UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Reports Sep 21, 1983

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubcreports-1.0118718.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubcreports-1.0118718.json
JSON-LD: ubcreports-1.0118718-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubcreports-1.0118718-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubcreports-1.0118718-rdf.json
Turtle: ubcreports-1.0118718-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubcreports-1.0118718-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubcreports-1.0118718-source.json
Full Text
ubcreports-1.0118718-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubcreports-1.0118718.ris

Full Text

 Volume 29, Number 16
September 21, 1983
Martin Berinbaum of UBC's music department rehearses the University Concert
Band in preparation for special installation ceremony in the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre Sept. 26 when Dr. George Pedersen will be installed as president of
UBC and Dr.  William Saywell will be installed as president of Simon Fraser
University. Some tickets for the 8 p.m. ceremony are available by calling
228-2484. Installation ceremony is prelude to UBC's National Universities Week
celebrations Oct. 2-8, which are detailed in a special four-page supplement in
this issue of UBC Reports.
Board chairman tells Senate
that co-operation is the key
The chairman of the Board of
Governors, David McLean, called for closer
cooperation between Board and Senate
when he made an unprecedented
appearance before the University Senate
last week, at the invitation of President
George Pedersen.
Here are the highlights of his remarks:
"I hope that we can look at some of the
touchy issues that are going to be facing
the Board and the Senate this year with a
sense of humor, because we're going to
need it.
"As we begin this academic year with
many problems and challenges, I want you
to know that the Board pledges itself to
improve the relationship between the
Board and the Senate, by ensuring that
there will be a free flow of communication
and ideas.
"I have no doubt whatsoever that we are
all motivated by the same goals and
objectives — to ensure that the University
of British Columbia maintains a great
educational system, always striving for
those qualities of excellence that have
established UBC as Canada's most
outstanding university.
"Universities are not immune to (the
recession.) In the 1983-84 academic year,
we face very serious financial problems.
Our funding is short and many sacrifices
will have to made. At the same time, this
will generate new opportunities . . .
"I think it will encourage us to seek
financing from sources other than
government. Perhaps we have become a
little bit too self-satisfied, a little bit too
heavily dependent upon government
funding. We must now look for other
sources, perhaps the private sector, for
more support.
"We must have very serious scrutiny of
need versus cost. We must carefully
consider the cost of new programs
balanced against the need to have that
facility as an academic priority. You must
set priorities.
"We must efficiently mobilize our
existing resources. It is a time to look at
both staff and physical resources, both of
which we have an abundance of. There is
no room for the inefficiency that a
booming economy lets you get away with.
We must now pause and carefully consider
how to best use our limited resources. If we
face this challenge realistically, the result
will be improved morale, and general pride
in what can be accomplished by the
maximum utilization of existing resources.
"I would like to leave you with these
Please turn to Page 2
See McLEAN
FULL PROGRAM OF EVENTS FOR
NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES WEEK
The University will observe National Universities Week Oct. 2 to 8 with a
wide range of events and activities, both on and off campus.
A full listing of events is contained in a four-page lift-out centre section of
today's UBC Reports.
As a prelude to Universities Week, all three B.C universities will join together
in a colorful ceremony at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre Sept. 26 for the
installation of William Saywell as president of Simon Fraser University and
George Pedersen as president of UBC.
Admission is by ticket only, available through the Ceremonies Office,
228-2484. Tickets are free.
President optimistic
despite sad state
of UBC finances
UBC's new president, George Pedersen,
told Senate and faculty last week that he
remains optimistic despite the financial
problems faced by the University.
Dr. Pedersen, who assumed office July 1
as the University's eighth president, chaired
his first Senate meeting Sept. 14. The
following day he addressed more than 500
faculty at a special meeting of the UBC
Faculty Association.
After telling faculty that UBC now has
an operating-budget shortfall of about $4
million, with a chance that the operating
grant from the provincial government
might be even lower next year, the
president said:
"In spite of what I've had to say this
afternoon, I remain very optimistic. I
honestly do. And that is not a naive
comment based on some lack of reality as
to what we face.
"This is a great university. It is my
intention that it will be considerably
greater . . . Any aspirations we have to
greatness at an international level will
depend on the help and support and cooperation of all of you. It is certainly my
expectation that you will be prepared to
give it."
In his remarks to Senate, Dr. Pedersen
said UBC should think in terms of being
regarded as the number one institution of
higher education in Canada over the next
five years.
"I want to assure you that while I regard
the challenge as extremely formidable, I do
not regard it as hopeless at all."
He said that he and his wife, Joan, were
"extremely pleased" to be associated with
UBC, which he termed "a great resource of
this province."
Dr. Pedersen, himself a UBC graduate,
said his task would be to create "a set of
conditions that will allow us to attain our
own overriding goals — goals that will
enhance professors, because in the final
analysis professors are the university."
Speaking to faculty, the president
explained that less money had been
received this year from the provincial
government, despite the fact that the
federal government (which pays 77 per
cent of university costs in B.C.) had
increased its transfer of payments to the
province for post-secondary education by
eight per cent.
"My best estimate of what our shortfall is
at the moment is $4.1 to $4.2 million. We
will have to find that, in one way or the
other, between now and the end of the
fiscal year (March 31, 1984)."
He said maybe half of the shortfall could
be recovered from various contingency
funds and the remainder would have to
come from existing units on campus.   "The
vice-presidents are currently going through
that rather unpleasant exercise starting
right now."
Dr. Pedersen said there were "long run"
problems as well. He said he originally had
Please turn to Page 2
See PEDERSEN
Deficit leads
to freeze
on all hiring
A University-wide hiring freeze has been
imposed by President George Pedersen
because of UBC's difficult financial
position.
"I am placing a freeze on all
appointments chargeable in whole or part
against University operating funds,
effective immediately." Dr. Pedersen said
in a Sept. 7 memo to deans, heads and
directors. "This action applies to academic,
non-academic and student service
appointments."
The president said UBC faces a deficit in
the order of $4 million for 1983-84,
exclusive of salary increases.
"Legislation prevents us from ending a
fiscal year in a deficit position without
seeking and obtaining the approval of the
Ministries of Finance and of Universities,
Science and Communications," Dr.
Pedersen said in his memo. "Even if we
were to seek such approval to postpone the
problem, it is not clear we would receive
il."
The president said the hiring freeze
would.be reviewed on Oct. 5.
Meanwhile, only two groups of
employees — the Association of University
and College Employees and the Office and
Technical Employees Union — have
received wage increases this year. Members
of those unions received 5.25 per cent on
April 1 as the second year of two-year
contracts negotiated last year.
Negotiations are continuing with other
labor unions and faculty. UBC Reports September 21, 1983
Winners of $7,500 scholarships from the provincial government's Heritage Trust
are Glen Isaac, left, a 1983 UBC history graduate who is this year enrolled in
the Archival Studies program, and Gordon Mohs, a 1976 UBC graduate in
anthropology who is working on his master's degree at SFU. Isaac received the
Willard Ireland Scholarship and Mohs the Charles Borden Scholarship.
Pedersen
expected the same operating grant for the
next five years, but there were reports now
that there could be a cut of five per cent
for 1984-85.
"For this university that is $10 million,
and let me tell you, folks, I don't have a
clue how the hell we would respond to a
$10 million cut."
The president said he did not agree with
the provincial government's restraint
program.
"This is precisely the time when
governments should be investing more in
their people aged 18 to 24 . . . because we
are not yet in the habit of allowing 18-to-
24-year-olds to starve. They will be
supported in one way or another, whether
it's through welfare, UIC or whatever. I
would really argue that it is a much more
impressive way to go to invest in them by
ensuring that they are in our universities."
Dr. Pedersen said Canadian universities
have not done a particularly good job of
convincing anyone in the private sector
that they should support their universities.
"I would like to suggest to you that it is
going to be necessary for all of us to do a
better job of ensuring that the general
public, including our political
representatives, understand better what it
is that universities are trying to do.
"I think almost without exception that
everyone will concede that universities do a
reasonably good job of producing educated
manpower. People talk well generally
about university graduates . . . The
student side is one which is generally
acknowledged as a worthwhile
contribution."
What is not generally understood,
however, he said, is the fundamental goal
— the extension of understanding and the
basic research that is our heritage.
"It is not always appreciated that the
universities have been the major
contributors to that for many hundreds of
years."
The president also devoted some time to
the question of inter-university cooperation, and commended the Faculty
Association executive for their work with
Simon Fraser University and the University
of Victoria.
"All of you are aware that I have now
sort of completed the B.C. circuit," said
Dr. Pedersen, who was a vice-president of
UVic and then president of SFU before
coming to UBC, "so I have a little
understanding about each of the three
universities.
"If there is anything that has caused me
continued from Page 1
genuine distress over the years it is the fact
that universities in this province have
somehow seen themselves in a competitive
mode as opposed to a co-operative one.
"I would like to suggest to you that in
the long haul, all of us have lost as a result
of that effort . . . It's unfortunate that we
have to get into the kind of situation that
we are now in fiscally (before) we recognize
that by working together we will gain a
great deal more."
Dr. Pedersen called upon faculty "to give
me a hand in trying to give encouragement
and support to the non-academic staff."
"I'm sure all of you are prepared to
acknowledge that without the help and the
strength and the loyalty that comes from
our administrative professional staff, our
support staff and others within the
University — that without that help, this
University would not be a university.
"I would ask you that when those
occasions arise, whin people give a little
more than is normally expected, that you
take the time to give somebody a pat on
the back, or if you have a little more time,
drop them a note.
"I think it would make a lot of
difference to the way in which we, as
academics, are viewed and it would make a
difference, I think, to the overall question
of morale within this University.
"Morale is going to be a bit of a problem
as it is, and we need all the help we can
get."
The president received a sustained
ovation from the overflow crowd in IRC 2.
Faculty members contacted later said they
were impressed by Dr. Pedersen's forthright
approach and positive attitude.
McLean
Continued from Page 1
thoughts on behalf of the Board:
"One, we welcome the opportunity to
work with Senate in facing problems and
finding their solutions in the coming year.
"Two, we are excited about your new
president and his administration. They are
all first class people.
"Three, we are committed to academic
excellence.
"Finally, we hold out our hand in
friendship. We seek a new spirit of
cooperation between the Board and the
Senate to see that this institution which we
both love shall flourish and prosper."
Mr. McLean's remarks were warmly
applauded by Senate.
CAMPUS
P€OPI£'
Prof. Michael Shaw, University
Professor in the UBC botany department,
is the first recipient of the Gold Medal
Award of the Biological Council of Canada
for outstanding service to biology in
Canada.
Prof. Shaw, who is the leading authority
on rust diseases and their interactions with
the plants they infect, has been honored on
numerous occasions for his research. He
was awarded the gold medal of the
Canadian Society of Plant Physiologists, the
Flavelle Medal of the Royal Society of
Canada and an honorary Doctor of Science
degree by his alma mater, McGill
University.
The Biological Council, in awarding its
gold medal for the first time, cited Prof.
Shaw for his distinguished academic career
and his "many significant contributions
within the broader Canadian scientific
community."
Prof. Shaw first joined UBC as dean of
the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and
was named UBC's vice-president,
academic, in 1975, a post he held until
June 30 this year, when he stepped down
to devote himself to teaching and research
on a full-time basis.
Prof. Peter Oberlander, director of the
UBC Centre for Human Settlements, is in
Ottawa this week to present a paper at a
research colloquium convened by the UN
Economic Commission for Europe.
The colloquium is on "Human
Settlement Policies in Periods of Economic
Stress" and Dr. Oberlander has prepared
an analysis of related experience in
Western Canada.
President George Pedersen is a member
of a group of 19 corporate leaders and an
equal number of Canadian university
presidents who met recently at Concordia
University in Montreal for the inaugural
meeting of the Corporate/Higher
Education Forum, which seeks to promote
dialogue between business and academia.
At its inaugural meeting, forum
participants agreed to establish a planning
committee to propose a permanent
structure to assure the forum's viability.
Dr. Roy Taylor, director of the UBC
Botanical Garden, is the recipient of the
Mary E. Elliott Service Award of the
American Botanical Association. The
garden's assistant director, A. Bruce
Macdonald, has been elected an honorary
life member of the B.C. Nursery Trades
Association.
Peter Hennessy, assistant registrar,
admissions, has been selected by the Joint
Commission on Workshops (American)
Association of Collegiate Registrars and
Admissions Officers and the National
Association of Foreign Student Affairs to
participate in an Arabian Gulf States
Workshop in October and November.
In addition to being the only Canadian,
Mr. Hennessy will be the team chairman
for a visit to the Yemen Arab Republic.
A report on the workshop will be used as
a reference guide for evaluating the
educational systems of the Arabian Gulf
States.
Joan Pedersen, wife of UBC president
George Pedersen, was made honorary
president of the Faculty Women's Club
yesterday at the club's first meeting of the
year, at Cecil Green Park.
Club president Barbara Tait,
meanwhile, has invited wives of new and
visiting faculty members to join. The club
meets monthly and members are eligible to
join any of 23 interest groups — including
gourmet dining, hiking, art appreciation
and financial affairs.
The Faculty Women's Club also raises
money for student scholarships and
bursaries.
At the bi-annual meeting of the
Canadian Guidance and Counselling
Association in Fredericton this summer,
Prof. John Allan of Counselling
Psychology and former graduate student,
Mrs. Judith Nairne, received the "Best
Professional Article Award" for their 1981
paper: "Racial Prejudice in the classroom:
A developmental counselling approach. "
Development
plan headed
by Ken Strand
Dr. Kenneth Strand, former president of
Simon Fraser University, has been
appointed project manager of the strategic
planning project being conducted by the
universities, the provincial government and
the Universities Council of B.C.
This was announced by President George
Pedersen to Senate Sept. 14. He also
announced that Dr. Robert Smith, vice-
president academic, will be UBC's
representative on the working group
headed by Dr. Strand.
In addition to defining the future roles
of each university, the project will aim at
developing strategies that will enable the
university system to achieve its objectives
and make the best use of available
educational dollars.
The project is expected to be completed
by the end of 1984.
Meanwhile, Senate last week endorsed a
report on academic planning and priorities
by the Senate budget committee.
"Whether it is in a period of expansion
or retrenchment, the University needs an
overall academic plan," the report said.
"In a period of expansion, the existence
of a plan should enable the University to
expand in a way which is in its best long-
term, academic interests. In a period of
retrenchment, the existence of a plan
should enable the University to act in a
way which does the least damage to its
major academic objectives."
The report said the first, and
fundamental, step in working out an
academic plan would be to decide in what
areas the University should carry on its
activities, to determine what might be
considered as "core" activities. Factors such
as quality, cost, and special value to the
province or to Canada should be
considered, the report said.
Dr. Pedersen told Senate that Dr. Strand
was prepared to meet with the Senate
Budget Committee.
Five appeals;
3 disallowed
The Senate Committee on Appeals on
Academic Standing heard five appeals
during the period April 1, 1982 to March
31, 1983, Senate was told last week.
Three of the appeals were denied and
two were allowed in part.
The committee also recommended to
Senate "that the Senate request faculties
offering combined degrees' to re-assess and
to report on the philosophy underlying
those degrees, particularly with a view to
deciding if it is appropriate to require that
the work in the second of the degrees needs
to be completed at this university."
The recommendation was approved by
Senate.
Behind the recommendation was an
appeal from a student taking a combined
Commerce-Law degree.
He completed all of the Commerce
requirements at UBC, then did his first
year of Law at Queen's and the second at
McGill. On completion of his second year,
at McGill, he applied for a Commerce
degree from UBC.
This was denied because current
regulations require that the Law
requirement be met either at UBC or at
the University of Victoria. National Universities Week
September 21, 1983
OCTOBER 2nd THROUGH 8th
i f-" * at..* t.s
We    *'■■■
have
the
■i future
in minds.
NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES WEEK
The universities of Canada,
including UBC, are celebrating.
In the week of Oct. 2 to 8,
you and your friends are
invited to sample the events
planned during National
Universities Week. A wide
range of concerts, tours,
exhibits, lectures and sporting
events — most of them
free — are planned to focus
attention on the essential role
universities play in the life of
the province through teaching,
research and public service.
This special supplement to UBC
Reports provides details of all
events being staged on the
campus and a map showing the
location of events. From Oct. 2
to 8, we'll be open so you can
see a sampling of activities at
Canada's second largest
university. Plan to visit us.
Stanley Weese, left, directs Waiting for Godot at
UBC's Frederic Wood Theatre. Playing leading
characters of tramps are Pat Blaney, centre, and
Bruce Dow.
w
Admission will be free during public swimming
hours at UBC's Aquatic Centre during National
Universities Week Oct. 2-8.
Popular Art of South India is one of seven special
displays at Museum of Anthropology. Museum
open noon to 9 p.m. Oct. 4-8. Admission free. National Universities Week
September 21, 1983
CELEBRATION
National Universities Week Oct. 2-8
MONDAY, SEPT. 26
■ Special ceremony at 8 p.m. in the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre to install Dr. George
Pedersen as president of UBC and Dr.
William Saywell as president of SFU. Some
free tickets for the ceremony are available
through UBC's Ceremonies Office. Call
228-2484 Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. - 4p.m.
SATURDAY, OCT. 1
■ Soccer. UBC Thunderbirds vs. University of Victoria Vikings, 2 p.m. UBC Playing
Fields (L-7 on map opposite). ■ Samuel
Beckett's play, Waiting for Godot, 8 p.m.
Frederic Wood Theatre. Ticket information: 228-2678. ■ Vancouver Institute Lecture. Dr. Margaret Rule, Mary Rose Trust,
England, on A Tudor Warship: King Henry
VIU's Mary Rose, 8:15 p.m., Lecture Hall
2, Woodward Building. Free admission.
SUNDAY, OCT. 2
■ Museum of Anthropology. Snake in the
Grass Moving Theatre opens a new season
with a performance of a Kwagiutl story entitled The Wisest One at 2:30 p.m. Museum
open noon to 5 p.m. today, closed Monday.
Free admission to museum Tuesday through
Saturday, Oct. 4-8, open till 9 p.m.
MONDAY, OCT. 3
B First of four lectures on Advanced
Technology, Human Values and the Universities at Robson Square Media Theatre at 12
noon. Continues Oct. 5, 6, 7. Today's speaker: Dr. Peter Cornell, director of the Economic Council of Canada, on Why We Must
Broaden the Focus of Technological Policy
in Canada — Now. Free admission. I First
of three discussions on the Search for Knowledge by UBC faculty members. Tonight's
speakers: Dr. John McNeill, Pharmaceutical
Sciences, and Dr. Douglas Clement, Sports
Medicine, on In Sickness and in Health. Free
admission. ■ Special FESTIVAL OF
THE ARTS performance of Samuel
Beckett's play Waiting for Godot, 8 p.m.,
Frederic Wood Theatre. Ticket information: 228-2678.
TUESDAY, OCT. 4
H Second of three discussions on the Search
for Knowledge by UBC faculty members.
Continues Oct. 6 in Lecture Hall 6, Woodward Building, 7:30 p.m. Tonight's speakers: Prof. Michael Ovenden, Astronomy,
and Prof. Tad Ulrych, Geophysics, on
Heaven and Earth. ■ FESTIVAL OF
THE ARTS concert by faculty members of
the UBC Department of Music. Free admission. 8 p.m. Recital Hall, UBC Music Building.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 5
■ Second of four lectures on Advanced
Technology, Human Values and the Universities at Robson Square Media Theatre at 12
noon. Continues Oct. 6 and 7. Today's
speaker: Dr. Tom Calvert, SFU interdisciplinary studies, on Advanced Industrial
Technology in B. C. — Are We Really Too
Late? Free admission. ■ Recital. Das
Marienleben, a cycle of poems by Rilke set to
music by Hindemith. Performed by Karen
Smith, soprano, and Philip Tillotson, piano.
Recital Hall, Music Building, 12:30 p.m.
Free admission. ■ Museum of Anthropology concert by the Cassation Group. New
music for percussion, computer synthesizer
and recorder. 8 p.m. Rotunda, Museum of
Anthropology. Free admission. ■ Geology
lecture by Joe Nagel, curator M.Y. Williams
Geology Museum, UBC, on Data Bases and
Museum Cases: Science and Museums. Admission $2.50; $4 per couple. 8 p.m. Geological Sciences Centre. ■ FESTIVAL OF
THE ARTS. A colorful evening of the performing arts featuring faculty and students
in a program of music (40-voice choir),
dance and poetry. Frederic Wood Theatre,
8 p.m. Free admission.
THURSDAY, OCT. 6
■ Third of four lectures on Advanced
Technology, Human Values and the Universities at Robson Square Media Theatre at 12
noon. Continues on Oct. 7. Today's speaker:
Dr. Erich Vogt, director of TRIUMF meson
facility, on The Cult of Modern Science and
its   Impact   on   Society.   Free   admission.
■ Arts '20 Relay Race, opening ceremony
at 12:30 p.m. on the south plaza of the Student Union Building. Relay starts at 12th
and Willow and finishes on campus at the
Great Trek cairn on Main Mall. ■ Last of
three discussions on the Search for Knowledge by UBC facultv members in Lecture
Hall 6, Woodward Building, 7:30 p.m. Tonight's speakers: Dr. Hector Williams,
Classics, and Dr. Caroline Williams, postdoctoral fellow in Classics, on Bringing the
Past Back to Life. Free admission. I Sitar
Recital. Classical Music of India performed
by Nikhil Banerjee, sitar, and Zakir Husain,
tabla, 7:30 p.m., Recital Hall, Music Building. Ticket information: 228-3881. FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS. A program of short
films, some of them national award winners,
produced in the Department of Theatre.
Frederic Wood Theatre, 8 p.m. Free admission.
FRIDAY, OCT. 7
■ Last of four lectures on Advanced
Technology, Human Values and the Universities at Robson Square Media Theatre at 12
noon. Today's speaker: Prof. W.D. Valgard-
son, chairman of the creative writing department at the University of Victoria, on Technology   and   Literacy.    Free   admission.
■ Soccer. UBC Thunderbirds vs. University of Lethbridge Pronghorns, 2 p.m., UBC
Playing   fields   (L-7   on   map   opposite).
■ FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS. An even
ing of the performing arts featuring faculty
and students in a program of music, dance
and poetry. Frederic Wood Theatre, 8 p.m.
Free admission.
SATURDAY, OCT. 8
■ Soccer. UBC Thunderbirds vs. University of Calgary Dinosaurs, 2 p.m., UBC Playing Fields (L-7 on map opposite). ■ Vancouver Institute Lecture. President George
Pedersen, UBC, on Education Under Siege:
Academic Freedom and the Cult of Efficiency, 8:15 p.m., Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building. Free admission.
SUNDAY, OCT. 9
H Museum of Anthropology. Snake in the
Grass Moving Theatre presents a story entitled Scab at 2:30 p.m. Museum open noon
to 5 p.m.
Work of UBC film-makers will be shown during
National Universities Week Festival of the Arts at
UBC. See Thursday, Oct. 6 at 8 p.m.
baajajaaa. National Universities Week
September 21, 1983
Here's a guide to the location of
NUW events
at UBC
GETTING TO UBC
Major bus routes serving the UBC
campus are:
No. 10 from downtown Vancouver
via Granville St.. West Broadway
(9th Ave). West 10th Avenue and
University Boulevard. Returns to
downtown Vancouver as No. 14.
The No. 41 bus reaches the
campus via 41st Ave. and
Southwest Marine Drive. Major
arteries to the campus for cars are
Northwest and Southwest Marine
Dr.. West 4th Ave.. West 10th Ave.
and 16th Ave. There are numerous
parking lots on the central campus
lor visitors, including two multi-
storey parkades. Large-scale
campus maps are located at maigr
campus entrances and parking
lots.
National Universities Week events will be held in a
number of campus buildings and locations during the
week of Oct. 2-8. Locations of events are listed below,
together with the co-ordinates to enable you to pinpoint
buildings on the campus map above.
PARKING — There will be free parking on the campus
Oct. 2-8 on weekends and after 5 p.m. on weekdays. The
most convenient parking facilities on campus are
parkades located in co-ordinates D-3 and G-6.
THUNDERBIRD PARK PLAYING FIELDS (L-7)
— Site of soccer games against UVic Oct. 1, Lethbridge
Pronghorns Oct. 7 and Calgary Dinosaurs Oct. 8. All
games start at 2 p.m.
BOTANICAL GARDEN (L-3) - A daily tour of the
Main Botanical Garden begins at 2 p.m. Oct. 3-7 starting
from garden entrance on Stadium Road. Admission to
the NITOBE JAPANESE GARDEN (C-3) will be free
Oct. 2-8. HORTLINE, UBC's horticultural advisory service, will be at Lansdowne Shopping Centre on No. .3
Road in Richmond from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 3-7.
Bring your plants for advice on care and protection.
WOODWARD BUILDING (G-6) - Site of three free
lecture-discussions on the search for knowledge by leading
UBC researchers on Oct. 3, 4 and 6 at 7:30 p.m. in Lecture Hall 6. Lecture details on the next page of this flyer.
UBC president Dr. George Pedersen winds up National
Universities Week at UBC Oct. 8 when he addresses the
Vancouver Institute in Lecture Hall 2 of the Woodward
Building on the topic Education Under Siege: Academic
Freedom and the Cult of Efficiency. Free admission.
AQUATIC CENTRE (E-6) - Free admission to UBCs
Olympic-sized swimming pool during public swimming
hours Oct. 2-8. For hours, call 228-4521.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING (E-6) Cafeteria in
building open Oct. 2-8 (till 7 p.m. Oct. 3-6). Bowling and
video games in basement.
BOOKSTORE (F-5) - UBC's new Bookstore, the
second-largest in Canada, will be open till 9 p.m. Oct. 3
to 7. Huge selection of specialized books, fiction, stationary, art supplies, calculators, microcomputers, novelties.
ARTS '20 RELAY - This annual event, now in its 64th
year, will wind its way through Vancouver streets on Oct.
6 from 12th and Willow to the finish line at the Cairn in
front of the UBC Chemistry Building (E-5). Opening
ceremonies at 12:30 p.m. on the south plaza of the Student Union Building (E-6).
FINE ARTS GALLERY (basement of Main Library,
D-5) — Display of contemporary Japanese porcelain.
Gallery open noon to 9 p.m. Oct. 3-8, free admission.
Look for other National Universities Week displays in
showcases in the Main Library building.
GEOPHYSICS   AND   ASTRONOMY   BUILDING
(G-4) — Telescopes on the roof of this building will be
open Oct. 3-8 from 8-11 p.m. for free public observing,
provided skies are clear.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES CENTRE (G-4) - M.Y.
Williams Geology Museum open 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Oct.
3-7. See mining and mineral displays and reconstructed
dinosaur. Free admission. Lecture by museum curator Joe
Nagel on Data Bases and Museum Cases: Science and
Museums at 8 p.m. Oct. 5. Admission $2.50, $4 per couple.
FREE FOR ALL
■ UBC's Museum of Anthropology
will be open without charge until 9 p.m.
Oct. 4 to 8.
■ Free admission to UBC's Aquatic
Centre during public swimming hours
Oct. 2-8.
■ Free tours of UBC Main Botanical
Garden Oct. 3-7 at 2 p.m.
■ Visit UBC Geology Museum for fascinating mining and mineral displays
and a look at a reconstructed dinosaur.
Open until 9 p.m. Oct. 3-7.
■ Free lecture series at UBC Oct. 3, 4
and 6 and at Robson Square Oct. 3,5,6
and 7.
■ See the stars through UBC telescopes Oct. 3-8, provided skies are
clear.
■ Free Festival of the Arts (music,
dance, film, art display) and other exhibits open Oct. 2-8.
COMPUTING CENTRE (E-4) - Free, half-hour tours
of UBC's Computing Centre, one of Canada's best, on
Oct. 4 from 10 a.m. to noon. Other tours can be arranged
by calling 228-3939 one week in advance.
OLD   ADMINISTRATION   BUILDING   (D-4)    -
Seldom-seen paintings by Emily Carr, Lawren Harris,
A.Y. Jackson and others on display in the Board and
Senate Room (2nd floor) Oct. 3-7 (except Thursday, Oct.
6). Free admission, noon to 9 p.m.
MUSIC BUILDING (C-4) - Free concerts on Oct. 4
and 5. UBC faculty members will perform a varied program of music by Bach, Brahms and others on Oct. 4 at 8
p.m. On Oct. 5 at 12:30 p.m., a performance of Hinde-
mith's Das Marienleben, a cycle of poems on the life of
the Virgin Mary by Rilke, set to music. On Oct. 6, sitar
maestro Nikhil Banerjee performs at 7:30 p.m. Admission $10 general, students $7.50. For ticket information,
call 228-3881.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE (C-4) - Site of Festi-
val of the Arts performances Oct. 3-7. Oct. 3 - Special
performance of Samuel Beckett's play Waiting for Godot
at 8 p.m. $6.50 adults, $4.50 students and seniors. For
ticket information, call 228 2678. Oct. 5 - UBC faculty
members and students present a colorful evening of the
performing arts, including the 40-voice University Singers
conducted by James Fankhauser, plus dance and poetry
readings. Free admission. Oct. 6 - Film at UBC, a program of short films made by members of UBC's theatre
department. Several award-winners will be shown. Free
admission. Oct. 7 - another evening of the performing
arts featuring music, dance and poetry readings. Free admission.
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY (B-4) Museum
open noon to 9 p.m. Oct. 4-8. Free admission. Special
National Universities Week events: Oct. 2 - Snake in the
Grass Moving Theatre performs at 2:30 p.m. Oct. 2. (The
Wisest One, a Kwagiutl story) and at 2:30 p.m. Oct. 9
(premier performance of Scab); Guided walking tours of
museum collections and special exhibits at 2:30 p.m. Oct.
4 and 6; The Cassation Group, a chamber ensemble presents new music for percussion, computer synthesizer and
recorder at 8p.m. on Oct. 5. Special exhibits currently on
display include The Copper that Came from Heaven,
Calendar Prints: Popular Art of South India, Blood from
Stone: Making and Using Stone Tools in Prehistoric B.C.,
plus four student displays.
ASIAN CENTRE (C-3) Free displays: Kasuri Folk
Fabric of Japan, opens on Oct. 2 and continues until
Oct. 16 (noon to 9 p.m. Oct. 2-8); Exhibition of landscape paintings by D.A. Khamgaonkar opens Oct. 3 and
continues until Oct. 9. National Universities Week
September 21, 1983
NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES WEEK
Here are details of NUW events at UBC
Members of the public are invited to participate in a
wide range of events and activities taking place both on
and off campus, as UBC joins in the celebration of National Universities Week, Oct. 2 through 8.
Highlights of the UBC activities include a Festival of
the Arts, which features a presentation each evening by
students and faculty in the performing arts, lectures on
research and advanced technology, sporting events,
displays and exhibits and much more.
Watch for the following events during National Universities Week:
ART
Seldom-seen works from UBC collections by artists such
as Emily Carr, Lawren Harris, A.Y. Jackson, Jack Shadbolt and others will be displayed in the Board and Senate
Room of the Old Administration Building, Oct. 3-7 (except Thursday, Oct. 6), noon to 9 p.m.
THEATRE AND
PERFORMING ARTS
The following events take place at 8 p.m. in the
Frederic Wood Theatre, unless otherwise indicated. A
special performance of Samuel Beckett's play Waiting for
Godot will be staged on Oct. 3. Tickets are $6.50 for
adults, $4.50 for students and seniors (reservations at
228-2678). On Oct. 4, faculty members from UBCs
music department will present a free concert at 8 p.m.
featuring the music of Bach, Brahms, Dvorak, Piston and
others. The concert takes place in the Recital Hall of the
Music Building. On Oct. 5 there will be a recital by the
University Singers, led by James Fankhauser, and dance
performances, drama and poetry readings by students
and faculty. Admission is free. A program of short films,
among them national award winners, produced by
members of the theatre department will be shown on Oct.
6 (free admission). On Oct. 7, faculty and students present another free evening of music, dance and poetry
reading.	
MUSIC
Das Marienleben, a cycle of poems based on the life of
the Virgin Mary set to music by Hindemith, will be performed in a free concert on Oct. 5 by Karen Smith,
soprano, and Philip Tillotson, piano. The recital is at
12:30 p.m. in the Music Building's recital hall. At 7:30
p.m. on Oct. 6 sitar maestro Nikhil Banerjee will give a
concert of classical music of India, accompanied by Zakir
Husain. Tickets are $10 general, $7.50 for students.
Recital Hall, Music Building.
DISPLAYS AND EXHIBITS
An exhibit of Contemporary Japanese Ceramics will be
on display at the Fine Arts Gallery, located in the basement of the Main Library. Gallery is open Oct. 4 through
8 until 9 p.m. (free admission). The Asian Centre is
featuring an exhibit entitled Kasuri: Folk Fabric of
Japan, Oct. 2 to 16. Exhibit hours are noon to 9 p.m.
daily during NUW. In the Music Studio of the Asian Centre, a display of landscape paintings of India by D.A.
Khamgaonkar is open to the public from noon to 9 p.m.
daily during NUW. Both exhibits are free.
LECTURE SERIES	
Two lecture series one on campus and another at
Robson Square — will be highlights of National Universities Week.
The on-campus series takes place in Lecture Hall 6 of
the Woodward Building and will feature a few of UBC's
leading researchers discussing their work. Admission is
free.
The series leads off on Oct. 3 at 7:30 p.m. with two
UBC faculty members discussing health matters under
the title In Sickness and In Health. Speakers will be
Prof. John McNeill of Pharmaceutical Sciences, who
works with new drugs for heart disease and diabetes, and
Dr. Douglas Clement, of the sports medicine department,
who studies the biomechanics of running, iron metabolism and doping control.
On Oct. 4 at 7:30 p.m., under the title Heaven and
Earth, the speakers will be astronomer Prof. Michael
Ovenden and geophysicist Prof. Tad Ulyrch. In addition
to discussing their own research, the pair will reflect what
their work has taught them about science itself.
A husband-and-wife team of archeologists will discuss
important research they have done at sites in Turkey and
Greece at 7:30 on Oct. 6 during an evening entitled
Bringing the Past Back to Life. The speakers are Dr.
Hector Williams of Classics and his wife, Caroline, a postdoctoral fellow at UBC. Both have recently returned from
Greece.
The other series of four lectures at noon in the Robson
Square Media Centre Theatre is jointly sponsored by
UBC, SFU and UVic and is entitled Advanced Technology, Human Values and the Universities. Admission to
all the lectures listed below is free.
Leading off the series Oct. 3 will be Dr. Peter Cornell,
director of the Economic Council of Canada, who speaks
on Why We Must Broaden the Focus of Technological
Policy in Canada — Now. The second lecturer is Dr.
Tom Calvert, dean of interdisciplinary studies at SFU,
who speaks on Advanced Industrial Technology in B.C.
— Are We Really Too Late? on Oct. 5. The lecturer on
Oct. 6 will be Dr. Erich Vogt, director of the TRIUMF
Project located at UBC and a professor of physics, whose
topic will be The Cult of Modern Science and its Impact
on Society. The final speaker in the series on Oct. 7 will
be Prof. W.D. Valgardson, writer and chairman of the
creative writing department at the University of Victoria,
whose topic is Technology and Literacy.
Associated with the Robson Square lecture series is a
60-minute television program — a joint project between
UBC and SFU — entitled Advanced Technology - The
University and the Community, which explores the economic, social, educational and research issues of advanced technology in B.C. and the role of the universities.
Appearing on the program will be well-known B.C. scientist Dr. Gordon Shrum, the presidents of UBC and SFU
and Dr. Patrick McGeer, provincial minister of universities, science and communications. The program will be
shown on the Knowledge Network (KNOW) on converter
channel 18 in B.C.'s Lower Mainland on the following
schedule: Oct. 6, 10-11 p.m.; Oct. 7, 1:30-2:30 p.m. and
Oct. 9, 9-10 p.m. Check local listings for telecast times in
other B.C. areas.
Two other talks worth noting during National Universities Week: UBC president Dr. George Pedersen speaks
to the Vancouver Institute in Lecture Hall 2 of the Woodward Building at 8:15 p.m. Oct. 8. His topic: Education
Under Siege: Academic Freedom and the Cult of Effi- .
ciency. On Oct. 5 at 8 p.m., Joe Nagel, curator of the
UBC geology museum, speaks in the Geological Sciences
Centre on Data Bases and Museum Cases: Science and
Museums. Admission $2.50; $4 a couple.
SPORTS EVENTS	
Three soccer games, all of them at 2 p.m. at the
Thunderbird Park playing fields, will take place during
NUW at UBC. On Oct. 1, the Thunderbirds meet their
archrivals from the University of Victoria. The
Lethbridge Pronghorns will be in town on Oct. 7 and the
Calgary Dinosaurs will be the visitors on Oct. 8.
On Thursday, Oct. 6, the 64th annual running of the
Arts '20 Relay Race begins at 12th and Willow in Fairview
about 1:45 p.m. Teams of runners will reach the campus
via 16th Ave., Blanca St. and University Boulevard, terminating at the Cairn on the Main Mall.
MUSEUM OF
ANTHROPOLOGY
There will be plenty to see and do at the museum which
will be open until 9 p.m. Oct. 4 to 8 with free admission.
The Snake in the Grass Moving Theatre begins its season
with a Kwagiutl story entitled The Wisest One on Oct. 2
at 2:30 p.m. On Oct. 9 the theatre presents a premiere
performance of Scab. Guided walking tours of the
museum's collections and special exhibitons will take
place on Oct. 4 and 6 at 2:30 p.m. The Cassation Group,
a chamber ensemble, performs new music for percussion,
computer synthesizer and recorder on Oct. 5 at 8 p.m.
OFF-CAMPUS DISPLAYS,
SPECIAL EVENTS
The University of B.C. Press will mount a display illustrating UBC's extensive publishing program in the
Bentall Centre, Burrard and Pender Sts., Oct. 3-7 from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.
The UBC Botanical Garden will take its plant advisory
service — the HORTLINE — to Lansdowne Shopping
Centre in Richmond Oct. 3-7 from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Bring your plant problems to the experts.
Some 24 UBC faculty members will be appearing on
the Rafe Mair open line radio show on station CJOR (dial
600) in and around NUW. The faculty members will
describe their research in such areas as politics,
economics, the forest and fishing industries, cancer,
herpes, TV advertising and Toxic Shock Syndrome,
among other things. The show is on from 9 a.m. to 12
noon.
The CBC program entitled Ideas will broadcast a series
of talks Oct. 2-6 entitled Hard Times in the Ivory
Tower, detailing the problems and achievements of
Canadian universities. Ideas is broadcast on AM radio
(dial 690 in Vancouver) from 9:05 to 10 p.m.
We
have
the
future
in minds.
Come see what's going on at your local university.
It's more than academic!
Take a look at the rich cultural life, the exciting sports events - and at the special activities
scheduled during National Universities Week.
We'll intrigue you - we'll probably surprise you. Because we're more than academic.
October 2nd - 8th
NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES WEEK UBC Reports September 21, 1983
Ed Carlin
joins UBC
for year
Ed Carlin, Superintendent of Schools in
West Vancouver, has been appointed to a
one-year term as the first Resident Fellow
in UBC's Department of Administrative,
Adult and Higher Education in the Faculty
of Education.
In addition to teaching duties in the
department, Mr. Carlin will act as a liaison
between UBC and the Association of B.C.
School Superintendents in a study being
carried out by a group of UBC researchers
on the state of school superintendency in
the province.
Profiles will be developed of the 75
superintendents in B.C. and their role and
effectiveness within the school system will
be examined.
Prof. Lawrence Downey, head of the
administrative, adult and higher education
department and chief investigator in the
study, said he hoped Mr. Carlin's
appointment at UBC would be the first
step in developing a closer association
between the University and the
profession in B.C.
John Wormsbecker, past president of the
Association of B.C. School Superintendents
who was instrumental in initiating the
liaison with UBC, said members of the
association were  "delighted" with the
appointment.
"I think it provides a much-needed
strengthening of the link between the
University and the profession . . .
between theory and practice. The
association is pleased that someone with
Mr. Carlin's experience and ability has
been chosen for this task.'
Mr. Carlin holds a Bachelor of
Education degree from UBC and a Master
of Education degree from the University of
Western Washington, and has worked as a
teacher and district superintendent in B.C.
for the past 26 years. He has been
Superintendent of Schools in West v,
Vancouver since 1974.
Former Botany Head
Tommy Taylor dies
Alan Bruce Gellatly, from the
University of Waterloo, assumes office
fan. 1, 1984, as UBC's Vice-President,
Finance.
UDC
UBC grad gets
key NSERC job
A UBC graduate has been named
director of grants for the National Sciences
and Engineering Research Council
(NSERC), the major national funding
agency for research in the basic and
applied sciences.
Janet Halliwell, who was awarded her
Master of Science degree in chemistry by
UBC in 1970, has been with NSERC since
1977 and laid the groundwork for the
council's strategic grants program.
The programs under Ms. Halliwell's
direction currently entail annual
expenditures of about $160 million or 64
per cent of NSERC's 1983-84 budget. In
the last fiscal year, UBC researchers were
awarded $17,546,387 by NSERC.
CalcndaR
Professor emeritus T.M.C.   "Tommy''
Taylor, former head of UBC's Department
of Biology and Botany and director of the
UBC Botanical Garden, died in Victoria on
Aug. 6 at the age of 79.
Prof. Taylor joined the UBC faculty in
1946 after a 19-year teaching and research
career at the University of Toronto, where
he received his Doctor of Philosophy degree
in 1930. He graduated from UBC in 1926
with honors in biology.
He became head of the Department of
Biology and Botany at UBC in 1954 and
stepped down from the post in 1963 to
Comedy, farce
key elements
Comedy and farce are the key elements
in four plays being staged by UBC's
Department of Theatre at the Frederic
Wood Theatre in the 1983 84 season.
Leading off the season is Samuel
Beckett's classic 20th-century comedy
Waiting for Godot, which opens tonight
(Sept. 21) at 8 p.m. Stanley Weese directs
the play, which centres on the vigil of two
tramps who wait (and wait) in the
wilderness to keep an appointment with a
Mr. Godot. The play runs until Oct. 3,
with the final night marking the opening
of a UBC Festival of the Arts during
National Universities Week Oct. 2-8.
The second play of the season is Love's
Labor's Lost, William Shakespeare's play
about four young men who decide to
isolate themselves for three years of study
and contemplation, only to have their idyll
shattered by the unexpected arrival of four
determined young women. The play is
directed by Arne Zaslove and runs from
Nov. 9 to 19.
Theatre department head John
Brockington will direct Oscar Wilde's play
The Importance of Being Earnest Jan. 11
through 21. Described by Wilde as "a
trivial comedy for serious people," this
well-known farce contains such legendary
characters as Lady Bracknell, Canon
Chasuble and Miss Prism.
The final play of the Freddy Wood
season is The Suicide by Nikolai Erdman.
The play is a political farce in which
Podsekalnikov's intended suicide is greedily
seized upon by a mob of Muscovites, each
anxious to claim it for his own political
cause. The play was banned by the Soviet
Censorship Committee in 1932 and still has
not been seen in that country. The Suicide
is directed by Klaus Strassmann and runs
from March 7 to 17.
devote full time to teaching and research.
He retired in 1968.
Dr. Taylor was widely known as one of
Canada's leading experts on ferns and
roses. He was the author of a book on ferns
and numerous articles which appeared in
learned journals in Canada and the U.S.
Prof. Taylor maintained an active
interest in his discipline after retirement
and was a member of a UBC Botanical
Garden study group which visited the
Queen Charlotte Islands a month prior to
his death.
* * *
Robert E. Mills, a lecturer in UBC's
Faculty of Forestry since 1980, died
suddenly on July 25 at the age of 56.
A graduate of the University of
Washington, Mr. Mills had extensive
experience in the forest industry in the
areas of forest management and
engineering prior to joining the UBC
faculty.
Alice Neil, a long-time supporter of the
arts at UBC, died on July 27 at the age of
90. For more than 20 years she represented
the University Chapter of the I.O.D.E. on
the University's Fine Arts Committee,
helping to establish the Fine Arts Gallery
in 1948 and the Fine Arts Foundation in
1963. Although the University Chapter of
the I.O.D.E. no longer exists, funds raised
through its efforts under the leadership of
Mrs. Neil still provide assistance to the
Fine Arts Gallery and annual scholarships
for students in the Departments of Fine
Arts, Theatre, Music and Creative
Writing.
Mrs. Neil was born in Lennoxville,
Quebec in 1892, and graduated with a
Master of Arts degree in English and
economics from UBC in 1932.
President to speak
at Toronto meeting
The Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada (AUCC) and the
American Council on Education (ACE) are
co-hosting a major conference in Toronto
Oct. 11-14, with the theme  "North
American Higher Education: Shaping the
Future."
President George Pedersen of UBC will
speak Oct. 13 on "Ethical Aspects of
Public Relations in Higher Education."
The conference is open to all interested.
Registration information is available from
Joan Rondeau, AUCC, 1200-151 Slater
Street. Ottawa, KIP 5N1. Telephone (613)
563 1236.
Calendar Deadlines
For events in the weeks of Oct. 9 and 16
material must be submitted not later than 4
p.m. Sept. 29. Send notices to Information
Services, 6328 Memorial Road (Old
Administration Building). For further
information, call 228 3131.
The Vancouver Institute.
Saturday, Sept. 24
China's Race Against
Time: Modernization
and Education.
President William
Saywell. Simon Fraser
University.
Saturday, Oct. 1
A Tudor Warship: King
Henry VIII's Mary
Rose. Dr. Margaret
Rule, The Mary Rose
Trust, England.
Both lectures take place in Lecture Hall 2 of the
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre at
8:15 p.m.
MONDAY, SEPT. 26
The Pedersen Exchange.
An opportunity for any member of the on-
campus University community to meet with
President George Pedersen, to discuss matters of
concern. Persons wishing to meet with the
president should identify themselves to the
receptionist in the Librarian's office, which is
immediately to the left of the main entrance to
the Main Library Building. The president will
be available every Monday when he is on
campus. 3:30 to 5 p.m.
Mechanical Engineering Seminar.
The Role of Technology in Economic
Development. Dr. Tom Siddon. Room 1202,
Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building.
3:30 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Bifurcation and Limit Points in Elastic Shell
Problems. Prof. HubertusJ. Weinitschke,
Institut fur Angewandte Mathematik.
Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg. Room 229,
Mathematics Building. 3:45 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar.
A Long Look at the X-Ray Sky. Dr. Bill
Priedhorsky, Los Alamos National Laboratory,
New Mexico. Room 318, Hennings Building.
4 p.m.
Biochemical Discussion Group
Seminar.
Gene Expression in the Rat and Human
Intestine. Dr. Jeff Gordon, Biological Chemistry,
Washington University School of Medicine.
Lecture Hall 4, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre. 4 p.m.
Zoology Physiology Group Seminar.
Coping with Environmental Stress; Wave Forces
on Intertidal Organisms. Dr. Mark Denny,
Hopkins Marine Laboratory, Stanford
University. Room 2449, Biological Sciences
Building. 4:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 27
Botany Seminar.
Mitochrondrially-Based Senescence in
Neurospora. Dr. Anthony Griffiths, Botany,
UBC. Room 3219, Biological Sciences Building.
12:30 p.m.
Assertiveness Training Workshop.
The Office for Women Students will lead an
Assertive Training Group for women students
Sept. 27 to Oct. 11 from 12:30    2:30 p.m. Pre
registration required in Room 203 of Brock
Hall. Room 106C, Brock Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
The Measurement of Biological Active Copper
in Seawater. Dr. Niko Zorkin, Oceanography,
UBC. Room 1465, Biological Sciences Building.
3 p.m.
Chemistry Lecture.
Photoimmunotherapy: The Use of Conjugates of
Monoclonal Antibodies and Hematoporphyrin as
"Magic Bullets" in the Treatment of Tumors in
Animal Models. Prof. Julia G. Levy,
Microbiology, UBC. Room 250, Chemistry
Building. 4 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 28
Noon-Hour Recital.
Music of Schubert, Weber, Kuhlau and
Donizetti. Paul Douglas, flute, and Robert
Rogers, piano. Recital Hall, Music Building.
12:30 p.m.
Women's Studies and English Lecture.
Cult Books and Sexual Cultures. Prof. Blanche
Gelfant, Robert E. Maxwell Professor,
Dartmouth University. Sponsored by the
Committee on Lectures. Room A102, Buchanan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Mature Women Student Discussion
Group.
The Brown Bag Lunch Group. Students bring
their own lunch at these weekly informal
discussions focusing on topics of interest to
mature women students. Returning women
students invited to join. Sponsored by the
Women Students' Office. Room 223, Brock
Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Statistics Workshop.
A Simple Two-Dimensional Competing Risks
Problem. Prof. P.C. Sander, University of
Eindhoven, Netherlands   Room 223. Angus
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Economic Theory Workshop.
Welfare Dominance and Poverty Orderings.
James Foster. Economics, Purdue University.
Room 351, Brock Hall. 4 p.m.
Zoology Physiology Group Seminar.
Biochemistry of Freezing  Tolerance in Animals.
Dr. Kenneth B. Storey. Institute of
Biochemistry, Carleton University. Room 5460.
Biological Sciences Building. 6 p.m.
Folk Dance Club.
Folk dances and steps from many countries
taught at beginning and intermediate level.
Open to students, faculty, staff and community.
Yearly fee is $10 (students $5). No partner
necessary. For further information, call Marcia
Snider at 738-1246. Upper Lounge.
International House. 7:30 p.m.
Faculty Club Meeting.
Annual general meeting of the Faculty Club.
Ballroom, Faculty Club. 8 p.m.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 29
Faculty Recital.
Music of Villa-Lobos, Rorem and Chatman.
Alan Rinehart, guitar, and Jane Martin, flute.
Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Geological Colloquium.
Phosphate Removal during Diagenesis of Mine
Tailings in Rupert Inlet. T.F. Pedersen,
Oceanography, UBC. Room 330A, Geological
Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Continued on Page 4 UBC Reports September 21, 1983
UK
CalcndaR
Thursday, Sept. 29
Continued from Page 3
Computing Centre Open House.
Self-guided tours through the machine room.
Open to all students, staff and faculty. Starting
point is Room 100, Computer Sciences Building.
12:30 - 4 p.m.
Film/Discussion.
The Making of Judy Chicago's 'The Dinner
Party". Pre-registration in Room 203 of Brock
Hall. For information, call 228-2415. Room
203, Brock Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Condensed Matter Seminar.
Metallic Glasses: The Simplest Kind of Metal?
John Strom-Olsen, McGill University. Room
318, Hennings Building. 2:30 p.m.
Librarianship/History Lecture.
The Signing of the Peace of Paris in 1783. Dr.
H.G.Jones, archivist and historian. Room A100,
Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
China Seminar.
The Romanticism and Humanism of China's
Post-Mao Thinking Generation'. Prof. Michael
Duke, Asian Studies, UBC. Room 604, Asian
Centre. 3:30 p.m.
Mathematics Colloquium.
Representing PSL2(p) on a Riemann Surface of
Least Genus. Prof. Denis Sjerve, UBC. Room
1100, Mathematics Annex Building. 3:45 p.m.
Biochemical Discussion Group
Seminar.
Regulation of Haemoprotein Synthesis in Yeast.
Dr. Helmut Ruis, Institut fur Allgemeine
Biochemie and Ludwig Boltzmann-
Forschungsstelle fur Biochemie, Vienna. Lecture
Hall 3, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. 4 p.m.
SUB Films.
Gandhi. Continues until Sunday, Oct. 2.
Thursday and Sunday shows at 7 p.m., Friday
and Saturday at 6:30 and 9:45 p.m.
Auditorium, Student Union Building. 7 p.m.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 30
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Actions of Environmental Mutagens on the
Human Genome. Prof. H.F.. Evans. M.R.C.,
Western General Hospital, Edinburgh.
Parentcraft Room, Grace Hospital.  1 p.m.
D)
C
"co"2
^ c
^  <D
coQ-
i           ;
(0  r-
«8
i - - % § 1
o~
x  s « u <   *
■§ £ ■= > s =
r- +-1
§.!2
.= ~ ! u. i, o
i|s * g 3
u ■= o  c   £" 2
O O)
CD O
§   3   D   >   -   f
COQC
z   i
SATURDAY, OCT. 1
Soccer.
UBC vs. Victoria Vikings. UBC Playing Fields.
2 p.m.
MONDAY, OCT. 3
Anthropology and Sociology Lecture.
Rock Art: New Scopes on Old Subject. Prof.
Emmanuel Anati, director, Centro di Studi
Preistorici, Brescia, Italy. Room 102, Lasserre
Building. 1:30 p.m.
The Pedersen Exchange.
An opportunity for any member of the on-
campus University community to meet with
President George Pedersen, to discuss matters of
concern. Persons wishing to meet with the
president should identify themselves to the
receptionist in the Librarian's office, which is
immediately to the left of the main entrance to
the Main Library Building. The president will
be available every Monday when he is on
campus. 3:30 to 5 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Asymptotic Analysis of Some Hankel
Transforms. Dr. Chris Frenzen, Mathematics,
UBC. Room 229. Mathematics Building.
3:45 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCT. 4
Faculty Women's Club.
General Meeting. Babysitting available.
Registration for interest groups. Cecil Green
Park. 10 a.m.
Botany Lecture.
Variation in some Lasthenia Populations. B.
Bohm, Botany, UBC. Room 3219, Biological
Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Lecture.
TRIUMF and the Emerging Chemistry of
Quarks, Gluons and Leptons. Dr. Erich W.
Vogt, TRIUMF, UBC. Room 250, Chemistry
Building. 4 p.m.
Gerontology Lecture.
Aging Populations and Aging Communities. Dr.
Peter Oberlander, Centre for Human
Settlements and School of Community and
Regional Planning, UBC. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. 7
p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 5
Pharmacology Seminar.
Can we Define an Ideal Antifibrillatory Drug?
Drs. B.A. MacLeod and M.J.A. Walker,
Pharmacology and Therapeutics, UBC. Room
317, Block C, Medical Sciences Building.
12 noon.
History Lecture.
The Military and the Breakdown of the German
Empire 1917-18. Prof. Wilhelm Deist, Military
Historical Research Centre, Freiberg. Sponsored
by the Committee on Lectures. Room 102,
Buchanan   Building. 12:30 p.m.
Anatomy Seminar.
Muscle Spindles Capsule. Dr. W.K. Ovalle,
Anatomy, UBC. Room 37, Anatomy Building.
12:30 p.m.
History Seminar.
New Directions in Research in the History of the
German Military. Prof. Wilhelm Deist, Military
Historical Research Centre, Freiburg. Sponsored
by the Committee on Lectures. Penthouse.
Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
Statistics Workshop.
Linear Prediction of Time Series with Infinite
Variance. Prof. Daren B.H. Cline, Statistics,
Texas A & M University. Room 223, Angus
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Economic Theory Workshop.
Bargaining and Competition. David Harbord.
London School of Economics. Room 351, Brock
Hall. 4 p.m.
Geophysics Seminar.
Current Avalanche Research Topics. Dr. David
M. McClung, National Research Council.
Vancouver and Adjunct Associate Professor.
Geophysics and Astronomy, UBC. Room 260.
Geophysics and Astronomy Building. 4 p.m.
Folk Dance Club.
Folk dances and steps from many countries
taught at beginning and intermediate level.
Open to students, faculty, staff and community.
Yearly fee is $10 (students $5). No partner
necessary. For further information call Marcia
Snider at 738-1246. Upper Lounge.
International House. 7:30 p.m.
A mask from the exhibit The Copper that Came from Heaven: Dance Dramas of the
Kwakwawa'wakw, currently on display at the Museum of Anthropology.
THURSDAY, OCT. 6
Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar.
Diabetes-Induced Changes in Rat Heart
Function. Dr. J.H. McNeill, Pharmaceutical
Sciences, UBC. Lecture Hall 3, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Condensed Matter Seminar.
Electronic Structure Spectroscopy of Alloys.
Derek Fabian, University of Strathclyde. Room
318, Hennings Building. 2:30 p.m.
Mathematics Colloquium.
Falting's Proof of the Mordell Conjecture. Prof.
Larry Roberts, UBC. Room 1100, Mathematics
Annex Building. 3:45 p.m.
SUB Films.
Sophie's Choice. Continues until Sunday, Oct. 9.
Thursday and Sunday shows at 7 p.m., Friday
and Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Auditorium,
Student Union Building. 7 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 7
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Molecular Genetics of Blood Clotting Factors.
Dr. R.T.A. MacGillivray. Parentcraft Room,
Grace Hospital. 1 p.m.
Soccer.
UBC vs. Lethbridge Pronghorns. UBC Playing
Fields. 2 p.m.
Finance Workshop.
Delegation and Portfolio Management. Prof.
Sudipto Bhattacharya, Stanford University.
Penthouse, Angus Building. 3:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, OCT. 8
Soccer.
UBC vs. Calgary Dinosaurs. UBC Playing Fields.
2 p.m.
Notices
Museum of Anthropology
Exhibits: The Copper that Came from Heaven:
Calendar Prints        Popular Art of South India;
Blood from Stone       Making and Using Stone
Tools in Prehistoric British Columbia.
Lecture: Sept. 21  — Stephen Inglis will speak
on "Multiple Images: India Art and Society'" at
12:30 p.m. in the Theatre Gallery of the
museum. For details about museum activities,
call 228-5087.
Faculty Club Display
Sidney Harris explores the Lighter Side of
Science, an exhibit of cartoons from the New
York Hall of Science. Display continues until
Oct. 7 in the lower hall of the Faculty Club
Sponsored by the UBC Sigma Xi Club.
Ballet UBC Jazz
Ballet UBC Jazz offers a number of
professionally taught ballet, jazz, dancercise,
and tap classes to club members. Classes are
taught at beginner, intermediate and advanced
levels. Registration will be held on Sept. 22 and
23 in the SUB foyer during Club Days. For
further information come to Room SUB 216E or
call 228-6668.
Calendar Event Forms
New calendar forms have been printed and are
available by calling 228-3131 or dropping by
Information Services, Room 207, Old
Administration Building.
Blood Donor Clinics
The following blood donor clinics will take place
this fall on the UBC campus: Sept. 30
Auditorium, Psychiatric Unit, Health Sciences
Centre Hospital, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Oct. 3 to 7
- Rooms 207, 209, 211, 213 and 215, Student
Union Building, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Oct. 26
Rooms 207 and 209, Student Union Building,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Nov. 7  —  Place Vanier
Residence. 3 to 9 p.m.; Nov. 28 -   Totem Park
Residence, 3 to 9 p.m.
Exercise to Music
The Fitness Group will conduct exercise to
music classes at different levels throughout the
year. Sponsored by Recreation UBC. For
information, call 738-4169.
Agricurl
Agricurl begins Tuesday, Oct. 11 from 5 to 7
p.m. Beginners and experienced curlers
welcome. For more information, call J. Shelford
at 228-6578, P. Welling at 228-3280 or A.
Finlayson at 228-3480.
Faculty/Staff Badminton Club
The club meets in Gym B of the Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre on Tuesday evenings from
8:30 to 11:30 p.m. and Friday evenings from
7:30 to 10 p.m. New members welcome.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubcreports.1-0118718/manifest

Comment

Related Items