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The Imaginary Invalid Jan 16, 1985

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 Frederic Wood Theatre
The Imaginary
Invalid
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MOLIERE
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iiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiijiiiiiiifiiiiiiijiyiiiji Before and
STUDENT
UNION BUILDING
MAIN CONCOURSE
UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
613? SU B Boulevard
• ••
After the Show!
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BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard, Vancouver, B.C.   V6T1Y5
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Also Open Wednesday Evenings and Saturdays! University of British Columbia
Frederic Wood Theatre
Presents
The Imaginary Invalid
By
Moliere
Directed by
Mavor Moore
January 16-26
1985
COMING PRODUCTIONS
Happy End
by
Bertolt Brecht & Kurt Weill
directed by
Arne Zaslove
Frederic Wood Theatre, March 6-16
•*••••*•••*•••••
The Taming of the Shrew
by
William Shakespeare
directed by
Beth French
Dorothy Somerset Studio,
January 29-February 2
An MFA thesis production
•*•*•••••**•••*•
Majakowski
by Stefan Schutz
directed by
Craig Duffy
Dorothy Somerset Studio,
February 26-March 2
An MFA thesis production
FWT
Program Magazine
PUBLISHER
Joseph G. MacKinnon
DIRECTOR OF SALES
Doug Henderson
SALES REPRESENTATIVE
Richard Marchak
A publication of:
University Productions Inc.
3591 West Eleventh Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
733-9658
Any comments or enquiries
regarding the contents of this
publication may be forwarded to
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Chronology of Important Dates
1622        Jean-Baptiste Poquelin born in Paris.
1632-37 Studies at the College de Clermont. According to legend,
often taken by his grandfather to watch Italian comedians
and French tragedians at the Hotel de Bourgogne. Begins
law studies.
1638        Birth of Louis XIV.
1640       Poquelin meets Madeleine Bejart.
1642 Death of Richelieu.
1643 Death of Louis XIII. Birth of Armande, daughter or sister of
Madeleine Bejart and future wife of Moliere. Poquelin founds
"L'lllustre Theatre" with the Bejart family and other actors.
1644 Poquelin adopts the name "Moliere". Bankruptcy of
"L'lllustre Theatre." Moliere imprisoned for debt in the
Chatelet. Moliere's father pays his debts.
1645 Moliere and the Bejarts join the Dufresne company.
They tour the provinces until 1658.
1650 Moliere becomes director of the company. Protected by the
Prince de Conti.
1653-55   Moliere writes farces and his first comedy, L'Etourdi (1655).
1656       Le Depit amoureux.
1658 At the Louvre in Paris, Moliere and his company perform
Corneille's Nicomede for the young King, as well as Moliere's own farce Le Docteur amoureux: "The King deigned
to laugh."
1661 Dom Carcie de Navarre ("comedie heroique"). L'Ecole des
Maris. Les Facheux, in a "Fete offerte au Roi par Fouquet."
Louis XIV personally assumes power.
1662 Moliere marries Armande. L'Ecole des femmes.
1664 Le Mariage force. Louis XIV godfather of Moliere's son (who
dies shortly after). For the feast given at Versailles by the King
for his mistress Mile de La Valliere, "Les Plaisirs de I'ile
enchantee," Moliere and his company participate in the great
pageants and perform Moliere's La Princesse d'Elide, as well
as the first version of Tartuffe, in three acts. Tartuffe banned
in Paris. Moliere will fight until 1669 to obtain the authorization to produce it.
1665 Dom juan, ou le Festin de Pierre, withdrawn after initial
success. Louis XIV names Moliere's company "Troupe du
Roy." L 'Amour medecin.
1666 Moliere's health failing. Marital difficulties with Armande.
Le Misanthrope (a modest success). Le Medecin malgre lui.
1668 Amphitryon. George Dandin.LAvare (a flop). Moliere and
Armande separated, but they continue to act together.
1669 Third version of Tartuffe authorized. Monsieur de Pour-
ceaugnac at Chambord. O^D     Moliere      ^O
MOLIERE AS SCANARELL. The actor playing the leading role in his
own comedy, about 1660. (Drawing by Cerda Becker With, after an
engraving by Simonin.)
T
T
1671
1672
1673
Psyche (in collaboration with Corneille and Quinault) in the
"salle des machines" at the Tuileries. Les Fourberies de
Scapin. La Comtesse d'Escarbagnas at Saint-Germain-en-
Laye.
Les Femmes savantes. Death of Madeleine Bejart.
Le Malade imaginaire. February 17: during the fourth performance, Moliere falls ill, and dies the same night.
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MALADY AND MUSICAL COMEDY
As a culmination of a theatrical career, Moliere's comedy, Le Malade
imaginaire, could not have struck a more fitting note. In a farce about a
hypochondriac intent upon achieving an illusion of vitality and health,
the doomed playwright wrote the last of his works which would give
him his only triumph over death, the immortality of the great artist.
This comedy about "the imaginary invalid" caps a series of "medical"
plays in which the doctor is portrayed as the destroyer of life and
health, a figure whose verbal and material magic give him a peculiar
power over the gullible. The character was ideally suited to the purposes of an author who delighted in exploiting the acceptance of such
illusory notions for reality, so from 1659 on, medicine and doctors are
frequently satirized. Le Medecin volant was followed by L'Amour
medecin (1665), Le Medecin malgre lui (1666), and by the part of
Dom juan in which Sganarelle is disguised as a doctor. Then too, Monsieur de Pourceaugnac (1669) has heavy satire of medicine, so that the
final comedy is very much a reprise of earlier material. Extending the
satire in depth and resuming so many things observed throughout his
works, Le Malade imaginaire moves far beyond its predecessors in
medical farce.
The typically Molieresque twist is that the character who is so intent
upon living should dwell as if in suspended animation, bound to his
rest and cures. In contrast to this idea, the true magic life — joy in the
present moment — is stressed by the young lovers and by Toinette.
The message of natural happiness is presented by Beralde as well, and
the grasping Beline also expresses her version of present joy through
her wish for gold to buy happiness. The wife is a transitional sort of
character, thematically speaking, since she is partly one of the group of
leeches who live by exploiting illness and death, the doctors and
lawyer. They profit from Argan's mania which has made living a hollow
mockery by purging and medicating the body until he is nothing but an
evacuating, embalmed bag of flesh, to use Beline's terms of description. To go on living he feels he must limit himself to a deathlike imprisonment; chaining himself to a cane, chair or toilet. The morbid
preoccupation with the chance of demise has led him to reject his true
healthy nature and take on the stench of death.
So consistently does the author develop a theme in this manner that
one may say that an aspect of his style is the use of great paradoxes of
the sort, the endless, striking contrasts of truth and its distortions, of
fact and fancy, of knowledge and ignorance. There can be no greater
paradox than a light comedy about fear of death, but the mastery of
Moliere comes to the fore as he creates this very thing.
Le Malade imaginaire is a full development, by the best theatrical
means at Moliere's command, of the concept of joyous living and of
the "imaginary" obstacles to such living erected by men's fancies.
During the fourth performance of this comedy, on February 17, 1673,
Moliere was seized by a paroxysm of coughing in the final ballet, but
he insisted upon completing the show. Carried to his home, he was
dead within an hour. His final physical efforts, like his whole existence,
had been dedicated to the service of his art.
Hallam Walker DOCTORS AT VERSAILLES
Illness and death were very dreadful at Versailles. As soon as the
breath had left the body of a member of the royal family, his or her
gilded bed-chamber was turned into a butcher's shop. Lords or ladies-
in-waiting, who had spent their lives with the deceased and wereoften
in a sad state of grief, were obliged to stand by the bed while the body
was chopped to pieces. The head was sawn open and examined; the
liver and lights laid aside, the heart, on a silver salver, was given to one
duchess and the entrails, in a big silver bowl, to another. Seven or eight
doctors made notes of their gruesome findings and pronounced the
causes of death; the only cause which invariably escaped their notice
was their own incompetence.
Moliere has presented that sort of doctor once and for all; a consultation of big-wigs is ever a scene from one of his plays. The learned,
magic, meaningless words, the grave looks at each other, the artful
hesitation between one worthless formula and another — all are there.
In those days, terrifying in black robes and bonnets, they bled the
patient; now, terrifying in white robes and masks, they pump blood into him. The result is the same; the strong live; the weak, after much
suffering and expense, both of spirit and of money, die.
The hazards to human life in those days were chilbirth for women,
battle for men, babyhood and smallpox for everybody. Old age was
not particularly dangerous or disagreeable; people lived to enormous
ages and never seem to have become senile. Lauzun rode to hounds
every day at eighty-nine. Mme de Ventadour danced a minuet at
ninety. Mme de Maintenon, at over seventy, complained bitterly to
her confessor that the King insisted on his conjugal rights every day and
sometimes twice. She died at eighty-four, but only of boredom. Mme
de Clerambault was the best of company at ninety. Le Notre was in
perfect health at eighty-eight. Isaac Bartet, one of the King's secretaries,
died at a hundred and five, and the Spanish Marquis de Mansera at a
hundred and seven, having practically lived on chocolate for years.
The King's first doctor was M. de L'Orme (1584-1678) who had attended Louis XIII and was the fashionable doctor for fifty years. De L'Orme
swore by hygiene and applied his theories to himself, with the result
that he lived to be ninety-four. 'Why do fish live to such a great age?
Because', said he, 'they are never subjected to draughts.' So he spent
his days in a sedan chair draped with blankets and lined with hares' fur
to ensure that no air could percolate. When obliged to go out, he
covered himself with a morocco robe and mask and wore six pairs of
stockings and several fur hats. He always kept a bit of garlic in his
mouth, incense in his ears and a stalk of rue sticking out of each nostril.
He slept in a sort of brick oven, surrounded by hot water bottles, and
lived on sheep's tongues and syrup of greengages — he never touched
vegetables, raw fruit, jam or pastry. At eighty-seven he married a
young wife and wore her out; she died within the year.
Nancy Mitford
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3
8
THE IMAGINv
a Comedy ii
by Jean-Bapti;
called MOUER
Music by Marc-An
(1643-
First perfof
Theatre-Francais;
Staged by MAVOR MOORE*
Set and Lighting design by
Douglas Welch
Costumes designed by
Brian H. Jackson
Dances arranged by
Garry Semeniuk
Music arranged and
conducted by
John Burgess
With SIMON WEBB*
CHARACTERS
PROLOGUE Pamela Dangelmaier
ARCAN, a hypochondriac Simon Webb*
BELINE, second wife of Argan Tamsin Kelsey
ANGELIQUE, Argan's daughter, beloved of Cleante Laura White
LOUISE, Angel ique's younger sister Carolyn Soper
BERALD, Argan's brother Mark Hopkins
CLEANTE, Angelique's suitor Bruce Dow
OFFENTROT, a doctor Paul Batten*
THOMAS OFFENTROT, his son, Angelique's suitor.... Bruce Harwood
PURGEON, Argan's doctor Ed Izrael
SCHNIFFER, Argan's pharmacist Christopher Beck
BONNIDOU, a notary Chris Rosati
TOINETTE, Argan's servant Kathryn Bracht
Carnival Revellers: Gypsy singers: Pamela Dangelmaier, Julie Atchison
Gypsy dancers: Katarina Thorsen, Claudia Wober; Judge: Tom Carlson
Cavalier: Steve Grant; Policeman: Michael Langton; Priest: Tom Jones,
Presiding Physician: Christopher Beck.
Orchestra: Harpsichord: John Burgess; Flute: Beverley Chiu
The action takes place in Paris:
in Argan's bed-sitting room, and in the street near his house.
The play is in three acts, with two intermissions.
* Appearing through the courtesy of
Canadian Actors' Equity Association ARY INVALID	
n three acts
iste Poquelin,
vE (1622-1673)
itoine Charpentier
•1704)
l
rmed at the
•10 February 1673
PRODUCTION
Technical Director IAN PRATT
Properties Mistress SHERRY DARCUS
Lighting Execution DON GRIFFITHS
Set Construction ROBERT EBERLE, JOHN HENRICKSON
Costume Supervisor ROSEMARIE HESELTON
Cutters CHRISTINA McQUARRIE, ANITA SIMARD
Properties MELODY ANDERSON
Wigs TERRY KOZAK
Scenic Artist DON S. DAVIS
Stage Manager SYLVIA SWIFT
Properties Assistants KATHLEEN MEASURES, NANCY FORD
Assistant Stage Managers ... ROSS PALFREY with DIANA CRUMBACH,
BEVSIVER
Wardrobe OWEN LOCK
Crew MARY KENNEDY, GARYMUIR
Assistant to the Lighting Designer ROBERT HAMILTON
Business Manager MARJORIE FORDHAM
Box Office CAROL FISHER, MARK HOPKINS, LINDA HUMPHRIES
House Manager CHRISTINE PLUNKETT
Production NORMAN YOUNG
Vocal Coach STEVEN THORNE
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Playhouse
Arts Club Theatre
Men's costumes executed by
Costume House (Toronto)
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10 AN OPEN AIR THEATER AT VERSAILLES. Le Malade imaginaire, the
play in which Moliere appeared on the night of his death in 1673, was
first produced as part of one of the spectacular festivities that Louis
XIV ordered for his country estate outside Paris. (Drawing by Cerda
Becker With, after an engraving by Le Pautre.)
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11 MAYOR MOORE
Playwright, actor, director, producer, critic and essayist, Mavor Moore
has long been in the forefront of modern Canadian theatre, radio,
television, films and cultural affairs. The first artist to be appointed
Chairman of the Canada Council (1979-83), he is professor emeritus of
York University (Toronto) and adjunct professor of Fine Arts at the
University of Victoria, B.C. He was CBC-Television's first chief producer,
founding director of the Charlottetown Festival and Toronto's St.
Lawrence Centre for the Arts, founding chairman of the Canadian
Theatre Centre and of the Guild of Canadian Playwrights, and winner
of the 1982 Drainie Award for lifetime service to broadcasting. He
holds the Order of Canada, the Centennial Medal, the Queen's Medal
and three honorary doctorates.
SIMON WEBB
Simon Webb is well known in Vancouver as a writer, composer and
actor. In the last year he has been seen in various productions at the
Arts Club Theatre such as Reflections on Crooked Walking for which
he received a Jessie Richardson Award, and The Chairs. He is also the
Artistic Director for the Vancouver Cabaret Society. He has recently
appeared at the Vancouver Playhouse in A Man for all Seasons and
Terra Nova. Mr. Webb's previous appearances at the Frederic Wood
Theatre include Fadinard in The Italian Straw Hat and Semyon
Semyonovich Podsekalnikov in The Suicide. Last summer he directed
Bedroom Farce for UBC Stage Campus Summerstock.
12 A NOTE ON THE PRODUCTION
Le Malade Imaginaire is one of the most "adapted" of classical dramas.
In its original form it contained an irrelevant prologue saluting the
monarch (Moliere's patron), two only faintly relevant entre-actes, and a
dramatically essential finale (in mock Latin) that makes little sense formally without the earlier interludes. Furthermore, the composer Char-
pentier set a song that Moliere wrote as an alternative prologue, and
constantly revised his entre-acte music for later productions.
The present revival retains more of the full text and music than
customary, by the device of added connections between the (alternative) prologue, interludes and finale, and the main action. We have
sought English equivalents for the punning names of Moliere's medical
characters, and in general emphasized the carnival context in which
the playwright set his comedy of retreat from life.
M.M.
A NOTE ON THE MUSIC
MARC ANTOINE CHARPENTIER (1634-1704), generally considered the
most important composer of his generation in France, and writer of
much music for plays, was born in Paris in 1634, On his return to
France after studying in Rome with Giacomo Carissimi, he wrote the
music for a new version of Moliere's Le Mariage force (1672) and
collaborated with him again in La Malade Imaginaire (1673). After
Moliere's death Charpentier continued to work for the Theatre Fran-
cais until 1685; his greatest stage work, Medee, to Corneille's text, was
produced in 1693.
In his own lifetime he was considered by many to be a finer musician
than Lully, who until his death in 1687 ruled French music with an iron
hand. From 1680 to 1688 Charpentier was director of music to the
Princess de Guise; from 1679 he composed music for the dauphin's
private chapel; in about 1692 he began teaching composition to the
due d'Orleans, the future regent of France; and in 1698 his official functions were further increased when he was made maitre de musique
at the Ste. Chapelle in Paris.
His works include, besides 24 works for the stage (comedie-ballets,
pastorales, etc.), many masses, motets, Te Deums and other sacred
choral works; he made use of a comparatively large orchestra and
double chorus. In his music for the sacred tragedies performed by the
Jesuit community in Paris he established the oratorio in France, and
one of these works, Le Reniement de St. Pierre, is considered his
masterpiece.
Charpentier composed music for a number of different productions of
Le Malade Imaginaire. The production here at UBC has drawn from
this rich musical material.
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13 Tie, FoaM Anncud
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