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Waiting for Godot Sep 21, 1983

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Full Text

 Samuel Beckett
Waiting For Godot Fashions for Men & Women
JAI
On Broadway
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BOOKSTORE ■UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA-
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Presents
Samuel Beckett's
WAITING FOR GODOT
Directed by
Stanley Weese
September 21 - October 3
1983 BECKETT: IS IT ALL GLOOM AND DOOM?
Martin Esslin in "The New York Times", September 24, 1967
Beckett is, in spite of all, a comic
writer - this cannot be stressed
strongly enough - as well as a
tragic poet. His images may be
bleak but his message is certainly
not one of hopelessness. He does
put characters reduced to bare
essentials of the human condition
in situations at the extreme edge
of existence. But he does this not
because he delights in gloom for its
own sake, but because characters
reduced to the essentials and put
into extreme situations will tell us
most about the true nature of our
own lives.
It has frequently been pointed out
that Beckett's heroes have much in
common with the great popular
comedians of our century: Laurel
and Hardy, Charlie Chaplin, Buster
Keaton. It is no coincidence that
those great comedians also
portrayed men at the edge of
society, in extreme situations of
poverty. Chaplin's little man was
as often disappointed in his hopes
as Estragon and Vladimir are in
Waiting for Godot, and we usually
saw him at the end wandering away
into the distance toward another
and equally disappointing
adventure.
Yet those great popular comic
archetypes of our century were
never felt to be depressing
characters. They embodied the
courage, the indestructibility of
the little man in the face of the
horrors of an industrialized and
over-mechanized society. It is
because Vladimir and Estragon are
BECKETT
from the same tribe as Charlie
Chaplin's little tramp and Buster
Keaton's stoic that they have
succeeded in making their creator
famous throughout the world.
Courage and sincerity were the
redeeming, hopeful side of the
great film comics; courage and
sincerity, in a deepened, modified
form, are also the elements that
nurture hope and consolation in
Beckett's     plays. Above     all,
sincerity. There is in Beckett's
work a totally uncompromising
determination always to face the
worst about man and his nature;
never to fall for cheap
consolations; never to accept any
euphemisms, any false hope. Such
uncompromising determination to
face the truth may produce gloomy
answers, but it is, in itself,
anything but depressing. For it
shows man as capable of facing and
confronting the truth. And that
becomes something noble and
inspiring. SAMUEL BECKETT:  A CHRONOLOGY
1906 Born at Foxrock, near Dublin, on Good Friday, April 13th, as
son of Protestant parents
1927 B.A. in French and Italian, Trinity College, Dublin
1928 Paris.  Lecturer at the "Ecole Normale Superieure"
Meets James Joyce
1931 M.A. in French, Trinity College, Dublin
Publication of his study on Marcel Proust
1932 Begins five years of wandering in Germany, France, England
and Ireland
1937 Settles in Paris
1938 The novel Murphy published in London
1941 Joins French Resistance Movement
1953 5th January:    first production of Waiting  for Godot at the
"Theatre de Babylone" in Paris
1956 The novel Malone Dies published in New York
1957 Endgame
1961 Happy Days.  Poems published in London
1964 Works with Buster Keaton on Film.
1969 Awarded Nobel Prize for Literature
Breath published and produced in New York
1973 Not I published and produced in London
1976 The Collected Works published in New York
1983 Memory produced in Berlin A NIGHT AT SAN QUENTIN
From Martin Esslin, The Theatre of the Absurd
On 19 November 1957, a group of
worried actors were preparing to
face their audience. The actors
were members of the San
Francisco Actors' Company. The
audience consisted of 1400
convicts at the San Quentin
Penitentiary. No live play had
been performed at San Quentin
since 1913. Now, forty-four years
later, the play that had been
chosen, largely because no women
appeared in it, was Samuel
Beckett's Waiting for Godot.
No wonder the actors and Herbert
Blau, the director, were apprehensive. How were they to face one of
the toughest audiences in the world
with a highly obscure, intellectual
play that had produced near riots
among a good many highly
sophisticated audiences in Western
Europe? Herbert Blau decided to
prepare the San Quentin audience
for what was to come. He stepped
on to the stage and addressed the
packed, darkened North Dining
Hall - a sea of flickering matches
that the convicts tossed over their
shoulders after lighting their
cigarettes. Blau compared the
play to a piece of jazz music "to
which one must listen for whatever
one may find in it." In the same
way,   he   hoped,   there   would   be
Eccks
some meaning, some personal
significance for each member of
the audience in Waiting for Godot.
The curtain parted. The play
began. And what bewildered the
sophisticated audiences of Paris,
London, and New York was
immediately grasped by an
audience of convicts. As the
writer in the columns of the prison
paper, the San Quentin News, put
it: "They listened; they looked;
they stayed; and they left at the
end, all shook...".
A reporter from the San Francisco
Chronicle who was present noted
that the convicts had no
difficulties understanding the play.
One prisoner told him, 'Godot is
Society'. Said another, 'He's the
Outside'. A teacher at the prison
was quoted as saying: "They know
what is meant by waiting . . . and
they knew if Godot finally came,
he would only be a disappointment.
Still, they're waiting for Godot,
and will continue and continue to
wait."
Since that night in 1957 Godot
himself, as well as turns of phrase
and characters from the play, have
become a permanent part of the
private language, the institutional
mythology of San Quentin.
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4480 Dunbar
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Books Make Wonderful Gifts! m
Scene from World Premiere
"Theatre de Babylone", Paris 1953 WAITING FOR GODOT
The Director's "back page"
The Concept: The characters are real people in an absurd situation (which
is "the human condition") - driven by a need to know in the midst of a
universe which is essentially unknowable! (which is both comic and
tragic) - and keeping up their courage, while waiting, with various
diversions ("Will you not play?").
The plot is not linear (telling a story) but cyclical (the experience of
waiting) and turns from hope to despair, kept in motion by a recurring
motif ("it's not certain").
Hope
(action)
"It's not certain'
End of action
("What do we do now?")
"Nothing to be done"
"It's not certain"
Despair t
(stasis)
The setting should be the antithesis of the Garden of Eden (a desert -
slanted strata - tortured tree, bent to the wind, clinging to existence -
beyond, the void - and in the void, the great dead world of the moon). The
whole to be done in a naive theatrical style (stage boards, cut-out tree,
ill-hung eye, jerky moon, vaudeville/circus costumes, broad make-up).
Amngraptj® &tutaa ICtb.
3343 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. V6R 2B1
Telephone: 732-7446
Official Graduation Portrait Photographers for the
University of British Columbia The Director's observations to the actors
after an early rehearsal
"There's a 50/50 chance that Gogo and Didi are the two thieves of the
Gospels, hanging on the Cross alongside of Christ, and waiting for
deliverance. Didi the believer, with a crown of thorns on his head, and
Gogo the doubter, with nails through his feet.
There's a 50/50 chance that Pozzo jjs Godot (longing for something that,
when it arrives, is not recognized).
There's a 50/50 chance that Pozzo is God and Lucky is Christ and that the
first act represents the Old Testament and the second act the New
Testament.
It is, however, only a 50/50 chance and is not to be taken as a simple
explanation of the play, but if it helps your characterization to imagine
you are hanging from a Cross and passing the time while waiting for
deliverance, then, by all means, use it."
Left to right:   Stanley Weese, John Woods, Michael Robinson, Pat Blaney,
Bruce Dow (behind) and Luc Corbeil. WAITING FOR GODOT
by
Samuel Beckett
Directed by
Stanley Weese
Scenography by
J. Amburn Darnell
CAST
(in order of appearance)
GOGO  Pat Blaney
DIDI  Bruce Dow
LUCKY      Michael Robinson
POZZO  Luc Corbeil
THE BOY  Carolyn Soper
ACT I        A country road.   A tree.   Evening
There will be one 15 minute intermission
ACT II       Next day.   Same time.   Same place.
FRONT COVER PHOTO
Scene from 1966 Production of
Waiting for Godot
at the University of California
Santa Barbara PRODUCTION
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
PROPERTIES 	
COSTUME SUPERVISOR
Ian Pratt
Sherry Darcus
Rosemarie Heselton
SET CONSTRUCTION          Don Griffiths, Robert Eberle
LIGHTING EXECUTION  John Henrickson
STAGE MANAGER          Craig Laven
ASSISTANTS TO THE DIRECTOR     Beth French, John Woods
WARDROBE MISTRESSES  Se Keohane, Wiluya
STAGE CREW   The Students of Theatre 250/350
HOUSE MANAGER          Tamsin Kelsey
BOX OFFICE       Carol Fisher, Roseann Janzen and Lyle Moon
BUSINESS MANAGER      Marjorie Fordham
PRODUCTION   Norman Young
PROGRAM BOOK   Joseph MacKinnon
WAITING FOR GODOT
is produced by special arrangement with
Dramatists Play Service Inc., New York
* *   .    * * * v*
* ****   . cS    %# ft
1968 Production of Waiting for Godot, U.B.C.
Lee Taylor as Pozzo with Gregory Reid as Gogo i  . *
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Carolyn Soper and Bruce Dow
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Value in Quality Gold & Silver Jewellery
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 Special Thanks to:	
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and
John Mee of P. Lawson Travel
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Rehearsal Shot
Left to right:   Pat Blaney, Michael Robinson, Bruce Dow, Luc Corbeil.
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11 THREE BECKETT ANECDOTES
When Beckett was asked about the
theme of Waiting for Godot, he
referred to what he called 'a
wonderful passage1 in the writings
of St. Augustine: "Do not despair:
one of the thieves was saved. Do
not presume: one of the thieves
was damned."
When asked who or what Godot
stood for, Beckett replied: "I once
encountered a large group of
people standing on a street corner
one afternoon during the annual
Tour de France bicycle race, and I
asked what they were doing. 'Nous
attendons Godot', they replied,
adding that all the competitors had
passed except the oldest, whose
name was Godot."
Q: Is there any one motto that
captures the essence of your
work?
A: "Fluctuat nee mergitur" ("The
ship is being tossed about, but
the ship won't sink").
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Open 1-5 daily, including Sundays
Phone:   261-3812
13 UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
B.F.A. in Acting and in Technical Theatre/Design
The University and its Setting
The University of British Columbia, established in 1915, has a present
enrolment of 30,000. It is located six miles from downtown Vancouver on
a campus that is regarded as one of the most beautiful in North America.
The Vancouver area offers a flourishing cultural scene and provides
excellent opportunities for summer and winter sports.
The Department of Theatre
Over the years the Department of Theatre at UBC has assembled a very
strong faculty of specialists. Their teaching covers all aspects of the
theatre, both as a practical craft and as an academic discipline: Acting,
Directing, Design, Technical Theatre; Theatre History, Dramatic
Literature, Theory; Film Production and Film Criticism.
Degrees range from the B.A. and B.F.A. over the M.A. and M.F.A. to the
Ph.D.
The B.F.A. Programme
In its continuous attempt to strengthen its curriculum, the Department is
now offering a B.F.A. in Acting, a B.F.A. in Design and a B.F.A. in
Technical Theatre. These new programmes give the exceptionally
talented student a thorough training of professional scope, without
neglecting any academic values. The programme consists of a carefully
arranged combination of classroom work, private tutorials and stage
exposure. Its breadth and focus make this B.F.A. one of the strongest and
most comprehensive on the continent.
The Facilities
The departmental complex houses two fully equipped and professionally
manned stages: the 400 seat Frederic Wood Theatre with its season of
large-scale productions, and the 90 seat Dorothy Somerset Studio, which
-offers a series of chamber plays each year. Both theatres have become an
integral part of Vancouver's artistic life. Students in any of the B.F.A.
programmes will be expected to participate in these productions
according to their expertise.
The University Library now has over two million volumes, including a rich
collection of periodicals; its theatre collection is undergoing a vigorous
and systematic expansion.
The Departmental Reading Room has its own collection of relevant
critical and reference material.
14 Entrance Requirements
In order to maintain the highest standard, only the most promising
applicants will be accepted into the programme. Thus, apart from the
regular entrance requirements set down by the University, the Department will judge the candidates' potential by either audition (Acting) or
portfolio (Technical Theatre/Design).
Faculty Involved in the B.F.A.
John Brockington, Don Davis, Brian Jackson, Peter Loeffler, Ian Pratt,
Charles Siegel, Donald Soule, Klaus Strassmann, Stanley Weese, Norman
Young, Arne Zaslove, J. Amburn Darnali, and Steven Thorne.
Recent Artists in Residence
Tennessee   Williams,   Christopher   Newton,   Tony   Van   Bridge,   Theatre
Beyond Words, Alan King and Donald Brittain.
Some Former Students
Rae Ackerman, Brian Arnott, Rodger Barton, Greg Burhoe, Brent Carver,
Nicola Cavendish, Bob Dubberley, Ken Gass, Allan Gray, John Gray, Scott
Hylands, Lome Kennedy, Ken Kramer, Patricia Ludwick, David Y.H. Lui,
Ray Michal, Bill Millerd, Jane Mortifee, Elizabeth Murphy, Richard
Ouzounian, Eric Peterson, Ellis Pryce-Jones, Wayne Robson, Pat Rose,
Alan Scarfe, Goldie Semple, Pia Shandel, Leueen Willoughby, John Wright,
Karl Wylie.
Canadian Premiere of Waiting for Godot
1957 U.B.C, with John Brockington (right) as Pozzo
15 COMING ATTRACTIONS
WAITING FOR THE PARADE
by John Murrell
An MFA Thesis Production irtissgW
October 11 - 15
Dorothy Somerset Studio
LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST
by William Shakespeare
Directed by Arne Zaslove
November 9-19
Frederic Wood Theatre
For information and reservations
phone 228-2678
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