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Student Handbook 1931

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  Indentification
NAME-
HOME ADDRESS-
VANCOUVER ADDRESS-
VANCOUVER PHONE-
CLASS	
IDENTIFICATION
YOUR PRINTER
NAME:
ANDERSON & ODLUM LTD.
address:  303 W.  PENDER ST.
PHONE:
SEYMOUR   3400
REMARKS:
WE PRINT EVERYTHING
FROM   CARDS  TO
CATALOGUES.
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Utttoent Handbook
1931 - 1952
EDITOR:
rosemary wlnslow, arts "33
assistant:
Dorothy Thompson. Arts -33
GRADUATE    MANAGER:
Arnold Henderson, Com.  '3i
STUDENT   PUBLICATIONS
BOARD UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
Above the
Commonplace
/or Service
in 'Producing
HIGH   SCHOOL   ANNUALS
AND
COLLEGE   MAGAZINES
Pacific Printers  Ltd.
500  BEKINS  BUILDING
SOO    BEATTY   STREET
PHONE   SEYMOUR   9592
STUDENT   HANDBOOK
Editors' Note
The Editors wish to thank all those
who have assisted in any way in the
publication of this edition of the Handbook, and to acknowledge use of previous Handbooks. It is hoped that the
information contained herein will prove
of practical assistance.
It would be greatly appreciated if
students would give their patronage to
the advertisers whose support has made
this  publication  possible. UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
STUDENT   HANDBOOK
Your Nearest Bank !
Contents
Canadian lank
nf (flmnmrra
1     10th Ave. and Sasamat St.
Bankers to the
Alma  Mater Society
GENERAL   BANKING    BUSINESS
TRANSACTED
Students' Accounts
Welcomed
C. R. MYERS, Manager
Foreword  6
Student Body Organization   7
Message of A.M.S. President   9
General Information     11
Historical   Sketch        IS
A.M.S.  Constitution    18
Students'   Council     34
Publications   Board     35
Directory     36
New Eligibility  Rules      40   ■
Kla-How-Yah  43
Freshman   Initiation     44
Valedictory   Gifts  46
Undergraduate   Societies     47
Social  Events  48
Honor  System     50
Athletics  51
Men's Athletic Awards   52
Men's  Athletics    56
Women's  Athletic  Awards    66
Track Championships    67
Women's Athletics   68
Literary and  Scientific    71
Fraternities     85
Points of Interest   88
Undergraduate   Exchange   Scheme 91
Graduate   Manager     92
Curator     92
Songs  93
Yells     99
Important Dates   101
Time   Tables    122-124 UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Foreword
This little Handbook is the recognized authority on all matters of which
it treats. To those who would gain an
insight into the many phases of student
life and organization it is indispensable,
since it covers a wide range of topics
of interest to all undergraduates.
Upper classmen expect the new stu-
clents to familiarize themselves with the
existing organizations, because in no
other way can the newcomers fit themselves for their responsibilities as members of a corporate body which is largely self-governing. By this means the
in-coming students can best preserve
the worthiest traditions of their predecessors, and at the same time prepare themselves to make a fuller contribution to future developments in student  activities.
In helping to attain these ends, the
Handbooks of past years have been
most valuable. This little volume, by
carrying over into the present many of
the best features of previous editions,
"amply justifies its publication. I heartily commend it to the careful consideration of all students because the purpose which its editors had in mind has
been achieved.
L. S. KLINCK,
President.
STUDENT   HANDBOOK
Organization of the
Student Body
The Students' Council is the governing body,
its nine members being elected by the students
late in the Spring term. This body meets every
Monday night during the term to discuss all
motions for student welfare. The Presidents of
the Men's and Women's Undergraduate Societies, the Presidents of the Men's and Women's
Athletic Societies and the President of the
Literary and Scientific Executive, represent
definite bodies of student opinion. These members bring up matters relative to their own
subsidiaries, but are expected to know and
discuss  matters  outside  their  own  spheres.
Each of the suhsidiary clubs submits a budget
early in the fall to its own governing hody,
which in turn submits it to the Council through
the club president. Budgets are then allotted
by Council. In addition to club budgets, special
grants may be made at the discretion of the
Council.
Each club has its own executive, which is
elected by undergraduates interested in the
activities of that club.
The Publications Board is a semi-independent
body, having no representation on Council,
though the Editor-in-Chief holds an "A" position. TNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
STUDENT   HANDBOOK
EARL   VANCE
PRESIDENT,    ALMA   MATER   SOCIETY
To the Men and Women
of the Class of '35
Kla-how-3'ah, Class of '35! You arc
now members of the University of British Columbia and of its student organization, the Alma Mater Society. The
Students' Council extends to you the
sincere greetings and the best wishes
of the Student Body.
You tread on ground that is sacred
to the Alumni, the Student Body, and
the Faculty of this institution. Guide
your footsteps that they may never
bring harm nor disrepute to that which
you will soon learn to cherish.
You have been entrusted with the
safe-guarding of a past whose glory is
unblemished, and a present whose
achievements are many and honored.
The upbuilding of the future is in your
hands. The past and present challenge
you to mount higher on the stairway of
achievement. Will you accept this
challenge or lay it idly aside? We
watch jealously to see if you will accept
our ideals or replace them with better
ones.
The highest ideals of development,
both of the individual and of the community life of the University, are only 10
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
realized when every student participates
in some phase of student activity.
Choose the activity in which you are
most interested and to which you are
best suited. Students here are judged
by their individual accomplishments
rather than by their pedigree or their
bank account.
You can do as you like about your
work; no one will make you do it. But
be honest with yourself, and remember
why you are here. Your success in College depends on you alone. Class of
'35, "Tuum Est."
EARL VANCE,
Pres. A.M.S.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Qeneral Information
-^.
LOST AND FOUND—The University Book Store is the official Lost and
Found Bureau on the campus.   .
NOTICE BOARDS—Notice Boards
are placed in every University Building
and in the space between the Arts and
Auditorium Buildings. Students are at
liberty to use them; care must be
taken, however, to see that the notices
are neat. The official Student Council
Notice Board is on the South stairway
in the Auditorium Building.
UBYSSEY — The "Ubyssey," published on Tuesdays and Fridays, is distributed  in  the  Common  Rooms.
TELEPHONES—Pay phones are installed in all the University Buildings.
Toll is 5 cents to the city exchange.
SCHOLARSHIPS —Information re
Scholarships, Medals and Prizes will be
found in the Calendar, pages 51-64.
MAIL—Mail is received twice daily
on the campus. The Letter-Rack for
clubs and societies is at the head of
the south stairway in the Auditorium
Building. General Student Letter-
Racks are situated in the lower hall of
the Arts Building. The official address is: "The University of British
Columbia, West Point Grey, B. C."
UNIVERSITY EMPLOYMENT
BUREAU—The   objects   of   the   Em- UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.
ployment Bureau are to provide students with summer employment, to
provide part-time work for students
during the Winter Session, and to help
students in obtaining positions after
graduation. This service is for employers seeking help and for students
desiring employment. Those who know
of positions vacant are requested to
notify the Bureau. Correspondence
should be addressed to "Employment
Bureau, Registrar's Office."
THE BOOK STORE—The Book
Store, which occupies a room in the
Auditorium Building, is prepared to
supply all the text books required for
the various courses offered in the University, also such articles as note books,
loose-leaf sheets, fountain pens, drawing paper and instruments. During
the Winter Session the Book Store is
open Monday to Friday, from nine to
five o'clock, and Saturday from nine to
one.
THE LIBRARY—During the session
the Library is open on week days from
8:45 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. except on Saturdays, when the hours are from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Further information regarding the Library is posted on the notice
board in that building.
UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE
AND FIRST AID DEPARTMENT—
Exists for the purpose of the preven- .
tion    of    communicable    diseases,    to
render first aid in case of accident or
STUDENT HANDBOOK
sudden sickness, and for the general
well-being of the student body, who are
at liberty to seek ad\ ice about health
matters. Students can help the service
materially by observing the  following:
1. Rules governing Medical Physical
Examination : Students who have not
been examined by the University Medical Examiner within the last five years
will report immediately to the Health
Service and secure an appointment,
which must be kept on the date and
at the time assigned. Students who do
not conform to the above regulations
will be reported to the University
Health   Committee.
2. Vaccination against smallpox will
be performed free of charge, for students who cannot otherwise secure it.
All students are advised to be vaccinated.
3. Illness, however slight, especially
of a communicable nature, such as the
common cold, must be reported when
the student becomes ill, not after recovery, and the student must report to
the Health Service before returning to
classes. "
4. Exposure to infection : In the case
of a student being exposed to infectious disease at the residerice of the
student or elsewhere, report must be
made over the telephone for advice as
to procedure. In no case may the student return to the University before
receiving advice from the Health Service. UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
5. Athletic students sustaining injuries. Students must report to the
Health Service as soon after sustaining injuries as possible. Failure to so
report will result in no recommendation
being sent forward to the Council in
case Medical treatment is necessary,
and in no case will the Health Service
he responsible or undertake to treat
an injury where a student has unsuccessfully attempted to treat the injured part over a period of time, before
reporting. A signed authorization from
the Health Service is necessary before
students may obtain treatment for
their injuries, and apply to Students'
. Council   for   financial   assistance.
The above applies to any student
attending the University; the Medical
service is not available to any other
.than athletes.
THE STUDENTS' DIRECTORY
The Students' Directory contains the
name, Vancouver and out-of-town address, and the telephone number of
every student registered at the University, the address and telephone
number of each fraternity on the campus, and the telephone numbers of the
various offices about the University.
The Directory will be published, with
the full co-operation of the students,
early in November; a small fee will be
charged. Students are urged to fill in
their addresses and telephone numbers
STUDENT HANDBOOK
15
on the card marked "Information for
Students' Council" when registering, or
1 unable to do so then, to do so at the
earliest possible moment.
Historical Sketch
<*.
In 1890 the Provincial Legislature
passed an Act establishing a bod}
politic and corporate named "The University of British Columbia.'' No material progress was made, however,
.;;;til 1894, when an Act was passed
which permitted the affiliation of high
schools in the Province with recognized
Canadian  Universities.
In 1899 Yancouver High School was
affiliated with McGill University in
order to provide first year work in
Arts, and took the name of Yancouver
College. First Year work in Arts was
offered by Victoria High School when
it became Victoria College by affiliation with McGill University in 1902.
In the same year Yancouver College
undertook the  Second Year in Arts.
In 1906 an Act was passed incorporating the Royal Institution for the
Advancement of Learning of British
Columbia, which in ,the same year
established at Vancouver the McGill
University College of British Columbia.
In 1915 the University of British Columbia was opened and the McGill
University   College   of   Yancouver   and UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Victoria College which was part of it,
ceased to exist.
Definite sleps to establish the University were taken by Dr. H. E. Young,
Minister of Education, in 1907, when
he introduced a "University Endowment Act." This Act was followed in
1908 by an Act establishing and incorporating the University of British
Columbia and repealing the old Act of
1890-91. This Act, with its subsequent
amendments, determines the present
constitution  of  the  University.
A site commission, appointed in 1910,
recommended the vicinity of Vancouver
and in the following year the Point
Grey site was granted to the University.
The grant now consists of 548 acres
at the extremity of Point Grey. The
waters of the Gulf of Georgia form
more than half the boundary-of the
University campus. A tract of some
3,000 acres of Government land immediately adjoining the site and lying between it and the City of Vancouver has
been set aside by the Government in
order that University revenue may be
provided by sale or lease.
The first Convocation, held on August
1st, 1912, chose Mr. F. L. Carter-Cotton
as first chancellor of the University. In
March, 1913, the Liutenant-Governor-
in-Council appointed as President of
the University. F. F. Wesbrook, M.A.,
M.D., CM., LL.D.    On April 4th, 1918,
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Dr. R. E. McKechnie, the present chancellor, was elected. On the death of
President Wesbrook, October 20th,
1918, L. S. Klinck, Dean of the Faculty
of Agriculture, was appointed Acting
President, and on June 1st, 1919, President.
From its opening in 1915 till the
summer of 1925. the University carried
on its work in temporary quarters on
part of the site of the General Hospital
in Fairview.
Construction work was commenced
on the Science Building at the Point
Grey site in 1914, but was interrupted
because of war conditions. Work on
this building was resumed in 1923
shortly after the great Student Campaign. The Science Building and
Library, as well as nine other buildings,
were completed and ready for occupancy in  the  fall of  1925.
The inauguration of the new buildings was held on October 15th and 16th,
1925. on which occasion honorary degrees were granted by the University
for  the  first time. UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
CONSTITUTION
of the
ALMA   MATER   SOCIETY
THE   UNIVERSITY   OF   BRITISH
COLUMBIA
(Incorporated)
SCHEDULE   "A."
Section 6, 37—"Societies Act"
DECLARATION
(1) The name of the Society is the "Alma
Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia.
(2) The  objects  of the  Society   are:
(a) To promote, direct and control all student activities within the University of British
Columbia as represented in the following
associations and societies and their subsidiary
organizations:
1. The Undergraduate Societies.
2. The Literary and Scientific Executive.
3. The Athletic Associations.
4. The Students'  Publications  Board.
(b) To advance the cause of higher learning in the Province of British Columbia;
(c") To promote unity and goodwill amongst
its  members;
(d) To acquire by gift, bequest, lease, exchange or purchase any lands, buildings or
hereditaments, whether freehold or leasehold,
for the  use of the  Society.
(e) To erect on such lands any buildings or
improvements necessary for the proper use
and occupation of the same by the Society;
(f) To take or otherwise acquire and hold
shares or stock debentures, debenture stock,
bonds, obligations and securities issued by
any benevolent or charitable Society or Company within the Province of British Columbia
or  elsewhere;
STUDENT HANDBOOK
19
■ (g) Subject   to   the   provisions   contained   in
Clause   10   of   the   Societies   Act   to   borrow,
raise   and   secure   the   payment  of   money   in
such  manner  as  the Society sees   fit,  and  in
particular by  the  issue  of  debentures;
(3) The  operations  of  the  Society  are  to  be
chiefly carried on at the University of  British
Columbia,     University    Section,    Point    Grey,
Province   of   British   Columbia.
SCHEDULE  "B"
BY-LAW No. 1—(a) The society shall be
composed   of   active   and   honorary   members.
(b) Active members shall comprise all registered students of the University of British
Columbia, graduates, undergraduates and partial students, who have paid Alma Mater Society  fees   for  the  current  session.
(c) Honorary members shall comprise all
members of the Faculty, graduates of the University, and others to whom honorary membership  may be given.
BY-LAW No. 2—An active member of the
Society shall cease to be an active member
when he is no longer a graduate, undergraduate, or partial student of the University
of  British Columbia  in good standing.
BY-LAW No. 3—Student activities within the
University of British Columbia will be represented by the following associations and societies  and  their  subsidiary  organizations:
(a) The Undergraduate Societies which shall
comprise the Women's Undergraduate Society,
the Men's Undergraduate Society and subsidiary class organizations.
(b) The Literary and Scientific Executive,
which shall include a representative of the
Musical Society, of the Players' Club, of Debaters' organizations, and of each of such
kindred societies as may, with the consent of
the Executive ratified by the Students' Council,
be given direct representation of the Executive.
(c) The Athletic Associations, which shall
comprise the Women's Athletic Association, the
Men's Athletic Association, and all their subsidiary societies. 20
UNIVERSITY  OI?   B.C.
(d) The Students' Publications Board, which
shall comprise all boards or * rganizations undertaking   student   publications.
BY-LAW No. 4.—(a) A semi-annual meeting
of the Society will be held within the first ten
days of the Fall term, at which the Treasurer
will make a financial statement and the functions and activities of the Alma Mater Society
and   subsidiary   societies   w ill   be   outlined.
(b) The Annual Meeting will be held in the
last week in March, at which the President and
Treasurer will make a report, and the Secretary will make a report on all subsidiary
organizations.
(c) Special meetings may be called at any
time by the President on the request of the
Students' Council, or on the written request of
twenty members of the Socictj. At these
meetings no business can be transacted except
that for which the meeting has been called.
Cdl Only active members can vote at the
meetings of the Society. Honorary members
may not vote, but may take part in all discussions.
(e) Thirty-three per cent of the students
registered for the current session shall constitute  a  quorum  at   any  meeting of  the  Society.
BY-LAW No. 5. (a) The name of the Executive shall be the "Students' Council," and the
members of the Students' Council, for the time
being, shall be the, directors of the Society.
(b) The members of the Students' Council
shall   be:
1. The   Honorary   President.
2. The President, who shall be an undergraduate of the  Senior Year of any   Faculty.
3. The Secretary of the Alma Slater Society, who shall be an undergraduate of the
Junior or Senior  Year of any  Faculty.
4. The Treasurer of the Alma Mater Society, who shall be an undergraduate of the
Junior   Year   of   any   Faculty.
5. The President of the Women's Undergraduate Society, who shall be an undergraduate of the Senior  Year of any  Faculty-
6. The President of the Men's Undergraduate Society, who shall be an undergraduate
of the Senior Year of any  Faculty.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
21
7. The President of the Literary and Scien-
tifi Executive, who shall be an undergraduate of the Junior or Senior Year of any
Faculty.
8. The President of the Womens Athletic
Association, who shall he an undergraduate
of the Junior or Senior Year of any  Faculty.
9. The President of the Men's Athletic
Ass tciation, who shall 1 e an undergraduate
fo thhe Junior or Senic r Year of an>   Faculty.
10. The Junior Member, who shall be an
undergraduate of the Junior Y'ear of any
Faculty elected by  the  student body.
(c) Officers  of  the  Society  shall be:
1. Honorary   President.
2. President.
3. Vice-President (to be elected by the
Council from its members by a majority
vote.)
4. Secretary.
5. Treasurer
6. Assistant   Treasurers.
Cd) Duties    of    the   officers    of    the    Society
shall  be:
1. The President shall preside at all meetings of the Students' Council and of the
Alma Mater Society; shall convene all ordinary and special meetings of the Students'
Council; shall be an ex-officio member of all
committees under the Alma Mater Society,
and shall undertake all such other duties as
usually  fall  to the office of the  President.
2. The Vice-President shall, in the absence
of  the  President,  assume  all  his duties.
3. The Secretar\ shall take minutes of all
the meetings of the Students' Council and of
the Alma Mater Society, and shall conduct
all correspondence of the Students' Council
and keep on file copies of all letters written
and received by him relating to the affairs
of the Society; shall read the annual report
of the subsidiary organizations at the annual
meeting, and shall keep in his custody all
books   and   records   of   the   Socictv.
4. If the Students' Council shall deem it
advisable, an Assistant Secretary shall be
appointed by it to assist the Secretary in
the discharge of his  duties. 22
UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.
5. The Treasurer shall, on assuming office,
provide a bond in the sum of $2,000 on himself in a company* selected by the Students'
Council. The cost of such bond shall be paid
from the funds of the Alma Mater Society.
He shall take charge of and be responsible
for the funds of the Society, which shall be
divided as follows:
(1) Appropriations to the Students' Publications.
(2) Appropriations to the Literary and Sci-'
entific    Executive.
(3) Appropriations to the Men's Athletic
Association.
(4) The balance shall be appropriated to
the general account of the Alma Mater Society. The Treasurer shall immediately, on
receipt of the funds, deposit the same in a
chartered bank selected by the Students'
Council, and shall open a separate bank
account for each of the aforesaid divisions oi
the funds. He shall not disburse the funds
under his direct control, except in the payment of bills certified by the President and
Treasurer of the Society which contracted
the bills, and then only by a cheque signed
by him and countersigned by the President
of the Students' Council. ,He shall keep
careful account of, and be responsible for, all
moneys received and disbursed by himself
and by the assistant Treasurers, and shall
file all bills, receipts and vouchers under
their control. He shall have the power to
audit the books of the assistant Treasurers
at any time, and he shall see that they keep
careful count of, and are responsible for the
moneys, and file all bills, receipts and vouchers under their control. He shall render a
financial statement of the Alma Mater Society to the Students' Council each month,
and at any other time on the written order
of the Council, and shall embody in such
statement the financial statements received
from his assistant Treasurers. He shall
obtain a financial report of each activity
within two weeks of each activity, and present   it   to   the   Students'   Council!
STUDENT HANDBAAK
23
(5) The assistant Treasurers shall be (1)
the business manager of the Publications
Board, (2) the Treasurer of the Literary and
Scientific Executive, (< ;i The Treasurer of the
Men's Athletic Association, (4) the Treasurer
of the Men's Undergraduate Society. These
officers shall not sit on the Council. They
shall not disburse the funds under their
direct control, except in payment of bills
certified by the President and Treasurer of
the Society which contracted the bills, and
then only by cheque signed by the assistant
treasurer concerned, and countersigned by
the President and Treasurer of the Students'
Council. They shall each render a financial
statement of their department monthly, and
a financial report once a year for the annual
meeting of the Alma Mater Society; or at
any other time on the writte^i order of the
President and Treasurer of the Students'
Council. They shall obtain and file a financial report of each activity of the societies in
their department, and shall forward a copy
to the Treasurer of the Students' Council
within two weeks after the date of the
activity.
(e. Duties   of   the   Students'   Council:
1. The Students' Council shall be the only
recognized medium between the Alma Mater
Society   and:
1. The   University   Authorities.
2. The   other   organizations.
3. The   general   public.
2. The Students' Council shall have control
of all affiliated student activities, subject to
the approval of the Faculty Committee on
Student  Affairs.
3. The Students' Council shall act as a
court, before which any student may be called
to   account   for   misdemeanor.
4. The Students' Council shall appoint a returning officer and scrutineers for the election of the Honorary President and President
of  the Alina  Mater  Society.
5. The Students' Council shall appoint two
of "its members to sit with the President of
the Alma Mater Society on the Joint Committee   of   Student   Affairs. 24
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
6. The Students' Council shall meet regularly   each   week   during   the   session.
7. Immediately after the close of the Spring
term, the Students' Council-elect shall assume
its office at a joint meeting with the retiring
Students'    Council.
8. It   shall   be   the   duty   of   the   Students'
Council   to   promote   social    intercourse   and
academic   unity   within   the   University.
BY-LAW No. 6—The Students' Council shall
have power to appoint a Secretary-Treasurer
to assist the regular officers of the Society at
a salary to be fixed by the Students' Council,
provided the Society shall, at a meeting of
which due notice has been given, first have
passed a resolution authorizing such appointment.
BY-LAW No. 7—Subject to the provisions
contained in Clause 10 of the Societies' Act,
the Students' Council may, for the purpose of
carrying out the objects of the Society, borrow,
raise, or secure the repayment of such sum or
sums of money in such manner and upon such
terms and conditions in all respects as the
Students' Council thinks fit, and in particular
by the issue of bonds, perpetual or redeemable
debentures, or any mortgage charge or other
security on the whole or any part of the property or assets of the Society, both present and
future, including all fees or membership dues
now   or   hereafter   due   or  payable.
BY-LAW No. 8—Not more than four weeks
prior to the last day of the Spring term, an
audit shall be made of the Treasurer's books
by auditors appointed for that purpose by the
Students' Council, and auditors so appointed
shall be paid such remuneration as the Council
shall  determine.
BY-LAW No. 9—The seal of the Society shall
not be affixed to any instrument except by the
authority of a resolution of the Students' Council or of the Society, and in the presence of
such officers of the Society as may be prescribed in and by any such resolution, or, if
no officers are prescribed by the resolution, in
the  presence  of:
STUDENT HANDBOOK
(a) Two members of the Students' Council
and   the  Secretary,   or
(b) The President of the Society and the
Secretary; and such officers shall sign every
instrument to ^ which the seal of the Society
is so affixed in their presence.
BY-LAW No. 10.—Elections shall be conducted as follows:
(a) Honorary President and Council members.
1. Nominations for officers other than that
of President shall be in the bands of the
Secretary seven days before election {lay,
and nominations for the office of President
shall be in the hands of the Secretary eight
days before election day. These nominations
shall be posted on the bulletin board and
shall be signed by not less than 10 active
members of the Society.
2. No student may sign the list of nomination for more than one candidate for each
office.
3. The   elections   shall   be   by   ballot.
4. The election of Honorary President and
President shall be held on the second Tuesday
of March; polling booths will be open from
ten o'clock   a.m.  to 4 o'clock  p.m.
5. The elections for all Council offices not
mentioned in sub-section 4 shall be held on
the third Tuesday of March; polling booths
will be open from ten o'clock a.m. to 4 o'clock"
p.m.
6. Active members only shall have the
privilege   of   voting   at   these   elections.
7. After the ballots have been counted the
returning officer shall place them in a package, which shall be sealed in the presence of
the scrutineers and preserved until after the
annual   meeting   of   the   Society.
(b) Appointments   by   the   Students'   Council:
1. The Editor-in-Chief of the Students' Publications: The Students' Council shall appoint this officer, following the election of
the President of the Alma  Mater Societj.
2. Assistant Treasurers: The business manager of the Publications Board, the Treasurer
of the Literary and Scientific Executive, the
Treasurer   of   the   Men's   I'ndergraduate   So- 26
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
ciety shall be appointed by the Students'
Council in collaboration with representatives
ftf the retiring executive of the department
concerned at the first Council meeting following the election or appointment of the
head of that department for the next session.
3. The Senior Editors of Student Publications: The Students' Council, in collaboration
with the Publications Board, shall appoint
these officers at the first Council meeting
following the appointment of the Editor-in-
Chief   for   the   next   session.
(c) The Senior Editors shall superintend the
editorial work of the Students' Publications and
i shall   be   responsible   for   it   to   the   Editor-in-
Chief.
(d) Appointments by the Students' Council-
elect: Vice-President and Assistant Secretary.
The Students' Council-elect shall appoint these
from its members before the close of the Spring
term.
(e) When a vacancy has been definitely
established in any of the offices of the Society,
the election of a successor shall be held in
accordance with the procedure prescribed for
in   the  election  of  such   officers.
BY-LAW No. 11 (at The funds of the Society  shall consist  of  the  following:
1. Fees of admission to the Society collected
by the Registrar under authority of the Board
of  Governors.
2. All moneys, excepting special membership
fees received by Student organizations under
the Alma Mater Society, which moneys shall
be remitted to the Treasurer of the Students'
Council direct.
(b) Estimates of the proposed expenditures
of the Undergraduate Societies, the Literary
and Scientific Executive, the Athletic Associations and the Students' Publications, shall be
in the hands of the Treasurer before the end
of the  third  week  of  the  session.
(c) The budget shall he prepared by the
Treasurer from these estimates and presented
in the fourth week of the session to the Students' Council for consideration and adoption.
The appropriations for the  Publications  Board,
STUDENT HANDBOOK
the Literary and Scientific Executive, and the
.Men'l Athletic Association, shall be prepared
according   to   these   budgets.
(d) Any Student organization under the Society may spend money for the purpose and
for the amount prescribed for its use in the
hudget, but shall not spend moneys which are
not prescribed for in the budget, except by
special   permission  of   the   Students'   Council.
(e> Twenty per cent of all moneys accruing
to the Alina Mater Society by reason of activities of organizations under its control, to be
receh ed for the Injuries Trust Fund until
such time as the fund shall reach five hundred
dollars, such reservation thereafter made when
the fund falls below  five hundred dollars.
BY-LAW No. 12—Reports from the Secretaries and Treasurers of the Undergraduate
Societies, the Literary and Scientific Executive,
the Publications Department, Athletic Associations, and their subsidiary organizations, shall
be in the hands of the Secretary of the Society
immediately after the election of their Presidents.
BY-LAW No. 13—No student shall be elected
to the Students' Council for more than one
office.
BY-LAW No. 14—The Faculty Committee on
Student Affairs shall be the first medium between the University authorities and the student body. It shall confirm the activities oi
the student body by endorsing from time to
time the proposals of the Alma Mater Society.
All matters concerning which a conference is
deemed advisable shall be referred to the Joint
Committee on Student Affairs, which shall he
composed of three representatives of the
Faculty and three members of the Students'
Council. Should this committee not endorse
the proposals of the Alma Mater Society, it
may amend or annul them, and its decision
shall be considered as the combined judgment
of Faculty and Students. A minority of two
members of this Committee with the consent
of the Chairman, may appeal to the Senate
any decision made by the Committee. 28
UNI\ ER  ITY  OF   B.C.
BY-LAW No. 15.—Student organizations not
subsidiary to~ the Alma Mater Society shall
make application to the Students' Council before the end of the third week in the Fall term
for permission to use the University name
and   crest   for   that   session.
To this application the following information
regarding the Society making application shall
be   appended:
1. Name.
2. Aims   and   objects.
3. Conditions   of   membership.
4. Complete   list   of   members.
5. Complete   list  of  officers.
The Alma Mater Society shall hold student
members of such organizations responsible to
the Alma Mater Society for the conduct of the
organization in an> wa> in which it may be
held, directly or indirectly, to affect the University.
BY-LAW No. 16—(a) Students of the first
year will not be allowed to represent the University in more than one activity, athletic or
literary, until they have obtained complete
standing by the regular Christmas * examinations. Any Freshman failing to obtain such
complete standing shall not represent the University in any activity during the remainder
of the session. (This rule does not apply to
students in the  first  year of Applied  Science).
(b) No student whose academic standing is
incomplete will be allowed to represent the
University on any activity which necessitates
absence from class.
(c) No student will be allowed to represent
the University in any senior activity unless he
has full standing in at least 80 per cent of his
required   course.
(d) No student will be allowed to engage in
any activity calling for competition with
organizations outside the University unless he
has full standing in at least 60 per cent of his
required course.
(e) Students shall be limited in the number
of activities in which they engage; that in no
case shall a student whose academic standing
is incomplete carry on more than two activities,
STUDENT HANDBOOK
29
and these shall be of different characters, i.e.,
Athletic or  Literary or  Executive.
BY-LAW No. 17—All University organizations inviting outside speakers to address University students shall apply to the Students'
Council for permission to hold such meeting,
and the matter shall be dealt with in a separate   motion  of  the  Council.
BY-LAW No. 18—The Men's Undergraduate
Society executive shall arrange^ a schedule of
all social functions under its jurisdiction for
the college year in the second we-ek of the Fall
term; and these functi ns shall be on Friday
evenings.
BY-LAW No. 19—There shall be no drinking
of intoxicating liquors on the Unhersity
campus nor at any University function; nor
shall any person appear on the University
campus nor at any University function show -
ing any  trace of such intoxicating  liquors.
BY-LAW No. 20—Subsidiary societies under
the Literary and Scientific Executive and the
Athletic Associations will not be permitted to
hold   general   social   functions.
BY-LAW No. 21—Attendance at University
dances shall be restricted to members of the
Alma   Mater   Society   and   guests.
Guests   shall   be:
(a) Honorary   guests.
(b) Such guests as may be invited by members of the Alma Mater Society, each member
to be entitled to one guest; no couple consisting of two outsiders to be permitted to attend;
admission to dances to be by ticket and invitation only; the sale of tickets to close forty-
eight hours before the date of the function.
That arrangements for any social functions of
the University must be submitted for the
approval of the Students' Council at least two
weeks   before   the  date   of  the  function.
BY-LAW No. 22 All organizations of the
Students of the University of British Columbia
which do not come under the Alma Mater
Society, with such exceptions as shall be approved by the Students' Council, shall be
debarred from the use of the University  name 30
UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
and Alma Mater Society notice boards, and
all such societies shall each year, during the
first month of the Fall term, renew their
application for permission to use the University
name   and   crest.
BY-LAW No. 23— Card playing, except at
University functions, and gambling in any
form, such as dice throwing and coin tossing
for money or any monetary equivalent whatsoever shall be prohibited within the precincts
of   the   University.
BY-LAW No. 24—Major functions, such as
annual Undergraduate dances, shall end at
one  o'clock.
Minor functions, such as class parties, shall
end at twelve o'clock.
BY-LAW No. 25—Any member of the Society buying a ticket for any University function shall in no case sell such ticket to any
other person for a higher price than that set
by the committee in charge of the special
function.
" BY-LAW No. 26 —The official University
sweater to be worn by any student of the
University   of   British  Columbia   shall  be:
Girls' Sweater—A pull-over; "V" neck with
roll collar; white body, blue collar with ]4'
inch gold band around edge of collar, J^-inch
from the edge. Blue cuffs with similar gold
band.
Boys' Sweater—A pull-over; "V" neck with
roll collar; blue body with gold collar, cuffs
and   band   around   bottom.
Light Sweater—Blue body; 'V" neck, with
lj^-iuch  gold band around  bottom.
White Sweater—White body; "V" neck,
lj4-inch band around neck, consisting of Vt-
inch blue; a 3-inch band around bottom consisting of lj^-inch blue, J^-inch gold and
lj/g-inch  blue.
Blazer—Blue body outlined  with gold cord,
with gold cord across top of pockets, official
crest  to be  worn on  the breast pocket.
BY-LAW   No.   27—All    students    who    have
entered   upon   their   Sophomore   year   shall   be
STUDENT HANDBOOK
entitled on their regulation University sweaters
to wear the University crest, as follows:
1. To  be   worn  on   left   breast.
2. Size $Yi inches by 4'/> niches.
All students who have held or are holding
an "A" class office shall be entitled to wea-
a V) inch gold band about the crest. On
white sweaters this band shall be edged with
a   J^-inch  blue   line.
Each class shall insert the class numerals
at the top of the crest in blue on a white
ground, and j4-i»ch bar diagonally across the
crest bearing the faculty col-irs. Arts, blue;
Science,   red;   Agriculture,   maize.
BY-LAW No. 28—The ranking of student
offices shall be:
Class "A"—All members of the Students'
Council,  and  the   Editor of the  "Ubyssey."
Class "-B"—All members of the executives
of major organizati ns, the Undergraduate
Societies, the Athletic Associations, the Literary and Scientific Executive, the Senior
Editors, the Business Manager, the Editor
of the annual, the News Manager and the
Advertising Manager of the Publications
Board.
Class "C" -All other Student offices.
Any student holding an "A" office shall hold
no other office; any student holding a "B"
office may hold a "C" offce also, but none
other. No student may hold more than three
"C" offices.
BY-LAW No. 29—All student organizations
Dr groups of students who organize or conduct
any function in the name of the University of
British Columbia, and outside the precincts of
the University, shall, before planning such
function or activity, obtain the consent of the
Students' Council to the holding of such function or  activity.
BY-LAW No. 30—The Literary and Scientific
Executive and the Executives of the Men's
Athletic Society and Men's Uudeigraduate Society shall be ghcn power to transact all business in connection with the activities of the
Societies  under  their direct   control,  subject  to UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.
the approval of the Students' Council, and three
c pics of the minutes of the meetings of the
Literary and Scientific Executive, the Men's
Athletic Society, the Women's Athletic Society, the Men's Undergraduate Society, the
Women's Undergraduate Society, the Inter-
Fraternity Council, the Inter-Sorority Council
(both executive and general meetings), shall
be forwarded to the Students' Council immediately following the meetings of the above-
mentioned Societies, for consideration and approval of the Students' Council before being
posted, and two copies of these minutes shall
be forwarded to the Faculty Committee on
Student Affairs after approval by the Students'
Council, together with the minutes cf the Students'  Council.
BY-LAW No. 31—A standing committee on
discipline shall be appointed each year, the
members  of the  Committee  to be:
President  of the  Men's Undergraduate  Society.
President of the Arts Men's Undergraduate
Society.
President    of    the    Science    Undergraduate
Society.
President  of  the  Agricultural  Undergraduate Society.
President   of   the   Women's   Undergraduate
Society.
Nice-President  of   the  Junior   year.
Vice-President of the Sophomore year.
The   committee   shall   have   powers   as   laid
down in the Students'  Code.    They  shall meet
at least once a month at the call of the Chairman or at the request of three members of the
Committee.
This Committee shall make a report to the
Council within two weeks of the Fall term on
the   initiation  progran me   for   the   year.
BY-LAW No. 32—The moneys raised to May
8th, 1926, hy a Committee of the Women's
Undergraduate Society shall be kept in a trust
fund for the furnishing of the permanent
Women's Union Building, such fund to be administered    by    the    Women's    Undergraduate
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Society,   subject   to   the   approval   of   the   Students'   Council.
BY-LAW No. 33—1. A proposed amendment
or amendments to the By-laws of the Societv
shall be signed by at least ten members of
the Society entitled to vote and shall be
handed   to   the  Secretary  of  the  Soeietv.
2. The Secretary of the Society shall jpost at
least three copies of the proposed amendment
or amendments in conspicuous places about the
University buildings, and shall submit a copy
of the same to the first meeting of the Students' Council after receipt of the said application.
3. Not less than ten days after posting of
the said copies, and not more than thirty days
after the said posting, the Students' Council
shall submit the proposed amendment or
amendments to a meeting of the Society, of
which notice specifying the intention to propose the resolution as an extraordinary resolution   has   been  duly   given.
4. A majority of not less than three-fourths
of all members of the Society present in person
or by proxy and entitled to vote at the said
meeting shall be necessary for the adoption of
any  such amendment or amendments.
BY-LAW No 34 The records of the Society
shall be open for inspection at the offices of the
Society, _ University Building, University Section, Point Grey, from and including the first
day of lectures in the Fall term until and including the last daj of lectures in the Fall
term, and from and including the first day of
lectures in the Spring term until and including
the last day of lectures in the Spring term.
MEMORANDUM
CLAUSE   10.     "SOCIETIES   ACT."
For the purpose of carrying out its objects,
a society may borrow or raise or secure the
payment of money in such manner as it
thinks fit, and in particular by the issue of
debentures,   but   this  power   shall  be   exercised 34
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
only under the authority of the by-laws of the
Society, and in no case shall debentures be
issued without the sanction of an extraordinary
resolution   of   the   Society.
CLAUSE  22 OF  THE  "SOCIETIES  ACT,"
SECTION 2.
The by-laws of the Society shall not be
altered or added to except by an extraordinary
resolution of  the Society.
''Extraordinary resolution" means a resolution passed by a majority of not less than
three-quarters of such members entitled to
vote as are present in person or by proxy (for
proxies are allowed) at a general meeting oi
which notice specifying the intention to propose the resolution as an extraordinary resolution  has  been  duly  given.
Interpretation of a Quorum—33% of
the total student body shall constitute a
quorum. In the case of an Extraordinary
Meeting called to pass an Extraordinary Motion, such as a change in the
Constitution, it requires a majority of
75% of the quorum.
Students' Council
Hon. President   Dr. L. S. Klinck
President     Earl  Vance,  Arts  '32
Bay.  3619L
Secretary   Cecilia Long, Arts '32
Bay. 3270R
Treasurer    Mark Collins, Arts  '33
Bay. 7S07R
Pres. M.U.S., Jack Thompson, Arts '32
Bay. 1233L
Pres. W.U.S., Dorothv Myers, Arts '32
Eay. S037L
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Pres. L.S.E  William Whimster
Ag. '33
Pres.  M.A.S Gavin Dirom, Sc. '32
Pres.  W.A.S Isabel   Macarthur
Arts  '32.    Ker. 2579
Junior   Member Howard   Cleveland,
Arts '33.    Bav. 6737
Publications Board
Editor-in-Chief
Himie Koshevoy    Arts  '32
Senior Editors
Doris Barton   Arts '32
Mairi Dingwall   Arts '32
News Manager
St. John Madeley     Arts '32
Associate   Editors
Art.  McKenzie    Com.  '34
Mollie Jordan          Arts '32
Frances  Lucas  Arts  '33
Cecil Brennan   Arts '33
Rosemary YVinslow   Arts '33
Literary Editor
Frances Lucas       Arts  '33
Sports   Editor
Wilfrid Lee   Ag. '32
Exchange Editor
Nathan Nemetz   Arts '34 36
UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
Three publications are undertaken by
the Publications Board : The "Ubyssey,"
the "Totem" and the "Handbook."
The "Ubyssey," now on a firm financial basis, enters its sixth year as a
twice-weekly journal. It appears every
Tuesday and Friday noon throughout
the session, except in examination
weeks.
The "Ubyssey" is the University
newspaper, dealing with the current
events of college life. It is managed
entirely by students. A Literary Supplement published twice a year is open
to contributions. The Publication.-.
Board is affiliated with the Pacific In
tercollegiate Press Association, and exchange news from other colleges in
Canada and United States is featured.
The "Totem" is the University Annual, the traditional publication to the
graduating class. A special staff prepares this annual, its editor being a
member of the Senior or Junior year
of any faculty.
The "Handbook"—this is it.
Directory
ADMINISTRATION  BUILDING
Room
D—Buchanan, D.
L—Dallas, F.
Room
B—Klinck, L. S.
F—Matthews, S. W.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
ARTS BUILDING
Room
Room
K—Angus, H. F. W
Q—Ashton, H. C-
V—-Black, W. G. F-
A—Bollert, M. L. D-
M—Clark, A. F. B. E-
R—Coleman, H. T.J T-
N—Cooke, A. C. O-
Z—Day, J. F. K-
Z—Drummond, G. F.P-
F—Evans. D. O. N-
D—Greig, J. T. J-
E—Hartley, B. S. Z-
S—-Harvey, D. C. H-
H—Henderson, J. V-
O—Jordan, E. E. W
W—Larsen, T. G-
J—Logan, H. T.
—MacDonald.W.
-Maclnnis,  I.
-Nowlan.   F.   S.
-Pilcher, J. W.
-Richardson, L.
-Robertson, L.
-Robinson. G. E.
-Sage, W. N.
-Sedgewick.G. G.
-Soward, F. H.
Todd, O. J.
-Topping, C. W.
-Walker, F. C.
-Weir, G. M.
-Wilcox. F. H.
-Wood, F. G. C.
APPLIED SCIENCE BUILDING
Room Room
J—Brock. R. W.     O—Lighthall, A.
*N—Christie, H. R.P—Matheson. F. G.
B—Davidson, J.        K— Phemister, T. C.
D—-Dickson, F.        H—Schofield. S. J.
Q—Duckering, W.   F—Spencer.  G.  J.
E—Fraser, C. McL.O—Wilkin, F. A.
C—-Hutchison, A. H.G—Williams, M. Y.
fM—Knapp, F.  M.
♦Department of Forestry UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
ELECTRICAL AND  MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING BUILDING
Room
I—Bell, J. F.
D—Coulthard, W.
*F—Gillies, G. A.
D—Letson, H. F.
C—Smith, G. S.
*G—Thomson, H.
*H—Turnbull, J.
C—Vernon, F. W.
B—Vickers, H.
*Department of Mining
SCIENCE BUILDING
Room Room
E—Archibald, E. H.B—Hennings, A. E.
G—Clark, R. H.      I—Hill, H. W.
D—Davidson, J. G. F—Marshall. M. J.
J—Gray, M. F. H—Sever, W. F.
405—Harris, J. A.    A—Shrum. G. M.
C—Hebb, T. C.
FOREST PRODUCTS LABORATORIES
Room Room
B—Alexander. J. B.D—Harris, Miss M.
C—Bartlett, D.  I.    C—Jenkins. J. H.
A—Brown, R. M.    B—Lee, J. T.
B—Davidson. W.W.D—Parr, E.
C—Eacles, H. W.    E—Perrv, R   S.
B—Eacles. R. J.      B—Philip. W.   T.
C—Guernsey, F. W. B—Wright, D. S.
Carpenter Shop—White, A.
Dry  Kiln—Chapman,  H.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
AGRICULTURE BUILDING
Room Room
114—Golding, N. S.I—Amundson, V. S.
F Harris, G. H.
U—Hare, H. R.
R—King, H. M.
A—Laird, D. G.
J—Lloyd, E. A.
A—Moe, G. G.
I—Riley, \\. J.
N—Sadler, \V.
E    Barss. A. F.
C—Boving, G. B.
B—Boving, P. A.
F—Buck, F. E.
P—Clement, F.  M.
U—Davis, R. L.
S—Delavault, F. E.
S—Fades,   B.  V.
AUDITORIUM
Room
203—The Book Store.
301—Curator's Office.
303—The Literary and Scientific Dept.
306—The Medical Office.
206—The Publications Board.
204—The  Publications  Business  Office.
312—The Student Christian Movement.
305—The Students' Council.
202—The Ticket Office.
205—Superintendent of Rooms.
The   Cafeteria «
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
New Eligibility Rules
ATHLETICS—
New eligibility rules were found necessary by the loose and inexplicit manner in which By-law No. 16 of the
Constitution of the Alma Mater Society
of the University of British Columbia is
drawn up.
The need of some sort of rules will
not be questioned by any one as the
essence of University life. A high
scholastic standing is necessary and if
we are to have students representing
us as a University, they should not be
deficient in this respect. However it is
not the desire to make athletics exclusive, but to eliminate that undesirable
type of Undergraduate who attends University without scholastic achievement
as the main motive, so that a place on
a team means both athletic and scholastic proficiency. With this in view the
following change to By-law No. 16 concerning athletics is submitted.
1. Students of first year shall not represent the University in more than one
athletic activity until they have obtained a standing of 50% or more in
the  Christmas  examinations.
2. Repeating, partial and unclassified
students may participate in one athletic
activity until the fall mid-term examinations. If at these examinations or
any other subsequent set of examinations   during  the   year   an   average   of
STUDENT HANDBOOK
55re is not obtained, then these students
may not participate further until such
percentage is obtained.
3. Students of all years may not proceed further with any athletic activity
if they fail to obtain an average of 50cc
in the mid-term or Christmas examination. As soon as an average of 50^ is
obtained the activity may be resumed in
the case of having failed previously.
4. All students must carry at least
.line units to represent the University in
any athletic activity.
5. Students asked to withdraw at
Christmas who return in the Spring to
a partial course may not represent the
University in any athletic activity.
6. The method of enforcing these
rules shall be: The President of Men's
Athletics, or his appointee, shall obtain
a list of all men playing the various
sports and submit it to the Faculty
Committee on Student Affairs. This
committee shall recommend to Students' Council the withdrawal from athletics of those students who have not
come up to the required standards as
outlined above. The final decision on
this matter shall rest with the Students'
Council.
M EN'S UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY—
1. No student shall hold a "B" office
in any class executive work whose general scholarship average is less than
50%,
2. The class executive of the Fresh- UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
man year shall not be elected until after
the   Christmas   examinations.
PUBLICATIONS BOARD—
1. No student shall hold a "B" office
on the Publications Board whose general scholastic average is less than
50%.
FOR CLUBS  UNDER LITERARY
AND SCIENTIFIC EXECUTIVE—
1. No freshman shall engage in any
major activity of the Debates Union or
the Musical Society during the first
term should he or she obtain below au
average 50% in the mid-term examinations or during the second term if he or
she obtains an average below 50% in
the Christmas examinations.
2. No freshman shall be eligible for
the Players' Club unless he or she obtains an average of at least 60% in the
Junior Matriculation examinations and
he or she shall be automatically disqualified for membership during the remainder of the session should he or she
obtain an average of less than 50% in
the Christmas examinations.
3. No student shall be a member of
the above clubs unless he or she is registered for at least nine units.
4. No student shall remain a member
of the aforementioned clubs should he
or she fail to obtain an average of at
least 50% on any set of examinations
nor shall he or she be again eligible
until he or she has again obtained an
average of 50%.
The method of enforcing these rules
STUDENT HANDBOOK
for clubs other than those coming under
Men's Athletics shall be: The president
of the organization concerned, or his
appointee, shall send a list of those concerned to the Faculty Committee on
Student Affairs. This Committee shall
recommend to Students' Council the
withdrawal from the organizations of
those students who have not come up
to the required standards outlined
above. The final decision on this matter shall rest with the Students' Coun-
Kla-How-Yah!
In the Chinook jargon, "Kla how-
yah" is the single word of welcome and
is, therefore, equivalent to any friendly
greeting in English. "Kla-how-yah"
was adopted at the University to become the traditional salutation among
its students; but, although the word
and its purpose have been recognized
and accepted by students, the greeting
has never been employed generally. It
was, however, incorporated two years
ago into one of our yells, and efforts
were made at the same time to make
the use of the word popular among
undergraduates. "Kla-how-yah" is too
rich in association with the early history of our province, too appropriately
ours, in a word, too British Columbian
to be lost to us. Greet fellow-students
with "Kla-how-yah;" it takes the place
of an  introduction. UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Freshman Initiation
The   Initiation  will   be   held   on   the
campus.    The  following  is  a   tentative
program, subject to change :
Regulations:
1. The period of initiation will approximately last until the end of the
second week of the first term and will
end by a night of hazing.
2. Placards, displaying the bearer's
name, must be worn up to and at the
Frosh Reception.
3. Green berets must be procured
and worn by both men and women.
These are procurable at the Curator's
office at a nominal sum. The period
during which these must be worn is
not yet definite but will probably be
the same as for the placards.
4. All Freshmen must carry a copy
of the Handbook.
5. Freshmen must attend all Alma
Mater meetings called for Freshmen.
6. At these meetings full information regarding initiation will be given.
The heads of the various Varsity organizations will address the Freshmen
as fellow students.
7. Freshmen Class Elections will
not be held until after the results of
the Christmas examinations a re
known.
8. The Initiation Committee will act
as a court before which Freshmen desirous  of being excused  may appear.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
The  same  committee will  also  function as a court to enforce regulations.
9. The hazing "ceremonies" will be
performed by the Sophomore Class.
The  initiation  program,  it  is  hoped,
will help to make the Freshmen realize
that  once  the hazing is over they are
then men and women of the University
and  create  a   certain   "esprit   decorps"
among everyone.    Any "horseplay" on
either side will be severely dealt with.
Watch the "Ubyssey"  for dates.
STUDENTS' BOOK EXCHANGE
(Kenneth M. Beckett, Manager)
The Book Exchange was organized
on our campus last spring, and is operating for the first time this year. Its
purpose is to effect the exchange of
second-hand books between students
registered at the University in a manner more convenient and certain than
the haphazard method of individual lists
and notices. It operates under the
supervision of Students' Council, and is
directed by a manager appointed by
Council. The office of the Exchange
is located in the basement of the Arts
Building, in last year's Totem office.
As the Exchange was instituted for the
benefit of students, they are urged to
make full use of it: those with secondhand books for sale to place them in
the hands of the officers of the Exchange, and those seeking books to in ■
quire there. Watch the "Ubvssev" for
announcements. UNIVERSITY OF   B.C.
Valedictory Gifts
The practice of presenting to the
University a valedictory gift from the
graduating class was instituted bv
the Class of 1919. Their gift was the
"A_rts '19 Scholarship." of the value of
$150. awarded annually until the session
1926-1927, when the final award was
made.
Other valedictory gifts were as follows :
1920— Relay Cup.
1921—Portrait of Dr. Wesbrook.
1922—$300.00. to be used for some University purpose later to be determined.
1923—Art collection.
1924—$44,196, for the purpose of providing an addition to the Art Collection  begun  by  Arts  '23.
1925—Addition to Arts '23 Art Collection.
1926—Trophy Case.
1927—Medical Equipment in Health
Department Office.
1928—Wesbrook Memorial Seat (in
front of the Library).
1929—Stone Seats in front of Library.
1930—Chancellor's Chair.
1931—Collection of documents and records connected with the early
history of   British  Columbia.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Undergraduate Societies
The Undergraduate Societies comprise the Women's Undergraduate
Society, the Men's Undergraduate
Society and subsidiary class organizations.
Membership in the Undergraduate
Societies is conferred automatically on
all students at the University. The
Women's Undergraduate executive is
composed of President, Vice-President,
Secretarj-treasurer, President of Nursing, representative of Agriculture, and
\ ice-Presidents of the other class organizations. The Men's Undergraduate
executive, is composed of President.
Secretary-treasurer, and Presidents of
the Arts Men's, the Science and the
Agriculture Undergraduate Societies.
The class presidents are members of the
I'ndergraduate Society of the faculty
to which they belong; thus the class
organizations are connected with the
Undergraduate Societies.
The duties of the Undergraduate Societies are mainly social: also, Ithe
president of each society is a member'
of a standing committee on discipline,
(see By-Law No. 31 of the Alma Mater
Constitution).
The Presidents for this season are:
Women's Undergraduate Society, Dorothy Myers; Men's Undergraduate
Society, J. W. Thomson; Arts Men's
Undergraduate   Society,   Russ.   Shane- UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
man; Science Undergraduate Society,
Harry Thorne; Agriculture Undergraduate, W. A. Taylor.
Social Events
Since the purpose of this book is to
deal with the "other" side of college, it
is well to give the student some idea of
the nature and approximate dates of
the main events on the social calendar.
FROSH Reception—A dance given
in honor of incoming students. The
Freshmen are expected to mingle with
members of the upper classes. Introductions are not necessary. One ticket
only is allowed to each undergraduate.
Takes place about the second or third
week of the fall term.
UNDERGRADUATE BALLS—Each
faculty is allowed to give one general
dance during the year. Tickets are
available to all undergraduates of all
faculties as long as they hold out. The
Arts Ball is held about the middle of
November. The Aggie Ball takes place
about the end of January and the
Science Ball about the middle of February.
CLASS PARTIES —Each class of
each faculty is allowed to hold one class
party during the year. Members only
of the class holding the dance are admitted.   Class fees pav for these dances.
BASKETBALL DANGES—Several
times a year the Basketball Club holds
informal   dances   in   honor   of   visiting
STUDENT HANDBOOK
basketball teams. The dances are informal and open to all students, admis-
on generally being 50 cents.
TEA DANCES—Some classes and
clubs hold Tea dances during the year,
especially after a big game. A small
admission fee is charged.
ANNUAL VICTORIA INVASION—
This is the major event on the social
calendar. The Invasion takes place
during the Christmas vacation. Athletic contests are arranged for all
teams with \ ancouver Island teams.
Two dances are given for L*. B. C.
athletes—one in Victoria High School
and the second the following night at
the Empress Hotel. Victoria College
plays the part of host for the Invasion.
Special boat and hotel rates are arranged.
MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT—
Each Spring the Musical Society gives
a concert in the Auditorium, to which
the public is invited. An admission fee
is charged.
CHRISTMAS AND SPRING
PLAYS—Late in the Fall term the
Players' Club presents four representative plays in the Auditorium for students only. Admission is free. The
Club also presents a Spring Play late
in the Spring term which is open to the
public.   An admission fee is charged.
HOME COMING — The Annual
Home Coming Week-End is celebrated
early in November. It is intended to
bring   the   Alumni   into   closer   contact 50
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
with the students and includes various
entertainments in honor 1* the graduates.
HI-JINX—An annual fancy-dress
party for women students only. The
Women's Undergraduate Society takes
charge of all arrangements. A small
admission fee is charged. Takes place
during February.
CO-ED'S BALL—A dance arranged
by the Women's Undergraduate Society
to which the women students invite the
men. Takes place during the latter
part of February.
VANCOUVER INVASION BY VICTORIA—The return visit paid by the
students of Victoria College. Athletic
contests and a Basketball Dance are
held.
The Honor System
"The Alma Mater Society depends
upon the honor of the individual student for the maintenance of discipline
and order on the campus."
Members of the Alma Mater Society
shall at all times endeavor to uphold
the honor and good name of the student body and the University as a
whole. They shall cooperate with the
Student and University authorities in
the maintenance of order and the protection of buildings, grounds and properties within the University precincts.
This is to include fire regulations pro-
STUDENT HANDBOOK
hibiting   smoking   in   the   halls   of   the
University buildings.
Athletics
It is the aim of the Men's and
Women's Athletic Association to promote clean sport, and to prevent the
unhealthy condition resulting from indoor work of the student. There are
coaches for all sports, who give their
time voluntarily and who have been
star athletes. They respect our ideals
and sportsmanship to the fullest. They
have been carefully selected with the
influence wdiich they have on their athletes in mind; they only ask for your
co-operation and support.
The University does not seek to train
star athletes, but to develop young and
inexperienced athletes. There are many
different sports and teams of all calibre
in each sport; the places on teams are
given without any favoritism or prejudice; nationality, age, experience,
pedigree, bank roll, past records, etc.,
do not mean a thing: the place is open
for the best man. There is an opportunity for everyone who is physically
fit, and we are anxious for you to take
advantage of this—it is to your interest
and ours. To those of you who are
not capable of active physical participation, we offer positions managing
these teams. This is an excellent
steDping-stone  to  executive  work. UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Here we allow freshmen the opportunity to play on any team on which
they can win a place. The Freshman
classes in the past have had men on the
first teams in every sport; that is the
challenge that they leave. Watch the
notice boards for the first practice and
get out to it.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
MEN'S ATHLETIC AWARDS
New  Winners  of  Big  Block.
Pi Campbell Fred Bolton
Bob Osborne Dick Farringlon
Laiiry Nicholson      Dan Tyreman
Randy Tervo Jack Steele
Dave Ellis Lyle Justly
Art Mercer Iry. Smith
Glen Ledingham Larry Jack
Howie Cleveland Alan Todd
Bert Griffin Ralph Thomas
Re-Winners  of  Big Block
Arnold Henderson   Gav. Dirom
Sandv Smith Ernie Peeden
Bert Barratt Phil Barratt
Bob Alpen Vie Rogers
Bud Murray Jim Winters
Ken Martin Dick Moore
Cam Duncan Alan Estabrook
Bill Latla Bobbie Gaul
Harold Cliffe Bob Chapman
Dick Nixon Cy Lee
1.—Awards Committee.
Big Blocks to be awarded by a Big
Block Awards Committee to consist
of the following members :
1. President of Men's Athletics.
2. Captain of First Team of Major
Sports.
3. One member of Alumni, appointed by Alumni Association.
4. One member of the Faculty,
appointed by Faculty Committee on Student Affairs.
This   Awards   Committee   shall   be
convened by the fifteenth of October of each session.    They shall receive passes to all games.
2. Eligibility.
Honorary Awards:
Awarded at the discretion of the
Awards   Committee   for  outstanding contribution to athletics.
Big Blocks::
All athletes fulfilling the following
requirements shall be eligible for
the Big Block, which shall be
given at the discretion of the Committee.
(a) The athlete shall be a member
of the first team of a Major sport
and subject to the time limitations
stated below. The Major sports
shall be: English Rugby, Track,
Basketball. Canadian Rugby.
1. English Rugby — Participation
in three-quarters of McKechnie
Cup  games  or  equivalents.
2. Track—Five points in a Western Inter-Collegiate Track Meet
or equivalent. Points to be
scored: 1st, 5 points; 2nd, 3
points; 3rd, 1 point. 54
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
3. Basketball—One-half of total
season time (league games and
equivalent).
4. Canadian Rugby—One quarter
of total season time (league
games and equivalent).
(b) That outstanding members of
Minor and Sub-Minor sports whose
performances compare favorably
with Canadian Championship standards, be eligible for Big Blocks.
3. Eligibility for Small Blocks.
(a) Athletes are automatically eligible who are members of the
first teams of Major sports and
who did not fulfil the requirements for the Big Block as laid
down in Section 2. This eligibility to be on the recommendation
of the coach.
(b) Athletes are eligible who fulfil
the following requirements :
1." Members of English Rugby
Miller Cup team not having
Big Blocks, or outstanding
members of intermediate
teams chosen on recommendation of the coach and subject
to same time limit in Major
awards for  English  Rugby.
2. Members of Track team winning one point in a Western
Canada Intercollegiate Track
Meet or  equivalent.
3. Members of second team Basketball fulfilling time limits
applying to first team.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
4. Members of the second Canadian Rugby team or fulfilling
same time limits as applying
to first team.
5. Members of Intercollegiate
Swimming team or Banff
team winning one first or
two seconds.
6. Members of Hockey teams in
Intermediate Leage playing
fifty per cent, of total time.
7. Members of Intercolleegiate
Rowing Crew or equivalent.
4. Eligibility   for   Plain   Letters.
1. Members of second teams in
Major sports and first teams
in Minor sports who did not
qualify for the Small  Block.
2. Members   performing   a   rec
ognized sport at the University not receiving any
higher  award.
5. Replacement of Awards.
New letters may be obtained if old
ones are turned in.
New sweaters may be obtained by
turning in old ones and paying for
new. The Curator may issue letters
and sweaters only on written authorization  of Awards Committee.
6. Letters shall be worn only on sweat
ers as outlined in the constitution of
the Alma Mater Society By-Law 26,
and on plain black or white sweaters ; Big Blocks only on original
sweaters.
7. Freshmen   shall   be   eligible   for   the UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Big Blocks but shall not receive
awards until they return for their
second year.
8. No graduate shall be eligible for the
Big Block, but may receive a symbol
if qualified and attending the University.
9. That letter holders can purchase
black sweaters from Curator at cost
price.
10. That no letter holder be allowed to
wear a lower award.
MEN'S   ATHLETIC   ASSOCIATION
(Gavin Dirom, President)
Membership in the Men's Athletic
Association is automatically conferred
on all men students in the Alma Mater
Society. The executive of the Association, composed of the presidents of all
branches of sport, is responsible for the
organization, supervision and administration of athletics for men.
The Association has been recognized
as a local board of the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada. Any athlete intending to play on any outside team
must obtain written permission from
Men's Athletics; if such is not done,
the athlete is liable for suspension from
all amateur athletics.
To encourage a man to stick to the-
sport he is best suited for, we give our
highest   athletic   award   to   an   athlete
who measures up t6 a certain standard
STUDENT HANDBOOK
iii that sport. However, most of the
Big Blocks go to the Major sports, the
small letters to the Minor sports, and
the plain letters to the Sub-Minor
sports. The second team in a Major
sport has rating of Minor sport, while
the third team in a Major sport and the
second team of a Minor sport ha\e
Sub-Minor rating.
The sports are classified into four
groups as follows, due to achievement
and interest shown :
(a) Major:      Basketball,      Canadian
Rugby,   English   Rugby,   Track.
(b) Sub-Major:  Soccer, Swimming.
(c) Minor:   Badminton,   Golf,   Grass
Hockey, Ice Hockey, Rowing
(d) Sub-Minor:     Boxing,     Fencing,
Gymnasium,  Outdoors,  Skating.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
(James   Winters,   President)
This Club is entirely separate from
the Awards Committee, membership
being automatically conferred to holders of the U.B.C. Big Block award. Its
aims are to bring about a unity of spirit
and effort for the furtherance of Varsity sport and to keep in touch with
preparatory schools in order to advise
prospective athletes for University
sports. An attempt will be made to
inaugurate Presentation Day into Big
Block Day by holding a dance. UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
BASKETBALL
(Lome Falconer, President)
Four teams are fielded in City leagues
by the Basketball Club. Some of these
teams also make trips into the Interior,
over to the Island and down to Washington. Regular practices will be held
in the Gymnasium.
CANADIAN RUGBY CLUB
(John McLean, President)
(Roy MacDonald, Vice-President)
Canadian Rugby is one of the major
sports on the campus and fields three
teams in competition in the city
leagues. Last year the Senior team
lost the Lipton Cup in the Big Four
League, and the Hardy Cup in the
Intercollegiate Championship. The Second team lost the Senior City League
by one game. The Junior team was
most fortunate and won the Junior
B. C. Championship. Last year a training camp was started and proved to be
such a success that it will be held again
this year at Bowen Island. The camp
is for pre-seasonal training and lasts
about two weeks. This year the Club
intends to enter the same number of
teams and hopes to be more successful
in  the results.
ENGLISH  RUGBY
(C. G. Macllmoyl, President)
The major events of the Club's activ-
STUDENT HANDBOOK
ities are the McKechnie Cup series, the
Miller Cup series and the Intermediate
and Freshman series. On entering the
McKechnie Cup league the University
won the trophy for three consecutive
\ears, lost it in 1926, won it again in
"1927, and in 1928 and 1929 and 1930 lost
it  again  to Yancouver "Rep."
The Club is very fortunate in securing the services of experienced players
as coaches for its teams.
Practices will be held as follows:
Seniors and First Intermediates—Wednesday at 3 p.m.; Second Intermediates
and Frosh—Tuesday and Thursday at
3 p.m.
TRACK CLUB
(Ralph Thomas. President)
Track at the University is one of
four major sports, and with the possibility of Canadian Olympic tryouts
being held in Vancouver, and the completion of the Stadium, it is expected
that competition in track and field will
be particularly keen during the coming
year. Turnouts will be held on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons under
the supervision of the Club's coaches.
The season will open on Wednesday,
October 7, with the Varsity-Frosh Meet
as part of the Initiation Program. At
this meet, all at the L'niversity for the
first time will be classified as Frosh to
compete against the rest of the University.     A   week   later   the   Arts   '30 60
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
Road Race will be held, the course of
which is four times around the Campus.
Arrangements are being conducted to
send a team to the Western Inter-
Collegiate Championships, should suitable material be available. Meets are
also being planned with the Y.A.C. and
local Y.M.C.A. for October 21 and
November 4, respectively. At the Invasion on January 2 a relay race will
be held against the Victoria "Y."
The Cross-Country on February 3
will open the Spring season. It will
be followed on February 17 by the
historic Arts '20 Relay: the course is
from the Fairview Buildings to Varsity,
and every class enters a team of eight
runners. February 24 and March 2 are
the plates for the Inter-Faculty and
Inter-Class meets. On March 19 a return meet against the College of Puget
Sound will be held on our oval, and in
connection with this a practice meet
may be held previously with some ex-
High School Club. The five-mile
Dunlop Road Race on Good Friday will
complete  the  year's  activities.
SOCCER
(E. H. King, President)
The Soccer Club fields two teams
each year, one in the second division
of the V. & D. League and the other
■ in the Junior Alliance. The Club is
gradually climbing back to its former
proud position and at the close of last
STUDENT HANDBOOK
session was raised to the rank of sub
major  sport.
The senior team finished in a good
place in the league last year while the
Juniors occupied a higher rung than
ever before. All men interested in
soccer are requested to communicate
with the president through the letter
rack.
SWIMMING
((Phyllis   Boe,   President)
The Swimming Club is an organization for men and women. Its purpose
is to give those interested a chance to
improve their swimming or to learn
how to swim. A tank is engaged for
at least two practices a week and an
expert coach is provided. Competition
is offered with local clubs, on the Victoria Invasion and probably this year
at Banff and Saskatchewan. There is
also an inter-class meet in November
for the Allan & Boultbee Trophy.
GOLF
This Club was organized in 1926. Its
activities include a match with Victoria
College, a Handicap Tournament before
Christmas and an Open Tournament
after Christmas. The completion of
the new course on the University campus should strengthen the position of
this sport. 62
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
MEN'S GYMNASIUM CLUB
(Arthur Dobson, President)
This Club is open to all men students
of the University. It purposes to give
all men organized physical training.
Classes in the Swedish system of gymnastics, which include^ apparatus and
floor work, are held weekly in the
Gymnasium under an experienced instructor.
ROWING
The Boat Club is now in its ninth
season and is one of the largest athletic clubs in the University. It has no
quarters of its own, but arrangements
are made with the Vancouver Rowing
Club to use their premises. An inter-
faculty race will be held in the Christmas term and races with Brentwood
College, Vancouver Rowing Club and
the University of Washington take
place  in   March.
BADMINTON
(Ian Campbell, President)
The Badminton Club enters teams in
the Vancouver and District League;
teams are also sent to Victoria during
the Invasion and to other places whenever possible. An Annual Tournament
is held in the Spring for the championship of the University. Practices will
be held in the Gymnasium.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
63
FENCING
The Fencing Club is a Men's and
Women's organization open to all interested. It is proposed to have an
instructor come out to the Gymnasium
for beginners and for those who desire
further lessons. There is a cup for
competition within the Club, and if
enough talent is forthcoming, there
will be a meet with the University of
Washington.
ICE   HOCKEY
The Ice Hockey Club enters only one
team in the Junior league. This Club
has the credit of winning the B. C
Senior Amateur title in 1921. The Club
visits Victoria on the annual Invasion
and meets a team from Victoria on the
return  Invasion.
GRASS HOCKEY CLUB
(Sidney Semple, President)
The Club has entered two teams in
the Mainland League for the par* three
years. Other activities have included
trips to Vancouver Island where games
against Victoria and Duncan have been
held. Comparatively few students come
to the University who have played grass
hockey before; the second team is
therefore composed largely of "green"
material. The club is anxious to obtain
new members and all students who
would like to try out should get in
touch with the president. UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.
OUTDOORS CLUB
Bill Osboru, President)
A Club for those students who are
interested in mountain climbing and
skiing. Hikes are held nearly every
week of the Fall term. During the
Spring term the Club's cabins on
Grouse Mountain are the headquarters
for skiing activities on the Plateau and
neighboring ridges.
TENNIS
(Reginald Price, President)
Phyllis White, Vice-President
The U.B.C. Tennis Club, to be reorganized this Fall, is open to both men
and women students. A small fee will
be charged, and the proceeds used to
keep the equipment of the excellent
courts in first-class shape. An active
program is planned for this session, including an efficiently managed tournament in the Fall term, with cups for
each of the finalists; one or possibly
two dances; matches with Faculty
members, and intercollegiate competition  in the  Spring.
BOXING  CLUB
(Ernest  Brown, President)
This  Club  has  been  formed  for  the
purpose of promoting inter-faculty and
intercollegiate boxing and also to coach
inexperienced   men.   Two   turnouts   a
STUDENT HANDBOOK
week are held and two coaches (one for
men up to 135 pounds and the other for
those over 135 pounds) will instruct.
A statement of physical fitness must be
handed in by each applicant. There will
also be a small fee for coaching expenses. Meets are arranged in Washington, Victoria and locally. Boxing
is regulated and governed by intercollegiate rules; weights range from
112 pounds to 175 pounds and over.
LIABILITY  FOR  ATHLETIC
INJURIES
The University Authorities, the
Alma Mater Society, or any subsidiary
club or organization do not assume any
responsibility for the payment of damages, doctors' bills, or hospital expenses
resulting from injuries to players or
participants in athletics. Any compensation shall be deemed to be a voluntary contribution at sole discretion of
Students' Council.
All applications for this voluntary
contribution must fill out an Accident
Report Form immediately, in order to
receive a hearing of their request.
These forms may be obtained from the
University Health Service Department,
Auditorium 306, the office of the Graduate Manager, Auditorium 303, or from
doctors selected by Council. Further,
the applicants must be attended by
those doctors selected by Council. 66
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
INTER-CLASS ATHLETICS
The Governor's Cup, donated for
inter-class athletics, is competed for
during the entire year by the various
classes. In this way all students able
and willing to take part in athletics are
enabled to show their ability and help
their class in a really tangible way.
The big athletic, intra-mural event of
the year has always been the Arts '20
Relay Race. Each Spring every class
turns out a team of eight men to compete for the cup.
The Arts '30 Inter-faculty Road Race
will be held in the Fall term. This race
is run entirely on the campus, and each
team consists of eight men.
WOMEN'S  ATHLETIC AWARDS
Honor: Betty Buckland, Pres. W.A.A.
Major: Re-winners—
Thelma  Mahon       Mary Campbell
Claire Menten
New Winners—
Jean Whyte       Lois Tourtellotte
Big Block: Re-winners—
Marjorie  Peel Mary McLean
New Winners—
Gladys Munton
Berna Dellert
Phyllis Boe
Jo McDiarmid
Marion Sangster (Won in Freshman
Year)
Phae  Van  Dusen    (Numeral)
Beth Pollock
Mabel  MacDonald
Marjorie   McKay
VARSITY  INTER-CLASS TRACK
CHAMPIONSHIPS
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WOMEN'S ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
(Isabel MacArthur, President)
The Women's Athletic Association,
like the Men's, confers membership
automatically on all women interested
in the association and in the individual
clubs. General meetings of the Association are called periodically for the
purpose of discussing problems of
women's athletics. The Executive consists of: President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, presidents of the subsidiary clubs and athletics, and representatives from the various classes. The
Executive is the only medium between
the various athletic clubs and the Students' Council.
WOMEN'S   BIG   BLOCK   CLUB
(Mary McLean, President)
The Women's Big Block Club was
organized on the campus last December
for the purpose of maintaining a high
standard of athletics among the women
students, and also of assisting freshettes
in the selection of a suitable athletic
activity. The Club also serves the purpose of linking together the various
major sports. The qualification for
membership is that members are Big
Block winners, graduate Big Block
holders being honorary members.
The   constitution   of   the   Club   deals
mainly with  letter awards  for women,
STUDENT HANDBOOK
at
this being identical with the W.A.A.
constitution. The Awards Committee
of the Club has power of suggesting
outstanding students for the Big Block
a\ard, the final decision being left to
the W.A.A.
BASKETBALL
(Muriel Clarke, President)
This Club enters two teams in the
Citj league. The Senior "A" team is
considered a Major team and members
receive Major awards. Regular practices will be held in the gymnasium.
Exhibition games are held with visiting
and local teams.
GRASS HOCKEY
(Beatrice Sutton, President)
This is the only outdoor sport for
women at the University. Two teams
are entitled in the Lower Mainland
League, and matches will be arranged
with Victoria College and Duncan.
Regular practices are held on the campus. All equipment is furnished by the
Club.
GYMNASIUM CLUB
(Jean Campbell, President)
The  purpose of this  Club  is to give
physical  training to girls by means of
exercises, apparatus work and aesthetic
dancing.  The Club will meet under the 70
UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.
supervision of a trained instructress,
on Thursday afternoons from 4 to 5 in
the Gymnasium. Any woman student
is eligible  for membership.
INTER-CLASS ATHLETICS
The Spencer Cup for inter-class athletics corresponds to the Governors'
Cup in Men's Athletics. The relay Cup
is also competed for in the annual meet.
Under the supervision of the executive
of the association, competitions are
held in Basketball, Swimming, Track
and Hockey.
TRACK.
In conjunction with Men's Track
Club, an inter-class meet is held in the
Fall term, the feature trophy being the
Arts '25 cup.
NOTE—See Men's Athletics for information regarding Badminton, Fencing, Skating, Swimming and Tennis for
women students.
«^
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Literary and Scientific
THE LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC
EXECUTIVE
(William  Whimster,  President)
This executive presides over such
phases of student activity as may be
tinned cultural and instructive. By
means of regular meetings the executive is able to act as a medium between
the Students' Council and those clubs
and societies under its control.
LETTERS CLUB
(Robert   Brooks,   President)
The Letters Club, now in its thirteenth year, meets every second week
for the discussion of literature in all
branches. Membership is limited to
twenty elected members of the two
upper years, who are responsible for
the program of the reading of prepared
papers, followed by informal discussion
bearing on the topic. The Club executive includes a critic whose function it
is to criticize the style of the author
and the waj in which the paper is read.
K> UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
CLUB.
(J. Sumner, President)
Formed under the auspices of the
Carnegie Endowment for International
Peace, this Club purposes the study of
International Affairs. Selected publications are sent out each year to form
a permanent library. Students who
show a genuine interest in the purpose
of the Club and wdio have completed
their Freshman year are eligible for
membership.
MUSICAL SOCIETY
(Dr. W. L. McDonald, Hon. President)
(Robert Brooks, President)
The Musical Society exists for the
purpose of furthering an interest in and
an appreciation of music at the University. Its members are given an unusual opportunity for expressing and
developing vocal or instrumental talent.
The chief activity of the year will be in
the production of a light opera, which
will be presented in the spring. An
English madrigal group will also be organized and will contribute to the noon
hour recitals, which are given periodically throughout the session. Admittance to the Society is by private tryouts conducted early in the Fall term.
A nominal membership fee is charged
to cover activities not budgeted.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
FRENCH CLUBS
Three clubs, L'Alouette, La Causerie,
and La Canadienne, have been organ
ized for the purpose of encouraging
fluency in the French tongue, and promoting interest in French life and manners. Fortnightly meetings are held
throughout the session, the programs
consisting of games, songs, lectures,
conversation and refreshments. Mem
hers are chosen mainly from the two
upper years, and a few vacancies are
reserved   for   Fall   applications.
PLAYERS' CLUB
(Alice Morrow, President)
The Players' Club is probably unique
in the field of amateur theatricals in
Canada. Founded a few weeks after
the opening of the University in 1915, it
is today one of the most active campus
organizations, leading the way in dramatic activities. Excellent facilities for
fininshed performances are available on
the Auditorium stage, part of the equipment of which was contributed by the
Players' Club.
Membership is limited to seventy,
sixty of whom have passed competitive
tryouts; the ten as a result of technical
skill. A prize of $50 is offered to the
student submitting the best play suitable for the Club's annual Christmas
Performance.
The annual Spring Play has become a 74
UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.
feature entertainment in twenty towns
throughout British Columbia. Since
'1915, more than 250 performances have
been given. In this way the Club has
become a valuable connecting link between the University and the province
at large.
THE GERMAN CLUB
The aim of Der Deutsche Verein is
to promote interest in the life and
culture of Germany, and to provide opportunities for interested students to
gain fluency in conversation. Membership is limited to students of the two
upper years.
HISTORICAL SOCIETY
(President,   Isabel   Bescoby)
This Club was organized to give students of the Upper Years a fuller understanding and appreciation of history. Meetings are held every two
weeks, at which prepared papers are
read by various members on historical
subjects. This is followed by informal
discussion bearing on the topic. Membership is limitedtote w
bership is limited to twenty members
of the Upper years. At present there
are four vacancies to enable students
from Victoria College, entering their
third year, to become members.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
VARSITY CHRISTIAN UNION
(Paul   Campbell,   President)
The Union has for its object the defense and proclamation of the funda-
dental truths of the Christian faith, and
especially the need of closer relationship with God, which is possible only
through the redemption offered by
Jesus Christ. It desires to present a
witness, both spiritual and intellectual,
to the truths of historic, evangelical
Christianity. It is affiliated with the
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship of
Canada. Its activities include daily
noon-hour meetings, several dinners
and informal squashes during the session, services in the city churches, and
a conference each term with the University   of   Washington.
PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
(H. T. J.  Coleman, Hon.  President)
(William   Selder,   President)
The Philosophical Society meets
every three weeks to discuss problems
of general or particular interest. A
limited number of students from the
two upper years comprises the membership, and provides the program.
Emphasis is laid on student papers, followed by criticism and informal debate.
A few vacancies are reserved for Fall
applications. UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
GUIDE CLUB
(Jean Whitbeck, President)
Girl Guides who come to the University feel it almost impossible to participate actively in Guiding during their
attendance at the University. Interest
in Guiding then lags until at the end of
four years the Guides know very little
of the work and development of the
movement, and when they have the
opportunity do not take up the work
again. It is to prevent this that the
Club has been organized. Meetings will
be held once a month, when talks will
be given on Guiding in general. The
Club is open to all Girl Guides, but at
present is limited to a membership of
thirty.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
(Andrew L. Broatch, President)
The Student Christian Movement on
the campus is open to all students regardless of creed and color. The only
qualification is a real interest in the
"raison d'etre," and an honest attempt
to work out an intelligent philosophy of
life.
Its activities consist of:
1. Weekly study groups  on  the  Life
and Teachings of Jesus;
2. Study groups on problems of modern life;
3. Occasional     week-end     discussion
camps;
STUDENT HANDBOOK
4. Spontaneous,     informal     evening
groups in homes of members.
5. A spring camp for one week at the
end of the spring term.
BIOLOGICAL   DISCUSSION   CLUB.
(President,   Ian   McTaggarl-Cowan)
The aim of the Club is to further the
interest of undergraduate students in
biological topics. Membership is limited
to twenty-five students: Upper class
students in biology, and second year
students who have taken Biology 1 and
are taking either Zoology 1 or Botany
1. Fortnightly meetings are held at
which papers are presented by members
of the Club and Faculty.
THE ART CLUB
The Art Club was organized three
years ago with the intention of promoting interest in different branches of
art among the students. The work of
the Club consists of sketching, painting, cartooning, sculpturing, and discussions and lectures on art subjects.
THE  MENORAH  SOCIETY
(Paul  Pinsky,   President)
The   Menorah   Society   has   for   its
object the discussion of current problems, with particular reference to problems of Jewish life and activity.   The 78
UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
program    for    the    year    consists    of
papers, discussions, and debates.
ENGINEERING INSTITUTE OF
CANADA
(Edward   Yerner,   President)
This Club is organized as a student
section of the Vancouver Branch.
Membership is open to third, fourth
and fifth year Applied Science students.
Meetings are held during the University session, at which addresses are
given by prominent engineers in the
province and members of the University Faculty. Student nights are held
at which papers are presented by student members, for which prizes may
be awarded. On Saturday afternoons
visits are made to engineering projects
and works in the vicinity of Vancouver.
A dinner is held in the Fall term and
other social events may be arranged.
THE RADIO CLUB
(Wilson  McRae,  President)
The objects of this Club are to promote an interest in radio communication and experimental work, and to extend the knowledge of the principles of
radio by individual and collective research. Meetings are held weekly when
papers on suitable topics are given and
discussed. All students interested in
the radio are eligible for membership.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
UNIVERSITY PARLIAMENTARY
FORUM
(Kenneth M. Beckett, Act. President)
This is an organization constituted
last spring to promote interest in
public speaking and debating. Meetings will be held fortnightly and will
be conducted according to British Parliamentary procedure, with a Speaker
and organized parties. Debates will
cover  topics  of  current  events.
SOCIAL  SCIENCE  CLUB
(Kenneth M. Beckett, Act. President)
Membership in this Club is primarily
for students specializing in Economics
and associated subjects, interested in
discussing some of the more pressing
social and economic problems of the
present day. Fortnightly meetings will
be held. A number of prominent speakers have been secured and an interesting program is assured. Membership
is limited to twenty, but some vacancies
still exist.
G. M. DAWSON GEOLOGICAL
DISCUSSION CLUB
This Club meets every two weeks
during the season to present and discuss papers on geological and mining
subjects. An outside engineer is secured
for each meeting to speak on some
problem with which he is familiar.
Qualifications   for   membership   are: UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.
One summer's work on a geological
survey and two courses in geology; or
four courses in ge logy. These courses
need not be taken before membership
but must be taken before the end of
the first year of membership.
LITERARY  FORUM
(Kathleen Crosby, President)
The Literary Forum, formerly the
Scrap Book Club, whose members are
women of all years, was last year able
to conduct an entertaining and instructive program consisting of literary papers followed by discussion, criticism of
plays, and light impromptu debating
and public speaking. The Club will engage in similar activities this year.
HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE CLUB
(Jean MacNaughton, President)
Its object is to make those taking
Household Science acquainted with
each other and to promote interest in
the subjects of the course. All those
who are taking the course are asked to
join in order to help to establish the
Household Science course on this campus.
CANADIAN OFFICERS' TRAINING
CORPS
(Com. Officer, Col. H. F. G. Letson)
The corps offers a three-year course
in Military Education.   The training re-
STUDENT HANDBOOK
ciuires attendance at lectures and drill
parades which are arranged so as not to
interfere with academic work. An annual camp is held at Victoria during
the Christmas vacation. The Rifle Association, now a permanent organization, is open to corps members, wdio
may take part in various service and
miniature range competitions and Dominion matches.
CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
(Alan H. Cameron, President)
The object of this Society is to create
an interest in matters pertaining to
chemistry, rather than to supplement
the knowledge of the class-room. It
affords students an opportunity of
reading and listening to papers on all
phases of the science. Membership is
limited to those students taking Cham-
istry III or higher. Throughout the
year, however, there is normally an
open meeting every month at which
prominent outside chemists and members of the Faculty speak. To these
meetings all those interested are cor-
diallv invited.
FOREST CLUB
The aim of the Forest Club is to create interest in forestry in all its phases.
Instructive and interesting lectures are
given 'by prominent members of the
lumbering industry, forestry profession UNIVERSITY   OF   B.C.
and the faculty. Papers are also read
by the student members. Although
primarily intended for Forest Engineering students, the Club is open to all interested in forestrv.
AGRICULTURE CLUB
(Langford Godfrey, President)
The object of the Club is to create
interest in the various phases of Agriculture. A series of noon-hour lectures
is arranged, and evening meetings are
held every two weeks. Public speaking
is encouraged by an annual oratorical
contest, and by minor debates throughout the year. Interest in livestock is
stimulated by an annual judging competition taking place at the Experimental Farm at Agassiz. The feature
event of the year is the Club banquet,
held in the spring, at which trophies
are presented for the oratorical contest, and for the livestock judging competition. Membership is open to all
students  interested  in  Agriculture.
CLASSICS CLUB
The Classics Club was formed for
those members of Upper years who are
interested in classical subjects. The
Club meets every three weeks during
the term when students give papers on
various aspects of the Greek and
Roman  civilization.      Two  papers  are
STUDENT HANDBOOK
83
delivered each evening, and discussion,
led by the members of the staff of the
Classics Department, follows.
MATHEMATICS  CLUB
(Frank   Waites,   President)
The Mathematics Club was founded
for the purpose of discussing problems
and methods that are not included in
the curriculum. Papers are given by
professors and members, who number
twenty-five, and are chosen from students of the two upper years and
graduates. Meetings are held fortnightly.
LAW CLUB
(George  Wheaton,  President)
The purpose of the Club is to provide an introduction to the study of
jurisprudence for all students interested
in law. Meetings are held fortnightly,
and usually take the form of mock
trials, in which every member participates in some capacity. Quite frequently a speaker secured from among the
practising lawyers and judges of the
city gives an address upon some of the
aspects of law. The Club has made a
beginning in acquiring a collection of
law books. The ultimate aim is to
work for the establishment of a Law
Faculty at U. B. C. SA
UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
SOCIETY OF THOTH
(St. John Madeley, Grand Scribe)
The Society of Thoth, founded in
1926, is an honorary journalistic Society. It is devoted to the discussion
of topical subjects that lie outside the
field of other University Clubs. In
addition, the Royal Egyptian Ballet of
the Society gives an annual performance.
THE  CHESS  CLUB
(R. Fordyce, President)
The Chess Club was founded in 1926
in response to the interest displayed
in the game. Tournaments are held
during each term and matches with
other clubs are arranged. The feature
event is the annual Handicap Tournament.
THE PHYSICS CLUB
(Arthur McCulloch, President)
The aim of this Club is to enable
students of Physics to hear papers on
the latest developments in that subject,
and to provide them with an opportunity to gain experience in the preparation and delivery of such papers. In
order that these ends may best be
attained, three short papers on different
subjects are usually delivered at each
meeting. Membership is open to all
students taking one or more Physics
courses.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Fraternities
It is probable that you already know
something about fraternities; but insofar as fraternity life plays so large a
part in the life of the college, it is well
to know something of the fundamental
workings of thjeir organizations.
Fraternities have existed at U.B.C.
for a number of years, and have become
an integral part of the life of the campus. They are essentially social organizations among the men and women
each group having from 15 to 35 members. Membership comes through what
is known as a "bid." This is an invitation, unsought, which comes from that
particular group which believes you to
be most suited for them and they for
you. You will perhaps be invited to a
fraternity house or two for a meal or
for some other "rushing" function. Do
not misunderstand these invitations.
They simply mean that that group is
looking you over. Look them over too.
It is much more important to you that
you join the group with which you are
going to be happy than it is to them
that they get you to be a member.
Men's fraternities are governed by
an Inter-Fraternity Council, and women's by the Pan-Hellenic Association,
which bodies are made up of representatives from each fraternity and a
member of Faculty. All fraternities are
subject   to   the   control   of   Students' S6
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Council through the media of these two
bodies; and for the maintenance of
discipline in respect to "rushing," etc.,
these bodies are entirely responsible.
They have formulated sets of rules
governing the "rushing" of men and
women during a certain season. These
rules outline the obligations of both
fraternity and man or woman in this
matter. Make it your business to know
these rules. Reserve your decision till
the expiration of the period of grace
which follows  the rushing term.
Fraternity life is successful only
when it is a mutual experience of give
and take. You should know before
you "pledge" what you are to give and
what you may expect to receive. Ask
yourself some such questions as these
before you make your decision : What
kind of reasons are advanced for my
joining this fraternity? Are they in
keeping with the motives which have
controlled by life? In what forms of
social and campus life does this fraternity engage? What are its standards and practices regarding profanity,
gambling, drinking? What is its scholastic standing?    What are its costs?
Some of you may not be asked to
join a fraternity. If you are not do not
bemoan the fact and think that you are
a social failure. There are many non-
fraternity men and women on our campus, some of whom are leaders among
their fellows. Fraternities are wholly
personal.    It is by no means a slam not
STUDENT HANDBOOK
S7
to be asked to join. Whatever you do,
do not turn anti-. That leads only to
discontentment. Mutual co-operation is
the rule at our University, for it is only
in this way that the greatest service can
be rendered to the institution.
MEN'S
International
Alpha  Delta  Phi.
Phi Gamma Delta.
Phi Delta Theta.
Zeta  Psi.
National
Phi  Kappa  Pi.
Local
Alpha Kappa Alpha.
Kappa Theta Rho.
Pi Kappa.
Sigma Alpha Phi.
Tau Lambda.
Chi Omega Psi.
WOMEN'S
International
Alpha  Gamma Delta.
Alpha Delta Pi.
Alpha Phi.
Delta Gamma
Gamma Phi Beta.
Kappa Alpha Theta.
Kappa Kappa Gamma.
Local
Alpha Sigma Alpha. UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Points of Interest
THE MEMORIAL WINDOWS —
The Canadian Jubilee Memorial Windows are one of the most recent additions to the Library. They are situated near the western end of the main
concourse, but may also be viewed from
the hallway below. Presented to the
University by an unknown donor, the
windows were unveiled on November
28, 1928, by the Honorable S. F. Tolmie, Premier of  British  Columbia.
WAR MEMORIAL—Inside the main
doorway of the Science Building are
erected two war memorials—one "to
commemorate the supreme sacrifices
and willing services of the members of
the 'D' Co'y 196th Battalian, C. E. F.
Western Universities in the Great War,
' 1914-1918;" the other "in honor of the
B. C. reinforcing platoon, 196th Western Universities Overseas Battalion,
C.E.F."
THE SUN DIAL — The Sun-Dial
with its oblong face and engraving of
the Cairn and the Lions is a familiar
object to all visitors of the Botanical
Gardens. It was presented to the University in 1926 by B. S. Hartley, Professor of Mathematics, who designed
.it especially for the position in which
it now stands.
FLAG POLE—The University flag
pole is at present being seasoned in a
shed  south  of  the   Scientific   Building.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
It is of British Columbia Fir, and when
erected will take its place among the
four tallest flagpoles in the world.
THE BURNETT COLLECTION—
The library of the University contains
a collection of curious relics, rated as
the most complete representative Polynesian collection in the world. Tbe
collection was made by Dr. Frank Burnett, who, during a period of 35 years,
sailed around the cannibal islands in
the South Pacific.
Among the exhibits are figures of
Polynesian gods, native implements,
several skulls, and samples of native
dress. Bill Tansley superintends this
museum of relics.
STAMP COLLECTION—The University stamp collection comprises the
postage stamps of Canada and the early
British North America colonies; it contains many interesting stamps, dating
from the time of Queen Victoria to the
present day. This collection is not yet
complete, and all new contributions will
be welcomed. Those interested may
have access to the collection through
the Registrar.
TOTEM POLES—The Totem Poles
now situated in the Botanical Gardens
were presented in 1927 by the Alumni
Association. They are from the Musquiam Reserve, Point Grey, and are the
last two of the tribe. The pole on the
right is the Capilano Pole, a carving of
the celebrated Capilano Chief; on the 90
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
left is the Tsem-Lano Pole, symbolic
of the magical powers of Tsm-Lano, a
great  Musquiam warrior.
PAINTINGS IN THE LIBRARY—
The series of paintings by John Innes
which hang in the library represent
early scenes in the history of British
Columbia.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM—The Geology
Museum is located in the southern
wing of the Applied Science Building.
It contains valuable and interesting
collections of material illustrative of
both the physical and historical branches
of geology and new additions are constantly being made.
THE CAIRN—The Cairn was first
set up as a memorial of the province-
wide campaign in 1922, wdien a group .
of enthusiastic students marched from
F'airview to the new University and
dedicated the Cairn. Only a skeleton
of the present University stood then.
The Cairn service for Freshmen,
which was inaugurated in 1928, has become a tradition  in the University.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
K>
Undergraduate Exchange
Scheme
Through this scheme the National
Federation of Canadian University Students hopes to most effectively serve
the fundamental purposes for which it
was formed. The scheme offers an
opportunity to Canadian university students, without extra expense to themselves, to receive a year's study at a
university in  another  part of  Canada.
Briefly speaking. the Exchange
Scheme pro\ides that each university,
through its selection committee of a
member of faculty and two students,
shall nominate, upon application, any
number of students not exceeding one
per cent of the enrollment. The only
prerequisite is that the student desiring
to take advantage of the scheme must
have completed at least two years of
study and be representative in a general way of the student body.
Through the cooperation of the various university authorities in promoting this national scheme, it is
provided that exchange schools are
exempt from tuition fees, which, except
in extreme cases, is more than sufficient
compensation for the railway fee involved in effecting the exchange. The
Junior Member on Council is our representative on the N.F.C.U.S. and can
give full information respecting the
Exchange  Scheme.
A UNIVERSITY   OF  B.C.
Qraduate Manager
This system of management was
adopted at the close of the session of
1928-1929 by the Alma Mater Society
on the recommendation of the Finance
Committee which was appointed by the
Students' Council to investigate conditions of the Alma Mater Society.
The Graduate Manager is a paid representative of the Students' Council,
carrying out the wishes of the Council
in all activities in regard to finance.
He is the only officer who can issue requisitions for equipment and supplies.
The executives of clubs and societies
are expected to give him their full cooperation.
Curator
The Curator is the keeper of all the
athletic equipment of the Alma Mater
Society. He is in his office in the
south-east corner of the Gymnasium at
certain hours as posted and all equipment must be obtained from him and
returned to him at the end of the season.
NOTE.—No bills will be honored by
the Students' Council unless they are
covered by purchase order from the
Graduate Manager. The business
houses of the city have been informed
of this ruling and it will be rigidly observed by Council.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Songs
Alma Mater, guardian of our youth,
Fair is the laurel wreath that crowns
thy brow,
Friend of our country and the friend of
truth
Thy children hail thee now.
Alma Mater, daughter of the years.
The great of other days are with thee
yet;
Speak   thou   their   high   faith   in   our
duller ears.
Forbid us to forget.
Mma Mater, watcher of the hours,
Thou  lookest on  the  mountains  and
the sea,
And rulest in the might of other powers
In loftier majesty.
Alma Mater, feeder of the flame.   ■
High  hopes  and  noble  purposes  are
thine—
On   us,  whose   pulses   quicken   at   thy
name,
Grant  that  the  light  may shine.
Alma  Mater,  mother of  our  love,
Many the  paths  we  tread  in   futur*
days—
Yet  naught  that  time  shall  bring car
e'er remove
Thy  memory  or  thy  praise.
—H. T. J. Colemar 94
UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
Sons   of   Western   Highland
Sons of Western Highland
Forest,  field  and  island,
Raise a shout for Varsity;
Sons  of  ancient glory
Told in song and story.
Lead on out for U. B. C.
Onward, onward!
This is the battle cry
Forward, forward!
For our hearts are high.
Sons of story olden,
On to glorv golden,
Win the fight for U. B. C.
Alouette
Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette
Je  te  plumerai,
Je te plumerai la tete,
Je te plumerai la tete,
Et la tete, Et la tete.
Oh-Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette
Je te plumerai.
2. Le Bee.
3. Le Nez.
4. Le Dos.
5. Les Pattes.
6. Le Cou.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
95
HAIL TO THE  GOLD AND  BLUE
Sons of our Alma Mater,
Gird  you  against the foe,
Count not the cost but fight boys,
And on to Victory we'll go.
Hearts that are never weary,
Hearts that are brave and true,
Glorious the cause and worthy,
Hail to the Gold and Blue.
When in thy halls we gather,
May hope attend our way.
When  from  thy courts we wander.
Let faith and  truth alone  hold sway.
Go forth in exultation,
Ever our pledge renew,
Source of our  inspiration.
Hail to the Gold and Blue.
Wm. C. Gibson.
Here's   to  Good  Old   Rum
Here's   to  good  old  rum,
Drink 'er down, drink 'er down.
Here's to good old rum,
Drink 'er down, drink 'er down.
Here's to good old rum that puts you
on  the bum.
Here's to good old rum, drink 'er down.
(CHORUS)
Rolling home—dead drunk,
Rolling home—dead drunk,
By the light of the silvery moon,
Here's to good old rum, drink 'er
down. UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Hi!   Hi!   The Varsity
It is the work of all the land
To build up now what they began;
So join with us and lend a hand
To build the future Varsity.
(CHORUS)
Hi!  Hi!  the Faculty,
'   The Students of the U.B.C.
Hi!  Hi!  the Varsity!
We're working for the future.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
There Is a Tavern in the Town
There is a tavern in the town, in the
town,
And there my dear love sits him down,
sits him down,
And drinks his wine 'mid laughter free,
And never, never thinks of me.
(CHORUS)
Fare thee well, for I must leave thee,
Do not let the parting grieve  thee,
And remember that the best of friends
must part, must part.
Adieu, adieu kind friends; adieu, adieu,
adieu;
I  can   no  longer   stay  with  you,  stay
with you;
I'll hang my harp on a weeping willow
tree,
And may the world go well with thee.
The  Senior
I'm tired of walking uphill;
I long for an automobile;
When I get a jag on,
I  need  a gas wagon ;
I'm  tired of walking uphill.
I'm  tired  of living  alone;
I want a wee wife of my own;
Someone   to   caress   me,
To wash  and  undress  me,
I'm tired  of living alone.
I'm  tired of living alone,
I want a wee sheik of my own.
Balloons and jazz sweater,
The  louder  the  better,
I'm tired of living alone.
As a beauty I am not a star;
There   are   others   more   handsome   by
far;
"My face I don't  mind  it;
For I am behind it;
The people in front get the jar—some
jar.
the
Come in all your fighting trim,
Come in all your strength to win,
Come   and   show   your   spirit   for
Blue and Gold.
Come and shout your war-cry out
With all your power and might,
And whate'er we do, we will all be true
To our cherished University. 98
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Here's to dear old U.B.C,
Here's to dear old U.B.C.
Hearty are the men who wear the Blue
and Gold.
We'll send across the land our ringing
cry.    (Rah! Rah!)
Hail to dear old U.B.C.
Her fighting spirit cannot die.
Even  when  our  luck  is  gone,
We'll carry on  for U.B.C.
Vera Peters, Arts '33.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
99
My Girl's a Hullabaloo
My girl's a hullabaloo,
She wears the Gold and Blue;
She goes to Varsity too
Just like the others do.
(CHORUS)
And in my future life
She's going to be my wife.
How in the world d'ja find that out:
She told me so.
She goes to all the games
Just  like  the  other dames,
I fork out all the change
Just like the others do, etc.
When we go walking
She does the talking,
1 do the squeezing,
She does the teasing, etc.
As we grow older
She will grow bolder,
And she will hold her
Head on my shoulder, etc.
Yells
Kit silano-Capilano
Kitsilano,  Capilano,   Siwash   Squaw—
Kla-how-yah Tillicum,  Skookum Wah.
Hy-yu  Mamook, Mucka  Mucka  Zip.
B. C. Yarsitv Rip, Rip, Rip. »
V-A-R-S-I-T-Y
Yarsitv.
Spo-ah
Spo-ah-pee-kaw-wa-wa-wak.
Spo-ah-pee-kaw-wa-wa-wak.
British  Columbia.
U.  B. C.  RAH!
S -S S—S-S-S—Boom   !   !   !
Ahahahahahahahahahahahah !   !   t
(whistle)
Varsity   !   !   !   !
Hold 'Em Varsity.
Hold 'em Varsity	
Hold 'em Varsity	
Hold 'em Varsitv	
Fight! Fight! Fight! FIGHT!
Locomotive
Rah! Rah! Rah! Varsitv!
Rah! Rah! Rah! Varsity!
Rah! Rah! Rah! Varsity!
Varsity!!! Rah!
(slow)
(faster)
(fast) 100
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
101
Welcome
Kla-how-yah (name)
Kla-how-yah (name)
Kla-how >ah, how are you?   (name)
Varsity Rah! Varsity Rah!
Give 'em 'ell with a zis boom bah!
Soak  'em,  croak  'em,  cover  'em  with
gore,
Sweep   'em   away  with   a   rush   and   a
roar,
Hold  'em!    Hold  'em!    Don't  let  'em
through!
Win that cup for the B. C. U.
K>
Important Dates
Sept. 23 Lectures  Begin
Oct. 5  Last   Day  for  Payment  of
First  Term  Fees.
Oct. 9 Frosh Reception.
Oct.  10 Last   Day   for   Change   in
Student's Courses.
Oct. 28 Fall  Congregation.
Nov. 6 Home-coming   Week-end.
Theatre  night.
Nov. 13 Arts Ball.
Nov. 19-21— Christmas Plays.
Dec. 4 Last  Day  of  Lectures  for
Term.
Dec. 7 Exams Begin.
Dec. 17 Exams End.
Jan. 4 Second   Term   Begins.
Jan.  18 Last  Day  for  Payment  of
Second  Term  Fees.
Jan. 22 Aggie  Ball.
Feb. 12 Science Ball.
Feb. 25-27....Musical    Society    Presentation.
Mar.  4 Co-Ed. Ball.
Mar. 16-19. .Spring Play.
Apr. 7 Last Day for Grad. Essays.
Last Day of Lectures.
Apr. 8 Exams. Begin.
. 102
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Mi-Hi
Every College Man
Carries Our Key
608 has always been and always
will be open to college men. It
warms our heart the way Varsity men stroll in and pass the
time of day.
They know that Foster's keeps
open house at all times where
they may meet, enjoy our cigarettes and discuss football, track,
basketball and even studies.
. . . and on the campus
the better dressed men
are wearing clothes from
Thos. Foster & Co.
608 Granville St.
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
$25.00 and up.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
103
PHONE   NUMBERS I M\ Fr -IT\   OF  B.C.
THE
University
Book Store
Hours:
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Loose-Leaf   Note   Books
Exercise   Books   and   Scribblers
AT REDUCED  PRICES
Graphic   and   Engineering   Paper
Biology   Paper
Loose-Leaf  Refills
Fountain   Pens and  Ink
Pencils   and   Drawing   Instruments
Crepe   Paper   for   Masquerades,   etc.
ALL YOUR BOOK SUPPLIES
SOLD HERE
STUDENT HANDBOOK
105
PHONE   NUMBERS IOC
UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.
ADDRESSES
STUDENT HANDBOOK
107
ADDRESSES 18
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
Remember
College
Days
With
Photographs
By
bridgmans
Studio
413 Granville St.
L
r
STUDENT HANDBOOK 105
ADDRESSES 11(1
UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
APPOINTMENTS
STUDENT HANDBOOK 111
APPOINTMENTS UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
BARR
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER
SPECIAL STUDENT'S MODEL, $58.50
THE    BARR   SPECIAL   is   a    thoroughly efficient writing machine, and is
proving very popular with students and
thers   who  wish  a practical  typewriter
at a  minimum price.
SPECIAL FEATURES:
1. Margin  Release,  for  both  right  and
left  margins.
2. Four row keyboard—84 characters.
For all languages, with any number of "dead keys" desired.
3.—Segment Shift—lighter in use and
permits rigid carriage construction.
Insures perfect alignment.
4. Ribbon twelve yards long. Both
automatic  and  manual  reverse.
5. Carriage return lever (and carriage
lock). Most conveniently located for
quick   operation.
6. Paper Bail—with scale and adjustable   rolls.
7. Platen, same diameter as on large
office  typewreiters.
8. Direct  visibility—all writing in sight
9. Paper Release.
11.-Variable   Line  Spacer.
13.-Shift Lock; released by either right
or   left   shift  key.
14.—Line Space Regulator adjustable  to
one,  two and  three  spaces.
Consolidated Typewriter Company
«1 HOMER ST., VANCOUVER, B C.
Seymour   7394
Campus   Representative..
STUDENT HANDBOOK U£
IMPORTANT   MEMORANDUM UNIVERSITY  OF  B.C.
Remembrances
s
A Gift is Made for
Two Reasons:
First—To  show  that  you  remember your friends.
Second—to   give   them   a   remembrance of yourself.
So what more appropriate than
your Photograph; the Gift that
you alone can give.
Qeo. T. IDadds
1318    GRANVILLE   ST.
Seymour   1002
SPECIAL    STUDENT    RATES
STUDENT HANDBOOK  U5
IMPORTANT   MEMORANDUM :i6
UNIVERSITY OF  B.C.
Basket!
Scoring a Dominion-wide Triumph
— "Universal
Knitwear continues to be—"Canada's  Choice."
Campus style leaders are
featuring the "Universal"
Golf Ensemble s—Dress,
Sweaters, Coats and Natty
Knitted Pullovers.
100% Pure Wool
MADE IN VANCOUVER
From B.C. Yarns.
UNIVERSAL
Look for this Label of Quality
STUDENT HANDBOOK
IMPORTANT   MEMORANDUM !'■
UNIVERSITY   OF  B.C.
Stationery
LOOSE   LEAF   RING   BOOKS
LOOSE   LEAF   LEDGERS
BLANK   BOOKS
CALENDAR  PADS  AND   DIARIES
DRAWING   AND   TRACING    PAPERS
DRAWING  BOARDS
SET  SQUARES,  T  SQUARES
SCALES,   SLIDE   RULES
EDISON-DICK
MIMEOGRAPH   MACHINES
and SUPPLIES
FOUNTAIN   PENS
AND
PROPELLING PENCILS
STEEL FURNITURE
CARD   FILING   SYSTEMS
Tickets.   Invitations,   Programmes,
for Class Parties and
Annual  Balls
PrinteDi engraved or Embossed
THE
CLARKE & STUART
co., limited
550 Seymour Street
Vancouver,  B.C.
STUDENT HANDBOOK
119
IMPORTANT   MEMORANDUM 120 UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.
Established 1817
lank of Montreal
UNIVERSITY   BRANCH
4381 TENTH AVE. WEST-
West Point Grev
STUDENT HANDBOOK
121
The Accounts of the
Faculty and Students
of the
University of British Columbia
are
Welcomed by the  Bank
INTEREST   PAID   AT   CURRENT   RATES
ON   SAVINGS   DEPOSITS
TRANSFERS    OF    FUNDS    TO    AND    FROM
POINTS    OF    RESIDENCE    CAN    BE
EASILY    ARRANGED
On application we shall be glad to
furnish yon with an interesting booklet
entitled "Y'our Bank and How You May
Use It."
N. T. BROWN, Manager
111
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STUDENT HANDBOOK
123
: Practical
Assistance
IS    INVALUABLE   WHEN
COMPILING
COLLEGE or
HIGH SCHOOL
ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
ETC.
*»-
WE   ARE   AT   YOUR   SERVICE
G.A.RoeddeLtd.
PRINTERS.    PUBLISHERS
AND   STATIONERS
616    HOMER    STREET
PHONE  SEY.   263
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UNIVERSITY   OF   B.C.'
STUDENT BANKBOOK
125
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UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
TRINITY  1311
Gehrke's
Can be relied upon
In that next Fraternity
or Sorority function for
THE VERY LATEST IN
♦ Dance Programs
•Place   Cards
♦ Tally Cards or
♦ Invitations . .
with artistic design
566 SEYMOUR ST.
Remember Cehrke*m carry nearly
ali Crests in their vatilte
I	
CALENDAR
1931    AUGUST    1931
1932   JANUARY   1932
S    M  T  W T  F   S
1
2    3    4    5    6    7    8
9   10   11   12   13   14   15
16  17   18  19  20  21   22
23  24  25  26  27   28  29
30 31
S M  T W T
3    4    5    6    7
10  11   12   13   14
17   18  19  20  21
24  25  26  27  28
31
F S
1    2
8    9
15   16
22  23
29  30
SEPTEMBER
FEBRUARY
12    5    4    5
6    7    8    9  10  11   12
13  14  15   16  17   18   19
20  21   22  23   24 25   26
27  28  29  30
12    3    4
7    8    9  10  11
14  15   16  17   18
21   22  23   24  25
28  29
5    6
12   13
19  20
26  27
OCTOBER
MARCH
1     2    3
4    5    6    7    8    9  10
11   12  13  14   15   16  17
18  19  20  21   22  23  24
25  26 27  28  29  30  31
1    2    3
6    7    8    9  10
13  14  15   16  17
20  21   22  23   24
27  28  29  30  31
4    5
11   12
18   19
25   26
NOVEMBER
APRIL
12    3    4    5    6    7
8    9  10  11   12  13  14
15   16  17  18  19  20  21
22  23  24  25   26  27  28
29  30
3    4    5    6    7
10  11   12  13   14
17   18   19  20  21
24  25  26 27  28
1    2
8    9
15   16
22   23
29  30
DECEMBER
MAY
12    3    4    5
6    7    8    9  10  11   12
13   14   15  16  17   18  19
20  21   22  23  24  25  26
27  28  29  30  31
12    3    4    5
8    9   10   11   12
15   16  17   18  19
22 23  24  25   26
29  30  31
6    7
13   14
20  21
27  28

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