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The Crucible Nov 12, 1986

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 Frederic Wood Theatre
CRUCIBLE + + + + +
+ + + * + +
NOVEMBER A
BOOK4
SALE
Once again this year we have an unusual selection
of books in our sale, including:
- publishers' specially-priced and remaindered books
— a large selection of books for children
"hurts" from some of the finest publishers
■ UBC Library discards: books and records at bargain prices
— sale-priced textbooks
-^ap..       Sale starts November 12
'«   mSt BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard    228-4741
The Anthropology Shop
UBC Museum of Anmropalogy
Special Pre-Christmas Sale
CRAFTS FROM  AROUND THE WORLD!
Tuesday Nov. 18 11 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Wednesday Nov. 19 - Sunday Nov. 23
11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Members Day:
Mon. Nov. 17 11:00 a.m. to 8 p.m.
15% Discount with Membership Card
THE ART OF THE
POLISH POSTER
an Exhibit in the Lobby of the
Frederic Wood Theatre
arranged by
CHRIS MIRSKI
and
The Department of
Germanic Studies
The Department of
Slavonic Studies
The Department of Theatre
The art of Polish posters has long been well
known in Furope and in North America,
mainly due to a number of group
exhibitions In Poland itself, poster art is
considered just as important as the art of
film and the art of theatre A National
Exhibit of Posters takes place annually in
Warsaw, and the first Poster Museum was
founded in Wilanow. a Renaissance palace
near the Polish capital Posters enjoy
generous state support in Poland because
of their efficiency in the governments
propaganda efforts. Ironically, the
government has never had much luck in
imposing its dogma of socialist realism on
poster art
Even an inexperienced viewer can
immediately notice that these posters from
Poland are somehow different from what
we are accustomed to At first, one does
not realize why this is so Is it the rough and
thin paper they are printed on' Or is it the
colours, so bright and vivid? Or the lively,
aggressive brushstroke? Perhaps )an
l.enica, one of the most prominent Polish
poster artists, has answered this best: "A
good poster sings "
Polish posters are meant to be works of art
Most of the designers have spent years at
art schools, and have received specialized
degrees Franciszek Starowieiski, whose
work can be seen in this exhibit, received
his diploma from the Academy of Fine Arts
in Warsaw, which has over the last two
decades become the tenter of poster
studies One-man shows of Starowiejski's
work were organised in Warsaw, New
York, London, Rome, and many other
cultural centers At the International
Fxhibit of Paris in 1175 he received the
Crand Prix in recognition for his entire
work
Hryk Lipinski. a graduate from the same
Academy, is a graphic: artist and founder of
Poland's leading satirical weekly His work
has been presented at various exhibitions
around the world
)an Mlodozeniec received his art diploma
in 1955. He is internationally known as a
book illustrator, and has had various
exhibitions of his graphic work both in
Poland and abroad
loday, the art of the Polish poster is a
lively and unique contribution to the world
of graphic design I his exhibition shall help
to understand its beauty and importance ARTHUR MILLER
Chronology of Important Dates
1915      Arthur Miller born in New York City.
1936 Attends University of Michigan First play, Honors at Dawn,
produced  Wins Avery Hopwood Award.
1936 No Villain wins Hopwood Award and Theatre Guild Pri^e Miller
graduates from Michigan and joins the Federal Theatre Project.
1940      Marries Mary Slattery
1944 The Man Who Had All The Luck — his first liroadway production.
Situation Normal published.
1945 His novel. Focus, published.
1947      Alt My Sons produced
1949 Death of a Salesman produced and wins Pulitzer Prize
1950 His adaptation of Ibsen's An tnemy of the People produced
195i      The Crucible produced.
1955 A Memory of two Mondays and the one-act version of A View from
the Bridge produced.
195b He appears before House Un-American Activities Committee and
refuses to inform on others. The revised two-act version of A View
from the Bridge produced in London Receives an honorary
doctorate from the University of Michigan Divorces Mary Slattery
and marries Marilyn Monroe.
1957 Convicted for contempt of Congress. Collected Plays published.
1958 Contempt conviction reversed Elected to the National Institute of
Arts and Letters
1960 Fie and Marilyn Monroe divorced.
1961 The Misfits released
1962 Marries Inge Morath; daughter Rebecca born.
1964 After The Fall is premiere production of Repertory Theatre of
Lincoln Center  incident at Vichy also produced there
1965 Elected International President of PEN. (Poets, Essayists, and
Novelists).
1967      / Don't Need You Any More, a collection of short stories, published.
1%t!       The Price produced.
1972 The Creation of the World and other Business performed in New
York.
1977      The Archibishop's Ceiling performed in Washington, D.C.
University of
British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
THE CRUCIBLE
by Arthur Miller
Directed by Stanley Weese
November 12 - 22
THE SCHOOL
FOR WIVES
by Moliere
Directed by
John Brockington
January 14 - 24
THE WINTER'S TALE
by William Shakespeare
Director to be announced
March 4 - 14
PHONK 228-2678
Frederic Wood Theatre
Magazine
PUBLISHER
Joseph G. MacKinnon
ADVERTISING
CONSULTANT
Edward P. Rogers
A seasonal publication ot
University Productions Inc.
#202-2182 West 12th Ave.
224-7743
Any comments or enquiries
regarding the contents of this
publication may be forwarded to
the publisher at the
above address UBC's First
Neighbourhood
Pub
Friendly place to get together
after your
evening
at the theatre.
Located in Fairoiew Crescent
(Behind the "Frat" Houses)
Open 5 p.m. to Midnight
We Get The
Highest Grades
come and discover our
entirely new selections of
coffees, teas and specialty
merchandise.
4441 West 10th Ave. 224-0331
4255 Arbutus 738-2024
2297 West 41st 261-2939
THE CR
by Arthi
Directed by S
Set and Lighting Design by
Robert Gardiner
Costume Design by
Brian H. Jackson
CAST
REVEREND PARRIS   Dennis Kuss
BETTY PARRIS   Cara Tekatch
TITUBA Rhiannon Charles
ABIGAIL WILLIAMS   Susan Elworthy
SUSANNA WALCOTT Vicki Maxwell
MRS. ANN PUTNAM Laura Di Cicco
THOMAS PUTNAM   Neil K. Gallagher
MERCY LEWIS Johnna Wright
MARY WARREN   Sarah Rodgers
JOHN PROCTOR Bruce Dow
REBECCA NURSE    Janine Payne
GILES COREY Michael Fera
REVEREND JOHN HALE   Lawrence Kagan-Ball
ELIZABETH PROCTOR Cynthia Ford
FRANCIS NURSE Anthony Davies
EZEKIEL CHEEVER Neil Ingram
MARSHALL HERRICK   Mark Weatherley
JUDGE HATHORNE   Dave Wallace
DEPUTY GOVERNOR DANFORTH Timothy Hyland
DEPUTY, HOPKINS    Phil Barnett
DEPUTY Kevin S. O'Brien
Setting — Salem, Massachusetts — 1692
Act I — A small upper bedroom in the home of Reverend
Samuel Parris — spring
Act II — The common room of the Proctor's house —
eight days later
Act III       — The vestry room of the Salem Meeting House,
now serving as the anteroom of the General Court.
Act IV       — A cell in Salem jail — that fall
There will be one intermission of 10 minutes. lucible-
ur Miller
tanley Weese
PRODUCTION
Technical Director .
Properties Mistress. .
Costume Supervisor
Set Construction . . .
Cutter	
Seamstress  	
Wardrobe	
 Ian Pratt
 Sherry Darcus
, . , . Rosemarie Heselton
 Don Davis, Robert Eberle,
Don Griffiths, John Henrickson
 Jean Driscoil-Bell
Lori Kenney, Ceferina Ofreneo
 Jannette BijdeA^aate
Stage Manager Kevin S. O'Brien
I ighling Board Operator  El ana lloncharuk
Assistant Stage Managers .... Laurence Koppe, Randall C. Plitt
Properties Assistant Siobhan Ryan
Make-up Cynthia Johnston
Hats     Kathleen Wright
Crew    Bonnie Beecher, Alan Brodie, Jill Buckham,
Spencer Hutchins, Heather Kent, J. Cricket Price
House Manager Kathleen Wright
Box Office     Michael Fera, Carol Fisher, Linda Humphries
Business Manager      Marjorie Fordham
Production Norman Young
Vocal Coach
Rod Menzies
THE CRUCIBLE
is produced by special arrangement with
Dramatists Play Service Inc.
New York
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Vancouver Playhouse
The Arts Club Theatre
Mrs, OF. O'Connor
UBC Research Forest
THEATRE^
SPORTS
THURSDAYS
Right Across The Street
From The
Frederic Wood Theatre
In The Ballroom Of The
GRADUATE STUDENT
CENTRE
8:00. P.M.
General Admission $4.00
Presented By The
Vancouver Theatre Sports
League
Produced by The
-Graduate Student Society—'
fflfanL WOCftJ
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A restaurant for people
who understand that, Lamb
with Basil and Rosemary
doesn't mean chops with
the couple next door.
We are pleased to offer a free entree of
lunch or dinner when a second entree of
equal or greater value is purchased.
4473 W. 10th Ave.
Tel. 228-8815
 Clip and Sttve	 What the
critics say ...
"In Vancouver, you'll
find the best of
Hollywood, foreign
films and theatre . . .
all at Videomatica"
— Lindsay Mitchell,
the Courier
Videomatica . . .
everyone's choice.
CLASSICS • FOREIGN • MUSIC
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SALES
RENTALS
1829 WEST 4th AVE. AT BURRARD
734-0411
A satirical fairy-tale in the best tradition
of good story-telling,
Respighi's Laud to the Nativity.
Vancouver Chamber Choir
Vancouver Chorale
Vancouver Chamber Ensemble
Jon Washburn, conductor
Friday, December 5 8:00
Orpheum
Tickets-VTC/C8Q outlets, Eaton's K Sfoodward's
Credit Cart Line: 280-5311
Information: 738-6822
Generously sponsored by
FlKSlCiti/ lltnsl
Arthur Miller
on
The Crucible
I was drawn to write The Crucible not merely as a response to
McCarthyism It is not any more an attempt to cure witch hunts than
Salesman is a plea for the improvement of conditions for traveling men, All
My Sons a plea for better inspection of airplane parts, or A View from the
Bridge an attack upon the Immigration Bureau. 7"he Crucible is, internally,
Salesman's blood brother It is examining the questions I was absorbed with
before — the conflict between a man's raw deeds and his conception of
himself; the question of whether conscience is in fact an organic part of the
human being, and what happens when it is handed over not merely to the
state or the mores of the time but to one's friend or wife The big difference,
I think, is that The Crucible sought to include a higher degree of consciousness than the earlier plays.
I believe that the wider the awareness, the felt knowledge, evoked by a
play, the higher it must stand as art. I think our drama is far behind our lives
in this respect. There is a lot wrong with the twentieth century, but one thing
is right with it — we are aware as no generation was before of the larger
units that help make us and destroy us The city, the nation, the world, and
now the universe are never far beyond our most intimate sense of life. The
vast majority of us know now — not merely as knowledge but as feeling,
feeling capable of expression in art — that we are being formed, that our
alternatives in life are not absolutely our own, as the romantic play inevitably must presuppose. But the response of our plays, of our dramatic
form itself, is to faint, so to speak, before the intricacies of man's wider relationships and to define him further and redefine him as essentially alone in a
world he never made.
The form, the shape, the meaning of The Crucible were all compounded
out of the faith of those who were hanged They were asked to be lonely and
they refused. They were asked to deny their belief in a God of all men, not
merely a god each individual could manipulate to his interests They were
asked to call a phantom real and to deny their touch with reality. It was not
good to cast this play, to form it so that the psyche of the hero should
emerge so "commonly" as to wipe out of mind the process itself, the spectacle of that faith and the knowing will which these people paid for with
their lives.
The "heat'' infusing this play is therefore of a different order from that
which draws tears and the common identifications. And it was designed to
be of a different order. In a sense, I felt, our situation had thrown us willy-
nilly into a new classical period. Classical in the sense that the social
scheme, as of old, had reached the point of rigidity where it had become implacable as a consciously known force working in us and upon us
Analytical psychology, when so intensely exploited as to reduce the world
to the size of a man's abdomen and equate his fate with his neurosis, is a re-
emergence of romanticism. It is inclined to deny all outer forces until man is
only his complex. It pre-supposes an autonomy in the human character that,
in a word, is false A neurosis is not a fate but an effect. There is a higher
wisdom, and if truly there is not, there is still no aesthetic point in repeating
something so utterly known, or in doing better what has been done so well
before.
For me The Crucible was a new beginning, the beginning of an attempt to
embrace a wider field of vision, a field wide enough to contain the whole of
our current awareness. It was not so much to move ahead ot the audience
but to catch up with what it commonly knows about the way things are and
how they get that way In a word, we commonly know so much more than
our plays let on. When we can put together what we do know with what we
feel, we shall find a new kind of theater in our hands. The Crucible was written as it was in order to bring me, and the audience, closer to that theater
and what I imagine can be an art more ample than any of us has dared to
strive for, the art of Man among men, Man amid his works 0
-C
Before and After the Show...
At the University Golf Club, we thought the
"neighbourly" thing to do would be to share our
sparkling new dining facilities with theatregoers.
Come to the University Golf Club for dinner
before the show...and with your theatre tickets
you'll receive a 10% discount on dinner!
Then, after the show, drop by for coffee and
dessert.
We're just minutes away and there's plenty of
free parking.
It's the "neighbourly" thing to do...
Reservations 224-7513
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VALID NOVEMBER 111986
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prices include:
Six night hotel
accommodation with private
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Continental breakfast
Service charge
Value Added Tax
Round trip transportation
between London Heathrow
Airport and Central London.
Three theatre tickets to a
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musicals. You will receive 3
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* Supplements apply for
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