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UBC Publications

Man and Superman Oct 2, 1964

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Array THE FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
PRESENTS
MAN
AMD SUPERMAN
A COMEDY AND A PHILOSOPHY
BY  BERNARD SHAW
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
OCTOBER  2 - 10,  1964 MAN    AND    SUPERMAN
by George Bernard Shaw
CAST
(in order of appearance)
ROEBUCK RAMSDEN (The Commander)
OCTAVIUS ROBINSON
JOHN TANNER (Don Juan)
ANN WHITE FIELD (Dona Ana)
MRS. WHITEFIELD, her mother
MISS RAMSDEN
VIOLET ROBINSON
HENRY STRAKER, a chauffer
HECTOR MALONE Jr., an American
MENDOZA (The Devil)
THE ANARCHIST
THE SULKY SOCIAL DEMOCRAT
THE ROWDY SOCIAL DEMOCRAT
DUVAL
THE GOATHERD
A SPANISH OFFICER
HECTOR MALONE Sr., an Irishman
PARLORMAID
SOLDIERS, BRIGANDS, ETC.
* SAM PAYNE
* JOHN SPARKS
* DEREK RALSTON
♦PATRICIA GAGE
JOYCE SOBELL
BICE CAPLE
PATRICIA WILSON
* JOHN WRIGHT
*ERIC SCHNEIDER
* MICHAEL ROTHERY
LEO BURDAK
JOHN WOLFORTH
MICHAEL GUTTERIDGE
CLIFFORD D. SMITH
KENNETH MORRISON
PETER SMYTHE
GEORGE CAVALIER
PATRICIA LUDWICK
MALCOLM CRANE, RICHARD
LANDON, HOWARD RAFFERTY,
DAVID RUTHERFORD, PETER SMYTHE
SCENES
ACT I: Scene 1:      Portland Place.  Roebuck Ramsden's Study
Scene 2:      Richmond.   Before Mrs. Whitefield's House
INTERMISSION  (10 minutes)
ACT II: Scene 1:      Evening in the Sierra Nevada
Scene 2:      Hell
Scene 3:      Early morning in the Sierra Nevada
INTERMISSION   (10 minutes)
ACT III: Grenada.   Garden of a Villa
TIME:    Before World War I
*   Appearing by permission of Actors' Equity Association DIRECTED BY JOHN BROCKINGTON
SETTINGS BY CLIFF ROBINSON
COSTUMES BY JESSIE  RICHARDSON
PRODUCTION
Technical Director and Stage Manager NORMAN YOUNG
Assistant Technical Director IAN PRATT
Costume Execution JESSIE RICHARDSON
GERALDINE RICHARDSON
JEAN CAUSEY
Scenery Execution RON WHITCOMBE
Properties JOYCE SOBELL
ISABEL KIMMETT
Assistant to the Director PATRICIA LUDWICK
Stage Carpenter RAE ACKERMAN
Stage Crew THEATRE DEPARTMENT STUDENTS
Make-up ROBERT GRAHAM
House Management NIRMAL K. GILL
Ushers PEGGY SAYLE
Production DOROTHY SOMERSET
JESSIE RICHARDSON
SHAW ON THE  "DON JUAN IN HELL" SCENE
When the  Hell scene  was first produced at the  Court Theatre on June 4, 1907,
the following note by Shaw was  inserted in the  programme:
"As this scene may prove puzzling at a first hearing to those who are not
to some extent skilled in modern theology, the Management have asked the Author
to offer the Court audience the same assistance that concert goers are accustomed
to receive in the form of an analytical programme.
"The scene, an abysmal void, represents hell; and the persons of the
drama speak of hell, heaven and earth as if they were separate localities, like
'the heavens above, the earth beneath, and the waters under the earth'. It must
be remembered that such localizations are purely figurative, like our fashion of
calling a treble voice 'high' and a bass voice 'low'. Modern theology conceives
heaven and hell, not as places, but as states of the soul; and by the soul it means,
not an organ like the liver, but the divine element common to all life, which
causes us ' to do the will of God' in addition to looking after our individual interests, and to honor one another for our divine activities and not at all solely for
our selfish activities. "Hell is popularly conceived not only as a place, but as a place of cruelty
and punishment, and heaven as a paradise of idle pleasure. These legends are
discarded by the higher theology, which holds that this world, or any other, may
be made a hell by a society in a state of damnation: that is, a society so lacking
in the higher orders of energy that it is given wholly to the pursuit of immediate
individual pleasure, and cannot even conceive the passion of the divine will.
Also that any world can be made a heaven by a society of persons in whom that
passion is the master passion — a ' communion of saints' in fact.
" In the scene presented to-day hell is this state of damnation. It is
personified in the traditional manner by the devil, who differs from the modern
plutocratic voluptuary only in being 'true to himself: that is, he does not disguise his damnation eithet from himself or others, but boldly embraces it as the
true law of life, and organizes his kingdom frankly on a basis of idle pleasure
seeking, and worships love, beauty, sentiment, youth, romance, etc., etc., etc.
"Upon this conception of heaven and hell the author has fantastically
grafted the XVIIth century legend of Don Juan Tenotio, Don Gonzalo of Ulloa,
Commandant of Calatrava, and the Commandant's daughter Dona Ana, as told in
the famous drama by Tirso de Molina and in Mozart's opera. Don Gonzalo, having,
as he says, 'always done what it was customary for a gentleman to do' until, he
died defending his daughter's honor, went to heaven. Don Juan, having slain him,
and become infamous by his failure to find any permanent satisfaction in his love
affairs, was cast into hell by the ghost of Don Gonzalo, whose statue he had
whimsically invited to supper.
"The ancient melodrama becomes the philosophic comedy presented to-day,
by postulating that Don Gonzalo was a simple-minded officer and gentleman who
cared for nothing but fashionable amusement, whilst Don Juan was consumed with
a passion for divine contemplation and cteative activity, this being the secret
of the failure of love to interest him permanently. Consequently we find Don
Gonzalo, unable to share the divine ecstasy, bored to distraction in heaven; and
Don Juan suffeting amid the pleasures of hell an agony of tedium.
"At last Don Gonzalo, after paying several reconnoitring visits to hell
under color of urging Don Juan to repent, determines to settle there permanently.
At this moment his daughter Ana, now full of years, piety, and worldly honors,
dies, and finds herself with Don Juan in hell, where she is presently the amazed
witness of the arrival of her sainted father. The devil hastens to welcome both
to his tealm. As Ana is no theologian, and believes the popular legends as to
heaven and hell, all this bewilders her extremely.
"The devil, eager as ever to reinforce his kingdom by adding souls to it,
is delighted at the accession of Don Gonzalo, and desirous to retain Dona Ana.
But he is equally ready to get rid of Don Juan, with whom he is on terms of forced
civility, the antipathy between them being fundamental. A discussion arises between them as to the merits of the heavenly and hellish states, and the future of
the world. The discussion lasts more than an hour, as the parties, with eternity
before them, are in no hurry. Finally, Don Juan shakes the dust of hell from his
feet, and goes to heaven. "Don Ana, being a woman, is incapable both of the devil's utter damnation and of Don Juan's complete supersensuality. As the mother of many children
she has shared in the divine travail, and with care and labor and suffering renewed the harvest of eternal life; but the honor and divinity of her work have been
jealously hidden from her by Man, who, dreading her domination, has offered her
for reward only the satisfaction of her senses and affections. She cannot, like
the male devil, use love as mere sentiment and pleasure; nor can she, like the
male saint, put love aside when it has once done its work as a developing and
enlightening experience. Love is neither her pleasure nor her study: it is her
business. So she, in the end, neither goes with Don Juan to heaven nor with the
devil and her father to the palace of pleasure, but declares that her work is not
yet finished. For though by her death she is done with the bearing of men to
mortal fathers, she may as yet, as Woman Immortal, bear the Superman to the
Eternal Father."
THE FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE FOUNDATION
We think it may be of interest to the friends of the Frederic Wood Theatre to
know that the Frederic Wood Theatre Foundation has received gifts amounting
to $44,000.00. Our patrons will recall that our objective was, and remains, to
raise $100,000.00. Because the Universities of this province are launching massive appeals to meet their ever-growing requirements we are not making a special
appeal on behalf of the Frederic Wood Theatre Foundation, but we hope it may
be the pleasure of our friends and patrons to remember its continuing need. Any
gifts to the Foundation will be most gratefully received.*
* Gifts to the Foundation are tax exempt. Cheques should be made out to the University
of British Columbia (Frederic Wood Theatre Foundation), and mailed to the Department
of Theatre at the University.
COMING  NOVEMBER  20 - 28
"THE    VISIT"
BY FRIEDRICH DURRENMATT
DIRECTED BY KLAUSS STRASSMANN ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Frederic Wood Theatre wishes to express its warm appreciation of the
generous assistance given to the production of "Man and Superman" by the
many friends of theatre both on and off the campus, including:
The Vancouvet Sun
The Vancouver Province
The Vancouver Times
Vancouver Weekly Newspapers
Jewish Western Bulletin
C.B.C,   C.H.Q.M.
Vancouvet Radio Stations
Arts Council News
Western Homes and Living
About Town
The Buzzer
The Ubyssey
Woodward Department Stores Ltd.
Hudson's Bay Company
Mayfair Antiques
Varsity Esso Service
The Tradewinds
Rosemary Malkin Antiques
Ararat Oriental Rug Company
B.C. Economy and Fixit Store
The University Departments of Extension, Buildings
and Grounds, Purchasing, and Traffic
The  Vintage  Car appears by courtesy of
Mr.  Kenneth Carter
HAIRSTYLING by "About Town Hairstylists"

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