UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Love Labor's Lost Nov 9, 1983

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubctp-1.0118909.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubctp-1.0118909.json
JSON-LD: ubctp-1.0118909-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubctp-1.0118909-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubctp-1.0118909-rdf.json
Turtle: ubctp-1.0118909-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubctp-1.0118909-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubctp-1.0118909-source.json
Full Text
ubctp-1.0118909-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubctp-1.0118909.ris

Full Text

Array William Shakespeare
Love's Labor's Lost UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Presents
William Shakespeare's
LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST
Directed by
Arne Zaslove
November 9-19
1983 A Note on Love's Labor's Lost
by John Barton
Loue's Labor's Lost is one of Shakespeare's
most perplexing texts. It is highly inconsistent,
both in quality and style of writing. Passages
of jingling verbal dexterity, thin in dramatic
content and loosely related to the characters'
situation, alternate with others as good as the
best in Shakespeare's mature comedies. The
changes are extreme and abrupt; as extreme,
say, as a play made up from assorted bits of
Congreve, Chekhov, Eliot, and Gilbert and
Sullivan. This is partly because the text is
obviously a revised one, full of odd omissions,
interpolations, and inconsistencies. Partly, too,
because Shakespeare, while ringing the changes
on the conventional comedy of the 1580's,
is also discovering, in fits and starts, the comedy
of mood and character which we now take for
granted, but which in fact he first invented.
The play looks at the process of growing up.
With the partial exception of Berowne and
Rosaline, there is very little contact, let alone
relationship, between the lovers; Longaville and
Maria. Dumaine and Katharine don't even speak
to each other till the very end of the play.
The men are as much in love with being in love
as with the thing itself. Wallowing in their
feelings and in their powers of verbalising love,
they are perhaps not all that aware of the actual
objects of their love. The girls, too, are not
what they seem, and certainly not what they
seem to their lovers. They have a surface
sophistication, and on public occasions may at
first blush, look like goddesses. But by themselves they are more deb than courtier. The
Princess, a young girl sent on a political mission
because her father is ill, is shy, in some awe
of the King, and none too sure about how to
cope with any situation. But when the news
comes of her father's death, she knows, like
Prince Hal, that she has to grow up, take the
throne and rule.
The comedy moves in a series of reversals.
Nothing ever works out as expected. The quirks
of human nature explode every situation, and
the wheel of fortune turns even swifter than in
the History plays. Every character and situation
is set up in order to be sent up. The series
reaches its climax with the arrival of Mercade.
William Shakespeare
On every level the play is built on apposition
and paradox. Everything derives from Shakespeare's favourite juxtaposition of Ceremony
and Nature. No sooner do the lords vow
hermithood and chastity than their pretensions
are exposed by Costard, the natural man, who
has been taken with a wench and is quite
open about it. The Princess arrives with a great
train on a political embassage, and finds herself
having to sleep in the fields. Armado sees himself as the Courtier of Courtiers, but he falls in
love with a country copulative and becomes a
ploughman. His love is ridiculous but is is also
real, certainly as real as the self-indulgent love
of the rest. Every character and situation is
turned topsy-turvy.
The play ends with the moral dialogue of the
learned men: When the meadows are full of
delight, look out for the cuckoo; and when
blood is nipped and ways be foul—be merry,
like the note of the owl. "A fencing lesson" Left to right:  Stephanie Berkmann  (Maria), Arne
Zaslove. Tamsin Kelsey  (Princess of France)  and Pam  Dangelmaier
(Katharine) . Photo: Marcel Williams
A New Pottery Shop
on West 4th Avenue
3610 West 4th   733-9181
terra
carta
Hours:
Mon.-Thms. ii:30a.m.-2a.rri.
Friday ii:30a rn.-3a.m.
Saturday 4:00 p.m.-3a.m.
Sunday 4:00 p.fn.-l p.m.
Steak & Pizza • Lasagna
Spare Ribs • Ravioli
Chicken • Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery 224-4218 224-0529
2136 Western Parkway We care about
the shape
your hair
First Lady'Coiffures
Tenth Avenue Ltd.
ELL
DOME
"The Shop for beautiful people"
4554 west 10th avenue,
Vancouver, B.C. 224-5636
To the Virgins, to make much of Time:
Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,
The higher he's a getting,
The sooner will his race be run,
And nearer he's to setting.
That age is best which is the first,
When youth and blood are warmer;
But being spent, the worse, and worst
Times still succeed the former.
Then be not coy, but use your time,
And while ye may, go marry;
For having lost but once your prime,
You may for ever tarry.
Robert Herrick
(1597-1674)
Aclina Typing Service
Word Processing
1-4326 West 10th Ave.
222-2122
Student Discounts
S.U.H. Lower Floor
1;(u i k n is 1< >r Sat k i\vk \ k \s,
Sc I11 K )S< IS i UK i ()th(T SI UK ks
Open 7:3() - 5:30, Fri. 'til 6:00
Alpha
Cc€k$
738-4514—
4480 Dunbar
Treat your friends or treat yourself
Books Make Wonderful Gifts! LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST
What The Critics Said
It   is   a   protest   against   youthful   schemes   of
shaping  life  according  to  notions rather than
according to reality, a protest against idealising
away the facts of life.
Ernest Dowden (1875)
Play is often that about which people are most
serious: and the humourist may observe how,
under all love of playthings, there is almost
always hidden an appreciation of something
really engaging and delightful...For what is called
fashion in these matters occupies, in each age,
much of the care of many of the most discerning people, furnishing them with a kind of
mirror of their real inward refinements and their
capacity for selection. Such modes or fashions
are, at their best, an example of the artistic
predominance of form over matter—of the
manner of the doing it over the thing done —
and have a beauty of their own. It is so with
that old euphuism of the Elizabethan age—that
pride of dainty language and curious expression,
which it is very easy to ridicule, which often
made itself ridiculous, but which had below it a
real sense of fitness and nicety; and which, as we
see in this very play, and still more clearly in
the sonnets, had some fascination for the young
Shakespeare himself.
Walter Pater (1885)
Fantastic and contrived as they are. those absurd
vows to which the four friends commit themselves in the initial scene spring from a recognition of the tragic brevity and impermanence
of life that is peculiarly Renaissance. For the
people of the sixteenth century, the world was
no longer the mere shadow of a greater Reality,
the imperfect image of that City of God whose
towers and golden spires had dominated the
universe of the Middle Ages. While the though
of Death was acquiring a new poignancy in its
contrast with man's increasing sense of the value
and loveliness of life in this world. Immortality
tended to become, for Renaissance minds, a
vague and even a somewhat dubious gift unless it could be connected in some way with the
earth itself, and the affairs of human life there.
Thus there arose among the humanist writers
of Italy that intense and sometimes anguished
longing, voiced by Navarre at the beginning of
Love's Labor's Lost, to attain "an immortality
of glory, survival in the minds of men by the
record of great deeds or of intellectual excellence." At the very heart of the plan for an
Academe lies the reality of Death, the Renaissance desire to inherit, through remarkable
devotion to learning, an eternity of Fame, and
thus to insure some continuity of personal existence, however slight, against the ravages of
"cormorant devouring Time"
Bobbyann Roesen (1953)
1 LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST
by
William Shakespeare
Directed by
Arne Zaslove
Costumes and Properties designed by Sets and Lighting designed by
Brian H. Jackson J. Am burn Darnall
CAST
(in order of appearance)
KING OF NAVARRE Mark Hopkins
LONGAVILLE Chris Beck
DUMAINE Aaron Norris
BEROWNE Bruce Dow
DULL John MacKay
COSTARD Carlo Ciorti
DON ARMADO Luc Corbei!
MOTH Carolyn Soper
JAQUENETTA Pauline Landberg
BOYET Patrick Blaney
PRINCESS OF FRANCE Tamsin Kelsey
MARIA Stephanie Berkmann
KATHARINE Pam Dangelmaier
ROSALINE Shauna Baird
STUDENTS Kathy Bracht, Carol Nesbitt
SIR NATHANIEL Lyle Moon
HOLOFERNES Jeff Smyth
MARCADE Chris Robson
AIDE-DE-CAMP Michael DeKoven
The Action occurs on the grounds of an academic institution circa 1914.
There will be one intermission.
Front Cover Photo
University of British Columbia 1983
Photographed in front of the School of Theology
Photo Credit: Marcel Williams
8 PRODUCTION
Technical Director Ian Pratt
Properties Sherry Darcus
Costume Supervisor Rosemarie Heselton
Set Construction Robert Eberle, Mark Gendron,
Don Griffiths and John Henrickson
Lighting Execution . ." Kairiin Aseltine
Stage Managers Andrea Greenberg, Karen Swendsen
Assistants to the Director Claire Brown, Brian Ferstman
Cutter Christina McQuarrie
First Hand Anita Simard
Seamstresses Wendy Foster, Ingrid Turk
Stage Crew The students of Theatre 250/350
House Manager Colleen Williamson
Assistant Stage Manager Marlene Rogers
Properties assistants Michael Cade. Colleen Williamson
Research Tony Montigue
Wardrobe Mistress Se Keohane, Wiluya
Box Office Carol Fisher, Rose Ann Janzen and Lyle Moon
Business Manager Marjorie Fordham
Production Norman Young
Program Book    Joseph MacKinnon
Act [V, Scene III "Now in thy likeness one more fool appear'
Aaron Norris (Dumaine) and Bruce Dow (Berowne).
Left to right: London 1969 "Did / not dance with you in Brabant
"Like n demigod here sit I in the sky"   once?" Act II, Scene 1   Joan Plowright as Rosaline
Act IV Sc. 3 From a print of Robson and Co and Jeremy Brett as Berowne
^■*-*£5
Acl IV, Scene 3'Dumaine tronsform'd. four wood
cocks in a dish "(Illustration from an edition of 1868
#ro(fajL$eac(u
jicrmerc
rurwpk* crestmtrant
NEW MEND
• Smaller portions ■ Lower prices • Many Halt servings offered
NEW WINE LIST
Over 70 wines • Including 1 1 by lr»e caratn or glass
CLASSICAL MUSK
SUNDAY OPERA BRUNCH
Open 7 days a week
4473 VV. 10th
228-8815
10 r*
]t%
V?
ENMARK
JEWELLERS
P
Value in Quality Gold & Silver Jewellery
4315   DUNBAR   STREET,   VANCOUVER.   B.C.    VSS   2G2
TELEPHONE   224-3513
SI LVEN SP1 -X I Al JZED BOOKSHOPS UNDER
ONE ROOF AT Till: NEW U.B.C. BOOKSTORE
BOOKSTORE'
• Ails & 1 lumanities
• Language & Literature
• Social & Behavioral Sciences
• Professional
• Health Sciences
• Science & Engineering
General
228-4741
11 UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
B.F.A. in Acting and in Technical
Theatre / Design
The University and its Setting
The University of British Columbia, established
in 1915, has a present enrolment of 30,000.
It is located six miles from downtown Vancouver
on a campus that is regarded as one of the
most beautiful in North America. The Vancouver
area offers a flourishing cultural scene and provides excellent opportunities for summer and
winter sports.
The Department of Theatre
Over the years the Department of Theatre at
UBC has assembled a very strong faculty of
specialists. Their teaching covers all aspects of
the theatre, both as a practical craft and as an
academic discipline: Acting, Directing, Design,
Technical Theatre; Theatre History, Dramatic
Literature, Theory; Film Production and Film
Criticism.
Degrees range from the B.A. and B.F.A. over
the M.A. and M.F.A. to the Ph.D.
The B.F.A. Programme
In its continuous attempt to strengthen its
curriculum, the Department is now offering a
B.F.A. in Acting, a B.F.A. in Design and a
B.F.A. in Technical Theatre. These new programmes give the exceptionally talented student
a thorough training of professional scope,
without neglecting any academic values. The
programme consists of a carefully arranged
combination of classroom work, private tutorials
and stage exposure. Its breadth and focus make
this B.F.A. one of the strongest and most
comprehensive on the continent.
The Facilities
The departmental complex houses two fully
equipped and professionally manned stages:
the 400 seat Frederic Wood Theatre with its
season of large-scale productions, and the 90
seat Dorothy Somerset Studio, which offers a
series of chamber plays each year. Both theatres
have become an integral part of Vancouver's
artistic life. Students in any of the B.F.A.
programmes will be expected to participate in
these productions according to their expertise.
The University Library now has over two million
volumes, including a rich collection of periodicals; its theatre collection is undergoing a
vigorous and systematic expansion.
The Departmental Reading Room has its own
collection of relevant critical and reference
material.
Entrance Requirements
In order to maintain the highest standard, only
the most promising applicants will be accepted
into the programme. Thus, apart from the
regular entrance requirements set down by the
University, the Department will judge the candidates' potential by either audition (Acting) or
portfolio (Technical Theatre/Design).
Faculty Involved in the B.F.A.
John Brockington, Don Davis, Brian Jackson,
Peter Loeffler, Ian Pratt, Charles Siegel, Donald
Soule, Klaus Strassmann, Stanley Weese, Norman Young, Arne Zaslove, J. Amburn Darnall,
and Steven Thome.
Act 1, Scene 1 "Your oaths are pass'd, and now subscribe your names'
12 Love s Labor's Lost is generally believed to have
been written especially for private performance
at some courtier's house in late 1593. The
earliest extant text is the quarto of 1598, which
furnished the copy for the 1623 First Folio. No
specific sources for the plot are known. Incidents
in the play, however, resemble historical events
occurring in France during the sixteenth century,
and the main characters bear names similar to
those of contemporary French nobility. Veild
topical allusions to certain Elizabethan courtiers
and literary figures have been detected.
The plot revolves around the attempt of Ferdinand, king of Navarre, to turn his court into
a Platonic-style academy for three years. During
this period Ferdinand and three courtiers—
Longaville, Dumain, and Berowne—vow to
abstain from any association with women. The
foolishness of their oaths is quickly revealed
when the princess of France, accompanied by
three sprightly ladies-in-waiting, arrives on a
diplomatic matter. The earnest wooing that
ensues is halted upon news of the death of the
princess's father. Although the ladies must leave
Navarre immediately, they promise to accept
their suitors as husbands after a twelve-month
waiting period. In the minor plot Don Armado,
a comical Spanish nobleman, woos the country
lass Jaquenetta.
Love's Labor's Lost is reminiscent in its tone and
diction of the artificial courtly comedies of John
Lyly. The ornate language, the wordplays,
the combats of wit, and the probable satire
on Sir Walter Raleigh's scientific discussion
groups (Shakespeare's "School of Night") are
the stuff for courtly audiences. The only play of
its type among the comedies, it shows Shakespeare's flexibility in his early experiments to find
Act IV Scene Rehearsal "Our Parson misdoubts it:
It was treason he said." Left to right: Carlo Ciotti
(Costard), Pauline Landberg (Jacquenetta) and Mark
Hopkins (King of Navarre) Photo: Marcel Williams
the form of comedy most suited to express his
views on mankind. Despite flaws in plot structure
and superficiality in characterization, a clear-
cut theme emerges: the debunking of those who
believe learning can be divorced from life.
Shakespeare and Music
A team of researchers at the University of Victoria is compiling
the first comprehensive, annotated catalogue of all music
related to Shakespeare. If you have any information to
submit or suggestions to make please contact:
Odean Long
Research Coordinator
Shakespeare Music Catalogue
University of Victoria
P.O. Box 1700
Victoria, B.C. V8W2Y2
13 • .•      viir      • •
•••
..    THE    ...
:: VANCOUVER::
PLAYHOUSE
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
••
THE VANCOUVER
PLAYHOUSE BLUE SERIES
presents
Gabrieile Rose as Terrace Tanz
Ric Reid as Dean Rebel in
TERRACE TANZI:
THE VENUS
FLYTRAP
by Claire Luckham in a
knock-'em-down-drag-'em-out
battle of the sexes!
THE VANCOUVER
EAST CULTURAL CENTRE
November 4 to November 26
8:00 p.m.
TICKETS:
VTC, CBO OUTLETS
ON SALE NOW
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Century 21
Executive Security Services Ltd.
CBC
Vancouver Playhouse
Studio 58
Heritage Festival Society
Vancouver Opera Society
Opera Department - UBC
Special thanks to the Vancouver Rowing Club
and Boorman Archery
COMING ATTRACTIONS
ELEANOR MARX
A new play by Leonard Angel
Directed by Charles Siegel
December 12-17
Dorothy Somerset Studio
and
THE IMPORTANCE OF
BEING EARNEST
by Oscar Wilde
Directed by John Brockington
January 11-21
Frederic Wood Theatre
For information and reservations
phone 228-2678
The EXCELSIOR
A restaurant of distinction
4544 West 10th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. V6R 2J1
Tel:   228-1181
Gourmet cuisine
and family prices ...
just outside The Gates
58   1
Program Booklet by
UNIVERSITY
PRODUCTIONS,,
733-9658
733-3908
14 "FeelirV Fit...Feelin' Great"
Shape up!
- ■
Facilities for Men and Women-
• Weight Training
Universal and Fre< • Weights
• Aerobic Classes to Music
• I 'limAlolei Sun Room
• Plus'
Relaxing Whirlpo >l
Seam ant 1 Dry Saunas
Swimming Pool
Visit us at 2411 West Broadway
736-9888  s^^^^^^^^^
I
I
AAAO
'J7X7V7X7\7\7\7\7X7^7^7^3
I
I
1
^£^^£^g^^J

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubctp.1-0118909/manifest

Comment

Related Items