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Jacques and his Master Nov 16, 1988

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6200 University Boulevard, Vancouver • Telephone 228-4741
Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8:30am-5:00pm
Wednesday 8:30am-8:30pm / Saturday 9:30am-5:00pm
University of British Columbia
Frederic Wood Theatre
presents
Jacques
and his
Master
By
Milan Kundera
Directed By
Charles Siegel
November 16-26
1988
The Frederic Wood Theatre Magazine
A Seasonal Publication of University Productions Inc.
For further information regarding this
and upcoming publications call:
(604) 732-7708 MILAN    KUNDERA   THE    LIGHTNESS    OF    WRITING
Milan Kundera
The Lightness of Writing
Beauty
Beauty, the last triumph possible for man who can no longer hope.
Beauty in art: the suddenly kindled light of the never-before-said.
This light that radiates from the great novels time can never dim, for
human existence is perpetually being forgotten by man, and thus the
novelists' discoveries, however old they may be, will never cease to
astonish us.
Border
It takes so little, so infinitely little, for a person to cross the border
beyond which everything loses meaning: love, convictions, faith,
history. Human life - and herein lies its secret - takes place in the
immediate proximity of that border, even in direct contact with it; it
is not miles away, but a fraction of an inch.
Comic
-Dy providing us with the lovely illusion of human greatness, the
tragic brings us consolation. The comic is cruder: it brutally reveals
the meaninglessness of everything. I suppose all things human have
their comic aspect, which in certain cases is recognized,
acknowledged, utilized, and in others is veiled. The real geniuses of
the comic are not those who make us laugh hardest but those who
reveal some unknown realm of the comic. History has always been
considered an exclusively serious territory. But there is the
undiscovered comic side to history. Just as there is the (hard-to-
take) comic side to sexuality.
yffcpi.- Sfa/fc hartj
THREE MILAN    KUNDERA   THE    LIGHTNESS    OF    WRITING
Misomusist
1 o be without a feeling for art is no disaster. A person can live in
peace without reading Proust or listening to Schubert. But the
misomusist does not live in peace. He feels humiliated by the
existence of something that is beyond him, and he hates it. There is
a popular misomusy just as there is popular anti-Semitism. The
fascist and Communist regimes made use of it when they declared
war on modern art. But there is an intellectual, sophisticated
misomusy as well: it takes revenge on art by forcing it to a purpose
beyond the aesthetic. The doctrine of engage art: art as an instrument
of politics. The professors for whom a work of art is merely the
pretext for deploying a method (psychoanalytic, semiological,
sociological, etc.). The apocalypse of art: the misomusists will
themselves take on the making of art; thus will their historic
vengeance be done.
Wisdom
There is a fine Jewish proverb: Man thinks, God laughs. Inspired
by that adage, I like to imagine that Francois Rabelais heard God's
laughter one day, and thus was born the idea of the first great
European novel. It pleases me to think that the art of the novel came
into the world as the echo of God's Laughter.
But why does God laugh at the sight of man thinking? Because man
thinks and the truth escapes him. Because the more men think, the
more one man's thought diverges from another's. And finally,
because man is never what he thinks he is. The dawn of the Modern
Era revealed this fundamental situation of man as he emerged from
the Middle Ages: Don Quixote thinks, Sancho thinks, and not only
the world's truth but also the truth of their own selves slips away
from them. The first European novelists saw, and grasped, that new
situation of man, and on it they built the new art, the art of the
novel.
FOUR
MILAN    KUNDERA   THE    LIGHTNESS    OF    WRITING
The Art of the Novel
Of all the novels of the 18th century, it is Laurence Sterne's
Tristram Shandy I love best. A curious novel. Sterne starts it by
describing the night when Tristram was conceived, but he has barely
begun to talk about that when another idea suddenly attracts him,
and by free association that idea spurs him to some other thought,
then a further anecdote, with one digression leading to another - and
Tristram, the book's hero, is forgotten for a good hundred pages.
This extravagant way of composing the novel might seem no more
than a formal game. But in art, the form is always more than a form.
Every novel, like it or not, offers some answer to the question: What
is human existence, and wherein does its poetry lie? Sterne's
contemporaries - Fielding, for instance - particularly savored the
extraordinary charm of action and adventure. The answer we sense
in Sterne's novel is a very different one: for him the poetry lies not
in the action but in the interruption of the action.
It may be that, indirectly, a grand dialogue took shape here between
the novel and philosophy. Eighteenth-century rationalism is based
on Leibniz's famous declaration: Nihil est sine ratione - there is
nothing without its reason. Stimulated by that conviction, science
energetically explores the why of everything, such that whatever
exists seems explainable, thus predictable, calculable. The man who
wants his life to have a meaning forgoes any action that hasn't its
cause and its purpose. All biographies are written this way.
Against that reduction of the world to the casual succession of
events, Sterne's novel, by its very form, affirms that poetry lies not
in action but there where action stops; there where the bridge
between a cause and an effect has collapsed and thought wanders off
in sweet lazy liberty. The poetry of existence, says Sterne's novel,
is in digression. It is in the incalculable. It is on the other side of
causality. It is sine ratione, without reason. It is on the other side
of Leibniz's statement.
FIVE MILAN   KUNDERA  THE   LIGHTNESS   OF   WRITING
Valet and Master
With an illiterate peasant as his servant, Don Quixote left his house
one day to do battle with his enemies. One hundred and fifty years
later, Toby Shandy made his garden into a large model of a
battlefield; there he gave himself over to memories of his soldierly
youth, faithfully assisted by his valet Trim. He limped, just like
Jacques who, ten years later, entertained his master during his
voyage. He was as chatty and opinionated as, a hundred and fifty
years later in the Austro-Hungarian army, the orderly Josef Svetjk,
who so amused and horrified his master, Lieutenant Lukac. Thirty
years later, waiting for Godot, Vladimir and his servant already find
themselves alone on the empty stage of the world. The voyage is at
an end.
The valet and his master have crossed the whole of modern
Western history. In Prague, a city of the big farewell, I heard their
dwindling laughter. With love and anguish, I held on to that laughter
the way one holds on to fragile and perishable things which are
doomed.
Idyll
A word rarely used in France, but a concept important to Hegel,
Goethe, Schiller, the condition of the world before the first conflict;
or beyond conflicts; or with conflicts that are only misunderstandings, thus false conflicts. "Even though he enjoyed a
colourful erotic life, the middle-aged man was basicly of an idyllic
temperament..." (Life Is Elsewhere). The desire to reconcile erotic
adventure and idyll is the very essence of hedonism - and the reason
why it is impossible.
Selections from The Art of the Novel by Milan Kundera, translated
from the French by Linda Asher. ©1988 Grove Press, Inc.
New York, N.Y. Used By Permission.The Art of the Novel is distributed in
Canada by General Publishing and is available at the UBC Bookstore.
six
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— ^Cya/b/i/e'
Costume Design By
Mara Gottler Directed By
Charles Siegel
Jacques and his Master
An Homage to Diderot in Three Acts
By Milan Kundera
PRODUCTION
Set Design and Lighting Design By
Robert Gardiner
Costume Design By
Mara Gottler
CAST
(in order of appearance)
Master Roland Brand
Jacques Jamie Binkley
Chevalier de Saint-Ouen John Murphy
Agathe Suzanne Buchan-Grieder
Justine Susan Bertoia
Young Bugger Kurt Eby
Old Bugger Denis Johnston
Innkeeper Lisa Beley
Marquis des Arcis Jason Smith
Mother/Agathe's Mother Eliza Green-Moncur
Daughter Kathleen Duborg
Police Officer/Waiter/Peasant Christopher Lea
Agathe's Father/Waiter/Peasant Troy Skog
Bailiff/Waiter Omar Diaz
There will be two 10 minute intermissions.
Jacques and his Master
is produced by special arrangement with
Elisabeth Marton - Tonda Marton
96 Fifth Ave. New York, N.Y. 10011
Technical Director Ian Pratt
Properties Sherry Milne
Costume Supervisor Chelsea Moore
Set Construction. Don Griffiths, John Henrickson,
Robert Moser, Randall Plitt
Costume Cutter (Ladies) Jean Driscoll-Bell
Costume Cutter (Gentlemen) Leslie White
Wigs Terry Kuzyk
Stage Manager Erin E. Jarvis
Assistant Stage Manager Lisa Roy
Wardrobe Mistress Catherine King
Costume Assistants Jill Buckham, Catherine King
Douglas Falbo, Bill Rasmussen
Lighting Operator Randall Plitt
Sound Operator Nancy Lyons
Assistant Lighting Designer Alan Brodie
Lighting Crew Glen Winter
Assistant to the Director LaVonne Girard
Properties Assistant Corin Gutteridge
Scene Painters Kairiin Bright, Paula Pryce
Scene Shop Assistants Jamie Binkley, Bruce Cobanli
Make Up Nick Davis
Crew Amethyst First Rider, Lilli Wong
Scenic Artist David Roberts
Box Office Carol Fisher, Linda McRae, Jason Smith
House Manager Nik Von Schulmann
Business Manager Marjorie Fordham
Production Robert Eberle
Acknowledgements
Vancouver Playhouse
Dr. Marketa Goetz-Stankiewicz
Dr. Ann Scott
Les Ferch
Charles Tremewen AN  HISTORICAL  PERSPECTIVE
An Historical Perspective
Czechoslovakia 1968: The Theatrical and Literary Scene.
Vaclav Havel's bitingly funny play The Memorandum is running
at the Theatre On the Balustrade in Prague; Josef Topol's
psychological chamber play An Hour of Love has its premiere near
by at the Theatre Behind the Gate; Milan Uhde's farce about kings
as asses and asses as kings is making headlines in Brno; Pavel
Kohout's circus play about a tragic clown August, August, August
draws crowds to Prague's Vinohrady Theatre; Ivan Khma's Kafka
play The Castle is being translated for performance in Germany;
Pavel Landovsky's existentialist farce Rooms by the Hour is being
rehearsed at the Drama Club Theatre in Prague; Peter Karvas's
Stoppardian play The Great Wig has had a long run at the Bratislava
National Theatre; Alena Vostra's haunting On the Knife's Edge is
reviewed enthusiastically in Prague Theatre journals; Josef
Skvorecky, the well-known novelist, is translating and editing
Hemingway and Faulkner; the writer Jiri Grusa is editor of the
weekly New Books; Milan Simecka teaches philosophy at
Comenius University in Bratislava; Milan Kundera, writer and
professor at the academy of Arts in Prague, lectures to eager
students about the problems and potential of literature.
End of haphazard list of cultural activities which, if exhaustive,
would fill many pages.
Czechoslovakia 1988: The Changed Scene.
Seven of the above writers are still living at their home. The rest
have emigrated and are scattered in Austria, Germany, France and
Canada. The former, however, are not found in any official
collection of contemporary Czechoslovak literature; nor would a
literary tourist be able to see their plays on a Prague stage or
discover their works when browsing in one of the many bookstores
in Prague. These writers have become non-writers and their works
lead a shady existence in their home country, circulating
underground as "unbooks" in typescript, typed by anonymous loyal
TWELVE
AN       HISTORICAL     PERSPECTIVE
hands and read eagerly in faded sixth or eighth carbon copies. They
are keeping alive a throbbing culture that has not been able to speak
its mind in broad daylight because literature becomes a dangerous
and subversive weapon when a regime wants to impose a closed
system of absolute power.
For the Czechs, known for their deadpan humour and their
understated ironic view of the world, this situation has the definite
air of the deja vu about it. After all, they have become used to
censorship in various hues. Lodged at the very centre of Europe, the
coveted lands of Bohemia and Moravia mostly had someone else run
their country: the Austrians during the days of the Habsburg
Empire, the National Socialists during Hitler's occupation, a Soviet-
oriented government after 1948 until the political thaw of the mid-
sixties, and then again after the Soviet tanks rolled into Prague in
August 1968. In various degrees of intensity, Czech culture has
repeatedly been driven into sharply watched hiding, into an intensely
active ghetto existence where books are concealed in the most
unlikely places, carried around in briefcases as valuable but
dangerous cargo, avidly discussed, interpreted and analyzed behind
the thick closed doors of an apartment or under the benevolently
silent trees surrounding a country cottage. It is an odd mixture of
sadness and elation that arises when one realizes (and there exists
numerous volumes in many languages that illustrate this situation)
that samizdat literary culture in Czechoslovakia has been blossoming
in a somehow miraculous way, nourished by the talents and intense
dedication of writers and readers for whom literature still represents
the voice of truth.
There exists, of course, also an official literature and the theatres
(some thirty of them in Prague alone) are playing nightly to well-
attended houses. But the best of the national literature - best because
it speaks of things that cannot be contained in a prescriptive system -
has been silenced. It remains to be seen what the vast and
unpredictable changes of the present will bring.
THIRTEEN AN  HISTORICAL  PERSPECTIVE
The View from the West - The International Scene.
What the Western world knows about this is necessarily
fragmentary. Translations of samizdat texts appear here and there,
and snatches of writings of genius pop up arbitrarily in the vast and
overcrowded areas of international literary markets. Like corks they
bob on the surface, carried along on the waves of changing
interests, seemingly homeless, yet closely tied to a submerged net in
unplumbed depths. These literary corks pop up in bookform in
translations, from Swedish to Hebrew, from French to Chinese; or
else in international journals, on Swiss television, Norwegian radio,
British theatre stages, Canadian publications of poetry in translation.
Moreover several of the writers mentioned above have become well-
known literary figures: Vaclav Havel's plays and essays have been
translated into two dozen languages and his Faustian play
Temptation was performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company in
Britain. Josef Skvorecky, a Czech-Canadian writer now, is read in
various languages throughout the Western world. Jin Grusa's novel
The Questionnaire has become a text on the curriculum of North
American universities. But it is Milan Kundera who has become one
of the foremost figures in contemporary literature. In fact, his novel
The Unbearable Lightness of Being has become an international
bestseller of unmatched proportions. What is the reason for his vast
success? Is it his particular sense for the possibilities of the novel, as
he says himself? Is it his ability to merge a philosophical stance and
political, indeed documentary, aspects with erotic content? Is it the
fact that a troubled Central Europe has found an eloquent, if
disturbing spokesman in Kundera? Or is it that his cerebral style and
the classical clarity of his language are easier to translate than the
linguistic playfulness typical of other Slavic writers? These
questions may have to remain open; perhaps they are indeed mute
questions. One point, however, can be claimed: the writers of a
small nation in the eye of various political hurricanes have found a
chorus of voices the sound of which carries far beyond their
geographical border.
Marketa Goetz-Stankiewicz
Marketa Goetz-Stankiewicz is a professor of Germanic Studies
and Comparative Literature at UBC
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 222-5254	
THE
VANEK PLAYS
Four Authors,
One Character
Edited
by
Marketa Goetz-Stankiewicz
Eight powerful plays—seven
translated here for the first
time—share one hero,
"dissident" writer Ferdinand
Vanek, first created by
Vaclav Havel.
he $34.95        pb $17.95
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In seven relatively independent but closely
linked parts, Milan Kundera sets forth his
personal conception of the European novel
("the art born as the echo of God's laughter").
Is its history coming to an end? Today, in the
period of "terminal paradoxes," the novel
"cannot live in peace with the spirit of our
time:... if it is to go on 'progressing' as novel,
it can do so only against the progress of the
world."
The Art of the Novel by Milan Kundera, translated from the French
by Linda Asher. ©1988 Grove Press, Inc., New York, N.Y.
The Art of the Novel is distributed in Canada by General Publishing
and is available at the UBC Bookstore.
MOLAN
K;UN/D£fcA
A Note On University Productions Inc.
For six years University Productions Inc. has endeavored to
produce quality publications for individual authors, private
companies, arts organizations as well as educational institutions including high schools and universities.
Our production of the Frederic Wood Theatre magazine was our
first endeavor into the publishing arena. Over 2,000,000 pages later
we feel we are finally achieving what we set out to do in 1983: The
consistent publication of a 'magazine' that serves as a welcomed
source of information for the theatre audience.
While serving the theatre audience, this publication, this 'second
stage', also provides an important vehicle for authors and visual
artists, individuals who are instrumental in the theatrical process but
seldom have their work presented directly to the theatre audience.
Many visual artists including Karsh, Brian Jackson, Robert
Gardiner, Mara Gottler, Steve Hynes and Anita Skolleborg have
contributed to make the publication more attractive. Writers such as
Marketa Goetz-Stankiewicz, Jerry Wasserman, and Dominique
Baudouin have endeavored to make it more interesting.
The private sector, through our advertising agent Doug
Henderson, has also played an important role in making the
publication a financial possibility. Consistent advertisers such as the
Frog and Peach Restaurant, Video Matica, Panache and the Punjab
Restaurant demonstrate in a practical way how free-enterprise can
work with the academic and artistic community.
On-campus businesses such as UBC Media Services and the
UBC Bookstore also support the publication and thus bolster an
intra-university cooperation that benefits all parties involved.
I want to thank all these and others who have contributed, and
continue to do so, and thus make the Frederic Wood Theatre
Magazine a worthwhile endeavor. We welcome your comments on
our publication and would be happy to answer any enquiries
regarding advertising and other publishing projects.
J.G.M.
Please direct all enquiries to: Joseph G. MacKinnon, Publisher
C/O University Productions Inc. P.O. Box 46408 Station G
Vancouver, B.C. V6R 4G7 Phone: (604) 732-7708 Two For One
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For many years, about nine actually, The Frog and Peach has
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Character is more important than theme, and developing it takes
time, patience and a special ability to out-bluff the bank manager.
Good, comfortable, character restaurants, which offer honest
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Jack Moore Concludes:
The Frog and Peach has been entirely worthy of consideration
these past nine years or so, and continues to be so. And as for the
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