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UBC Reports Apr 30, 1970

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 REPORTS
VOLUME     16,     NUMBER    TWELVE
APRIL    30,     1970,    VANCOUVER    8,   B.C. J
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N   MADE 'TO
FES-STOR    Q:f    ART
ATIOM   SAM'-'-BLACK,
THJS THOTQ, AND DR.
^ROFESSOR  OF  ENGLISH,
M£#HttS FROM SURGERY IN A
I^Wtt^iStiftlLD NOT BE PRESENT
*HJS a|tURE WAS TAKEN. THE TWO MASTER
$*S W^^SHAfiL^lTHfe &,QQ0 CASH AWARD THAT
'JPftt' vtfi hobsr; AWARSETJ CERTIFICATES OF
IN THE 1870 COMPETITION ARE THE FOUR UBC
 S IM T££ BACKGROUND. THEY ARE, LEFT TO
ty#R. C$rft&MALD HAZELL, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
0F' MECHANICAL ENGINEERING; PROF. GEOFFREY
DURRANT, FORMER HEAD OF THE ENGLISH
DEPARTMENT; MR. CORTLAND HULTBERG, ASSISTANT
PROFESSOR OF MUSIC, AND DR. KARL I. KOBBERVIG,
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF SPANISH. DETAILS ON PAGES
TWO AMD THREE. PHOTO BY EXTENSION GRAPHIC ARTS. 2/UBC Reports/April 30, 1970 MASTER TEACHERS NAMED
*
Prof. Sam Black, 56, of the Faculty of Education,
and Dr. John Hulcoop, 39, associate professor of
English, have been named the second and third
recipients of the Master Teacher Award at the
University of B.C.
The two master teachers will share the $5,000 cash
prize that goes with the honor.
In addition to naming two master teachers, the
eight-man selection committee responsible for
screening nominees has awarded certificates of merit
to four other UBC teachers.
Certificate of merit winners, all of whom will be
eligible for the Master Teacher Award in future years,
are:
FOUR NAMED
— Prof. Geoffrey Durrant, 56, former head of the
Department of English;
— Mr. Cortland Hultberg, 38, assistant professor of
music and director of the University Chamber
Singers;
— Dr. Karl I. Kobbervig, 41, associate professor of
Spanish, and
— Dr. C. Ronald Hazell, 32, associate professor of
mechanical engineering.
^ The Master Teacher Awards, designed to recognize
Witstanding teachers of undergraduates at UBC, were
established by Dr. Walter Koerner, chairman of UBC's
Board of Governors, as a tribute to his brother, Dr.
Leon Koerner. The first winner of the Master Teacher
Award was UBC's president, Dr. Walter Gage.
Dr. W.C. Gibson, chairman of the selection
committee, said the committee had decided to select
two master teachers this year. Each will receive
$2,500.
"It was the feeling of the committee, based on
letters received last year and other discussions that
the University should move more quickly to
recognize a greater number of outstanding UBC
teachers."
A total of 30 members of the UBC faculty were
his year nominated by alumni, students and faculty.
Prof. Black, who is a noted painter as well as
professor of art education in UBC's Faculty of
Education, said he would use his $2,500 award to
extend his knowledge of art and the teaching of art.
He plans to visit a number of European countries in
1971 to study art and art education.
NOTED PAINTER
Born and educated in Scotland, Prof. Black holds a
diploma in art from Glasgow School of Arts and an
art teacher's diploma from the British Ministry of
Education. He was elected a member of the Royal
Scottish Society of Watercolor Painters in 1953.
He was a school inspector for the British Ministry
of Education from 1946 to 1949 and principal
lecturer in art at Jordanhill Training College in
Glasgow from 1949 to 1958, when he joined the UBC
faculty.
Prof. Black, who also teaches in the fine arts
department of UBC's Faculty of Education, paints in
both watercolors and oils and his works hang in many
private collections and public galleries in North
America, Europe and Great Britain.
He has been active in the International Society for
Education Through Art and was a recent candidate
for the presidency of that organisation. He is also the
B.C. representative on the Caiadian Society for
Education Through Art.
Dr. Hulcoop, who is currently recovering from
surgery in a Vancouver hospital, plans to use his
$2,500 award for research on a novel centered around
the life of British novelist Virginia Woolf.
He plans to visit New York, where he will consult
material on Miss Woolf's life, and London, to
interview persons who knew Miss Woolf.
Dr. Hulcoop is a native of England and a graduate
of the University of London, where he obtained his
bachelor   of   arts   degree   with   honors   in   English
language and literature, and his doctor of philosophy
degree.
He declined a graduate fellowship to an American
university to join the UBC faculty in 1956. Dr.
Hulcoop has published numerous poems, short stories
and articles in various magazines and was the
recipient in 1969 of a $7,000 Canada Council leave
fellowship.
Here are brief biographical notes on the four
certificate of merit winners:
Prof. Geoffrey Durrant joined the UBC faculty in
1966 as head of the Department of English after
having served in a similar capacity at the University of
Manitoba. He resigned as head of the UBC
department early in 1969 to devote all his time to
teaching and research.
Prof. Durrant taught in England, Germany and
South Africa before coming to Canada in 1961. He
holds the degrees of bachelor and master of arts from
Cambridge University and the degree of doctor of
literature from the University of South Africa.
Prof. Durrant is a prolific writer and his chief
research interests are the works of Shakespeare and
the poet William Wordsworth.
Mr. Cortland Hultberg has been a member of the
UBC faculty since 1959 and is director of the
electronic music studio in the UBC music
department.
SECOND AWARD
A native of Chicago, Mr. Hultberg was educated at
Northern Illinois State Teachers College, where he
received the degree of bachelor of science in music;
the University of Illinois, where he received the
degree of master of science in music education, and
the University of Arizona, where he was awarded the
degree of master of music.
Dr. Karl I. Kobbervig came to UBC in 1956 after
teaching at the University of Washington and Central
Washington College of Education. He holds the
degrees of bachelor of arts and doctor of philosophy
from the University of Washington. He is currently at
work on two books, one dealing with historical
linguistics of the Romance languages and the other a
Rumanian grammar and a literary anthology of
Rumanian prose and poetry.
Dr. Ronald Hazell is a native of Halifax. After
receiving his bachelor of education degree at Nova
Scotia Technical College, he enrolled at Pennsylvania
State University, where he obtained the degrees of
master of science and doctor of philosophy.
This is the second time this year that Dr. Hazell
has been honored for his teaching ability. In January
he received the Society of Automotive Engineers'
Ralph R. Teetor Award for outstanding teaching and
research.
VIBRATION ANALYSIS
Dr. Hazell's research deals with applying optical
principles to the analysis of vibration. Dr. Hazell is a
registered professional engineer and is active on the
Canadian Council of Professional Engineers as a
member of a national sub-committee on foreign
engineering curricula. The sub-committee is in the
process of developing a list of accredited universities
in the field of engineering on an international basis.
To be eligible for the Master Teacher Award
candidates   must   have   held   a   full-time   teaching
Please turn to Page Ten
See TEACHERS
■BBfcffc Volume 16, No. 12-Apr. 30,
I 111 I 197°- Published by the Univer-
BB B B B B sity of British Columbia and
^^ ^^ ^^ distributed free. J.A. Banham,
REPORTS Editor; Barbara Claghorn, Production Supervisor. Letters to the Editor
should be addressed to the Information Office,
UBC, Vancouver 8, B.C.
UBC NEWS
IN REVIEW
A COLUMN FOR UBC GRADUATES ROUNDING UP THE
TOP NEWS ITEMS OF RECENT WEEKS. THE MATERIAL
BELOW APPEARED IN MORE EXTENDED FORM IN
CAMPUS EDITIONS OF 'UBC REPORTS'. READERS WHO
WISH COPIES OF CAMPUS EDITIONS CAN OBTAIN
THEM BY WRITING TO THE INFORMATION OFFICE,
UBC, VANCOUVER 8, B.C.
UBC's Senate has approved recommandations
to restrict enrolment on the Point Grey campus to
27,500 students and to maintain the present
administrative structure of the University.
These are the main decisions which have
resulted from a series of Senate debates on
recommendations made by its Committee on
Long-Range Objectives, chaired by Prof. Cyril
Belshaw, head of the Department of Anthropology
and Sociology.
Approval of the enrolment limitation came
early in February. By substantial majorities.
Senate decided:
- To limit the total undergraduate enrolment
on the present campus to a maximum of 22,000
students, and
— To limit the annual rate of increase of total
enrolment in graduate studies to 15 per cent and
set a ceiling of 5,500 graduate students.
UBC's present enrolment is 20,767, made up of
2,687 graduate students and 18,080
undergraduates, a percentage split of
approximately 13 per cent graduate students and
87 per cent undergraduates.
When enrolment reaches the 27,500 ceiling, the
percentage mix will be 20 per cent graduate
students and 80 per cent undergraduates.
Senate was told that the enrolment ceiling for
undergraduates would probably be reached in the
next five years and that it might be up to ten years
before the ceiling for graduate students was
reached.
At a special meeting on March 18 Senate
approved a recommendation that "the present
type of structure of faculties, departments and
schools be retained with modifications to make
the system more responsive to changing
conditions. . . ."
Adoption of this recommendation meant that
Senate had rejected a minority recommendation
contained in the report calling for adoption of a
federated colleges system, which Senate was told
would be more complex in terms of administration
and lead to excessive specialization on the part of
students.
At the same meeting Senate approved a
recommendation to create an ad hoc committee
"to consider and recommend possible changes in
the groupings of faculties, schools and
departments." (A report of the Senate debate on
enrolment limitation appeared in the campus
edition of Feb. 12).
* * *
UBC has received a gift of $600,000 from a
former student and his wife to enable UBC to
bring to the campus distinguished visiting
professors and other scholars of special attainment
and merit for periods of up to a year.
This is the second major gift made to UBC by
Dr. Cecil Green and his wife Ida, of Dallas, Texas.
In 1966, Dr. Green and his wife gave $200,000 to
the University for the purchase and renovation of
the former residence of Senator S.S. McKeen on
North West Marine Drive.
The residence, rechristened Cecil Green Park,
serves as a "town-gown" activities center and
houses the UBC Alumni Association and the
University Resources Council.
The $600,000 gift, payable over the next three
years, will be invested by the University and the
annual income used to establish visiting
professorships bearing the name of Cecil H. and
Ida Green.
Income from the gift may be used for salary or
Please turn to Page Eleven
See REVIEW
UBC Reports/April 30, 1970/3 CANADA'S
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL WILL
GIVE UBC MORE THAN $500,000 OVER THE NEXT THREE YEARS TO BOOST
RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS. UBC WILL USE
THE FUNDS TO BUY SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT AND FOSTER THREE MAJOR
PROJECTS DESCRIBED IN THE ARTICLE BELOW BY UBC'S ASSISTANT
INFORMATION OFFICER PETER THOMPSON.
The National Research Council has awarded a
$538,600 grant spread over three years to the
University of B.C. for research into astronomy and
astrophysics.
It is a "negotiated development grant," a type
of NRC grant made to Canadian universities to
stimulate rapid development of research in subject
areas where the University already has some
competence, particularly if the area doesn't fall
within the domain of a department but is shared
by a number of departments.
UBC has a nucleus of scientists working within
the inter-departmental Institute of Astronomy and
Space Science established 18 months ago. The
grant will be used primarily to bring more
scientists to UBC and to buy specialized
equipment.
It is anticipated that at the end of the
three-year period, the Institute will have become
the center of an integrated program of research in
astrophysics and astronomy.
UBC scientists are already working in close
contact with scientists at the NRC's Dominion
Astrophysical Observatory in Victoria and the
NRC's Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory
in Penticton, two of the major astronomical
installations in Canada. Close co-operation
between these three groups will be maintained.
DEVELOP RESEARCH
The grant will help develop three closely-linked
lines of research.
Atoms and molecules of material making up the
universe emit electromagnetic radiation.
Information about the universe comes to us from
these electromagnetic waves, which vary in length
depending on their source.
From the shortest to the longest wavelengths,
the electromagnetic spectrum runs from gamma
rays, x-rays, ultraviolet rays, light waves — the
only range of the spectrum our eyes are sensitive
to — infra-red radiation which we feel as heat,
microwaves and radio waves.
The earth's atmosphere is transparent to light
waves and a wide range of radio waves but absorbs
many of the other wavelengths.
Classical astronomy was concerned almost
entirely with observations of visible light. Since
the Second World War, our knowledge of the
universe has been increased enormously by
observing radio waves. Experience has shown that
when a new region of the spectrum is examined.
many unexpected and exciting phenomena are
seen.
Dr. W.L.H. Shuter, associate professor in UBC's
Department of Physics, will develop a
high-precision radio telescope with a 15-foot
diameter to study radio emission of about 1/8-inch
wavelength from atoms and molecules in
interstellar space.
Nothing has so far been detected in this
wavelength range but huge clouds of ammonia and
water vapor in interstellar space have been
detected at slightly longer wavelengths of about
3/8-inch. This suggests that work in this area holds
great promise and wilt probably lead to very
interesting results concerning the chemical
composition of the material from which stars and
planets are formed.
TEST SITES
Some radiation between the radio band and the
infra-red band penetrates almost to the earth's
surface before being absorbed by water vapor and
other material in the troposphere, the lowest layer
of the atmosphere.
Dr. M.W. Ovenden, professor of astronomy in
the Department of Geophysics, will try to extend
observations into this area of the spectrum. Part of
his work will be to test sites in western Canada
high enough and cold enough to eliminate water
vapor absorption.
The astronomy group within the geophysics
department will also extend the work that it is
already doing to develop new and more efficient
techniques of detecting light using television
techniques.
The third major project will be in laboratory
astrophysics and involves UBC's plasma physicists,
the largest group of these specialists in Canada.
Plasma physics is the study of the fourth stage
of matter. Generally, if a material in solid form is
heated it will turn to liquid. More heat will convert
it to a gas. At still higher temperatures, the gas
turns to plasma.
INTERPRET RADIATION
Plasmas don't occur on the Earth's surface in
stable form and little is known of their
characteristics, though almost all the matter in the
universe is in the plasma state.
To interpret radiation from outer space more
effectively, science will have to know more about
plasma physics. The grant will allow UBC's plasma
physicists to apply their methods and techniques
to problems directly affecting astrophysics.
Engineer at Corning Glass Works is shown watching
the final turning of the fused silica mirror blank
157 inches in diameter and 25 inches thick
which has been turned over to the Westar
consortium for inclusion in a telescope to be built
eventually on Mount Kobau in B.C.'s interior.'
Fused silica is one of the purest man-made
substances and doesn 7 change shape much under
4/UBC Reports/April 30, 1970 THE PLAN
temperature variations, a characteristic which is
important to astronomers. In addition, the material
is transparent and can be inspected for possible
internal stress. Westar's next step is to launch a
fund drive to enable grinding of the mirror and
'eventual construction of an observatory. Details in
story at top right. Photo courtesy the Coming
Glass Works, New York.
TO BUILD A NEW ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY IN
B.C.'S INTERIOR TOOK ANOTHER STEP FORWARD RECENTLY WHEN A 157-INCH
MIRROR BLANK, THE MAIN COMPONENT OF THE OBSERVATORY'S TELESCOPE,
ARRIVED AT UBC. IN THE ARTICLE BELOW, ASSISTANT INFORMATION OFFICER PETER
THOMPSON DESCRIBES THE DIFFICULTIES WHICH SURROUNDED THE TRANSPORTING
OF THE BLANK FROM THE CORNING GLASS WORKS IN NEW YORK TO VANCOUVER.
The 157-inch mirror blank for the Queen
Elizabeth II telescope to be built near
Osoyoos in the Okanagan has been delivered
to the University of B.C. from the eastern
United States.
A special railway flatcar and a special route
was used because of the blank's huge size.
The crated mirror blank is about 15 feet
high, 16 feet long and 10 feet wide. It
travelled in a well-car - a flatcar with a
sunken deck — to reduce its over-all height.
But even with this height reduction the
well-car had to travel along a carefully
planned route with tunnels and bridges high
enough to allow the mirror blank through.
After the crate was placed on the well-car
at the Corning Glass Works' McKean plant at
Bradford, Pa., it travelled across the northern
U.S. to Duluth, Minn., north into Canada and
along the Canadian National Railway route to
the coast.
WORLD'S LARGEST
The easily identified crate was painted
white and blue and a sign on both sides
advertised it as the world's largest fused silica
telescope mirror blank.
Silica was used because it expands very
little, and has the necessary thermal stability,
hardness, mechanical strength and finishing
properties.
The crate was made of armored plate. This
precaution is being taken because of
destructive incidents involving mirror blanks
in the past. The blank weights 17.5 tons and
the crate 12.5 tons.
Arrow Transport trucked the crate from
CN's Vancouver terminal to the B.C. Research
building at the south end of the UBC campus
where the special grinding machine for the
blank is stored.
The mirror blank and grinding machine are
the major assets of the Queen Elizabeth II
telescope project being turned over by Ottawa
to Westar, a consortium of Queen'sUniversity,
the University of Lethbridge, University of
Alberta, University of Calgary, University of
Victoria and UBC.
BEST IN CANADA
Chairman of the consortium is Dr. B.G.
Wilson, dean of arts and science at the
University of Calgary.
Westar was formed after the federal cabinet
stopped the project in an economy move in
August, 1968. The consortium will also
receive engineering designs for the project and
permission to use the site on 6,200-foot
Mount Kobau near Osoyoos. Total value of
the assets is $4.5 million.
UBC's Dean of Science, Dr. Vladimir
Okulitch, a UBC representative to the
consortium, said the Mount Kobau site is the
best in Canada and one of the best in the
world for an observatory.
PUBLIC APPEAL
He said Westar will launch a $10-million
public subscription to complete the project.
"This is all we will need to put the telescope
into operation," Dr. Okulitch said, "and it
will be spent over 10 years so we will need
about $1 million per year."
The first step will be to build a grinding
shop and begin the laborious job of grinding
the mirror blank.
Institute Head Named
Prof. Maurice H.L. Pryce of the University
of B.C.'s Department of Physics has been
appointed acting director of the University's
Institute of Astronomy and Space Science,
effective May 1.
He succeeds Prof. R.D. Russell, head of the
Department of Geophysics, who has won a
Killam Fellowship and will take a sabbatical
year beginning July 1 to do research at the
University of Tokyo.
Dr. Pryce is an internationally-known
theoretical physicist who came to UBC two
years ago from the University of Southern
California where he was Distinguished
Professor of Physics.
He was born in England and took his
bachelor and master of arts degrees at
Cambridge University. He received his doctor
of philosophy degree from Princeton
University in 1937.
Dr. Pryce taught at Cambridge and the
University of Liverpool until 1941 when he
entered war research in radar and atomic
energy. His atomic research was done in the
National Research Council's Montreal
laboratory.
He returned to Cambridge as a fellow of
Trinity College after the war and became
Wykeham Professor of Physics at Oxford in
1946. Eight years later he was named Wills
Professor of Physics and head of the
department at Bristol University.
He is a fellow of the Royal Astronomical
Society and is one of the three UBC faculty
members who are fellows of the prestigious
Royal Society of Great Britain.
PROF. MAURICE PRYCE
UBC Reports/April 30, 1970/5 AMSTERDAM, MAY 12
m;
TAKE ten years of hard work by about 600 people,
stir in some $350,000 and add tens of thousands
of miles of travel to 65 different countries. Let the
mixture  simmer  slowly   and   bring  to   a boil  in
Amsterdam    on    May    12,    1970.
The resulting dish will be carefully savoured by 75
gourmets called the  International Olympic Committee
and if they like what they see and taste Vancouver will
be awarded the 1976 Winter Olympics.
The upshot of all this, according to a UBC faculty
member who has been deeply involved in the drive to get
the Games for Vancouver, will be one of the biggest
single events ever staged in Canada and will have
ramifications for Canadian athletics stretching far into
the future.
Dr. Robert Hindmarch, associate professor of
physical education and recreation at UBC, is one of 15
persons who make up the executive committee of the
Vancouver/Garibaldi Olympic Committee which was
conceived in 1960 by a group of Canadian winter sports
enthusiasts who attended the Winter Olympics in Squaw
Valley in the United States.
In the ensuing ten years the Vancouver committee,
aided by a total of some $350,000 contributed by the
federal, provincial and civic governments as well as
industry, has established a permanent local office,
commissioned economic and feasibility studies,
persuaded governments at all levels to make funds
available for the project and travelled untold miles by air
to influence the votes of the 75-member International
Olympic Committee.
The decade of effort will culminate in Amsterdam'
May 12 when the IOC meets to consider the bids of four
cities, including Vancouver.
If the site of the games was the only consideration,
Vancouver would win hands down, according to Dr.
Hindmarch. The proposed venue for the games will be
Whistler Mountain on the edge of (but not part of)
Garibaldi Provincial Park, 54 air miles north oi.
Vancouver.
"The Whistler site," Dr. Hindmarch said, "offers one
advantage over all other previous sites — it can house all
athletes and other personnel necessary for the Games
and stage the start and finish of every event within an
area of two and a half miles.
"This has never been possible before in the history of
the winter games. At some previous sites spectators fcatr
to travel up to 35 miles in various directions if they
wished to see certain events."
6/UBC Reports/April 30, 1970 DAY OF DECISION ON THE OLYMPICS
!\. •*"."! ft?,* »
• .'aK.
•^ it*
iP COURTESY VANCOUVER/GARIBALDI OLYMPIC COMMITTEE
Dr. Hindmarch admits there are other considerations
— mainly political — which enter into the decision about
who gets the winter games.
One is the question of which city will get the summer
games to be held in the same year — 1976. Three cities
are bidding for the summer games — Los Angeles,
Montreal and Moscow — and the choice of this site has
in the past influenced the choice of the winter games
site.
The cities other than Vancouver bidding for the
winter games are Denver, Colorado; Sion, in Switzerland,
and Tampere, in Finland.
"Right   now,"    said    Dr.    Hindmarch,   "people   are
talking    in    terms   of   Moscow-Vancouver   for   the
summer-winter games.  But if Moscow didn't win . . ."
" Here Dr. Hindmarch's voice trailed off into a shrug of
the shoulders and he refused to speculate further.
ASSUMING Vancouver does get the games, just
over $46.8 million will have to be invested in
the site alone to make it useable for the Games.
Facilities will include an Olympic village to
house the Olympic "family" of some 10,000
persons — athletes, the IOC, the personnel needed to run
the  games  and   representatives  of  the news media  —
THE 75 PEOPLE WHO
MAKE UP THE INTERNATIONAL
OLYMPIC COMMITTEE WILL MEET IN
AMSTERDAM MAY 12 TO DECIDE WHERE
THE 1976 WINTER OLYMPICS ARE TO BE HELD.
A COMMITTEE OF VANCOUVER WINTER SPORTS
ENTHUSIASTS, INCLUDING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION DR. ROBERT HINDMARCH, INSET AT FAR LEFT, HAS BEEN WORKING
UNCEASINGLY FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS TO CONVINCE THE IOC THAT WHISTLER MOUNTAIN (SEE
MAP AT LEFT), ON THE EDGE OF GARIBALDI PARK
NORTH OF VANCOUVER, IS AN IDEAL SITE FOR
THE INTERNATIONAL EVENT. UBC REPORTS EDITOR JIM BANHAM TALKED TO DR. HINDMARCH RECENTLY ABOUT THE WINTER
GAMES AND WHAT THEY Wl LL MEAN
FOR THE VANCOUVER AREA IN
1976 AND THE FUTURE. THE
STORY BEGINS OPPOSITE.
arenas seating 10,000 and 5,000 persons respectively,
practice rinks, a speed skating oval and a curling rink,
plus the facilities necessary to stage the skiing, jumping
and cross-country events.
WA  UST over $25.2 million of this investment will be
H  recoverable,   Dr.   Hindmarch said, which  leaves
H the committee with a deficit of $21.6 million.
^Lm The committee already has commitments from
^^ the federal and provincial governments for
contributions of $10 million each and Dr. Hindmarch
says the balance will come from a source yet to be
announced.
There are other benefits as well, Dr. Hindmarch said.
"The committee has done a study which shows that the
benefits-to-cost ratio of the games runs to four-to-one,
which means that for every dollar invested, four come
back.
"This four-to-one ratio is direct benefits and includes
such things as the spectator who comes to Vancouver,
rents a hotel room and car, buys food and takes
advantage of shopping facilities."
(If you're planning to be a spectator at the Games,
incidentally, you'll have to make Vancouver your base.
Only the Olympic "family" will be housed at the games
site).
There are also indirect and hidden benefits resulting
from the games, Dr. Hindmarch said. The international
publicity which Vancouver and vicinity will get will
advance tourism to this area by an estimated 20 years.
And when the Games are over Vancouver will have an
outstanding athletic complex at its disposal, Dr.
Hindmarch hastens to add. Half the Olympic village will
be sold for private housing and the balance will provide
training facilities for Canadian national teams and serve
as a conference and short course center for universities
and other organizations.
The 10,000-seat stadium would become a gymnasium
complex and the 5,000-seat stadium a 50-metre diving
and swimming pool. "I would hope the complex could
be used by UBC as a physical education training center
where young people could go for six-week periods to
train in an outdoor environment," Dr. Hindmarch said.
He also points out that because the site is adjacent to
Garibaldi Provincial Park the facilities could be used as a
jumping-off point for ecological and wildlife studies and
a conference center on these topics.
For Dr. Hindmarch, involvement in the
Garibaldi/Olympic Committee has meant hundreds of
hours of committee meetings and some 150,000 miles of
travel in the past year, including a round-the-world trip
at Christmas, 1969, and visits to almost every country in
Europe.
In each country he has explained the advantages of
the Whistler Mountain site to a member of the IOC,
some of whom are members of royal families. If the
reception which he has received in each of the interviews
is an indicator, he feels Vancouver has the best chance of
obtaining the games.
On May 12 in Amsterdam, each of the cities bidding
for the Winter Games will have a half-hour to make its
case before the IOC. "The day prior to the winter games
presentations, the IOC will have made a decision about
the summer games," Dr. Hindmarch said, "but it's
thought that this time, unlike previous years, the site of
the summer games may not be announced until a
decision has been made about the winter site." This, he
said, could be of some advantage to the Vancouver
committee's bid.
"The presentations are made to the committee
alphabetically by cities," Dr. Hindmarch says, "and that
means we'll be last. This, too, could be to our
advantage."
THE Vancouver group will show the IOC a
15-minute slide show — "It's a superb
presentation," Dr. Hindmarch said — take ten
minutes to make some technical observations on
the site and allow five minutes for iquestions "We
won't go into too much detail," Dr. Hindmarch said.
"Each of them will already have had the message as the
result of a personal visit from someone on our
committee."
Then the IOC will vote by secret ballot. If no city has
a majority, the city with the least votes will be dropped
and a second vote taken.
About 5  p.m.   Amsterdam  time  (8 a.m. Vancouver
time) the result of the vote will be announced.
And if Vancouver does win?
"Well, after the party," Dr. Hindmarch said smiling,
"the real work will begin."
UBC Reports/April 30, 1970/7 THE light is most beautiful....Dazzling....Take
a look at its exquisitely colored beam and its
twinkling, starlike reflections, and you'll
know what "dazzling" means. Don't look
directly into the beam, for it is pure light, at
least as pure as you can get, and the lens in your eye
will focus it down to a hot pinpoint that can hurt.
It has been called "the light that never was," "the
light that man made." Scientists called it "Light
Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation,"
or laser light. In private, they are much more human
about it.
"We get it by tickling atoms," said Dr. Michael
Beddoes, associate professor of electrical engineering.
And that is probably the best way to describe
what happens. Atoms get excited by the energy in
rays of ordinary light; the electrons spinning around
the atom jump up and down into different orbits
("energy levels" is the correct description), and when
they revert back to their stable orbits or energy levels,
USERS
ARE BEING WIDELY USED ON THE
UBC CAMPUS FOR A VARIETY OF BASIC AND APPLIED RESEARCH PROJECTS. IN
A BASEMENT LABORATORY OF THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING BUILDING (SEE
PICTURE AT RIGHT), DR. MICHAEL BEDDOES AND GRADUATE STUDENT CHU KE
HAVE COMBINED A LASER WITH SIMPLE OPTICAL METHODS TO BUILD A MODEL
OF A TELEVISION SYSTEM TO DETERMINE IF EXISTING TELEVISION CHANNELS
CAN BE NARROWED WITHOUT AFFECTING THE QUALITY OF THE TRANSMITTED
PICTURE. THE UPSHOT OF THEIR RESEARCH COULD MEAN THAT A GREATER
NUMBER OF STATIONS COULD BE ACCOMMODATED ON YOUR TELEVISION SET.
TO TAKE THE PICTURE AT RIGHT, EXTENSION GRAPHIC ARTS PHOTOGRAPHER
MEREDITH SMITH TOOK A DOUBLE EXPOSURE. HE FIRST EXPOSED HIS FILM IN
THE DARKENED LABORATORY TO CATCH THE LASER BEAM AND THEN TOOK A
SECOND EXPOSURE IN NORMAL LIGHT WITH THE TWO RESEARCHERS.
FREE-LANCE SCIENCE WRITER JOHN BARBER DESCRIBES DR. BEDDOES' WORK
AND SOME OTHER UBC RESEARCH PROJECTS INVOLVING LASERS IN THE
ARTICLE BEGINNING ON THIS PAGE.
BY JOHN BARBER
carry the picture details to TV screens may be wider
than it needs to be.
"If we can narrow the existing channels, that is,
make the frequency bandwidth narrower, without
affecting the quality of the picture, we would make
room for other stations, particularly for educational
broadcasting," said Chu Ke. Crowding of the radio
and television airways has long been a problem that
has worried the people concerned with the
information you hear and see.
Dr. Beddoes and his students use the sparkling red
beam of an argon-neon gas laser to simulate their
television system. They shine the beam through a
black-and-white transparency of a trio of students,
then through three simple but precise lenses. The first
two lenses allow the beam to be analysed and the
third lens reconstructs the image of the student trio
so that Chu Ke can check the quality of the picture
after he has chopped out bits of information from the
beam.
The laser beam is composed of light rays all
travelling in one direction, at one frequency, in a very
they give off a lot of energy which, under the right
conditions, will appear as a thin, shaped pencil of
light having one color.
Not that you'll hear any atomic chuckles bubbling
up from Dr. Beddoes' spartan, basement lab where,
amongst the odds and ends of electrical apparatus, he
and graduate students Chu Ke and Otto Meier use the
laser light to simulate a complete television system.
"To do our research, we would need a very large
computer and that is expensive. Using a laser.which is
much cheaper, we can use relatively simple optical
methods to build a model of a TV system, and still be
able to relate our results to the real television
problem we are working on."
The purity, orderliness, and coherence of the laser
light rays enables the electrical engineers to process
visual information rapidly and precisely. Their
objective is to determine what details they can
eliminate from a transmitted picture and still be able
to view a good picture on a TV receiver screen. Dr.
Beddoes believes that the band of frequencies which
narrow, well-defined beam. Ordinary light, which we
call "white light," is composed of light rays of many
frequencies and fans out in all directions. With
ordinary light, the grass is green only because it
absorbs all the rays except those that have the
frequency of green light. The grass reflects the green
back to us. The frequency, color, and wavelength are
all interdependent and, in one sense, synonymous.
Shining the argon-neon laser beam through the
transparency "modulates" the emerging beam with all
the "information" defined by the dark and light
shades of the transparency. The images on
photographic transparencies are made up of many
small dots of different shades depending on how
much light passed through the shutter of the camera
when the original picture was taken. The dark hair of
one student is a mass of dark dots which will not
allow as much light through as the lighter dots
defining the blond hair of the second student. Each
ray in the beam has its intensity or brightness
modified by each dot on the transparency very much
8/UBC Reports/April 30, 1970 in the same way that a pair of sunglasses cuts the
intensity of the sunlight reaching your eyes. The
beam thus carries with it all the information in the
transparency and it is said to be modulated.
THE uniqueness of the single frequency, pure
laser light beam allows Chu Ke and Otto
Meier to use the first two lenses to split the
beam up so that light rays representing the
coarse and fine detail in the transparency go
through a "Fourier transformation." Because of this
transformation, the image that appears in what is
known as the "Fourier transform plane" of the
second lens is made up of a series of bright spots
regularly spaced on either side of the center line of
the lens. The farther away each spot is from the
center line, the finer the picture detail it represents.
With ordinary light, those spots would meld into each
other and show up as one big blur.
The theory on which all these optical
manipulations is based was developed decades ago by
those  giant  intellects who had to  picture in  their
that is at one moment complete and the next minus
the finer details.
The human eye will not notice the deficiencies in
that final reconstructed image and will see what it
believes to be a complete picture. The completeness
of that picture is an optical illusion.
Dr. Beddoes explained that when we look at a
movie picture as the movie projector slows down, we
become conscious of a flicker. To avoid that flicker,
the projector must be able to project the individual
pictures onto a screen at the rate of 24 per second. In
television we avoid the flicker effect by sending 30
pictures every second. The human eye is fooled into
believing it is seeing one continuous picture.
Further, Dr. Beddoes went on, the eye is most
sensitive to flicker which comes from large uniform
bright areas which represent the coarse detail of a
picture, and is much less sensitive to flicker from the
finer details. Thus, the elimination of some of the
finer details, or "higher spatial frequencies" as Dr.
Beddoes calls them, would   be  something we could
THE way they eliminate information from the
beam is by revolving a small windmill-type
shutter through the beam and periodically
blank the spots representing the finer detail
of the picture. The windmill lets through al
the information between its blades. Thus the third
lens, which reconstructs the image, produces an image
tolerate   without   complaining   about   poor   picture
quality.
"Our experiments have shown that we cannot
perceive the difference between a television picture
which contains all the information in each of the 30
'frames' we see every second and one in which every
other frame is deficient in the finer detail," said Dr.
Beddoes. The amount of detail that can be eliminated
from the picture before the eye begins to notice the
deficiency is what they are after. These nonessential
picture details can then be related to the TV
frequencies used to carry them.
Chu Ke said the image produced by the third lens
is too small to work with effectively. So he uses a
small TV camera to pick up the final image with all
its deficiencies, and views the amplified image on an
ordinary TV screen.
"Seems as if we are cheating, doesn't it?" said Dr.
Beddoes. "We say we use a laser to simulate the
conditions of a television station, then go ahead and
use a TV camera and receiver.
"But that is not really so. Because we are dealing
with practical pictures, we use the kind of TV picture
we see on our home TV screens as a standard."
Preliminary results of the investigation indicate
they will be able to "compress" the channels to about
one-third the present frequency bandwidth. What
that means is that the future may see three stations
broadcasting where only one exists now. Technically,
it will be an exciting achievement. Socially? We will
see!
Dr. Beddoes has thought of experimenting with
the transmission of three-dimensional pictures using
the laser, but has shelved the idea for the moment.
One of the problems inherent in such a project is that
a TV viewer would have to have a laser coupled in
with his receiver in his home to reconstruct the
picture into a three-dimensional one. The viewer
would be able to view the picture from three sides,
and could virtually look "behind the scenes."
A three-dimensional image produced by light rays
is called a holograph. Holographs are the results of
the fact that light rays have the characteristics of a
wave. Just as two waves on the surface of the sea can
"interfere" with each other, two light waves can
reinforce each other, become brighter, if they are "in
step," or they can cancel out, become dimmer, if
they are "out of step."
THIS interference is responsible for the many
shadow and light patterns around us. Blurred
and fuzzy edges to some shadow patterns are
caused by the interference of rays of
different frequencies. Single frequency light
produces sharp, well-defined patterns. Laser light
with its single wave-length and highly directional
beam make the production of the sharp, mirage-like
image of a holograph a practical, simple third year
physics experiment to demonstrate the wave
characteristics   of   light   rays.
"We use a knight chess-piece as the object of the
holograph experiment," said Dr. Boye Ahlborn,
associate professor of physics, who lectures in the
optics science course.
To produce the holograph, the students put the
knight in the path of the laser beam. A second laser
beam of exactly the same frequency, directed at the
shadow of the knight, creates the ghostlike holograph
with the dark and light interference patterns of the
rays. It's a temptation to run your finger through that
eerie horses's head.
"The students are in no real danger if they put
their hands in the beam path," said Dr. Ahlborn.
"The lab lasers are of a very low power, about a
milliwatt." One milliwatt is one-thousandth of a watt.
The lab lasers, similar to the one Dr. Beddoes and
his students use in electrical engineering, are known
as continuous lasers. As long as they are switched on,
they will shine their beams continuously. They use
gases or mixtures of gases as the lasing material.
Another type of laser is called an intermittent or
pulsed laser. The beam shines for short periods then
cuts off. The lasing material need not be a gas, and
may produce a very high powered beam containing
millions of watts of heat.
The very first laser, just ten short years ago, used a
ruby as the lasing material and shone its beam
intermittently. It was expensive to produce that first
beam of man-made light and the technological
problems seemed formidable.
"Some lasers cost less than $100 today," said Dr.
Ahlborn, "and we use both intermittent and
continuous lasers in our research work." Dr. Ahlborn
does research with the plasma physics group which
uses a high-powered, intermittent laser to probe the
secrets out of plasmas. Dr. Roy Nodwell, professor of
physics, heads that group.
"We use what is known as a Q-spoil laser," said
Dr. Nodwell. That is a laser that is allowed to build
up a lot of power before the beam is released to shoot
into the plasma for a fraction of a second.
DR. Nodwell calls his work "plasma
diagnostics" but it has no connection with
medicine. The plasmas he diagnoses are very
hot gases. They are the stuff of stars, of
outer space, and nuclear fusion reactions.
"Our plasmas are hot gases of ions, electrons and
other charged particles. The gas temperatures are
around 15,000 degrees Centigrade ... and that is a
cool plasma," said Dr. Nodwell.
He creates his plasma by discharging a high current
between an anode and a cathode. This causes a 300
Please turn to Page Ten
See LASERS
UBC Reports/April 30, 1970/9 LASERS
Continued from Page Nine
ampere arc to bridge the gap between the electrodes.
He then passes a gas through the arc which creates the
plasma.
"Our diagnostics, we hope, will tell us what the
properties and the constituents of plasmas are. With
the pulsed laser we can probe one very small spot at a
time and that allows us to obtain much more
definitive information than we could with our
previous probes.
"We recently reported data pointing to the
existence of microturbulences in the plasma. Our find
did not fit the existing theory of plasmas but
fortunately other plasma physicists, after reading the
paper, confirmed our discovery."
The plasma is a restless, boiling mass of particles in
constant motion. The stab of the pulsed laser beam
can tell the physicists what was happening at a
particular spot at any instant of time. Diagnostic data
come from the analysis of the ways the light rays are
scattered, absorbed, or reflected by the plasma
particles. The analysis is made easier and definitive
when they can use light rays of known frequency and
wavelength because they know how specific light rays
react when they hit different particles.
DEFINE PROPERTIES
"What ultimate application have we in mind? Our
goal is to get as much information as we can defining
the properties of a plasma. That information is
important to the control of fusion nuclear reactions
for the production of electric power. The Atomic
Energy Control Board of Canada sponsors our work
and they oversee Canada's nuclear power program.
Present power reactors are fission-type reactors and
generate heat from the splitting of atoms. In fusion
reactions, atoms generate heat when they join
together or fuse, and the electric power potential is
almost unlimited."
Probably one of the first men at UBC to use the
laser as a research tool was Dr. David Walker, who is a
radiation chemist and associate professor of
chemistry. He used his first laser in 1965 which he
borrowed from the physicists.
Most of Dr. Walker's research is concerned with
the chemical decomposition of materials when they
are bombarded by x-rays and other atomic radiations.
It turns out that one of the most important very
short-lived chemical species produced in pure water
absorbs red light quite strongly. The red lasers are
consequently extremely useful sources of light for
monitoring the formation and subsequent reactions
of these species. "Some of the experiments we have
successfully performed by this technique would have
been impossible to do prior to the development of
the laser," said Dr. Walker.
By "very short-lived" Dr. Walker means something
that exists as an identifiable chemical entity for about
a nanosecond, one billionth of a second. Some of
these same reactions are being studied in experiments
using the intense light from a pulsed ruby laser to
trigger off the chemical reaction. This light source has
the immense power of 30 million watts, but is "on"
for only about ten billionths of a second.
One of the most direct applications of studies on
the radiation chemistry of water is in the
understanding of the effects of high energy radiation,
natural or man-made, on living cells. A considerable
and diversified industry is also being developed using
atomic radiations as an energy source based on
fundamental studies of radiation chemistry.
Dr. Walker and colleague Dr. Norman Basco,
associate professor of chemistry, work together on
aspects of their research. Dr. Basco is mainly
interested in the reactions of atoms and free radicals.
These are produced by subjecting molecules to a very
intense pulse of ultraviolet radiation for about ten
millionths of a second.
STUDY REACTIONS
Ultraviolet radiation is another form of light and
Dr. Basco uses a source with a power of more than
ten million watts. The research technique is known as
'flash photolysis'.
When very dilute solutions of alkalis or salts in
water are subjected to ultraviolet radiation, the
"hydrated electron" is produced. This is the same
species as that formed by the irradiation of pure
water with x-rays. Dr. Basco, in collaboration with
Dr. Walker, is studying the reactions of the hydrated
electron using a laser to follow the change in its
10/UBC Reports/April 30, 1970
concentration over a period of ten to 100 millionths
of a second.
Few basic research scientists will put themselves
out on the limb by predicting ultimate practical
applications for the results of their research. Yet
many of today's developments — the laser is a perfect
example — are the result of past scientists dedicating
themselves to filling a void in the recorded scientific
knowledge.
"We chose our work because we feel the
knowledge and data we generate and record are
necessary to the understanding of our world," said
Dr. Basco. "Maybe in 20 years time somebody will
use our results in some development."
Drs. Basco and Walker are working with an
element without which we could not live on this
earth — water. They agreed, cautiously, to one
application of their work: pollution control. The
more known about what happens to our water under
all conditions, the more likely we will be able to
control and perhaps reverse the creeping forces of
environmental pollution.
The laser's usefulness as a research tool was
predicted by the early witnesses to its discovery — the
early laser literature was replete with predictions of
the great things the laser would do for man. When
that ruby laser first pierced the slightly acrid, lab
atmosphere with its beam, the news got around fast.
Fertile imaginations soared with what they could do
with this beam of pure light. They said they could
carry all the radio, TV, and other telecommunications
signals broadcast in North America on one, single,
thin light beam, pipe it underground from point to
point, and clear the electromagnetic airways. The
U.S. Army engineers did try it in New York,
successfully. The costs, however, of changing all our
communication systems would have been
out-of-this-world, and soon, enthusiasm cooled, just
slightly.
SECOND LOOK
Sober scientists and hard-headed businessmen
started to take a second look at this "light that never
was." The Harvard School of Business studied the
possible applications of lasers and prepared, in the
early '60s, a definitive report on its potentials. Their
conclusion? Any practical work enthusiasts saw the
laser doing could be done by existing equipment,
cheaper and sometimes better. This conclusion was
not the most encouraging for a fledgling industry
looking for money, but money did come, mainly
from the military, who wanted the light beam
developed into a silent, maiming, blinding weapon.
Even today, most of the "popular press" articles
about the laser are written around its destructive
power.
Not too much is written about the very delicate
work a laser can do. In the hands of skillful surgeons
the thin light beam can apply just enough gentle heat
to weld detached retinas to the backs of human eyes.
But, as the Harvard investigators found, existing
equipment that could do the same job as a laser was
available and some eye surgeons preferred not to use
the laser. At the UBC Faculty of Medicine, they do
not use lasers at all.
''At the moment, I prefer the xenon
photocoagulator," said Dr. Gordon Harris, who is an
eye surgeon at the Vancouver General Hospital and
assistant   professor   with   the  medical   faculty.   The
xenon device does the retina repair work just as well
as the laser — so why change to something new just
because it is new?
"However, I would expect that a future laser will
replace the xenon equipment eventually."
Commercial developers met with stiff competition
for their laser instruments every step of the way, but
the soon found permanent homes for their products.
Many scientists could not, today, do without the
definitive precision of the light beams. It makes
details easier to see, as with Dr. Nodwell's plasma
physics discovery. Apart from illustrating to third
year physics students the properties of light,
holography seems to be one of the most exciting
applications of laser light. With the three-dimensional
image of the holograph, scientists will actually be able
to see what is going on in dynamic processes, where
before they could only theorize about what was
happening.
LOSSES COSTLY
Dr. Donald Thompson, associate professor of
chemical engineering, is pioneering in this use of
holographs. He is investigating the eddy currents that
swirl about the walls of an ordinary pipe and restrict
the flow of water and other fluids through them.
These eddy currents are related to the friction
resistance of the pipe walls to fluid flow and cause
pressure losses downstream in the pipe. The losses can
be very costly in terms of having to add expensive
booster, pumping stations at different points on a
long pipeline. Part of the cost of our gasoline and
other fuels is this cost of moving it efficiently along
pipelines.
Dr. Thompson is at present working on the effects
of very small amounts of friction-reducing additives i
in fluids as they flow through pipes. It is believed that
these additives react with the turbulent eddies and
reduce their resistive effects.
"I will dissolve material into the water so that the
refractive index of the water flowing near the pipe
wall will be different from that in the center of the
pipe. This difference in the refractive properties will
cause the light rays to bend at different angles and
show up the eddies on a continuous holograph," said
Dr. Thompson. The refractive index of a material is a
measure of the angle a light ray will bend through
when it passes from air through that material. It is a
result of the fact that light rays travel at different
speeds in different materials. The effect of the
friction-reducing additives is to make the water near
the pipe walls a "different" material as far as the light .
rays are concerned to the water in the center of the "
pipe.
A second laser beam will mix with the refracted
beam coming through the pipe and construct a
three-dimensional picture of what is happening near
the pipe walls. Taking pictures of the holograph and
storing the negatives will allow Dr. Thompson to
reconstruct, for future analysis, the three-dimensional
flow conditions.
Some laser sceptics, when the first beam shone in
1959 and 1960, dubbed it "the solution in search of a
problem." But a great many problems, most of them
shelved because practical solutions were not feasible,
were dusted off and exposed to the searching laser
light. The important point is that some of them were
solved in these past ten years and they might net have
been had the laser not made its appearance.
TEACHERS
Continued from Page Three
appointment at UB<" for at least three years and be
presently teaching on campus. Candidates are
appraised on the basis of their teaching in recent
years.
Those nominating UBC faculty members submit
an evaluation of the candidate, bearing in mind such
criteria as the following:
— Having a comprehensive knowledge of the
subject,
— Being habitually well-prepared for class,
— Having enthusiasm for the subject,
— Having the capacity to arouse interest in it
among students,
— Establishing good rapport with students both in
and out of classes,
— Encouraging student participation in class,
— Setting a high standard and successfully
motivating students to try to attain such a standard,
— Communicating effectively at levels appropriate
to the preparedness of the students, and
— Utilizing methods of evaluation of student
performance which search for understanding of the
subject rather than just ability to memorize.
Members of the selection committee, in addition
to Dr. Gibson, are: Dr. Robert M. Clark, UBC's
academic planner, secretary; Mr. Allan M. McGavin,
Chancellor of the University; Prof. Roy Daniells,
Department of English, representing the President;
Dean Helen McCrae, Dean of Women, representing
the donor; Mr. Nicholas Omelusik, of the UBC
Library, representing the Alumni Association, and
Miss Ann Jacobs, Arts IV, and graduate student Mr.
Arthur Burgess, representing the student body. New UBC Housing Project Started
The University of B.C. has awarded a
construction contract for stage one of a housing
development involving a new approach to costing
and the living environment for students.
The new development, to be built on the
eastern edge of the campus adjacent to the
Student Union Building, has been designed over a
two-year period by the architectural firm of Reno
C. Negrin and Associates in consultation with a
UBC client's committee which has included four
student members.
The contract for stage one of the development,
which will house 788 students in two 16-storey
towers, has been awarded to Frank Stanzl
Construction Limited.
The two residence towers and a common
building will be constructed under a negotiated
contract arrangement at a cost of $4,656,452. The
total cost of stage one of the project will be
$5,516,000.
The bulk of the funds - $5,170,000 - have
been allocated by Central Mortgage and Housing
Corp. and the balance has been borrowed by the
University from the Bank of Montreal. Expected
completion   date  for  the   project   is  September,
1971.
The basis of the negotiated contract process is
the early establishment of a cost ceiling for the
project. Contractors are then asked to submit
proposals on the basis of a minimum guaranteed
fee.
NEGOTIATED CONTRACT
The negotiated contract also contains
provisions for a shared saving agreement between
the University and the contractor. If the
contractor completes the project for less than the
fixed maximum price, the savings are divided
between the University and the contractor on an
agreed basis.
The design of the stage one residence towers is
also unique. Each floor in the two residence
towers is divided into four self-contained
quadrants, each housing six students, each of
whom have a private room for study and sleeping.
The six students occupying each quadrant will
share certain common facilities - a lounge
containing kitchen and dining facilities and a
bathroom.
The common block to be built as part of stage
one of the project will include lounge and study
facilities as well as administrative areas.
The living environment of the residence towers
reflects a new direction in the provision of
accommodation for students.
The provision of a small-scale, communal living
situation is an attempt to scale down the student's
relationship from his individual unit to the total
residence complex and to establish a graduated
relationship of the individual to the whole.
The architectural solution aims to allow the
independence of the student to function within
the framework of order.
SECOND STAGE PLANNED
Providing funds are available from Central
Mortgage and Housing Corp. next year, UBC will
proceed with stage two of the project —
construction of a third residence tower, two
low-rise structures containing housekeeping units
and completion of the interior of the commons
building to include dining and other facilities.
When complete, the development will house
1,386 students.
REVIEW
Continued from Page Three
salary supplementation, library or other expenses
connected with the appointments.
Dr. Green attended UBC as an engineering
student from 1918 to 1921. He then enrolled at
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he
received  the degrees of bachelor and master of
science in engineering. (Issue of March 18, 1970).
# * #
Prof. John H. Young has resigned as dean of
UBC's Faculty of Arts but will continue to hold
his post as professor of economics.
Prof. Young's resignation is effective June 30.
The Board of Governors has also extended Prof.
Young's current leave of absence for a year
beyond July 1 to enable him to continue his work
in Ottawa as chairman of the federal
government's Prices and Incomes Commission,
established to investigate and report on the causes,
processes and consequences of inflation. (Issue of
March 18, 1970).
UBC will offer a bachelor of fine arts degree for
the first time in the 1970-71 session. UBC's
Senate approved a proposal from the Faculty of
Arts to offer the degree at a meeting on Feb. 25.
The new four-year program is designed to give
the student-artist "a university education in which
he can take initial steps towards the learning and
development of his art iin conjunction with
entering into other fields of knowledge and
experience as offered by university courses and the
general university environment." (Issue of March
12, 1970).
* # *
UBC's Board of Governors has awarded
construction and component contracts for the
TRIUMF project, the major nuclear facility being
constructed on the UBC campus.
In February, the Board awarded a $1.94 million
contract to a Quebec Shipbuilding Company for
fabrication of the cyclotron's 4,000-ton magnet,
the largest and most important component in the
project.
A second contract for nearly $200,000 has also
been awarded for excavation of the vault to
contain the cyclotron, which will be located 30
feet below ground. The building which will
eventually house the cyclotron will be 400 feet
long, 100 feet wide and 60 feet high. (Issue of
Feb. 5, 1970).
Contracts have also been awarded by the Board
for two new components of the Health Sciences
Center. They are:
— A new Instructional Resources Center which
will cost a total of $4,650,967, including
$358,785 in audio-visual equipment, and
— An addition to the Faculty of Pharmaceutical
Sciences' George Cunningiam Building costing
almost $800,000.
The Instructional Resources Center will be a
six-storey building linked to the existing P.A.
Woodward Biomedical Library and, eventually, to
the planned University teaching and research
hospital, the next major unit in the Health
Sciences Center.
The IRC will provide a centralized building for
training all students in the health sciences,
including doctors, dentists and nurses, and
includes 30,000 square feet of space for lecture
and audio-visual facilities. The building will also
house the Faculty of Medicine's Division of
Continuing Education in the Health Sciences.
The 24,000-square-foot addition to the existing
pharmacy building will be four storeys high and
will be used largely for graduate research work.
The extension is an integral part of the Health
Sciences Center, which it adjoins. (Issue of March
5, 1970).
#**
Prof. W.D. Liam Finn, former head of the
Department of Civil Engineering, was named Dean
of the Faculty of Applied Science in February. At
35 Prof. Finn is the youngest dean at UBC. He was
acting dean of the Faculty from August, 1969,
following the death of Prof. Frank Noakes.
Prof. Finn plans to give priority to exapnding
teaching and research in water resources and
pollution engineering. A graduate program in
ocean engineering is also planned if sufficient
federal funds are made available. (Issue of Feb. 5,
1970).
NEWS BRIEFS - Prof. Robert W. Stewart,
professor of physics and oceanography, has been
elected to Great Britain's Royal Society, one of
the world's most prestigious scientific bodies. He is
one of 28 Canadians — three of them at UBC —
who have been elected fellows of the society,
which was incorporated in 1662 ... Dr. J.H.
Quastel, professor of neurochemistry and
honorary professor of biochemistry, will receive
the honorary degree of doctor of philosophy from
the Hebrew University of Jerusalem at its
convocation July 6 . . . Prof. Frank A. Forward,
former head of the Department of Metallurgy, was
recently installed as a fellow of the Metallurgical
Society at a meeting in Denver, Colorado, "in
recognition of his standing as one of the leaders of
our time in metallurgy." . . . Two UBC chemists
are among 76 North American scientists who have
been awarded highly-coveted fellowships by the
Sloan Foundation of New York. The winners are
Dr. Edward Piers, 31, and Dr. Anthony J. Merer,
32 . . . Dr. William L. Dunn, 43, a member of the
UBC faculty since 1963, has been named head of
the medical faculty's Department of Pathology. He
succeeds Dr. Harold Taylor, who resigned as head
to devote full-time to a national program designed
to   solve   the   problem   of   rejection   of   organ
transplants . . . Prof. Ian McTaggart-Cowan, dean
of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and former
head of the Department of Zoology, has received
the Aldo Leopold Award, the highest honour
which can be bestowed by the Wildlife Society of
the United States. The Award is made for service
to wildlife conservation ... Dr. Peter H. Pearse,
associate professor of economics, has been elected
president of UBC's Faculty Association for
1970-71. Other officers are Dr. Robert Kubicek,
associate professor of history, vice-president; Mr.
Knute Buttedahl, associate director of extension,
secretary; Prof. Andrew R. Thompson, Faculty of
Law, treasurer, and Dr. John E. Phillips, associate
professor of zoology and Dr. Walter D. Young,
head of the political science department,
members-at-large . .. The 1969—70 athletic year
has been one of the most successful ever for UBC
teams. Both the men's and women's Thunderbird
basketball teams won Canadian intercollegiate
championships as did the women's gymnastic
team. In addition, a number of individual athletes
won intercollegiate championships and were
named to Canadian national teams.
Graduates of McGill University — including
some who were students at McGill College, the
forerunner of the University of B.C. - • will take
part in a west coast reunion of the Montreal
University at the Hotel Vancouver May 7 and 8.
The two-day meeting will include public
addresses by two internationally known medical
scientists. Both will speak on May 8.
•At 10 a.m. Prof. Paul B. Beeson, Nuffield
Professor of Clinical Medicine at Oxford
University, will speak on "A Transatlantic View of
Medical Education."
The same morning at 11 a.m., Dr. Frank L.
Horsfall, president and director of the
Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, in
New York, will speak on "Cancer of Man and
Animals."
Many top officials of McGill University,
including Principal Rocke Robertson, will take
part in the meetings.
Mr. Gregory Fyffe, a graduate student in
political science at the University of B.C., is one of
nine Canadian university students who have been
named the first recipients of Parliamentary
Internships for 1970-71.
The Parliamentary Internship program is a joint
venture of the Canadian House of Commons and
the Canadian Political Science Association. It is
financed by the Canadian Donner Foundation.
Under the scheme, a group of students from
Canadian universities will be selected each year to
spend nine to ten months working in the House of
Commons.
UBC Reports/April 30, 1970/11 jAp+M^ UBC ALUMNI    j~ J^
Contact
f Annual Meeting
May 26,6:30 p.m.
1     Cecil Green Park
Dean F.H. Soward (left), Dean Emeritus of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies, accepts an honorary life
membership in the UBC Alumni Association for his
contribution to UBC education. And Dr. Donald
Chant (right) of the University of Toronto receives
the Alumni Award of Merit for his part in the battle
to ban DDT in Ontario. Photos by Vlad.
DEAN SOWARD, DR. CHANT
Alumni Honor Two Men
A man who played an important part in the fight
to have DDT banned in Ontario has been given the
UBC Alumni Association's highest award.
Dr. Donald Chant, BA'50, MA'52, chairman of the
University of Toronto zoology department and the
son of former UBC Arts Dean Dr. S.N.F. Chant, was
given the Alumni Award of Merit at the annual
alumni dinner on April 9. The honor is conferred
annually on a graduate who has made a distinguished
contribution to his, or her, field of endeavor.
Close to 300 persons attended the dinner in the
UBC Faculty Club, which also featured an address by
the former Prime Minister of Canada, the Hon. Lester
B. Pearson.
Dr. Chant is a director of the Ontario
anti-pollution organization called Pollution Probe and
in this capacity was a leader in the struggle to have
DDT banned in that province. In receiving the award,
Dr. Chant said he felt it should rather have been
"given to the many young people who have so
strongly pushed the work of Pollution Probe in
Toronto and across Canada in the campaign to
prevent the degradation of our environment."
At the same dinner meeting, Dean F.H. Soward,
Dean Emeritus of the Faculty of Graduate Studies,
was granted an honorary life membership in the UBC
Alumni Association in recognition of his long and
outstanding contribution to UBC education.
Dean Soward joined UBC in 1922 as an instructor
in history, rising to become head of the department
in 1953. An acknowledged expert on international
affairs, he took time out from teaching to serve in
Canada's External Affairs department as a special
assistant to the Under-Secretary of State from
1943-46. He became dean of graduate studies in
1961, a post he held until his retirement in 1964.
12/UBC Reports/April 30, 1970
In his address, Mr. Pearson discussed problems in
international development and in Canada's domestic
development. Rapid population growth — with world
population growing by one billion every five years —
is still the major problem in international aid, he said.
To improve conditions in the developing countries, he
said population growth must be curbed and the
developed countries must contribute more aid.
On the latter score, Mr. Pearson warned that there
is now an unfortunate tendency for wealthier nations
to cut their foreign aid contributions. He stressed that
it is essential for world peace and progress that they
increase their foreign aid and, equally important, find
more effective ways of making it improve conditions
in developing countries.
For example, Mr. Pearson said that "even if a
nation's gross national product increases four or five
times, it does not help if the proceeds are not
distributed equitably among all the people."
Canada, Mr. Pearson said, is also a developing
country in many ways. And in the process of
developing, he suggested that Canada should not
develop too close ties with the U.S., but neither
should the nation become isolationist.
Mr. Pearson said Canada's major problem remains
that of developing national unity. He suggested the
nation should not panic over this issue since all
federal states historically have had unity problems.
But Mr. Pearson emphasized that there is one
prerequisite for unity: "We will not solve the
problems of Canadian unity, indeed we may fall
apart, unless we accept the fact that has been with us
since the beginning, that our country was established
in 1871 on the basis of two original language groups,
French and English-speaking groups. There is no
other basis on which we can become a united Canada
than by accepting that fact."
The rush is on to
JAPAN and EXPO 70
It's the chance of a lifetime ... a chance for
UBC graduates to see Japan and Expo '70 . .
and it's yours through the UBC Alumni charter
flight which will get you there for $337 return
. . . the flight leaves Vancouver June 20 and
returns July 12, so reserve now . . . contact the
UBC Alumni Association, 6251 N.W. Marine
Drive, Vancouver 8, B.C. or phone 228-3313.
3

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