UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Reports Feb 25, 1976

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubcreports-1.0118713.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubcreports-1.0118713.json
JSON-LD: ubcreports-1.0118713-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubcreports-1.0118713-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubcreports-1.0118713-rdf.json
Turtle: ubcreports-1.0118713-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubcreports-1.0118713-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubcreports-1.0118713-source.json
Full Text
ubcreports-1.0118713-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubcreports-1.0118713.ris

Full Text

 70cpiw rmuw raw
$1 million for UBC summer jobs
UBC will get $1,020,000 from the
provincial government to fund a
summer-job program for senior UBC
students.
The program, called Careers '75 last
year, will provide a total of
$1,500,000 for B.C.'s three public
universities. UBC's 1976 allocation is
$181,000 less than last year's, and it
must be stretched to cover Faculty of
Education projects that were funded
separately last year through the
Department of Education.
Richard Spratley, UBC coordinator
of the summer-job program, said
students interested in the 1976
program    will    be    able    to    obtain
Senate
asks look
at tenure
The issue of tenure was once again
the subject of discussion when Senate
last Wednesday voted to recommend
that the Board of Governors set up a
committee to investigate tenure at
UBC.
The motion to establish such a
committee was put forward by
Senator Gordon Funt, a Law student.
"There has been a good deal of
controversy at this University for a
number ol years about tenure, and it
doesn't just come from the students,"
Mr. Funt said. "I think that Senate has
a duty to the students, to the
University, and to the community to
safeguard teaching quality and I think
that I, and most of the students, feel
that the present tenure system does
not ensure this."
The motion asks the Board to
establish an ad hoc committee to
investigate tenure at UBC with specific
attention directed to the criteria used
in granting tenure, the relative weights
placed on these criteria, the methods
used in ascertaining performance of
faculty members and the extent to
which the criteria are applied
consistent with the interests of the
department in maintaining academic
strength and balance.
Although several senators objected
vigorously to Mr. Funt's criticisms of
the tenure system, several others
suggested that this kind of criticism
showed the need for such a
committee.
Prof.    Robert   Osborne,    Physical
Education   and   Recreation,   said   the
criticism  "was ample evidence of the
Please turn to Page Two
See TENURE
application forms from departmental
and faculty offices by March 5.
Eligible students are those who have
completed their third year of study at
the end of the current academic year.
This induces students registered in the
second year of four-year programs in
faculties such as Applied Science and
Commerce and Business
Administration.
Dr. Spratley said the objectives of
the program include the provision of
valuable work experience for students,
and the funding of jobs related to the
academic disciplines of students to
provide   new,   additional   or  enriched
REPORTS
Vol. 22, No. 8, Feb. 25, 1976/Vancouver
Recent harbinger of spring on the UBC
campus was a haircut for overhanging
bank of clematis in planter between
Music and Frederic Lasserre buildings.
Physical Plant gardener Seiichi
Utsunomiya is the barber.
services to rural and urban
communities in B.C.
Proposals will be developed and
screened at the departmental level, Dr.
Spratley said, before being forwarded
to faculty deans for approval. The
provincial Department of Labour
reserves the right to approve or reject
any projects, he added.
Under Careers '75, students in a
variety of faculties mounted
career-oriented projects, including aid
for native Indians in managing their
financial affairs, provision of free legal
aid services in a number of B.C.
centres, and a food-information
service.
Voice in
UBC budget
rejected
UBC's Senate has rejected two
motions that would have given it a
stronger voice in the preparation of
the University budget.
The motions were rejected at
Senate's February meeting when it
voted to uphold an opinion of its
agenda committee that they were
"outside the purview of Senate."
The two motions by Prof. Cyril
Belshaw, Anthropology and Sociology,
would have affected Senate's budget
committee, which is empowered under
the Universities Act to advise the
president on the preparation of the
University budget that is approved by
the Board of Governors.
Dr. Belshaw's first motion asked
that the Senate budget committee
report annually to Senate and give an
account of the financial provisions
made by the Board to give effect to
the academic decisions of Senate.
Approval by Senate of academic
decisions such as new programs and
major curriculum changes is no
guarantee that they will then be
offered. The proposals must first be
approved by the Board of Governors,
which must also allocate funds where
there are financial implications.
Prof. Belshaw told Senate there is
nothing that specifically prevents
Senate from undertaking any of the
tasks put forward in the motion.
"I think it would be of considerable
value to Senate to have some
knowledge of the (budget)
committee's work, how its priorities
are arrived at and expressed, what
principles are used, and how they
Please turn to Page Two
See BUDGET Good memory pays off in UBC
So you say the mail is slow, that
memos take a week to cross the
campus, that your magazine takes a
month to be delivered? UBC Reports
did some investigating into the campus
mail service and found plenty of room
for praise.
Take an average town of close to
30,000 with a normal post office to serve
it and address a letter to Mr. Smith,
simply care of that Average Town.
Chances are you'll get that letter
returned, undelivered.
But take the same sized town — UBC
— and the campus mail service, address a
letter simply to Dr. Smith, UBC, and
chances are very good that he'll get it.
"We'll put a letter through about six
checks before we send it back
downtown," says Len Coleman,
supervisor of the campus mail room and
its staff of 12. "And there's probably half
a dozen Dr. Smith's here." About 20 per
cent   of   the   mail   to   the   campus   is
addressed with only a name and UBC.
"Up until about two years ago all the
finance department cheques (staff
paycheques sent twice a month) used to
come alphabetically, no department. We
just had to sort them individually and
that took a long, long time."
Campus mail serves close to 150
departments on campus, some, such as
Physical Education and Recreation, in
several locations, plus the UBC
departments at the Vancouver General
Hospital, all residences and the
theological colleges affiliated with UBC.
The campus mail day begins at 6:30
a.m. Sorters entering the windowless
room in the basement of the new
administration building are greeted by
bags and bags of mail left by the federal
postal service. "A typical Monday
morning we could get about 25 bags of
first class mail. They're small bags but
when you get them filled with letters
layered three deep, that's quite a bit of
mail," Len explains. A good sorter can
distribute about two bags an hour.
Then there's the odds and ends of a
mail service to deal with daily — letters
with postage due, special deliveries, 150
pieces of registered mail which have to be
listed, signed for and checked off on the
federal    post   office   forms,   third-   and
BUDGET
Continued from Page One
reflect on specific issues."
Prof. Charles Bourne, Law, said
Prof. Belshaw was really calling on the
Board to pass on a justification of its
financial decisions.
He said the function of the Senate
budget committee under the
Universities Act was to advise the
president, not the Board, on the
preparation of the budget. He said the
motion was shot through with
disorder, "admirable though it may be
if you take the view that Senate
should have greater control over the
finances of the University."
Prof. Bourne then challenged the
motion and called for a vote on the
agenda committee's viewpoint, which
was approved.
Senate also voted to uphold the
agenda committee on a second motion
proposed by Prof. Belshaw. It asked
that prior to signature proposed
collective agreements be placed before
the Senate budget committee for
advice on the implications for the
academic goals of the University, and
that existing agreements be reviewed
to determine whether there are adverse
effects on academic goals.
TENURE
Continued from Page One
fact that there is some kind of
misunderstanding, some misgivings, on
the part of students."
Another motion concerning
teaching quality was proposed by Ron
Walls, also a student senator.
"Teaching is so important at this
University ... that it is important that
teaching be evaluated in the best
manner possible," he said. "It is time
for Senate to step in, establish a
committee ... to come up with a
uniform means whereby teaching can
be evaluated, and whereby Senate can
be assured that the integrity of the
teaching is maintained."
Agreeing that a uniform procedure
for evaluating teaching was neither
possible nor desirable, Senate passed
an amended version of Mr. Walls's
motion which calls for a committee to
"make   specific   recommendations
concerning procedures for evaluating
the effectiveness df faculty members
in teaching situations."
"The requirements of courses are so
different, the type of student involved
is so different, that it would be
extremely difficult to administer any
type of uniform questionnaire except
one that concentrated on banal trivia,
and most of the uniform types of
questionnaire do exactly that," argued
Prof.   Cyril   Belshaw,   Anthropology.
UBC
Published by the University
of British Columbia on
Wednesdays and distributed
free. Jim Banham, editor.
REPORTS Judjth Walker, staff writer.
Production assistants - Bruce Baker and Anne
Shorter. Send letters to the Editor to
Information Services, Main Mall North
Administration Building, UBC, 2075 Wesbrook
Place, Vancouver, B.C.  V6T  1W5.
Experts give
Green talks
Two top researchers in their fields
will be visiting UBC in March as Cecil
H. and Ida Green Visiting Professors.
Prof. Joachim Wohlwill, a pioneer
in the emerging field of environmental
psychology which combines aspects of
sociology, psychology, architecture,
geography and planning, will give two
public lectures during his stay at UBC.
Dr. Wohlwill will speak on "Human
Behavior and Environmental Quality"
on Wednesday, March 3, at 12:30 p.m.
in Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
On Thursday, March 4, he will discuss "The Study of Man-Environment
Relations and Its Application to
Design" at 12:30 p.m. in Room 202,
Buchanan Building.
Dr. Magda Arnold, a psychologist
specializing in studies of emotions and
motivation, will be giving a public
lecture on her work on March 25.
Fund walk planned
The English department is holding a
Scholarship Walk along 10 miles of
paths running through the Endowment
Lands on Sunday, Feb. 29. The walk is
designed to raise money for
scholarships and prizes for UBC
students taking English courses.
Anyone wishing either to pledge or
to walk should sign up in Rooms 397
or 597 of the Buchanan Tower.
2/UBC Reports/Feb. 25, 1976 mail room
fourth-class mail, magazines and
newspapers.
"After long weekends it's just
ridiculous. You come in here and there's
this great big pile .... You hardly know
where to start."
Even during normal times, the third-
and fourth-class mail piles up. About 200
bags await sorting as Len explains the
mail service.
Keeping track of people who change
departments, or change buildings but not
departments, makes sorting challenging.
"Memory helps a great deal," says Len
lightly, as he flips through a stack of 50
memos outlining such changes since
September.
Three trucks deliver the sorted mail to
departments all over the campus.
Then it's time to pick up the hundreds
of letters addressed to people no longer at
UBC, find home addresses for students
whose mail has been sent simply care of
UBC, and clear away space for
tomorrow's deluge of mailbags and
parcels.
Senate seeks
GSA opinion
Senate wants to know how
graduate students feel about a
proposal to exempt them from UBC's
ban on Thursday noon-hour classes.
The Thursday lunch break, from
12:30 to 2:30 p.m., is officially free
time for student activities, when no
classes are supposed to be scheduled.
But the Board of Governors learned
recently that 115 classes had been
meeting in this sacrosanct period,
despite official disapproval.
Now Dr. Harold Copp, acting
co-ordinator of health sciences, has
asked Senate to pass a motion
legitimizing Thursday-noon classes for
grad students only.
Senate tabled the motion at its
meeting last week to enable it to
consult the Graduate Students'
Association on the matter.
Dr. Copp argued that the long
lunch-hour was intended to permit
special functions for undergrads, not
for graduate students. He said his
exemption would provide welcome
flexibility in the scheduling of grad
classes.
Prof. John Dennison, Education,
said Senate passage of Dr. Copp's
motion would lower student morale
and make it more difficult for students
to participate in extracurricular
activities such as concerts, films,
sports, and lectures by visiting
speakers.
Open house ready to go
UBC opens its doors to the public
on March 5 and 6 for its triennial
Open House.
UBC students and teachers have
prepared  hundreds of demonstrations
Union offered
8.1 per cent
A wage increase of 8.1 per cent, in
keeping with the federal wage and
price guidelines, has been offered by
UBC to the 24 members of the
International Union of Operating
Engineers, Local 882.
The increase would be retroactive
to Jan. 1, in a one-year contract.
The new range for salaried
employees would be from $15,595 to
$20,592 a year. Wages for temporary
staff would range from $9.06 to
$11.24 an hour.
The University has also made a
number of other proposals to the
union.
Members of Local 882 are
employed by the University as
stationary engineers and maintenance
mechanics.
The union is expected to vote on
the 8.1-percent offer this week.
Another meeting with provincial
mediator Ken Albertini is scheduled
for next Monday.
The union, which asked for a wage
increase of 27 per cent, served strike
notice in December after only two
meetings with  University negotiators.
and displays as well as musical,
dramatic and athletic performances,
designed to reflect the wide range of
activities that take place on the
1,000-acre campus.
Open House hours are 12:30 to
9:00 p.m. on Friday, March 5, and
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Saturday,
March 6.
There will be displays in at least 27
buildings, with buildings such as
Buchanan and MacMillan serving as the
locale for a wide variety of events.
A highlight of Open House will be a
Grand Moot Court (mock criminal
trial) at 2 p.m. on March 6 in the Law
Building.
Weather permitting, visitors will be
able to view the moon and planets
through a 12-inch reflecting telescope
mounted on the roof of the
Geophysics and  Astronomy Building.
There will be continuous athletic
displays in the War Memorial
Gymnasium, home-made ice cream
and free gardening advice in the
MacMillan Building, and continuous
concerts and recitals in the Music
Building.
Symposium set
A symposium this weekend on
science and religion will examine the
uncertainty faced by both religion and
science in the 20th century.
For more information call George
Hermanson at 224-3722.
THE MUSIC BOX
THURSDAY, FEB. 26
12:30p.m. UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.   Douglas Talney directs
Music of Rimsky-Korsakov, Copland and Pergolesi. Old Auditorium.
8:00p.m. UNIVERSITY OF REGINA CHAMBER CHOIR, with Dr. S. Vernon
Sanders, conductor, performs Music of Bach, Piston and Copland.
FRIDAY, FEB. 27
8:00p.m. UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.   Douglas Talney directs
Music of Rimsky-Korsakov, Copland and Pergolesi. Old Auditorium.
SUNDAY, FEB. 29
2:30 p.m. GRADUATION  RECITAL.   Harald  Krebs, piano, performs Musks of
Bach, Schubert, Berg and Brahms.
MONDAY, MARCH 1
8:00 p.m. CELLO RECITAL.   Carlton Spotts, of the University of Missouri, plays
Music of J.S. Bach for Solo Cello.
TUESDAY, MARCH 2
8:00 p.m. GRADUATION RECITAL.   Julie Poskitt, piano, plays Music of Bach,
Schonberg, Schubert and Chopin.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3
12:30p.m. NOON-HOUR CONCERT.   Leon Lishner, bass; and Anneliese Nessin,
piano, perform Music of Monteverdi, Bach, Schubert and Brahms.
8:00 p.m. FACULTY RECITAL.   Jane Martin, flute; with Angela Cavadas, violin,
perform Music of Genzmer, Martinu and Bach.
THURSDAY, MARCH 4
12:30p.m. UNIVERSITY CONCERT BAND.   Loren Marsteller directs Music of
Dello Joio, J.S. Bach and Milhaud. Old Auditorium.
8:00 p.m. GRADUATION RECITAL.    Francis Chan, composer, directs Musks of
Chan.
All performances, unless otherwise specified, held in Recital Hall, Music Building.
UBC Reports/Feb. 25, 1976/3 THIS WEEK
AND NEXT
THURSDAY, FEB. 26
9:00a.m.      PSYCHIATRY  CONFERENCE.   Panel  discussion  on
Sexual Dysfunctions: Recent Developments in Diagnosis and  Treatment.   Lecture theatre, Health Sciences
Centre Hospital.
12:30p.m.     FINE ARTS ILLUSTRATED  LECTURE. Art Green,
Vancouver artist, on My Paintings and Other Wild Works
I Have Known. Room 102, Lasserre Building.
HISTORY   LECTURE.   Prof.   Peter Stansky, History,
Stanford University, Calif., on Orwell and the Intellectual Left in the'30s. Room 104, Buchanan Building.
SLAVONIC  STUDIES  LECTURE.  Dr. Barbara Heldt
Monter,   associate  editor,  Russian  Literature  Tri-
Quarterly,  Ann Arbor,   Mich.,  on Tolstoy's Changing
Attitude Towards Women. Room 102, Buchanan Bldg.
FILM SERIES: Parts 5 and 6of Alistair Cooke's/lmer/-
ca. Lecture Hall 3, Instructional Resources Centre.
12:45p.m.      FINE   ARTS   ILLUSTRATED   LECTURE.   Lionel
Thomas, Fine Arts, UBC, on Looking Through Glass-
Vitroux. Room 104, Lasserre Building.
3:30p.m.     SLAVONIC STUDIES SEMINAR. Dr. Barbara Heldt
Monter discusses Blok and Akhmatova: Two Poemsand
Their Personae. Room 2225, Buchanan Building.
ASIAN SEMINAR. Dr. Suma Chitnis of New Delhi on
The Status of Women in India. Penthouse, Buchanan.
3:45 p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS COLLOQUIUM.
Dr. G.V. Parkinson, Mechanical Engineering, UBC, on
Thin Airfoil Theory - Still Alive and Healthy in Middle
Age. Room 1100, Mathematics Annex.
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. R.W. Williams, University of
Washington, on Testing Fundamental Physics: The New
g-2 Experiment. Room 201, Hennings Building.
8:00p.m. WESTWATER PUBLIC LECTURE. Dr. T.G. Northcote, Westwater Research Centre, on Biology of the
Lower Fraser and Ecological Effects of Pollution.
MacMillan Planetarium, 1100 Chestnut St.
METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY LECTURE. Dr. John
E. Hay, Geography, UBC, on Feasibility of Solar Energy
as a Domestic Heat Source in Vancouver and Other
Canadian  Locations. Room 249, Geography Building.
FRIDAY, FEB. 27
9:00a.m. PAEDIATRICS GRAND ROUND. Dr. R.B. Elliott,
University of Denver, Colo., on New Observations on
the Etiology, Detection and Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis. Lecture Room B, Heather Pavilion, VGH.
3:30p.m. ECONOMICS SEMINAR. Prof. Christopher Green,
McGill University, on The Causes of High Canadian Unemployment in the 1970s. Room 351 A, Brock Hall.
COMPUTER COLLOQUIUM. Dr. Charles Fillmore,
Linguistics, University of California at Berkeley, on Interactional and Cognitive Frames. Room 326, Angus.
SATURDAY, FEB. 28
8:15p.m. THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE. Dr. Gerard Piel, publisher, Scientific American, on Science and the Citizen:
The Scientific American and Its World Public. Lecture
Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
MONDAY, MARCH 1
12:30p.m.     CANCER   RESEARCH   CENTRE.  William  Chase,
Pathology, UBC, on Immunologic Tolerance. Library,
Block B, Medical Sciences Building.
FINE   ARTS   FILM:   USA  Artists:   Barnett Newman
(B&W.30 minutes). Room 102, Lasserre Building.
CUSO FILM SERIES: Cree Hunters of the Mistassini.
Room 201, Geography Building.
3:30p.m.     MECHANICAL  ENGINEERING  SEMINAR.  Brad  C.
Nelson,   UBC  Mechanical Engineering graduate student,  on Mechanics of Rock Drilling.  Room A106,
Mechanical Engineering Annex.
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE SEMINAR. M. Kusy, Commerce and Business Administration, UBC, on An Asset
and Liability Management Model. Room 306, Angus.
4:30p.m. CANCER CONTROL AGENCY OF B.C. SEMINAR.
Dr. Allen Eaves on Production of Factors which Stimulate Growth of Marrow Cells in Culture. Cancer Control
Agency, 2656 Heather St.
BIOMEMBRANESGROUPSEMINAR. Dr. Peter Rand,
Biological Sciences, Brock University, on X-ray Structural Studies of Model Membrane Systems. Lecture Hall
1, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
8:00p.m. GRADUATE FORUM. J.E. Runions, Psychiatry, UBC,
on Can a Psychiatrist Impose His Values. 2120 Wesbrook Cres.
TUESDAY, MARCH 2
12:30p.m. BOTANY SEMINAR. Dr. D.H.S. Richardson, Biology,
Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ont., on Lichens and
Air Pollution. Room 3219, Biological Sciences Building.
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES LECTURE. Dr. Allan
Fritzberg, UBC post-doctoral fellow, on Development
of 99mTc Bioquin-7CA as a Potential Hepatobiliary
Scanning Agent in Nuclear Medicine. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
1:30p.m.     ELECTRICAL    ENGINEERING   SEMINAR.   Dr.
Malcome Wvong, Electrical Engineering, UBC, on
Laboratory AC and DC Power System Models. Room
214, MacLeod Building.
2:30p.m. BOARD OF GOVERNORS OPEN MEETING. Board
and Senate Room, old administration building.
3:30p.m. ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM. Dr. Andrew Parkin, English, UBC, on Yeats and the One-Act Play. Room 599,
Buchanan Tower.
3:45 p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS COLLOQUIUM.
Dr. David Gottlieb, NASA, on Numerical Stability of
the Spectral Method. Room 1100, Mathematics Annex.
4:30p.m. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. T. Long
Truong, UBC Chemical Engineering graduate student,
on Hydrodynamics of Flow of Capsules in Pipelines.
Room 206, Chemical Engineering Building.
CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. A. Addison, Chemistry,
UBC, on The Behavior of Copper in Protein Environments. Room 250, Chemistry Building.
PHILOSOPHY LECTURE. Prof. Fred Dretske, University of Wisconsin, Madison, on Content and Cognition. Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
5:00p.m. DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY LECTURE. Dr. Gloria
Frankl, Southern California Permanente Medical
Group, on Experiences in Xeroradiography. Lecture
Hall B, Heather Pavilion, Vancouver General Hospital.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3
12:30p.m. GREEN VISITING PROFESSOR. Prof. Joachim
Wohlwill, Pennsylvania State University, on Human
Behavior and Environmental Quality. Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
3:30 p.m. STATISTICS WORKSHOP. J. Rolph, The Rand Corporation, on Some Empirical Bayes Estimators of a Multivariate Normal Mean. Room 321, Angus Building.
MEDIEVAL STUDIES LECTURE. Dr. Michael
Sheehan, visiting History professor, on Application of
an Ideology. Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
4:00p.m. GENERAL AND APPLIED SYSTEMS WORKSHOP.
Prof. Margaret A. Campbell, Nursing, UBC, on A Behavioral Systems Model for Nursing. Penthouse, Angus.
GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY SEMINAR. Dr.
Jorge Sahade, Argentine NRC, Buenos Aires, on The
Symbiotic Objects. Room 260, Geophysics Building.
4:30p.m. ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr.
James Smith, Zoology, UBC, on Darwin's Finches —
Seed Cracking and Survival in a Seasonal Environment.
Room 2446, Biological Sciences Building.
5:00p.m. TUMOR BIOLOGY STUDY GROUP. Dr. Brian
Henderson, University of Southern California, Los
Angeles, on New Concepts on the Epidemiology of
Breast Cancer. Lecture Hall B, Heather Pavilion, VGH.
7:30p.m. HEALTH CARE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY FILM. The
Barefoot Doctors of Rural China. Lecture Hall 4, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. Admission, $1;
students, 50 cents.
THURSDAY, MARCH 4
12:30 p.m. LOCAL TALENT READING SERIES. Ken Fernstrom,
English department, UBC, reads from his works. Orientation room, lower level, Sedgewick Library.
UNIVERSITY LECTURE. Malcolm Miller speaks on
The Cathedral at Chartres, where he is English guide and
lecturer. Hebb Theatre.
GREEN VISITING PROFESSOR. Prof. Joachim
Wohlwill, Pennsylvania State University, on The Study
of Man-Environment Relations and Its Application to
Design. Room 202, Buchanan Building.
Notices must reach Information Services, Main Mall North Admin. Bldg., by mail, by 5 p.m. Thursday of week preceding publication of notice.
4/UBC Reports/Feb. 25, 1976

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubcreports.1-0118713/manifest

Comment

Related Items