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Tuum Est... ...and all that Aug 23, 1967

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 ^lu Ho..if/ b&n K
WF UBYSSEY
all that
^  new student
guide to the
University
of B.C. Who is a
Chartered Accountant
and why is his
profession the fastest
growing in
Canada?
• • •
Just as a doctor earns the right to his
M.D. after serving as an intern in a
hospital, a Chartered Accountant earns
the right to the designation of CA. after
undergoing a period of intense training
with a firm of chartered accountants
employed in public practice. This "on-
the-job" experience is vital because of
the nature of a C.A.'s work in public
practice, industry, education and government: the organization, analysis and
application of financial methods, procedures and controls. A Chartered Accountant is a key man in charting a company's course, and the rapid growth of
his profession is one of the outstanding
phenomena of the modern business era.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia "University must meet the needs of all the people. ". . . We must therefore proceed with care to the erection of those workshops
where we may design and fashion the tools needed in the building of a nation,
and from which we can survey and lay out the paths of enlightenment, tunnel
the mountains of ignorance and bridge the chasms of incompetence."
—Dr. Frank Wesbrook, first president,
The University of B.C. (Oct. 28, 1922)
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967 I I1<-1
"The tygers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction."—Wm. Blake
TUUM EST
...and all that
1967-68
Editor: John Kelsey '
Executive editors: Carolyn Tate, Norm Gidney, Kris Emmott, Danny
Stoffman, Murray McMillan, Bonnie Lee, Powell Hargrave, Shaun
Sullivan, Sue Gransby, Tom Wayman.
. Photos;   courtesy   six   generations   of   Ubyssey   photographers,   all,
thankfully nameless.
Cover: The great trek of October 28, 1922
A special edition of The Ubyssey published by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
^^^^M ■■■■^^^^^^^^■^^^^^^^^■■■■^^^^^^■^■■iHBH The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, "•B-c2>
JaitulcuA Jatkfan Collect fan
"IMPORTED FOR YOU  FROM AROUND THE WORLD"
*   GOWNS
*   CASUAL WEAR
• IMPORTED SUITS & TOPCOATS
* EXQUISITE LINGERIE
•   DISTINCTIVE ACCESSORIES & GIFTS
*   HOSIERY
£vsuujihw£. in. JoMwl, Qndwidiwlk^ SsdsudksxL foh QoUaqsL Jtivwg-
OPEN  FRIDAY  EVENINGS
TO  NINE
4409 W. 10th Ave.
"Just three  blocks from
the gates"
224-5352
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967 1922 GREAT TREKKERS fill shell of then-abandoned chemistry building at UBC.   Thus began the tradition of Tuum Est.
On history...
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967 THE idea of a University of
British Columbia came from
B.C.'s first provincial government. Characteristically, the
first classes met 41 years later, and it
was 51 years before UBC had a campus.
The first annual report of the first
provincial superintendent of education, John Jessup, noted "that British
Columbia will soon require a provincial university." The idea — and a
couple of dry runs — were kicked
around all through the gay 90's, and
not until 1907 were crown lands put
aside for the university which was
finally incorporated in 1908.
The universities act of 1908 maintained:
". . . the university shall be non-
sectarian . . .
". . . the instruction shall be free
to all students in the arts classes . . .
"the women students shall have
equality of privilege with men students . . ."
In 1914, construction began on what
is now the old wing of the chemistry
building on main mall, but the war
It began
when...
intervened and the steel skeleton sat
barren among the trees for eight years.
Academic planning began in 1906,
under the wing of Montreal's McGill
University. Despite the war and despite no facilities, 379 students and
university president Dr. Frank Wesbrook declared themselves in class on
Sept. 30, 1915. Another 56 students
registered their spiritual presence
from the trenches of France.
The tradition of making do with old
huts started then too. Point Grey was
still mostly woods, so the university
was temporarily located in the Fair-
view shacks on the Vancouver General
Hospital grounds.
The tie that binds the 1967-68 stu
dent to his ancestors is hut life — the
Fairview shacks were as uninhabitable
as the Second World War models still
housing Fort and Acadia camps, classrooms, offices and labs.
By 1922, the utter inadequacy of the
shacks forced classes into tents,
a church basement, an attic and private homes. Construction had not
resumed on Point Grey — no money,
what else? — and the 1,200 students
resolved to do something about it.
A second tradition was set, translating the theory of the university
motto, Tuum Est — it's up to you or
it's yours — into practice. That tradition continues today to move UBC
students to direct action: a national
student's day march two years ago,
last year's housing tent-in and money
march to Victoria, and this year . . .
whatever is necessary.
The 1922 campaign was to obtain
signatures for a petition to be presented to the provincial legislature, asking
for a work resumption on Point Grey.
Door to door canvassing, work at
the PNE and in downtown Vancouver,
THROUGH THE SOPPING Vancouver streets, against the  wishes of a  do-nothing council, 3,700 students  marched for
universal accessability  to higher education on  October  22,   1965—the first national student day.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967 and then a burst of energy during Varsity Week, Oct 22 to 29, gathered 56,-
000 signatures demanding action to
■Build Varsity'.
And on Saturday, Oct. 28, 1922, the
Great Trek was on. A parade with 35
floats marched from Main along Hastings to Granville and up to Davie St.
Only 1,100 students took part, as
many ferried to Victoria to rally on
the legislature steps last January. The
1,100 represented nearly the whole
student body.
From Davie they travelled to Tenth
and Sasamat, the end of the street
car line, and hiked on the old logging
road that is today University Boulevard and only slightly less bumpy. In
front of the Science building shell,
each Trekker placed a stone and built
the Great Cairn. Now totally buried in
ivy, the Cairn still stands on Main
Mall as a monument to student action.
Unlike recent years, the public
presure paid off. On Nov. 9, 1922,
$1.5 million was voted by the province to continue construction of UBC
at Point Grey.
And the tone of student life had
been set. By 1954, the third president
of the University, Dr. Norman MacKenzie could tell the freshman class:
"No university in the world that I
know of owes as much to its students
as does the University of British Columbia. That applies not only to buildings . . . but to participation in the
actual operation of the university at a
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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GOOD  OLD  DAYS   are  reflected  by
ancient fee receipts.
variety of levels. This, I ibelieve, is
good for the university and good for
you, for it is in the exercise of responsibility of that kind that you gain
experience and maturity and become,
in a real sense, actively interested in
and supporters of the university."
For the Great Trek had been just
a start. The first gymnasium for the
campus, now the Women's Gym, was
built in 1929 after a student campaign.
Between the wars, students initiated
and contributed financially to the present Brock Hall. During the second
world war, the armory was built and
expanded as a student project. After
the war, in the 50's the university's
human losses were commemorated in
a drive to build another needed gymnasium, the War Memorial Gym on
University Boulevard.
Student monies ($300,000) were used
to fully finance the last of the men's
houses in the Lower Mall permanent
residence complex, Sherwood Lett
House, named after the first president
of the UBC's student government and
former chief justice of B.C. Student
money — nearing $5 million mortgaged for the next 20 years — is building the new student union building behind the library off East Mall. It's due
for occupancy at the start of the 1968
session.
Student action has progressed in
recent years, as the need for facilities
is increasingly met by student-
pressured governments at all levels.
The new trend is for a student voice,
both in the physical operation of the
university and in the academic programming. Student campaigns of the
past two years have increasingly
sought representation on governing
bodies and this fall four student senators will be elected to the academic
senate. Since the real power is with
the board of governors, which still
meets in secret, it is unlikely that the
four will be able to produce any real
change. The task for student action
in the next few years is solving that
problem.
In 1962, Harvard dental college head
Dr. John B. Macdonald followed Wesbrook, Dr. Leonard Klinck and Dr.
Mackenzie to become the university's
fourth president. Macdonald began his
tenure by conducting a study of the
future of higher education needs in
the province, released early in 1963
as the Macdonald Report. When it
appeared   as   though   the   provincial
EDUCATION MINISTER Les Peterson
greets masses on legislature steps, Jan.
27, 1967. Peterson doesn't like students,
who reciprocate.
government might not act on Macdon-
ald's recommendations, the student
body swung into action to 'Back Mac',
to agitate and petition throughout B.C.
for the founding of additional universities and regional colleges — the process currently under way.
The aim of the Back Mac campaign
had toeen to ensure that there was
sufficient higher educational plant in
the province to meet the needs of the
people. The campaign and ensuing barrages against the Socreds succeeded in
all respects but one: the evolution of
a workable federal-provincial financial formula and grants commission to
ensure enough money for all the province's institutes. The B.C. government played money games again last
year, and shorted the three universities by $13 million federal dollars
— which were snuck into provincial
general revenue.
Moved by the knowledge that this
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967 IMPERIAL
ARTS
ARTISTS' MATERIALS
*        PICTURE FRAMING
NOW TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
4458 W. 10th Avenue 8425 Granville Street
224-3933
263-4940
When you're a pioneer starting your 150th year of activity
you have plenty to remember. Especially when you've made financial
history, like laying the cornerstone of this
country's banking system—fifty years before Confederation.
At this time we could be looking back on a long record of achievement.
Instead, we're looking ahead—well ahead.
Canada's First Bank may be an old-timer but it has the
youngest outlook in banking.
Bank of Montreal
Campus Branch in The Administration
G. F. Peirson, Manager
BIRD CALLS'
Are For YOU
... not for the Birds
•
BIRD CALLS'
ir is the student telephone
directory
it is the campus' most
useful book   .
it tells "Who's who", at UBC
ir gives complete alphabetical
listings for all students, including name, faculty, year,
local address, telephone
number, and home address
ir lists athletic  events and
other important activities
•
BIRD CALLS'
Available mid-October
ORDER
Your Copy
NOW!
Pre-publication Reserve Order
Tickets Are Now On Sale I
ONIY 75 CENTS
( After publication price will be $1).
PUBLICATIONS   OFFICE,   BROCK   HALL
UNIVERSITY   BOOK   STORE
and from Phrateres Club members in the
FIELD HOUSE BOOKSTORE.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967
19 ••« •
OHd THOSE PAYINO BY CASH OR CHEQUES NOT IN
MOUNT A/JD SCHOlAKSl*
ilM  UPAI 'AWfOPftfATt O . >f"T   •</>•<    >
NATION  NUMMfil W<
fW,VINO h .<  IN fXACI       ^OUNrOffFiS
DROP IT INIO ' "OX
Fee, fie, $457.
Registration (Ugh)
111
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967 REGISTRATION is another
name for hell. It's also the
only time human hands touch
your records, and your role
is to be the machine which carries
cards from one desk to another, from
line-up to line-up.
Your registration form, which arrived in the mail a few days ago, has a
time on it, 'but that is When you begin
standing in a four-to-six hour line. Instead, see a faculty advisor during
the summer. Write a letter to the
Committee on Registration, Faculty of
Arts, 276 Buchanan Building, UBC
asking for an appointment. You then
find a way to fit what you want to
do into the rules at leisure, and get
the advisor to initial your form. Make
sure he initials it.
During the week of September 11,
the initialled form will admit you to
Buchanan building for course cards,
but only on the appointed day.
Course cards mean IBM cards for
the courses you want, at the times
you want. Trouble is, you can't often
get the time you want because everybody else got it first. To be avoided:
timetable clashes, which are illegal,
and 8:30 classes. Likely you won't be
able to avoid 8:30's. Too bad.
Of cards,
lines, and
money...
When you have your duly authorized envelope of course cards, scurry
to the armory, where you get the rest
of your cards from another long line,
pay fees, and get your student card.
The process is automatic and the lines
follow one after the other, but go
either at 8:30 sharp the day after you
get your first fistful of cards, or in the
very late afternoon. Shorter lines.
While waiting for your student card
to be plasticized, you will be ambushed by military reservists, health plan
salesmen, priests and wolves (if you
are a girl). None of these is compulsory. Don't let anybody tell you
otherwise.
Somewhere in the mill (it changes
each year) there is a card asking your
religious affiliation. You do not need
to fill it out. Hand it in blank, or write
pink pantheist or maoist. Unless you
want to be contacted by the church of
your choice. Then, of course, fill it
out.
Now you're a student, catalogued,
carded( broke, weary and nasty. If the
8:3 0's are intolerable, or if you got the
wrong cards after all, you can transfer
into a different course until Sept. 30,
if you stand in long lines in the administration building . . .
And if you goofed through all
this, the registrar simply says Tuum
Est, baby, better luck next year.
• • • and
to sleep
When you come to be advised, and
if you're looking for off-campus lodging, stop by the Alma Mater Society
office, south end of Brock Hall (the
yellow 'building behind the library),
and pick up a housing list. It's got
information about location, price and
facilities of rooms, houses and suites
currently for rent. Or phone 224-3242.
YOUR LIFE is totalled on the little
cards, which become bits of tape, and
if she loses the card, you cease to
exist. . . .
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967
12 Some Fresh Candidates   for the University Eres5.de.ncy Race I
^^
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*5*^
- -WE'D   LIKE
OF  COURSE m
IS   WING   /AM
fAPtA/&   FAST
Xbave
always been
able to cmaamze
younqsterSt
Jost recently
|or example--
St5 A step down
but At 71  you '
cant BE chooser
PEACEFUt PUACp,
AMP JUST ACROSS
THE BOARDER LIES
THt   SACRED
Father-Land.
I'll aNe 4%
students
'anything'
they want-
IN THE AFTERMATH of Dr. John Macdonald's resignation, many counties were heard from.  .  .  .
Officialdom.. •
13
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 13, 1967 A
PRESIDENT: Dr. Kenneth Hare, of
Birkbeck College, London, England,
arrives at UBC in June, 1968. He'll
pop over for a visit once or twice
through the year, and when he moves
in he'll be administrative and academic head of the university. But
meanwhile . . .
Waller F. Gage is acting president.
He's also dean of men, and dean of
interfaculty and student affairs. As
president, he's the final word on
major university policy; you should
write to him if you have a major
policy problem. Go see him if you
need a loan, have a personal problem
that a friendly grandfather could
solve, are flunking math, or want a
scholarship. His office is Buchanan
209, just inside the Main Mall doors.
Phone 228-2747.
Wanted:
these faces,
if sighted,
can bail
you out...
REGISTRAR: J. E. A. ParnalL who
records student marks,* courses and
financial dealings, is busily inaccessible but nonetheless whom you
should ask for (phone 228-2844)
when your registration is loused up
or the computer wants your fees
again. You'll get one of his staff who
will try to help you, and it all happens in the Main Mall administration
building.
WOMEN: Dean of women Helen
McRae is friendly and grandmotherly
and counsels women on course and
personal problems. She's also guardian of feminine morality on campus
and is readly accessible in her office,
Buchanan 456, 228-2415.
PARKING: Gen. Sir Ouvry Roberts.
G.C.B.? K.B.E.? O.S.O., M.A., is also
director of ceremonies, traffic and
parking czar and commands the squad
of university cops who ticket and tow
away cars. Pay fines and reclaim
your car at the university patrol office
on Wesbrook Crescent, across the
field from Brock. See the supervisor, J. H. Kelly, with complaints;
see Sir Ouvry if you want to appeal
a sentence or hold a ceremony.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967
14 AMS PRESIDENT: Shaun Sullivan
is your elected Alma Mater Society
president, and lives in the AMS office,
south end of Brock Hall, that old
building across from the library. His
phone number is 224-3242, local 20.
He chairs student council meetings,
Monday nights at 7 p.m. upstairs in
south Brock. Go to them — funnier
than Wednesday wrestling.
AMS FIRST VICE: Don Munion is
officially in charge of student-to-
council liaison and housing, which
means see him to bring something
before student council or have things
explained. He is in south Brock, too,
phone 224-3242, local 41.
AMS SECOND VICE: Kim Campbell is charged* with making the AMS
look good to the world, and generally
promoting the cause of higher education. Find Kim to find out about
higher education, 224-3242, local 47,
in her office, South Brock, upstairs,
by the Council Chamber.
AMS   TREASURER:   David   Hoye.
elected treasurer lives next to Sullivan's office in south Brock, phone
224-3242, local 30. See him for money
for any and all campus activities, and
to examine your undergrad society's
budget.
AMS CO-ORDINATOR: Jim Light-
foot is manager of the student building, Brock Hall, located on West Mall
behind the library. See him to book
any room on campus, reserve banner
space, get posters approved, get into
a locked clubroom (or find the Brock
proctor, who also has keys). South
Brock, rear, phone 224-3242, local 36.
UBYSSEY: Danny Sloffman is editor-in-chief, who operates a dedicated
news-gathering staff and hears all
and any complaints unsatisfied elsewhere. Find Danny in his office, North
Brock downstairs, by the ladies' can.
Come and work for The Ubyssey,
same place. Phone 224-3916.
ill
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967 Also Featuring the
3Piece VEST SUIT
& Hopsack Blazers
HARRY CRAMER
MEN'S WEAR
519 GRANVILLE   <fr   681-6017
• RECORDS
• TAPES and
RECORDERS
• RECORD PLAYERS
• RADIOS
Complete
Repair Service
SHOW AMS CARD
FOR  10%  DISCOUNT
ALEXANDER
& AXELSON
APPLIANCES LTD.
4558 W. 10th 224-6811
"TO US HAS COME THE OPPORTUNITY OF MAKING
OUR PROVINCE . . . OUR WORLD, A BETTER
PLACE IN WHICH TO LIVE. TO MEET IN FULL OUR
OBLIGATION, MAY OURS BE A PROVINCIAL UNIVERSITY WITHOUT PROVINCIALISM. MAY OUR SYMPATHIES BE SO EXTENDED TO ALL PEOPLE OF THE
PROVINCE, THAT WE MAY INDEED BE THE PEOPLE'S
UNIVERSITY,     WHOSE     MOTTO     IS     'TUUM     EST'."
Dr. F. f. Wesbrook
The first President of U.B.C
From the Annual of the First Graduating Class
THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CECIL GREEN PARK PHONE: 228-3313
Better
Buy
Books
Specializing in
UNIVERSITY TEXTS
STUDY HELPS
m
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
NEW & USED PAPERBACKS
MAGAZINES
4393 W. 10th Ave.
224-4144
RENTALS
TUXEDOS
DARK SUITS
TAILS
WHITE & COLORED
DINNER JACKETS
at
Special
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New York Costume
4397 W. 10th
224-0034
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967
16 Frosh
week
Frosh orientation is a series of
events designed to give you a better
idea of why you came here. In the
past, it's been fun (rah) and games
directed, but this year a new committee is trying  to inject ideas.
DANCES: Happen Sept. 13, 14, 15,
16, 22 and 23 in Brock Hall, with
local bands, cheap, casual, no date
needed. Your chance to sniff out the
competition. The money thus raised
pays for:
RESIDENCE NIGHTS. Four of
them, Sept. 18, 19, 20 and 21, from 7
p.m. to 11 p.m., free, specific dorm
lounges to be announced. Panels of
faculty and students will discuss, on
Sept. 18, The University in the Community; on Sept. 19, Government of
the University; on Sept. 20, The
Liberal Education; on Sept. 21, The
Educated Man's Role in the World.
These sessions are open to all students and especially all frosh. The
panel discussion is only a prelude
for searching questions and hard
answers, and free discussion for all.
FROSH RETREAT: You who want
a chance to roam Gabriola Island for
a weekend — Sept. 29, 30 and Oct. 1
— go to Frosh Retreat. Also attending will be student councillors, professors, and senior students of various
kinds.
ANOTHER BASH: The Varsity
Outdoor Club is holding its Annual
Splash and Dance on Sept. 23. The
splash at Empire Pool 7-9 p.m. and
the dance at Memorial Gym 8:30-mid-
night.
4
/,
TOM JO
4511  West 10th Ave.
UBC  FOOD
SERVICES
Quality food and service provided
tor your convenience at the following locations:
CAFETERIAS AND SNACK BARS
• CAFETERIA (BELOW AUDITORIUM)
• PONDEROSA CAFETERIA
• BROCK HALL
• BUS STOP (BY BOOK STORE)
• GYMNASIUM
RESIDENCE DINING HALLS
• GORDON SHRUM COMMONS
• TOTEM COMMONS
• FORT CAMP
• ACADIA CAMP
"I
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1«7 WELCOME STUDENTS -
From Your UBC Bookstore
You can get all your Books and Supplies
with ease and at a saving at the
UNIVERSITY-OPERATED BOOKSTORE
Buy All Text Books except -
Medicine Social Work Dentistry
Rehab. Medicine     Law Librarianship
Pharmacy Architecture
at THE FIELD HOUSE
(NEXT TO BROCK HALL)
Monday - Friday - During September
HOURS: 8:45 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
STATIONERY - ART MATERIALS - PAPERBACKS
Engineering and Gym Supplies, etc.
At the Regular Store on the Main Mall
REBATE POLICY
University of British Columbia students get a 5% rebaJe on all items purchased at the Bookstore.
All registered students, including GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE students in regular attendance at the winter and summer sessions, will be eligible for the rebate.
To obtain the rebate, students should save their cash register receipt slips — which are not transferable — and present them at the close of the winter session. Rebates will be given up to the 31st
of May for Winter Session Students. Summer Session Students will present their receipts at the close
of the Summer Session.
Students presenting their Alma Mater Society card or Summer Session Association card with their
accumulated CASH REGISTER RECEIPT SLIPS  will receive their 5% rebate in cash.
Students are  reminded  that  POSITIVELY NO   REFUNDS  OR  EXCHANGES
will be made without presenting the cash register receipt slips.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947   HHBH I   18 HERE YOU ARE, wherever that is
Campus •..
19
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 13, 1967 a ng no n    n* uy
^
up
ft«
*v.
^.—-' .-«-•- ;- •:... .» - •< -V--'-   >p,-'--".'.'v"- i,    -1 '
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tbe aniueRsitg
campus
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967
20 LEGEND
-^    ONE WAY STREETS
0      CAFETERIA
^      VISITORS'  PARKING
^T      METER PARKING
Main Mall between dotted lines
open to traffic on weekends
and holidays only.
AREA OF MAP
Strait of
Georgia
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967 some of the best eating facilities on
campus, relaxing and reading lounges
and committee rooms. Be envious.
Leon Koerner, timber baron, lives
on top of the GSC; his donation built
it. He has a view of the Pacific unobstructed by the low-rise high-cost
temporary Fort Camp shacks still
used as student residences.
Advice
Advice is what you are already getting too much of, but the counselling
and placement office offers a good
thing nonetheless. To wit, it posts
jobs, full and part time, for students.
Like part-time in the library or washing dorm dishes, or a  career  with
General Motors.
An adjoining hut is filled with
copies of old exams, which can trick
you if you rely on them, but which
are useful to see if you know anything at all or are just fooling yourself.
The counselling service is mostly a
directional aid to find the people with
the reasons why it's impossible, but if
you have financial problems trip up
to Buchanan 209 and see Dean Walter
H. Gage for a loan. He'll help you get
aid from the government.
Red tape
Administration building is on Memorial Road and Main Mall, which
you'll soon find is the place to pay
your fines and sort out your registration. Contained in the same building
is the computer centre, everybody's
records, the board of governor's meeting room and the campus branch of
the Bank of Montreal, which is friendlier than most banks and very kind
to students.
Strolling on down hill from the
administration building (the steps you.
just tripped over are the part of the
new N. A. M. MacKenzie fine arts
centre, and are supposed to connect
to the proposed rest of the centre,
which will be built on the soon-to-be
demolished auditorium) you pass
a great grey hut. This, the armory;
where exams, speeches and dances
are held, and where a few wretched
military officer training units are
located.
LUNCH IS FOR cultural activity like eating . . . or ogling.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967
24 STUDENT GOVERNMENT sends its emissary into the boondocks to preach education.
Student government...
25
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967 You automatically belong to
the Alma Mater Society, the
UBC student government.
Like most governments, it's visible
at taxation time and election time,
and subliminally present in between.
It is an incorporated society under
the B.C. societies act, which means
the AMS is entirely independent of
the university administration and faculty. Under the terms of its independence, all registered students are
members, whether they like it (and
the $29 annual tax) or not.
Student government has a history
of good intentions — it tries hard to
be   visible   between   elections,    and
ON GOVERNMENT: "This great humanity has said enough! and has started
to move forward!"
How the
people
decide...
honestly desires to serve the people
who elected it. That's you. Your part
in the decision is whether you want
it to do anything. And if you do, your
role is to help make the government
useful. AMS president Shaun Sullivan agrees; that's why he ran for
office; he  claims.
It's not as easy as just carping at
Shaun, though. No government is
worth more than the value its citizens place on it, and that value is
measured by the amount of energy
people expend working for it (or on
it).
Council meets on Monday nights
(upstairs, south Brock, 7 p.m.), with
a representative from each of 19 undergraduate societies, a member from
clubs and one from residences, and a
six-man executive elected the previous spring by campus-wide ballot.
There are visitor's seats, which are
rarely filled except during the Great
Crisis Meeting which precedes any
form of direct action. That's a shame,
because the show is always amusing
and often enlightening. Visitors can
speak on issues, and some students
take regular advantage of the open
meetings to voice loud and thoughtful views.
You can take a more direct role by
serving on any of the AMS' innumerable committees, from special events
to finance to Brock management. Any
executive member (see page 15) can
tell you all about the committee
structure and the function of each
committee,
And somebody can swallow the
whole ugly pill by running for secretary ->- the girl who was elected
last spring is unable to return fo
campus this September. You'd like
to be a wheel? If you're a girl, here's
your big chance to roll.
•
eaaaaato
j    .  lI'T1 *"
Jl
w**>
Xts
I
.
'  4
I    i
F   . \s
THIS  CHERUB  is Hurley  Rothstein,
arts guerrilla government terrorist, gaping at the masses at an arts general
meeting in the caf..
EVERYTHING important at the
university — curriculum,
food, library, parking, plan-
— ning, exams — is controlled
absolutely by the administration. The
board of governors rules the money
and business deals and approves
academic senate proposals, which are
exclusively concerned with course
content, degree programs and classroom use; and the BOG makes the
ground rules for the physical administration of the university, which is
actually carried out by the various
departments of housing, food services,
parking and like that.
In answer to student charges that
the university is for punch cards and
not people, and to try and find a role
for students who would otherwise
cause trouble, ex-president Macdonald
See these
about the
food • • •
last year created five administration
advisory committees composed of faculty, staff and students: for parking,
bookstore, library, residences and
food services. These committees have
no real power, but can suggest minor
reforms to the board — changes in
cafeteria hours, surveys of library
use and new parking regulations.
Mostly,   they   serve   as   clearing
houses (or dead ends) for student complaints, and students can get on them
by contacting any AMS exec whom
you'll find lounging in his office.
It's worth doing just to find out
how useless these committees are —
faculty and administrators outnumber
students on them, they have no power
whatsoever, and in any case are only
concerned with the irrelevancies of
university life.
The important thing, of course, is
the kind of education students get from
the university; continued agitation
across Canada last year prompted the
board of governors to allow four students to sit on the academic senate.
The elections will be held in late
October, and four of you will try to
represent students on a 70-strong
alumni-and-faculty body.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967
26 Arts
This year's arts council is guerilla
government with a real mass base.
When arts president Stan Persky was
elected last year, he got the largest
voter turn-out in arts history—700
people out of 4,500. A month later,
when Persky asked arts students to
vote for their own $2 fee hike, 1,400
people voted and 76 per cent said
yes, we'll pay. But the AMS said no,
you can't collect that $2, it's unconstitutional.
That characterizes the arts program,
and its problems with a straight student government. Arts executive members Harley Rothstein and Russ Precious last spring co-ordinated the
gathering of information sheets for a
to-be-distributed-f r e e anti - calendar,
and ibuilt a rubber arts office in the
Buchanan lounge.
Rothstein says it might become a
free store—cum—bridge school this
fall. Arts sponsors the experimental
college, which will teach anything
anybody wants in any manner that
works. And the council also publishes
a free weekly newspaper, the Moon.
Mostly, the new arts council will do
anything anybody wants it to do, free
if possible. Who else is on arts council?
Anybody who wants to be.
•••and these
for skool
spirit
AS in the creaky Canadian confederation, centralized student government is having
problems that can only be
solved by smaller legislative units.
Undergraduate societies, each with
one man on AIMS council and each
with its own progam for its members,
theoretically take control down to the
people.
There are 19 undergrad societies,
but most freshmen are in arts, science
or education.
Education
Education undergraduates, sometimes called Mickey Mousers out of
envy, live in two rooms in the basement of the teacher factory. The education building at the corner of University and Main Mall houses other
goodies — it has a real television studio, art rooms, a monstrous lounge and
a special education library.
Education president Gary Gumley
says his program for '67-'68 will
include movies, dances, a variety
show, B.C. Teachers Federation and
B.C. School Trustees days when the
administration of school boards lures
teachers to the wilds of British Columbia. A future teachers convention
the week of Jan. 27-28 and education
week, Feb. 10-15 round out the program for the 3,000 teachers in the
faculty.
Science
A woman is president of the 3500
member science undergrad society
for the first time in its history. Robin,
Russell and her science executive
will operate from their new office in
the Math building beside the Main
Mall bookstore. If you're in science'
and want to do* something about conditions in the faculty or need a science
sweater, see here there.
Program for sciencemen includes a
mixer right after the start of classes,
general meetings once a month in
Hennings 200, science week in Janu-
. ary, the crystal and black cat iballs in
the spring semester, a monthly lecture
series and an event honoring prominent sciencemen.
Science also publishes the Black
Plague, a horny science newspaper,
sometimes.
SUB
The AMS major project, the new
$5 million-plus student union building has been called the most dynamic
project ever undertaken by any student government in Canada. It has
also been called the multi-million
dollar white elephant.
After nearly seven years of wrangling, screaming and a few scandals,
construction on SUB (to replace crowded and obsolete Brock Hall) started,
about two months later than planned,
on May 1 ^f this year. During the
seven years • since SUB's first small
ideas, costs have jumped from $80,000
to $5 million. Students will pay for
the building for the next 20 years;
presently, $15 of your $29 activity
fee is SUB money.
Hopefully, before the building is
complete, again hopefully, in time for
the 1968-69 term, no further delays
will rock the SUB foundation.
Present plans for the building include 625 free parking spaces, 32,712
feet of university food services and
6,000 feet of the Bank of Montreal.
There will be a 6-line, 1,000-seat cafeteria and snack bar, a 450-seat auditorium, a large ballroom and even a
department store. It will also include
a t.v. room, two small music rooms,
an art gallery, club facilities and
special library and lounge facilities
for blind students.
The SUB is being built on East
Mall, behind the Library.
CUS
The Canadian Union of Students
is the Canada-wide organization representing over 140,000 students. You
automatically become a member
when you pay your AMS fee and are
entitled  to  various   discount  service
life insurance schemes, travel privileges abroad and participation in
inter-campus academic life. Plus
controversy.
On both national and home fronts
the CUS controversy is raging. Last
year, eight universities opted out of
CUS, fingering ideological differences
as the why.
UBC's student governors are split
on whether to stay or split; many
councillors cannot find ways to measure CUS' value in dollars and so
question that value.
Nationally, CUS is working to attain universal accessibility to education. The new universal accessibility
policy calls for student stipends, no
fees and improved education at all
levels.
To get more detail on CUS, you
can come to Brock extension 258,
across from the College Shop, any
noon hour during the week, phone
224-3242 and ask for the CUS office,
or call chairman Steve Beckow, 266-
5213 or Val Thorn, 988-3607.
27 I
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263-8121
A
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For one hundred years, the Commerce
has been the sign of the finest
in banking services. Either at home,
or wherever you travel, let the Commerce
take care of your financial problems.
There are branches in every major centre
in Canada to offer you the finest
in convenient, courteous service.
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Just Drop  In — No Purchase Necessaryl
• See our fantastic Fall stock
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over FREE COKE on Wednesday, Sept.  13th.
• Jim & Rodger will treat you
to  personalized   service  at—
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4445 West 10th Ave.
(near Sasamat)
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947
28 "A GOOD BOOK, a full crock, and you beside me in the Brock. . . ."
Student Life
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1747 Classes     For the  Arts one
Class attendance, as distinguished
from learning, is the university's excuse for being and the reason you
came here. Nonetheless, many, many
people find their classes useless, or
fascinating, or silly, or overcrowded,
or educational. The failure rate is
often directly proportional to classes
attended — if you go to them all it's
really hard to fail — and you must
attend tutorials and seminars. Most
people discover which classes are
worth going to and which are not
before mid-October. But what you
do then is, again, tuum est.
Profs with large classes are just as
aware of the futility of it all as you
are, and are almost always pleased
to meet with students afterwards. If
you don't understand and don't want
to be a fool in front of 400 other
fools,  ask the prof for an appoint-
"J REMEMBER my university days, son,
when we went from the football game to
the pub and partied all night . . ."
head
ment or a cup of coffee. Maybe he's
a good guy.
If you take notes in class, make
them as brief as possible. You'll be
more likely to study them lqter. A
common system is a notebook with
your class scribblings on the right
hand pages, and study notes from
library books on the left of the corresponding lecture notes. This makes
final studying much easier.
X-college
The experimental college (euphemistically called The5 Free University
of Canada at Kitsilano exists to teach
whatever classes don't — that is,
whatever people want to learn
about or talk about. It operates out
of Brock Hall, began in spring 1967,
and tested some programs during the
summer: Vietnam 100, Strange Greek,
and a direct action course called
Frank Buck Pool 100 to combat the
proposed de-excavation of the library
pond. It has absolutely no structure
except what people decide they need,
and Chancellor Steve Garrod has
charge of a few hundred dollars
to facilitate the whole venture.
You can find Steve around the
Brock special events office or in the
arts undergraduate construction in
the Buchanan lounge.
Academic
activities
To further supplement the university's curricular diet, the academic
activities committee holds noon lectures on topics of current interest,
challenge lectures in classrooms, and
evening and weekend symposia with
both local and imported speakers. All
its programs are advertised, most are
free or maybe fifty cents, and chairman Blaine Kennedy will try to get
a lecture or seminar on any topic
people are concerned about.
Arts one is what you take if you
want a different kind of first year.
This pilot project for undergraduate
education will put 240 students in
two sections, to be taught via seminar
discussion by 20 volunteer profs.
A student in arts one need take
two regular courses; his arts one
time is worth nine units of credit.
The curriculum was designed by students and professors to give a broad
overview of human affairs through
close correlation of humanities and
social sciences.
Thus to discuss "love", an arts one
section would not only examine philosophy and literature, but also history, psychology and sociology.
You get into the experiment by
volunteering before registration, and
if it's successful arts dean Dennis
Healy says he might try to extend
the program through all of arts. If
the board gives him the scratch.
The history behind arts one is a
hundred years of dissatisfaction
among students and profs with the
requirements you're discovering in
the calendar. The impulse for a complete rejection of large-lecture teaching came from the late arts dean
Kaspar Naegle in 1963; the present
program grew from that discussion
and the experience of the Tussman
experimental college at Berkeley.
EXPERIMENTAL    college    chancellor
Steve Garrod teaches Freak-Out 110.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947
30 AMS
All AMS organizations hide in
Brock Hall, on East Mall behind
the totem pole. If it's student organized, somebody in Brock will know
about it. Included in the building and
its environs are:
AMS: The offices are in south
Brock, and are open from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. weekdays. AMS executives
and last-minute theatre tickets are
also here.
MILDRED BROCK LOUNGE: A
ladies only place where you can take
your girdle off if you have one, or
burp unabashedly if you don't.
COLLEGE SHOP: In Brock extension. Sells stationery, lab coats, English 100 and 200 crib sheets, UBC
jackets, ties, beer mugs and other
rah-rah junk. Open 8:30 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. weekdays.
BARBER SHOP: In extension basement. Run by Peter Van Dyke for 22
hair-raising years.
BROCK LOUNGE: Main hall area,
good place to loaf or wait for your
car pool if there is no event scheduled
in the time you wish to waste. Raucous screech of Radio Society will
lull you into oblivion on one of the
hard and inflammable Brock sofas.
BROCK LINK: Joins the extension
(mostly club offices) to Brock proper,
used for lounge area and sleeping,
sometimes features art displays.
For the
body
GAMES ROOM: Mostly pool tables,
in Brock extension.
HUTS: Behind Brock, used for club
offices. Scheduled for demolition
three years ago.
joining a club, club's day is terrific
entertainment. If you want to join
something, all the better.
And if you don't see a club to your
liking, you can start one. Club committee chairman Mike Coleman, in
Brock extension 259, has fill-in-the
blanks constitutions for fast bureaucracy.
Forming new clubs is so painless,
cheerful Mike even formed a club,
the Demosthenes Society, to give
away citations to his friends. All you
need is ten members, Mike's approval
(he's agreeable), and you can ask
the AMS for money to get started.
Clubs      cuso
People who want to do the same
thing form clubs. There are more
than 100 clubs on campus, most
of them affiliated with the AMS, for
people who like anything from sports
cars to computer science to pranks.
Clubs use their Brock space for
offices and lunch-eating, and classrooms for meetings. Watch the
'Tween Classes section of The Ubyssey for club notices, fall general meetings and public events. Clubs fill the
armory on Clubs Day, in early October, to shanghai new members.
This annual madhouse is a one-day
PNE, where the various clubs do
their things in home-made booths.
Even if you couldn't care less about
OUTSIDE, a Varsity Outdoor Club member scales the armory walls, and inside this is club's day.
CUSO is the Canadian University
Service Overseas, Canada's answer to
the Peace Corps (which it predated)
and the Canadian students' answer
to Lester Pearson's Kumpany of Kool
Kanadians (whcih it also predated).
CUSO sends Canadian grads to
underprivileged countries. If you are
interested in serving your world,
contact CUSO through the AMS office. It is a worthwhile deal.
Alumni
The alumni association, with offices in Cecil Green Park down
beside the Fort Camp huts, is the
organization which keeps contact with
those who have already passed on
for the benefit of those of us failing
here now. It raises funds through the
Alumni Annual Giving Campaign, it
publishes a magazine, the Alumni
Chronicle, and sends former AMS
presidents to high schools to glorify
university. It also has career information from career graduate for
careerless undergraduates, and invites you to drop in any time.
WUS
World University Service is a faculty-student committee to promote
understanding and development in
the international university community. It administers four annual exchange scholarships to universities
around the world, sends obsolete
textbooks to Indian or Ghanaian universities, and raises money for struggling universities in exploited countries.  Brock extension 257,  anytime.
311
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1?t Church
UBC has chaplains for students'
souls. They are:
BAPTIST —Rev. William Wilburn
acting dean of Carey Hall. Office:
Carey Hall, UBC, 5920 Iona Drive,
224-6939.
LUTHERAN — Rev. Herbert Fox,
home, 4041 West Twelfth, 228-8166;
Rev. Robert Pearson, home, 2026
Wesbrook Crescent, 224-3328; offices:
Lutheran Campus Centre, Wesbrook
Crescent at University Boulevard.
PENTECOSTAL — Rev. Bernice
Gerrard, home, 5041 Heather, 266-
9275; Brock Hall, Room 350, 228-
3144.
PRESBYTERIAN — Rev. John A.
Ross, home, 1962 Iona Drive, 224-
7720.
ROMAN CATHOLIC — Father E.
C. LeBel, Fr. Neil Kelly, Fr. Gerry
McGuigan, Fr. James Hanrahan, Fr.
Andrew Maloney, Fr. M. J. Oliver,
and Father David Bauer, all at St.
Mark's College, 5960 Chancellor, 224-
3311.
UNITED—Rev. Jack Shaver, home,
4073 West Nineteenth, 224-6825; office, Brock Hall, Room 350, 228-3144.
At Tuum Est press time there was
no Anglican chaplain appointed.
Greeks
UBC is unique among B.C.'s three
universities in permitting 15 fraternities and nine sororities to operate
in association with the Point Grey
campus. Fraternities and sororities
are social clubs or organizations
with membership by invitation only,
and for this reason have been banned
at University of Victoria and Simon
Fraser University.
Fraternities perpetuate the time-
bound virtues of purity, patriotism,
Southern womanhood and brotherhood. They're also useful for com-
mercemen to meet future business
contacts.
Each fraternity has a house where
members may live and/or party. Frat
Row extends along Wesbrook Crescent between University Boulevard
and Agronomy Road.
Sororities are the female equivalent of fraternities but without individual houses. They hold meetings
in Panhellenic House behind International House at West Mall and
Marine Drive
You can join by "rushing" between September 26 and October 7.
Rushing is meeting your potential
brothers and sisters at "functions"
where everybody nervously sniffs
each other's wallet.
Register at the AMS office though,
before you rush. Dates to register are
Sept. 12 to 23. It costs you nothing.
Army
When you register, you will find
the armory, a large grey chicken coop
on West Mall at Memorial Road. You
can join the Canadian Armed Forces
there and still be a student—in return from most of your post-graduate life, the army will pay your fees
and make you a lieutenant.
If such things amuse you, you
should talk to someone there, provided you are not a communist, or
flunking, or have a peg leg, or something.
Fashion
It rains at UBC. Often, and lots.
You need rainwear to cope. If you
buy an umbrella, get a cheap one.
If you don't lose it, it will be stolen
for sure.
Beyond that, nobody else gives a
particular damn what you wear. So
wear whatever you like, or whatever you've got.
Campus dances are either advertised as semi-formal, or formal, or
else they're classroom casual. Frosh
mixers are  casual.
Ubyssey
The Ubyssey prints everything that
matters on campus — and then editorializes on it, comments on it, finds
out what other people think of it,
and prints all that too. Last year, it
went one step further and wondered
what really mattered and tried to
print only that. Some called it a step
backward culminating in a pratfall,
but Ubyssey editor Danny Stoffman,
a stogey-smoking, married ogre, disagrees and wants to continue to be
culturally revolting.
Stoffman has already become accustomed to charges of irresponsibility from those he has attacked. This
is because The Ubyssey is irreverent
—it considers nothing sacred—an unpopular attitude among sacred people.
Pubster offices are a dank basement by the ladies' can in north
Brock, where maybe 50 haggard souls
labor. The mass of the staff staggers
back from last year, but anybody is
welcome to come on in and opine or
work. The Ubyssey even shows you
how.
It is the most amazing newspaper
in B.C. It magically appears Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at 26
campus points in time to read during
10:30 classes. It is completely, absolutely, irrevocably controlled by the
staff, who are all students. Anybody
can be staff. You pay for it through
"your AMS fees, about $1 a year.
The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian University Press, a national
news service composed of all the
college papers in Canada.
It currently holds the Southam
trophy, for the sixth consecutive year,
awarded to the best college paper in
Canada. It has the trophy for fantastic editorial cartoons too.
It takes credit or abuse for producing most of Canada's leading
journalists — including Eric Nicol,
Pierre Berton, (urp) Stuart Keate,
Hymie Koshevoy, and Jack Wasser-
man.
Read it. Everyone else does.
Bird calls
Bird Calls is the hustler's handbook.
It contains, alphabetically, all students' names with phone number,
city address, home address and registration number.
It is lifted from registration computer cards by budding author IBM
7040 and printed on pulp to look like
a real B.C. Tel thing — including
yellow pages. Bird Calls costs 75
cents if ordered before publication
and $1.00 after. It appears in October,
and is sold by little Phrateres women,
by the Publications Office in Brock
and by the bookstore.
Annuals
Faculty annuals are published by
some faculties — engineers, forestry,
nurses, science and others — to replace the now-defunct Totem yearbook.
Your undergraduate society executive will tell you if you've got one,
who edits it and if you can work on
it, or buy it.   .
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947 . and the loin lies down with the limb."
Residence • • •
331
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947 If you need a place to live,
the best thing to do is rent
a house close to campus
with some friends. Failing that
you may have to live at UBC in the
Acadia or Fort Camp shantytowns
or newer Totem and Lower Mall
blocks.
New dorms are a-building — like
the married students' residence which
will rent for $110 a month minimum,
and the high-rise addition to Totem
Park.
Have no illusions: hardly anybody
stays in a UBC dorm more than a
year. The reasons? Cramped rooms,
outrageous rents and calorie-packed
food. Noise. In Fort and Acadia, dirt
and ramshackleness.
But Fort and Acadia can be made
Live it
up?
liveable — bring colorful posters, a
rug, some lamps, and ear plugs. And
although they lack the illusory "Spirit
of the Camps," Totem and Lower
Mall at least are warm and dry.
There are rules in residences which
you should break as sneakily as possible and work to remove. In loco
parentis — the insane North American attempt to make university an
extension of high school — is dying
but is far from dead.
Hot plates and coffee makers are
against the rules, but most people
have them anyway and the rule isn't
enforced. Same goes for alcohol,
which is forbidden, but which everybody drinks and nobody gets caught
except those who like to get a lot of
attention by being  loudly drunk.
Sex is also considered out-of-place.
This sick rule is also regularly circumvented — but be careful. Women
under 21 are allotted some late leaves.
They have to sign in and out on a
sheet of paper. If you don't sign in,
a frustrated female don will be after
you the next day. So if you aren't
coming in, don't sign out. Or if you
do and live in Totem, the wall can
be climbed. Similarly, the Fort laundry room windows open at ground
level.
Food needs supplementing. Buy instant coffee, crackers, and plenty of
fruit. Eat eggs for breakfast because
there is never enough meat.
There are some advantages to
dorm-living. The greatest is that
you're on campus 24 hours a day—
you become more a part of the university and travel time is eliminated.
If you're active, it's easier to belong
to things.
Acting housing boss Less Rohringer
is reasonable and interested. See
him in Hut D-3, behind the Education
Building for more information.
"YES, A MUCH better view than my
room had, and lower rent, too. ■ ■ ."
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FOR LADIES
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Other brands include:
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AM  1-7137
OPEN FRIDAY NIGHT TIL 9 P.M.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947
34 PAINT STAINS remain on the library quad from this winter '67 bum trip.
Culture
35 I
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 33, 1947 On   this   campus,   culture   is
what you soak up while eating your lunch, or any time
if  you're a weirdy-beardy.
It happens at:
The Fine Arts Gallery, in the
library basement below the fine arts '
reading room and reserve books. Curator Alvin Balkind remains friendly,
sneering and bespectacled and brings
regular, continuous exhibits of contemporary and historical interest.
Open 10 to 5 daily, except Mondays.
The Frederick Lasserre Building,
the fine arts centre of the campus,
is that nice new building opposite
Buchanan, between the administration building and the theatre parking
lot.
It houses the  departments of fine
It's great,
but is it
art?
arts and architecture, has statues
around it, and its corridors are frequently filled with painting, photo
and architectural displays.
STUDENT ACTORS in the Freddy Wood production of Peter Weiss' Marat Sade.
The N. A. M. MacKenzie building
is new, houses music, and is directly
behind the Lasserre building. The
music faculty has been crippled by
lack of facilities for years and says
it will be heard this year. Go there
and listen.
Brock Hall contains bureaucrats,
clubs and the Brock Art Collection.
Canadian and other paintings are
hung all' around the corridors.
The corridor linking Brock to the
newer extension (north end) features
a permanently changing display. Student money buys the paintings.
In the center of Brock is the
lounge. During lunch hour it is filled
with concerts, speeches, dances, folk-
singers and students.
Special Events, led by Gerry Cannon, provides most of the noon-hour
goodies. Student money brings speakers and events nobody else bothers
with, besides getting whoever's in
town out here for an hour or two,
at noon, cheaply. Programs include
politics, dance, symphony, movies,
jazz, folk, rock, folk-rock, plays and
arts lectures. Special events happen
several times each week in the aforementioned Brock lounge, or maybe
the auditorium or Freddy Wood
Theatre, or a large Buchanan or
Angus lecture theatre.
The Freddy Wood Theatre is over
there towards the flagpole on the
Main Mall. Frosh might have a few
classes there. It's where plays and
concerts happen. Watch for student-
directed and-written noon-hour plays
—they're good.
A large culture explosion takes
place every February with the Festival of the Contemporary Arts, cheap
to you, all over the campus, plugged
via the Page Friday section of the
Ubyssey.
Now and again poetry readings are
held on the library steps and in the
Buchanan lounge where arts students
go to play cards.
Other indigenous culture takes
place in the cafeteria under the administration, known as the Caf.
Those who find long hair sinister
are advised to avoid it, but the student wishing to bask in the university's best intellectual climate will
find the best minds there. Caf regulars may not attend all their lectures
but they paint, write, act, dance, love
and talk.
Residence students who find dorms
a cultural wasteland are advised to
listen carefully to profs until one
says something, and then urge him
to say it at your norm.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947
34 Uncle Frank needs YOU.
Athletics
371
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947 UBC has excellent facilities
for a wide variety of sports.
War Memorial Gymnasium
(Wesbrook Crescent and University
Boulevard) and its adjacent Olympic-
size swimming pool are near the centre of the campus. Playing field space
north of the gymnasium is to be
usurped by parking lots, a residence
and the new student union building,
and many outdoor sports have shifted
their activities to the Totem Park-
Marine Drive vicinity, where the new
outdoor sports stadium will be opened
October 7. The stadium seats 3,500
for football, rugby, soccer, and track
and field.
Not far away, the Winter Sports
Centre houses ice hockey and curling,
and is beside acres of newly-developed playing fields for extramural and
intramural team sports.
Varsity teams are called Thunderbirds. Junior varsity teams are called Braves, Chiefs, Totems, Tomahawks, Teepees and Papooses, according to the level at which they
compete. University teams play Canadian and American teams, and local aggregations. It varies from sport
to sport.
Athletic financing is in general
something of a scandal. $5 of your
AMS fee of $29 goes to finance extramural sports, and you have no
choice about it. This means sports are
student subsidized to the tune of
$68,460. Men's athletics also get a
grant from the administration of
$33,667.
A fledgling sports reporter once
wrote in the Ubyssey: "Hope springs
eternal behind Frank Gnup's cigar."
You'll have to be here a while to appreciate fully the mixed metaphor,
but the message is sports at UBC
are not what they could be.
Frank Gnup has been the football
(rah)
Games
(rah)
Team
coach here for 13 seasons, and has
had lots of practice hoping. He is not
unique among UBC coaches. Some
think the rather dismal football record has something to do with no
scholarships or grants for UBC athletes.
Anyway, games are unusually poorly attended for a student body of
18,000. Most of the rah-rah comes
from cheerleaders and players' girl
friends.
This year attendance should improve for all campus athletic events
will be free of charge to AMS members.
Athletes represent UBC in 23 officially sanctioned sports. Teams are
presently serving out the last year of
a two-year contract with the Western
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association, but the cost means UBC
can't carry on the necessary double-
round of games. Negotiations are continuing for UBC participation in
minor WCIAA sports.
All men on campus are members
of the Men's Athletic Association. Its
UBC rowers are among world's best.
executive consists of a president, secretary, and three executive members.
All senior members of UBC extramural teams are voting members.
MAA is usually represented on student council by the president of the
physical education undergraduate society.
The Men's Athletic Committee is a
president's committee of four faculty
members, two MAA men, two members of student council, and an
alumni representative. MAC makes
major policy decisions on varsity
teams and athletic funds.
Girls who still think they are athletes when they reach UBC will be
told they are now women — but still
athletes.
Women's varsity teams, Thunderettes, compete in 12 sports. The Women's Athletic Association (WAA)
runs most of the women's athletic
program. A student-faculty body, the
Women's Athletic Committee, makes
major policy changes.
WAA headquarters are in the Women's Gymnasium, the grey stucco
building between Brock Hall and the
library. Inquiries about specific
sports should be made there.
MEN'S ATHLETICS
Badminton, basketball, bowling,
cricket, cross-country, cycling, fencing, football, grass hockey, gymnastics, hockey, judo, rowing, rugby, sailing, skiing, soccer, squash, swimming,
tennis, track and field, volleyball,
weightlifting,  wrestling.
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
Archery, badminton, basketball,
bowling, curling, fencing, figure
skating grass hockey, golf, gymnastics, judo, skiing, swimming, tennis,
track and field, volleyball.
LIMBO
In limbo are baseball, curling, golf,
dancing and lust.
INTRAMURALS
Within the pale of this leviathan
are many beer parlor athletes. As
usual, UBC has something to offer
everyone looking for an offer. For
those who want to stay active but
who can't survive on extramural
teams, UBC offers nearly three dozen
intramural sports.
Men and women compete on fraternity and sorority teams, and many
clubs field squads for noon-hour and
Saturday   morning league games.
For further information, watch The
Ubyssey.
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947 Who Was It
That Said -
"For Campus
Clofhes of
Every
Description
See  —
Murray Goldman
™"wanvUIa"
It was
MURRAY GOLDMAN . .
ON GRANVILLE
ON GRANVILLE
ON GRANVILLE
ON  GRANVILLE
HONDA - FIAT
Motorcycles GT's
Cars Convertibles
Generators Sedans
Utility Units Sport Cars
Trail Bikes
SPORT CARS
New and Used
N    Motors    T
0 S
R E
T   W
145 Robson   H      688-1284
Downtown end of
Cambie Bridge
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
PRESCRIPTIONS
STATIONERY
PAPERBACKS
MEN#S & LADIES1
GROOMING AIDS
FREE   DELIVERY
TO  RESIDENCES
jhi the  Village
Just Vi Block from Memorial Gym
5754  University  Blvd. 224-3202
391
I The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1947 Let us
cut down your
overhead
Peter Van Dyke
& STAFF
at the
CAMPUS
BARBER SHOP
BROCK   HALL  EXTENSION
PHONE 224-4045
Wo one is perfect —
But we
split hairs trying
•
RAZOR CUTTING
BLOW WAVING
ALL STYLING
—   Expert  Work   —
Scoreboard
FOOTBALL
SEPT. 16
SEPT. 23
SEPT. 30
OCT. 7
OCT. 16
OCT. 21
OCT. 28
NOV. 4
NOV. ll1
NOV. 18
U. of Manitoba Away
Not scheduled
Williamette U. Away
S.  Ore. College Away
Simon Fraser U. Home
Portland College Away
U. of Sask. Home
U. of Calgary Away
U. of Alberta Home
Not scheduled
FEB. 2/3
FEB. 10
FEB. 16/17
FEB. 23
MAR. 8/9
U. of Manitoba Home
Simon Fraser U. Home
St. Martin's Col. Home
Simon Fraser U. Away
Cdn. Champs     Halifax
ICE HOCKEY
NOV. 3/4
NOV. 10/11
NOV. 17/18
Not scheduled
Notre Dame U.
U. of Sask.
NOV. 24/25  U. of Calgary
Home
Away
Home
BASKETBALL
NOV. 3 Grads Home
NOV. 17 Senior "A" Home
NOV. 24/25 U. of Sask. Home
DEC. 1/2 Int'l. Tourney Away
DEC. 21/22 Alas. Meth. U. Home
DEC. 28/29 Portland State Away
JAN. 5/6 U. of Calgary Home
JAN. 12/13 U. of Manitoba Away
JAN. 19/20 U. of Alberta Away
JAN. 23 Portland State Home
JAN. 26/27 U. of Sask. Away
DEC. 2
JAN. 2/3
JAN. 5/6
JAN. 12/13
JAN. 19/20
JAN 26/27
FEB. 2/3
FEB.  10
FEB. 16/17
FEB. 23/24
MAR. 1/2
MAR. 8/9
Not scheduled
Not scheduled
U. of Calgary
XJ. of Manitoba
U. of Alberta
U.  of Sask.
U. of Manitoba
Not scheduled
Not scheduled
U. of Alberta
Not scheduled
CIAU Champs Montreal
Away
Home
Away
Home
Away
Home
(subject to change)
Educator Approved!
PICKETT
PICKETT
All-metal construction with functional
grouping of micro-divided scales that
are mated back-to-back. Choice of Eye-
Saver Yellow to reduce eye fatigue,
increase visual accuracy; or White.
Smooth sliding Nylon cursor. Complete with leather case & instructions.
114 VECTOR LOG LOG EXPONENTIAL RULE
PRICED FROM
$2.50-$38.00
Ask about Pickett Templates
Available at
The University Bookstore
Leading Stationers & Dept. Stores
The Ubyssey — TUUM EST — Wednesday, August 23, 1967
49 4427 W. 10th Ave.
JhuuL ShoJit filoduL Qjwjhl  1A&C 3****^
* A Complete Floral Service
* Corsages a Specialty
* Flowers Wired World Wide
* Greeting Cards
10% Student Discount on Presentation of AMS. Card
224-1341
WE ARE AS NEAR
AS YOUR TELEPHONE
224-1341
This Year - ENJOY
SKATING - HOCKEY - CURLING
SPECIAL EVENTS
at the
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER  SPORTS  CENTRE
The Winter Sports Centre is located jusf off the top ot C Lot.
Facilities may be reserved for skating parties, scrimmage hockey, bonspiels, casual
curling, dances and special events at nominal student rates.
Our skate shop is now open 9 a.m. to II p.m. to provide maximum service to oar
patrons. Skates may be rented or sharpened at the shop and we also have a good supply
of laces, pucks, tape, hockey sticks, curling brooms, and other accessories for sale.
Our Snack Bar facilities and hours ot service have been expanded to provide you with
greater service.
Call 224-3205 tor further information. It's Tuum Est out here all right-
Especially when your prof announces
an 8:30 exam and you've spent the
night turning on and even now
you're still up and that
ice cream cone he's eating is
beginning to drip
onto your term paper and you don't
have another chance for coffee 'til 12:30
because you just CANT skip those
three classes .  . .
Cheer up! Dress up! Fashions from the
Campus and Career Shop (for men) and the
Collegienne Shop (for co-eds)
will perk up the drabbest day and you'll be asked
to coffee on the south side
by someone you just can't afford
NOT to turn down and the prof will be so
impressed by your good taste,
he'll forget about the ice cream
on your Dialectics of Marxism as
compared to Plato and you'll turn on
with the Bay. So, Turn on with fashions.
Tune in on style, and Drop by the Bay.
Campus and Career Shop, second floor.
The Collegienne Shop, third floor.
the
S£ay

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