN S. N.
HARRISON, JOHN S. M.
HUTCHINSON, BRUCE
LEAR, HAROLD K:
MASON, ERNEST
MILLER, JAMES W.
NORTON, ERIC H.
ROACH, STEWART W.„
ROGERS, JOHN S.
ROXBURGH, J. MALCOLM SMITH, FRANK F.
SPAETGEN3, THEODORE W.
SUTCLIFFE, E. DOUGLAS
WEED, JOSEPH D.
BELEY, JOHN P.
BENSON, EDWARD
EVANS, DONALD C.
LIVINGSTONE, HUGHIE
McCULLOCH, JAMEO P.
BLAIR, WILLIAM B.
GILL, NORMAN A.
SINCLAIR, G. WILLIAM
SMITH, WILLIAM R.
AWiMACK, JOSEPH W.
BRADNER, FRANK E.
BROWN, IVAN T.
CLAYDON, GEORGE W.
COOK, DOUGLAS T.
FERGUSSON, CONRAD N.
FITZ-JAMES, PHILIP C.
GOODWIN, MARTIN B.
GREEN, CHARLES A.
KILT.TCK, STANLEY R.
LOGAN, FITZGERALD
LOURIE, MARIANNE
MERRYFTELD, JACK W.
MOYLS, ADRIAN W.
MULVTN, MARY L.
McDONALD, IAN J.
MacLEAN, DONALD W.
ROE, JOHN A.
SANDALL, FRANCES W.
SHORE, ALAN W.
STEWART, HUGH MacL.
SULLY, LYNN K.
SWACKHAMER, DAVID
TAMBOLINE, FLORENCE R.
TURNER, STUART W. %a*
VAN HORNE, H. BIRCHAM
WALKER, JOY
BANFORD, PAULINE E.
BEVERIDGE, MARGARET A.
BREETON, BARBARA A.
CAMPBELL, E. JEAN
DUNFIELD, MARY F.
GOBLE, MARGARET A.
JENKENS, A. ELIZABETH
ROBERTSON, MARGARET
R03S, F. MARY
TROUT, M. FERNE
WALKER, J. MARIE
WORRALL, MRS. JEANNE E.
WRIGHT, LEORA R. (no picture)
GRADUATION   CLASS   EXECUTIVE
President Roy Deane
Secretary Margaret Buller
Vice President Bill Smith
Treasurer Brick Elliot
Class Will Buddy Graham
Class Soloist Gwen Telfer
Valedictorian Mack Buck
Class Poet Len Cox
Class Prophet Lucy Berton
Honorary President Dr. J. A. Crumb
Honorary Vice President Professor W. Gage Planned for PEACE
Powered tor WAR
war broke oot the B.C
a new power installation of 47.000
we anticipating a world war?
fittd we foresee a gigantic armament production
with this entire nation mobilized to the last ounce
of capacity to turn out ships, planes, guns, tanks
and other implements of war.
Hardly. But the B.C Electric was doing what it
has always done . .. keeping wen ahead of the
demand for power... and that policy has more than
Justified itself in recent years.
Today there are scores of plants in and around
Vancouver employing tens of thousands of men and
women making their quota of war goods from
delicate instruments which steer the planes to the
guns which shoot them down, from the boilers and
engines that drive our cargo ships to the mine'
sweepers that clear their paths.
They are able to operate because B.C Electric power
was and is ready for them day in and day out, a
dependable supply of power so that not a day nor
an hour is lost in the all important job of lighting
the Axis on the production line.
And not a single inquiry for electric power fer war
or other industries has been turned down because
of any shortage of power capacity.
B. C. Electric
ELECTRIC POWER speeding the wheels ot Victory Qoltege
J^a (Ba'ieeti  .   .   ..
All through school you knew you could
count on-The BAY for the clothes you
wanted . . . the suits and sweaters and
skirts and casual things that are part
of University life. Now that school is
over and you're going to carve a little
niche for yourself in the business world '■>
or war work . . . you can count on The   .
BAY to turn you out in the confident
clothes that will give you poise and
celf-assurance.   From College to Career
The BAY is behind you all the way!
^ORATED   8Vf MAY IS70
'The future of the world is left
to highly educated races" —
JLn THESE words Rt. Hon. Winston
Churchill introduced a rare tribute
in Parliament to the place of education in the post-war world.
The essence of education is both that
knowledge acquired from books and
laboratories and the kindred wisdom
derived from acquaintance with current movements and world events.
In this picture the press of Canada has
a place.
THE VANCOUVER
DAILY PROVINCE FROm EVGRV
Bm                         H
ARGLE ...
Lk        w              ■
W /JweL *
\m\Wm             wMiTio
wSm^nm.    J J    AtfA
... will fill a CO-ED'S
most rigid requirements
V"                                    ^^mmmmm^^^f'   ^*^                                *I                 >   zW
^^gpBK^'          gW                 g&          -j #
^daata\1       ^^^                  Lt         i/mk   "     1
•
691 Granville Street
■f^^ Jl   g| - " dM
MEN'S SUITS AND LADIES' SUITS AND
TOP-COATS COATS
Braemar Sweaters from
Scotland
FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN
Fashioned  and Loomed  from  the  Finest
Quality Yarns available in Great Britain
YOUR INSPECTION INVITED
•
George Straith Ltd.
905 WEST GEORGIA
VANCOUVER, B. C.
"Always the Finest in Quality" ' ^^^ COLLE
COLLEGE
OF BUSINESS
A School of Distinction
For Those Who Prefer
QUALITY
EFFICIENCY
DEPENDABILITY
The superior facilities and training offered at Willis
College will prepare you quickly for the best positions.
■LOOK AHEAD! Realize now that competition will
be keen after the war. Willis training will enable you
to hold your own and win advancement.
Begin your course at our Summer School.
850 West Hastings
PA cific 0327
MACAULAY, NICOLLS,
MAITLAND & CO. LTD.
Insurance, Financial and Estate Agents
435 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone
PAcific 4111
I am happy to have this opportuity of conveying to the graduating students of the University of
British Columbia my sincerest congratulations upon
their success.
Many of them will now be passing from the
preparatory stage of their life work Into the careers
they respectively choose; others will be Joining the
fighting forces of Canada in the greatest war of
all time.
Whatever their ultimate destiny may be. I am
sure the training they will have received at their
Univers.ty, together with the fine example set by
Its principles and traditions, will stand them in
good stead throughout their Individual lifetimes,
and I wish each of them God-speed in their efforts
and all success In the attainment of their ambitions.
"W. C WOODWARD".
Lieutenant   Governor   of   the
Province of British Columbia.
BEST WISHES
TO THE STUDENT BODY OF U.B.C.
FOR SUCCESS IN
1943
McLennan, McFeely &
Prior Ltd.
VANCOUVER — VICTORIA — NEW WESTMINSTER
British Columbia's Pioneer Hardware Supply House
Established 1859
DEVELOPING
PRINTING
ENLARGING
OUR PHOTOFINISHING SERVICE brings out the best
In   your    snapshots.     Expert    workmanship   .   .   .   fine
chemicals  and  papers  .  .   .  prompt  attention  to  every
order. Bring us your next roll of exposed film.
t H J I III H II MATERIALS
610 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C
PHOTOGRAPHIC    I TII
COMPLIMENTS OF
DAN McLEAN
Motor Co. Ltd.
B. C.
Distributors of
NASH
1148 Georgia W.
MA rine 2277 CASUAL
SWARMS....
... is easily achieved when
you choose your clothes at
WILLARDS.
WILLA&D/
681 Granville
DPFUS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SUMMER RATE
3 MONTHS FOR $45
SECRETARIAL
OFFICE MACHINES
CIVIL SERVICE
PITMAN & GREGG
SHORTHAND
COMPTOMETERS
BOOKKEEPING
ACCOUNTING
FINISHING COURSES
SHORT COURSES FOR WAR WORKERS
DAY AND NIGHT
Seymour and Pender
Phone PA cific 7567 for catalog
STATIONERY
LOOSE LEAF SUPPLIES-DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
SLIDE RULES—SCALE RULES—FOUNTAIN PENS
Let us do your printing for your Fraternity
and Sorority Organizations
The Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
STATIONERS and PRINTERS
550 Seymour Street Vanrouver, B. C.
Experts...
Today the specialist is the man of the hour—He builds
the tanks, the planes and the guns Keeping pace with
the eye needs of this man Is also a job for experts, for
upon his ability to see depends the fitness of these
machines of war. Here for the past 19 years such skilled
technicians have been rendering this service, that of
maintaining your see-ability through the medium of your
Bye Physician's Prescription—Remember—
ESTABLISHED 1924
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL
CO. LTD.
424
VANCOUVER. BLOCK. busv mEn mid women
WEAR THE
CHflLLEDGER WATCH
For Appearance
For Accurate Performance
For Everyday Service
Anywhere
•
SOLD ONLY BY BIRKS
DIAMOND
MERCHANTS
i^ ,      ff JEWELLERS
WLlt'tiW    SILVERSMITHS
VANCOUVER
BUV BRITISH
GESTETHER DUPLICATORS
are made only by
D. GESTETNER LTD.
at
TOTTENHAM, LONDON, N. 17
Used by Hundreds of educational institutes for the
speedy reproduction of
MAPS — EXAMINATION PAPERS — BULLETINS
REPORTS — MUSIC CHARTS — FORMS, ETC
A complete range of models to meet every duplicating
requirement
D. Gestetner (Canada) Limited
'660 Seymour Street
Vancouver, B. C.
HALIFAX, St. John, Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto,
Hamilton, London, Regina, Windsor, Winnipeg, Calgary,
Edmonton
COMPLIMENTS OF
W. & J. WILSON
IMPORTER OF FINE BRITISH WOOLLENS
HOTEL VANCOUVER
Sweaters from Braemar of Scotland. New line
Coats   and   Suits   from  Jaegar   and   Chester
Barrie of London.
Shirts, Socks, Ties, etc., from well-known
Old Country Makers.
IT HAS BEEN
A PLEASURE
to entertain students of the
University in our Theatres
this last year.
During that time we gave
you many outstanding picture productions, and look
forward to serve you again,
and we hope, make new
friends among you.
The coming year will see
on our screens the best
pictures of the year.
CAPITOL —  ORPHEUM
STRAND —  DOMINION
Famous Players Canadian Corp. THE m...
still boasts the same informality
.... although the Brock Memorial Building
Lunch Room is getting some of its business. Eat in either place,
depending in the mood you're in ... . but don't forget to
patronize Campus Merchants. Your undergrad idiosyncracies
will be understood and overlooked.
The University Book Store
The Book Store, which occupies a room in the Auditorium
Building, was established for the convenience of the Students
and has effected a considerable saving to the students in time
and money. It is prepared to supply all Text Books required
for the various courses offered in the University, also such
articles as Note Books, Loose-Leaf Sheets, Fountain Pens,
Drawing Paper and Instruments. Our Good Wishes to the Students
in the Armed Services
MAYOR J. W. CORNETT
HON. W. A MacDONALD, K.C.
ERIC C. DONEGANI
HENRY REIFEL
E. E. BUCKERFIELD
J. E. THOMPSON
LAWRENCE KILLAM
E. A. JUKES
SENATOR J. W. deB. FARRIS
ALFRED HYAMS
NELSON LAUNDRY LTD.
ALEXANDER MURRAY CO. LTD.
GORDON WISMER, K.C.
W. G. MURRIN
CHRIS. SPENCER
SHELDON D. BROOKS
M. KOENIGSBERG
JOHN R. KERR
W. H. MALKIN
S. S. McKEEN
T. S. DIXON
E. W. HAMBER
SHARP & THOMSON
ALBERTA LUMBER CO.
CAMPBELL MEREDITH and BECKETT
To Reach Your Goal
Every graduate when he
leaves University has an
objective he would like to
reach. No matter what he
decides his life work will be,
regular Savings deposits of
even small amounts, accumulating at compound interest,
lead step by step to security
and to the attainment of his
goal
THE
ROVflL BATIK
OF CANADA
COLUfllBlfl
Paper Co. Ltd.
Wholesale
Paper Merchants
Manufacturers of "Columbia" Quality
Scribblers and Exercise Books.
Vancouver, B.C.
Victoria, B.C. .   .   . featuring
TOUJI)   HALL   CLOTHES
for
men or women
Sammy Gold's
BOnD CLOTHES SHOP
312 W. HASTINGS
MArine 1842
^;~"^--
Our Studio of Furs features smart fur Coate
and jaunty Jackets priced to college budgets.
You are invited to drop in anytime and inspect
this fine collection of quality pelts and latest
styles.
R. J. POP LTO.
Furrier
GRANVILLE at SIXTEENTH
BAyview 8311
Fireproof Refrigerated Fur Storage
East — West — North — South—around the world—
the mcst famous name in textiles is Jantzen. It was
true before the war—it is  true during the war—it
will be true after the war.
Such a name is not built by  chance.   Only many
years can build it—years of integrity of manufacture
—years   of   alertness   in   styling—years   of   lasting
consumer satisfaction.
JANTZEN KNITTING MILLS
OP CANADA LTD.
Vancouver
Canada WOODWARD'S
GREATER VANCOUVER'S
SHOPPING CENTRE
You can save money on all the new Fashions
for  Campus and  Social  Activities from the
complete selection at Woodward's.
Misses' Fashion   —   Floor 2
Men's Fashion — Main Floor
WE ARE ALWAYS
WILLING TO SERVE YOU
PRINTING
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
ii»0N Prime ('ii.
LIMITED
Located at
Victory Square
455 Hamilton St.
Telephone:
PAcific 5838
COMPLIMENTS OF
Gordon Farrell
!EBSl* f.f»f*)%Sm JENKINS VALVES PASS
P*MANy examinations/
When these valves "graduate" into industrial life
they are fitted to make a real contribution to
economical and efficient production, extremely low maintenance costs, and protection against disrupting shutdowns.
Whenever you visit a plant, notice the large number of
Jenkins Diamond trade marked valves in use. A convincing
proof of their quality and performance.
JENKINS BROS. LIMITED, 617 St. Remi Street, Montreal
Branches: Toronto, Winnipeg. Vancouver and
6 Great Queen Street, Kingsway, W.C. 2, London, Eng,
JENKINS VALVES
For every industrial, engineering, marine and power        -/<£n.
plant service . . . in Bronze, Iron, Cast Steel and     <*JjBK|!5^
Corrosion-Resisting alloys... 125 to 600 lbs. pressure     ^uSu/O^
BEST WISHES
Hume and Rumble
LTD.
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
AND ENGINEERS
Assay, Industrial and
Educational
Laboratory Supplies
Chemicals
CAVE & COMPANY
LIMITED
567 Hornby St.
Vancouver, B.C.
DIETHERS
LTD.
SAND and GRAVEL
TRUE-MIX CONCRETE
BUILDERS'  SUPPLY
COAL
Granville
Island
MArine 6231        Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Union Oil Company
OF CANADA LTD. To  the men  and women  who  graduate this year and
enter their various fields of endeavor—
. . . and especially to those
men who have donned the
uniform in defence of their
country . . .
WE   EXTEND   OUR   BEST  WISHES
FOR SUCCESS AND "GOOD LUCK"
SITKA SPRUCE
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Vancouver, British Columbia
. . . Through this doorway Canadians have
walked in and out
with confidence on
every business day for
125 years.
Bank of
Montreal
Established 1817
"a bank where small
accounts are welcome"
To The Student Body ....
Our Congratulations and
Best Wishes
Dell & Mitchell Ltd.
541 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B. C.
VANCOUVER'S
CKWX
980 on Your Dial
For the Best In Radio Entertainment
Tune to CKWX
mflDflmOISELLE LTD.
•
FASHIONS FOR FEMINITY
AND
INDIVIDUALITY
•
643 HOWE STREET
DIAMONDS
WATCHES
SILVERWARE
ENGLISH CHINA
LEATHER   GOODS
PAcific 4364-5
Seymour at Dunsmuir
Vancouver,      Canada
FOB THE SMARTEST
LN FUR STYLES ....
E. flnDERSOn
Furs
PAc. 7654
653 Howe St.
Plan now to spend your vacation at
BOWEN  ISLAND  INN
Open for season May 14
Everyone, needs a vacation in these days (^-<^^—m^mm^mm^m^^^_^
tension.    Beautiful  U^^^^^^^V       ^^^HH
Bowen Island will pro-   VM  111!   1^^^^^^
vide complete rest and   VB  11       1 \ % \      V
relaxation.     Reserva-    VB       IV 1  1 1 1       H
City Ticket Office        1
793 Granville   Street       '
MArine 5438
VWMftVftKl
r^
or direct to
Bowen Island
Ml                     ^~~" /*
\
To Students and Faculty of
The University of British
Columbia, our good wishes
^mtomcer
Vancouver's HOME-OWNED Newspaper
..J
/
Whether for Home or Business Office Our
Stationery and Printing Departments will
serve you in many ways.
GEHRHES LTD
566 Seyuour
PAC. 0171
COMPLIMENTS
OF
•
O. B. Allen
Ltd.
JEWELLERS
DIAMONDS WATCHES
Granville at Pender
Vancouver
COMPLIMENTS OF
BEGG MOTOR CO.
1062 W. Georgia Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
Canada Permanent Trust Co.
432 Richards Street Vancouver, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
commoDORE cabaret Wherever You Go,
Whatever You Do,
We Wish You Well
PARSONS, BROWN LTD.
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS
404 West Hastings Street
MArine 9211
With the Compliments
and
Best Wishes
to the Men in Uniform
for a safe and speedy return
Burrard Dry
Dock Co. Ltd.
Main Office and Works
NORTH VANCOUVER
British Columbia
YOU MAY DO BETTER
WITH
KEVSTOnE
BRAND
LOOSELEAF  SHEETS
AND BINDERS
Choose Keystone Brand for all
your class and study work
Smith Dauiddon
&UhiqhtCtd.
VANCOUVER — VICTORIA — EDMONTON
CALGARY
Modern construction demands the liberal use
of concrete.   It's the foundation of all good
building  projects  everywhere.    "Elk Brand"
cement has proved its merit for many years
and is a B.C. Product.
•
British Columbia Cement
Co. Ltd.
500 Fort Street                               Victoria, B.C.
•
Use CEMENT and conserve STEEL
for National Defence Congratulations to the Graduates of 1943
AND
our sincere best wishes to those students
who are leaving on active service
BLOEDEL, STEWART
& WELCH LTD.
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
West Coast Shipbuilders Ltd.
. . . congratulate the U.B.C. lads
who have volunteered for Active
Service
The
Toronto General
Trusts Corporation
ESTABLISHED 1882
British Columbia Advisory Board
Hon. W. A. Macdonald, K.C., Chairman
Col. Hon. Eric W. Hamber
R. P. Butchart
J. H. Roaf
W. H. Malkin
Vancouver Office:
Pender and Seymour Streets
Assets Under Administration:
$250,000,000.00
EnGinEERS mid
Graduates of the University of British
Clumbia, accept our best wishes for a
useful and successful career	
Your present task is to add your full
weight to our Drive for Victory ....
Your Future . . . the application of the
lessons you will learn from a World at
War to the Development of a World of
Permanent Peace.
HEAPS EnGinEERInG
1940 LIMITED
New Wesminster, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
CANADIAN BROADCASTING
CORPORATION
fllPRUJELL
CONSTRUCTION CO. LTD.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
540 Howe Street
Vancouver COMPLIMENTS  OF
HEWERS HARDWARE
4459 W. 10th ALma 1552
COMPLIMENTS  OF
BLAIN BOILER WORKS
LIMITED
VANCOUVER, B. C.
SWEET SIXTEEN LTD.
LADD5S' READY-TO-WEAR
Five Stores  for  Your   Convenience
137 W. Hastings; 807 Granville; 2438 E. Hastings;
2315 Main St; 437 Columbia, New Westminster
Union Garment House
Quality Bread, Cakes
and Cookies, at Your
Grocers, Fresh Daily
Canadian Bakeries Ltd.
Good Luck to the Men in Service . . .
Boyles Bros. Drilling Co.
LIMITED
Diamond Drilling Contractors and Manufacturers
1291 Parker, Vancouver, B. C.
COMPLIMENTS OF
SHEARS & CO. LTD.
FAir. 2202
PRINTERS
Vancouver
2218 Main S.
COMPLIMENTS OF
VIVIAN ENGINE
WORKS LTD.
COMPLIMENTS  OF
Famous Cloak & Suit Co.
FEEL FRESH ....
DRINK
ORANGE CRUSH
"CANADA'S MOST FAMOUS ORANGE DRINK"
GOULD & HIRD
Importers and Exporters
TEA, COFFEE, SEED, ETC.
300 Arts & Crafts) Building
576 Seymour St. — Vancouver, B.C.
WITH COMPLIMENTS OF
GEORGIA PHARMACY
LIMITED
777 W. Georgia St.
Leslie G. Henderson, Oc.P. '06
Captain Gibb G. Henderson, B.A., B.A.Sc., U.B.C. '33 COMPLIMENTS OF
BEVERLY
Hosiery and Lingerie Shop
648 Granville St.
Vancouver,  B. C.
Phone: PAc. 5561
f
jtfi^
SILK SPECIALISTS
622-628 Granville St.
Vancouver, B.C.
DICKSON IMPORTING CO.
MAKERS OF
BLOSSOM TEA
COMPLIMENTS OF
WESTERN MUSIC LTD.
570 Seymour
PA cific 9548
Build keen minds and strong bodies
by   drinking   plenty    of   delicious
FAir. 1000
MILK
from  "Canada's  Most
Modern Dairy".
ASSOCIATED DAIRIES LTD.
Best Wishes to the
Graduating Students and
Boys Entering Armed Services
KER & KER Ltd.
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
475 Howe Street
PAcific 3241
We like to sell clothes to men who
know that clothes mean a lot
in   everyday   life
BUSINESS AND SOCIAL
For Smarter Styling and Perfect
Fit see our new Lounge Models,
both in Business and Sportswear.
PERSONAL SERVICE ALWAYS
EDDIE R. DEEm
498 Seymour Street
Cor. Pender
DeLuxe Bowling Centre
MArine 9940   Hastings at Homer  PAcific 0956
Home of the
U.B.C. SORORITIES' BOWUNG LEAGUE
We Cater To Rushing Parties
YOUR BOOKS WILL BE APPRECIATED
at the
Sasamat Text Book Exchange
Near Bus Stop
Many U.B.C. Graduates have begun
their journalistic careers on the
Vancouver News Herald
B.C.'s Third Largest Newspaper
COMPLIMENTS OF
Alcock, Downing & Wright Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbing and Heating Supplies
896 Cambie St. Vancouver, B.C. WI ARE PROP . .
to have so large a part in the production of this
Graduation Issue of the UBYSSEY and hope to
serve you in the future when you need ....
PHOTOGRAPHS
in your business, professional or social life
ARTOnfl   STUDIO
833 Granville Street
Phone MA rine 3932

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