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The Glass Menagerie Sep 18, 1985

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 Frederic Wood Theatre
Glass He seemed larger than life.
Saw things with more clarity. More brilliance. More impact.
Some said it was the Pentax 645, a professional format motor drive SLR that he
handled with the agility of a 35mm,
Who could have guessed that a medium
format camera with all the latest automatic
modes still could be had at a price that compared to a premium 35mm SLR outfit?
It just didn't seem possible.
Naturally, the negatives and transparencies his 645 produced were twice as large as a 35.
Could that explain why his pictures
look twice as good?
PENTAX
fentax Canada Inc.
1760 West 3rd Ave
\imcouver, B.C.
V6J1K5
nnovation for Inspiration University of British Columbia
Frederic Wood Theatre
Presents
The Glass
Menagerie
By
Tennessee Williams
Directed by
Stanley Weese
September 18-28
1985
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
1985/86 Season
The Glass Menagerie
by Tenessee Williams
Directed by Stanley Weese
September 18-28,1985
Love for Love
by William Congreve
Directed by Arne Zaslove
November 6 -16,1985
Major Barbara
by Bernard Shaw
Directed by Antony Holland
January 15-25,1986
As You Like It
by William Shakespeare
Directed by John Brockington
March 5 -15, 1986
Bonus Production
(Not included in Regular Season)
World Premiere of a New Musical
by John Gray
The Thirty Nine Steps
a musical version of
Alfred Hitchcock's greatest film
April 7 - May 3, 1986
(Subject to rights approval)
For information and reservations
phone 228-2678
Frederic Wood Theatre
Magazine
PUBLISHER
Joseph G. MacKinnon
DIRECTOR OF SALES
Doug Henderson
A publication of:
University Productions Inc.
3591 West Eleventh Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
738-7768
Any comments or enquiries
regarding the contents of this
publication may be forwarded to
the publisher at the
above address Photo of Tennessee Williams by Yosuf Karsh, 1956
Miller Services 1911
1919
1927
1928
1929
1931
1935
1936
1937
1940
1943
1945
1947
1951
1955
1961
1969
1972
1975
1977
1983
-Tennessee Williams—
A Chronology
Thomas Lanier Williams born March 26, Columbus,
Mississippi.
Family moved to St. Louis.
Essay, "Can a Good Wife be a Good Sport?" Smart Set
(April).
Story, "The Vengeance of Nitrocis," Weird Tales (August).
University of Missouri, where he won small literary prizes.
Monotonous stretch with shoe company relieved by all-
night  writing;   nervous   breakdown   and   recuperation   in
Memphis.
July 12: Cairo, Shanghai, Bombay!, a farce produced in
Memphis.
Washington University, St. Louis; Willard Holland, director
of Mummers, a little theater group, produced a one act and
two long plays: Candles in the Sun and Fugitive Kind.
State University of Iowa; awarded Bachelor of Arts degree.
Audrey Wood secured Rockefeller fellowship, $1000;
Williams entered advanced playwriting seminar, New
School, New York; Battle of Angels opened in Boston, a
fiasco; Williams given $200 to rewrite play.
Audrey Wood secured Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM)
contract for six months at $250 a week; scripts rejected;
Williams wrote The Glass Menagerie, a manuscript
submitted to and refused by Metro Goldwyn Mayer.
March 31: The Glass Menagerie opened in New York for 561
performances; won New York Drama Critics Circle Award
on the first ballot;
December 3: A Streetcar Named Desire opened in New York
for 855 performances; won for Williams a second New York
Drama Critics Circle Award; won Pulitzer Prize; film
version, 1951;
February 3: The Rose Tattoo opened in New York for 300
performances.
March 24: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof opened in New York for 79
performances; won third New York Drama Critics Circle
Award, second Pulitzer Prize;
December 28: The Night of the Iguana opened in New York
for 316 performances; film version, 1964.
January: Williams converted to Roman Catholicism. May
11: In the Bar of a Tokyo Bar opened off-Broadway for 29
performances; awards from National Institute of Arts and
Letters and from Academy of Arts and Letters.
April 2: Small Craft Warnings opened off-Broadway for 200
performances.
June 18: The Red Devil Battery Sign opened in Boston;
May   11:   Vieux   Carre   opened   in   New   York   for   five
performances.
February 25: Death in New York
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 224-2417/224-2625	 © in 15
THE GLASS MENAGERIE
by
Directed by
Stanley Weese
Tennessee Williams
PRODUCTION
Set designed by
Don S. Davis
Costumes designed    Lighting designed by
by
Brian H. Jackson Robert Hamilton
CAST
AMANDA    Marjorie Nelson*
TOM Bruce Harwood
LAURA Sarah Rodgers
JIM Bruce Dow
SCENE: An Alley in St. Louis
TIME: The Thirties
ACT I: Preparation for Gentleman Caller
ACT II: The Gentleman Calls
There will be one 15 minute intermission
THE CLASS MENACERIE
is produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service Inc., New York
"Ms Nelson is currently Artist in Residence with the Department of Theatre
Technical Director Ian Pratt
Properties     Sherry Darcus
Costume Supervisor Rosemarie Heselton
Set Construction Robert Eberle, John Henrickson
Lighting Execution Don Griffiths
Stage Manager Cynthia Burtinshaw
Assistant Stage Manager Bruce Dow
Wardrobe Jannette Bijde-Vaate
Properties Assistant David Hay
Stage Crew Students of Theatre 250
House Manager Carol Nesbitt
Box Office    Bruce Dow, Carol Fisher, Linda Humphries
Business Manager    Marjorie Fordham
Production        Norman Young
Vocal Coach Rod Menz
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Playhouse
les
Marjorie Nelson
Artist in Residence
The    Glass    Menagerie    marks    Ms.
Nelson's    third    appearance    at    the
Frederic    Wood    Theatre,    having
previously acted in The Trojan Women
and Mother Courage, both under the
direction   of   Klaus   Strassman.   Ms.
Nelson   was    also   seen    in    Samuel
Beckett's   Happy   Days   and   Play   at
Simon    Fraser    University    with    the
Floating Theatre Company, under the
direction of Arne Zaslove. For many years Ms. Nelson has
performed in professional theatre, in Hollywood, on and off
Broadway and in regional theatres nationally. Ms. Nelson's
home base is Seattle and she has been in over 50 productions
at the Seattle Repertory and in other Seattle theatres as well.
Her most recent appearances were at the New York Public
Theatre in Michael Weller's The Ballad of Soapy Smith and in
Seattle at the A.C.T. in Sam Shepard's True West.  Late this
season Ms. Nelson will be seen at the Empty Space Theatre in
C. Churchill's new play. Ms. Nelson is a London graduate of
the Alexander Technique and presently teaches at the Cornish
School in Seattle. She would like to dedicate this performance
to Victor Steinbrueck.
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H — A Note On The Play -
By William Inge
The Glass Menagerie was a great surprise to me when I saw it,
during the first week of its try-out in Chicago, a few nights before
the new year (1945) was celebrated, for I had met the play's
author a few weeks previously in St. Louis and not suspected him
of genius. Here, obviously, was a greater man than the one I had
taken to be accompanying me to concerts and movies and bars
while he visited his family in St. Louis. When I left the theatre, I
felt uncertain how to talk to the new image I had of him. I felt
very stupid for having taken him for no more than his shyness
would permit him to express of himself in social situations.
The play still remains in my memory as the most moving
American play I have ever seen. The newness of its production
when I saw it, and of all its fine performances, still shone on the
play like the gloss on a new piece of silver. The acting of the late
Laurette Taylor was of a calibre I had never seen before; the
quality of the writing was a bright illumination in the dim course
of American drama. I was conscious, upon leaving the theatre, of
having seen a landmark made.
But at the same time there was little evidence in Chicago that
anyone else felt similarly. The play had received excellent notices
but the audicences were not attracted to it. The night I saw it, the
theatre was about half-filled. The producers, I was told, were
giving up their plans to bring the show into New York.
I was very bitter to think that such a beautiful play might have so
short a life. But the happy ending finally came about, as surely as
in a melodrama, the hero being such an unlikely group as the
critics, all of whom began to work overtime writing articles urging
people into the theatre. Business improved and the play's destiny
was assured. It may be discouraging to think that the recognition
of greatness can depend upon such precarious perception, but
maybe Euripides had to take the same chances.
lulie Haydon, Laurette Taylor, New York, 1941
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(604) 683-0333 Announcement
University
Productions Inc.
is pleased to announce that
it has been awarded the
contract to publish
The Vancouver Playhouse
Program Magazines
for the 1985/86 Season
at the
Queen Elizabeth
Playhouse Theatre.
The Season includes:
Goodnight Disgrace
September 21 - October 9
Who's Afraid of
Virginia Woolf
October 26 - November 23
Season's Greetings
November 30 December 29
Of Mice and Men
January 4 - February 7
Noises Off
February 15 - March 15
A Chorus Line
March 29 - April 26
For information on
advertising rates and
closing dates call:
Director of Sales:
Doug Henderson
687-7763
Publisher:
Joseph G. MacKinnon
738-7768
A Memory
By Kenneth Tynan
In Spain, where I saw him last, he looked profoundly Spanish. He
might have passed for one of those confidential street dealers
who earn their living selling spurious Parker pens in the cafes of
Malaga or Valencia. Like them, he wore a faded chalk-striped
shirt, a coat slung over his shoulders, a trim, dark moustache, and
a sleazy, fat-cat smile. His walk, like theirs, was a raffish saunter,
and everything about him seemed slept in, especially his hair, a
nest of small, wet serpents. Had we been in Seville and his clothes
had been more formal, he could have been mistaken for a
pampered elder son idling away a legacy in dribs and on drabs,the
sort you see sitting in windows along the Sierpes, apparently
stuffed. In Italy he looks Italian; in Greece, Greek; wherever he
travels on the Mediterranean coast, Tennessee Williams takes on
a protective colouring which melts him into his background, like
a lizard on a rock.
It is unmistakably the face of a nomad. Wherever Williams goes
he is a stranger, one who lives out of suitcases and has a trick of
making any home he acquires resemble, within ten minutes, a
hotel apartment. Like most hypochondriacs, he is an uneasy guest
on earth. When he sold the film rights of his play Cat on a Hot Tin
Roof for a half a million dollars, he asked that the payment
should be spread over ten years, partly out of prudence but
mostly out of a manic suspicion, buzzing in his ears, that in ten
years' time he might be dead. He says justly of himself that he is
'a driven person'. The condemned tend always to be lonely, and
one of Williams' favourite quotations is a line from a play which
runs: 'We're all of us sentenced to solitary confinement inside our
own skins.' He says such things quite blandly, with a thick chuckle
which is as far from cynicism as it is from self-pity.
To be alone at forty is to be really alone, and Williams has passed
forty. In a sense, of course, solitude is a condition of his trade. All
writing is an anti-social act, since the writer is a man who can
speak freely only when alone; to be himself he must lock himself
up,      to   communicate   he   must   cut   himself   off   from   all
10 communication; and in this there is something always a little
mad. Many writers loathe above all sounds the closing of the door
which seals them up in their privacy. Williams, by contrast,
welcomes it: it dispels the haze of uncertainty through which he
normally converses, and releases for his pleasure the creatures
who people his imaginings — desperate women, men nursing
troublesome secrets, untouchables whom he touches with
frankness and mercy, society's derelict rag dolls.
He longs for intimacy, but shrinks from its responsibilities.
Somewhere in the past, before he became famous, lies the one
perfect passion; its object parted from him and afterwards died of
cancer. Since then, too cautious to spoil perfection by trying to
repeat it, he has kept all emotional relationships deliberately
casual. He will incur no more emotional debts, nor extend any
more emotional credit. His friendships are many and generous,
ranging from Mediterranean remittance men to Carson
McCullers; but love is a sickness which he will do anything to
avoid. If his deeper instincts crave release, you may find him at a
bullfight — or even writing a play.
Discussing the incidence of genius, Somerset Maugham once
remarked: 'The lesson of anatomy applies: there is nothing so rare
as the normal.' Williams's view of life is always abnormal,
heightened and spotlighted, and slashed with bogey shadows. The
marvel is that he makes it touch ours, thereby achieving the
miracle of communication between human beings which he has
always held to be impossible.
Yet he looks anonymous. One ends, as one began, with the
enigma. Arthur Miller, after all, looks Lincolnesque, and Anouilh
looks hypersensitive, and Sartre looks crazy. Williams, alone of
the big playwrights, seems miscast. From that round, rubbery
face, those dazed eyes which nothing, no excess or enormity, can
surprise — from there the message comes, the latest bulletin from
the civil war between purity and squalor. It will always, however
long or well I know him, seem wonderfully strange.
jh
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Tickets: VTC OC i
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Credit Card Line: 280-4444     Information: 736-pSZ
■   ..   .
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