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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Major Barbara Jan 15, 1986

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 Frederic Wood Theatre
Barbara $'   Before and
UNION BUILDING
LOWER CONCOURSE
T0K1TJL1NI5
TOOD TOK 1MGHT
UNIVERSITY (
BRITISH COLOMBIA
613RSUB Boulevard
After the Show!   AL
ESTERN CANADA'S
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Gome On Over 8c You'll Be Surprised!
Western Canada's
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B38 Park Royal North
West Vancouver
922-7123 University of
British Columbia
FREDERIC
u
niversity of British Columbia
WOOD
THEATRE
Coming Up
Frederic Wood Theatre
Shakespeare                               Marth5-l5
presents
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS
Regretfully,  the  Frederic  Wood
Theatre   has  had  to  cancel   its
plans to produce The Thirty Nine
k    A         •
Steps    due    to    unforeseen
Major
copyright   difficulties.   We   are,
however,   working   on    another
project with John Gray, details of
which we hope to be able to an-
Barbara
nounce shortly.
For information & Reservations
PHONE 228-2678
by
Frederic Wood Theatre
George Bernard Shaw
Magazine
PUBLISHER
Joseph G. MacKinnon
directed by
DIRECTOR OF SALES
Doug Henderson
Antony Holland
A seasonal publication of
University Productions Inc.
3591 West Eleventh Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
January 15-25
738-7768
1986
Any comments or enquiries
regarding the contents of this
publication may be forwarded 1o
the publisher at the
above address j\iUKOinjet'
Gnstmber
Gtioir
presents
Wed. Feb 5
8:00 Orpheum
(A great stocking staffer)
ON SALE NOW!!!
VTC/CBO OUTLETS,
EATON'S & WOODWARD'S
CREDIT CARD LINE: 280-4444
INFORMATION: 738-6822
This performance is one of a series
of Canadian cultural events        =:r=r^
sponsored by IBM Canada Ltd.   -S-.SIr.fr
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When it's time for a
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• ••
George Bernard Shaw
A Chronology
1856 George Bernard Shaw born in Dublin, Ireland, July 26th.
1876 Arrived in London to make his way.
1879-83 Wrote five unsuccessful novels in laborious succession:
Immaturity, 1879; Irrational Knot, 1880; Love Among the
Artists, 1881; Cashel Byron's Profession, 1882; and An Unsocial Socialist, 1883.
1882 Heard  Henry George, American author of Progress and
Poverty, address a London Meeting. It "changed the
whole current of my life." Read Marx's Das Kapital at the
British Museum. It "made a man of me."
1884 Fabian Society formed; Shaw elected a member.
1890 Wrote Quintessence of Ibsen ism.
1888-94 Brilliant success as music critic.
1892 First play, Widower's Houses, produced.
1893 Mrs. Warren's Profession banned. First produced in 1902.
1894 Arms and the Man and Candida. Shaw's first stage successes.
1895-98 London's leading drama critic in  Frank Harris' Saturday
Review.
1896 You Never Can Tell.
1898 Married Charlotte Payne-Townsend, an heiress and fellow
Socialist.
1899 Wrote Captain Brassbound's Conversion for Ellen Terry,
and Caesar and Cleopatra.
1901-03 Man and Superman (produced in 1905) began Shaw's great
period. First play to have full-scale Shavian preface.
1904-07 Vedrenne and Granville Barker Court Theatre productions
of Shaw, Shakespeare, and Euripides establish Shaw's permanent theatrical reputation with 701 performances of
eleven Shaw plays.
1905 Major Barbara.
1906 The Doctor's Dilemma. Bought "Shaw's Corner" at Ayot
St. Lawrence.
1908 Getting Married.
1911 Androcles and the Lion.
1912 Pygmalion. Shaw sculpted by Rodin.
1914 Courageous and much reviled attack on super-patriotism
and the insanity of war, Commonsense About the War.
1913-16 Heartbreak House (produced in 1920).
1921 Back    to    Methuselah,    Shaw's    "Metabiological
Pentateuch."
1923 Saint Joan.
1925 Awarded Nobel Prize for Literature.
1928 The    Intelligent    Woman's    Guide    to    Socialism    and
Capitalism.
1929 The Apple Cart.
1947 Wrote   last  complete   play   at  the  age  of  91:   Buoyant
Billions. His career as a publishing writer exceeded seventy years.
1950 Shaw died at his home in Ayot St. Lawrence, November
2nd. Photo of George Bernard Shaw © 1943, KARSH, Ottawa/Miller Services MAJOR B
Bernarc
Directed by Anl
With Leon Pownefl
f
Set Costumes Lighting
designed by designed by designed by
Alison Green        Jannette Bijde-Vaate    Marsha Sibthorpe
CAST
LADY BRIT Kathryn Bracht
STEPHEN Bruce Harwood
SARAH Katey Wright
BARBARA Sarah Rodgers (January 16,18, 21, 23, 25)
Laura White (January 15, 17, 20, 22, 24)
CUSINS Philip Spedding
CHARLES LOMAX Stefan Winfield
MORRISON, BILTON    Don McAdam
RUMMY MITCHINS Tanja Dixon-Warren
SNOBBY PRICE   Chris Rosati
JENNY    Corrine Hebden
PETER SHIRLEY Michael Fera
BILL WALKER   Darren Andrichuk
MRS. BAINES Carol Nesbitt
Act One
It is after dinner in January, 1906, in the library of Lady Britomart
Undershaft's house in Wilton Crescent.
Act Two
The yard of the West Ham shelter of the Salvation Army on a cold
January morning.
INTERMISSION
Act Three; Scene One
The next day, after lunch in Lady Britomart's library in Wilton
Crescent.
Act Three; Scene Two
Perivale,  St. Andrew's at the Undershaft and  Lazarus Cannon
Foundry.
**Mr. Holland and Mr. Pownall who are currently Artists in
Residence, appear through the courtesy of Canadian Actors'
Equity Association. tARBARA
'Y
d Shaw
itony Holland*
111* as Undershaft
PRODUCTION
Technical Director Ian Pratt
Properties Mistress Sherry Darcus
Costume Supervisor Rosemarie Heselton
Lighting Execution Debbie Starr, John Henrickson
Set Construction Don Griffiths, Robert Eberle
Cutter Charlotte Burke
Wardrobe Mistress Jannette Bijde-Vaate
Stage Manager David Hay
Assistant Stage Managers . Michael Groberman, Wayne LaRiviere
Properties Assistant Cynthia Burtinshaw
Make-up Cynthia Johnston
Musical Director Bruce Dow
House Manager   Craig Duffy
Box Office Bruce Dow, Carol Fisher, Linda Humphries
Business Manager Marjorie Fordham
Production Norman Young
Scenic Artists David Roberts, Larry Osland
Vocal Coach Rod Menzies
MAJOR BARBARA
is produced by special arrangement with
SAMUEL FRENCH (Canada) Ltd.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Vancouver Playhouse
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ir ELI PRODUCTIONS INC.
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CUT THIS OUT
TRAVEL TALKS
Robson Square Media Centre
800 Robson St.
Sundays, 2 p.m. (sharp) to 4:30 p.m.
*3 at door
or $2 in advance from WestCan Treks
Programme
Sun. 12 Jan. CHINA
Sun. 26 Jan. AUSTRALIA
Sun.    9 Feb. PERU
Sun.    2 Mar. THAILAND
Sun. 16 Mar. EGYPT
Sun.     6 Apr. INDIA
Sun. 20 Apr. EUROPE
Sun.      4 May NEPAL
TRAVEL TALKS cover sights, hotels,
climate, flights, hints. Personal movies and slides are narrated by the
speaker, RUSSELL JENNINGS.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION,
and for your flights or tours, contact:
WESTCAN TREKS and TRAVEL
3415 West Broadway
Vancouver, B.C. V6R 2B4
Tel.: 734-1066
G.B.S. on Major Barbara
In reviving a play 24 years old, I shall find myself, as usual, up against that
sanguine belief in progress which classes everything unpleasant with old
unhappy far-off things and battles long ago. Quite recently a play of mine on
the subject of marriage was criticized as out of date because it dealt with
abuses that have long since disappeared. As a matter of fact the only abuse
which had disappeared in the meantime was one which was not mentioned in
the play. Every proposal to remedy the others has been funked and rebuffed. I
therefore venture to offer our amateurs of progress a hint or two as to how the
passage of time has affected the actuality of Major Barbara.
First, the problem of the unemployed, with which the Salvation Army is
seen struggling in the play, grew to an unprecedented magnitude in 1920; and
as the unemployed now consist to a considerable extent of demobilized
soldiers, and their successors with the colours do not enjoy the confidence of
the Government in the matter of compelling them to starve, the old restraints
upon indiscriminate outdoor relief under the Poor Law have been thrown to
the winds, bankrupting the Guardians in all the centres of unemployment, and
sending up rates and taxes to a point at which Major Barbara's poverty on
£7,000 a year has become titled destitution on little more than half that pittance.
In consequence 'the bribe of bread' which so troubled Major Barbara is
now anticipated by a variety of so-called doles, ranging from unemployment
insurance benefit to outdoor relief to wives and children, and even to
ablebodied men under pretexts available for easy going guardians (not, by the
way, always Labor Guardians). But there are still ablebodied men, out of
benefit and without wives or children, who are as destitute as Peter Shirley in
the play; and unfortunately the typical cases are not now those of skilled men
'too old at 46,' but of young men who have never had any industrial training.
Having grown up since the great industrial debacle of 1920, they have had
their mouths stopped with Poor Rates, Lord Mayors' Funds, and doles of one
sort or another until, if there were any commercial employment within their
reach, they would be unemployable for want of the habit and training of
steady work. Only in the case of the soldier is it recognised that he must be
kept in full health and training between his jobs. For the civilian, we think it
enough to throw the poor fellow a good natured half-crown, and hurry away
in the opposite direction whilst he goes to the devil.
When the war came Undershaft and Lazarus did not do so well as was expected of them, because Lazarus had obtained too much control; and after a
frightful slaughter of our young men through insufficient munitions the
Government had to organize the business in national factories and to send
public officials to teach Lazarus how to conduct as much of it as was left to
him. But the moment the war was over, Undershaft and Lazarus came back
with all their newspapers shouting that they had saved the country, and that
the national factories were sinks of corruption and incompetence. They then
plunged into an orgy of over capitalization followed by wholesale repudiation, which they called reconstruction and stabilization; so that every blunder
and every swindle on their part left the public more and more impressed with
their gigantic grasp of business and finance, incidentally providing our
playwrights with materials for much tragic farce.
"Undershaft", however, survived the wreck. His policy of high wages and
ruthless scrapping of obsolete methods proved more lucrative than sweating
and doing what was done last time. His well-paid employees became his best
customers. He emerged in fiction as Clissold and fact as John Ford. And the
spectacle of his successes in making money gave great satisfaction to the
huge majority who have rather less chance of achieving it themselves than of
winning the Calcutta Sweep.
West Ham meanwhile is in the same old mess as when the play was written,
except that the rates have risen to such impossible heights that the Government has had the brilliant idea of camouflaging them by adding them to the
rents. The Salvation Army still spends in a struggle with poverty the zeal that
was meant for a struggle with sin and the money that Undershaft and Bodger
subscribe for the reasons set forth in the play. And the author is still of opinion
that the best comedies for British audiences are those which they themselves
provide by trying to run an international civilization on the precepts of our
village Sunday Schools and the outlook of our suburban nurseries.
(When MAJOR BARBARA was revived at Wyndham's Theatre on March 5,
1929, this note by Shaw was printed in the programme.) Shaw and the World of
Major Barbara
By Peter Lewis
Major Barbara was the third new Shaw play to be presented at the Court
Theatre in 1905, Shaw's annus mirabilis. He had made his reputation for
comedy in March, when the King attended a command performance of John
Bull's Other Island and laughed so much that he broke his chair Man and
Superman, shorn of the Don Juan in Hell act, played to packed houses in October and, in November, came Major Barbara With these three plays, Shaw
converted the theatre into a forum of ideas and debate, where audiences
came to be provoked, to be forced to think and to carry on the argument
after the curtain fell. He was in his 50th year and he had indisputably arrived
before the general public as England's leading playwright.
Poverty and the Salvation Army
Shaw's theme in Major Barbara was poverty and what could or should be
done about it. It was a timely subject. Although Britain was still at the summit of her imperial power in 1905, there were nearly a million people receiving Poor Law relief. One person in 36 was a pauper, over two-thirds of them
women and children In London the proportion was higher, one person in 31.
On 1 lanuary 1905, there were in London, 148,000 paupers, including 1,365
"casual paupers", most of them described as vagrants, who spent the night
on the streets or in the workhouse casual wards, or Spikes.
Their number had increased substantially since 1878, when William Booth
founded the Salvation Army and became its first General. In 1888 the Army
had opened its first hostel for down-and-outs (it still runs many today).
Booth's book, In Darkest England, claimed that one person in ten lived
"below the standard of the London cab-horse", which was at least assured
of food, shelter and warmth. From the beginning women enjoyed equal
status with men in the Salvation Army as officers, soldiers and preachers,
thanks to his wife, Catherine Booth's initiative. There were many Major
Barbaras
Arms and Armourers
In 1905 (the year the first Dreadnought was built) the biggest arms makers
in Britain were Armstrong, VickerS and tHe Nobel Dynamite Trust Sit
William (later Lord) Armstrong had built up his firm until it was second only
to Alfried Krupp, selling armaments from China to Peru. To Armstrong's
mansion on Tyneside came (in person) the Shah of Persia, the King of Siam,
the Emir of Afghanistan and many a military delegation to buy arms. "Those
who use the means we supply must be responsible for their legitimate application," said Armstrong, who professed to believe that the new engines of
war would make war less barbarous.
Alfred Nobel, who patented dynamite in 1867, bringing himself an immense fortune, was a strange, withdrawn, misanthropic man who wrote
poetry in imitation of Shelley. He was interested in pacifism but claimed
"My factories may end war sooner than your peace congresses. The day two
army corps can destroy each other in one second, all civilised nations will
recoil from war and disband their armies. "This was not Shaw's belief. Says
Undershaft: "The more destructive war becomes, the more fascinating we
find it." Who was the greater realists
ENTER
ANOTHER WORLD
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SALES ^^      RENTALS
1829 West 4th Ave.
at Burrard    734-0411 Photosoc
The
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Jan. 20-25 in the
Art Gallery
Located
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A Note On Major Barbara
Shaw's attitude to General Booth's Army was very friendly,
but he might not have thought of writing "Major Barbara" had
he not trounced in print someone who had written to the papers
describing an orchestral performance as "worse than a Salvation
Army band". Shaw's reply drew from the delighted General an
invitation to the Salvation Army Festival of Massed Bands. After
writing a professional musical criticism of this performance,
Shaw suggested the Army's lads and lassies should act plays as
well as sing and play in bands and added: "Why not a little play
by me?" This notion of a playlet for the Salvation Army grew into a three act play for the Court Theatre under the Vedrenne-
Barker management.
The play was first titled "Andrew Undershaft's Profession" to
make the point that, although munition-making is supposed to
be discreditable, it is not, and, if used to produce better conditions for its employees, it is doing good. Later Shaw decided it
should be called "Major Barbara" and offered the name part to
Ada Rehan. The completion of the play was delayed and on
September 17th, 1905, Shaw wrote that he was in a condition of
sullen desparation concerning it. However, the production went
into rehearsal a month later but Ada Rehan, who had met with
an accident, was not able to play the title role and Annie Russell
took the lead, with Louis Calvert as "Undershaft" and Granville
Barker as "Cusins".
The first performance of the play on November 28th, 1905,
was received with "mingled delight and exasperation" by an audience including the Prime Minister, "all the intelligentsia of
London" and a box full of Salvation Army commissioners who
viewed the production as an excellent advertisement for their
organisation and lent the uniforms to the Management in the interest of authenticity.
Years later, in 1937, Sir Winston Churchill, writing in "Great
Contemporaries" referred to Bernard Shaw as "the greatest living master of letters in the English-speaking world", and related
how he had recently taken his children to see a production of
"Major Barbara", the "very acme of modernity". It had been
twenty years since he had seen it, "the most terrific years" the
world had known, in which the landmarks of centuries had been
swept away and science had transformed the conditions of our
lives and the aspect of town and country. But, said Sir Winston,
in this play "there was not a character requiring to be re-drawn,
not a sentence, not a suggestion that was out of date."
CD. Antony Holland
Antony Holland has had a distinguished
career in the theatre, with a long list of
credits as actor and director. He is currently busy as an actor, and last year
won the Jessie Award for the best performance in a Leading Role (in the Arts
Club Production of S. Snukal's Family
Matters). In 1985 he directed Dylan
Thomas' Under Milk Wood for the U BC
Summer Stock Company. Mr. Holland
has recently completed work on three
movies; in one of them he played opposite Katharine Hepburn.
Leon Pownall
Mr. Pownall has worked in the theatre
as an actor, director, writer and
educator for over 25 years. A veteran of
the Stratford and Shaw Festivals, the
Manitoba Theatre Centre, The Guthrie
Theatre in Minneapolis, the Neptune
Theatre in Halifax, the Vancouver
Playhouse, the Seattle Repertory, and
many others, this award-winning Canadian of Welsh ancestry enjoys the
respect of his wide audience. For the
Frederic Wood Theatre he has directed
The Firebugs and he has played the title
role in Shakespeare's King Lear.
Alison Green
Set Design
Alison Green graduated from UBC in 1965 in Fine Arts. From
1967-1974 she worked as a set designer for CBC TV. Since 1974
she has been the resident designer for the Arts Club Theatre,
responsible for shows like Reflections on Crooked Walking, The
Sea Horse, A Cuckoo in the Nest, Twelfth Night, and many others,
Marsha Sibthorpe
Lighting Design
Marsha Sibthorpe is Resident Lighting Designer at the Arts Club
Theatre and most recently lit Ann Mortifee's We/come to the
Planet and Nicola Cavendish's Snowing on Saltspring for that
theatre. She has also worked with the New Play Centre, Axis
Mime, Carousel Theatre, and has designed the lighting for Ann
Mortifee's concert appearances.
Wong,
Obahi,
Seims
& Lee
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11 He seemed larger than life.
Saw things with more clarity. More brilliance. More impact.
Some said it was the Pentax 645, a professional format motor drive SLR that he
handled with the agility of a 35mm.
Who could have guessed that a medium
format camera with all the latest automatic
modes still could be had at a price that compared to a premium 35mm SLR outfit?
It just didn't seem possible.
Naturally, the negatives and transparencies his 645 produced were twice as large as a 35.
Could that explain why his pictures
look twice as good?
PENTAX
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Innovation for Inspiration

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